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Sample records for accuracy precision linearity

  1. Accuracy and precision of integumental linear dimensions in a three-dimensional facial imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Hwan; Jung, Woo-Young; Seo, Yu-Jin; Kim, Kyung-A; Park, Ki-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective A recently developed facial scanning method uses three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging with a light-emitting diode. Such scanning enables surface data to be captured in high-resolution color and at relatively fast speeds. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and precision of 3D images obtained using the Morpheus 3D® scanner (Morpheus Co., Seoul, Korea). Methods The sample comprised 30 subjects aged 24-34 years (mean 29.0 ± 2.5 years). To test the correlation between direct and 3D image measurements, 21 landmarks were labeled on the face of each subject. Sixteen direct measurements were obtained twice using digital calipers; the same measurements were then made on two sets of 3D facial images. The mean values of measurements obtained from both methods were compared. To investigate the precision, a comparison was made between two sets of measurements taken with each method. Results When comparing the variables from both methods, five of the 16 possible anthropometric variables were found to be significantly different. However, in 12 of the 16 cases, the mean difference was under 1 mm. The average value of the differences for all variables was 0.75 mm. Precision was high in both methods, with error magnitudes under 0.5 mm. Conclusions 3D scanning images have high levels of precision and fairly good congruence with traditional anthropometry methods, with mean differences of less than 1 mm. 3D surface imaging using the Morpheus 3D® scanner is therefore a clinically acceptable method of recording facial integumental data. PMID:26023538

  2. Accuracy and precision of manual baseline determination.

    PubMed

    Jirasek, A; Schulze, G; Yu, M M L; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2004-12-01

    Vibrational spectra often require baseline removal before further data analysis can be performed. Manual (i.e., user) baseline determination and removal is a common technique used to perform this operation. Currently, little data exists that details the accuracy and precision that can be expected with manual baseline removal techniques. This study addresses this current lack of data. One hundred spectra of varying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), signal-to-baseline ratio (SBR), baseline slope, and spectral congestion were constructed and baselines were subtracted by 16 volunteers who were categorized as being either experienced or inexperienced in baseline determination. In total, 285 baseline determinations were performed. The general level of accuracy and precision that can be expected for manually determined baselines from spectra of varying SNR, SBR, baseline slope, and spectral congestion is established. Furthermore, the effects of user experience on the accuracy and precision of baseline determination is estimated. The interactions between the above factors in affecting the accuracy and precision of baseline determination is highlighted. Where possible, the functional relationships between accuracy, precision, and the given spectral characteristic are detailed. The results provide users of manual baseline determination useful guidelines in establishing limits of accuracy and precision when performing manual baseline determination, as well as highlighting conditions that confound the accuracy and precision of manual baseline determination.

  3. Accuracy and Precision of an IGRT Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Gareth J. Rowbottom, Carl G.; Mackay, Ranald I.

    2009-07-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) can potentially improve the accuracy of delivery of radiotherapy treatments by providing high-quality images of patient anatomy in the treatment position that can be incorporated into the treatment setup. The achievable accuracy and precision of delivery of highly complex head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with an IGRT technique using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) was investigated. Four head-and-neck IMRT plans were delivered to a semi-anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom and the dose distribution was measured simultaneously by up to 20 microMOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transmitter) detectors. A volumetric kilovoltage (kV) x-ray image was then acquired in the treatment position, fused with the phantom scan within the TPS using Syntegra software, and used to recalculate the dose with the precise delivery isocenter at the actual position of each detector within the phantom. Three repeat measurements were made over a period of 2 months to reduce the effect of random errors in measurement or delivery. To ensure that the noise remained below 1.5% (1 SD), minimum doses of 85 cGy were delivered to each detector. The average measured dose was systematically 1.4% lower than predicted and was consistent between repeats. Over the 4 delivered plans, 10/76 measurements showed a systematic error > 3% (3/76 > 5%), for which several potential sources of error were investigated. The error was ultimately attributable to measurements made in beam penumbrae, where submillimeter positional errors result in large discrepancies in dose. The implementation of an image-guided technique improves the accuracy of dose verification, particularly within high-dose gradients. The achievable accuracy of complex IMRT dose delivery incorporating image-guidance is within {+-} 3% in dose over the range of sample points. For some points in high-dose gradients

  4. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W. Bruce; McNeilly, David R.; Thacker, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp unction which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  5. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

    1984-08-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  6. Bullet trajectory reconstruction - Methods, accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Mattijssen, Erwin J A T; Kerkhoff, Wim

    2016-05-01

    Based on the spatial relation between a primary and secondary bullet defect or on the shape and dimensions of the primary bullet defect, a bullet's trajectory prior to impact can be estimated for a shooting scene reconstruction. The accuracy and precision of the estimated trajectories will vary depending on variables such as, the applied method of reconstruction, the (true) angle of incidence, the properties of the target material and the properties of the bullet upon impact. This study focused on the accuracy and precision of estimated bullet trajectories when different variants of the probing method, ellipse method, and lead-in method are applied on bullet defects resulting from shots at various angles of incidence on drywall, MDF and sheet metal. The results show that in most situations the best performance (accuracy and precision) is seen when the probing method is applied. Only for the lowest angles of incidence the performance was better when either the ellipse or lead-in method was applied. The data provided in this paper can be used to select the appropriate method(s) for reconstruction and to correct for systematic errors (accuracy) and to provide a value of the precision, by means of a confidence interval of the specific measurement. PMID:27044032

  7. Precision magnetic suspension linear bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumper, David L.; Queen, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    We have shown the design and analyzed the electromechanics of a linear motor suitable for independently controlling two suspension degrees of freedom. This motor, at least on paper, meets the requirements for driving an X-Y stage of 10 Kg mass with about 4 m/sq sec acceleration, with travel of several hundred millimeters in X and Y, and with reasonable power dissipation. A conceptual design for such a stage is presented. The theoretical feasibility of linear and planar bearings using single or multiple magnetic suspension linear motors is demonstrated.

  8. [History, accuracy and precision of SMBG devices].

    PubMed

    Dufaitre-Patouraux, L; Vague, P; Lassmann-Vague, V

    2003-04-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose started only fifty years ago. Until then metabolic control was evaluated by means of qualitative urinary blood measure often of poor reliability. Reagent strips were the first semi quantitative tests to monitor blood glucose, and in the late seventies meters were launched on the market. Initially the use of such devices was intended for medical staff, but thanks to handiness improvement they became more and more adequate to patients and are now a necessary tool for self-blood glucose monitoring. The advanced technologies allow to develop photometric measurements but also more recently electrochemical one. In the nineties, improvements were made mainly in meters' miniaturisation, reduction of reaction time and reading, simplification of blood sampling and capillary blood laying. Although accuracy and precision concern was in the heart of considerations at the beginning of self-blood glucose monitoring, the recommendations of societies of diabetology came up in the late eighties. Now, the French drug agency: AFSSAPS asks for a control of meter before any launching on the market. According to recent publications very few meters meet reliability criteria set up by societies of diabetology in the late nineties. Finally because devices may be handled by numerous persons in hospitals, meters use as possible source of nosocomial infections have been recently questioned and is subject to very strict guidelines published by AFSSAPS.

  9. Novel linear piezoelectric motor for precision position stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Shi, Yunlai; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Junshan

    2016-03-01

    Conventional servomotor and stepping motor face challenges in nanometer positioning stages due to the complex structure, motion transformation mechanism, and slow dynamic response, especially directly driven by linear motor. A new butterfly-shaped linear piezoelectric motor for linear motion is presented. A two-degree precision position stage driven by the proposed linear ultrasonic motor possesses a simple and compact configuration, which makes the system obtain shorter driving chain. Firstly, the working principle of the linear ultrasonic motor is analyzed. The oscillation orbits of two driving feet on the stator are produced successively by using the anti-symmetric and symmetric vibration modes of the piezoelectric composite structure, and the slider pressed on the driving feet can be propelled twice in only one vibration cycle. Then with the derivation of the dynamic equation of the piezoelectric actuator and transient response model, start-upstart-up and settling state characteristics of the proposed linear actuator is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and is applicable to evaluate step resolution of the precision platform driven by the actuator. Moreover the structure of the two-degree position stage system is described and a special precision displacement measurement system is built. Finally, the characteristics of the two-degree position stage are studied. In the closed-loop condition the positioning accuracy of plus or minus <0.5 μm is experimentally obtained for the stage propelled by the piezoelectric motor. A precision position stage based the proposed butterfly-shaped linear piezoelectric is theoretically and experimentally investigated.

  10. A study of laseruler accuracy and precision (1986-1987)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, R.S.; Armstrong, K.P.

    1989-06-22

    A study was conducted to investigate Laserruler accuracy and precision. Tests were performed on 0.050 in., 0.100 in., and 0.120 in. gauge block standards. Results showed and accuracy of 3.7 {mu}in. for the 0.12 in. standard, with higher accuracies for the two thinner blocks. The Laserruler precision was 4.83 {mu}in. for the 0.120 in. standard, 3.83 {mu}in. for the 0.100 in. standard, and 4.2 {mu}in. for the 0.050 in. standard.

  11. Precision and accuracy in diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek K

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews some of the key factors influencing the accuracy and precision of quantitative metrics derived from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data. It focuses on the study pipeline beginning at the choice of imaging protocol, through preprocessing and model fitting up to the point of extracting quantitative estimates for subsequent analysis. The aim was to provide the newcomers to the field with sufficient knowledge of how their decisions at each stage along this process might impact on precision and accuracy, to design their study/approach, and to use diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging in the clinic. More specifically, emphasis is placed on improving accuracy and precision. I illustrate how careful choices along the way can substantially affect the sample size needed to make an inference from the data.

  12. Accuracy and precision of temporal artery thermometers in febrile patients.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Margaret; Granstrom, Patsy; Pomarico, Bernie; Reimanis, Cathryn

    2013-01-01

    The noninvasive temporal artery thermometer offers a way to measure temperature when oral assessment is contraindicated, uncomfortable, or difficult to obtain. In this study, the accuracy and precision of the temporal artery thermometer exceeded levels recommended by experts for use in acute care clinical practice.

  13. Precision envelope detector and linear rectifier circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for the precise linear rectification and envelope detection of oscillatory signals. The signal is applied to a voltage-to-current converter which supplies current to a constant current sink. The connection between the converter and the sink is also applied through a diode and an output load resistor to a ground connection. The connection is also connected to ground through a second diode of opposite polarity from the diode in series with the load resistor. Very small amplitude voltage signals applied to the converter will cause a small change in the output current of the converter, and the difference between the output current and the constant current sink will be applied either directly to ground through the single diode, or across the output load resistor, dependent upon the polarity. Disclosed also is a full-wave rectifier utilizing constant current sinks and voltage-to-current converters. Additionally, disclosed is a combination of the voltage-to-current converters with differential integrated circuit preamplifiers to boost the initial signal amplitude, and with low pass filtering applied so as to obtain a video or signal envelope output.

  14. Accuracy-precision trade-off in visual orientation constancy.

    PubMed

    De Vrijer, M; Medendorp, W P; Van Gisbergen, J A M

    2009-02-09

    Using the subjective visual vertical task (SVV), previous investigations on the maintenance of visual orientation constancy during lateral tilt have found two opposite bias effects in different tilt ranges. The SVV typically shows accurate performance near upright but severe undercompensation at tilts beyond 60 deg (A-effect), frequently with slight overcompensation responses (E-effect) in between. Here we investigate whether a Bayesian spatial-perception model can account for this error pattern. The model interprets A- and E-effects as the drawback of a computational strategy, geared at maintaining visual stability with optimal precision at small tilt angles. In this study, we test whether these systematic errors can be seen as the consequence of a precision-accuracy trade-off when combining a veridical but noisy signal about eye orientation in space with the visual signal. To do so, we used a psychometric approach to assess both precision and accuracy of the SVV in eight subjects laterally tilted at 9 different tilt angles (-120 degrees to 120 degrees). Results show that SVV accuracy and precision worsened with tilt angle, according to a pattern that could be fitted quite adequately by the Bayesian model. We conclude that spatial vision essentially follows the rules of Bayes' optimal observer theory.

  15. Evaluation of optoelectronic Plethysmography accuracy and precision in recording displacements during quiet breathing simulation.

    PubMed

    Massaroni, C; Schena, E; Saccomandi, P; Morrone, M; Sterzi, S; Silvestri, S

    2015-08-01

    Opto-electronic Plethysmography (OEP) is a motion analysis system used to measure chest wall kinematics and to indirectly evaluate respiratory volumes during breathing. Its working principle is based on the computation of marker displacements placed on the chest wall. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy and precision of OEP in measuring displacement in the range of human chest wall displacement during quiet breathing. OEP performances were investigated by the use of a fully programmable chest wall simulator (CWS). CWS was programmed to move 10 times its eight shafts in the range of physiological displacement (i.e., between 1 mm and 8 mm) at three different frequencies (i.e., 0.17 Hz, 0.25 Hz, 0.33 Hz). Experiments were performed with the aim to: (i) evaluate OEP accuracy and precision error in recording displacement in the overall calibrated volume and in three sub-volumes, (ii) evaluate the OEP volume measurement accuracy due to the measurement accuracy of linear displacements. OEP showed an accuracy better than 0.08 mm in all trials, considering the whole 2m(3) calibrated volume. The mean measurement discrepancy was 0.017 mm. The precision error, expressed as the ratio between measurement uncertainty and the recorded displacement by OEP, was always lower than 0.55%. Volume overestimation due to OEP linear measurement accuracy was always <; 12 mL (<; 3.2% of total volume), considering all settings. PMID:26736504

  16. The Plus or Minus Game - Teaching Estimation, Precision, and Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forringer, Edward R.; Forringer, Richard S.; Forringer, Daniel S.

    2016-03-01

    A quick survey of physics textbooks shows that many (Knight, Young, and Serway for example) cover estimation, significant digits, precision versus accuracy, and uncertainty in the first chapter. Estimation "Fermi" questions are so useful that there has been a column dedicated to them in TPT (Larry Weinstein's "Fermi Questions.") For several years the authors (a college physics professor, a retired algebra teacher, and a fifth-grade teacher) have been playing a game, primarily at home to challenge each other for fun, but also in the classroom as an educational tool. We call the game "The Plus or Minus Game." The game combines estimation with the principle of precision and uncertainty in a competitive and fun way.

  17. Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-06-15

    We describe a new technique, standing wave axial nanometry (SWAN), to image the axial location of a single nanoscale fluorescent object with sub-nanometer accuracy and 3.7 nm precision. A standing wave, generated by positioning an atomic force microscope tip over a focused laser beam, is used to excite fluorescence; axial position is determined from the phase of the emission intensity. We use SWAN to measure the orientation of single DNA molecules of different lengths, grafted on surfaces with different functionalities.

  18. Assessing the Accuracy of the Precise Point Positioning Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnath, S. B.; Collins, P.; Seepersad, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) GPS data processing technique has developed over the past 15 years to become a standard method for growing categories of positioning and navigation applications. The technique relies on single receiver point positioning combined with the use of precise satellite orbit and clock information and high-fidelity error modelling. The research presented here uniquely addresses the current accuracy of the technique, explains the limits of performance, and defines paths to improvements. For geodetic purposes, performance refers to daily static position accuracy. PPP processing of over 80 IGS stations over one week results in few millimetre positioning rms error in the north and east components and few centimetres in the vertical (all one sigma values). Larger error statistics for real-time and kinematic processing are also given. GPS PPP with ambiguity resolution processing is also carried out, producing slight improvements over the float solution results. These results are categorised into quality classes in order to analyse the root error causes of the resultant accuracies: "best", "worst", multipath, site displacement effects, satellite availability and geometry, etc. Also of interest in PPP performance is solution convergence period. Static, conventional solutions are slow to converge, with approximately 35 minutes required for 95% of solutions to reach the 20 cm or better horizontal accuracy. Ambiguity resolution can significantly reduce this period without biasing solutions. The definition of a PPP error budget is a complex task even with the resulting numerical assessment, as unlike the epoch-by-epoch processing in the Standard Position Service, PPP processing involving filtering. An attempt is made here to 1) define the magnitude of each error source in terms of range, 2) transform ranging error to position error via Dilution Of Precision (DOP), and 3) scale the DOP through the filtering process. The result is a deeper

  19. Scatterometry measurement precision and accuracy below 70 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendelbach, Matthew; Archie, Charles N.

    2003-05-01

    Scatterometry is a contender for various measurement applications where structure widths and heights can be significantly smaller than 70 nm within one or two ITRS generations. For example, feedforward process control in the post-lithography transistor gate formation is being actively pursued by a number of RIE tool manufacturers. Several commercial forms of scatterometry are available or under development which promise to provide satisfactory performance in this regime. Scatterometry, as commercially practiced today, involves analyzing the zeroth order reflected light from a grating of lines. Normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry, 2-theta fixed-wavelength ellipsometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry are among the optical techniques, while library based spectra matching and realtime regression are among the analysis techniques. All these commercial forms will find accurate and precise measurement a challenge when the material constituting the critical structure approaches a very small volume. Equally challenging is executing an evaluation methodology that first determines the true properties (critical dimensions and materials) of semiconductor wafer artifacts and then compares measurement performance of several scatterometers. How well do scatterometers track process induced changes in bottom CD and sidewall profile? This paper introduces a general 3D metrology assessment methodology and reports upon work involving sub-70 nm structures and several scatterometers. The methodology combines results from multiple metrologies (CD-SEM, CD-AFM, TEM, and XSEM) to form a Reference Measurement System (RMS). The methodology determines how well the scatterometry measurement tracks critical structure changes even in the presence of other noncritical changes that take place at the same time; these are key components of accuracy. Because the assessment rewards scatterometers that measure with good precision (reproducibility) and good accuracy, the most precise

  20. Raster linearity of video cameras calibrated with precision tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The time between transitions in the video output of a camera is measured when registered at reticle marks on the vidicon faceplate. This device permits precision calibration of raster linearity of television camera tubes.

  1. Gamma-Ray Peak Integration: Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Richard M. Lindstrom

    2000-11-12

    The accuracy of singlet gamma-ray peak areas obtained by a peak analysis program is immaterial. If the same algorithm is used for sample measurement as for calibration and if the peak shapes are similar, then biases in the integration method cancel. Reproducibility is the only important issue. Even the uncertainty of the areas computed by the program is trivial because the true standard uncertainty can be experimentally assessed by repeated measurements of the same source. Reproducible peak integration was important in a recent standard reference material certification task. The primary tool used for spectrum analysis was SUM, a National Institute of Standards and Technology interactive program to sum peaks and subtract a linear background, using the same channels to integrate all 20 spectra. For comparison, this work examines other peak integration programs. Unlike some published comparisons of peak performance in which synthetic spectra were used, this experiment used spectra collected for a real (though exacting) analytical project, analyzed by conventional software used in routine ways. Because both components of the 559- to 564-keV doublet are from {sup 76}As, they were integrated together with SUM. The other programs, however, deconvoluted the peaks. A sensitive test of the fitting algorithm is the ratio of reported peak areas. In almost all the cases, this ratio was much more variable than expected from the reported uncertainties reported by the program. Other comparisons to be reported indicate that peak integration is still an imperfect tool in the analysis of gamma-ray spectra.

  2. Precision measurements of linear scattering density using muon tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, E.; Bonomi, G.; Calliari, I.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Donzella, A.; Faraci, E.; Forsberg, F.; Gonella, F.; Hu, X.; Klinger, J.; Sundqvist Ökvist, L.; Pagano, D.; Rigoni, A.; Ramous, E.; Urbani, M.; Vanini, S.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  3. Precision Linear Actuator for Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) Siderostat Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant; Braun, David; Hankins, Steve; Koenig, John; Moore, Don

    2008-01-01

    'SIM PlanetQuest will exploit the classical measuring tool of astrometry (interferometry) with unprecedented precision to make dramatic advances in many areas of astronomy and astrophysics'(1). In order to obtain interferometric data two large steerable mirrors, or Siderostats, are used to direct starlight into the interferometer. A gimbaled mechanism actuated by linear actuators is chosen to meet the unprecedented pointing and angle tracking requirements of SIM. A group of JPL engineers designed, built, and tested a linear ballscrew actuator capable of performing submicron incremental steps for 10 years of continuous operation. Precise, zero backlash, closed loop pointing control requirements, lead the team to implement a ballscrew actuator with a direct drive DC motor and a precision piezo brake. Motor control commutation using feedback from a precision linear encoder on the ballscrew output produced an unexpected incremental step size of 20 nm over a range of 120 mm, yielding a dynamic range of 6,000,000:1. The results prove linear nanometer positioning requires no gears, levers, or hydraulic converters. Along the way many lessons have been learned and will subsequently be shared.

  4. Improved DORIS accuracy for precise orbit determination and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Pascal; Jayles, Christian; Tavernier, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 and 2002, 3 more DORIS satellites were launched. Since then, all DORIS results have been significantly improved. For precise orbit determination, 20 cm are now available in real-time with DIODE and 1.5 to 2 cm in post-processing. For geodesy, 1 cm precision can now be achieved regularly every week, making now DORIS an active part of a Global Observing System for Geodesy through the IDS.

  5. Robust methods for assessing the accuracy of linear interpolated DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Shi, Wenzhong; Liu, Eryong

    2015-02-01

    Methods for assessing the accuracy of a digital elevation model (DEM) with emphasis on robust methods have been studied in this paper. Based on the squared DEM residual population generated by the bi-linear interpolation method, three average-error statistics including (a) mean, (b) median, and (c) M-estimator are thoroughly investigated for measuring the interpolated DEM accuracy. Correspondingly, their confidence intervals are also constructed for each average error statistic to further evaluate the DEM quality. The first method mainly utilizes the student distribution while the second and third are derived from the robust theories. These innovative robust methods possess the capability of counteracting the outlier effects or even the skew distributed residuals in DEM accuracy assessment. Experimental studies using Monte Carlo simulation have commendably investigated the asymptotic convergence behavior of confidence intervals constructed by these three methods with the increase of sample size. It is demonstrated that the robust methods can produce more reliable DEM accuracy assessment results compared with those by the classical t-distribution-based method. Consequently, these proposed robust methods are strongly recommended for assessing DEM accuracy, particularly for those cases where the DEM residual population is evidently non-normal or heavily contaminated with outliers.

  6. S-193 scatterometer backscattering cross section precision/accuracy for Skylab 2 and 3 missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, K.; Pounds, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures for measuring the precision and accuracy with which the S-193 scatterometer measured the background cross section of ground scenes are described. Homogeneous ground sites were selected, and data from Skylab missions were analyzed. The precision was expressed as the standard deviation of the scatterometer-acquired backscattering cross section. In special cases, inference of the precision of measurement was made by considering the total range from the maximum to minimum of the backscatter measurements within a data segment, rather than the standard deviation. For Skylab 2 and 3 missions a precision better than 1.5 dB is indicated. This procedure indicates an accuracy of better than 3 dB for the Skylab 2 and 3 missions. The estimates of precision and accuracy given in this report are for backscattering cross sections from -28 to 18 dB. Outside this range the precision and accuracy decrease significantly.

  7. Accuracy and Precision in Measurements of Biomass Oxidative Ratio and Carbon Oxidation State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Masiello, C. A.; Randerson, J. T.; Chadwick, O. A.; Robertson, G. P.

    2007-12-01

    Ecosystem oxidative ratio (OR) is a critical parameter in the apportionment of anthropogenic CO2 between the terrestrial biosphere and ocean carbon reservoirs. OR is the ratio of O2 to CO2 in gas exchange fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere. Ecosystem OR is linearly related to biomass carbon oxidation state (Cox), a fundamental property of the earth system describing the bonding environment of carbon in molecules. Cox can range from -4 to +4 (CH4 to CO2). Variations in both Cox and OR are driven by photosynthesis, respiration, and decomposition. We are developing several techniques to accurately measure variations in ecosystem Cox and OR; these include elemental analysis, bomb calorimetry, and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A previous study, comparing the accuracy and precision of elemental analysis versus bomb calorimetry for pure chemicals, showed that elemental analysis-based measurements are more accurate, while calorimetry- based measurements yield more precise data. However, the limited biochemical range of natural samples makes it possible that calorimetry may ultimately prove most accurate, as well as most cost-effective. Here we examine more closely the accuracy of Cox and OR values generated by calorimetry on a large set of natural biomass samples collected from the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research (KBS-LTER) site in Michigan.

  8. Precision linear shaped charge analyses for severance of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1996-08-01

    The Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) design concept involves the independent fabrication and assembly of the liner (wedge of PLSC), the tamper/confinement, and explosive. The liner is the most important part of a linear shaped charge (LSC) and should be fabricated by a more quality controlled, precise process than the tamper material. Also, this concept allows the liner material to be different from the tamper material. The explosive can be loaded between the liner and tamper as the last step in the assembly process rather than the first step as in conventional LSC designs. PLSC designs have been shown to produce increased jet penetrations in given targets, more reproducible jet penetration, and more efficient explosive cross-section geometries using a minimum amount of explosive. The Linear Explosive Shaped Charge Analysis (LESCA) code developed at Sandia National Laboratories has been used to assist in the design of PLSCs. LESCA predictions for PLSC jet tip velocities, jet-target impact angles, and jet penetration in aluminum and steel targets are compared to measured data. The advantages of PLSC over conventional LSC are presented. As an example problem, the LESCA code was used to analytically develop a conceptual design for a PLSC component to sever a three-inch thick 1018 steel plate at a water depth of 500 feet (15 atmospheres).

  9. A mechanism for precise linear and angular adjustment utilizing flexures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The design and development of a mechanism for precise linear and angular adjustment is described. This work was in support of the development of a mechanical extensometer for biaxial strain measurement. A compact mechanism was required which would allow angular adjustments about perpendicular axes with better than 0.001 degree resolution. The approach adopted was first to develop a means of precise linear adjustment. To this end, a mechanism based on the toggle principle was built with inexpensive and easily manufactured parts. A detailed evaluation showed that the resolution of the mechanism was better than 1 micron and that adjustments made by using the device were repeatable. In the second stage of this work, the linear adjustment mechanisms were used in conjunction with a simple arrangement of flexural pivots and attachment blocks to provide the required angular adjustments. Attempts to use the mechanism in conjunction with the biaxial extensometer under development proved unsuccessful. Any form of in stitu adjustment was found to cause erratic changes in instrument output. These changes were due to problems with the suspension system. However, the subject mechanism performed well in its own right and appeared to have potential for use in other applications.

  10. [Accuracy and precision in the evaluation of computer assisted surgical systems. A definition].

    PubMed

    Strauss, G; Hofer, M; Korb, W; Trantakis, C; Winkler, D; Burgert, O; Schulz, T; Dietz, A; Meixensberger, J; Koulechov, K

    2006-02-01

    Accuracy represents the outstanding criterion for navigation systems. Surgeons have noticed a great discrepancy between the values from the literature and system specifications on one hand, and intraoperative accuracy on the other. A unitary understanding for the term accuracy does not exist in clinical practice. Furthermore, an incorrect equality for the terms precision and accuracy can be found in the literature. On top of this, clinical accuracy differs from mechanical (technical) accuracy. From a clinical point of view, we had to deal with remarkably many different terms all describing accuracy. This study has the goals of: 1. Defining "accuracy" and related terms, 2. Differentiating between "precision" and "accuracy", 3. Deriving the term "surgical accuracy", 4. Recommending use of the the term "surgical accuracy" for a navigation system. To a great extent, definitions were applied from the International Standardisation Organisation-ISO and the norm from the Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V.-DIN (the German Institute for Standardization). For defining surgical accuracy, the terms reference value, expectation, accuracy and precision are of major interest. Surgical accuracy should indicate the maximum values for the deviation between test results and the reference value (true value) A(max), and additionally indicate precision P(surg). As a basis for measurements, a standardized technical model was used. Coordinates of the model were acquired by CT. To determine statistically and reality relevant results for head surgery, 50 measurements with an accuracy of 50, 75, 100 and 150 mm from the centre of the registration geometry are adequate. In the future, we recommend labeling the system's overall performance with the following specifications: maximum accuracy deviation A(max), precision P and information on the measurement method. This could be displayed on a seal of quality.

  11. Accuracy and precision in measurements of biomass oxidative ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Masiello, C. A.; Randerson, J. T.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2005-12-01

    One fundamental property of the Earth system is the oxidative ratio (OR) of the terrestrial biosphere, or the mols CO2 fixed per mols O2 released via photosynthesis. This is also an essential, poorly constrained parameter in the calculation of the size of the terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks via atmospheric O2 and CO2 measurements. We are pursuing a number of techniques to accurately measure natural variations in above- and below-ground OR. For aboveground biomass, OR can be calculated directly from percent C, H, N, and O data measured via elemental analysis; however, the precision of this technique is a function of 4 measurements, resulting in increased data variability. It is also possible to measure OR via bomb calorimetry and percent C, using relationships between the heat of combustion of a sample and its OR. These measurements hold the potential for generation of more precise data, as error depends only on 2 measurements instead of 4. We present data comparing these two OR measurement techniques.

  12. Multi-Repeated Projection Lithography for High-Precision Linear Scale Based on Average Homogenization Effect.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dongxu; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Chupeng; Yuan, Daocheng; Xi, Jianpu; Zhu, Xueliang; Ban, Xinxing; Dong, Longchao; Gu, Yawen; Jiang, Chunye

    2016-04-14

    A multi-repeated photolithography method for manufacturing an incremental linear scale using projection lithography is presented. The method is based on the average homogenization effect that periodically superposes the light intensity of different locations of pitches in the mask to make a consistent energy distribution at a specific wavelength, from which the accuracy of a linear scale can be improved precisely using the average pitch with different step distances. The method's theoretical error is within 0.01 µm for a periodic mask with a 2-µm sine-wave error. The intensity error models in the focal plane include the rectangular grating error on the mask, static positioning error, and lithography lens focal plane alignment error, which affect pitch uniformity less than in the common linear scale projection lithography splicing process. It was analyzed and confirmed that increasing the repeat exposure number of a single stripe could improve accuracy, as could adjusting the exposure spacing to achieve a set proportion of black and white stripes. According to the experimental results, the effectiveness of the multi-repeated photolithography method is confirmed to easily realize a pitch accuracy of 43 nm in any 10 locations of 1 m, and the whole length accuracy of the linear scale is less than 1 µm/m.

  13. Multi-Repeated Projection Lithography for High-Precision Linear Scale Based on Average Homogenization Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dongxu; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Chupeng; Yuan, Daocheng; Xi, Jianpu; Zhu, Xueliang; Ban, Xinxing; Dong, Longchao; Gu, Yawen; Jiang, Chunye

    2016-01-01

    A multi-repeated photolithography method for manufacturing an incremental linear scale using projection lithography is presented. The method is based on the average homogenization effect that periodically superposes the light intensity of different locations of pitches in the mask to make a consistent energy distribution at a specific wavelength, from which the accuracy of a linear scale can be improved precisely using the average pitch with different step distances. The method’s theoretical error is within 0.01 µm for a periodic mask with a 2-µm sine-wave error. The intensity error models in the focal plane include the rectangular grating error on the mask, static positioning error, and lithography lens focal plane alignment error, which affect pitch uniformity less than in the common linear scale projection lithography splicing process. It was analyzed and confirmed that increasing the repeat exposure number of a single stripe could improve accuracy, as could adjusting the exposure spacing to achieve a set proportion of black and white stripes. According to the experimental results, the effectiveness of the multi-repeated photolithography method is confirmed to easily realize a pitch accuracy of 43 nm in any 10 locations of 1 m, and the whole length accuracy of the linear scale is less than 1 µm/m. PMID:27089348

  14. Precision and accuracy of decay constants and age standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, I. M.

    2011-12-01

    40 years of round-robin experiments with age standards teach us that systematic errors must be present in at least N-1 labs if participants provide N mutually incompatible data. In EarthTime, the U-Pb community has produced and distributed synthetic solutions with full metrological traceability. Collector linearity is routinely calibrated under variable conditions (e.g. [1]). Instrumental mass fractionation is measured in-run with double spikes (e.g. 233U-236U). Parent-daughter ratios are metrologically traceable, so the full uncertainty budget of a U-Pb age should coincide with interlaboratory uncertainty. TIMS round-robin experiments indeed show a decrease of N towards the ideal value of 1. Comparing 235U-207Pb with 238U-206Pb ages (e.g. [2]) has resulted in a credible re-evaluation of the 235U decay constant, with lower uncertainty than gamma counting. U-Pb microbeam techniques reveal the link petrology-microtextures-microchemistry-isotope record but do not achieve the low uncertainty of TIMS. In the K-Ar community, N is large; interlaboratory bias is > 10 times self-assessed uncertainty. Systematic errors may have analytical and petrological reasons. Metrological traceability is not yet implemented (substantial advance may come from work in progress, e.g. [7]). One of the worst problems is collector stability and linearity. Using electron multipliers (EM) instead of Faraday buckets (FB) reduces both dynamic range and collector linearity. Mass spectrometer backgrounds are never zero; the extent as well as the predictability of their variability must be propagated into the uncertainty evaluation. The high isotope ratio of the atmospheric Ar requires a large dynamic range over which linearity must be demonstrated under all analytical conditions to correctly estimate mass fractionation. The only assessment of EM linearity in Ar analyses [3] points out many fundamental problems; the onus of proof is on every laboratory claiming low uncertainties. Finally, sample

  15. Precision and accuracy of visual foliar injury assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Gumpertz, M.L.; Tingey, D.T.; Hogsett, W.E.

    1982-07-01

    The study compared three measures of foliar injury: (i) mean percent leaf area injured of all leaves on the plant, (ii) mean percent leaf area injured of the three most injured leaves, and (iii) the proportion of injured leaves to total number of leaves. For the first measure, the variation caused by reader biases and day-to-day variations were compared with the innate plant-to-plant variation. Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Pinto'), pea (Pisum sativum 'Little Marvel'), radish (Rhaphanus sativus 'Cherry Belle'), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea 'Northland') plants were exposed to either 3 ..mu..L L/sup -1/ SO/sub 2/ or 0.3 ..mu..L L/sup -1/ ozone for 2 h. Three leaf readers visually assessed the percent injury on every leaf of each plant while a fourth reader used a transparent grid to make an unbiased assessment for each plant. The mean leaf area injured of the three most injured leaves was highly correlated with all leaves on the plant only if the three most injured leaves were <100% injured. The proportion of leaves injured was not highly correlated with percent leaf area injured of all leaves on the plant for any species in this study. The largest source of variation in visual assessments was plant-to-plant variation, which ranged from 44 to 97% of the total variance, followed by variation among readers (0-32% of the variance). Except for radish exposed to ozone, the day-to-day variation accounted for <18% of the total. Reader bias in assessment of ozone injury was significant but could be adjusted for each reader by a simple linear regression (R/sup 2/ = 0.89-0.91) of the visual assessments against the grid assessments.

  16. Spectropolarimetry with PEPSI at the LBT: accuracy vs. precision in magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, Ilya; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Hofmann, Axel

    2009-04-01

    We present the design of the new PEPSI spectropolarimeter to be installed at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona to measure the full set of Stokes parameters in spectral lines and outline its precision and the accuracy limiting factors.

  17. Precision and Accuracy in Measurements: A Tale of Four Graduated Cylinders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1998-01-01

    Expands upon the concepts of precision and accuracy at a level suitable for general chemistry. Serves as a bridge to the more extensive treatments in analytical chemistry textbooks and the advanced literature on error analysis. Contains 22 references. (DDR)

  18. An analytically linearized helicopter model with improved modeling accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Patrick T.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An analytically linearized model for helicopter flight response including rotor blade dynamics and dynamic inflow, that was recently developed, was studied with the objective of increasing the understanding, the ease of use, and the accuracy of the model. The mathematical model is described along with a description of the UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter and flight test used to validate the model. To aid in utilization of the model for sensitivity analysis, a new, faster, and more efficient implementation of the model was developed. It is shown that several errors in the mathematical modeling of the system caused a reduction in accuracy. These errors in rotor force resolution, trim force and moment calculation, and rotor inertia terms were corrected along with improvements to the programming style and documentation. Use of a trim input file to drive the model is examined. Trim file errors in blade twist, control input phase angle, coning and lag angles, main and tail rotor pitch, and uniform induced velocity, were corrected. Finally, through direct comparison of the original and corrected model responses to flight test data, the effect of the corrections on overall model output is shown.

  19. Accuracy and precision of silicon based impression media for quantitative areal texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Robert H; Darras, Laurent P; Purnell, Mark A

    2015-05-20

    Areal surface texture analysis is becoming widespread across a diverse range of applications, from engineering to ecology. In many studies silicon based impression media are used to replicate surfaces, and the fidelity of replication defines the quality of data collected. However, while different investigators have used different impression media, the fidelity of surface replication has not been subjected to quantitative analysis based on areal texture data. Here we present the results of an analysis of the accuracy and precision with which different silicon based impression media of varying composition and viscosity replicate rough and smooth surfaces. Both accuracy and precision vary greatly between different media. High viscosity media tested show very low accuracy and precision, and most other compounds showed either the same pattern, or low accuracy and high precision, or low precision and high accuracy. Of the media tested, mid viscosity President Jet Regular Body and low viscosity President Jet Light Body (Coltène Whaledent) are the only compounds to show high levels of accuracy and precision on both surface types. Our results show that data acquired from different impression media are not comparable, supporting calls for greater standardisation of methods in areal texture analysis.

  20. Accuracy and Precision of Silicon Based Impression Media for Quantitative Areal Texture Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Robert H.; Darras, Laurent P.; Purnell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Areal surface texture analysis is becoming widespread across a diverse range of applications, from engineering to ecology. In many studies silicon based impression media are used to replicate surfaces, and the fidelity of replication defines the quality of data collected. However, while different investigators have used different impression media, the fidelity of surface replication has not been subjected to quantitative analysis based on areal texture data. Here we present the results of an analysis of the accuracy and precision with which different silicon based impression media of varying composition and viscosity replicate rough and smooth surfaces. Both accuracy and precision vary greatly between different media. High viscosity media tested show very low accuracy and precision, and most other compounds showed either the same pattern, or low accuracy and high precision, or low precision and high accuracy. Of the media tested, mid viscosity President Jet Regular Body and low viscosity President Jet Light Body (Coltène Whaledent) are the only compounds to show high levels of accuracy and precision on both surface types. Our results show that data acquired from different impression media are not comparable, supporting calls for greater standardisation of methods in areal texture analysis. PMID:25991505

  1. A linear actuator for precision positioning of dual objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuxin; Cao, Jie; Guo, Zhao; Yu, Haoyong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a linear actuator for precision positioning of dual objects is proposed based on a double friction drive principle using a single piezoelectric element (PZT). The linear actuator consists of an electromagnet and a permanent magnet, which are connected by the PZT. The electromagnet serves as an object 1, and another object (object 2) is attached on the permanent magnet by the magnetic force. For positioning the dual objects independently, two different friction drive modes can be alternated by an on-off control of the electromagnet. When the electromagnet releases from the guide way, it can be driven by impact friction force generated by the PZT. Otherwise, when the electromagnet clamps on the guide way and remains stationary, the object 2 can be driven based on the principle of smooth impact friction drive. A prototype was designed and constructed and experiments were carried out to test the basic performance of the actuator. It has been verified that with a compact size of 31 mm (L) × 12 mm (W) × 8 mm (H), the two objects can achieve long strokes on the order of several millimeters and high resolutions of several tens of nanometers. Since the proposed actuator allows independent movement of two objects by a single PZT, the actuator has the potential to be constructed compactly.

  2. Precision linear shaped charge severance of graphite-epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, Manuel G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) components designed to sever a variety of target materials. Recent data for the severance of graphite-epoxy panels or targets with PLSC's are presented. A brief history of the requirement to originate the development of PLSC's for weapon components at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. The Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapon systems have continually decreased in size. Today's relatively small weapons require the design of much more efficient, lighter, and smaller explosive components because fragments, air shocks, and pyro-shocks associated with the function of these components can damage electrical and other sensitive components located nearby. The DOE requirements for PLSC's are listed. Therefore, linear shaped charge (LSC) components for weapon systems can no longer be empirically or experimentally designed for a given application. Many of today's designs require severing concentric cylinders, for example, where the LSC jet is designed to sever only one of the two cylinders as was the case for the B90/Nuclear Depth Strike Bomb. Therefore, code modeling and simulation technology must be utilized to obtain a better understanding of the LSC jet hydrodynamic penetration, fracture, shear, and spall mechanisms associated with the severance of metallic as well as composite targets.

  3. Gaining Precision and Accuracy on Microprobe Trace Element Analysis with the Multipoint Background Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaz, J. M.; Williams, M. L.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Donovan, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Electron microprobe trace element analysis is a significant challenge, but can provide critical data when high spatial resolution is required. Due to the low peak intensity, the accuracy and precision of such analyses relies critically on background measurements, and on the accuracy of any pertinent peak interference corrections. A linear regression between two points selected at appropriate off-peak positions is a classical approach for background characterization in microprobe analysis. However, this approach disallows an accurate assessment of background curvature (usually exponential). Moreover, if present, background interferences can dramatically affect the results if underestimated or ignored. The acquisition of a quantitative WDS scan over the spectral region of interest is still a valuable option to determine the background intensity and curvature from a fitted regression of background portions of the scan, but this technique retains an element of subjectivity as the analyst has to select areas in the scan, which appear to represent background. We present here a new method, "Multi-Point Background" (MPB), that allows acquiring up to 24 off-peak background measurements from wavelength positions around the peaks. This method aims to improve the accuracy, precision, and objectivity of trace element analysis. The overall efficiency is amended because no systematic WDS scan needs to be acquired in order to check for the presence of possible background interferences. Moreover, the method is less subjective because "true" backgrounds are selected by the statistical exclusion of erroneous background measurements, reducing the need for analyst intervention. This idea originated from efforts to refine EPMA monazite U-Th-Pb dating, where it was recognised that background errors (peak interference or background curvature) could result in errors of several tens of million years on the calculated age. Results obtained on a CAMECA SX-100 "UltraChron" using monazite

  4. A Comparison of the Astrometric Precision and Accuracy of Double Star Observations with Two Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Pablo; Fishbein, Amos E.; Hyland, Michael W.; Kight, Cheyne L.; Lopez, Hairold; Navarro, Tanya; Rosas, Carlos A.; Schachter, Aubrey E.; Summers, Molly A.; Weise, Eric D.; Hoffman, Megan A.; Mires, Robert C.; Johnson, Jolyon M.; Genet, Russell M.; White, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Using a manual Meade 6" Newtonian telescope and a computerized Meade 10" Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, students from Arroyo Grande High School measured the well-known separation and position angle of the bright visual double star Albireo. The precision and accuracy of the observations from the two telescopes were compared to each other and to published values of Albireo taken as the standard. It was hypothesized that the larger, computerized telescope would be both more precise and more accurate.

  5. Active transport improves the precision of linear long distance molecular signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Molecular signalling in living cells occurs at low copy numbers and is thereby inherently limited by the noise imposed by thermal diffusion. The precision at which biochemical receptors can count signalling molecules is intimately related to the noise correlation time. In addition to passive thermal diffusion, messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signalling molecules can transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported across biological cells. Active transport is most beneficial when trafficking occurs over large distances, for instance up to the order of 1 metre in neurons. Here we explain how intermittent active transport allows for faster equilibration upon a change in concentration triggered by biochemical stimuli. Moreover, we show how intermittent active excursions induce qualitative changes in the noise in effectively one-dimensional systems such as dendrites. Thereby they allow for significantly improved signalling precision in the sense of a smaller relative deviation in the concentration read-out by the receptor. On the basis of linear response theory we derive the exact mean field precision limit for counting actively transported molecules. We explain how intermittent active excursions disrupt the recurrence in the molecular motion, thereby facilitating improved signalling accuracy. Our results provide a deeper understanding of how recurrence affects molecular signalling precision in biological cells and novel medical-diagnostic devices.

  6. Sex differences in accuracy and precision when judging time to arrival: data from two Internet studies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff; Sinclair, Kamila

    2011-12-01

    We report two Internet studies that investigated sex differences in the accuracy and precision of judging time to arrival. We used accuracy to mean the ability to match the actual time to arrival and precision to mean the consistency with which each participant made their judgments. Our task was presented as a computer game in which a toy UFO moved obliquely towards the participant through a virtual three-dimensional space on route to a docking station. The UFO disappeared before docking and participants pressed their space bar at the precise moment they thought the UFO would have docked. Study 1 showed it was possible to conduct quantitative studies of spatiotemporal judgments in virtual reality via the Internet and confirmed reports that men are more accurate because women underestimate, but found no difference in precision measured as intra-participant variation. Study 2 repeated Study 1 with five additional presentations of one condition to provide a better measure of precision. Again, men were more accurate than women but there were no sex differences in precision. However, within the coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) literature, of those studies that report sex differences, a majority found that males are both more accurate and more precise than females. Noting that many CAT studies report no sex differences, we discuss appropriate interpretations of such null findings. While acknowledging that CAT performance may be influenced by experience we suggest that the sex difference may have originated among our ancestors with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting and women for gathering.

  7. The Plus or Minus Game--Teaching Estimation, Precision, and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forringer, Edward R.; Forringer, Richard S.; Forringer, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    A quick survey of physics textbooks shows that many (Knight, Young, and Serway for example) cover estimation, significant digits, precision versus accuracy, and uncertainty in the first chapter. Estimation "Fermi" questions are so useful that there has been a column dedicated to them in "TPT" (Larry Weinstein's "Fermi…

  8. Commissioning Procedures for Mechanical Precision and Accuracy in a Dedicated LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Larrga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Juarez, J.; Prieto, I.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.

    2008-08-11

    Mechanical precision measurements are fundamental procedures for the commissioning of a dedicated LINAC. At our Radioneurosurgery Unit, these procedures can be suitable as quality assurance routines that allow the verification of the equipment geometrical accuracy and precision. In this work mechanical tests were performed for gantry and table rotation, obtaining mean associated uncertainties of 0.3 mm and 0.71 mm, respectively. Using an anthropomorphic phantom and a series of localized surface markers, isocenter accuracy showed to be smaller than 0.86 mm for radiosurgery procedures and 0.95 mm for fractionated treatments with mask. All uncertainties were below tolerances. The highest contribution to mechanical variations is due to table rotation, so it is important to correct variations using a localization frame with printed overlays. Mechanical precision knowledge would allow to consider the statistical errors in the treatment planning volume margins.

  9. The Accuracy of Solutions of Linear Equations in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, G. A.; Webster, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring of the errors resulting from the solution of a set of linear algebraic equations is conventionally achieved using either the mathematical standard perturbation theory for ill-conditioning or the computer studies route through interval arithmetic. Proposes an alternative based on continuous monitoring of the errors in each operation. The…

  10. Sex differences in accuracy and precision when judging time to arrival: data from two Internet studies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff; Sinclair, Kamila

    2011-12-01

    We report two Internet studies that investigated sex differences in the accuracy and precision of judging time to arrival. We used accuracy to mean the ability to match the actual time to arrival and precision to mean the consistency with which each participant made their judgments. Our task was presented as a computer game in which a toy UFO moved obliquely towards the participant through a virtual three-dimensional space on route to a docking station. The UFO disappeared before docking and participants pressed their space bar at the precise moment they thought the UFO would have docked. Study 1 showed it was possible to conduct quantitative studies of spatiotemporal judgments in virtual reality via the Internet and confirmed reports that men are more accurate because women underestimate, but found no difference in precision measured as intra-participant variation. Study 2 repeated Study 1 with five additional presentations of one condition to provide a better measure of precision. Again, men were more accurate than women but there were no sex differences in precision. However, within the coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) literature, of those studies that report sex differences, a majority found that males are both more accurate and more precise than females. Noting that many CAT studies report no sex differences, we discuss appropriate interpretations of such null findings. While acknowledging that CAT performance may be influenced by experience we suggest that the sex difference may have originated among our ancestors with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting and women for gathering. PMID:21125324

  11. The Use of Scale-Dependent Precision to Increase Forecast Accuracy in Earth System Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornes, Tobias; Duben, Peter; Palmer, Tim

    2016-04-01

    At the current pace of development, it may be decades before the 'exa-scale' computers needed to resolve individual convective clouds in weather and climate models become available to forecasters, and such machines will incur very high power demands. But the resolution could be improved today by switching to more efficient, 'inexact' hardware with which variables can be represented in 'reduced precision'. Currently, all numbers in our models are represented as double-precision floating points - each requiring 64 bits of memory - to minimise rounding errors, regardless of spatial scale. Yet observational and modelling constraints mean that values of atmospheric variables are inevitably known less precisely on smaller scales, suggesting that this may be a waste of computer resources. More accurate forecasts might therefore be obtained by taking a scale-selective approach whereby the precision of variables is gradually decreased at smaller spatial scales to optimise the overall efficiency of the model. To study the effect of reducing precision to different levels on multiple spatial scales, we here introduce a new model atmosphere developed by extending the Lorenz '96 idealised system to encompass three tiers of variables - which represent large-, medium- and small-scale features - for the first time. In this chaotic but computationally tractable system, the 'true' state can be defined by explicitly resolving all three tiers. The abilities of low resolution (single-tier) double-precision models and similar-cost high resolution (two-tier) models in mixed-precision to produce accurate forecasts of this 'truth' are compared. The high resolution models outperform the low resolution ones even when small-scale variables are resolved in half-precision (16 bits). This suggests that using scale-dependent levels of precision in more complicated real-world Earth System models could allow forecasts to be made at higher resolution and with improved accuracy. If adopted, this new

  12. Comparison between predicted and actual accuracies for an Ultra-Precision CNC measuring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.C.; Fix, B.L.

    1995-05-30

    At the 1989 CIRP annual meeting, we reported on the design of a specialized, ultra-precision CNC measuring machine, and on the error budget that was developed to guide the design process. In our paper we proposed a combinatorial rule for merging estimated and/or calculated values for all known sources of error, to yield a single overall predicted accuracy for the machine. In this paper we compare our original predictions with measured performance of the completed instrument.

  13. Measuring changes in Plasmodium falciparum transmission: precision, accuracy and costs of metrics.

    PubMed

    Tusting, Lucy S; Bousema, Teun; Smith, David L; Drakeley, Chris

    2014-01-01

    As malaria declines in parts of Africa and elsewhere, and as more countries move towards elimination, it is necessary to robustly evaluate the effect of interventions and control programmes on malaria transmission. To help guide the appropriate design of trials to evaluate transmission-reducing interventions, we review 11 metrics of malaria transmission, discussing their accuracy, precision, collection methods and costs and presenting an overall critique. We also review the nonlinear scaling relationships between five metrics of malaria transmission: the entomological inoculation rate, force of infection, sporozoite rate, parasite rate and the basic reproductive number, R0. Our chapter highlights that while the entomological inoculation rate is widely considered the gold standard metric of malaria transmission and may be necessary for measuring changes in transmission in highly endemic areas, it has limited precision and accuracy and more standardised methods for its collection are required. In areas of low transmission, parasite rate, seroconversion rates and molecular metrics including MOI and mFOI may be most appropriate. When assessing a specific intervention, the most relevant effects will be detected by examining the metrics most directly affected by that intervention. Future work should aim to better quantify the precision and accuracy of malaria metrics and to improve methods for their collection.

  14. Precision and accuracy of 3D lower extremity residua measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Pilgram, Thomas K.

    1996-04-01

    Accurate and reproducible geometric measurement of lower extremity residua is required for custom prosthetic socket design. We compared spiral x-ray computed tomography (SXCT) and 3D optical surface scanning (OSS) with caliper measurements and evaluated the precision and accuracy of each system. Spiral volumetric CT scanned surface and subsurface information was used to make external and internal measurements, and finite element models (FEMs). SXCT and OSS were used to measure lower limb residuum geometry of 13 below knee (BK) adult amputees. Six markers were placed on each subject's BK residuum and corresponding plaster casts and distance measurements were taken to determine precision and accuracy for each system. Solid models were created from spiral CT scan data sets with the prosthesis in situ under different loads using p-version finite element analysis (FEA). Tissue properties of the residuum were estimated iteratively and compared with values taken from the biomechanics literature. The OSS and SXCT measurements were precise within 1% in vivo and 0.5% on plaster casts, and accuracy was within 3.5% in vivo and 1% on plaster casts compared with caliper measures. Three-dimensional optical surface and SXCT imaging systems are feasible for capturing the comprehensive 3D surface geometry of BK residua, and provide distance measurements statistically equivalent to calipers. In addition, SXCT can readily distinguish internal soft tissue and bony structure of the residuum. FEM can be applied to determine tissue material properties interactively using inverse methods.

  15. Evaluation of precision and accuracy of selenium measurements in biological materials using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials has become increasingly important in view of the essential nature of this element for human nutrition and its possible role as a protective agent against cancer. Unfortunately, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials is often difficult for most analytical techniques for a variety of reasons, including interferences, complicated selenium chemistry due to the presence of this element in multiple oxidation states and in a variety of different organic species, stability and resistance to destruction of some of these organo-selenium species during acid dissolution, volatility of some selenium compounds, and potential for contamination. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be one of the best analytical techniques for selenium determinations in biological materials for a number of reasons. Currently, precision at the 1% level (1s) and overall accuracy at the 1 to 2% level (95% confidence interval) can be attained at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for selenium determinations in biological materials when counting statistics are not limiting (using the {sup 75}Se isotope). An example of this level of precision and accuracy is summarized. Achieving this level of accuracy, however, requires strict attention to all sources of systematic error. Precise and accurate results can also be obtained after radiochemical separations.

  16. Large format focal plane array integration with precision alignment, metrology and accuracy capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Jay; Parlato, Russell; Tracy, Gregory; Randolph, Max

    2015-09-01

    Focal plane alignment for large format arrays and faster optical systems require enhanced precision methodology and stability over temperature. The increase in focal plane array size continues to drive the alignment capability. Depending on the optical system, the focal plane flatness of less than 25μm (.001") is required over transition temperatures from ambient to cooled operating temperatures. The focal plane flatness requirement must also be maintained in airborne or launch vibration environments. This paper addresses the challenge of the detector integration into the focal plane module and housing assemblies, the methodology to reduce error terms during integration and the evaluation of thermal effects. The driving factors influencing the alignment accuracy include: datum transfers, material effects over temperature, alignment stability over test, adjustment precision and traceability to NIST standard. The FPA module design and alignment methodology reduces the error terms by minimizing the measurement transfers to the housing. In the design, the proper material selection requires matched coefficient of expansion materials minimizes both the physical shift over temperature as well as lowering the stress induced into the detector. When required, the co-registration of focal planes and filters can achieve submicron relative positioning by applying precision equipment, interferometry and piezoelectric positioning stages. All measurements and characterizations maintain traceability to NIST standards. The metrology characterizes the equipment's accuracy, repeatability and precision of the measurements.

  17. Precision measurement of a particle mass at the linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Freitas, A.; Schmitt, M.; Sopczak, A.; /Lancaster U.

    2007-06-01

    Precision measurement of the stop mass at the ILC is done in a method based on cross-sections measurements at two different center-of-mass energies. This allows to minimize both the statistical and systematic errors. In the framework of the MSSM, a light stop, compatible with electro-weak baryogenesis, is studied in its decay into a charm jet and neutralino, the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP), as a candidate of dark matter. This takes place for a small stop-neutralino mass difference.

  18. Accuracy and precision of ice stream bed topography derived from ground-based radar surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Edward

    2016-04-01

    There is some confusion within the glaciological community as to the accuracy of the basal topography derived from radar measurements. A number of texts and papers state that basal topography cannot be determined to better than one quarter of the wavelength of the radar system. On the other hand King et al (Nature Geoscience, 2009) claimed that features of the bed topography beneath Rutford Ice Stream, Antarctica can be distinguished to +/- 3m using a 3 MHz radar system (which has a quarter wavelength of 14m in ice). These statements of accuracy are mutually exclusive. I will show in this presentation that the measurement of ice thickness is a radar range determination to a single strongly-reflective target. This measurement has much higher accuracy than the resolution of two targets of similar reflection strength, which is governed by the quarter-wave criterion. The rise time of the source signal and the sensitivity and digitisation interval of the recording system are the controlling criteria on radar range accuracy. A dataset from Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica will be used to illustrate these points, as well as the repeatability or precision of radar range measurements, and the influence of gridding parameters and positioning accuracy on the final DEM product.

  19. Wound Area Measurement with Digital Planimetry: Improved Accuracy and Precision with Calibration Based on 2 Rulers

    PubMed Central

    Foltynski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the treatment of chronic wounds the wound surface area change over time is useful parameter in assessment of the applied therapy plan. The more precise the method of wound area measurement the earlier may be identified and changed inappropriate treatment plan. Digital planimetry may be used in wound area measurement and therapy assessment when it is properly used, but the common problem is the camera lens orientation during the taking of a picture. The camera lens axis should be perpendicular to the wound plane, and if it is not, the measured area differ from the true area. Results Current study shows that the use of 2 rulers placed in parallel below and above the wound for the calibration increases on average 3.8 times the precision of area measurement in comparison to the measurement with one ruler used for calibration. The proposed procedure of calibration increases also 4 times accuracy of area measurement. It was also showed that wound area range and camera type do not influence the precision of area measurement with digital planimetry based on two ruler calibration, however the measurements based on smartphone camera were significantly less accurate than these based on D-SLR or compact cameras. Area measurement on flat surface was more precise with the digital planimetry with 2 rulers than performed with the Visitrak device, the Silhouette Mobile device or the AreaMe software-based method. Conclusion The calibration in digital planimetry with using 2 rulers remarkably increases precision and accuracy of measurement and therefore should be recommended instead of calibration based on single ruler. PMID:26252747

  20. Design of a linear-motion dual-stage actuation system for precision control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Tang, J.; El Deeb, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Actuators with high linear-motion speed, high positioning resolution and a long motion stroke are needed in many precision machining systems. In some current systems, voice coil motors (VCMs) are implemented for servo control. While the voice coil motors may provide the long motion stroke needed in many applications, the main obstacle that hinders the improvement of the machining accuracy and efficiency is their limited bandwidth. To fundamentally solve this issue, we propose to develop a dual-stage actuation system that consists of a voice coil motor that covers the coarse motion, and a piezoelectric stack actuator that induces the fine motion, thus enhancing the positioning accuracy. The focus of this present research is the mechatronics design and synthesis of the new actuation system. In particular, a flexure hinge based mechanism is developed to provide a motion guide and preload to the piezoelectric stack actuator that is serially connected to the voice coil motor. This mechanism is built upon parallel plane flexure hinges. A series of numerical and experimental studies are carried out to facilitate the system design and the model identification. The effectiveness of the proposed system is demonstrated through open-loop studies and preliminary closed-loop control practice. While the primary goal of this particular design is aimed at enhancing optical lens machining, the concept and approach outlined are generic and can be extended to a variety of applications.

  1. Accuracy or precision: Implications of sample design and methodology on abundance estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowalewski, Lucas K.; Chizinski, Christopher J.; Powell, Larkin A.; Pope, Kevin L.; Pegg, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Sampling by spatially replicated counts (point-count) is an increasingly popular method of estimating population size of organisms. Challenges exist when sampling by point-count method, and it is often impractical to sample entire area of interest and impossible to detect every individual present. Ecologists encounter logistical limitations that force them to sample either few large-sample units or many small sample-units, introducing biases to sample counts. We generated a computer environment and simulated sampling scenarios to test the role of number of samples, sample unit area, number of organisms, and distribution of organisms in the estimation of population sizes using N-mixture models. Many sample units of small area provided estimates that were consistently closer to true abundance than sample scenarios with few sample units of large area. However, sample scenarios with few sample units of large area provided more precise abundance estimates than abundance estimates derived from sample scenarios with many sample units of small area. It is important to consider accuracy and precision of abundance estimates during the sample design process with study goals and objectives fully recognized, although and with consequence, consideration of accuracy and precision of abundance estimates is often an afterthought that occurs during the data analysis process.

  2. Automated Gravimetric Calibration to Optimize the Accuracy and Precision of TECAN Freedom EVO Liquid Handler.

    PubMed

    Bessemans, Laurent; Jully, Vanessa; de Raikem, Caroline; Albanese, Mathieu; Moniotte, Nicolas; Silversmet, Pascal; Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    High-throughput screening technologies are increasingly integrated into the formulation development process of biopharmaceuticals. The performance of liquid handling systems is dependent on the ability to deliver accurate and precise volumes of specific reagents to ensure process quality. We have developed an automated gravimetric calibration procedure to adjust the accuracy and evaluate the precision of the TECAN Freedom EVO liquid handling system. Volumes from 3 to 900 µL using calibrated syringes and fixed tips were evaluated with various solutions, including aluminum hydroxide and phosphate adjuvants, β-casein, sucrose, sodium chloride, and phosphate-buffered saline. The methodology to set up liquid class pipetting parameters for each solution was to split the process in three steps: (1) screening of predefined liquid class, including different pipetting parameters; (2) adjustment of accuracy parameters based on a calibration curve; and (3) confirmation of the adjustment. The run of appropriate pipetting scripts, data acquisition, and reports until the creation of a new liquid class in EVOware was fully automated. The calibration and confirmation of the robotic system was simple, efficient, and precise and could accelerate data acquisition for a wide range of biopharmaceutical applications. PMID:26905719

  3. The tradeoff between accuracy and precision in latent variable models of mediation processes

    PubMed Central

    Ledgerwood, Alison; Shrout, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Social psychologists place high importance on understanding mechanisms, and frequently employ mediation analyses to shed light on the process underlying an effect. Such analyses can be conducted using observed variables (e.g., a typical regression approach) or latent variables (e.g., a SEM approach), and choosing between these methods can be a more complex and consequential decision than researchers often realize. The present paper adds to the literature on mediation by examining the relative tradeoff between accuracy and precision in latent versus observed variable modeling. Whereas past work has shown that latent variable models tend to produce more accurate estimates, we demonstrate that observed variable models tend to produce more precise estimates, and examine this relative tradeoff both theoretically and empirically in a typical three-variable mediation model across varying levels of effect size and reliability. We discuss implications for social psychologists seeking to uncover mediating variables, and recommend practical approaches for maximizing both accuracy and precision in mediation analyses. PMID:21806305

  4. Automated Gravimetric Calibration to Optimize the Accuracy and Precision of TECAN Freedom EVO Liquid Handler

    PubMed Central

    Bessemans, Laurent; Jully, Vanessa; de Raikem, Caroline; Albanese, Mathieu; Moniotte, Nicolas; Silversmet, Pascal; Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening technologies are increasingly integrated into the formulation development process of biopharmaceuticals. The performance of liquid handling systems is dependent on the ability to deliver accurate and precise volumes of specific reagents to ensure process quality. We have developed an automated gravimetric calibration procedure to adjust the accuracy and evaluate the precision of the TECAN Freedom EVO liquid handling system. Volumes from 3 to 900 µL using calibrated syringes and fixed tips were evaluated with various solutions, including aluminum hydroxide and phosphate adjuvants, β-casein, sucrose, sodium chloride, and phosphate-buffered saline. The methodology to set up liquid class pipetting parameters for each solution was to split the process in three steps: (1) screening of predefined liquid class, including different pipetting parameters; (2) adjustment of accuracy parameters based on a calibration curve; and (3) confirmation of the adjustment. The run of appropriate pipetting scripts, data acquisition, and reports until the creation of a new liquid class in EVOware was fully automated. The calibration and confirmation of the robotic system was simple, efficient, and precise and could accelerate data acquisition for a wide range of biopharmaceutical applications. PMID:26905719

  5. Accuracy, precision, usability, and cost of free chlorine residual testing methods.

    PubMed

    Murray, Anna; Lantagne, Daniele

    2015-03-01

    Chlorine is the most widely used disinfectant worldwide, partially because residual protection is maintained after treatment. This residual is measured using colorimetric test kits varying in accuracy, precision, training required, and cost. Seven commercially available colorimeters, color wheel and test tube comparator kits, pool test kits, and test strips were evaluated for use in low-resource settings by: (1) measuring in quintuplicate 11 samples from 0.0-4.0 mg/L free chlorine residual in laboratory and natural light settings to determine accuracy and precision; (2) conducting volunteer testing where participants used and evaluated each test kit; and (3) comparing costs. Laboratory accuracy ranged from 5.1-40.5% measurement error, with colorimeters the most accurate and test strip methods the least. Variation between laboratory and natural light readings occurred with one test strip method. Volunteer participants found test strip methods easiest and color wheel methods most difficult, and were most confident in the colorimeter and least confident in test strip methods. Costs range from 3.50-444 USD for 100 tests. Application of a decision matrix found colorimeters and test tube comparator kits were most appropriate for use in low-resource settings; it is recommended users apply the decision matrix themselves, as the appropriate kit might vary by context.

  6. Accuracy and precision of stream reach water surface slopes estimated in the field and from maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isaak, D.J.; Hubert, W.A.; Krueger, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of five tools used to measure stream water surface slope (WSS) were evaluated. Water surface slopes estimated in the field with a clinometer or from topographic maps used in conjunction with a map wheel or geographic information system (GIS) were significantly higher than WSS estimated in the field with a surveying level (biases of 34, 41, and 53%, respectively). Accuracy of WSS estimates obtained with an Abney level did not differ from surveying level estimates, but conclusions regarding the accuracy of Abney levels and clinometers were weakened by intratool variability. The surveying level estimated WSS most precisely (coefficient of variation [CV] = 0.26%), followed by the GIS (CV = 1.87%), map wheel (CV = 6.18%), Abney level (CV = 13.68%), and clinometer (CV = 21.57%). Estimates of WSS measured in the field with an Abney level and estimated for the same reaches with a GIS used in conjunction with l:24,000-scale topographic maps were significantly correlated (r = 0.86), but there was a tendency for the GIS to overestimate WSS. Detailed accounts of the methods used to measure WSS and recommendations regarding the measurement of WSS are provided.

  7. Super-linear Precision in Simple Neural Population Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David; Fiete, Ila

    2015-03-01

    A widely used tool for quantifying the precision with which a population of noisy sensory neurons encodes the value of an external stimulus is the Fisher Information (FI). Maximizing the FI is also a commonly used objective for constructing optimal neural codes. The primary utility and importance of the FI arises because it gives, through the Cramer-Rao bound, the smallest mean-squared error achievable by any unbiased stimulus estimator. However, it is well-known that when neural firing is sparse, optimizing the FI can result in codes that perform very poorly when considering the resulting mean-squared error, a measure with direct biological relevance. Here we construct optimal population codes by minimizing mean-squared error directly and study the scaling properties of the resulting network, focusing on the optimal tuning curve width. We then extend our results to continuous attractor networks that maintain short-term memory of external stimuli in their dynamics. Here we find similar scaling properties in the structure of the interactions that minimize diffusive information loss.

  8. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off ) ~ 3,000 s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100 s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements

  9. Accuracy and precision of four common peripheral temperature measurement methods in intensive care patients

    PubMed Central

    Asadian, Simin; Khatony, Alireza; Moradi, Gholamreza; Abdi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An accurate determination of body temperature in critically ill patients is a fundamental requirement for initiating the proper process of diagnosis, and also therapeutic actions; therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and precision of four noninvasive peripheral methods of temperature measurement compared to the central nasopharyngeal measurement. Methods In this observational prospective study, 237 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of Imam Ali Hospital of Kermanshah. The patients’ body temperatures were measured by four peripheral methods; oral, axillary, tympanic, and forehead along with a standard central nasopharyngeal measurement. After data collection, the results were analyzed by paired t-test, kappa coefficient, receiver operating characteristic curve, and using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 19, software. Results There was a significant meaningful correlation between all the peripheral methods when compared with the central measurement (P<0.001). Kappa coefficients showed good agreement between the temperatures of right and left tympanic membranes and the standard central nasopharyngeal measurement (88%). Paired t-test demonstrated an acceptable precision with forehead (P=0.132), left (P=0.18) and right (P=0.318) tympanic membranes, oral (P=1.00), and axillary (P=1.00) methods. Sensitivity and specificity of both the left and right tympanic membranes were more than for other methods. Conclusion The tympanic and forehead methods had the highest and lowest accuracy for measuring body temperature, respectively. It is recommended to use the tympanic method (right and left) for assessing a patient’s body temperature in the intensive care units because of high accuracy and acceptable precision.

  10. Accuracy and precision of four common peripheral temperature measurement methods in intensive care patients

    PubMed Central

    Asadian, Simin; Khatony, Alireza; Moradi, Gholamreza; Abdi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An accurate determination of body temperature in critically ill patients is a fundamental requirement for initiating the proper process of diagnosis, and also therapeutic actions; therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and precision of four noninvasive peripheral methods of temperature measurement compared to the central nasopharyngeal measurement. Methods In this observational prospective study, 237 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of Imam Ali Hospital of Kermanshah. The patients’ body temperatures were measured by four peripheral methods; oral, axillary, tympanic, and forehead along with a standard central nasopharyngeal measurement. After data collection, the results were analyzed by paired t-test, kappa coefficient, receiver operating characteristic curve, and using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 19, software. Results There was a significant meaningful correlation between all the peripheral methods when compared with the central measurement (P<0.001). Kappa coefficients showed good agreement between the temperatures of right and left tympanic membranes and the standard central nasopharyngeal measurement (88%). Paired t-test demonstrated an acceptable precision with forehead (P=0.132), left (P=0.18) and right (P=0.318) tympanic membranes, oral (P=1.00), and axillary (P=1.00) methods. Sensitivity and specificity of both the left and right tympanic membranes were more than for other methods. Conclusion The tympanic and forehead methods had the highest and lowest accuracy for measuring body temperature, respectively. It is recommended to use the tympanic method (right and left) for assessing a patient’s body temperature in the intensive care units because of high accuracy and acceptable precision. PMID:27621673

  11. Assessing accuracy and precision for field and laboratory data: a perspective in ecosystem restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Lewis, Timothy E; Palmer, Craig J.; Middlebrook Amos, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Unlike most laboratory studies, rigorous quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures may be lacking in ecosystem restoration (“ecorestoration”) projects, despite legislative mandates in the United States. This is due, in part, to ecorestoration specialists making the false assumption that some types of data (e.g. discrete variables such as species identification and abundance classes) are not subject to evaluations of data quality. Moreover, emergent behavior manifested by complex, adapting, and nonlinear organizations responsible for monitoring the success of ecorestoration projects tend to unconsciously minimize disorder, QA/QC being an activity perceived as creating disorder. We discuss similarities and differences in assessing precision and accuracy for field and laboratory data. Although the concepts for assessing precision and accuracy of ecorestoration field data are conceptually the same as laboratory data, the manner in which these data quality attributes are assessed is different. From a sample analysis perspective, a field crew is comparable to a laboratory instrument that requires regular “recalibration,” with results obtained by experts at the same plot treated as laboratory calibration standards. Unlike laboratory standards and reference materials, the “true” value for many field variables is commonly unknown. In the laboratory, specific QA/QC samples assess error for each aspect of the measurement process, whereas field revisits assess precision and accuracy of the entire data collection process following initial calibration. Rigorous QA/QC data in an ecorestoration project are essential for evaluating the success of a project, and they provide the only objective “legacy” of the dataset for potential legal challenges and future uses.

  12. Mapping stream habitats with a global positioning system: Accuracy, precision, and comparison with traditional methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauwalter, D.C.; Fisher, W.L.; Belt, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    We tested the precision and accuracy of the Trimble GeoXT??? global positioning system (GPS) handheld receiver on point and area features and compared estimates of stream habitat dimensions (e.g., lengths and areas of riffles and pools) that were made in three different Oklahoma streams using the GPS receiver and a tape measure. The precision of differentially corrected GPS (DGPS) points was not affected by the number of GPS position fixes (i.e., geographic location estimates) averaged per DGPS point. Horizontal error of points ranged from 0.03 to 2.77 m and did not differ with the number of position fixes per point. The error of area measurements ranged from 0.1% to 110.1% but decreased as the area increased. Again, error was independent of the number of position fixes averaged per polygon corner. The estimates of habitat lengths, widths, and areas did not differ when measured using two methods of data collection (GPS and a tape measure), nor did the differences among methods change at three stream sites with contrasting morphologies. Measuring features with a GPS receiver was up to 3.3 times faster on average than using a tape measure, although signal interference from high streambanks or overhanging vegetation occasionally limited satellite signal availability and prolonged measurements with a GPS receiver. There were also no differences in precision of habitat dimensions when mapped using a continuous versus a position fix average GPS data collection method. Despite there being some disadvantages to using the GPS in stream habitat studies, measuring stream habitats with a GPS resulted in spatially referenced data that allowed the assessment of relative habitat position and changes in habitats over time, and was often faster than using a tape measure. For most spatial scales of interest, the precision and accuracy of DGPS data are adequate and have logistical advantages when compared to traditional methods of measurement. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media

  13. Accuracy, precision, and method detection limits of quantitative PCR for airborne bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Hospodsky, Denina; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Peccia, Jordan

    2010-11-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for rapid and specific enumeration of microbial agents is finding increased use in aerosol science. The goal of this study was to determine qPCR accuracy, precision, and method detection limits (MDLs) within the context of indoor and ambient aerosol samples. Escherichia coli and Bacillus atrophaeus vegetative bacterial cells and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores loaded onto aerosol filters were considered. Efficiencies associated with recovery of DNA from aerosol filters were low, and excluding these efficiencies in quantitative analysis led to underestimating the true aerosol concentration by 10 to 24 times. Precision near detection limits ranged from a 28% to 79% coefficient of variation (COV) for the three test organisms, and the majority of this variation was due to instrument repeatability. Depending on the organism and sampling filter material, precision results suggest that qPCR is useful for determining dissimilarity between two samples only if the true differences are greater than 1.3 to 3.2 times (95% confidence level at n = 7 replicates). For MDLs, qPCR was able to produce a positive response with 99% confidence from the DNA of five B. atrophaeus cells and less than one A. fumigatus spore. Overall MDL values that included sample processing efficiencies ranged from 2,000 to 3,000 B. atrophaeus cells per filter and 10 to 25 A. fumigatus spores per filter. Applying the concepts of accuracy, precision, and MDL to qPCR aerosol measurements demonstrates that sample processing efficiencies must be accounted for in order to accurately estimate bioaerosol exposure, provides guidance on the necessary statistical rigor required to understand significant differences among separate aerosol samples, and prevents undetected (i.e., nonquantifiable) values for true aerosol concentrations that may be significant.

  14. To address accuracy and precision using methods from analytical chemistry and computational physics.

    PubMed

    Kozmutza, Cornelia; Picó, Yolanda

    2009-04-01

    In this work the pesticides were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In present study the occurrence of imidacloprid in 343 samples of oranges, tangerines, date plum, and watermelons from Valencian Community (Spain) has been investigated. The nine additional pesticides were chosen as they have been recommended for orchard treatment together with imidacloprid. The Mulliken population analysis has been applied to present the charge distribution in imidacloprid. Partitioned energy terms and the virial ratios have been calculated for certain molecules entering in interaction. A new technique based on the comparison of the decomposed total energy terms at various configurations is demonstrated in this work. The interaction ability could be established correctly in the studied case. An attempt is also made in this work to address accuracy and precision. These quantities are well-known in experimental measurements. In case precise theoretical description is achieved for the contributing monomers and also for the interacting complex structure some properties of this latter system can be predicted to quite a good accuracy. Based on simple hypothetical considerations we estimate the impact of applying computations on reducing the amount of analytical work.

  15. Precision and accuracy of spectrophotometric pH measurements at environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Karoline; Schneider, Bernd; Kuliński, Karol; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2014-06-01

    The increasing uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans has raised an interest in precise and accurate pH measurement in order to assess the impact on the marine CO2-system. Spectrophotometric pH measurements were refined during the last decade yielding a precision and accuracy that cannot be achieved with the conventional potentiometric method. However, until now the method was only tested in oceanic systems with a relative stable and high salinity and a small pH range. This paper describes the first application of such a pH measurement system at conditions in the Baltic Sea which is characterized by a wide salinity and pH range. The performance of the spectrophotometric system at pH values as low as 7.0 (“total” scale) and salinities between 0 and 35 was examined using TRIS-buffer solutions, certified reference materials, and tests of consistency with measurements of other parameters of the marine CO2 system. Using m-cresol purple as indicator dye and a spectrophotometric measurement system designed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (B. Carter, A. Dickson), a precision better than ±0.001 and an accuracy between ±0.01 and ±0.02 was achieved within the observed pH and salinity ranges in the Baltic Sea. The influence of the indicator dye on the pH of the sample was determined theoretically and is presented as a pH correction term for the different alkalinity regimes in the Baltic Sea. Because of the encouraging tests, the ease of operation and the fact that the measurements refer to the internationally accepted “total” pH scale, it is recommended to use the spectrophotometric method also for pH monitoring and trend detection in the Baltic Sea.

  16. Improvement in precision, accuracy, and efficiency in sstandardizing the characterization of granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Jonathan R.; Shadle, Lawrence J.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Mei, Joseph; Guenther, Chris; Koepke, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Useful prediction of the kinematics, dynamics, and chemistry of a system relies on precision and accuracy in the quantification of component properties, operating mechanisms, and collected data. In an attempt to emphasize, rather than gloss over, the benefit of proper characterization to fundamental investigations of multiphase systems incorporating solid particles, a set of procedures were developed and implemented for the purpose of providing a revised methodology having the desirable attributes of reduced uncertainty, expanded relevance and detail, and higher throughput. Better, faster, cheaper characterization of multiphase systems result. Methodologies are presented to characterize particle size, shape, size distribution, density (particle, skeletal and bulk), minimum fluidization velocity, void fraction, particle porosity, and assignment within the Geldart Classification. A novel form of the Ergun equation was used to determine the bulk void fractions and particle density. Accuracy of properties-characterization methodology was validated on materials of known properties prior to testing materials of unknown properties. Several of the standard present-day techniques were scrutinized and improved upon where appropriate. Validity, accuracy, and repeatability were assessed for the procedures presented and deemed higher than present-day techniques. A database of over seventy materials has been developed to assist in model validation efforts and future desig

  17. Learning Linear Spatial-Numeric Associations Improves Accuracy of Memory for Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Clarissa A.; Opfer, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for numbers improves with age and experience. One potential source of improvement is a logarithmic-to-linear shift in children’s representations of magnitude. To test this, Kindergartners and second graders estimated the location of numbers on number lines and recalled numbers presented in vignettes (Study 1). Accuracy at number-line estimation predicted memory accuracy on a numerical recall task after controlling for the effect of age and ability to approximately order magnitudes (mapper status). To test more directly whether linear numeric magnitude representations caused improvements in memory, half of children were given feedback on their number-line estimates (Study 2). As expected, learning linear representations was again linked to memory for numerical information even after controlling for age and mapper status. These results suggest that linear representations of numerical magnitude may be a causal factor in development of numeric recall accuracy. PMID:26834688

  18. Hepatic perfusion in a tumor model using DCE-CT: an accuracy and precision study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Errol E.; Chen, Xiaogang; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2008-08-01

    In the current study we investigate the accuracy and precision of hepatic perfusion measurements based on the Johnson and Wilson model with the adiabatic approximation. VX2 carcinoma cells were implanted into the livers of New Zealand white rabbits. Simultaneous dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and radiolabeled microsphere studies were performed under steady-state normo-, hyper- and hypo-capnia. The hepatic arterial blood flows (HABF) obtained using both techniques were compared with ANOVA. The precision was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV). Under normo-capnia the microsphere HABF were 51.9 ± 4.2, 40.7 ± 4.9 and 99.7 ± 6.0 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 while DCE-CT HABF were 50.0 ± 5.7, 37.1 ± 4.5 and 99.8 ± 6.8 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 in normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. There were no significant differences between HABF measurements obtained with both techniques (P > 0.05). Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between HABF values from both techniques: slope of 0.92 ± 0.05, intercept of 4.62 ± 2.69 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 and R2 = 0.81 ± 0.05 (P < 0.05). The Bland-Altman plot comparing DCE-CT and microsphere HABF measurements gives a mean difference of -0.13 ml min-1 (100 g)-1, which is not significantly different from zero. DCE-CT HABF is precise, with CV of 5.7, 24.9 and 1.4% in the normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. Non-invasive measurement of HABF with DCE-CT is accurate and precise. DCE-CT can be an important extension of CT to assess hepatic function besides morphology in liver diseases.

  19. Accuracy improvement techniques in Precise Point Positioning method using multiple GNSS constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileios Psychas, Dimitrios; Delikaraoglou, Demitris

    2016-04-01

    The future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), including modernized GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou, offer three or more signal carriers for civilian use and much more redundant observables. The additional frequencies can significantly improve the capabilities of the traditional geodetic techniques based on GPS signals at two frequencies, especially with regard to the availability, accuracy, interoperability and integrity of high-precision GNSS applications. Furthermore, highly redundant measurements can allow for robust simultaneous estimation of static or mobile user states including more parameters such as real-time tropospheric biases and more reliable ambiguity resolution estimates. This paper presents an investigation and analysis of accuracy improvement techniques in the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method using signals from the fully operational (GPS and GLONASS), as well as the emerging (Galileo and BeiDou) GNSS systems. The main aim was to determine the improvement in both the positioning accuracy achieved and the time convergence it takes to achieve geodetic-level (10 cm or less) accuracy. To this end, freely available observation data from the recent Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service, as well as the open source program RTKLIB were used. Following a brief background of the PPP technique and the scope of MGEX, the paper outlines the various observational scenarios that were used in order to test various data processing aspects of PPP solutions with multi-frequency, multi-constellation GNSS systems. Results from the processing of multi-GNSS observation data from selected permanent MGEX stations are presented and useful conclusions and recommendations for further research are drawn. As shown, data fusion from GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou systems is becoming increasingly significant nowadays resulting in a position accuracy increase (mostly in the less favorable East direction) and a large reduction of convergence

  20. Slight pressure imbalances can affect accuracy and precision of dual inlet-based clumped isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Jens; Hofmann, Sven; Löffler, Niklas; Lüdecke, Tina; Methner, Katharina; Wacker, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that a subtle nonlinearity can occur during clumped isotope analysis of CO2 that - if remaining unaddressed - limits accuracy. The nonlinearity is induced by a negative background on the m/z 47 ion Faraday cup, whose magnitude is correlated with the intensity of the m/z 44 ion beam. The origin of the negative background remains unclear, but is possibly due to secondary electrons. Usually, CO2 gases of distinct bulk isotopic compositions are equilibrated at 1000 °C and measured along with the samples in order to be able to correct for this effect. Alternatively, measured m/z 47 beam intensities can be corrected for the contribution of secondary electrons after monitoring how the negative background on m/z 47 evolves with the intensity of the m/z 44 ion beam. The latter correction procedure seems to work well if the m/z 44 cup exhibits a wider slit width than the m/z 47 cup. Here we show that the negative m/z 47 background affects precision of dual inlet-based clumped isotope measurements of CO2 unless raw m/z 47 intensities are directly corrected for the contribution of secondary electrons. Moreover, inaccurate results can be obtained even if the heated gas approach is used to correct for the observed nonlinearity. The impact of the negative background on accuracy and precision arises from small imbalances in m/z 44 ion beam intensities between reference and sample CO2 measurements. It becomes the more significant the larger the relative contribution of secondary electrons to the m/z 47 signal is and the higher the flux rate of CO2 into the ion source is set. These problems can be overcome by correcting the measured m/z 47 ion beam intensities of sample and reference gas for the contributions deriving from secondary electrons after scaling these contributions to the intensities of the corresponding m/z 49 ion beams. Accuracy and precision of this correction are demonstrated by clumped isotope analysis of three internal carbonate standards. The

  1. Slight pressure imbalances can affect accuracy and precision of dual inlet-based clumped isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Jens; Hofmann, Sven; Löffler, Niklas; Lüdecke, Tina; Methner, Katharina; Wacker, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that a subtle nonlinearity can occur during clumped isotope analysis of CO2 that - if remaining unaddressed - limits accuracy. The nonlinearity is induced by a negative background on the m/z 47 ion Faraday cup, whose magnitude is correlated with the intensity of the m/z 44 ion beam. The origin of the negative background remains unclear, but is possibly due to secondary electrons. Usually, CO2 gases of distinct bulk isotopic compositions are equilibrated at 1000 °C and measured along with the samples in order to be able to correct for this effect. Alternatively, measured m/z 47 beam intensities can be corrected for the contribution of secondary electrons after monitoring how the negative background on m/z 47 evolves with the intensity of the m/z 44 ion beam. The latter correction procedure seems to work well if the m/z 44 cup exhibits a wider slit width than the m/z 47 cup. Here we show that the negative m/z 47 background affects precision of dual inlet-based clumped isotope measurements of CO2 unless raw m/z 47 intensities are directly corrected for the contribution of secondary electrons. Moreover, inaccurate results can be obtained even if the heated gas approach is used to correct for the observed nonlinearity. The impact of the negative background on accuracy and precision arises from small imbalances in m/z 44 ion beam intensities between reference and sample CO2 measurements. It becomes the more significant the larger the relative contribution of secondary electrons to the m/z 47 signal is and the higher the flux rate of CO2 into the ion source is set. These problems can be overcome by correcting the measured m/z 47 ion beam intensities of sample and reference gas for the contributions deriving from secondary electrons after scaling these contributions to the intensities of the corresponding m/z 49 ion beams. Accuracy and precision of this correction are demonstrated by clumped isotope analysis of three internal carbonate standards. The

  2. Estimated results analysis and application of the precise point positioning based high-accuracy ionosphere delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-tai; Peng, Jun-huan

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of ionosphere delay estimated with precise point positioning is analyzed in this paper. The estimation, interpolation and application of the ionosphere delay are studied based on the processing of 24-h data from 5 observation stations. The results show that the estimated ionosphere delay is affected by the hardware delay bias from receiver so that there is a difference between the estimated and interpolated results. The results also show that the RMSs (root mean squares) are bigger, while the STDs (standard deviations) are better than 0.11 m. When the satellite difference is used, the hardware delay bias can be canceled. The interpolated satellite-differenced ionosphere delay is better than 0.11 m. Although there is a difference between the between the estimated and interpolated ionosphere delay results it cannot affect its application in single-frequency positioning and the positioning accuracy can reach cm level.

  3. Precision and accuracy testing of FMCW ladar-based length metrology.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Ana Baselga; Barber, Zeb W

    2015-07-01

    The calibration and traceability of high-resolution frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) ladar sources is a requirement for their use in length and volume metrology. We report the calibration of FMCW ladar length measurement systems by use of spectroscopy of molecular frequency references HCN (C-band) or CO (L-band) to calibrate the chirp rate of the FMCW sources. Propagating the stated uncertainties from the molecular calibrations provided by NIST and measurement errors provide an estimated uncertainty of a few ppm for the FMCW system. As a test of this calibration, a displacement measurement interferometer with a laser wavelength close to that of our FMCW system was built to make comparisons of the relative precision and accuracy. The comparisons performed show <10  ppm agreement, which was within the combined estimated uncertainties of the FMCW system and interferometer. PMID:26193146

  4. Accuracy improvement of protrusion angle of carbon nanotube tips by precision multiaxis nanomanipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Young Song, Won; Young Jung, Ki; O, Beom-Hoan; Park, Byong Chon

    2005-02-01

    In order to manufacture a carbon nanotube (CNT) tip in which the attachment angle and position of CNT were precisely adjusted, a nanomanipulator was installed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A CNT tip, atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe to which a nanotube is attached, is known to be the most appropriate probe for measuring the shape of high aspect ratio. The developed nanomanipulator has two sets of modules with the degree of freedom of three-directional rectilinear motion and one-directional rotational motion at an accuracy of tens of nanometers, so it enables the manufacturing of more accurate CNT tips. The present study developed a CNT tip with the error of attachment angle less then 10 deg. through three-dimensional operation of a multiwalled carbon nanotube and an AFM probe inside a SEM.

  5. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    DOE PAGES

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence ofmore » a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.« less

  6. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence of a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.

  7. Accuracy and precision of estimating age of gray wolves by tooth wear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gipson, P.S.; Ballard, W.B.; Nowak, R.M.; Mech, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy and precision of tooth wear for aging gray wolves (Canis lupus) from Alaska, Minnesota, and Ontario based on 47 known-age or known-minimum-age skulls. Estimates of age using tooth wear and a commercial cementum annuli-aging service were useful for wolves up to 14 years old. The precision of estimates from cementum annuli was greater than estimates from tooth wear, but tooth wear estimates are more applicable in the field. We tended to overestimate age by 1-2 years and occasionally by 3 or 4 years. The commercial service aged young wolves with cementum annuli to within ?? 1 year of actual age, but under estimated ages of wolves ???9 years old by 1-3 years. No differences were detected in tooth wear patterns for wild wolves from Alaska, Minnesota, and Ontario, nor between captive and wild wolves. Tooth wear was not appropriate for aging wolves with an underbite that prevented normal wear or severely broken and missing teeth.

  8. Accuracy, Precision, and Reliability of Chemical Measurements in Natural Products Research

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Joseph M.; Brown, Paula N.; Roman, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products chemistry is the discipline that lies at the heart of modern pharmacognosy. The field encompasses qualitative and quantitative analytical tools that range from spectroscopy and spectrometry to chromatography. Among other things, modern research on crude botanicals is engaged in the discovery of the phytochemical constituents necessary for therapeutic efficacy, including the synergistic effects of components of complex mixtures in the botanical matrix. In the phytomedicine field, these botanicals and their contained mixtures are considered the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and pharmacognosists are increasingly called upon to supplement their molecular discovery work by assisting in the development and utilization of analytical tools for assessing the quality and safety of these products. Unlike single-chemical entity APIs, botanical raw materials and their derived products are highly variable because their chemistry and morphology depend on the genotypic and phenotypic variation, geographical origin and weather exposure, harvesting practices, and processing conditions of the source material. Unless controlled, this inherent variability in the raw material stream can result in inconsistent finished products that are under-potent, over-potent, and/or contaminated. Over the decades, natural products chemists have routinely developed quantitative analytical methods for phytochemicals of interest. Quantitative methods for the determination of product quality bear the weight of regulatory scrutiny. These methods must be accurate, precise, and reproducible. Accordingly, this review discusses the principles of accuracy (relationship between experimental and true value), precision (distribution of data values), and reliability in the quantitation of phytochemicals in natural products. PMID:20884340

  9. Transfer accuracy and precision scoring in planar bone cutting validated with ex vivo data.

    PubMed

    Milano, Federico Edgardo; Ritacco, Lucas Eduardo; Farfalli, Germán Luis; Bahamonde, Luis Alberto; Aponte-Tinao, Luis Alberto; Risk, Marcelo

    2015-05-01

    The use of interactive surgical scenarios for virtual preoperative planning of osteotomies has increased in the last 5 years. As it has been reported by several authors, this technology has been used in tumor resection osteotomies, knee osteotomies, and spine surgery with good results. A digital three-dimensional preoperative plan makes possible to quantitatively evaluate the transfer process from the virtual plan to the anatomy of the patient. We introduce an exact definition of accuracy and precision of this transfer process for planar bone cutting. We present a method to compute these properties from ex vivo data. We also propose a clinical score to assess the goodness of a cut. A computer simulation is used to characterize the definitions and the data generated by the measurement method. The definitions and method are evaluated in 17 ex vivo planar cuts of tumor resection osteotomies. The results show that the proposed method and definitions are highly correlated with a previous definition of accuracy based in ISO 1101. The score is also evaluated by showing that it distinguishes among different transfer techniques based in its distribution location and shape. The introduced definitions produce acceptable results in cases where the ISO-based definition produce counter intuitive results.

  10. Accuracy and precision of gait events derived from motion capture in horses during walk and trot.

    PubMed

    Boye, Jenny Katrine; Thomsen, Maj Halling; Pfau, Thilo; Olsen, Emil

    2014-03-21

    This study aimed to create an evidence base for detection of stance-phase timings from motion capture in horses. The objective was to compare the accuracy (bias) and precision (SD) for five published algorithms for the detection of hoof-on and hoof-off using force plates as the reference standard. Six horses were walked and trotted over eight force plates surrounded by a synchronised 12-camera infrared motion capture system. The five algorithms (A-E) were based on: (A) horizontal velocity of the hoof; (B) Fetlock angle and horizontal hoof velocity; (C) horizontal displacement of the hoof relative to the centre of mass; (D) horizontal velocity of the hoof relative to the Centre of Mass and; (E) vertical acceleration of the hoof. A total of 240 stance phases in walk and 240 stance phases in trot were included in the assessment. Method D provided the most accurate and precise results in walk for stance phase duration with a bias of 4.1% for front limbs and 4.8% for hind limbs. For trot we derived a combination of method A for hoof-on and method E for hoof-off resulting in a bias of -6.2% of stance in the front limbs and method B for the hind limbs with a bias of 3.8% of stance phase duration. We conclude that motion capture yields accurate and precise detection of gait events for horses walking and trotting over ground and the results emphasise a need for different algorithms for front limbs versus hind limbs in trot.

  11. Systematic accuracy and precision analysis of video motion capturing systems--exemplified on the Vicon-460 system.

    PubMed

    Windolf, Markus; Götzen, Nils; Morlock, Michael

    2008-08-28

    With rising demand on highly accurate acquisition of small motion the use of video-based motion capturing becomes more and more popular. However, the performance of these systems strongly depends on a variety of influencing factors. A method was developed in order to systematically assess accuracy and precision of motion capturing systems with regard to influential system parameters. A calibration and measurement robot was designed to perform a repeatable dynamic calibration and to determine the resultant system accuracy and precision in a control volume investigating small motion magnitudes (180 x 180 x 150 mm3). The procedure was exemplified on the Vicon-460 system. Following parameters were analyzed: Camera setup, calibration volume, marker size and lens filter application. Equipped with four cameras the Vicon-460 system provided an overall accuracy of 63+/-5 microm and overall precision (noise level) of 15 microm for the most favorable parameter setting. Arbitrary changes in camera arrangement revealed variations in mean accuracy between 76 and 129 microm. The noise level normal to the cameras' projection plane was found higher compared to the other coordinate directions. Measurements including regions unaffected by the dynamic calibration reflected considerably lower accuracy (221+/-79 microm). Lager marker diameters led to higher accuracy and precision. Accuracy dropped significantly when using an optical lens filter. This study revealed significant influence of the system environment on the performance of video-based motion capturing systems. With careful configuration, optical motion capturing provides a powerful measuring opportunity for the majority of biomechanical applications.

  12. Improving accuracy and precision in biological applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Wei

    The quantitative understanding of cellular and molecular responses in living cells is important for many reasons, including identifying potential molecular targets for treatments of diseases like cancer. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can quantitatively measure these responses in living cells by producing spatially resolved images of fluorophore lifetime, and has advantages over intensity-based measurements. However, in live-cell microscopy applications using high-intensity light sources such as lasers, maintaining biological viability remains critical. Although high-speed, time-gated FLIM significantly reduces light delivered to live cells, making measurements at low light levels remains a challenge affecting quantitative FLIM results. We can significantly improve both accuracy and precision in gated FLIM applications. We use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with fluorescent proteins to detect molecular interactions in living cells: the use of FLIM, better fluorophores, and temperature/CO2 controls can improve live-cell FRET results with higher consistency, better statistics, and less non-specific FRET (for negative control comparisons, p-value = 0.93 (physiological) vs. 9.43E-05 (non-physiological)). Several lifetime determination methods are investigated to optimize gating schemes. We demonstrate a reduction in relative standard deviation (RSD) from 52.57% to 18.93% with optimized gating in an example under typical experimental conditions. We develop two novel total variation (TV) image denoising algorithms, FWTV ( f-weighted TV) and UWTV (u-weighted TV), that can achieve significant improvements for real imaging systems. With live-cell images, they improve the precision of local lifetime determination without significantly altering the global mean lifetime values (<5% lifetime changes). Finally, by combining optimal gating and TV denoising, even low-light excitation can achieve precision better than that obtained in high

  13. A Linear Variable-[theta] Model for Measuring Individual Differences in Response Precision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.

    2011-01-01

    Models for measuring individual response precision have been proposed for binary and graded responses. However, more continuous formats are quite common in personality measurement and are usually analyzed with the linear factor analysis model. This study extends the general Gaussian person-fluctuation model to the continuous-response case and…

  14. Parallaxes and Proper Motions of QSOs: A Test of Astrometric Precision and Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Hugh C.; Dahn, Conard C.; Zacharias, Norbert; Canzian, Blaise; Guetter, Harry H.; Levine, Stephen E.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Monet, Alice K. B.; Monet, David G.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Stone, Ronald C.; Subasavage, John P.; Tilleman, Trudy; Walker, Richard L.; Johnston, Kenneth J.

    2016-11-01

    Optical astrometry of 12 fields containing quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) is presented. The targets are radio sources in the International Celestial Reference Frame with accurate radio positions that also have optical counterparts. The data are used to test several quantities: the internal precision of the relative optical astrometry, the relative parallaxes and proper motions, the procedures to correct from relative to absolute parallax and proper motion, the accuracy of the absolute parallaxes and proper motions, and the stability of the optical photocenters for these optically variable QSOs. For these 12 fields, the mean error in absolute parallax is 0.38 mas and the mean error in each coordinate of absolute proper motion is 1.1 mas yr‑1. The results yield a mean absolute parallax of ‑0.03 ± 0.11 mas. For 11 targets, we find no significant systematic motions of the photocenters at the level of 1–2 mas over the 10 years of this study; for one BL Lac object, we find a possible motion of 4 mas correlated with its brightness.

  15. 13 Years of TOPEX/POSEIDON Precision Orbit Determination and the 10-fold Improvement in Expected Orbit Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Klosko, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Launched in the summer of 1992, TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) was a joint mission between NASA and the Centre National d Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French Space Agency, to make precise radar altimeter measurements of the ocean surface. After the remarkably successful 13-years of mapping the ocean surface T/P lost its ability to maneuver and was de-commissioned January 2006. T/P revolutionized the study of the Earth s oceans by vastly exceeding pre-launch estimates of surface height accuracy recoverable from radar altimeter measurements. The precision orbit lies at the heart of the altimeter measurement providing the reference frame from which the radar altimeter measurements are made. The expected quality of orbit knowledge had limited the measurement accuracy expectations of past altimeter missions, and still remains a major component in the error budget of all altimeter missions. This paper describes critical improvements made to the T/P orbit time series over the 13-years of precise orbit determination (POD) provided by the GSFC Space Geodesy Laboratory. The POD improvements from the pre-launch T/P expectation of radial orbit accuracy and Mission requirement of 13-cm to an expected accuracy of about 1.5-cm with today s latest orbits will be discussed. The latest orbits with 1.5 cm RMS radial accuracy represent a significant improvement to the 2.0-cm accuracy orbits currently available on the T/P Geophysical Data Record (GDR) altimeter product.

  16. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Goodman, Joseph W.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy requirements of optical processors in adaptive optics systems are determined by estimating the required accuracy in a general optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) that results in a smaller average residual aberration than that achieved with a conventional electronic digital processor with some specific computation speed. Special attention is given to an error analysis of a general OLAP with regard to the residual aberration that is created in an adaptive mirror system by the inaccuracies of the processor, and to the effect of computational speed of an electronic processor on the correction. Results are presented on the ability of an OLAP to compete with a digital processor in various situations.

  17. Evaluation of Accuracy in Kinematic GPS Analyses Using a Precision Roving Antenna Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Sweeney, A.; Fujimoto, H.; Osaki, H.; Kawai, E.; Ichikawa, R.; Kondo, T.; Osada, Y.; Chadwell, C. D.

    2002-12-01

    Most tectonic plate boundaries and seismogenic zones of interplate earthquakes exist beneath the ocean and our knowledge on interplate coupling and on generation processes of those earthquakes remain limited. Seafloor geodesy will consequently play a very important role in improving our understanding of the physical process near plate boundaries. Seafloor positioning using a GPS/Acoustic technique is the one potential method to detect the displacement occurring at the ocean bottom. The accuracy of the technique depends on two parts: acoustic ranging in seawater, and kinematic GPS (KGPS) analysis. Accuracy of KGPS have evaluated with following way: 1) Static test: First, we carried out an experiment to confirm the capability of the KGPS analysis using GIPSY/OASIS-II for a long baseline of about 310 km. We used two GPS stations on land, one as a reference station in Sendai, and the other in Tokyo as a rover one, whose coordinate can vary from epoch to epoch. This baseline length is required for our project because the farthest seafloor transponder array is 280 km east of the nearest coastal GPS station. The 1 cm stability of the KGPS solution was achieved in the horizontal components of the 310-km baseline over the course of one day. The vertical component showed fluctuation probably due to parameters unmodeled in the analysis such as multipath and/or tropospheric delay. 2) Sea surface experiment: During cruise KT01-11 of the R/V Tansei-maru, Ocean Research Institute (ORI), University of Tokyo, around the Japan Trench in late July 2001, we deployed three precision acoustic transponders on both the Pacific plate (280 km from the coast, depth around 5450 m) and the landward slope (110 km from the coast, depth around 1600 m). We used a surface buoy with 3 GPS antennas, a motion sensor, a hydrophone, and a computer for data acquisition and control to make combined GPS/Acoustic observations. The buoy was towed about 80 m away from the R/V to reduce the impact of ship

  18. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures.

  19. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures. PMID:27610131

  20. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; He, Xu; Tian, Chuan; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures. PMID:27610131

  1. Precision and accuracy in the quantitative analysis of biological samples by accelerator mass spectrometry: application in microdose absolute bioavailability studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lan; Li, Jing; Kasserra, Claudia; Song, Qi; Arjomand, Ali; Hesk, David; Chowdhury, Swapan K

    2011-07-15

    Determination of the pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of an experimental compound, SCH 900518, following a 89.7 nCi (100 μg) intravenous (iv) dose of (14)C-SCH 900518 2 h post 200 mg oral administration of nonradiolabeled SCH 900518 to six healthy male subjects has been described. The plasma concentration of SCH 900518 was measured using a validated LC-MS/MS system, and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used for quantitative plasma (14)C-SCH 900518 concentration determination. Calibration standards and quality controls were included for every batch of sample analysis by AMS to ensure acceptable quality of the assay. Plasma (14)C-SCH 900518 concentrations were derived from the regression function established from the calibration standards, rather than directly from isotopic ratios from AMS measurement. The precision and accuracy of quality controls and calibration standards met the requirements of bioanalytical guidance (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Center for Veterinary Medicine. Guidance for Industry: Bioanalytical Method Validation (ucm070107), May 2001. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceCompilanceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm070107.pdf ). The AMS measurement had a linear response range from 0.0159 to 9.07 dpm/mL for plasma (14)C-SCH 900158 concentrations. The CV and accuracy were 3.4-8.5% and 94-108% (82-119% for the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ)), respectively, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The absolute bioavailability was calculated from the dose-normalized area under the curve of iv and oral doses after the plasma concentrations were plotted vs the sampling time post oral dose. The mean absolute bioavailability of SCH 900518 was 40.8% (range 16.8-60.6%). The typical accuracy and standard deviation in AMS quantitative analysis of drugs from human plasma samples have been reported for the first time, and the impact of these

  2. A high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor for finite element applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Taylor, B. K.

    1984-01-01

    Optical linear processors are computationally efficient computers for solving matrix-matrix and matrix-vector oriented problems. Optical system errors limit their dynamic range to 30-40 dB, which limits their accuray to 9-12 bits. Large problems, such as the finite element problem in structural mechanics (with tens or hundreds of thousands of variables) which can exploit the speed of optical processors, require the 32 bit accuracy obtainable from digital machines. To obtain this required 32 bit accuracy with an optical processor, the data can be digitally encoded, thereby reducing the dynamic range requirements of the optical system (i.e., decreasing the effect of optical errors on the data) while providing increased accuracy. This report describes a new digitally encoded optical linear algebra processor architecture for solving finite element and banded matrix-vector problems. A linear static plate bending case study is described which quantities the processor requirements. Multiplication by digital convolution is explained, and the digitally encoded optical processor architecture is advanced.

  3. Design of a high linearity and high gain accuracy analog baseband circuit for DAB receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ma; Zhigong, Wang; Jian, Xu; Yiqiang, Wu; Junliang, Wang; Mi, Tian; Jianping, Chen

    2015-02-01

    An analog baseband circuit of high linearity and high gain accuracy for a digital audio broadcasting receiver is implemented in a 0.18-μm RFCMOS process. The circuit comprises a 3rd-order active-RC complex filter (CF) and a programmable gain amplifier (PGA). An automatic tuning circuit is also designed to tune the CF's pass band. Instead of the class-A fully differential operational amplifier (FDOPA) adopted in the conventional CF and PGA design, a class-AB FDOPA is specially employed in this circuit to achieve a higher linearity and gain accuracy for its large current swing capability with lower static current consumption. In the PGA circuit, a novel DC offset cancellation technique based on the MOS resistor is introduced to reduce the settling time significantly. A reformative switching network is proposed, which can eliminate the switch resistor's influence on the gain accuracy of the PGA. The measurement result shows the gain range of the circuit is 10-50 dB with a 1-dB step size, and the gain accuracy is less than ±0.3 dB. The OIP3 is 23.3 dBm at the gain of 10 dB. Simulation results show that the settling time is reduced from 100 to 1 ms. The image band rejection is about 40 dB. It only draws 4.5 mA current from a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis for Characterizing the Accuracy and Precision of JEM/SMILES Mesospheric O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili Mahani, M.; Baron, P.; Kasai, Y.; Murata, I.; Kasaba, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the Superconducting sub-Millimeter Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) measurements of mesospheric ozone, O3. As the first step, the error due to the impact of Mesospheric Temperature Inversions (MTIs) on ozone retrieval has been determined. The impacts of other parameters such as pressure variability, solar events, and etc. on mesospheric O3 will also be investigated. Ozone, is known to be important due to the stratospheric O3 layer protection of life on Earth by absorbing harmful UV radiations. However, O3 chemistry can be studied purely in the mesosphere without distraction of heterogeneous situation and dynamical variations due to the short lifetime of O3 in this region. Mesospheric ozone is produced by the photo-dissociation of O2 and the subsequent reaction of O with O2. Diurnal and semi-diurnal variations of mesospheric ozone are associated with variations in solar activity. The amplitude of the diurnal variation increases from a few percent at an altitude of 50 km, to about 80 percent at 70 km. Although despite the apparent simplicity of this situation, significant disagreements exist between the predictions from the existing models and observations, which need to be resolved. SMILES is a highly sensitive radiometer with a few to several tens percent of precision from upper troposphere to the mesosphere. SMILES was developed by the Japanese Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) located at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES has successfully measured the vertical distributions and the diurnal variations of various atmospheric species in the latitude range of 38S to 65N from October 2009 to April 2010. A sensitivity analysis is being conducted to investigate the expected precision and accuracy of the mesospheric O3 profiles (from 50 to 90 km height) due to the impact of Mesospheric Temperature

  5. Accuracy and precision of polyurethane dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional subtractive rapid prototyping method with an intraoral scanning technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of polyurethane (PUT) dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional (3D) subtractive rapid prototyping (RP) method with an intraoral scanning technique by comparing linear measurements obtained from PUT models and conventional plaster models. Methods Ten plaster models were duplicated using a selected standard master model and conventional impression, and 10 PUT models were duplicated using the 3D subtractive RP technique with an oral scanner. Six linear measurements were evaluated in terms of x, y, and z-axes using a non-contact white light scanner. Accuracy was assessed using mean differences between two measurements, and precision was examined using four quantitative methods and the Bland-Altman graphical method. Repeatability was evaluated in terms of intra-examiner variability, and reproducibility was assessed in terms of inter-examiner and inter-method variability. Results The mean difference between plaster models and PUT models ranged from 0.07 mm to 0.33 mm. Relative measurement errors ranged from 2.2% to 7.6% and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.93 to 0.96, when comparing plaster models and PUT models. The Bland-Altman plot showed good agreement. Conclusions The accuracy and precision of PUT dental models for evaluating the performance of oral scanner and subtractive RP technology was acceptable. Because of the recent improvements in block material and computerized numeric control milling machines, the subtractive RP method may be a good choice for dental arch models. PMID:24696823

  6. Annular precision linear shaped charge flight termination system for the ODES program

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.; Marchi, D.L.

    1994-06-01

    The work for the development of an Annular Precision Linear Shaped Charge (APLSC) Flight Termination System (FTS) for the Operation and Deployment Experiment Simulator (ODES) program is discussed and presented in this report. The Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) concept was recently developed at Sandia. The APLSC component is designed to produce a copper jet to cut four inch diameter holes in each of two spherical tanks, one containing fuel and the other an oxidizer that are hyperbolic when mixed, to terminate the ODES vehicle flight if necessary. The FTS includes two detonators, six Mild Detonating Fuse (MDF) transfer lines, a detonator block, detonation transfer manifold, and the APLSC component. PLSCs have previously been designed in ring components where the jet penetrating axis is either directly away or toward the center of the ring assembly. Typically, these PLSC components are designed to cut metal cylinders from the outside inward or from the inside outward. The ODES program requires an annular linear shaped charge. The (Linear Shaped Charge Analysis) LESCA code was used to design this 65 grain/foot APLSC and data comparing the analytically predicted to experimental data are presented. Jet penetration data are presented to assess the maximum depth and reproducibility of the penetration. Data are presented for full scale tests, including all FTS components, and conducted with nominal 19 inch diameter, spherical tanks.

  7. Multi-mode sliding mode control for precision linear stage based on fixed or floating stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiwen; Long, Zhili; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Lufan; Dai, Xufei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the control performance of a linear motion stage driven by Voice Coil Motor (VCM). Unlike the conventional VCM, the stator of this VCM is regulated, which means it can be adjusted as a floating-stator or fixed-stator. A Multi-Mode Sliding Mode Control (MMSMC), including a conventional Sliding Mode Control (SMC) and an Integral Sliding Mode Control (ISMC), is designed to control the linear motion stage. The control is switched between SMC and IMSC based on the error threshold. To eliminate the chattering, a smooth function is adopted instead of a signum function. The experimental results with the floating stator show that the positioning accuracy and tracking performance of the linear motion stage are improved with the MMSMC approach.

  8. Non-Linear Filtering for Precise Point Positioning GPS/INS integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Rabbou, M.; El-Rabbany, A.

    2014-11-01

    This research investigates the performance of non-linear estimation filtering for GPS-PPP/MEMS-based inertial system. Although integrated GPS/INS system involves nonlinear motion state and measurement models, the most common estimation filter employed is extended Kalman filter. In this paper, both unscented Kalman filter and particle filter are developed and compared with extended Kalman filter. Tightly coupled mechanization is adopted, which is developed in the raw measurements domain. Un-differenced ionosphere-free linear combination of pseudorange and carrier-phase measurements is employed. The performance of the proposed non-linear filters is analyzed using real test scenario. The test results indicate that comparable accuracy-level are obtained from the proposed filters compared with extended Kalman filter in positioning, velocity and attitude when the measurement updates from GPS measurements are available.

  9. Multi-mode sliding mode control for precision linear stage based on fixed or floating stator.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiwen; Long, Zhili; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Lufan; Dai, Xufei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the control performance of a linear motion stage driven by Voice Coil Motor (VCM). Unlike the conventional VCM, the stator of this VCM is regulated, which means it can be adjusted as a floating-stator or fixed-stator. A Multi-Mode Sliding Mode Control (MMSMC), including a conventional Sliding Mode Control (SMC) and an Integral Sliding Mode Control (ISMC), is designed to control the linear motion stage. The control is switched between SMC and IMSC based on the error threshold. To eliminate the chattering, a smooth function is adopted instead of a signum function. The experimental results with the floating stator show that the positioning accuracy and tracking performance of the linear motion stage are improved with the MMSMC approach.

  10. Accuracy of linear measurement in the Galileos cone beam computed tomography under simulated clinical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R; Ruprecht, A; Vincent, S; Hellstein, J; Timmons, S; Qian, F

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the geometric accuracy of cone beam CT (CBCT)-based linear measurements of bone height obtained with the Galileos CBCT (Sirona Dental Systems Inc., Bensheim, Hessen, Germany) in the presence of soft tissues. Methods Six embalmed cadaver heads were imaged with the Galileos CBCT unit subsequent to placement of radiopaque fiduciary markers over the buccal and lingual cortical plates. Electronic linear measurements of bone height were obtained using the Sirona software. Physical measurements were obtained with digital calipers at the same location. This distance was compared on all six specimens bilaterally to determine accuracy of the image measurements. Results The findings showed no statistically significant difference between the imaging and physical measurements (P > 0.05) as determined by a paired sample t-test. The intraclass correlation was used to measure the intrarater reliability of repeated measures and there was no statistically significant difference between measurements performed at the same location (P > 0.05). Conclusions The Galileos CBCT image-based linear measurement between anatomical structures within the mandible in the presence of soft tissues is sufficiently accurate for clinical use. PMID:21697155

  11. Accuracy and precision of total mixed rations fed on commercial dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Sova, A D; LeBlanc, S J; McBride, B W; DeVries, T J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant time and effort spent formulating total mixed rations (TMR), it is evident that the ration delivered by the producer and that consumed by the cow may not accurately reflect that originally formulated. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how TMR fed agrees with or differs from TMR formulation (accuracy), (2) determine daily variability in physical and chemical characteristics of TMR delivered (precision), and (3) investigate the relationship between daily variability in ration characteristics and group-average measures of productivity [dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield, milk components, efficiency, and feed sorting] on commercial dairy farms. Twenty-two commercial freestall herds were visited for 7 consecutive days in both summer and winter months. Fresh and refusal feed samples were collected daily to assess particle size distribution, dry matter, and chemical composition. Milk test data, including yield, fat, and protein were collected from a coinciding Dairy Herd Improvement test. Multivariable mixed-effect regression models were used to analyze associations between productivity measures and daily ration variability, measured as coefficient of variation (CV) over 7d. The average TMR [crude protein=16.5%, net energy for lactation (NEL) = 1.7 Mcal/kg, nonfiber carbohydrates = 41.3%, total digestible nutrients = 73.3%, neutral detergent fiber=31.3%, acid detergent fiber=20.5%, Ca = 0.92%, p=0.42%, Mg = 0.35%, K = 1.45%, Na = 0.41%] delivered exceeded TMR formulation for NEL (+0.05 Mcal/kg), nonfiber carbohydrates (+1.2%), acid detergent fiber (+0.7%), Ca (+0.08%), P (+0.02%), Mg (+0.02%), and K (+0.04%) and underfed crude protein (-0.4%), neutral detergent fiber (-0.6%), and Na (-0.1%). Dietary measures with high day-to-day CV were average feed refusal rate (CV = 74%), percent long particles (CV = 16%), percent medium particles (CV = 7.7%), percent short particles (CV = 6.1%), percent fine particles (CV = 13%), Ca (CV = 7

  12. Development and testing of a high-precision high-stiffness linear actuator for the focus-center mechanism of the SOFIA secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Lorenzo; Schwab, Philippe; Gallieni, Daniele

    2000-06-01

    The SOFIA telescope chopping secondary mirror is mounted on a Focus Centering Mechanism. This system is a novel type of parallel manipulator (hexapod) made of six linear actuators which provide active alignment and focus of the chopper unit with respect to the top ring frame. We describe the development of the compact high-precision linear actuator used for this hexapod mechanism. The paper reports the test results measured on the actuator prototype proving its submicron position accuracy capability as well as its high stiffness and force. The prototype was designed to be largely representative of the flight unit ones currently in the construction phase.

  13. Integrated Analytic and Linearized Inverse Kinematics for Precise Full Body Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulic, Ronan; Raunhardt, Daniel

    Despite the large success of games grounded on movement-based interactions the current state of full body motion capture technologies still prevents the exploitation of precise interactions with complex environments. This paper focuses on ensuring a precise spatial correspondence between the user and the avatar. We build upon our past effort in human postural control with a Prioritized Inverse Kinematics framework. One of its key advantage is to ease the dynamic combination of postural and collision avoidance constraints. However its reliance on a linearized approximation of the problem makes it vulnerable to the well-known full extension singularity of the limbs. In such context the tracking performance is reduced and/or less believable intermediate postural solutions are produced. We address this issue by introducing a new type of analytic constraint that smoothly integrates within the prioritized Inverse Kinematics framework. The paper first recalls the background of full body 3D interactions and the advantages and drawbacks of the linearized IK solution. Then the Flexion-EXTension constraint (FLEXT in short) is introduced for the partial position control of limb-like articulated structures. Comparative results illustrate the interest of this new type of integrated analytical and linearized IK control.

  14. High-accuracy linear and circular polarization measurements at 21 cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, I.; Weiler, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    New high-accuracy linear and circular polarization measurements have been obtained for 27 small-diameter radio sources, using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at 21 cm (1415 MHz). From these and other observed properties of the sources, estimates of the average internal magnetic field strengths in the sources are made by applying the uniform synchrotron emission model to the measured circular polarization and by using equipartition arguments. These two values are compared and found to be in agreement to within an order of magnitude, as was previously found by Weiler and de Pater (1980). Also, the magnetic fields estimated from circular polarization measurements at two different wavelengths (49 and 21 cm) are compared and found to be in rough agreement, but with indications of differences between variable and nonvariable sources. A comparison of the magnitudes of linear and circular polarization in sources shows no correlations.

  15. Accuracy and precisions of water quality parameters retrieved from particle swarm optimisation in a sub-tropical lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Glenn; Phinn, Stuart R.

    2009-09-01

    Optical remote sensing has been used to map and monitor water quality parameters such as the concentrations of hydrosols (chlorophyll and other pigments, total suspended material, and coloured dissolved organic matter). In the inversion / optimisation approach a forward model is used to simulate the water reflectance spectra from a set of parameters and the set that gives the closest match is selected as the solution. The accuracy of the hydrosol retrieval is dependent on an efficient search of the solution space and the reliability of the similarity measure. In this paper the Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) was used to search the solution space and seven similarity measures were trialled. The accuracy and precision of this method depends on the inherent noise in the spectral bands of the sensor being employed, as well as the radiometric corrections applied to images to calculate the subsurface reflectance. Using the Hydrolight® radiative transfer model and typical hydrosol concentrations from Lake Wivenhoe, Australia, MERIS reflectance spectra were simulated. The accuracy and precision of hydrosol concentrations derived from each similarity measure were evaluated after errors associated with the air-water interface correction, atmospheric correction and the IOP measurement were modelled and applied to the simulated reflectance spectra. The use of band specific empirically estimated values for the anisotropy value in the forward model improved the accuracy of hydrosol retrieval. The results of this study will be used to improve an algorithm for the remote sensing of water quality for freshwater impoundments.

  16. Nano-accuracy measurements and the surface profiler by use of Monolithic Hollow Penta-Prism for precision mirror testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shinan; Wayne, Lewis; Idir, Mourad

    2014-09-01

    We developed a Monolithic Hollow Penta-Prism Long Trace Profiler-NOM (MHPP-LTP-NOM) to attain nano-accuracy in testing plane- and near-plane-mirrors. A new developed Monolithic Hollow Penta-Prism (MHPP) combined with the advantages of PPLTP and autocollimator ELCOMAT of the Nano-Optic-Measuring Machine (NOM) is used to enhance the accuracy and stability of our measurements. Our precise system-alignment method by using a newly developed CCD position-monitor system (PMS) assured significant thermal stability and, along with our optimized noise-reduction analytic method, ensured nano-accuracy measurements. Herein we report our tests results; all errors are about 60 nrad rms or less in tests of plane- and near-plane- mirrors.

  17. Simulations of thermally transferred OSL signals in quartz: Accuracy and precision of the protocols for equivalent dose evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Adamiec, Grzegorz; Athanassas, C.; Chen, Reuven; Baker, Atlee; Larsen, Meredith; Thompson, Zachary

    2011-06-01

    Thermally-transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) signals in sedimentary quartz have been the subject of several recent studies, due to the potential shown by these signals to increase the range of luminescence dating by an order of magnitude. Based on these signals, a single aliquot protocol termed the ReSAR protocol has been developed and tested experimentally. This paper presents extensive numerical simulations of this ReSAR protocol. The purpose of the simulations is to investigate several aspects of the ReSAR protocol which are believed to cause difficulties during application of the protocol. Furthermore, several modified versions of the ReSAR protocol are simulated, and their relative accuracy and precision are compared. The simulations are carried out using a recently published kinetic model for quartz, consisting of 11 energy levels. One hundred random variants of the natural samples were generated by keeping the transition probabilities between energy levels fixed, while allowing simultaneous random variations of the concentrations of the 11 energy levels. The relative intrinsic accuracy and precision of the protocols are simulated by calculating the equivalent dose (ED) within the model, for a given natural burial dose of the sample. The complete sequence of steps undertaken in several versions of the dating protocols is simulated. The relative intrinsic precision of these techniques is estimated by fitting Gaussian probability functions to the resulting simulated distribution of ED values. New simulations are presented for commonly used OSL sensitivity tests, consisting of successive cycles of sample irradiation with the same dose, followed by measurements of the sensitivity corrected L/T signals. We investigate several experimental factors which may be affecting both the intrinsic precision and intrinsic accuracy of the ReSAR protocol. The results of the simulation show that the four different published versions of the ReSAR protocol can

  18. Linear FMCW Laser Radar for Precision Range and Vector Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockhard, George; Rubio, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An all fiber linear frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) coherent laser radar system is under development with a goal to aide NASA s new Space Exploration initiative for manned and robotic missions to the Moon and Mars. By employing a combination of optical heterodyne and linear frequency modulation techniques and utilizing state-of-the-art fiber optic technologies, highly efficient, compact and reliable laser radar suitable for operation in a space environment is being developed. Linear FMCW lidar has the capability of high-resolution range measurements, and when configured into a multi-channel receiver system it has the capability of obtaining high precision horizontal and vertical velocity measurements. Precision range and vector velocity data are beneficial to navigating planetary landing pods to the preselected site and achieving autonomous, safe soft-landing. The all-fiber coherent laser radar has several important advantages over more conventional pulsed laser altimeters or range finders. One of the advantages of the coherent laser radar is its ability to measure directly the platform velocity by extracting the Doppler shift generated from the motion, as opposed to time of flight range finders where terrain features such as hills, cliffs, or slopes add error to the velocity measurement. Doppler measurements are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than the velocity estimates obtained by pulsed laser altimeters. In addition, most of the components of the device are efficient and reliable commercial off-the-shelf fiber optic telecommunication components. This paper discusses the design and performance of a second-generation brassboard system under development at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project.

  19. A high-precision Jacob's staff with improved spatial accuracy and laser sighting capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patacci, Marco

    2016-04-01

    A new Jacob's staff design incorporating a 3D positioning stage and a laser sighting stage is described. The first combines a compass and a circular spirit level on a movable bracket and the second introduces a laser able to slide vertically and rotate on a plane parallel to bedding. The new design allows greater precision in stratigraphic thickness measurement while restricting the cost and maintaining speed of measurement to levels similar to those of a traditional Jacob's staff. Greater precision is achieved as a result of: a) improved 3D positioning of the rod through the use of the integrated compass and spirit level holder; b) more accurate sighting of geological surfaces by tracing with height adjustable rotatable laser; c) reduced error when shifting the trace of the log laterally (i.e. away from the dip direction) within the trace of the laser plane, and d) improved measurement of bedding dip and direction necessary to orientate the Jacob's staff, using the rotatable laser. The new laser holder design can also be used to verify parallelism of a geological surface with structural dip by creating a visual planar datum in the field and thus allowing determination of surfaces which cut the bedding at an angle (e.g., clinoforms, levees, erosion surfaces, amalgamation surfaces, etc.). Stratigraphic thickness measurements and estimates of measurement uncertainty are valuable to many applications of sedimentology and stratigraphy at different scales (e.g., bed statistics, reconstruction of palaeotopographies, depositional processes at bed scale, architectural element analysis), especially when a quantitative approach is applied to the analysis of the data; the ability to collect larger data sets with improved precision will increase the quality of such studies.

  20. An investigation of the accuracy of finite difference methods in the solution of linear elasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    The accuracy of the finite difference method in the solution of linear elasticity problems that involve either a stress discontinuity or a stress singularity is considered. Solutions to three elasticity problems are discussed in detail: a semi-infinite plane subjected to a uniform load over a portion of its boundary; a bimetallic plate under uniform tensile stress; and a long, midplane symmetric, fiber reinforced laminate subjected to uniform axial strain. Finite difference solutions to the three problems are compared with finite element solutions to corresponding problems. For the first problem a comparison with the exact solution is also made. The finite difference formulations for the three problems are based on second order finite difference formulas that provide for variable spacings in two perpendicular directions. Forward and backward difference formulas are used near boundaries where their use eliminates the need for fictitious grid points.

  1. Influence of a high vacuum on the precise positioning using an ultrasonic linear motor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan-Soo; Lee, Dong-Jin; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the ultrasonic linear motor stage for use in a high vacuum environment. The slider table is driven by the hybrid bolt-clamped Langevin-type ultrasonic linear motor, which is excited with its different modes of natural frequencies in both lateral and longitudinal directions. In general, the friction behavior in a vacuum environment becomes different from that in an environment of atmospheric pressure and this difference significantly affects the performance of the ultrasonic linear motor. In this paper, to consistently provide stable and high power of output in a high vacuum, frequency matching was conducted. Moreover, to achieve the fine control performance in the vacuum environment, a modified nominal characteristic trajectory following control method was adopted. Finally, the stage was operated under high vacuum condition, and the operating performances were investigated compared with that of a conventional PI compensator. As a result, robustness of positioning was accomplished in a high vacuum condition with nanometer-level accuracy.

  2. Influence of a high vacuum on the precise positioning using an ultrasonic linear motor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wan-Soo; Lee, Dong-Jin; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2011-01-15

    This paper presents an investigation of the ultrasonic linear motor stage for use in a high vacuum environment. The slider table is driven by the hybrid bolt-clamped Langevin-type ultrasonic linear motor, which is excited with its different modes of natural frequencies in both lateral and longitudinal directions. In general, the friction behavior in a vacuum environment becomes different from that in an environment of atmospheric pressure and this difference significantly affects the performance of the ultrasonic linear motor. In this paper, to consistently provide stable and high power of output in a high vacuum, frequency matching was conducted. Moreover, to achieve the fine control performance in the vacuum environment, a modified nominal characteristic trajectory following control method was adopted. Finally, the stage was operated under high vacuum condition, and the operating performances were investigated compared with that of a conventional PI compensator. As a result, robustness of positioning was accomplished in a high vacuum condition with nanometer-level accuracy.

  3. Accuracy evaluation of the optical surface monitoring system on EDGE linear accelerator in a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Mancosu, Pietro; Fogliata, Antonella; Stravato, Antonella; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) requires dedicated systems to monitor the patient position during the treatment to avoid target underdosage due to involuntary shift. The optical surface monitoring system (OSMS) is here evaluated in a phantom-based study. The new EDGE linear accelerator from Varian (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) integrates, for cranial lesions, the common cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and kV-MV portal images to the optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), a device able to detect real-time patient׳s face movements in all 6 couch axes (vertical, longitudinal, lateral, rotation along the vertical axis, pitch, and roll). We have evaluated the OSMS imaging capability in checking the phantoms׳ position and monitoring its motion. With this aim, a home-made cranial phantom was developed to evaluate the OSMS accuracy in 4 different experiments: (1) comparison with CBCT in isocenter location, (2) capability to recognize predefined shifts up to 2° or 3cm, (3) evaluation at different couch angles, (4) ability to properly reconstruct the surface when the linac gantry visually block one of the cameras. The OSMS system showed, with a phantom, to be accurate for positioning in respect to the CBCT imaging system with differences of 0.6 ± 0.3mm for linear vector displacement, with a maximum rotational inaccuracy of 0.3°. OSMS presented an accuracy of 0.3mm for displacement up to 1cm and 1°, and 0.5mm for larger displacements. Different couch angles (45° and 90°) induced a mean vector uncertainty < 0.4mm. Coverage of 1 camera produced an uncertainty < 0.5mm. Translations and rotations of a phantom can be accurately detect with the optical surface detector system.

  4. Improving Precision and Accuracy of Isotope Ratios from Short Transient Laser Ablation-Multicollector-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Signals: Application to Micrometer-Size Uranium Particles.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Fanny; Hubert, Amélie; Berail, Sylvain; Donard, Ariane; Pointurier, Fabien; Pécheyran, Christophe

    2016-04-19

    The isotope drift encountered on short transient signals measured by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) is related to differences in detector time responses. Faraday to Faraday and Faraday to ion counter time lags were determined and corrected using VBA data processing based on the synchronization of the isotope signals. The coefficient of determination of the linear fit between the two isotopes was selected as the best criterion to obtain accurate detector time lag. The procedure was applied to the analysis by laser ablation-MC-ICPMS of micrometer sized uranium particles (1-3.5 μm). Linear regression slope (LRS) (one isotope plotted over the other), point-by-point, and integration methods were tested to calculate the (235)U/(238)U and (234)U/(238)U ratios. Relative internal precisions of 0.86 to 1.7% and 1.2 to 2.4% were obtained for (235)U/(238)U and (234)U/(238)U, respectively, using LRS calculation, time lag, and mass bias corrections. A relative external precision of 2.1% was obtained for (235)U/(238)U ratios with good accuracy (relative difference with respect to the reference value below 1%). PMID:27031645

  5. A method for the precision mass measurement of the stop quark at the international linear collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, A.; Milstene, C.; Schmitt, M.; Sopczak, A.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. Aurich; FNAL; Northwestern Univ.; Lancaster Univ.

    2008-09-16

    Many supersymmetric models predict new particles within the reach of the next generation of colliders. For an understanding of the model structure and the mechanism(s) of symmetry breaking, it is important to know the masses of the new particles precisely. In this article the measurement of the mass of the scalar partner of the top quark (stop) at an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is studied. A relatively light stop is motivated by attempts to explain electroweak baryogenesis and can play an important role in dark matter relic density. A method is presented which makes use of cross-section measurements near the pair-production threshold as well as at higher center-of-mass energies. It is shown that this method not only increases the statistical precision, but also greatly reduces the systematic uncertainties, which can be important. Numerical results are presented, based on a realistic event simulation, for two signal selection strategies: using conventional selection cuts, and using an Iterative Discriminant Analysis (IDA). Our studies indicate that a precision of {Delta}m{tilde t}{sub 1} = 0.42 GeV can be achieved, representing a major improvement over previous studies. While the analysis of stops is particularly challenging due to the possibility of stop hadronization, the general procedure could be applied to the mass measurement of other particles as well. We also comment on the potential of the IDA to discover a stop quark in this scenario, and we revisit the accuracy of the theoretical predictions for the neutralino relic density.

  6. A Method for the Precision Mass Measurement of the Stop Quark at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ayres; Milstene, Caroline; Schmitt, Michael; Sopczak, Andre; /Lancaster U.

    2007-12-01

    Many supersymmetric models predict new particles within the reach of the next generation of colliders. For an understanding of the model structure and the mechanism(s) of symmetry breaking, it is important to know the masses of the new particles precisely. In this article the measurement of the mass of the scalar partner of the top quark (stop) at an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is studied. A relatively light stop is motivated by attempts to explain electroweak baryogenesis and can play an important role in dark matter relic density. A method is presented which makes use of cross-section measurements near the pair-production threshold as well as at higher center-of-mass energies. It is shown that this method not only increases the statistical precision, but also greatly reduces the systematic uncertainties, which can be important. numerical results are presented, based on a realistic event simulation, for two signal selection strategies: using conventional selection cuts, and using an Iterative Discriminant Analysis (IDA). The studies indicate that a precision of {Delta}m{sub {bar t}{sub 1}} = 0.42 GeV can be achieved, representing a major improvement over previous studies. While the analysis of stops is particularly challenging due to the possibility of stop hadronization, the general procedure could be applied to the mass measurement of other particles as well. They also comment on the potential of the IDA to discover a stop quark in this scenario, and they revisit the accuracy of the theoretical predictions for the neutralino relic density.

  7. Note: electronic circuit for two-way time transfer via a single coaxial cable with picosecond accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Panek, Petr

    2012-11-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested the overall performance of the electronic circuit for the two-way time transfer between two timing devices over modest distances with sub-picosecond precision and a systematic error of a few picoseconds. The concept of the electronic circuit enables to carry out time tagging of pulses of interest in parallel to the comparison of the time scales of these timing devices. The key timing parameters of the circuit are: temperature change of the delay is below 100 fs/K, timing stability time deviation better than 8 fs for averaging time from minutes to hours, sub-picosecond time transfer precision, and a few picoseconds time transfer accuracy.

  8. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Noz, Marilyn E.; Zeleznik, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  9. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Brodén, Cyrus; Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  10. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  11. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Accuracy of Four Impression Techniques using Polyether Impression Material.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Smita Sara; Cherian, K P; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena

    2013-12-01

    There is much discussion in the dental literature regarding the superiority of one impression technique over the other using addition silicone impression material. However, there is inadequate information available on the accuracy of different impression techniques using polyether. The purpose of this study was to assess the linear dimensional accuracy of four impression techniques using polyether on a laboratory model that simulates clinical practice. The impression material used was Impregum Soft™, 3 M ESPE and the four impression techniques used were (1) Monophase impression technique using medium body impression material. (2) One step double mix impression technique using heavy body and light body impression materials simultaneously. (3) Two step double mix impression technique using a cellophane spacer (heavy body material used as a preliminary impression to create a wash space with a cellophane spacer, followed by the use of light body material). (4) Matrix impression using a matrix of polyether occlusal registration material. The matrix is loaded with heavy body material followed by a pick-up impression in medium body material. For each technique, thirty impressions were made of a stainless steel master model that contained three complete crown abutment preparations, which were used as the positive control. Accuracy was assessed by measuring eight dimensions (mesiodistal, faciolingual and inter-abutment) on stone dies poured from impressions of the master model. A two-tailed t test was carried out to test the significance in difference of the distances between the master model and the stone models. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparison followed by the Bonferroni's test for pair wise comparison. The accuracy was tested at α = 0.05. In general, polyether impression material produced stone dies that were smaller except for the dies produced from the one step double mix impression technique. The ANOVA revealed a highly

  12. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Accuracy of Four Impression Techniques using Polyether Impression Material.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Smita Sara; Cherian, K P; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena

    2013-12-01

    There is much discussion in the dental literature regarding the superiority of one impression technique over the other using addition silicone impression material. However, there is inadequate information available on the accuracy of different impression techniques using polyether. The purpose of this study was to assess the linear dimensional accuracy of four impression techniques using polyether on a laboratory model that simulates clinical practice. The impression material used was Impregum Soft™, 3 M ESPE and the four impression techniques used were (1) Monophase impression technique using medium body impression material. (2) One step double mix impression technique using heavy body and light body impression materials simultaneously. (3) Two step double mix impression technique using a cellophane spacer (heavy body material used as a preliminary impression to create a wash space with a cellophane spacer, followed by the use of light body material). (4) Matrix impression using a matrix of polyether occlusal registration material. The matrix is loaded with heavy body material followed by a pick-up impression in medium body material. For each technique, thirty impressions were made of a stainless steel master model that contained three complete crown abutment preparations, which were used as the positive control. Accuracy was assessed by measuring eight dimensions (mesiodistal, faciolingual and inter-abutment) on stone dies poured from impressions of the master model. A two-tailed t test was carried out to test the significance in difference of the distances between the master model and the stone models. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparison followed by the Bonferroni's test for pair wise comparison. The accuracy was tested at α = 0.05. In general, polyether impression material produced stone dies that were smaller except for the dies produced from the one step double mix impression technique. The ANOVA revealed a highly

  13. A low noise and high precision linear power supply with thermal foldback protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2016-05-01

    A low noise and high precision linear power supply was designed for use in rare event search experiments with macrobolometers. The circuit accepts at the input a "noisy" dual supply voltage up to ±15 V and gives at the output precise, low noise, and stable voltages that can be set between ±3.75 V and ±12.5 V in eight 1.25 V steps. Particular care in circuit design, component selection, and proper filtering results in a noise spectral density of 50 nV / √{ Hz } at 1 Hz and 20 nV / √{ Hz } white when the output is set to ±5 V. This corresponds to 125 nV RMS (0.8 μV peak to peak) between 0.1 Hz and 10 Hz, and 240 nV RMS (1.6 μV peak to peak) between 0.1 Hz and 100 Hz. The power supply rejection ratio (PSRR) of the circuit is 100 dB at low frequency, and larger than 40 dB up to high frequency, thanks to a proper compensation design. Calibration allows to reach a precision in the absolute value of the output voltage of ±70 ppm, or ±350 μV at ±5 V, and to reduce thermal drifts below ±1 ppm/∘C in the expected operating range. The maximum peak output current is about 6 A from each output. An original foldback protection scheme was developed that dynamically limits the maximum output current to keep the temperature of the output transistors within their safe operating range. An add-on card based on an ARM Cortex-M3 microcontroller is devoted to the monitoring and control of all circuit functionalities and provides remote communication via CAN bus.

  14. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As research laboratories and clinics collaborate to achieve precision medicine, both communities are required to understand mandated electronic health/medical record (EHR/EMR) initiatives that will be fully implemented in all clinics in the United States by 2015. Stakeholders will need to evaluate current record keeping practices and optimize and standardize methodologies to capture nearly all information in digital format. Collaborative efforts from academic and industry sectors are crucial to achieving higher efficacy in patient care while minimizing costs. Currently existing digitized data and information are present in multiple formats and are largely unstructured. In the absence of a universally accepted management system, departments and institutions continue to generate silos of information. As a result, invaluable and newly discovered knowledge is difficult to access. To accelerate biomedical research and reduce healthcare costs, clinical and bioinformatics systems must employ common data elements to create structured annotation forms enabling laboratories and clinics to capture sharable data in real time. Conversion of these datasets to knowable information should be a routine institutionalized process. New scientific knowledge and clinical discoveries can be shared via integrated knowledge environments defined by flexible data models and extensive use of standards, ontologies, vocabularies, and thesauri. In the clinical setting, aggregated knowledge must be displayed in user-friendly formats so that physicians, non-technical laboratory personnel, nurses, data/research coordinators, and end-users can enter data, access information, and understand the output. The effort to connect astronomical numbers of data points, including '-omics'-based molecular data, individual genome sequences, experimental data, patient clinical phenotypes, and follow-up data is a monumental task. Roadblocks to this vision of integration and interoperability include ethical, legal

  15. Precise and Continuous Time and Frequency Synchronisation at the 5×10-19 Accuracy Level

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B.; Gao, C.; Chen, W. L.; Miao, J.; Zhu, X.; Bai, Y.; Zhang, J. W.; Feng, Y. Y.; Li, T. C.; Wang, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    The synchronisation of time and frequency between remote locations is crucial for many important applications. Conventional time and frequency dissemination often makes use of satellite links. Recently, the communication fibre network has become an attractive option for long-distance time and frequency dissemination. Here, we demonstrate accurate frequency transfer and time synchronisation via an 80 km fibre link between Tsinghua University (THU) and the National Institute of Metrology of China (NIM). Using a 9.1 GHz microwave modulation and a timing signal carried by two continuous-wave lasers and transferred across the same 80 km urban fibre link, frequency transfer stability at the level of 5×10−19/day was achieved. Time synchronisation at the 50 ps precision level was also demonstrated. The system is reliable and has operated continuously for several months. We further discuss the feasibility of using such frequency and time transfer over 1000 km and its applications to long-baseline radio astronomy. PMID:22870385

  16. Pupil size dynamics during fixation impact the accuracy and precision of video-based gaze estimation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kyoung Whan; Blake, Randolph; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Video-based eye tracking relies on locating pupil center to measure gaze positions. Although widely used, the technique is known to generate spurious gaze position shifts up to several degrees in visual angle because pupil centration can change without eye movement during pupil constriction or dilation. Since pupil size can fluctuate markedly from moment to moment, reflecting arousal state and cognitive processing during human behavioral and neuroimaging experiments, the pupil size artifact is prevalent and thus weakens the quality of the video-based eye tracking measurements reliant on small fixational eye movements. Moreover, the artifact may lead to erroneous conclusions if the spurious signal is taken as an actual eye movement. Here, we measured pupil size and gaze position from 23 human observers performing a fixation task and examined the relationship between these two measures. Results disclosed that the pupils contracted as fixation was prolonged, at both small (<16s) and large (∼4min) time scales, and these pupil contractions were accompanied by systematic errors in gaze position estimation, in both the ellipse and the centroid methods of pupil tracking. When pupil size was regressed out, the accuracy and reliability of gaze position measurements were substantially improved, enabling differentiation of 0.1° difference in eye position. We confirmed the presence of systematic changes in pupil size, again at both small and large scales, and its tight relationship with gaze position estimates when observers were engaged in a demanding visual discrimination task.

  17. Pupil size dynamics during fixation impact the accuracy and precision of video-based gaze estimation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kyoung Whan; Blake, Randolph; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Video-based eye tracking relies on locating pupil center to measure gaze positions. Although widely used, the technique is known to generate spurious gaze position shifts up to several degrees in visual angle because pupil centration can change without eye movement during pupil constriction or dilation. Since pupil size can fluctuate markedly from moment to moment, reflecting arousal state and cognitive processing during human behavioral and neuroimaging experiments, the pupil size artifact is prevalent and thus weakens the quality of the video-based eye tracking measurements reliant on small fixational eye movements. Moreover, the artifact may lead to erroneous conclusions if the spurious signal is taken as an actual eye movement. Here, we measured pupil size and gaze position from 23 human observers performing a fixation task and examined the relationship between these two measures. Results disclosed that the pupils contracted as fixation was prolonged, at both small (<16s) and large (∼4min) time scales, and these pupil contractions were accompanied by systematic errors in gaze position estimation, in both the ellipse and the centroid methods of pupil tracking. When pupil size was regressed out, the accuracy and reliability of gaze position measurements were substantially improved, enabling differentiation of 0.1° difference in eye position. We confirmed the presence of systematic changes in pupil size, again at both small and large scales, and its tight relationship with gaze position estimates when observers were engaged in a demanding visual discrimination task. PMID:25578924

  18. Accuracy and precision of cone beam computed tomography in periodontal defects measurement (systematic review).

    PubMed

    Anter, Enas; Zayet, Mohammed Khalifa; El-Dessouky, Sahar Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of literature was made to assess the extent of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for measurement of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect. A systematic search of PubMed electronic database and a hand search of open access journals (from 2000 to 2015) yielded abstracts that were potentially relevant. The original articles were then retrieved and their references were hand searched for possible missing articles. Only articles that met the selection criteria were included and criticized. The initial screening revealed 47 potentially relevant articles, of which only 14 have met the selection criteria; their CBCT average measurements error ranged from 0.19 mm to 1.27 mm; however, no valid meta-analysis could be made due to the high heterogeneity between the included studies. Under the limitation of the number and strength of the available studies, we concluded that CBCT provides an assessment of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect with a minimum reported mean measurements error of 0.19 ± 0.11 mm and a maximum reported mean measurements error of 1.27 ± 1.43 mm, and there is no agreement between the studies regarding the direction of the deviation whether over or underestimation. However, we should emphasize that the evidence to this data is not strong. PMID:27563194

  19. A simple device for high-precision head image registration: Preliminary performance and accuracy tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pallotta, Stefania

    2007-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new device for multimodal head study registration and to examine its performance in preliminary tests. The device consists of a system of eight markers fixed to mobile carbon pipes and bars which can be easily mounted on the patient's head using the ear canals and the nasal bridge. Four graduated scales fixed to the rigid support allow examiners to find the same device position on the patient's head during different acquisitions. The markers can be filled with appropriate substances for visualisation in computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance, single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography images. The device's rigidity and its position reproducibility were measured in 15 repeated CT acquisitions of the Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom and in two SPECT studies of a patient. The proposed system displays good rigidity and reproducibility characteristics. A relocation accuracy of less than 1,5 mm was found in more than 90% of the results. The registration parameters obtained using such a device were compared to those obtained using fiducial markers fixed on phantom and patient heads, resulting in differences of less than 1 deg. and 1 mm for rotation and translation parameters, respectively. Residual differences between fiducial marker coordinates in reference and in registered studies were less than 1 mm in more than 90% of the results, proving that the device performed as accurately as noninvasive stereotactic devices. Finally, an example of multimodal employment of the proposed device is reported.

  20. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms. PMID:27686111

  1. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms.

  2. Accuracy and precision of cone beam computed tomography in periodontal defects measurement (systematic review)

    PubMed Central

    Anter, Enas; Zayet, Mohammed Khalifa; El-Dessouky, Sahar Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of literature was made to assess the extent of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for measurement of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect. A systematic search of PubMed electronic database and a hand search of open access journals (from 2000 to 2015) yielded abstracts that were potentially relevant. The original articles were then retrieved and their references were hand searched for possible missing articles. Only articles that met the selection criteria were included and criticized. The initial screening revealed 47 potentially relevant articles, of which only 14 have met the selection criteria; their CBCT average measurements error ranged from 0.19 mm to 1.27 mm; however, no valid meta-analysis could be made due to the high heterogeneity between the included studies. Under the limitation of the number and strength of the available studies, we concluded that CBCT provides an assessment of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect with a minimum reported mean measurements error of 0.19 ± 0.11 mm and a maximum reported mean measurements error of 1.27 ± 1.43 mm, and there is no agreement between the studies regarding the direction of the deviation whether over or underestimation. However, we should emphasize that the evidence to this data is not strong. PMID:27563194

  3. Accuracy and precision of cone beam computed tomography in periodontal defects measurement (systematic review).

    PubMed

    Anter, Enas; Zayet, Mohammed Khalifa; El-Dessouky, Sahar Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of literature was made to assess the extent of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for measurement of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect. A systematic search of PubMed electronic database and a hand search of open access journals (from 2000 to 2015) yielded abstracts that were potentially relevant. The original articles were then retrieved and their references were hand searched for possible missing articles. Only articles that met the selection criteria were included and criticized. The initial screening revealed 47 potentially relevant articles, of which only 14 have met the selection criteria; their CBCT average measurements error ranged from 0.19 mm to 1.27 mm; however, no valid meta-analysis could be made due to the high heterogeneity between the included studies. Under the limitation of the number and strength of the available studies, we concluded that CBCT provides an assessment of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect with a minimum reported mean measurements error of 0.19 ± 0.11 mm and a maximum reported mean measurements error of 1.27 ± 1.43 mm, and there is no agreement between the studies regarding the direction of the deviation whether over or underestimation. However, we should emphasize that the evidence to this data is not strong.

  4. A Method of Determining Accuracy and Precision for Dosimeter Systems Using Accreditation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Cummings and John Flood

    2010-12-01

    A study of the uncertainty of dosimeter results is required by the national accreditation programs for each dosimeter model for which accreditation is sought. Typically, the methods used to determine uncertainty have included the partial differentiation method described in the U.S. Guide to Uncertainty in Measurements or the use of Monte Carlo techniques and probability distribution functions to generate simulated dose results. Each of these techniques has particular strengths and should be employed when the areas of uncertainty are required to be understood in detail. However, the uncertainty of dosimeter results can also be determined using a Model II One-Way Analysis of Variance technique and accreditation testing data. The strengths of the technique include (1) the method is straightforward and the data are provided under accreditation testing and (2) the method provides additional data for the analysis of long-term uncertainty using Statistical Process Control (SPC) techniques. The use of SPC to compare variances and standard deviations over time is described well in other areas and is not discussed in detail in this paper. The application of Analysis of Variance to historic testing data indicated that the accuracy in a representative dosimetry system (Panasonic® Model UD-802) was 8.2%, 5.1%, and 4.8% and the expanded uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were 10.7%, 14.9%, and 15.2% for the Accident, Protection Level-Shallow, and Protection Level-Deep test categories in the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program, respectively. The 95% level of confidence ranges were (0.98 to 1.19), (0.90 to 1.20), and (0.90 to 1.20) for the three groupings of test categories, respectively.

  5. A method of determining accuracy and precision for dosimeter systems using accreditation data.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Frederick; Flood, John R

    2010-12-01

    A study of the uncertainty of dosimeter results is required by the national accreditation programs for each dosimeter model for which accreditation is sought. Typically, the methods used to determine uncertainty have included the partial differentiation method described in the U.S. Guide to Uncertainty in Measurements or the use of Monte Carlo techniques and probability distribution functions to generate simulated dose results. Each of these techniques has particular strengths and should be employed when the areas of uncertainty are required to be understood in detail. However, the uncertainty of dosimeter results can also be determined using a Model II One-Way Analysis of Variance technique and accreditation testing data. The strengths of the technique include (1) the method is straightforward and the data are provided under accreditation testing and (2) the method provides additional data for the analysis of long-term uncertainty using Statistical Process Control (SPC) techniques. The use of SPC to compare variances and standard deviations over time is described well in other areas and is not discussed in detail in this paper. The application of Analysis of Variance to historic testing data indicated that the accuracy in a representative dosimetry system (Panasonic® Model UD-802) was 8.2%, 5.1%, and 4.8% and the expanded uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were 10.7%, 14.9%, and 15.2% for the Accident, Protection Level-Shallow, and Protection Level-Deep test categories in the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program, respectively. The 95% level of confidence ranges were (0.98 to 1.19), (0.90 to 1.20), and (0.90 to 1.20) for the three groupings of test categories, respectively. PMID:21068596

  6. Accuracy and Precision of Equine Gait Event Detection during Walking with Limb and Trunk Mounted Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Emil; Andersen, Pia Haubro; Pfau, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    The increased variations of temporal gait events when pathology is present are good candidate features for objective diagnostic tests. We hypothesised that the gait events hoof-on/off and stance can be detected accurately and precisely using features from trunk and distal limb-mounted Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). Four IMUs were mounted on the distal limb and five IMUs were attached to the skin over the dorsal spinous processes at the withers, fourth lumbar vertebrae and sacrum as well as left and right tuber coxae. IMU data were synchronised to a force plate array and a motion capture system. Accuracy (bias) and precision (SD of bias) was calculated to compare force plate and IMU timings for gait events. Data were collected from seven horses. One hundred and twenty three (123) front limb steps were analysed; hoof-on was detected with a bias (SD) of −7 (23) ms, hoof-off with 0.7 (37) ms and front limb stance with −0.02 (37) ms. A total of 119 hind limb steps were analysed; hoof-on was found with a bias (SD) of −4 (25) ms, hoof-off with 6 (21) ms and hind limb stance with 0.2 (28) ms. IMUs mounted on the distal limbs and sacrum can detect gait events accurately and precisely. PMID:22969392

  7. Pseudo-inverse linear discriminants for the improvement of overall classification accuracies.

    PubMed

    Daqi, Gao; Ahmed, Dastagir; Lili, Guo; Zejian, Wang; Zhe, Wang

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the learning and generalization performances of pseudo-inverse linear discriminant (PILDs) based on the processing minimum sum-of-squared error (MS(2)E) and the targeting overall classification accuracy (OCA) criterion functions. There is little practicable significance to prove the equivalency between a PILD with the desired outputs in reverse proportion to the number of class samples and an FLD with the totally projected mean thresholds. When the desired outputs of each class are assigned a fixed value, a PILD is partly equal to an FLD. With the customarily desired outputs {1, -1}, a practicable threshold is acquired, which is only related to sample sizes. If the desired outputs of each sample are changeable, a PILD has nothing in common with an FLD. The optimal threshold may thus be singled out from multiple empirical ones related to sizes and distributed regions. Depending upon the processing MS(2)E criteria and the actually algebraic distances, an iterative learning strategy of PILD is proposed, the outstanding advantages of which are with limited epoch, without learning rate and divergent risk. Enormous experimental results for the benchmark datasets have verified that the iterative PILDs with optimal thresholds have good learning and generalization performances, and even reach the top OCAs for some datasets among the existing classifiers.

  8. Assessment of Completeness and Positional Accuracy of Linear Features in Volunteered Geographic Information (vgi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghi, M.; Alesheikh, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in spatial data collection technologies and online services dramatically increase the contribution of ordinary people to produce, share, and use geographic information. Collecting spatial data as well as disseminating them on the internet by citizens has led to a huge source of spatial data termed as Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) by Mike Goodchild. Although, VGI has produced previously unavailable data assets, and enriched existing ones. But its quality can be highly variable and challengeable. This presents several challenges to potential end users who are concerned about the validation and the quality assurance of the data which are collected. Almost, all the existing researches are based on how to find accurate VGI data from existing VGI data which consist of a) comparing the VGI data with the accurate official data, or b) in cases that there is no access to correct data; therefore, looking for an alternative way to determine the quality of VGI data is essential, and so forth. In this paper it has been attempt to develop a useful method to reach this goal. In this process, the positional accuracy of linear feature of Iran, Tehran OSM data have been analyzed.

  9. Accuracy, Precision, Ease-Of-Use, and Cost of Methods to Test Ebola-Relevant Chlorine Solutions.

    PubMed

    Wells, Emma; Wolfe, Marlene K; Murray, Anna; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    To prevent transmission in Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is recommended to disinfect living things (hands and people) with 0.05% chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% chlorine solution. In the current West African EVD outbreak, these solutions (manufactured from calcium hypochlorite (HTH), sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)) have been widely used in both Ebola Treatment Unit and community settings. To ensure solution quality, testing is necessary, however test method appropriateness for these Ebola-relevant concentrations has not previously been evaluated. We identified fourteen commercially-available methods to test Ebola-relevant chlorine solution concentrations, including two titration methods, four DPD dilution methods, and six test strips. We assessed these methods by: 1) determining accuracy and precision by measuring in quintuplicate five different 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions manufactured from NaDCC, HTH, and NaOCl; 2) conducting volunteer testing to assess ease-of-use; and, 3) determining costs. Accuracy was greatest in titration methods (reference-12.4% error compared to reference method), then DPD dilution methods (2.4-19% error), then test strips (5.2-48% error); precision followed this same trend. Two methods had an accuracy of <10% error across all five chlorine solutions with good precision: Hach digital titration for 0.05% and 0.5% solutions (recommended for contexts with trained personnel and financial resources), and Serim test strips for 0.05% solutions (recommended for contexts where rapid, inexpensive, and low-training burden testing is needed). Measurement error from test methods not including pH adjustment varied significantly across the five chlorine solutions, which had pH values 5-11. Volunteers found test strip easiest and titration hardest; costs per 100 tests were $14-37 for test strips and $33-609 for titration. Given the

  10. Accuracy, Precision, Ease-Of-Use, and Cost of Methods to Test Ebola-Relevant Chlorine Solutions.

    PubMed

    Wells, Emma; Wolfe, Marlene K; Murray, Anna; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    To prevent transmission in Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is recommended to disinfect living things (hands and people) with 0.05% chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% chlorine solution. In the current West African EVD outbreak, these solutions (manufactured from calcium hypochlorite (HTH), sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)) have been widely used in both Ebola Treatment Unit and community settings. To ensure solution quality, testing is necessary, however test method appropriateness for these Ebola-relevant concentrations has not previously been evaluated. We identified fourteen commercially-available methods to test Ebola-relevant chlorine solution concentrations, including two titration methods, four DPD dilution methods, and six test strips. We assessed these methods by: 1) determining accuracy and precision by measuring in quintuplicate five different 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions manufactured from NaDCC, HTH, and NaOCl; 2) conducting volunteer testing to assess ease-of-use; and, 3) determining costs. Accuracy was greatest in titration methods (reference-12.4% error compared to reference method), then DPD dilution methods (2.4-19% error), then test strips (5.2-48% error); precision followed this same trend. Two methods had an accuracy of <10% error across all five chlorine solutions with good precision: Hach digital titration for 0.05% and 0.5% solutions (recommended for contexts with trained personnel and financial resources), and Serim test strips for 0.05% solutions (recommended for contexts where rapid, inexpensive, and low-training burden testing is needed). Measurement error from test methods not including pH adjustment varied significantly across the five chlorine solutions, which had pH values 5-11. Volunteers found test strip easiest and titration hardest; costs per 100 tests were $14-37 for test strips and $33-609 for titration. Given the

  11. Accuracy, Precision, Ease-Of-Use, and Cost of Methods to Test Ebola-Relevant Chlorine Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Emma; Wolfe, Marlene K.; Murray, Anna; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    To prevent transmission in Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is recommended to disinfect living things (hands and people) with 0.05% chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% chlorine solution. In the current West African EVD outbreak, these solutions (manufactured from calcium hypochlorite (HTH), sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)) have been widely used in both Ebola Treatment Unit and community settings. To ensure solution quality, testing is necessary, however test method appropriateness for these Ebola-relevant concentrations has not previously been evaluated. We identified fourteen commercially-available methods to test Ebola-relevant chlorine solution concentrations, including two titration methods, four DPD dilution methods, and six test strips. We assessed these methods by: 1) determining accuracy and precision by measuring in quintuplicate five different 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions manufactured from NaDCC, HTH, and NaOCl; 2) conducting volunteer testing to assess ease-of-use; and, 3) determining costs. Accuracy was greatest in titration methods (reference-12.4% error compared to reference method), then DPD dilution methods (2.4–19% error), then test strips (5.2–48% error); precision followed this same trend. Two methods had an accuracy of <10% error across all five chlorine solutions with good precision: Hach digital titration for 0.05% and 0.5% solutions (recommended for contexts with trained personnel and financial resources), and Serim test strips for 0.05% solutions (recommended for contexts where rapid, inexpensive, and low-training burden testing is needed). Measurement error from test methods not including pH adjustment varied significantly across the five chlorine solutions, which had pH values 5–11. Volunteers found test strip easiest and titration hardest; costs per 100 tests were $14–37 for test strips and $33–609 for titration

  12. Measuring the bias, precision, accuracy, and validity of self-reported height and weight in assessing overweight and obesity status among adolescents using a surveillance system

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding bias, precision, and accuracy in adolescent self-reported height and weight across demographic subpopulations is lacking. The bias, precision, and accuracy of adolescent self-reported height and weight across subpopulations were examined using a large, diverse and representative sample of adolescents. A second objective was to develop correction equations for self-reported height and weight to provide more accurate estimates of body mass index (BMI) and weight status. Methods A total of 24,221 students from 8th and 11th grade in Texas participated in the School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) surveillance system in years 2000–2002 and 2004–2005. To assess bias, the differences between the self-reported and objective measures, for height and weight were estimated. To assess precision and accuracy, the Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient was used. BMI was estimated for self-reported and objective measures. The prevalence of students’ weight status was estimated using self-reported and objective measures; absolute (bias) and relative error (relative bias) were assessed subsequently. Correction equations for sex and race/ethnicity subpopulations were developed to estimate objective measures of height, weight and BMI from self-reported measures using weighted linear regression. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values of weight status classification using self-reported measures and correction equations are assessed by sex and grade. Results Students in 8th- and 11th-grade overestimated their height from 0.68cm (White girls) to 2.02 cm (African-American boys), and underestimated their weight from 0.4 kg (Hispanic girls) to 0.98 kg (African-American girls). The differences in self-reported versus objectively-measured height and weight resulted in underestimation of BMI ranging from -0.23 kg/m2 (White boys) to -0.7 kg/m2 (African-American girls). The sensitivity of self-reported measures to classify weight

  13. Accuracy and precision of minimally-invasive cardiac output monitoring in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Koichi; Joosten, Alexandre; Murphy, Linda Suk-Ling; Desebbe, Olivier; Alexander, Brenton; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Cannesson, Maxime

    2016-10-01

    Several minimally-invasive technologies are available for cardiac output (CO) measurement in children, but the accuracy and precision of these devices have not yet been evaluated in a systematic review and meta-analysis. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature in PubMed, Cochrane Library of Clinical Trials, Scopus, and Web of Science from its inception to June 2014 assessing the accuracy and precision of all minimally-invasive CO monitoring systems used in children when compared with CO monitoring reference methods. Pooled mean bias, standard deviation, and mean percentage error of included studies were calculated using a random-effects model. The inter-study heterogeneity was also assessed using an I(2) statistic. A total of 20 studies (624 patients) were included. The overall random-effects pooled bias, and mean percentage error were 0.13 ± 0.44 l min(-1) and 29.1 %, respectively. Significant inter-study heterogeneity was detected (P < 0.0001, I(2) = 98.3 %). In the sub-analysis regarding the device, electrical cardiometry showed the smallest bias (-0.03 l min(-1)) and lowest percentage error (23.6 %). Significant residual heterogeneity remained after conducting sensitivity and subgroup analyses based on the various study characteristics. By meta-regression analysis, we found no independent effects of study characteristics on weighted mean difference between reference and tested methods. Although the pooled bias was small, the mean pooled percentage error was in the gray zone of clinical applicability. In the sub-group analysis, electrical cardiometry was the device that provided the most accurate measurement. However, a high heterogeneity between studies was found, likely due to a wide range of study characteristics. PMID:26315477

  14. Community-based Approaches to Improving Accuracy, Precision, and Reproducibility in U-Pb and U-Th Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, N. M.; Condon, D. J.; Bowring, S. A.; Schoene, B.; Dutton, A.; Rubin, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The last two decades have seen a grassroots effort by the international geochronology community to "calibrate Earth history through teamwork and cooperation," both as part of the EARTHTIME initiative and though several daughter projects with similar goals. Its mission originally challenged laboratories "to produce temporal constraints with uncertainties approaching 0.1% of the radioisotopic ages," but EARTHTIME has since exceeded its charge in many ways. Both the U-Pb and Ar-Ar chronometers first considered for high-precision timescale calibration now regularly produce dates at the sub-per mil level thanks to instrumentation, laboratory, and software advances. At the same time new isotope systems, including U-Th dating of carbonates, have developed comparable precision. But the larger, inter-related scientific challenges envisioned at EARTHTIME's inception remain - for instance, precisely calibrating the global geologic timescale, estimating rates of change around major climatic perturbations, and understanding evolutionary rates through time - and increasingly require that data from multiple geochronometers be combined. To solve these problems, the next two decades of uranium-daughter geochronology will require further advances in accuracy, precision, and reproducibility. The U-Th system has much in common with U-Pb, in that both parent and daughter isotopes are solids that can easily be weighed and dissolved in acid, and have well-characterized reference materials certified for isotopic composition and/or purity. For U-Pb, improving lab-to-lab reproducibility has entailed dissolving precisely weighed U and Pb metals of known purity and isotopic composition together to make gravimetric solutions, then using these to calibrate widely distributed tracers composed of artificial U and Pb isotopes. To mimic laboratory measurements, naturally occurring U and Pb isotopes were also mixed in proportions to mimic samples of three different ages, to be run as internal

  15. Cascade impactor (CI) mensuration--an assessment of the accuracy and precision of commercially available optical measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Frank; Ali, Aziz; Mitchell, Jolyon; Shelton, Christopher; Nichols, Steve

    2010-03-01

    Multi-stage cascade impactors (CIs) are the preferred measurement technique for characterizing the aerodynamic particle size distribution of an inhalable aerosol. Stage mensuration is the recommended pharmacopeial method for monitoring CI "fitness for purpose" within a GxP environment. The Impactor Sub-Team of the European Pharmaceutical Aerosol Group has undertaken an inter-laboratory study to assess both the precision and accuracy of a range of makes and models of instruments currently used for optical inspection of impactor stages. Measurement of two Andersen 8-stage 'non-viable' cascade impactor "reference" stages that were representative of jet sizes for this instrument type (stages 2 and 7) confirmed that all instruments evaluated were capable of reproducible jet measurement, with the overall capability being within the current pharmacopeial stage specifications for both stages. In the assessment of absolute accuracy, small, but consistent differences (ca. 0.6% of the certified value) observed between 'dots' and 'spots' of a calibrated chromium-plated reticule were observed, most likely the result of treatment of partially lit pixels along the circumference of this calibration standard. Measurements of three certified ring gauges, the smallest having a nominal diameter of 1.0 mm, were consistent with the observation where treatment of partially illuminated pixels at the periphery of the projected image can result in undersizing. However, the bias was less than 1% of the certified diameter. The optical inspection instruments evaluated are fully capable of confirming cascade impactor suitability in accordance with pharmacopeial practice.

  16. Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boucher, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suitability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment such as steel tapes, or they were taken continuously, using automated data recorders and pressure transducers. This report presents precision range and accuracy data established for manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, 1988-90. Precision and accuracy ranges were determined for all phases of the water-level measuring process, and overall accuracy ranges are presented. Precision ranges were determined for three steel tapes using a total of 462 data points. Mean precision ranges of these three tapes ranged from 0.014 foot to 0.026 foot. A mean precision range of 0.093 foot was calculated for the multiconductor cable, using 72 data points. Mean accuracy values were calculated on the basis of calibrations of the steel tapes and the multiconductor cable against a reference steel tape. The mean accuracy values of the steel tapes ranged from 0.053 foot, based on three data points to 0.078, foot based on six data points. The mean accuracy of the multiconductor cable was O. 15 foot, based on six data points. Overall accuracy of the water-level measurements was calculated by taking the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual accuracy values. Overall accuracy was calculated to be 0.36 foot for water-level measurements taken with steel tapes, without accounting for the inaccuracy of borehole deviations from vertical. An overall accuracy of 0.36 foot for measurements made with steel tapes is considered satisfactory for this project.

  17. An evaluation of the accuracy and precision of a stand-alone submersible continuous ruminal pH measurement system.

    PubMed

    Penner, G B; Beauchemin, K A; Mutsvangwa, T

    2006-06-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to develop and evaluate the accuracy and precision of a new stand-alone submersible continuous ruminal pH measurement system called the Lethbridge Research Centre ruminal pH measurement system (LRCpH; Experiment 1); 2) to establish the accuracy and precision of a well-documented, previously used continuous indwelling ruminal pH system (CIpH) to ensure that the new system (LRCpH) was as accurate and precise as the previous system (CIpH; Experiment 2); and 3) to determine the required frequency for pH electrode standardization by comparing baseline millivolt readings of pH electrodes in pH buffers 4 and 7 after 0, 24, 48, and 72 h of ruminal incubation (Experiment 3). In Experiment 1, 6 pregnant Holstein heifers, 3 lactating, primiparous Holstein cows, and 2 Black Angus heifers were used. All experimental animals were fitted with permanent ruminal cannulas. In Experiment 2, the 3 cannulated, lactating, primiparous Holstein cows were used. In both experiments, ruminal pH was determined continuously using indwelling pH electrodes. Subsequently, mean pH values were then compared with ruminal pH values obtained using spot samples of ruminal fluid (MANpH) obtained at the same time. A correlation coefficient accounting for repeated measures was calculated and results were used to calculate the concordance correlation to examine the relationships between the LRCpH-derived values and MANpH, and the CIpH-derived values and MANpH. In Experiment 3, the 6 pregnant Holstein heifers were used along with 6 new submersible pH electrodes. In Experiments 1 and 2, the comparison of the LRCpH output (1- and 5-min averages) to MANpH had higher correlation coefficients after accounting for repeated measures (0.98 and 0.97 for 1- and 5-min averages, respectively) and concordance correlation coefficients (0.96 and 0.97 for 1- and 5-min averages, respectively) than the comparison of CIpH to MANpH (0.88 and 0.87, correlation coefficient and concordance

  18. Single-frequency receivers as master permanent stations in GNSS networks: precision and accuracy of the positioning in mixed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabove, Paolo; Manzino, Ambrogio Maria

    2015-04-01

    The use of GPS/GNSS instruments is a common practice in the world at both a commercial and academic research level. Since last ten years, Continuous Operating Reference Stations (CORSs) networks were born in order to achieve the possibility to extend a precise positioning more than 15 km far from the master station. In this context, the Geomatics Research Group of DIATI at the Politecnico di Torino has carried out several experiments in order to evaluate the achievable precision obtainable with different GNSS receivers (geodetic and mass-market) and antennas if a CORSs network is considered. This work starts from the research above described, in particular focusing the attention on the usefulness of single frequency permanent stations in order to thicken the existing CORSs, especially for monitoring purposes. Two different types of CORSs network are available today in Italy: the first one is the so called "regional network" and the second one is the "national network", where the mean inter-station distances are about 25/30 and 50/70 km respectively. These distances are useful for many applications (e.g. mobile mapping) if geodetic instruments are considered but become less useful if mass-market instruments are used or if the inter-station distance between master and rover increases. In this context, some innovative GNSS networks were developed and tested, analyzing the performance of rover's positioning in terms of quality, accuracy and reliability both in real-time and post-processing approach. The use of single frequency GNSS receivers leads to have some limits, especially due to a limited baseline length, the possibility to obtain a correct fixing of the phase ambiguity for the network and to fix the phase ambiguity correctly also for the rover. These factors play a crucial role in order to reach a positioning with a good level of accuracy (as centimetric o better) in a short time and with an high reliability. The goal of this work is to investigate about the

  19. Standardization of Operator-Dependent Variables Affecting Precision and Accuracy of the Disk Diffusion Method for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Maurer, Florian P; Pfiffner, Tamara; Böttger, Erik C; Furrer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    Parameters like zone reading, inoculum density, and plate streaking influence the precision and accuracy of disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). While improved reading precision has been demonstrated using automated imaging systems, standardization of the inoculum and of plate streaking have not been systematically investigated yet. This study analyzed whether photometrically controlled inoculum preparation and/or automated inoculation could further improve the standardization of disk diffusion. Suspensions of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 of 0.5 McFarland standard were prepared by 10 operators using both visual comparison to turbidity standards and a Densichek photometer (bioMérieux), and the resulting CFU counts were determined. Furthermore, eight experienced operators each inoculated 10 Mueller-Hinton agar plates using a single 0.5 McFarland standard bacterial suspension of E. coli ATCC 25922 using regular cotton swabs, dry flocked swabs (Copan, Brescia, Italy), or an automated streaking device (BD-Kiestra, Drachten, Netherlands). The mean CFU counts obtained from 0.5 McFarland standard E. coli ATCC 25922 suspensions were significantly different for suspensions prepared by eye and by Densichek (P < 0.001). Preparation by eye resulted in counts that were closer to the CLSI/EUCAST target of 10(8) CFU/ml than those resulting from Densichek preparation. No significant differences in the standard deviations of the CFU counts were observed. The interoperator differences in standard deviations when dry flocked swabs were used decreased significantly compared to the differences when regular cotton swabs were used, whereas the mean of the standard deviations of all operators together was not significantly altered. In contrast, automated streaking significantly reduced both interoperator differences, i.e., the individual standard deviations, compared to the standard deviations for the manual method, and the mean of

  20. Standardization of Operator-Dependent Variables Affecting Precision and Accuracy of the Disk Diffusion Method for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Maurer, Florian P; Pfiffner, Tamara; Böttger, Erik C; Furrer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    Parameters like zone reading, inoculum density, and plate streaking influence the precision and accuracy of disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). While improved reading precision has been demonstrated using automated imaging systems, standardization of the inoculum and of plate streaking have not been systematically investigated yet. This study analyzed whether photometrically controlled inoculum preparation and/or automated inoculation could further improve the standardization of disk diffusion. Suspensions of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 of 0.5 McFarland standard were prepared by 10 operators using both visual comparison to turbidity standards and a Densichek photometer (bioMérieux), and the resulting CFU counts were determined. Furthermore, eight experienced operators each inoculated 10 Mueller-Hinton agar plates using a single 0.5 McFarland standard bacterial suspension of E. coli ATCC 25922 using regular cotton swabs, dry flocked swabs (Copan, Brescia, Italy), or an automated streaking device (BD-Kiestra, Drachten, Netherlands). The mean CFU counts obtained from 0.5 McFarland standard E. coli ATCC 25922 suspensions were significantly different for suspensions prepared by eye and by Densichek (P < 0.001). Preparation by eye resulted in counts that were closer to the CLSI/EUCAST target of 10(8) CFU/ml than those resulting from Densichek preparation. No significant differences in the standard deviations of the CFU counts were observed. The interoperator differences in standard deviations when dry flocked swabs were used decreased significantly compared to the differences when regular cotton swabs were used, whereas the mean of the standard deviations of all operators together was not significantly altered. In contrast, automated streaking significantly reduced both interoperator differences, i.e., the individual standard deviations, compared to the standard deviations for the manual method, and the mean of

  1. Determination of the precision and accuracy of morphological measurements using the Kinect™ sensor: comparison with standard stereophotogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Bonnechère, B; Jansen, B; Salvia, P; Bouzahouene, H; Sholukha, V; Cornelis, J; Rooze, M; Van Sint Jan, S

    2014-01-01

    The recent availability of the Kinect™ sensor, a low-cost Markerless Motion Capture (MMC) system, could give new and interesting insights into ergonomics (e.g. the creation of a morphological database). Extensive validation of this system is still missing. The aim of the study was to determine if the Kinect™ sensor can be used as an easy, cheap and fast tool to conduct morphology estimation. A total of 48 subjects were analysed using MMC. Results were compared with measurements obtained from a high-resolution stereophotogrammetric system, a marker-based system (MBS). Differences between MMC and MBS were found; however, these differences were systematically correlated and enabled regression equations to be obtained to correct MMC results. After correction, final results were in agreement with MBS data (p = 0.99). Results show that measurements were reproducible and precise after applying regression equations. Kinect™ sensors-based systems therefore seem to be suitable for use as fast and reliable tools to estimate morphology. Practitioner Summary: The Kinect™ sensor could eventually be used for fast morphology estimation as a body scanner. This paper presents an extensive validation of this device for anthropometric measurements in comparison to manual measurements and stereophotogrammetric devices. The accuracy is dependent on the segment studied but the reproducibility is excellent. PMID:24646374

  2. Strategy for high-accuracy-and-precision retrieval of atmospheric methane from the mid-infrared FTIR network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussmann, R.; Forster, F.; Rettinger, M.; Jones, N.

    2011-05-01

    We present a strategy (MIR-GBM v1.0) for the retrieval of column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of methane (XCH4) with a precision <0.3 % (1-σ diurnal variation, 7-min integration) and a seasonal bias <0.14 % from mid-infrared ground-based solar FTIR measurements of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, comprising 22 FTIR stations). This makes NDACC methane data useful for satellite validation and for the inversion of regional-scale sources and sinks in addition to long-term trend analysis. Such retrievals complement the high accuracy and precision near-infrared observations of the younger Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) with time series dating back 15 yr or so before TCCON operations began. MIR-GBM v1.0 is using HITRAN 2000 (including the 2001 update release) and 3 spectral micro windows (2613.70-2615.40 cm-1, 2835.50-2835.80 cm-1, 2921.00-2921.60 cm-1). A first-order Tikhonov constraint is applied to the state vector given in units of per cent of volume mixing ratio. It is tuned to achieve minimum diurnal variation without damping seasonality. Final quality selection of the retrievals uses a threshold for the ratio of root-mean-square spectral residuals and information content (<0.15 %). Column-averaged dry-air mole fractions are calculated using the retrieved methane profiles and four-times-daily pressure-temperature-humidity profiles from National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) interpolated to the time of measurement. MIR-GBM v1.0 is the optimum of 24 tested retrieval strategies (8 different spectral micro-window selections, 3 spectroscopic line lists: HITRAN 2000, 2004, 2008). Dominant errors of the non-optimum retrieval strategies are HDO/H2O-CH4 interference errors (seasonal bias up to ≈4 %). Therefore interference errors have been quantified at 3 test sites covering clear-sky integrated water vapor levels representative for all NDACC sites (Wollongong maximum = 44.9 mm, Garmisch mean = 14.9 mm

  3. Strategy for high-accuracy-and-precision retrieval of atmospheric methane from the mid-infrared FTIR network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussmann, R.; Forster, F.; Rettinger, M.; Jones, N.

    2011-09-01

    We present a strategy (MIR-GBM v1.0) for the retrieval of column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of methane (XCH4) with a precision <0.3% (1-σ diurnal variation, 7-min integration) and a seasonal bias <0.14% from mid-infrared ground-based solar FTIR measurements of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, comprising 22 FTIR stations). This makes NDACC methane data useful for satellite validation and for the inversion of regional-scale sources and sinks in addition to long-term trend analysis. Such retrievals complement the high accuracy and precision near-infrared observations of the younger Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) with time series dating back 15 years or so before TCCON operations began. MIR-GBM v1.0 is using HITRAN 2000 (including the 2001 update release) and 3 spectral micro windows (2613.70-2615.40 cm-1, 2835.50-2835.80 cm-1, 2921.00-2921.60 cm-1). A first-order Tikhonov constraint is applied to the state vector given in units of per cent of volume mixing ratio. It is tuned to achieve minimum diurnal variation without damping seasonality. Final quality selection of the retrievals uses a threshold for the goodness of fit (χ2 < 1) as well as for the ratio of root-mean-square spectral noise and information content (<0.15%). Column-averaged dry-air mole fractions are calculated using the retrieved methane profiles and four-times-daily pressure-temperature-humidity profiles from National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) interpolated to the time of measurement. MIR-GBM v1.0 is the optimum of 24 tested retrieval strategies (8 different spectral micro-window selections, 3 spectroscopic line lists: HITRAN 2000, 2004, 2008). Dominant errors of the non-optimum retrieval strategies are systematic HDO/H2O-CH4 interference errors leading to a seasonal bias up to ≈5%. Therefore interference errors have been quantified at 3 test sites covering clear-sky integrated water vapor levels representative for all NDACC

  4. Precision Interval Estimation of the Response Surface by Means of an Integrated Algorithm of Neural Network and Linear Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1999-01-01

    The integration of Radial Basis Function Networks and Back Propagation Neural Networks with the Multiple Linear Regression has been accomplished to map nonlinear response surfaces over a wide range of independent variables in the process of the Modem Design of Experiments. The integrated method is capable to estimate the precision intervals including confidence and predicted intervals. The power of the innovative method has been demonstrated by applying to a set of wind tunnel test data in construction of response surface and estimation of precision interval.

  5. Design of a platinum resistance thermometer temperature measuring transducer and improved accuracy of linearizing the output voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Malygin, V.M.

    1995-06-01

    An improved method is presented for designing a temperature measuring transducer, the electrical circuit of which comprises an unbalanced bridge, in one arm of which is a platinum resistance thermometer, and containing a differential amplifier with feedback. Values are given for the coefficients, the minimum linearization error is determined, and an example is also given of the practical design of the transducer, using the given coefficients. A determination is made of the limiting achievable accuracy in linearizing the output voltage of the measuring transducer, as a function of the range of measured temperature.

  6. A strategy for multivariate calibration based on modified single-index signal regression: Capturing explicit non-linearity and improving prediction accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Li, Qingbo; Zhang, Guangjun

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, a modified single-index signal regression (mSISR) method is proposed to construct a nonlinear and practical model with high-accuracy. The mSISR method defines the optimal penalty tuning parameter in P-spline signal regression (PSR) as initial tuning parameter and chooses the number of cycles based on minimizing root mean squared error of cross-validation (RMSECV). mSISR is superior to single-index signal regression (SISR) in terms of accuracy, computation time and convergency. And it can provide the character of the non-linearity between spectra and responses in a more precise manner than SISR. Two spectra data sets from basic research experiments, including plant chlorophyll nondestructive measurement and human blood glucose noninvasive measurement, are employed to illustrate the advantages of mSISR. The results indicate that the mSISR method (i) obtains the smooth and helpful regression coefficient vector, (ii) explicitly exhibits the type and amount of the non-linearity, (iii) can take advantage of nonlinear features of the signals to improve prediction performance and (iv) has distinct adaptability for the complex spectra model by comparing with other calibration methods. It is validated that mSISR is a promising nonlinear modeling strategy for multivariate calibration.

  7. The impact of 3D volume of interest definition on accuracy and precision of activity estimation in quantitative SPECT and planar processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate and precise estimation of organ activities is essential for treatment planning in targeted radionuclide therapy. We have previously evaluated the impact of processing methodology, statistical noise and variability in activity distribution and anatomy on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained with quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) and planar (QPlanar) processing. Another important factor impacting the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates is accuracy of and variability in the definition of organ regions of interest (ROI) or volumes of interest (VOI). The goal of this work was thus to systematically study the effects of VOI definition on the reliability of activity estimates. To this end, we performed Monte Carlo simulation studies using randomly perturbed and shifted VOIs to assess the impact on organ activity estimates. The 3D NCAT phantom was used with activities that modeled clinically observed 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan distributions. In order to study the errors resulting from misdefinitions due to manual segmentation errors, VOIs of the liver and left kidney were first manually defined. Each control point was then randomly perturbed to one of the nearest or next-nearest voxels in three ways: with no, inward or outward directional bias, resulting in random perturbation, erosion or dilation, respectively, of the VOIs. In order to study the errors resulting from the misregistration of VOIs, as would happen, e.g. in the case where the VOIs were defined using a misregistered anatomical image, the reconstructed SPECT images or projections were shifted by amounts ranging from -1 to 1 voxels in increments of with 0.1 voxels in both the transaxial and axial directions. The activity estimates from the shifted reconstructions or projections were compared to those from the originals, and average errors were computed for the QSPECT and QPlanar methods, respectively. For misregistration, errors in organ activity estimations were

  8. The impact of 3D volume of interest definition on accuracy and precision of activity estimation in quantitative SPECT and planar processing methods.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C

    2010-06-21

    Accurate and precise estimation of organ activities is essential for treatment planning in targeted radionuclide therapy. We have previously evaluated the impact of processing methodology, statistical noise and variability in activity distribution and anatomy on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained with quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) and planar (QPlanar) processing. Another important factor impacting the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates is accuracy of and variability in the definition of organ regions of interest (ROI) or volumes of interest (VOI). The goal of this work was thus to systematically study the effects of VOI definition on the reliability of activity estimates. To this end, we performed Monte Carlo simulation studies using randomly perturbed and shifted VOIs to assess the impact on organ activity estimates. The 3D NCAT phantom was used with activities that modeled clinically observed (111)In ibritumomab tiuxetan distributions. In order to study the errors resulting from misdefinitions due to manual segmentation errors, VOIs of the liver and left kidney were first manually defined. Each control point was then randomly perturbed to one of the nearest or next-nearest voxels in three ways: with no, inward or outward directional bias, resulting in random perturbation, erosion or dilation, respectively, of the VOIs. In order to study the errors resulting from the misregistration of VOIs, as would happen, e.g. in the case where the VOIs were defined using a misregistered anatomical image, the reconstructed SPECT images or projections were shifted by amounts ranging from -1 to 1 voxels in increments of with 0.1 voxels in both the transaxial and axial directions. The activity estimates from the shifted reconstructions or projections were compared to those from the originals, and average errors were computed for the QSPECT and QPlanar methods, respectively. For misregistration, errors in organ activity estimations were

  9. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1990-01-01

    A ground-based adaptive optics imaging telescope system attempts to improve image quality by detecting and correcting for atmospherically induced wavefront aberrations. The required control computations during each cycle will take a finite amount of time. Longer time delays result in larger values of residual wavefront error variance since the atmosphere continues to change during that time. Thus an optical processor may be well-suited for this task. This paper presents a study of the accuracy requirements in a general optical processor that will make it competitive with, or superior to, a conventional digital computer for the adaptive optics application. An optimization of the adaptive optics correction algorithm with respect to an optical processor's degree of accuracy is also briefly discussed.

  10. Accuracy, precision and response time of consumer fork, remote digital probe and disposable indicator thermometers for cooked ground beef patties and chicken breasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine different commercially available instant-read consumer thermometers (forks, remotes, digital probe and disposable color change indicators) were tested for accuracy and precision compared to a calibrated thermocouple in 80 percent and 90 percent lean ground beef patties, and boneless and bone-in...

  11. An Examination of the Precision and Technical Accuracy of the First Wave of Group-Randomized Trials Funded by the Institute of Education Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Raudenbush, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the power analyses for the first wave of group-randomized trials funded by the Institute of Education Sciences. Specifically, it assesses the precision and technical accuracy of the studies. The authors identified the appropriate experimental design and estimated the minimum detectable standardized effect size (MDES) for each…

  12. The JPL Hg(sup +) Extended Linear Ion Trap Frequency Standard: Status, Stability, and Accuracy Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    Microwave frequency standards based on room temperature (sup 199)Hg(sup +) ions in a Linear Ion Trap (LITS) presently achieve a Signal to Noise and line Q inferred short frequency stability. Long term stability has been measured for averaging intervals up to 5 months with apparent sensitivity to variations in ion number/temperature limiting the flicker floor.

  13. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Downie, J D; Goodman, J W

    1989-10-15

    A ground-based adaptive optics imaging telescope system attempts to improve image quality by measuring and correcting for atmospherically induced wavefront aberrations. The necessary control computations during each cycle will take a finite amount of time, which adds to the residual error variance since the atmosphere continues to change during that time. Thus an optical processor may be well-suited for this task. This paper investigates this possibility by studying the accuracy requirements in a general optical processor that will make it competitive with, or superior to, a conventional digital computer for adaptive optics use.

  14. Deformable Image Registration for Adaptive Radiation Therapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Accuracy and Precision in the Presence of Tumor Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Mencarelli, Angelo; Kranen, Simon Robert van; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Beek, Suzanne van; Nico Rasch, Coenraad Robert; Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare deformable image registration (DIR) accuracy and precision for normal and tumor tissues in head and neck cancer patients during the course of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with oropharyngeal tumors, who underwent submucosal implantation of small gold markers (average 6, range 4-10) around the tumor and were treated with RT were retrospectively selected. Two observers identified 15 anatomical features (landmarks) representative of normal tissues in the planning computed tomography (pCT) scan and in weekly cone beam CTs (CBCTs). Gold markers were digitally removed after semiautomatic identification in pCTs and CBCTs. Subsequently, landmarks and gold markers on pCT were propagated to CBCTs, using a b-spline-based DIR and, for comparison, rigid registration (RR). To account for observer variability, the pair-wise difference analysis of variance method was applied. DIR accuracy (systematic error) and precision (random error) for landmarks and gold markers were quantified. Time trend of the precisions for RR and DIR over the weekly CBCTs were evaluated. Results: DIR accuracies were submillimeter and similar for normal and tumor tissue. DIR precision (1 SD) on the other hand was significantly different (P<.01), with 2.2 mm vector length in normal tissue versus 3.3 mm in tumor tissue. No significant time trend in DIR precision was found for normal tissue, whereas in tumor, DIR precision was significantly (P<.009) degraded during the course of treatment by 0.21 mm/week. Conclusions: DIR for tumor registration proved to be less precise than that for normal tissues due to limited contrast and complex non-elastic tumor response. Caution should therefore be exercised when applying DIR for tumor changes in adaptive procedures.

  15. Design, Simulation and Testing of a Precision Alignment Frame for the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fitsos, P

    2004-06-18

    An alignment frame is developed to support 3 Beam Position Monitors (BPM's) for detecting and ultimately aligning the electron beam from a linear accelerator. This report discusses the design details, preliminary modal analysis of the alignment frame as well as the addition of a metrology frame in the final phase of development.

  16. Linear diffraction grating interferometer with high alignment tolerance and high accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fang; Fan, Kuang-Chao

    2011-08-01

    We present an innovative structure of a linear diffraction grating interferometer as a long stroke and nanometer resolution displacement sensor for any linear stage. The principle of this diffractive interferometer is based on the phase information encoded by the ±1st order beams diffracted by a holographic grating. Properly interfering these two beams leads to modulation similar to a Doppler frequency shift that can be translated to displacement measurements via phase decoding. A self-compensation structure is developed to improve the alignment tolerance. LightTool analysis shows that this new structure is completely immune to alignment errors of offset, standoff, yaw, and roll. The tolerance of the pitch is also acceptable for most installation conditions. In order to compact the structure and improve the signal quality, a new optical bonding technology by mechanical fixture is presented so that the miniature optics can be permanently bonded together without an air gap in between. For the output waveform signals, a software module is developed for fast real-time pulse counting and phase subdivision. A laser interferometer HP5529A is employed to test the repeatability of the whole system. Experimental data show that within 15mm travel length, the repeatability is within 15nm.

  17. Linear diffraction grating interferometer with high alignment tolerance and high accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Fang; Fan, Kuang-Chao

    2011-08-01

    We present an innovative structure of a linear diffraction grating interferometer as a long stroke and nanometer resolution displacement sensor for any linear stage. The principle of this diffractive interferometer is based on the phase information encoded by the {+-}1st order beams diffracted by a holographic grating. Properly interfering these two beams leads to modulation similar to a Doppler frequency shift that can be translated to displacement measurements via phase decoding. A self-compensation structure is developed to improve the alignment tolerance. LightTool analysis shows that this new structure is completely immune to alignment errors of offset, standoff, yaw, and roll. The tolerance of the pitch is also acceptable for most installation conditions. In order to compact the structure and improve the signal quality, a new optical bonding technology by mechanical fixture is presented so that the miniature optics can be permanently bonded together without an air gap in between. For the output waveform signals, a software module is developed for fast real-time pulse counting and phase subdivision. A laser interferometer HP5529A is employed to test the repeatability of the whole system. Experimental data show that within 15 mm travel length, the repeatability is within 15 nm.

  18. a Method for Self-Calibration in Satellite with High Precision of Space Linear Array Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Qian, Fangming; Miao, Yuzhe; Wang, Rongjian

    2016-06-01

    At present, the on-orbit calibration of the geometric parameters of a space surveying camera is usually processed by data from a ground calibration field after capturing the images. The entire process is very complicated and lengthy and cannot monitor and calibrate the geometric parameters in real time. On the basis of a large number of on-orbit calibrations, we found that owing to the influence of many factors, e.g., weather, it is often difficult to capture images of the ground calibration field. Thus, regular calibration using field data cannot be ensured. This article proposes a real time self-calibration method for a space linear array camera on a satellite using the optical auto collimation principle. A collimating light source and small matrix array CCD devices are installed inside the load system of the satellite; these use the same light path as the linear array camera. We can extract the location changes of the cross marks in the matrix array CCD to determine the real-time variations in the focal length and angle parameters of the linear array camera. The on-orbit status of the camera is rapidly obtained using this method. On one hand, the camera's change regulation can be mastered accurately and the camera's attitude can be adjusted in a timely manner to ensure optimal photography; in contrast, self-calibration of the camera aboard the satellite can be realized quickly, which improves the efficiency and reliability of photogrammetric processing.

  19. International normalised ratio (INR) measured on the CoaguChek S and XS compared with the laboratory for determination of precision and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas D; Larsen, Torben B; Jensen, Claus; Maegaard, Marianne; Sørensen, Benny

    2009-03-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy is monitored by the use of international normalised ratio (INR). Patients performing self-management estimate INR using a coagulometer, but studies have been partly flawed regarding the estimated precision and accuracy. The objective was to estimate the imprecision and accuracy for two different coagulometers (CoaguChek S and XS). Twenty-four patients treated with coumarin were prospectively followed for six weeks. INR's were analyzed weekly in duplicates on both coagulometers, and compared with results from the hospital laboratory. Statistical analysis included Bland-Altman plot, 95% limits of agreement, coefficient of variance (CV), and an analysis of variance using a mixed effect model. Comparing 141 duplicate measurements (a total of 564 measurements) of INR, we found that the CoaguChek S and CoaguChek XS had a precision (CV) of 3.4% and 2.3%, respectively. Regarding analytical accuracy, the INR measurements tended to be lower on the coagulometers, and regarding diagnostic accuracy the CoaguChek S and CoaguChek XS deviated more than 15% from the laboratory measurements in 40% and 43% of the measurements, respectively. In conclusion, the precision of the coagulometers was found to be good, but only the CoaguChek XS had a precision within the predefined limit of 3%. Regarding analytical accuracy, the INR measurements tended to be lower on the coagulometers, compared to the laboratory. A large proportion of measurement of the coagulometers deviated more than 15% from the laboratory measurements. Whether this will have a clinical impact awaits further studies.

  20. Towards the GEOSAT Follow-On Precise Orbit Determination Goals of High Accuracy and Near-Real-Time Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Beckley, Brian D.; Lillibridge, John L.

    2006-01-01

    The US Navy's GEOSAT Follow-On spacecraft (GFO) primary mission objective is to map the oceans using a radar altimeter. Satellite laser ranging data, especially in combination with altimeter crossover data, offer the only means of determining high-quality precise orbits. Two tuned gravity models, PGS7727 and PGS7777b, were created at NASA GSFC for GFO that reduce the predicted radial orbit through degree 70 to 13.7 and 10.0 mm. A macromodel was developed to model the nonconservative forces and the SLR spacecraft measurement offset was adjusted to remove a mean bias. Using these improved models, satellite-ranging data, altimeter crossover data, and Doppler data are used to compute both daily medium precision orbits with a latency of less than 24 hours. Final precise orbits are also computed using these tracking data and exported with a latency of three to four weeks to NOAA for use on the GFO Geophysical Data Records (GDR s). The estimated orbit precision of the daily orbits is between 10 and 20 cm, whereas the precise orbits have a precision of 5 cm.

  1. A simple algorithm improves mass accuracy to 50-100 ppm for delayed extraction linear MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Christopher A.; Benner, W. Henry

    2001-10-31

    A simple mathematical technique for improving mass calibration accuracy of linear delayed extraction matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOF MS) spectra is presented. The method involves fitting a parabola to a plot of Dm vs. mass data where Dm is the difference between the theoretical mass of calibrants and the mass obtained from a linear relationship between the square root of m/z and ion time of flight. The quadratic equation that describes the parabola is then used to correct the mass of unknowns by subtracting the deviation predicted by the quadratic equation from measured data. By subtracting the value of the parabola at each mass from the calibrated data, the accuracy of mass data points can be improved by factors of 10 or more. This method produces highly similar results whether or not initial ion velocity is accounted for in the calibration equation; consequently, there is no need to depend on that uncertain parameter when using the quadratic correction. This method can be used to correct the internally calibrated masses of protein digest peaks. The effect of nitrocellulose as a matrix additive is also briefly discussed, and it is shown that using nitrocellulose as an additive to a CHCA matrix does not significantly change initial ion velocity but does change the average position of ions relative to the sample electrode at the instant the extraction voltage is applied.

  2. An assessment of coefficient accuracy in linear regression models with spatially varying coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, David C.; Calder, Catherine A.

    2007-06-01

    The realization in the statistical and geographical sciences that a relationship between an explanatory variable and a response variable in a linear regression model is not always constant across a study area has led to the development of regression models that allow for spatially varying coefficients. Two competing models of this type are geographically weighted regression (GWR) and Bayesian regression models with spatially varying coefficient processes (SVCP). In the application of these spatially varying coefficient models, marginal inference on the regression coefficient spatial processes is typically of primary interest. In light of this fact, there is a need to assess the validity of such marginal inferences, since these inferences may be misleading in the presence of explanatory variable collinearity. In this paper, we present the results of a simulation study designed to evaluate the sensitivity of the spatially varying coefficients in the competing models to various levels of collinearity. The simulation study results show that the Bayesian regression model produces more accurate inferences on the regression coefficients than does GWR. In addition, the Bayesian regression model is overall fairly robust in terms of marginal coefficient inference to moderate levels of collinearity, and degrades less substantially than GWR with strong collinearity.

  3. The precision and accuracy of iterative and non-iterative methods of photopeak integration in activation analysis, with particular reference to the analysis of multiplets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    The relative precisions obtainable using two digital methods, and three iterative least squares fitting procedures of photopeak integration have been compared empirically using 12 replicate counts of a test sample with 14 photopeaks of varying intensity. The accuracy by which the various iterative fitting methods could analyse synthetic doublets has also been evaluated, and compared with a simple non-iterative approach. ?? 1977 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  4. Impact of field strength and iron oxide nanoparticle concentration on the linearity and diagnostic accuracy of off-resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Christian T; Dai, Guangping; Novikov, Mikhail; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Weissleder, Ralph; Rosen, Bruce R; Sosnovik, David E

    2008-06-01

    Off-resonance imaging (ORI) techniques are being increasingly used to image iron oxide imaging agents such as monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MION). However, the diagnostic accuracy, linearity, and field dependence of ORI have not been fully characterized. In this study, the sensitivity, specificity, and linearity of ORI were thus examined as a function of both MION concentration and magnetic field strength (4.7 and 14 T). MION phantoms with and without an air interface as well as MION uptake in a mouse model of healing myocardial infarction were imaged. MION-induced resonance shifts were shown to increase linearly with MION concentration. In contrast, the ORI signal/sensitivity was highly non-linear, initially increasing with MION concentration until T2 became comparable to the TE and decreasing thereafter. The specificity of ORI to distinguish MION-induced resonance shifts from on-resonance water was found to decrease with increasing field because of the increased on-resonance water linewidths (15 Hz at 4.7 T versus 45 Hz at 14 T). Large resonance shifts ( approximately 300 Hz) were observed at air interfaces at 4.7 T, both in vitro and in vivo, and led to poor ORI specificity for MION concentrations less than 150 microg Fe/mL. The in vivo ORI sensitivity was sufficient to detect the accumulation of MION in macrophages infiltrating healing myocardial infarcts, but the specificity was limited by non-specific areas of positive contrast at the air/tissue interfaces of the thoracic wall and the descending aorta. Improved specificity and linearity can, however, be expected at lower fields where decreased on-resonance water linewidths, reduced air-induced resonance shifts, and longer T2 relaxation times are observed. The optimal performance of ORI will thus likely be seen at low fields, with moderate MION concentrations and with sequences containing very short TEs.

  5. Precision of high-resolution multibeam echo sounding coupled with high-accuracy positioning in a shallow water coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstsen, Verner B.; Noormets, Riko; Hebbeln, Dierk; Bartholomä, Alex; Flemming, Burg W.

    2006-09-01

    Over 4 years, repetitive bathymetric measurements of a shipwreck in the Grådyb tidal inlet channel in the Danish Wadden Sea were carried out using a state-of-the-art high-resolution multibeam echosounder (MBES) coupled with a real-time long range kinematic (LRK™) global positioning system. Seven measurements during a single survey in 2003 ( n=7) revealed a horizontal and vertical precision of the MBES system of ±20 and ±2 cm, respectively, at a 95% confidence level. By contrast, four annual surveys from 2002 to 2005 ( n=4) yielded a horizontal and vertical precision (at 95% confidence level) of only ±30 and ±8 cm, respectively. This difference in precision can be explained by three main factors: (1) the dismounting of the system between the annual surveys, (2) rougher sea conditions during the survey in 2004 and (3) the limited number of annual surveys. In general, the precision achieved here did not correspond to the full potential of the MBES system, as this could certainly have been improved by an increase in coverage density (soundings/m2), achievable by reducing the survey speed of the vessel. Nevertheless, precision was higher than that reported to date for earlier offshore test surveys using comparable equipment.

  6. Accuracy and reliability of linear measurements using 3-dimensional computed tomographic imaging software for Le Fort I Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Gaia, Bruno Felipe; Pinheiro, Lucas Rodrigues; Umetsubo, Otávio Shoite; Santos, Oseas; Costa, Felipe Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmão Paraíso

    2014-03-01

    Our purpose was to compare the accuracy and reliability of linear measurements for Le Fort I osteotomy using volume rendering software. We studied 11 dried skulls and used cone-beam computed tomography (CT) to generate 3-dimensional images. Linear measurements were based on craniometric anatomical landmarks that were predefined as specifically used for Le Fort I osteotomy, and identified twice each by 2 radiologists, independently, using Dolphin imaging version 11.5.04.35. A third examiner then made physical measurements using digital calipers. There was a significant difference between Dolphin imaging and the gold standard, particularly in the pterygoid process. The largest difference was 1.85mm (LLpPtg L). The mean differences between the physical and the 3-dimensional linear measurements ranged from -0.01 to 1.12mm for examiner 1, and 0 to 1.85mm for examiner 2. Interexaminer analysis ranged from 0.51 to 0.93. Intraexaminer correlation coefficients ranged from 0.81 to 0.96 and 0.57 to 0.92, for examiners 1 and 2, respectively. We conclude that the Dolphin imaging should be used sparingly during Le Fort I osteotomy.

  7. Accuracy and precision of a custom camera-based system for 2D and 3D motion tracking during speech and nonspeech motor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories, and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable alternative, provided that they offer high temporal resolution and sub-millimeter accuracy. Method We examined the accuracy and precision of 2D and 3D data recorded with a system that combines consumer-grade digital cameras capturing 60, 120, or 240 frames per second (fps), retro-reflective markers, commercially-available computer software (APAS, Ariel Dynamics), and a custom calibration device. Results Overall mean error (RMSE) across tests was 0.15 mm for static tracking and 0.26 mm for dynamic tracking, with corresponding precision (SD) values of 0.11 and 0.19 mm, respectively. The effect of frame rate varied across conditions, but, generally, accuracy was reduced at 240 fps. The effect of marker size (3 vs. 6 mm diameter) was negligible at all frame rates for both 2D and 3D data. Conclusion Motion tracking with consumer-grade digital cameras and the APAS software can achieve sub-millimeter accuracy at frame rates that are appropriate for kinematic analyses of lip/jaw movements for both research and clinical purposes. PMID:24686484

  8. Precision Linear Actuators for the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope Demonstration Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinoff, Jason; Pfenning, David

    2006-01-01

    The Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) is an ongoing research effort at Goddard Space Flight Center developing wavefront sensing and control architectures for future space telescopes. The 03.5-m SPOT telescope primary mirror is comprise9 of six 0.86-m hexagonal mirror segments arranged in a single ring, with the central segment missing. The mirror segments are designed for laboratory use and are not lightweighted to reduce cost. Each primary mirror segment is actuated and has tip, tilt, and piston rigid-body motions. Additionally, the radius of curvature of each mirror segment may be varied mechanically. To provide these degrees of freedom, the SPOT mirror segment assembly requires linear actuators capable of

  9. [The linear hyperspectral camera rotating scan imaging geometric correction based on the precise spectral sampling].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-min; Zhang, Ai-wu; Hu, Shao-xing; Wang, Jing-meng; Meng, Xian-gang; Duan, Yi-hao; Sun, Wei-dong

    2015-02-01

    As the rotation speed of ground based hyperspectral imaging system is too fast in the image collection process, which exceeds the speed limitation, there is data missed in the rectified image, it shows as the_black lines. At the same time, there is serious distortion in the collected raw images, which effects the feature information classification and identification. To solve these problems, in this paper, we introduce the each component of the ground based hyperspectral imaging system at first, and give the general process of data collection. The rotation speed is controlled in data collection process, according to the image cover area of each frame and the image collection speed of the ground based hyperspectral imaging system, And then the spatial orientation model is deduced in detail combining with the star scanning angle, stop scanning angle and the minimum distance between the sensor and the scanned object etc. The oriented image is divided into grids and resampled with new spectral. The general flow of distortion image corrected is presented in this paper. Since the image spatial resolution is different between the adjacent frames, and in order to keep the highest image resolution of corrected image, the minimum ground sampling distance is employed as the grid unit to divide the geo-referenced image. Taking the spectral distortion into account caused by direct sampling method when the new uniform grids and the old uneven grids are superimposed to take the pixel value, the precise spectral sampling method based on the position distribution is proposed. The distortion image collected in Lao Si Cheng ruin which is in the Zhang Jiajie town Hunan province is corrected through the algorithm proposed on above. The features keep the original geometric characteristics. It verifies the validity of the algorithm. And we extract the spectral of different features to compute the correlation coefficient. The results show that the improved spectral sampling method is

  10. On detector linearity and precision of beam shift detection for quantitative differential phase contrast applications.

    PubMed

    Zweck, Josef; Schwarzhuber, Felix; Wild, Johannes; Galioit, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Differential phase contrast is a STEM imaging mode where minute sideways deflections of the electron probe are monitored, usually by using a position sensitive device (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Lohr et al., 2012 [2]) or, alternatively in some cases, a fast camera (Müller et al., 2012 [3,4]; Yang et al., 2015 [5]; Pennycook et al., 2015 [6]) as a pixelated detector. While traditionally differential phase contrast electron microscopy was mainly focused on investigations of micro-magnetic domain structures and their specific features, such as domain wall widths, etc. (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Chapman et al., 1978, 1981, 1985 [7-9]; Sannomiya et al., 2004 [10]), its usage has recently been extended to mesoscopic (Lohr et al., 2012, 2016 [2,12]; Bauer et al., 2014 [11]; Shibata et al., 2015 [13]) and nano-scale electric fields (Shibata et al., 2012 [14]; Mueller et al., 2014 [15]). In this paper, the various interactions which can cause a beam deflection are reviewed and expanded by two so far undiscussed mechanisms which may be important for biological applications. As differential phase contrast microscopy strongly depends on the ability to detect minute beam deflections we first treat the linearity problem for an annular four quadrant detector and then determine the factors which limit the minimum measurable deflection angle, such as S/N ratio, current density, dwell time and detector geometry. Knowing these factors enables the experimenter to optimize the set-up for optimum performance of the microscope and to get a clear figure for the achievable field resolution error margins.

  11. Linear and Logarithmic Speed-Accuracy Trade-Offs in Reciprocal Aiming Result from Task-Specific Parameterization of an Invariant Underlying Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bongers, Raoul M.; Fernandez, Laure; Bootsma, Reinoud J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the origins of linear and logarithmic speed-accuracy trade-offs from a dynamic systems perspective on motor control. In each experiment, participants performed 2 reciprocal aiming tasks: (a) a velocity-constrained task in which movement time was imposed and accuracy had to be maximized, and (b) a distance-constrained task in…

  12. Precise calibration of linear camera equipped with cylindrical lenses using a radial basis function-based mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiqing; Yang, Linghui; Guo, Yin; Guan, Ruifen; Zhu, Jigui

    2015-02-01

    The linear camera equipped with cylindrical lenses has prominent advantages in high-precision coordinate measurement and dynamic position-tracking. However, the serious distortion of the cylindrical lenses limits the application of this camera. To overcome this obstacle, a precise two-step calibration method is developed. In the first step, a radial basis function-based (RBF-based) mapping technique is employed to recover the projection mapping of the imaging system by interpolating the correspondence between incident rays and image points. For an object point in 3D space, the plane passing through the object point in camera coordinate frame can be calculated accurately by this technique. The second step is the calibration of extrinsic parameters, which realizes the coordinate transformation from the camera coordinate frame to world coordinate frame. The proposed method has three aspects of advantage. Firstly, this method (black box calibration) is still effective even if the distortion is high and asymmetric. Secondly, the coupling between extrinsic parameters and other parameters, which is normally occurred and may lead to the failure of calibration, is avoided because this method simplifies the pinhole model and only extrinsic parameters are concerned in the simplified model. Thirdly, the nonlinear optimization, which is widely used to refine camera parameters, is better conditioned since fewer parameters are needed and more accurate initial iteration value is estimated. Both simulative and real experiments have been carried out and good results have been obtained.

  13. Optimizing the accuracy and precision of the single-pulse Laue technique for synchrotron photo-crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, Radosław; Graber, Timothy; Benedict, Jason B.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Scheins, Stephan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Coppens, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy that can be achieved in single-pulse pump-probe Laue experiments is discussed. It is shown that with careful tuning of the experimental conditions a reproducibility of the intensity ratios of equivalent intensities obtained in different measurements of 3–4% can be achieved. The single-pulse experiments maximize the time resolution that can be achieved and, unlike stroboscopic techniques in which the pump-probe cycle is rapidly repeated, minimize the temperature increase due to the laser exposure of the sample. PMID:20567080

  14. Progress integrating ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology with accessory mineral geochemistry: towards better accuracy and higher precision time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoene, B.; Samperton, K. M.; Crowley, J. L.; Cottle, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly common that hand samples of plutonic and volcanic rocks contain zircon with dates that span between zero and >100 ka. This recognition comes from the increased application of U-series geochronology on young volcanic rocks and the increased precision to better than 0.1% on single zircons by the U-Pb ID-TIMS method. It has thus become more difficult to interpret such complicated datasets in terms of ashbed eruption or magma emplacement, which are critical constraints for geochronologic applications ranging from biotic evolution and the stratigraphic record to magmatic and metamorphic processes in orogenic belts. It is important, therefore, to develop methods that aid in interpreting which minerals, if any, date the targeted process. One promising tactic is to better integrate accessory mineral geochemistry with high-precision ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology. These dual constraints can 1) identify cogenetic populations of minerals, and 2) record magmatic or metamorphic fluid evolution through time. Goal (1) has been widely sought with in situ geochronology and geochemical analysis but is limited by low-precision dates. Recent work has attempted to bridge this gap by retrieving the typically discarded elution from ion exchange chemistry that precedes ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology and analyzing it by ICP-MS (U-Pb TIMS-TEA). The result integrates geochemistry and high-precision geochronology from the exact same volume of material. The limitation of this method is the relatively coarse spatial resolution compared to in situ techniques, and thus averages potentially complicated trace element profiles through single minerals or mineral fragments. In continued work, we test the effect of this on zircon by beginning with CL imaging to reveal internal zonation and growth histories. This is followed by in situ LA-ICPMS trace element transects of imaged grains to reveal internal geochemical zonation. The same grains are then removed from grain-mount, fragmented, and

  15. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  16. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  17. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  18. Clock accuracy and precision evolve as a consequence of selection for adult emergence in a narrow window of time in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Nisha N; Vaze, Koustubh M; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2012-10-15

    Although circadian clocks are believed to have evolved under the action of periodic selection pressures (selection on phasing) present in the geophysical environment, there is very little rigorous and systematic empirical evidence to support this. In the present study, we examined the effect of selection for adult emergence in a narrow window of time on the circadian rhythms of fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. Selection was imposed in every generation by choosing flies that emerged during a 1 h window of time close to the emergence peak of baseline/control flies under 12 h:12 h light:dark cycles. To study the effect of selection on circadian clocks we estimated several quantifiable features that reflect inter- and intra-individual variance in adult emergence and locomotor activity rhythms. The results showed that with increasing generations, incidence of adult emergence and activity of adult flies during the 1 h selection window increased gradually in the selected populations. Flies from the selected populations were more homogenous in their clock period, were more coherent in their phase of entrainment, and displayed enhanced accuracy and precision in their emergence and activity rhythms compared with controls. These results thus suggest that circadian clocks in D. melanogaster evolve enhanced accuracy and precision when subjected to selection for emergence in a narrow window of time.

  19. Accuracy and Precision in the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) Dataset in Light of the JOSIE-2000 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Thompson, Anne M.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Oltmans, S. J.; Smit, H. G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1998 the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) project has provided over 2000 ozone profiles over eleven southern hemisphere tropical and subtropical stations. Balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes are used to measure ozone. The data are archived at: &ttp://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/shadoz>. In analysis of ozonesonde imprecision within the SHADOZ dataset, Thompson et al. [JGR, 108,8238,20031 we pointed out that variations in ozonesonde technique (sensor solution strength, instrument manufacturer, data processing) could lead to station-to-station biases within the SHADOZ dataset. Imprecisions and accuracy in the SHADOZ dataset are examined in light of new data. First, SHADOZ total ozone column amounts are compared to version 8 TOMS (2004 release). As for TOMS version 7, satellite total ozone is usually higher than the integrated column amount from the sounding. Discrepancies between the sonde and satellite datasets decline two percentage points on average, compared to version 7 TOMS offsets. Second, the SHADOZ station data are compared to results of chamber simulations (JOSE-2000, Juelich Ozonesonde Intercomparison Experiment) in which the various SHADOZ techniques were evaluated. The range of JOSE column deviations from a standard instrument (-10%) in the chamber resembles that of the SHADOZ station data. It appears that some systematic variations in the SHADOZ ozone record are accounted for by differences in solution strength, data processing and instrument type (manufacturer).

  20. Automatic optimal filament segmentation with sub-pixel accuracy using generalized linear models and B-spline level-sets.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xun; Geyer, Veikko F; Bowne-Anderson, Hugo; Howard, Jonathon; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2016-08-01

    Biological filaments, such as actin filaments, microtubules, and cilia, are often imaged using different light-microscopy techniques. Reconstructing the filament curve from the acquired images constitutes the filament segmentation problem. Since filaments have lower dimensionality than the image itself, there is an inherent trade-off between tracing the filament with sub-pixel accuracy and avoiding noise artifacts. Here, we present a globally optimal filament segmentation method based on B-spline vector level-sets and a generalized linear model for the pixel intensity statistics. We show that the resulting optimization problem is convex and can hence be solved with global optimality. We introduce a simple and efficient algorithm to compute such optimal filament segmentations, and provide an open-source implementation as an ImageJ/Fiji plugin. We further derive an information-theoretic lower bound on the filament segmentation error, quantifying how well an algorithm could possibly do given the information in the image. We show that our algorithm asymptotically reaches this bound in the spline coefficients. We validate our method in comprehensive benchmarks, compare with other methods, and show applications from fluorescence, phase-contrast, and dark-field microscopy.

  1. Evaluation of accuracy of non-linear finite element computations for surgical simulation: study using brain phantom.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wittek, A; Singh, S; Joldes, G; Washio, T; Chinzei, K; Miller, K

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the accuracy of non-linear finite element computations in application to surgical simulation was evaluated by comparing the experiment and modelling of indentation of the human brain phantom. The evaluation was realised by comparing forces acting on the indenter and the deformation of the brain phantom. The deformation of the brain phantom was measured by tracking 3D motions of X-ray opaque markers, placed within the brain phantom using a custom-built bi-plane X-ray image intensifier system. The model was implemented using the ABAQUS(TM) finite element solver. Realistic geometry obtained from magnetic resonance images and specific constitutive properties determined through compression tests were used in the model. The model accurately predicted the indentation force-displacement relations and marker displacements. Good agreement between modelling and experimental results verifies the reliability of the finite element modelling techniques used in this study and confirms the predictive power of these techniques in surgical simulation. PMID:21153973

  2. Automatic optimal filament segmentation with sub-pixel accuracy using generalized linear models and B-spline level-sets.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xun; Geyer, Veikko F; Bowne-Anderson, Hugo; Howard, Jonathon; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2016-08-01

    Biological filaments, such as actin filaments, microtubules, and cilia, are often imaged using different light-microscopy techniques. Reconstructing the filament curve from the acquired images constitutes the filament segmentation problem. Since filaments have lower dimensionality than the image itself, there is an inherent trade-off between tracing the filament with sub-pixel accuracy and avoiding noise artifacts. Here, we present a globally optimal filament segmentation method based on B-spline vector level-sets and a generalized linear model for the pixel intensity statistics. We show that the resulting optimization problem is convex and can hence be solved with global optimality. We introduce a simple and efficient algorithm to compute such optimal filament segmentations, and provide an open-source implementation as an ImageJ/Fiji plugin. We further derive an information-theoretic lower bound on the filament segmentation error, quantifying how well an algorithm could possibly do given the information in the image. We show that our algorithm asymptotically reaches this bound in the spline coefficients. We validate our method in comprehensive benchmarks, compare with other methods, and show applications from fluorescence, phase-contrast, and dark-field microscopy. PMID:27104582

  3. TanDEM-X IDEM precision and accuracy assessment based on a large assembly of differential GNSS measurements in Kruger National Park, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baade, J.; Schmullius, C.

    2016-09-01

    High resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM) represent fundamental data for a wide range of Earth surface process studies. Over the past years, the German TanDEM-X mission acquired data for a new, truly global Digital Elevation Model with unprecedented geometric resolution, precision and accuracy. First TanDEM Intermediate Digital Elevation Models (i.e. IDEM) with a geometric resolution from 0.4 to 3 arcsec have been made available for scientific purposes in November 2014. This includes four 1° × 1° tiles covering the Kruger National Park in South Africa. Here, we document the results of a local scale IDEM height accuracy validation exercise utilizing over 10,000 RTK-GNSS-based ground survey points from fourteen sites characterized by mainly pristine Savanna vegetation. The vertical precision of the ground checkpoints is 0.02 m (1σ). Selected precursor data sets (SRTMGL1, SRTM41, ASTER-GDEM2) are included in the analysis to facilitate the comparison. Although IDEM represents an intermediate product on the way to the new global TanDEM-X DEM, expected to be released in late 2016, it allows first insight into the properties of the forthcoming product. Remarkably, the TanDEM-X tiles include a number of auxiliary files providing detailed information pertinent to a user-based quality assessment. We present examples for the utilization of this information in the framework of a local scale study including the identification of height readings contaminated by water. Furthermore, this study provides evidence for the high precision and accuracy of IDEM height readings and the sensitivity to canopy cover. For open terrain, the 0.4 arcsec resolution edition (IDEM04) yields an average bias of 0.20 ± 0.05 m (95% confidence interval, Cl95), a RMSE = 1.03 m and an absolute vertical height error (LE90) of 1.5 [1.4, 1.7] m (Cl95). The corresponding values for the lower resolution IDEM editions are about the same and provide evidence for the high quality of the IDEM products

  4. The science of and advanced technology for cost-effective manufacture of high precision engineering products. Volume 4. Thermal effects on the accuracy of numerically controlled machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, R.; Barash, M. M.; Liu, C. R.

    1985-10-01

    Thermal effects on the accuracy of numerically controlled machine tools are specially important in the context of unmanned manufacture or under conditions of precision metal cutting. Removal of the operator from the direct control of the metal cutting process has created problems in terms of maintaining accuracy. The objective of this research is to study thermal effects on the accuracy of numerically controlled machine tools. The initial part of the research report is concerned with the analysis of a hypothetical machine. The thermal characteristics of this machine are studied. Numerical methods for evaluating the errors exhibited by the slides of the machine are proposed and the possibility of predicting thermally induced errors by the use of regression equations is investigated. A method for computing the workspace error is also presented. The final part is concerned with the actual measurement of errors on a modern CNC machining center. Thermal influences on the errors is the main objective of the experimental work. Thermal influences on the errors of machine tools are predictable. Techniques for determining thermal effects on machine tools at a design stage are also presented. ; Error models and prediction; Metrology; Automation.

  5. Development of a compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system for precision linear stage metrology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangzhi; Gillmer, Steven R; Woody, Shane C; Ellis, Jonathan D

    2016-06-01

    A compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system which enables fast, accurate calibration, and error mapping of precision linear stages is presented. The novel design has the advantages of simplicity, compactness, and relatively low cost. This proposed sensor can simultaneously measure displacement, two straightness errors, and changes in pitch, yaw, and roll using a single optical beam traveling between the measurement system and a small target. The optical configuration of the system and the working principle for all degrees-of-freedom are presented along with the influence and compensation of crosstalk motions in roll and straightness measurements. Several comparison experiments are conducted to investigate the feasibility and performance of the proposed system in each degree-of-freedom independently. Comparison experiments to a commercial interferometer demonstrate error standard deviations of 0.33 μm in straightness, 0.14 μrad in pitch, 0.44 μradin yaw, and 45.8 μrad in roll. PMID:27370499

  6. A precise measurement of the left-right asymmetry of Z Boson production at the SLAC linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    We present a precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry of Z boson production (A{sub LR}) observed in 1993 data at the SLAC linear collider. The A{sub LR} experiment provides a direct measure of the effective weak mixing angle through the initial state couplings of the electron to the Z. During the 1993 run of the SLC, the SLD detector recorded 49,392 Z events produced by the collision of longitudinally polarized electrons on unpolarized positrons at a center-of-mass energy of 91.26 GeV. A Compton polarimeter measured the luminosity-weighted electron polarization to be (63.4{+-}1.3)%. ALR was measured to be 0.1617{+-}0.0071(stat.){+-}0.0033(syst.), which determines the effective weak mixing angle to be sin {sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2292{+-}0.0009(stat.){+-}0.0004(syst.). This measurement of A{sub LR} is incompatible at the level of two standard deviations with the value predicted by a fit of several other electroweak measurements to the Standard Model.

  7. Development of a compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system for precision linear stage metrology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangzhi; Gillmer, Steven R; Woody, Shane C; Ellis, Jonathan D

    2016-06-01

    A compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system which enables fast, accurate calibration, and error mapping of precision linear stages is presented. The novel design has the advantages of simplicity, compactness, and relatively low cost. This proposed sensor can simultaneously measure displacement, two straightness errors, and changes in pitch, yaw, and roll using a single optical beam traveling between the measurement system and a small target. The optical configuration of the system and the working principle for all degrees-of-freedom are presented along with the influence and compensation of crosstalk motions in roll and straightness measurements. Several comparison experiments are conducted to investigate the feasibility and performance of the proposed system in each degree-of-freedom independently. Comparison experiments to a commercial interferometer demonstrate error standard deviations of 0.33 μm in straightness, 0.14 μrad in pitch, 0.44 μradin yaw, and 45.8 μrad in roll.

  8. Development of a compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system for precision linear stage metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangzhi; Gillmer, Steven R.; Woody, Shane C.; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    A compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system which enables fast, accurate calibration, and error mapping of precision linear stages is presented. The novel design has the advantages of simplicity, compactness, and relatively low cost. This proposed sensor can simultaneously measure displacement, two straightness errors, and changes in pitch, yaw, and roll using a single optical beam traveling between the measurement system and a small target. The optical configuration of the system and the working principle for all degrees-of-freedom are presented along with the influence and compensation of crosstalk motions in roll and straightness measurements. Several comparison experiments are conducted to investigate the feasibility and performance of the proposed system in each degree-of-freedom independently. Comparison experiments to a commercial interferometer demonstrate error standard deviations of 0.33 μm in straightness, 0.14 μrad in pitch, 0.44 μradin yaw, and 45.8 μrad in roll.

  9. SU-E-J-147: Monte Carlo Study of the Precision and Accuracy of Proton CT Reconstructed Relative Stopping Power Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Dedes, G; Asano, Y; Parodi, K; Arbor, N; Dauvergne, D; Testa, E; Letang, J; Rit, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of the intrinsic performances of proton computed tomography (pCT) as a modality for treatment planning in proton therapy. The performance of an ideal pCT scanner is studied as a function of various parameters. Methods: Using GATE/Geant4, we simulated an ideal pCT scanner and scans of several cylindrical phantoms with various tissue equivalent inserts of different sizes. Insert materials were selected in order to be of clinical relevance. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm taking into account the scattering of protons into the phantom. To quantify the performance of the ideal pCT scanner, we study the precision and the accuracy with respect to the theoretical relative stopping power ratios (RSP) values for different beam energies, imaging doses, insert sizes and detector positions. The planning range uncertainty resulting from the reconstructed RSP is also assessed by comparison with the range of the protons in the analytically simulated phantoms. Results: The results indicate that pCT can intrinsically achieve RSP resolution below 1%, for most examined tissues at beam energies below 300 MeV and for imaging doses around 1 mGy. RSP maps accuracy of less than 0.5 % is observed for most tissue types within the studied dose range (0.2–1.5 mGy). Finally, the uncertainty in the proton range due to the accuracy of the reconstructed RSP map is well below 1%. Conclusion: This work explores the intrinsic performance of pCT as an imaging modality for proton treatment planning. The obtained results show that under ideal conditions, 3D RSP maps can be reconstructed with an accuracy better than 1%. Hence, pCT is a promising candidate for reducing the range uncertainties introduced by the use of X-ray CT alongside with a semiempirical calibration to RSP.Supported by the DFG Cluster of Excellence Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  10. An experimental analysis of accuracy and precision of a high-speed strain-gage system based on the direct-resistance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, P.; del Prete, Z.

    1992-03-01

    An experimental study on the relative merits of using a high-speed digital-acquisition system to measure directly the strain-gage resistance, rather than using a conventional Wheatstone bridge, is carried out. Both strain gages, with a nominal resistance of 120 ohm and 1 kohm, were simulated with precision resistors, and the output signals were acquired over a time of 48 and 144 hours; furthermore, the effects in metrological performances caused by a statistical filtering were evaluated. The results show that the implementation of the statistical filtering gains a considerable improvement in gathering strain-gage-resistance readings. On the other hand, such a procedure causes, obviously, a loss of performance with regard to the acquisition rate, and therefore to the dynamic data-collecting capabilities. In any case, the intrinsic resolution of the 12-bit a/d converter, utilized in the present experimental analysis, causes a limitation for measurement accuracy in the range of hundreds microns/m.

  11. High-precision, high-accuracy ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography using vertical cavity surface emitting laser light source.

    PubMed

    Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Liu, Jonathan J; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Jiang, James; Fujimoto, James G; Cable, Alex E

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using vertical cavity surface emitting laser technology. The ability to adjust laser parameters and high-speed acquisition enables imaging ranges from a few centimeters up to meters using the same instrument. We discuss the challenges of long-range OCT imaging. In vivo human-eye imaging and optical component characterization are presented. The precision and accuracy of OCT-based measurements are assessed and are important for ocular biometry and reproducible intraocular distance measurement before cataract surgery. Additionally, meter-range measurement of fiber length and multicentimeter-range imaging are reported. 3D visualization supports a class of industrial imaging applications of OCT.

  12. Achieving plane wave accuracy in linear-scaling density functional theory applied to periodic systems: A case study on crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Haynes, Peter D.

    2007-10-01

    Linear-scaling methods for density functional theory promise to revolutionize the scope and scale of first-principles quantum mechanical calculations. Crystalline silicon has been the system of choice for exploratory tests of such methods in the literature, yet attempts at quantitative comparisons under linear-scaling conditions with traditional methods or experimental results have not been forthcoming. A detailed study using the ONETEP code is reported here, demonstrating for the first time that plane wave accuracy can be achieved in linear-scaling calculations on periodic systems.

  13. In situ sulfur isotope analysis of sulfide minerals by SIMS: Precision and accuracy, with application to thermometry of ~3.5Ga Pilbara cherts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozdon, R.; Kita, N.T.; Huberty, J.M.; Fournelle, J.H.; Johnson, C.A.; Valley, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurement of sulfur isotope ratios is a potentially powerful technique for in situ studies in many areas of Earth and planetary science. Tests were performed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of sulfur isotope analysis by SIMS in a set of seven well-characterized, isotopically homogeneous natural sulfide standards. The spot-to-spot and grain-to-grain precision for δ34S is ± 0.3‰ for chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite, and ± 0.2‰ for pyrite (2SD) using a 1.6 nA primary beam that was focused to 10 µm diameter with a Gaussian-beam density distribution. Likewise, multiple δ34S measurements within single grains of sphalerite are within ± 0.3‰. However, between individual sphalerite grains, δ34S varies by up to 3.4‰ and the grain-to-grain precision is poor (± 1.7‰, n = 20). Measured values of δ34S correspond with analysis pit microstructures, ranging from smooth surfaces for grains with high δ34S values, to pronounced ripples and terraces in analysis pits from grains featuring low δ34S values. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) shows that individual sphalerite grains are single crystals, whereas crystal orientation varies from grain-to-grain. The 3.4‰ variation in measured δ34S between individual grains of sphalerite is attributed to changes in instrumental bias caused by different crystal orientations with respect to the incident primary Cs+ beam. High δ34S values in sphalerite correlate to when the Cs+ beam is parallel to the set of directions , from [111] to [110], which are preferred directions for channeling and focusing in diamond-centered cubic crystals. Crystal orientation effects on instrumental bias were further detected in galena. However, as a result of the perfect cleavage along {100} crushed chips of galena are typically cube-shaped and likely to be preferentially oriented, thus crystal orientation effects on instrumental bias may be obscured. Test were made to improve the analytical

  14. An in-depth evaluation of accuracy and precision in Hg isotopic analysis via pneumatic nebulization and cold vapor generation multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rua-Ibarz, Ana; Bolea-Fernandez, Eduardo; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) isotopic analysis via multi-collector inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can provide relevant biogeochemical information by revealing sources, pathways, and sinks of this highly toxic metal. In this work, the capabilities and limitations of two different sample introduction systems, based on pneumatic nebulization (PN) and cold vapor generation (CVG), respectively, were evaluated in the context of Hg isotopic analysis via MC-ICP-MS. The effect of (i) instrument settings and acquisition parameters, (ii) concentration of analyte element (Hg), and internal standard (Tl)-used for mass discrimination correction purposes-and (iii) different mass bias correction approaches on the accuracy and precision of Hg isotope ratio results was evaluated. The extent and stability of mass bias were assessed in a long-term study (18 months, n = 250), demonstrating a precision ≤0.006% relative standard deviation (RSD). CVG-MC-ICP-MS showed an approximately 20-fold enhancement in Hg signal intensity compared with PN-MC-ICP-MS. For CVG-MC-ICP-MS, the mass bias induced by instrumental mass discrimination was accurately corrected for by using either external correction in a sample-standard bracketing approach (SSB) or double correction, consisting of the use of Tl as internal standard in a revised version of the Russell law (Baxter approach), followed by SSB. Concomitant matrix elements did not affect CVG-ICP-MS results. Neither with PN, nor with CVG, any evidence for mass-independent discrimination effects in the instrument was observed within the experimental precision obtained. CVG-MC-ICP-MS was finally used for Hg isotopic analysis of reference materials (RMs) of relevant environmental origin. The isotopic composition of Hg in RMs of marine biological origin testified of mass-independent fractionation that affected the odd-numbered Hg isotopes. While older RMs were used for validation purposes, novel Hg isotopic data are provided for the

  15. Design of decoupled dual servo stage with voice coil motor and linear motor for XY long stroke ultra-precision scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Young-Man; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Hong, Dong-Pyo; Kim, Koung-Suk; Lee, Suk-Won; Lee, Moon-Gu

    2005-12-01

    A decoupled dual servo (DDS) stage for ultra-precision scanning system is introduced in this paper. The proposed DDS consists of a 3 axis fine stage for handling and carrying workpieces and a XY coarse stage. Especially, the DDS uses three voice coil motors (VCM) as a planar actuation system of the fine stage to reduce the disturbances due to any mechanical connections with its coarse stage. VCMs are governed by Lorentz law. According to the law and its structure, there are no mechanical connections between coils and magnetic circuits. Moreover, the VCM doesn't have force ripples due to imperfections of commutation components of linear motor systems - currents and flux densities. However, due to the VCM's mechanical constraints the working range of the fine is about 5mm2. To break that hurdle, the coarse stage with linear motors is used for the fine stage to move about 200mm2. Because of the above reasons, the proposed DDS can achieve higher precision scanning than other stages with only one servo. Using MATLAB's Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP), the VCMs are optimally designed for the highest force under conditions and constraints such as thermal dissipations due to its coil, its size, and so on. For linear motors, Halbach magnet linear motor is proposed and optimally designed in this paper. In addition, for their smooth movements without any frictions, guide systems of the DDS are composed of air bearings. And then, precisely to get their positions, linear scales with 0.1um resolution are used for the coarse's XY motions and plane mirror laser interferometers with 20nm for the fine's XYθz. On scanning, the two stages have same trajectories and are controlled. The control algorithm is Parallel method. The embodied ultra-precision scanning system has about 100nm tracking error and in-positioning stability.

  16. Guidelines for Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Analysis of Trabecular Bone-Rich Regions in Mice: Improved Precision, Accuracy, and Sensitivity for Assessing Longitudinal Bone Changes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiayu; Lee, Soonchul; Uyeda, Michael; Tanjaya, Justine; Kim, Jong Kil; Pan, Hsin Chuan; Reese, Patricia; Stodieck, Louis; Lin, Andy; Ting, Kang; Kwak, Jin Hee; Soo, Chia

    2016-05-01

    Trabecular bone is frequently studied in osteoporosis research because changes in trabecular bone are the most common cause of osteoporotic fractures. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) analysis specific to trabecular bone-rich regions is crucial to longitudinal osteoporosis research. The purpose of this study is to define a novel method for accurately analyzing trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA. This method will be utilized to analyze scans obtained from the International Space Station in an upcoming study of microgravity-induced bone loss. Thirty 12-week-old BALB/c mice were studied. The novel method was developed by preanalyzing trabecular bone-rich sites in the distal femur, proximal tibia, and lumbar vertebrae via high-resolution X-ray imaging followed by DXA and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The key DXA steps described by the novel method were (1) proper mouse positioning, (2) region of interest (ROI) sizing, and (3) ROI positioning. The precision of the new method was assessed by reliability tests and a 14-week longitudinal study. The bone mineral content (BMC) data from DXA was then compared to the BMC data from micro-CT to assess accuracy. Bone mineral density (BMD) intra-class correlation coefficients of the new method ranging from 0.743 to 0.945 and Levene's test showing that there was significantly lower variances of data generated by new method both verified its consistency. By new method, a Bland-Altman plot displayed good agreement between DXA BMC and micro-CT BMC for all sites and they were strongly correlated at the distal femur and proximal tibia (r=0.846, p<0.01; r=0.879, p<0.01, respectively). The results suggest that the novel method for site-specific analysis of trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA yields more precise, accurate, and repeatable BMD measurements than the conventional method.

  17. Guidelines for Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Analysis of Trabecular Bone-Rich Regions in Mice: Improved Precision, Accuracy, and Sensitivity for Assessing Longitudinal Bone Changes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiayu; Lee, Soonchul; Uyeda, Michael; Tanjaya, Justine; Kim, Jong Kil; Pan, Hsin Chuan; Reese, Patricia; Stodieck, Louis; Lin, Andy; Ting, Kang; Kwak, Jin Hee; Soo, Chia

    2016-05-01

    Trabecular bone is frequently studied in osteoporosis research because changes in trabecular bone are the most common cause of osteoporotic fractures. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) analysis specific to trabecular bone-rich regions is crucial to longitudinal osteoporosis research. The purpose of this study is to define a novel method for accurately analyzing trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA. This method will be utilized to analyze scans obtained from the International Space Station in an upcoming study of microgravity-induced bone loss. Thirty 12-week-old BALB/c mice were studied. The novel method was developed by preanalyzing trabecular bone-rich sites in the distal femur, proximal tibia, and lumbar vertebrae via high-resolution X-ray imaging followed by DXA and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The key DXA steps described by the novel method were (1) proper mouse positioning, (2) region of interest (ROI) sizing, and (3) ROI positioning. The precision of the new method was assessed by reliability tests and a 14-week longitudinal study. The bone mineral content (BMC) data from DXA was then compared to the BMC data from micro-CT to assess accuracy. Bone mineral density (BMD) intra-class correlation coefficients of the new method ranging from 0.743 to 0.945 and Levene's test showing that there was significantly lower variances of data generated by new method both verified its consistency. By new method, a Bland-Altman plot displayed good agreement between DXA BMC and micro-CT BMC for all sites and they were strongly correlated at the distal femur and proximal tibia (r=0.846, p<0.01; r=0.879, p<0.01, respectively). The results suggest that the novel method for site-specific analysis of trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA yields more precise, accurate, and repeatable BMD measurements than the conventional method. PMID:26956416

  18. Five degree-of-freedom control of an ultra-precision magnetically-suspended linear bearing. Ph.D. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumper, David L.; Slocum, A. H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors constructed a high precision linear bearing. A 10.7 kg platen measuring 125 mm by 125 mm by 350 mm is suspended and controlled in five degrees of freedom by seven electromagnets. The position of the platen is measured by five capacitive probes which have nanometer resolution. The suspension acts as a linear bearing, allowing linear travel of 50 mm in the sixth degree of freedom. In the laboratory, this bearing system has demonstrated position stability of 5 nm peak-to-peak. This is believed to be the highest position stability yet demonstrated in a magnetic suspension system. Performance at this level confirms that magnetic suspensions can address motion control requirements at the nanometer level. The experimental effort associated with this linear bearing system is described. Major topics are the development of models for the suspension, implementation of control algorithms, and measurement of the actual bearing performance. Suggestions for the future improvement of the bearing system are given.

  19. Functional wave time-lag focusing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer: improved mass accuracy.

    PubMed

    Whittal, R M; Russon, L M; Weinberger, S R; Li, L

    1997-06-01

    A strength of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is its ability to analyze mixtures without separation. MALDI mass spectrometers capable of providing a linear mass calibration over a broad mass range should find wide use in these applications. This work addresses issues pertinent to mass measurement accuracy of a time-lag focusing MALDI time-of-flight instrument and presents a new approach to improving mass accuracy by using a functional wave extraction pulse, instead of a square wave, for time-lag focusing. A model is described of an ideal extraction pulse shape that provides constant total kinetic energy for all ions. If total kinetic energy is constant, then there is an exact linear correlation between ion mass and flight time raised to the second power. Using a descending wave extraction pulse, it is demonstrated that mass accuracy of better than 30 ppm using two internal calibrants and better than 70 ppm using external calibrants can be obtained over a 25 ku mass range. The practical aspects of an instrument needed to obtain consistent mass accuracy is discussed. It is found that ion flight time shows a small dependence upon laser flux; flight times increase slightly as the flux increases. But this dependence is much smaller than is observed in continuous-extraction MALDI.

  20. The Relationship between a Linear Combination of Intelligence, Musical Background, Rhythm Ability and Tapping Ability to Typewriting Speed and Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fante, Cheryl H.

    This study was conducted in an attempt to identify any predictor or combination of predictors of a beginning typewriting student's success. Variables of intelligence, rhythmic ability, musical background, and tapping ability were combined to study their relationship to typewriting speed and accuracy. A sample of 109 high school students was…

  1. Improved Accuracy and Precision in LA-ICP-MS U-Th/Pb Dating of Zircon through the Reduction of Crystallinity Related Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, W.; McDonald, A.; Hamilton, B.; Guest, B.

    2015-12-01

    The accuracy of zircon U-Th/Pb ages generated by LA-ICP-MS is limited by systematic bias resulting from differences in crystallinity of the primary reference and that of the unknowns being analyzed. In general, the use of a highly crystalline primary reference will tend to bias analyses of materials of lesser crystallinity toward older ages. When dating igneous rocks, bias can be minimized by matching the crystallinity of the primary reference to that of the unknowns. However, the crystallinity of the unknowns is often not well constrained prior to ablation, as it is a function of U and Th concentration, crystallization age, and thermal history. Likewise, selecting an appropriate primary reference is impossible when dating detrital rocks where zircons with differing ages, protoliths, and thermal histories are analyzed in the same session. We investigate the causes of systematic bias using Raman spectroscopy and measurements of the ablated pit geometry. The crystallinity of five zircon reference materials with ages between 28.2 Ma and 2674 Ma was estimated using Raman spectroscopy. Zircon references varied from being highly crystalline to highly metamict, with individual reference materials plotting as distinct clusters in peak wavelength versus Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) space. A strong positive correlation (R2=0.69) was found between the FWHM for the band at ~1000 cm-1 in the Raman spectrum of the zircon and its ablation rate, suggesting the degree of crystallinity is a primary control on ablation rate in zircons. A moderate positive correlation (R2=0.37) was found between ablation rate and the difference between the age determined by LA-ICP-MS and the accepted ID-TIMS age (ΔAge). We use the measured, intra-sessional relationship between ablation rate and ΔAge of secondary references to reduce systematic bias. Rapid, high-precision measurement of ablated pit geometries using an optical profilometer and custom MatLab algorithm facilitates the implementation

  2. Technical Note: Precision and accuracy of a commercially available CT optically stimulated luminescent dosimetry system for the measurement of CT dose index

    SciTech Connect

    Vrieze, Thomas J.; Sturchio, Glenn M.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the precision and accuracy of CTDI{sub 100} measurements made using commercially available optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters (Landaur, Inc.) as beam width, tube potential, and attenuating material were varied. Methods: One hundred forty OSL dosimeters were individually exposed to a single axial CT scan, either in air, a 16-cm (head), or 32-cm (body) CTDI phantom at both center and peripheral positions. Scans were performed using nominal total beam widths of 3.6, 6, 19.2, and 28.8 mm at 120 kV and 28.8 mm at 80 kV. Five measurements were made for each of 28 parameter combinations. Measurements were made under the same conditions using a 100-mm long CTDI ion chamber. Exposed OSL dosimeters were returned to the manufacturer, who reported dose to air (in mGy) as a function of distance along the probe, integrated dose, and CTDI{sub 100}. Results: The mean precision averaged over 28 datasets containing five measurements each was 1.4%{+-} 0.6%, range = 0.6%-2.7% for OSL and 0.08%{+-} 0.06%, range = 0.02%-0.3% for ion chamber. The root mean square (RMS) percent differences between OSL and ion chamber CTDI{sub 100} values were 13.8%, 6.4%, and 8.7% for in-air, head, and body measurements, respectively, with an overall RMS percent difference of 10.1%. OSL underestimated CTDI{sub 100} relative to the ion chamber 21/28 times (75%). After manual correction of the 80 kV measurements, the RMS percent differences between OSL and ion chamber measurements were 9.9% and 10.0% for 80 and 120 kV, respectively. Conclusions: Measurements of CTDI{sub 100} with commercially available CT OSL dosimeters had a percent standard deviation of 1.4%. After energy-dependent correction factors were applied, the RMS percent difference in the measured CTDI{sub 100} values was about 10%, with a tendency of OSL to underestimate CTDI relative to the ion chamber. Unlike ion chamber methods, however, OSL dosimeters allow measurement of the radiation dose profile.

  3. Technical Note: Precision and accuracy of a commercially available CT optically stimulated luminescent dosimetry system for the measurement of CT dose index

    PubMed Central

    Vrieze, Thomas J.; Sturchio, Glenn M.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the precision and accuracy of CTDI100 measurements made using commercially available optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters (Landaur, Inc.) as beam width, tube potential, and attenuating material were varied. Methods: One hundred forty OSL dosimeters were individually exposed to a single axial CT scan, either in air, a 16-cm (head), or 32-cm (body) CTDI phantom at both center and peripheral positions. Scans were performed using nominal total beam widths of 3.6, 6, 19.2, and 28.8 mm at 120 kV and 28.8 mm at 80 kV. Five measurements were made for each of 28 parameter combinations. Measurements were made under the same conditions using a 100-mm long CTDI ion chamber. Exposed OSL dosimeters were returned to the manufacturer, who reported dose to air (in mGy) as a function of distance along the probe, integrated dose, and CTDI100. Results: The mean precision averaged over 28 datasets containing five measurements each was 1.4% ± 0.6%, range = 0.6%–2.7% for OSL and 0.08% ± 0.06%, range = 0.02%–0.3% for ion chamber. The root mean square (RMS) percent differences between OSL and ion chamber CTDI100 values were 13.8%, 6.4%, and 8.7% for in-air, head, and body measurements, respectively, with an overall RMS percent difference of 10.1%. OSL underestimated CTDI100 relative to the ion chamber 21/28 times (75%). After manual correction of the 80 kV measurements, the RMS percent differences between OSL and ion chamber measurements were 9.9% and 10.0% for 80 and 120 kV, respectively. Conclusions: Measurements of CTDI100 with commercially available CT OSL dosimeters had a percent standard deviation of 1.4%. After energy-dependent correction factors were applied, the RMS percent difference in the measured CTDI100 values was about 10%, with a tendency of OSL to underestimate CTDI relative to the ion chamber. Unlike ion chamber methods, however, OSL dosimeters allow measurement of the radiation dose profile. PMID:23127052

  4. A method for estimation of accuracy of dose delivery with dynamic slit windows in medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, R; Binukumar, J P; Sivakumar, S S; Krishnamurthy, K; Davis, C A

    2008-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) clinical dose delivery is based on computer-controlled multileaf movements at different velocities. To test the accuracy of modulation of the beam periodically, quality assurance (QA) methods are necessary. Using a cylindrical phantom, dose delivery was checked at a constant geometry for sweeping fields. Repeated measurements with an in-house designed methodology over a period of 1 year indicate that the method is very sensitive to check the proper functioning of such dose delivery in medical linacs. A cylindrical perspex phantom with facility to accurately position a 0.6-cc (FC 65) ion chamber at constant depth at isocenter, (SA 24 constancy check tool phantom for MU check, Scanditronix Wellhofer) was used. Dosimeter readings were integrated for 4-mm, 10-mm, 20-mm sweeping fields and for 3 angular positions of the gantry periodically. Consistency of standard sweeping field output (10-mm slit width) and the ratios of outputs against other slit widths over a long period were reported. A 10-mm sweeping field output was found reproducible within an accuracy of 0.03% (n = 25) over 1 year. Four-millimeter, 20-mm outputs expressed as ratio with respect to 10-mm sweep output remained within a mean deviation of 0.2% and 0.03% respectively. Outputs at 3 gantry angles remained within 0.5%, showing that the effect of dynamic movements of multileaf collimator (MLC) on the output is minimal for angular positions of gantry. This method of QA is very simple and is recommended in addition to individual patient QA measurements, which reflect the accuracy of dose planning system. In addition to standard output and energy checks of linacs, the above measurements can be complemented so as to check proper functioning of multileaf collimator for dynamic field dose delivery.

  5. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y.-L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to a vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average, 91 % of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our setup, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our setup were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  6. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average 91% of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our set-up, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our set-up were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  7. A simple algorithm improves mass accuracy to 50-100 ppm for delayed extraction linear matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hack, Christopher A; Benner, W Henry

    2002-01-01

    A simple mathematical technique for improving mass calibration accuracy of linear delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOFMS) spectra is presented. The method involves fitting a parabola to a plot of Delta(m) vs. mass data where Delta(m) is the difference between the theoretical mass of calibrants and the mass obtained from a linear relationship between the square root of m/z and ion time of flight. The quadratic equation that describes the parabola is then used to correct the mass of unknowns by subtracting the deviation predicted by the quadratic equation from measured data. By subtracting the value of the parabola at each mass from the calibrated data, the accuracy of mass data points can be improved by factors of 10 or more. This method produces highly similar results whether or not initial ion velocity is accounted for in the calibration equation; consequently, there is no need to depend on that uncertain parameter when using the quadratic correction. This method can be used to correct the internally calibrated masses of protein digest peaks. The effect of nitrocellulose as a matrix additive is also briefly discussed, and it is shown that using nitrocellulose as an additive to the alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (alphaCHCA) matrix does not significantly change initial ion velocity but does change the average position of ions relative to the sample electrode at the instant the extraction voltage is applied.

  8. Improving power and accuracy of genome-wide association studies via a multi-locus mixed linear model methodology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Bo; Feng, Jian-Ying; Ren, Wen-Long; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Ling; Wen, Yang-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Dunwell, Jim M.; Xu, Shizhong; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been widely used in genetic dissection of complex traits. However, common methods are all based on a fixed-SNP-effect mixed linear model (MLM) and single marker analysis, such as efficient mixed model analysis (EMMA). These methods require Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, which often is too conservative when the number of markers is extremely large. To address this concern, we proposed a random-SNP-effect MLM (RMLM) and a multi-locus RMLM (MRMLM) for GWAS. The RMLM simply treats the SNP-effect as random, but it allows a modified Bonferroni correction to be used to calculate the threshold p value for significance tests. The MRMLM is a multi-locus model including markers selected from the RMLM method with a less stringent selection criterion. Due to the multi-locus nature, no multiple test correction is needed. Simulation studies show that the MRMLM is more powerful in QTN detection and more accurate in QTN effect estimation than the RMLM, which in turn is more powerful and accurate than the EMMA. To demonstrate the new methods, we analyzed six flowering time related traits in Arabidopsis thaliana and detected more genes than previous reported using the EMMA. Therefore, the MRMLM provides an alternative for multi-locus GWAS. PMID:26787347

  9. Improving power and accuracy of genome-wide association studies via a multi-locus mixed linear model methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Bo; Feng, Jian-Ying; Ren, Wen-Long; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Ling; Wen, Yang-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Dunwell, Jim M; Xu, Shizhong; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been widely used in genetic dissection of complex traits. However, common methods are all based on a fixed-SNP-effect mixed linear model (MLM) and single marker analysis, such as efficient mixed model analysis (EMMA). These methods require Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, which often is too conservative when the number of markers is extremely large. To address this concern, we proposed a random-SNP-effect MLM (RMLM) and a multi-locus RMLM (MRMLM) for GWAS. The RMLM simply treats the SNP-effect as random, but it allows a modified Bonferroni correction to be used to calculate the threshold p value for significance tests. The MRMLM is a multi-locus model including markers selected from the RMLM method with a less stringent selection criterion. Due to the multi-locus nature, no multiple test correction is needed. Simulation studies show that the MRMLM is more powerful in QTN detection and more accurate in QTN effect estimation than the RMLM, which in turn is more powerful and accurate than the EMMA. To demonstrate the new methods, we analyzed six flowering time related traits in Arabidopsis thaliana and detected more genes than previous reported using the EMMA. Therefore, the MRMLM provides an alternative for multi-locus GWAS. PMID:26787347

  10. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Experimental investigation on focusing characteristics of a He-Ne laser using circular Fresnel zone plate for high-precision alignment of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Masanori; Telada, Souichi; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2012-05-15

    We experimentally investigate the focusing characteristics of a He-Ne laser at the focal region for the high-precision alignment of long-distance linear accelerators using a circular Fresnel zone plate. The laser wave passing through the Fresnel zone plate having a focal length of 66.7 m propagates for a 268-m-long distance at atmospheric pressure. A new laser-based alignment system using Fresnel zone plates as the alignment targets is discussed. The transverse displacement of the focused spot of the laser is measured as a function of the displacement of the target by a detector installed at the focal point. Systematic studies on the focusing characteristics and alignment precision have been successfully conducted in this experiment. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations, and the alignment precision of the target is determined to be less than {+-}30 {mu}m. In this study, we perform a detailed experimental investigation on the laser propagation and focusing characteristics using the circular Fresnel zone plate at the focal region along with theoretical calculations.

  12. Non-linear partial least square regression increases the estimation accuracy of grass nitrogen and phosphorus using in situ hyperspectral and environmental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramoelo, A.; Skidmore, A. K.; Cho, M. A.; Mathieu, R.; Heitkönig, I. M. A.; Dudeni-Tlhone, N.; Schlerf, M.; Prins, H. H. T.

    2013-08-01

    Grass nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations are direct indicators of rangeland quality and provide imperative information for sound management of wildlife and livestock. It is challenging to estimate grass N and P concentrations using remote sensing in the savanna ecosystems. These areas are diverse and heterogeneous in soil and plant moisture, soil nutrients, grazing pressures, and human activities. The objective of the study is to test the performance of non-linear partial least squares regression (PLSR) for predicting grass N and P concentrations through integrating in situ hyperspectral remote sensing and environmental variables (climatic, edaphic and topographic). Data were collected along a land use gradient in the greater Kruger National Park region. The data consisted of: (i) in situ-measured hyperspectral spectra, (ii) environmental variables and measured grass N and P concentrations. The hyperspectral variables included published starch, N and protein spectral absorption features, red edge position, narrow-band indices such as simple ratio (SR) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The results of the non-linear PLSR were compared to those of conventional linear PLSR. Using non-linear PLSR, integrating in situ hyperspectral and environmental variables yielded the highest grass N and P estimation accuracy (R2 = 0.81, root mean square error (RMSE) = 0.08, and R2 = 0.80, RMSE = 0.03, respectively) as compared to using remote sensing variables only, and conventional PLSR. The study demonstrates the importance of an integrated modeling approach for estimating grass quality which is a crucial effort towards effective management and planning of protected and communal savanna ecosystems.

  13. NCLscan: accurate identification of non-co-linear transcripts (fusion, trans-splicing and circular RNA) with a good balance between sensitivity and precision

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Trees-Juen; Wu, Chan-Shuo; Chen, Chia-Ying; Hung, Li-Yuan; Chiang, Tai-Wei; Yang, Min-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of RNA-seq data often detects numerous ‘non-co-linear’ (NCL) transcripts, which comprised sequence segments that are topologically inconsistent with their corresponding DNA sequences in the reference genome. However, detection of NCL transcripts involves two major challenges: removal of false positives arising from alignment artifacts and discrimination between different types of NCL transcripts (trans-spliced, circular or fusion transcripts). Here, we developed a new NCL-transcript-detecting method (‘NCLscan’), which utilized a stepwise alignment strategy to almost completely eliminate false calls (>98% precision) without sacrificing true positives, enabling NCLscan outperform 18 other publicly-available tools (including fusion- and circular-RNA-detecting tools) in terms of sensitivity and precision, regardless of the generation strategy of simulated dataset, type of intragenic or intergenic NCL event, read depth of coverage, read length or expression level of NCL transcript. With the high accuracy, NCLscan was applied to distinguishing between trans-spliced, circular and fusion transcripts on the basis of poly(A)- and nonpoly(A)-selected RNA-seq data. We showed that circular RNAs were expressed more ubiquitously, more abundantly and less cell type-specifically than trans-spliced and fusion transcripts. Our study thus describes a robust pipeline for the discovery of NCL transcripts, and sheds light on the fundamental biology of these non-canonical RNA events in human transcriptome. PMID:26442529

  14. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ellens, N; Farahani, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasound B scan using 10 MHz linear probe in ocular trauma;results from a high burden country

    PubMed Central

    Shazlee, Muhammad Kashif; Ali, Muhammad; SaadAhmed, Muhammad; Hussain, Ammad; Hameed, Kamran; Lutfi, Irfan Amjad; Khan, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the diagnostic accuracy of Ultrasound B scan using 10 MHz linear probe in ocular trauma. Methods: A total of 61 patients with 63 ocular injuries were assessed during July 2013 to January 2014. All patients were referred to the department of Radiology from Emergency Room since adequate clinical assessment of the fundus was impossible because of the presence of opaque ocular media. Based on radiological diagnosis, the patients were provided treatment (surgical or medical). Clinical diagnosis was confirmed during surgical procedures or clinical follow-up. Results: A total of 63 ocular injuries were examined in 61 patients. The overall sensitivity was 91.5%, Specificity was 98.87%, Positive predictive value was 87.62 and Negative predictive value was 99%. Conclusion: Ultrasound B-scan is a sensitive, non invasive and rapid way of assessing intraocular damage caused by blunt or penetrating eye injuries. PMID:27182245

  16. Improvement in accuracy of multiple sequence alignment using novel group-to-group sequence alignment algorithm with piecewise linear gap cost

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shinsuke; Gotoh, Osamu; Yamana, Hayato

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a useful tool in bioinformatics. Although many MSA algorithms have been developed, there is still room for improvement in accuracy and speed. In the alignment of a family of protein sequences, global MSA algorithms perform better than local ones in many cases, while local ones perform better than global ones when some sequences have long insertions or deletions (indels) relative to others. Many recent leading MSA algorithms have incorporated pairwise alignment information obtained from a mixture of sources into their scoring system to improve accuracy of alignment containing long indels. Results We propose a novel group-to-group sequence alignment algorithm that uses a piecewise linear gap cost. We developed a program called PRIME, which employs our proposed algorithm to optimize the well-defined sum-of-pairs score. PRIME stands for Profile-based Randomized Iteration MEthod. We evaluated PRIME and some recent MSA programs using BAliBASE version 3.0 and PREFAB version 4.0 benchmarks. The results of benchmark tests showed that PRIME can construct accurate alignments comparable to the most accurate programs currently available, including L-INS-i of MAFFT, ProbCons, and T-Coffee. Conclusion PRIME enables users to construct accurate alignments without having to employ pairwise alignment information. PRIME is available at . PMID:17137519

  17. Propagation and stability characteristics of a 500-m-long laser-based fiducial line for high-precision alignment of long-distance linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Masanori; Telada, Souichi; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2013-09-01

    A laser-based alignment system with a He-Ne laser has been newly developed in order to precisely align accelerator units at the KEKB injector linac. The laser beam was first implemented as a 500-m-long fiducial straight line for alignment measurements. We experimentally investigated the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam passing through laser pipes in vacuum. The pointing stability at the last fiducial point was successfully obtained with the transverse displacements of ±40 μm level in one standard deviation by applying a feedback control. This pointing stability corresponds to an angle of ±0.08 μrad. This report contains a detailed description of the experimental investigation for the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam in the laser-based alignment system for long-distance linear accelerators.

  18. Propagation and stability characteristics of a 500-m-long laser-based fiducial line for high-precision alignment of long-distance linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Masanori; Telada, Souichi; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2013-09-15

    A laser-based alignment system with a He-Ne laser has been newly developed in order to precisely align accelerator units at the KEKB injector linac. The laser beam was first implemented as a 500-m-long fiducial straight line for alignment measurements. We experimentally investigated the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam passing through laser pipes in vacuum. The pointing stability at the last fiducial point was successfully obtained with the transverse displacements of ±40 μm level in one standard deviation by applying a feedback control. This pointing stability corresponds to an angle of ±0.08 μrad. This report contains a detailed description of the experimental investigation for the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam in the laser-based alignment system for long-distance linear accelerators.

  19. The effect of CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques on the accuracy of linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Whyms, B.J.; Vorperian, H.K.; Gentry, L.R.; Schimek, E.M.; Bersu, E.T.; Chung, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effect of scanning parameters on the accuracy of measurements from three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D-CT) mandible renderings. A broader range of acceptable parameters can increase the availability of CT studies for retrospective analysis. Study Design Three human mandibles and a phantom object were scanned using 18 combinations of slice thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm and three different threshold-based segmentations. Measurements of 3D-CT models and specimens were compared. Results Linear and angular measurements were accurate, irrespective of scanner parameters or rendering technique. Volume measurements were accurate with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, but not 2.5 mm. Surface area measurements were consistently inflated. Conclusions Linear, angular and volumetric measurements of mandible 3D-CT models can be confidently obtained from a range of parameters and rendering techniques. Slice thickness is the primary factor affecting volume measurements. These findings should also apply to 3D rendering using cone-beam-CT. PMID:23601224

  20. Detecting declines in the abundance of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) population: Understanding the accuracy, precision, and costs of our efforts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Al-Chokhachy, R.; Budy, P.; Conner, M.

    2009-01-01

    Using empirical field data for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), we evaluated the trade-off between power and sampling effort-cost using Monte Carlo simulations of commonly collected mark-recapture-resight and count data, and we estimated the power to detect changes in abundance across different time intervals. We also evaluated the effects of monitoring different components of a population and stratification methods on the precision of each method. Our results illustrate substantial variability in the relative precision, cost, and information gained from each approach. While grouping estimates by age or stage class substantially increased the precision of estimates, spatial stratification of sampling units resulted in limited increases in precision. Although mark-resight methods allowed for estimates of abundance versus indices of abundance, our results suggest snorkel surveys may be a more affordable monitoring approach across large spatial scales. Detecting a 25% decline in abundance after 5 years was not possible, regardless of technique (power = 0.80), without high sampling effort (48% of study site). Detecting a 25% decline was possible after 15 years, but still required high sampling efforts. Our results suggest detecting moderate changes in abundance of freshwater salmonids requires considerable resource and temporal commitments and highlight the difficulties of using abundance measures for monitoring bull trout populations.

  1. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals.

    PubMed

    Zuehlsdorff, T J; Hine, N D M; Payne, M C; Haynes, P D

    2015-11-28

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment. PMID:26627950

  2. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuehlsdorff, T. J.; Hine, N. D. M.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.

    2015-11-01

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment.

  3. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlsdorff, T. J. Payne, M. C.; Hine, N. D. M.; Haynes, P. D.

    2015-11-28

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment.

  4. Improved precision and accuracy for high-performance liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric exact mass measurement of small molecules from the simultaneous and controlled introduction of internal calibrants via a second electrospray nebuliser.

    PubMed

    Herniman, Julie M; Bristow, Tony W T; O'Connor, Gavin; Jarvis, Jackie; Langley, G John

    2004-01-01

    The use of a second electrospray nebuliser has proved to be highly successful for exact mass measurement during high-performance liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HPLC/FTICRMS). Much improved accuracy and precision of mass measurement were afforded by the introduction of the internal calibration solution, thus overcoming space charge issues due to the lack of control over relative ion abundances of the species eluting from the HPLC column. Further, issues of suppression of ionisation, observed when using a T-piece method, are addressed and this simple system has significant benefits over other more elaborate approaches providing data that compares very favourably with these other approaches. The technique is robust, flexible and transferable and can be used in conjunction with HPLC, infusion or flow injection analysis (FIA) to provide constant internal calibration signals to allow routine, accurate and precise mass measurements to be recorded.

  5. Sensor based real-time process monitoring for ultra-precision manufacturing processes with non-linearity and non-stationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyca, Omer Faruk

    This research investigates methodologies for real-time process monitoring in ultra-precision manufacturing processes, specifically, chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) and ultra-precision machining (UPM), are investigated in this dissertation. The three main components of this research are as follows: (1) developing a predictive modeling approaches for early detection of process anomalies/change points, (2) devising approaches that can capture the non-Gaussian and non-stationary characteristics of CMP and UPM processes, and (3) integrating multiple sensor data to make more reliable process related decisions in real-time. In the first part, we establish a quantitative relationship between CMP process performance, such as material removal rate (MRR) and data acquired from wireless vibration sensors. Subsequently, a non-linear sequential Bayesian analysis is integrated with decision theoretic concepts for detection of CMP process end-point for blanket copper wafers. Using this approach, CMP polishing end-point was detected within a 5% error rate. Next, a non-parametric Bayesian analytical approach is utilized to capture the inherently complex, non-Gaussian, and non-stationary sensor signal patterns observed in CMP process. An evolutionary clustering analysis, called Recurrent Nested Dirichlet Process (RNDP) approach is developed for monitoring CMP process changes using MEMS vibration signals. Using this novel signal analysis approach, process drifts are detected within 20 milliseconds and is assessed to be 3-7 times faster than traditional SPC charts. This is very beneficial to the industry from an application standpoint, because, wafer yield losses will be mitigated to a great extent, if the onset of CMP process drifts can be detected timely and accurately. Lastly, a non-parametric Bayesian modeling approach, termed Dirichlet Process (DP) is combined with a multi-level hierarchical information fusion technique for monitoring of surface finish in UPM process

  6. Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988--1990; Water-resources investigations report 93-4025

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, M.S.

    1994-05-01

    Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suit-ability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment such as steel tapes, or they were taken continuously, using automated data recorders and pressure transducers. This report presents precision range and accuracy data established for manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, 1988--90.

  7. Method and system using power modulation for maskless vapor deposition of spatially graded thin film and multilayer coatings with atomic-level precision and accuracy

    DOEpatents

    Montcalm, Claude; Folta, James Allen; Tan, Swie-In; Reiss, Ira

    2002-07-30

    A method and system for producing a film (preferably a thin film with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) on a flat or graded substrate (such as concave or convex optics), by sweeping the substrate across a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution. In preferred embodiments, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. A user selects a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a predetermined desired thickness profile of the deposited film. The method relies on precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

  8. Accuracy and precision of reconstruction of complex refractive index in near-field single-distance propagation-based phase-contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gureyev, Timur; Mohammadi, Sara; Nesterets, Yakov; Dullin, Christian; Tromba, Giuliana

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the quantitative accuracy and noise sensitivity of reconstruction of the 3D distribution of complex refractive index, n(r)=1-δ(r)+iβ(r), in samples containing materials with different refractive indices using propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PB-CT). Our present study is limited to the case of parallel-beam geometry with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, but can be readily extended to cone-beam CT and partially coherent polychromatic X-rays at least in the case of weakly absorbing samples. We demonstrate that, except for regions near the interfaces between distinct materials, the distribution of imaginary part of the refractive index, β(r), can be accurately reconstructed from a single projection image per view angle using phase retrieval based on the so-called homogeneous version of the Transport of Intensity equation (TIE-Hom) in combination with conventional CT reconstruction. In contrast, the accuracy of reconstruction of δ(r) depends strongly on the choice of the "regularization" parameter in TIE-Hom. We demonstrate by means of an instructive example that for some multi-material samples, a direct application of the TIE-Hom method in PB-CT produces qualitatively incorrect results for δ(r), which can be rectified either by collecting additional projection images at each view angle, or by utilising suitable a priori information about the sample. As a separate observation, we also show that, in agreement with previous reports, it is possible to significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio by increasing the sample-to-detector distance in combination with TIE-Hom phase retrieval in PB-CT compared to conventional ("contact") CT, with the maximum achievable gain of the order of 0.3δ /β. This can lead to improved image quality and/or reduction of the X-ray dose delivered to patients in medical imaging.

  9. The accuracy and precision of a micro computer tomography volumetric measurement technique for the analysis of in-vitro tested total disc replacements.

    PubMed

    Vicars, R; Fisher, J; Hall, R M

    2009-04-01

    Total disc replacements (TDRs) in the spine have been clinically successful in the short term, but there are concerns over long-term failure due to wear, as seen in other joint replacements. Simulators have been used to investigate the wear of TDRs, but only gravimetric measurements have been used to assess material loss. Micro computer tomography (microCT) has been used for volumetric measurement of explanted components but has yet to be used for in-vitro studies with the wear typically less than < 20 mm3 per 10(6) cycles. The aim of this study was to compare microCT volume measurements with gravimetric measurements and to assess whether microCT can quantify wear volumes of in-vitro tested TDRs. microCT measurements of TDR polyethylene cores were undertaken and the results compared with gravimetric assessments. The effects of repositioning, integration time, and scan resolution were investigated. The best volume measurement resolution was found to be +/- 3 mm3, at least three orders of magnitude greater than those determined for gravimetric measurements. In conclusion, the microCT measurement technique is suitable for quantifying in-vitro TDR polyethylene wear volumes and can provide qualitative data (e.g. wear location), and also further quantitative data (e.g. height loss), assisting comparisons with in-vivo and ex-vivo data. It is best used alongside gravimetric measurements to maintain the high level of precision that these measurements provide.

  10. Leaf Vein Length per Unit Area Is Not Intrinsically Dependent on Image Magnification: Avoiding Measurement Artifacts for Accuracy and Precision1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Lawren; Caringella, Marissa; Scoffoni, Christine; Mason, Chase; Rawls, Michael; Markesteijn, Lars; Poorter, Lourens

    2014-01-01

    Leaf vein length per unit leaf area (VLA; also known as vein density) is an important determinant of water and sugar transport, photosynthetic function, and biomechanical support. A range of software methods are in use to visualize and measure vein systems in cleared leaf images; typically, users locate veins by digital tracing, but recent articles introduced software by which users can locate veins using thresholding (i.e. based on the contrasting of veins in the image). Based on the use of this method, a recent study argued against the existence of a fixed VLA value for a given leaf, proposing instead that VLA increases with the magnification of the image due to intrinsic properties of the vein system, and recommended that future measurements use a common, low image magnification for measurements. We tested these claims with new measurements using the software LEAFGUI in comparison with digital tracing using ImageJ software. We found that the apparent increase of VLA with magnification was an artifact of (1) using low-quality and low-magnification images and (2) errors in the algorithms of LEAFGUI. Given the use of images of sufficient magnification and quality, and analysis with error-free software, the VLA can be measured precisely and accurately. These findings point to important principles for improving the quantity and quality of important information gathered from leaf vein systems. PMID:25096977

  11. High-accuracy, high-precision, high-resolution, continuous monitoring of urban greenhouse gas emissions? Results to date from INFLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. J.; Brewer, A.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Deng, A.; Hardesty, M.; Gurney, K. R.; Heimburger, A. M. F.; Karion, A.; Lauvaux, T.; Lopez-Coto, I.; McKain, K.; Miles, N. L.; Patarasuk, R.; Prasad, K.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Richardson, S.; Sarmiento, D. P.; Shepson, P. B.; Sweeney, C.; Turnbull, J. C.; Whetstone, J. R.; Wu, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) is testing the boundaries of our ability to use atmospheric measurements to quantify urban greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The project brings together inventory assessments, tower-based and aircraft-based atmospheric measurements, and atmospheric modeling to provide high-accuracy, high-resolution, continuous monitoring of emissions of GHGs from the city. Results to date include a multi-year record of tower and aircraft based measurements of the urban CO2 and CH4 signal, long-term atmospheric modeling of GHG transport, and emission estimates for both CO2 and CH4 based on both tower and aircraft measurements. We will present these emissions estimates, the uncertainties in each, and our assessment of the primary needs for improvements in these emissions estimates. We will also present ongoing efforts to improve our understanding of atmospheric transport and background atmospheric GHG mole fractions, and to disaggregate GHG sources (e.g. biogenic vs. fossil fuel CO2 fluxes), topics that promise significant improvement in urban GHG emissions estimates.

  12. Accuracy and Precision in the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) Dataset 1998-2000 in Light of the JOSIE-2000 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, J. C.; Thompson, A. M.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Oltmans, S. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Smit, H. G. J.

    2003-01-01

    A network of 12 southern hemisphere tropical and subtropical stations in the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) project has provided over 2000 profiles of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone since 1998. Balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes are used with standard radiosondes for pressure, temperature and relative humidity measurements. The archived data are available at:http: //croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/shadoz. In Thompson et al., accuracies and imprecisions in the SHADOZ 1998- 2000 dataset were examined using ground-based instruments and the TOMS total ozone measurement (version 7) as references. Small variations in ozonesonde technique introduced possible biases from station-to-station. SHADOZ total ozone column amounts are now compared to version 8 TOMS; discrepancies between the two datasets are reduced 2\\% on average. An evaluation of ozone variations among the stations is made using the results of a series of chamber simulations of ozone launches (JOSIE-2000, Juelich Ozonesonde Intercomparison Experiment) in which a standard reference ozone instrument was employed with the various sonde techniques used in SHADOZ. A number of variations in SHADOZ ozone data are explained when differences in solution strength, data processing and instrument type (manufacturer) are taken into account.

  13. The effect of dilution and the use of a post-extraction nucleic acid purification column on the accuracy, precision, and inhibition of environmental DNA samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna M.; Spear, Stephen F.; Pierson, Todd W.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of environmental DNA (eDNA) is an increasingly common method for detecting presence and assessing relative abundance of rare or elusive species in aquatic systems via the isolation of DNA from environmental samples and the amplification of species-specific sequences using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Co-extracted substances that inhibit qPCR can lead to inaccurate results and subsequent misinterpretation about a species’ status in the tested system. We tested three treatments (5-fold and 10-fold dilutions, and spin-column purification) for reducing qPCR inhibition from 21 partially and fully inhibited eDNA samples collected from coastal plain wetlands and mountain headwater streams in the southeastern USA. All treatments reduced the concentration of DNA in the samples. However, column purified samples retained the greatest sensitivity. For stream samples, all three treatments effectively reduced qPCR inhibition. However, for wetland samples, the 5-fold dilution was less effective than other treatments. Quantitative PCR results for column purified samples were more precise than the 5-fold and 10-fold dilutions by 2.2× and 3.7×, respectively. Column purified samples consistently underestimated qPCR-based DNA concentrations by approximately 25%, whereas the directional bias in qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed between stream and wetland samples for both dilution treatments. While the directional bias of qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed among treatments and locations, the magnitude of inaccuracy did not. Our results suggest that 10-fold dilution and column purification effectively reduce qPCR inhibition in mountain headwater stream and coastal plain wetland eDNA samples, and if applied to all samples in a study, column purification may provide the most accurate relative qPCR-based DNA concentrations estimates while retaining the greatest assay sensitivity.

  14. High-precision broad-band linear polarimetry of early-type binaries. I. Discovery of variable, phase-locked polarization in HD 48099

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V.; Sadegi, S.; Tsygankov, S.; Sakanoi, T.; Kagitani, M.; Yoneda, M.; Okano, S.; Poutanen, J.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the structure of the O-type binary system HD 48099 by measuring linear polarization that arises due to light scattering process. High-precison polarimetry provides independent estimates of the orbital parameters and gives important information on the properties of the system. Methods: Linear polarization measurements of HD 48099 in the B, V and R passbands with the high-precision Dipol-2 polarimeter have been carried out. The data have been obtained with the 60 cm KVA (Observatory Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain) and T60 (Haleakala, Hawaii, USA) remotely controlled telescopes during 31 observing nights. Polarimetry in the optical wavelengths has been complemented by observations in the X-rays with the Swift space observatory. Results: Optical polarimetry revealed small intrinsic polarization in HD 48099 with ~0.1% peak to peak variation over the orbital period of 3.08 d. The variability pattern is typical for binary systems, showing strong second harmonic of the orbital period. We apply our model code for the electron scattering in the circumstellar matter to put constraints on the system geometry. A good model fit is obtained for scattering of light on a cloud produced by the colliding stellar winds. The geometry of the cloud, with a broad distribution of scattering particles away from the orbital plane, helps in constraining the (low) orbital inclination. We derive from the polarization data the inclination i = 17° ± 2° and the longitude of the ascending node Ω = 82° ± 1° of the binary orbit. The available X-ray data provide additional evidence for the existence of the colliding stellar winds in the system. Another possible source of the polarized light could be scattering from the stellar photospheres. The models with circumstellar envelopes, or matter confined to the orbital plane, do not provide good constraints on the low inclination, better than i ≤ 27°, as is already suggested by the absence of eclipses. The

  15. Re-Os geochronology of the El Salvador porphyry Cu-Mo deposit, Chile: Tracking analytical improvements in accuracy and precision over the past decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Stein, Holly J.; Morgan, John W.; Markey, Richard J.; Watanabe, Yasushi

    2014-04-01

    deposit geochronology. The timing and duration of mineralization from Re-Os dating of ore minerals is more precise than estimates from previously reported 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages on alteration minerals. The Re-Os results suggest that the mineralization is temporally distinct from pre-mineral rhyolite porphyry (42.63 ± 0.28 Ma) and is immediately prior to or overlapping with post-mineral latite dike emplacement (41.16 ± 0.48 Ma). Based on the Re-Os and other geochronologic data, the Middle Eocene intrusive activity in the El Salvador district is divided into three pulses: (1) 44-42.5 Ma for weakly mineralized porphyry intrusions, (2) 41.8-41.2 Ma for intensely mineralized porphyry intrusions, and (3) ∼41 Ma for small latite dike intrusions without major porphyry stocks. The orientation of igneous dikes and porphyry stocks changed from NNE-SSW during the first pulse to WNW-ESE for the second and third pulses. This implies that the WNW-ESE striking stress changed from σ3 (minimum principal compressive stress) during the first pulse to σHmax (maximum principal compressional stress in a horizontal plane) during the second and third pulses. Therefore, the focus of intense porphyry Cu-Mo mineralization occurred during a transient geodynamic reconfiguration just before extinction of major intrusive activity in the region.

  16. Acceptability, Precision and Accuracy of 3D Photonic Scanning for Measurement of Body Shape in a Multi-Ethnic Sample of Children Aged 5-11 Years: The SLIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathan C. K.; Stocks, Janet; Bonner, Rachel; Raywood, Emma; Legg, Sarah; Lee, Simon; Treleaven, Philip; Lum, Sooky

    2015-01-01

    Background Information on body size and shape is used to interpret many aspects of physiology, including nutritional status, cardio-metabolic risk and lung function. Such data have traditionally been obtained through manual anthropometry, which becomes time-consuming when many measurements are required. 3D photonic scanning (3D-PS) of body surface topography represents an alternative digital technique, previously applied successfully in large studies of adults. The acceptability, precision and accuracy of 3D-PS in young children have not been assessed. Methods We attempted to obtain data on girth, width and depth of the chest and waist, and girth of the knee and calf, manually and by 3D-PS in a multi-ethnic sample of 1484 children aged 5–11 years. The rate of 3D-PS success, and reasons for failure, were documented. Precision and accuracy of 3D-PS were assessed relative to manual measurements using the methods of Bland and Altman. Results Manual measurements were successful in all cases. Although 97.4% of children agreed to undergo 3D-PS, successful scans were only obtained in 70.7% of these. Unsuccessful scans were primarily due to body movement, or inability of the software to extract shape outputs. The odds of scan failure, and the underlying reason, differed by age, size and ethnicity. 3D-PS measurements tended to be greater than those obtained manually (p<0.05), however ranking consistency was high (r2>0.90 for most outcomes). Conclusions 3D-PS is acceptable in children aged ≥5 years, though with current hardware/software, and body movement artefacts, approximately one third of scans may be unsuccessful. The technique had poorer technical success than manual measurements, and had poorer precision when the measurements were viable. Compared to manual measurements, 3D-PS showed modest average biases but acceptable limits of agreement for large surveys, and little evidence that bias varied substantially with size. Most of the issues we identified could be

  17. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  18. Data mining methods in the prediction of Dementia: A real-data comparison of the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, neural networks, support vector machines, classification trees and random forests

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dementia and cognitive impairment associated with aging are a major medical and social concern. Neuropsychological testing is a key element in the diagnostic procedures of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), but has presently a limited value in the prediction of progression to dementia. We advance the hypothesis that newer statistical classification methods derived from data mining and machine learning methods like Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines and Random Forests can improve accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of predictions obtained from neuropsychological testing. Seven non parametric classifiers derived from data mining methods (Multilayer Perceptrons Neural Networks, Radial Basis Function Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, CART, CHAID and QUEST Classification Trees and Random Forests) were compared to three traditional classifiers (Linear Discriminant Analysis, Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Logistic Regression) in terms of overall classification accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, Area under the ROC curve and Press'Q. Model predictors were 10 neuropsychological tests currently used in the diagnosis of dementia. Statistical distributions of classification parameters obtained from a 5-fold cross-validation were compared using the Friedman's nonparametric test. Results Press' Q test showed that all classifiers performed better than chance alone (p < 0.05). Support Vector Machines showed the larger overall classification accuracy (Median (Me) = 0.76) an area under the ROC (Me = 0.90). However this method showed high specificity (Me = 1.0) but low sensitivity (Me = 0.3). Random Forest ranked second in overall accuracy (Me = 0.73) with high area under the ROC (Me = 0.73) specificity (Me = 0.73) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). Linear Discriminant Analysis also showed acceptable overall accuracy (Me = 0.66), with acceptable area under the ROC (Me = 0.72) specificity (Me = 0.66) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). The remaining classifiers showed

  19. Comparative Analysis of the Equivital EQ02 Lifemonitor with Holter Ambulatory ECG Device for Continuous Measurement of ECG, Heart Rate, and Heart Rate Variability: A Validation Study for Precision and Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Akintola, Abimbola A.; van de Pol, Vera; Bimmel, Daniel; Maan, Arie C.; van Heemst, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Equivital (EQ02) is a multi-parameter telemetric device offering both real-time and/or retrospective, synchronized monitoring of ECG, HR, and HRV, respiration, activity, and temperature. Unlike the Holter, which is the gold standard for continuous ECG measurement, EQO2 continuously monitors ECG via electrodes interwoven in the textile of a wearable belt. Objective: To compare EQ02 with the Holter for continuous home measurement of ECG, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV). Methods: Eighteen healthy participants wore, simultaneously for 24 h, the Holter and EQ02 monitors. Per participant, averaged HR, and HRV per 5 min from the two devices were compared using Pearson correlation, paired T-test, and Bland-Altman analyses. Accuracy and precision metrics included mean absolute relative difference (MARD). Results: Artifact content of EQ02 data varied widely between (range 1.93–56.45%) and within (range 0.75–9.61%) participants. Comparing the EQ02 to the Holter, the Pearson correlations were respectively 0.724, 0.955, and 0.997 for datasets containing all data and data with < 50 or < 20% artifacts respectively. For datasets containing respectively all data, data with < 50, or < 20% artifacts, bias estimated by Bland-Altman analysis was −2.8, −1.0, and −0.8 beats per minute and 24 h MARD was 7.08, 3.01, and 1.5. After selecting a 3-h stretch of data containing 1.15% artifacts, Pearson correlation was 0.786 for HRV measured as standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN). Conclusions: Although the EQ02 can accurately measure ECG and HRV, its accuracy and precision is highly dependent on artifact content. This is a limitation for clinical use in individual patients. However, the advantages of the EQ02 (ability to simultaneously monitor several physiologic parameters) may outweigh its disadvantages (higher artifact load) for research purposes and/ or for home monitoring in larger groups of study participants. Further studies can be aimed

  20. Using measurements of muscle color, pH, and electrical impedance to augment the current USDA beef quality grading standards and improve the accuracy and precision of sorting carcasses into palatability groups.

    PubMed

    Wulf, D M; Page, J K

    2000-10-01

    This research was conducted to determine whether objective measures of muscle color, muscle pH, and(or) electrical impedance are useful in segregating palatable beef from unpalatable beef, and to determine whether the current USDA quality grading standards for beef carcasses could be revised to improve their effectiveness at distinguishing palatable from unpalatable beef. One hundred beef carcasses were selected from packing plants in Texas, Illinois, and Ohio to represent the full range of muscle color observed in the U.S. beef carcass population. Steaks from these 100 carcasses were used to determine shear force on eight cooked beef muscles and taste panel ratings on three cooked beef muscles. It was discovered that the darkest-colored 20 to 25% of the beef carcasses sampled were less palatable and considerably less consistent than the other 75 to 80% sampled. Marbling score, by itself, explained 12% of the variation in beef palatability; hump height, by itself, explained 8% of the variation in beef palatability; measures of muscle color or pH, by themselves, explained 15 to 23% of the variation in beef palatability. When combined together, marbling score, hump height, and some measure of muscle color or pH explained 36 to 46% of the variation in beef palatability. Alternative quality grading systems were proposed to improve the accuracy and precision of sorting carcasses into palatability groups. The two proposed grading systems decreased palatability variation by 29% and 39%, respectively, within the Choice grade and decreased palatability variation by 37% and 12%, respectively, within the Select grade, when compared with current USDA standards. The percentage of unpalatable Choice carcasses was reduced from 14% under the current USDA grading standards to 4% and 1%, respectively, for the two proposed systems. The percentage of unpalatable Select carcasses was reduced from 36% under the current USDA standards to 7% and 29%, respectively, for the proposed systems

  1. Verification of the Prediction Accuracy of Annual Energy Output at Noma Wind Park by the Non-Stationary and Non-Linear Wind Synopsis Simulator, RIAM-COMPACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Takanori; Ohya, Yuji

    In the present study, the hub-height wind speed ratios for 16 individual wind directional groups were estimated by the RIAM-COMPACT for Noma Wind Park, Kagoshima Prefecture. The validity of the proposed estimation technique for the actual wind was examined. For this procedure, field observational data from the one year period between April, 2004 and March, 2005 were studied. In this case, the relative error on the prediction accuracy was less than 10% and less than 5% for the monthly and annual average wind speeds, respectively. Similar to the results for the annual average wind speed, the difference in the selected reference points (Wind Turbines #4 and #6) had little difference in the relative error on the prediction accuracy of the annual energy output. For both reference points, the relative error was within 10%.

  2. The accuracy of linear measurements of maxillary and mandibular edentulous sites in cone-beam computed tomography images with different fields of view and voxel sizes under simulated clinical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Aruna; Pagni, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of varying resolutions of cone-beam computed tomography images on the accuracy of linear measurements of edentulous areas in human cadaver heads. Intact cadaver heads were used to simulate a clinical situation. Materials and Methods Fiduciary markers were placed in the edentulous areas of 4 intact embalmed cadaver heads. The heads were scanned with two different CBCT units using a large field of view (13 cm×16 cm) and small field of view (5 cm×8 cm) at varying voxel sizes (0.3 mm, 0.2 mm, and 0.16 mm). The ground truth was established with digital caliper measurements. The imaging measurements were then compared with caliper measurements to determine accuracy. Results The Wilcoxon signed rank test revealed no statistically significant difference between the medians of the physical measurements obtained with calipers and the medians of the CBCT measurements. A comparison of accuracy among the different imaging protocols revealed no significant differences as determined by the Friedman test. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.961, indicating excellent reproducibility. Inter-observer variability was determined graphically with a Bland-Altman plot and by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient. The Bland-Altman plot indicated very good reproducibility for smaller measurements but larger discrepancies with larger measurements. Conclusion The CBCT-based linear measurements in the edentulous sites using different voxel sizes and FOVs are accurate compared with the direct caliper measurements of these sites. Higher resolution CBCT images with smaller voxel size did not result in greater accuracy of the linear measurements. PMID:27358816

  3. Relative Accuracy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  4. Numerical investigation of multi-beam laser heterodyne measurement with ultra-precision for linear expansion coefficient of metal based on oscillating mirror modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Chao; Wang, Chun-Hui; Qu, Yang; Gao, Long; Cong, Hai-Fang; Yang, Yan-Ling; Gao, Jie; Wang, Ao-You

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of multi-beam laser heterodyne measurement for metal linear expansion coefficient. Based on the Doppler effect and heterodyne technology, the information is loaded of length variation to the frequency difference of the multi-beam laser heterodyne signal by the frequency modulation of the oscillating mirror, this method can obtain many values of length variation caused by temperature variation after the multi-beam laser heterodyne signal demodulation simultaneously. Processing these values by weighted-average, it can obtain length variation accurately, and eventually obtain the value of linear expansion coefficient of metal by the calculation. This novel method is used to simulate measurement for linear expansion coefficient of metal rod under different temperatures by MATLAB, the obtained result shows that the relative measurement error of this method is just 0.4%.

  5. Precise sequence control in linear and cyclic copolymers of 2,5-bis(2-thienyl)pyrrole and aniline by DNA-programmed assembly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Schuster, Gary B

    2013-03-20

    A series of linear and cyclic, sequence controlled, DNA-conjoined copolymers of aniline (ANi) and 2,5-bis(2-thienyl)pyrrole (SNS) were synthesized. In one approach, linear copolymers were prepared from complementary DNA oligomers containing covalently attached SNS and ANi monomers. Hybridization of the oligomers aligns the monomers in the major groove of the DNA. Treatment of the SNS- and ANi-containing duplexes with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H2O2 causes rapid and efficient polymerization. In this way, linear copolymers (SNS)4(ANi)6 and (ANi)2(SNS)2(ANi)2(SNS)2(ANi)2 were prepared and analyzed. A second approach to the preparation of linear and cyclic copolymers of ANi and SNS employed a DNA encoded module strategy. In this approach, single-stranded DNA oligomers composed of a central region containing (SNS)6 or (ANi)5 covalently attached monomer blocks and flanking 5'- and 3'-single-strand DNA recognition sequences were combined in buffer solution. Self-assembly of these oligomers by Watson-Crick base pairing of the recognition sequences creates linear or cyclic arrays of SNS and ANi monomer blocks. Treatment of these arrays with HRP/H2O2 causes rapid and efficient polymerization to form copolymers having patterns such as cyclic BBA and linear ABA, where B stands for an (SNS)6 block and A stands for an (ANi)5 block. These DNA-conjoined copolymers were characterized by melting temperature analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, native and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and UV-visible-near-IR optical spectroscopy. The optical spectra of these copolymers are typical of those of conducting polymers and are uniquely dependent on the specific order of monomers in the copolymer. PMID:23448549

  6. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chudakov, Eugene A.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. M{\\o}ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at ~300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100\\%-polarized electron target for M{\\o}ller polarimetry.

  7. Precision electron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudakov, E.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. Mo/ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at 300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100%-polarized electron target for Mo/ller polarimetry.

  8. SU-E-P-54: Evaluation of the Accuracy and Precision of IGPS-O X-Ray Image-Guided Positioning System by Comparison with On-Board Imager Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D; Wang, W; Jiang, B; Fu, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the positioning accuracy and precision of IGPS-O system which is a novel radiographic kilo-voltage x-ray image-guided positioning system developed for clinical IGRT applications. Methods: IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system consists of two oblique sets of radiographic kilo-voltage x-ray projecting and imaging devices which were equiped on the ground and ceiling of treatment room. This system can determine the positioning error in the form of three translations and three rotations according to the registration of two X-ray images acquired online and the planning CT image. An anthropomorphic head phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were used for this study. The phantom was set up on the treatment table with correct position and various “planned” setup errors. Both IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system and the commercial On-board Imager Cone-beam Computed Tomography (OBI CBCT) were used to obtain the setup errors of the phantom. Difference of the Result between the two image-guided positioning systems were computed and analyzed. Results: The setup errors measured by IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system and the OBI CBCT system showed a general agreement, the means and standard errors of the discrepancies between the two systems in the left-right, anterior-posterior, superior-inferior directions were −0.13±0.09mm, 0.03±0.25mm, 0.04±0.31mm, respectively. The maximum difference was only 0.51mm in all the directions and the angular discrepancy was 0.3±0.5° between the two systems. Conclusion: The spatial and angular discrepancies between IGPS-O system and OBI CBCT for setup error correction was minimal. There is a general agreement between the two positioning system. IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system can achieve as good accuracy as CBCT and can be used in the clinical IGRT applications.

  9. Combined linear polarization and angular distribution measurements of x-rays for precise determination of multipole-mixing in characteristic transitions of high-Z systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, G.; Bräuning, H.; Surzhykov, A.; Brandau, C.; Fritzsche, S.; Geyer, S.; Grisenti, R. E.; Hagmann, S.; Hahn, C.; Hess, R.; Hess, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kühnel, M.; Märtin, R.; Petridis, N.; Spillmann, U.; Trotsenko, S.; Winters, D. F. A.; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-07-01

    By applying novel-type position sensitive x-ray detectors as Compton polarimeters we recently performed a study of the linear polarization of Lyman-{{α }1} radiation following radiative electron capture into initially bare uranium ions. It was found that a model-independent determination of the ratio of the E1 and M2 transition amplitudes, and consequently of the corresponding transition rates, is feasible by combining the linear polarization data with a measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation. In this work a detailed description of the underlying experimental technique for combined measurements of the linear polarization and the angular distribution of characteristic transitions in high-Z ions is presented. Special emphasis is given to the application of two, two-dimensional position-sensitive x-ray detectors for Compton polarimetry of hard x-rays. Moreover, we demonstrate the polarimeter efficiency of such detector systems can be significantly improved if events, where the charge is spread over neighboring segments, are reconstructed to be used in the polarization analysis.

  10. Application of AFINCH as a Tool for Evaluating the Effects of Streamflow-Gaging-Network Size and Composition on the Accuracy and Precision of Streamflow Estimates at Ungaged Locations in the Southeast Lake Michigan Hydrologic Subregion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.; Holtschlag, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Bootstrapping techniques employing random subsampling were used with the AFINCH (Analysis of Flows In Networks of CHannels) model to gain insights into the effects of variation in streamflow-gaging-network size and composition on the accuracy and precision of streamflow estimates at ungaged locations in the 0405 (Southeast Lake Michigan) hydrologic subregion. AFINCH uses stepwise-regression techniques to estimate monthly water yields from catchments based on geospatial-climate and land-cover data in combination with available streamflow and water-use data. Calculations are performed on a hydrologic-subregion scale for each catchment and stream reach contained in a National Hydrography Dataset Plus (NHDPlus) subregion. Water yields from contributing catchments are multiplied by catchment areas and resulting flow values are accumulated to compute streamflows in stream reaches which are referred to as flow lines. AFINCH imposes constraints on water yields to ensure that observed streamflows are conserved at gaged locations. Data from the 0405 hydrologic subregion (referred to as Southeast Lake Michigan) were used for the analyses. Daily streamflow data were measured in the subregion for 1 or more years at a total of 75 streamflow-gaging stations during the analysis period which spanned water years 1971-2003. The number of streamflow gages in operation each year during the analysis period ranged from 42 to 56 and averaged 47. Six sets (one set for each censoring level), each composed of 30 random subsets of the 75 streamflow gages, were created by censoring (removing) approximately 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 75 percent of the streamflow gages (the actual percentage of operating streamflow gages censored for each set varied from year to year, and within the year from subset to subset, but averaged approximately the indicated percentages). Streamflow estimates for six flow lines each were aggregated by censoring level, and results were analyzed to assess (a) how the size

  11. Digital angiographic impulse response analysis of regional myocardial perfusion: linearity, reproducibility, accuracy, and comparison with conventional indicator dilution curve parameters in phantom and canine models.

    PubMed

    Eigler, N L; Pfaff, J M; Zeiher, A; Whiting, J S; Forrester, J S

    1989-05-01

    The system mean transit time (Tsys) of the impulse response function describing contrast material transit through the coronary circulation was determined from serial digital angiographic images. The linearity, reproducibility, and relations with regional myocardial perfusion and conventional time-density curve parameters, time to peak concentration (TPC), and exponential washout rate (k) were assessed in a dynamic flow x-ray phantom (n = 46) and in six open-chest dogs (n = 102) while coronary flow was altered by stenosis and/or hyperemic stimuli. In the phantom studies, the inverse of the system mean transit time (Tsys-1) closely predicted flow/volume (r = 0.99, slope = 0.99). In dogs, Tsys-1 was independent of the shape of the contrast bolus injection (single or double-peaked), class of contrast agent (ionic or nonionic), the type of hyperemic stimulus (dipyridamole, dipyridamole plus norepinephrine, transient total occlusion, or ionic contrast media), and was highly reproducible between adjacent myocardial regions served by the same artery (r = 0.98 +/- 0.01). There was a strong correlation between Tsys-1 and regional coronary flow for stenotic and/or hyperemic vessels (r = 0.94, distribution volume = 14.9 ml/100 g) over a wide range (0-514 ml/min/100 g). Tsys-1 performed better than conventional time-density curve parameters TPC-1 and k for predicting phantom flow/volume ratios and regional myocardial blood flow in the dog. These data suggest that both digital coronary angiography and coronary contrast transit can be modeled as linear systems and that impulse response analysis may provide accurate and reproducible estimates of regional myocardial blood flow.

  12. A comparative study of accuracy of linear measurements using cone beam and multi-slice computed tomographies for evaluation of mandibular canal location in dry mandibles

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Asieh Zamani; Mehr, Bahar Behdad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cross- sectional tomograms have been used for optimal pre-operative planning of dental implant placement. The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) measurements of specific distances around the mandibular canal by comparing them to those obtained from Multi-Slice Computed Tomography (MSCT) images. Materials and Methods: Ten hemi-mandible specimens were examined using CBCT and MSCT. Before imaging, wires were placed at 7 locations between the anterior margin of the third molar and the anterior margin of the second premolar as reference points. Following distances were measured by two observers on each cross-sectional CBCT and MSCT image: Mandibular Width (W), Length (L), Upper Distance (UD), Lower Distance (LD), Buccal Distance (BD), and Lingual Distance (LID). The obtained data were evaluated using SPSS software, applying paired t-test and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: There was a significant difference between the values obtained by MSCT and CBCT measurement for all areas such as H, W, UD, LD, BD, and LID, (P < 0.001), with a difference less than 1 mm. The ICC for all distances by both techniques, measured by a single observer with a one week interval and between 2 observers was 99% and 98%, respectively. Comparing the obtained data of both techniques indicates that the difference between two techniques is 2.17% relative to MSCT. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that there is significant difference between measurements obtained by CBCT and MSCT. However, the difference is not clinically significant. PMID:23878558

  13. Precision Nova operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.B.; Miller, J.L.; Saunders, R.L.; Thompson, C.E.; Weiland, T.L.; Laumann, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    To improve the symmetry of x-ray drive on indirectly driven ICF capsules, we have increased the accuracy of operating procedures and diagnostics on the Nova laser. Precision Nova operations includes routine precision power balance to within 10% rms in the ``foot`` and 5% nns in the peak of shaped pulses, beam synchronization to within 10 ps rms, and pointing of the beams onto targets to within 35 {mu}m rms. We have also added a ``fail-safe chirp`` system to avoid Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in optical components during high energy shots.

  14. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  15. Precise Orbit Determination for ALOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Ryo; Nakamura, Shinichi; Kudo, Nobuo; Katagiri, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has been developed to contribute to the fields of mapping, precise regional land coverage observation, disaster monitoring, and resource surveying. Because the mounted sensors need high geometrical accuracy, precise orbit determination for ALOS is essential for satisfying the mission objectives. So ALOS mounts a GPS receiver and a Laser Reflector (LR) for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). This paper deals with the precise orbit determination experiments for ALOS using Global and High Accuracy Trajectory determination System (GUTS) and the evaluation of the orbit determination accuracy by SLR data. The results show that, even though the GPS receiver loses lock of GPS signals more frequently than expected, GPS-based orbit is consistent with SLR-based orbit. And considering the 1 sigma error, orbit determination accuracy of a few decimeters (peak-to-peak) was achieved.

  16. Fitting magnetic field gradient with Heisenberg-scaling accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Liang; Wang, Huan; Jing, Li; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2014-01-01

    The linear function is possibly the simplest and the most used relation appearing in various areas of our world. A linear relation can be generally determined by the least square linear fitting (LSLF) method using several measured quantities depending on variables. This happens for such as detecting the gradient of a magnetic field. Here, we propose a quantum fitting scheme to estimate the magnetic field gradient with N-atom spins preparing in W state. Our scheme combines the quantum multi-parameter estimation and the least square linear fitting method to achieve the quantum Cramér-Rao bound (QCRB). We show that the estimated quantity achieves the Heisenberg-scaling accuracy. Our scheme of quantum metrology combined with data fitting provides a new method in fast high precision measurements. PMID:25487218

  17. New multi-station and multi-decadal trend data on precipitable water. Recipe to match FTIR retrievals from NDACC long-time records to radio sondes within 1 mm accuracy/precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussmann, R.; Borsdorff, T.; Rettinger, M.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Demoulin, P.; Duchatelet, P.; Mahieu, E.

    2009-04-01

    We present an original optimum strategy for retrieval of precipitable water from routine ground-based mid-infrared FTS measurements performed at a number globally distributed stations within the NDACC network. The strategy utilizes FTIR retrievals which are set in a way to match standard radio sonde operations. Thereby, an unprecedented accuracy and precision for measurements of precipitable water can be demonstrated: the correlation between Zugspitze FTIR water vapor columns from a 3 months measurement campaign with total columns derived from coincident radio sondes shows a regression coefficient of R = 0.988, a bias of 0.05 mm, a standard deviation of 0.28 mm, an intercept of 0.01 mm, and a slope of 1.01. This appears to be even better than what can be achieved with state-of-the-art micro wave techniques, see e.g., Morland et al. (2006, Fig. 9 therein). Our approach is based upon a careful selection of spectral micro windows, comprising a set of both weak and strong water vapor absorption lines between 839.4 - 840.6 cm-1, 849.0 - 850.2 cm-1, and 852.0 - 853.1 cm-1, which is not contaminated by interfering absorptions of any other trace gases. From existing spectroscopic line lists, a careful selection of the best available parameter set was performed, leading to nearly perfect spectral fits without significant forward model parameter errors. To set up the FTIR water vapor profile inversion, a set of FTIR measurements and coincident radio sondes has been utilized. To eliminate/minimize mismatch in time and space, the Tobin best estimate of the state of the atmosphere principle has been applied to the radio sondes. This concept uses pairs of radio sondes launched with a 1-hour separation, and derives the gradient from the two radio sonde measurements, in order to construct a virtual PTU profile for a certain time and location. Coincident FTIR measurements of water vapor columns (two hour mean values) have then been matched to the water columns obtained by

  18. Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) accuracy assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szajgin, John; Pettinger, L.R.; Linden, D.S.; Ohlen, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative accuracy assessment was performed for the vegetation classification map produced as part of the Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) project. This project was a cooperative effort between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center. The objective of the accuracy assessment was to estimate (with a precision of ?10 percent at the 90 percent confidence level) the comission error in each of the eight level II hierarchical vegetation cover types. A stratified two-phase (double) cluster sample was used. Phase I consisted of 160 photointerpreted plots representing clusters of Landsat pixels, and phase II consisted of ground data collection at 80 of the phase I cluster sites. Ground data were used to refine the phase I error estimates by means of a linear regression model. The classified image was stratified by assigning each 15-pixel cluster to the stratum corresponding to the dominant cover type within each cluster. This method is known as stratified plurality sampling. Overall error was estimated to be 36 percent with a standard error of 2 percent. Estimated error for individual vegetation classes ranged from a low of 10 percent ?6 percent for evergreen woodland to 81 percent ?7 percent for cropland and pasture. Total cost of the accuracy assessment was $106,950 for the one-million-hectare study area. The combination of the stratified plurality sampling (SPS) method of sample allocation with double sampling provided the desired estimates within the required precision levels. The overall accuracy results confirmed that highly accurate digital classification of vegetation is difficult to perform in semiarid environments, due largely to the sparse vegetation cover. Nevertheless, these techniques show promise for providing more accurate information than is presently available for many BLM-administered lands.

  19. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  20. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  1. Precision GPS ephemerides and baselines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Based on the research, the area of precise ephemerides for GPS satellites, the following observations can be made pertaining to the status and future work needed regarding orbit accuracy. There are several aspects which need to be addressed in discussing determination of precise orbits, such as force models, kinematic models, measurement models, data reduction/estimation methods, etc. Although each one of these aspects was studied at CSR in research efforts, only points pertaining to the force modeling aspect are addressed.

  2. Assessing the Accuracy and Precision of Inorganic Geochemical Data Produced through Flux Fusion and Acid Digestions: Multiple (60+) Comprehensive Analyses of BHVO-2 and the Development of Improved "Accepted" Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Scudder, R.; Dunlea, A. G.; Anderson, C. H.; Murray, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    The use of geological standard reference materials (SRMs) to assess both the accuracy and the reproducibility of geochemical data is a vital consideration in determining the major and trace element abundances of geologic, oceanographic, and environmental samples. Calibration curves commonly are generated that are predicated on accurate analyses of these SRMs. As a means to verify the robustness of these calibration curves, a SRM can also be run as an unknown item (i.e., not included as a data point in the calibration). The experimentally derived composition of the SRM can thus be compared to the certified (or otherwise accepted) value. This comparison gives a direct measure of the accuracy of the method used. Similarly, if the same SRM is analyzed as an unknown over multiple analytical sessions, the external reproducibility of the method can be evaluated. Two common bulk digestion methods used in geochemical analysis are flux fusion and acid digestion. The flux fusion technique is excellent at ensuring complete digestion of a variety of sample types, is quick, and does not involve much use of hazardous acids. However, this technique is hampered by a high amount of total dissolved solids and may be accompanied by an increased analytical blank for certain trace elements. On the other hand, acid digestion (using a cocktail of concentrated nitric, hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids) provides an exceptionally clean digestion with very low analytical blanks. However, this technique results in a loss of Si from the system and may compromise results for a few other elements (e.g., Ge). Our lab uses flux fusion for the determination of major elements and a few key trace elements by ICP-ES, while acid digestion is used for Ti and trace element analyses by ICP-MS. Here we present major and trace element data for BHVO-2, a frequently used SRM derived from a Hawaiian basalt, gathered over a period of over two years (30+ analyses by each technique). We show that both digestion

  3. Ultra precision machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debra, Daniel B.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Binford, Thomas

    1990-05-01

    There are a number of fields that require or can use to advantage very high precision in machining. For example, further development of high energy lasers and x ray astronomy depend critically on the manufacture of light weight reflecting metal optical components. To fabricate these optical components with machine tools they will be made of metal with mirror quality surface finish. By mirror quality surface finish, it is meant that the dimensions tolerances on the order of 0.02 microns and surface roughness of 0.07. These accuracy targets fall in the category of ultra precision machining. They cannot be achieved by a simple extension of conventional machining processes and techniques. They require single crystal diamond tools, special attention to vibration isolation, special isolation of machine metrology, and on line correction of imperfection in the motion of the machine carriages on their way.

  4. Precision Pointing System Development

    SciTech Connect

    BUGOS, ROBERT M.

    2003-03-01

    The development of precision pointing systems has been underway in Sandia's Electronic Systems Center for over thirty years. Important areas of emphasis are synthetic aperture radars and optical reconnaissance systems. Most applications are in the aerospace arena, with host vehicles including rockets, satellites, and manned and unmanned aircraft. Systems have been used on defense-related missions throughout the world. Presently in development are pointing systems with accuracy goals in the nanoradian regime. Future activity will include efforts to dramatically reduce system size and weight through measures such as the incorporation of advanced materials and MEMS inertial sensors.

  5. Precision orbit determination for Topex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Schutz, B. E.; Ries, J. C.; Shum, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of radar altimeters to measure the distance from a satellite to the ocean surface with a precision of the order of 2 cm imposes unique requirements for the orbit determination accuracy. The orbit accuracy requirements will be especially demanding for the joint NASA/CNES Ocean Topography Experiment (Topex/Poseidon). For this mission, a radial orbit accuracy of 13 centimeters will be required for a mission period of three to five years. This is an order of magnitude improvement in the accuracy achieved during any previous satellite mission. This investigation considers the factors which limit the orbit accuracy for the Topex mission. Particular error sources which are considered include the geopotential, the radiation pressure and the atmospheric drag model.

  6. Accuracy and precision of gravitational-wave models of inspiraling neutron star-black hole binaries with spin: Comparison with matter-free numerical relativity in the low-frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Barkett, Kevin; Bhagwat, Swetha; Afshari, Nousha; Brown, Duncan A.; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2015-11-01

    Coalescing binaries of neutron stars and black holes are one of the most important sources of gravitational waves for the upcoming network of ground-based detectors. Detection and extraction of astrophysical information from gravitational-wave signals requires accurate waveform models. The effective-one-body and other phenomenological models interpolate between analytic results and numerical relativity simulations, that typically span O (10 ) orbits before coalescence. In this paper we study the faithfulness of these models for neutron star-black hole binaries. We investigate their accuracy using new numerical relativity (NR) simulations that span 36-88 orbits, with mass ratios q and black hole spins χBH of (q ,χBH)=(7 ,±0.4 ),(7 ,±0.6 ) , and (5 ,-0.9 ). These simulations were performed treating the neutron star as a low-mass black hole, ignoring its matter effects. We find that (i) the recently published SEOBNRv1 and SEOBNRv2 models of the effective-one-body family disagree with each other (mismatches of a few percent) for black hole spins χBH≥0.5 or χBH≤-0.3 , with waveform mismatch accumulating during early inspiral; (ii) comparison with numerical waveforms indicates that this disagreement is due to phasing errors of SEOBNRv1, with SEOBNRv2 in good agreement with all of our simulations; (iii) phenomenological waveforms agree with SEOBNRv2 only for comparable-mass low-spin binaries, with overlaps below 0.7 elsewhere in the neutron star-black hole binary parameter space; (iv) comparison with numerical waveforms shows that most of this model's dephasing accumulates near the frequency interval where it switches to a phenomenological phasing prescription; and finally (v) both SEOBNR and post-Newtonian models are effectual for neutron star-black hole systems, but post-Newtonian waveforms will give a significant bias in parameter recovery. Our results suggest that future gravitational-wave detection searches and parameter estimation efforts would benefit

  7. Precision Measurements at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.K.; /SLAC

    2006-12-06

    With relatively low backgrounds and a well-determined initial state, the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) would provide a precision complement to the LHC experiments at the energy frontier. Completely and precisely exploring the discoveries of the LHC with such a machine will be critical in understanding the nature of those discoveries and what, if any, new physics they represent. The unique ability to form a complete picture of the Higgs sector is a prime example of the probative power of the ILC and represents a new era in precision physics.

  8. Vertical resolution and accuracy of atmospheric infrared sounding spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hung-Lung; Smith, William L.; Woolf, Harold M.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is performed to evaluate the accuracy and vertical resolution of atmospheric profiles obtained with the HIRS/2, GOES I/M, and HIS instruments. In addition, a linear simultaneous retrieval algorithm is used with aircraft observations to validate the theoretical predictions. Both theoretical and observational results clearly indicate that the accuracy and vertical resolution of the retrieval profile would be improved by high spectral resolution and broad spectral coverage of infrared radiance measurements. The HIS is found to possess the equivalent of 11 pieces of temperature- and 9 pieces of water vapor-independent precise measurements. The characteristics for temperature include a vertical resolution of 1-6 km with an accuracy of 1 K and for water vapor a vertical resolution of 0.5-3.0 km with an accuracy of 3 K in dewpoint temperature. The HIS is a factor of 2-3 times better in vertical resolution and a factor of 2 times better in accuracy than the GOES I/M and HIRS/2 filter radiometers.

  9. Nickel solution prepared for precision electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Lightweight, precision optical reflectors are made by electroforming nickel onto masters. Steps for the plating bath preparation, process control testing, and bath composition adjustments are prescribed to avoid internal stresses and maintain dimensional accuracy of the electrodeposited metal.

  10. Linear least-squares method for unbiased estimation of T1 from SPGR signals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lin-Ching; Koay, Cheng Guan; Basser, Peter J; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2008-08-01

    The longitudinal relaxation time, T(1), can be estimated from two or more spoiled gradient recalled echo images (SPGR) acquired with different flip angles and/or repetition times (TRs). The function relating signal intensity to flip angle and TR is nonlinear; however, a linear form proposed 30 years ago is currently widely used. Here we show that this linear method provides T(1) estimates that have similar precision but lower accuracy than those obtained with a nonlinear method. We also show that T(1) estimated by the linear method is biased due to improper accounting for noise in the fitting. This bias can be significant for clinical SPGR images; for example, T(1) estimated in brain tissue (800 ms < T(1) < 1600 ms) can be overestimated by 10% to 20%. We propose a weighting scheme that correctly accounts for the noise contribution in the fitting procedure. Monte Carlo simulations of SPGR experiments are used to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated T(1) from the widely-used linear, the proposed weighted-uncertainty linear, and the nonlinear methods. We show that the linear method with weighted uncertainties reduces the bias of the linear method, providing T(1) estimates comparable in precision and accuracy to those of the nonlinear method while reducing computation time significantly. PMID:18666108

  11. Superconducting Tunnel Junctions for High-Precision EUV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, F.; Carpenter, M. H.; Cantor, R.; Friedrich, S.

    2016-08-01

    We have characterized the photon response of superconducting tunnel junctions in the extreme ultraviolet energy range below 100 eV with a pulsed 355 nm laser. The detectors are operated at rates up to 5000 counts/s, are very linear in energy and have an energy resolution between 0.9 and 2 eV. We observe multiple peaks that correspond to an integer number of photons with a Poissonian probability distribution and that can be used for high-accuracy energy calibration. The uncertainty of the centroid depends on the detector resolution and the counting statistics and can be as low as 1 meV for well-separated peaks with >10^5 counts. We discuss the precision of the peak centroid as a function of detector resolution and total number of counts and the accuracy of the energy calibration.

  12. Design of a dual-axis optoelectronic level for precision angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kuang-Chao; Wang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Sheng-Yi; Liu, Yen-Chih

    2011-05-01

    The accuracy of machine tools is mainly determined by angular errors during linear motion according to the well-known Abbe principle. Precision angle measurement is important to precision machines. This paper presents the theory and experiments of a new dual-axis optoelectronic level with low cost and high precision. The system adopts a commercial DVD pickup head as the angle sensor in association with the double-layer pendulum mechanism for two-axis swings, respectively. In data processing with a microprocessor, the measured angles of both axes can be displayed on an LCD or exported to an external PC. Calibrated by a triple-beam laser angular interferometer, the error of the dual-axis optoelectronic level is better than ±0.7 arcsec in the measuring range of ±30 arcsec, and the settling time is within 0.5 s. Experiments show the applicability to the inspection of precision machines.

  13. Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.

    When multiple linear regression is used to develop a prediction model, sample size must be large enough to ensure stable coefficients. If the derivation sample size is inadequate, the model may not predict well for future subjects. The precision efficacy analysis for regression (PEAR) method uses a cross- validity approach to select sample sizes…

  14. Precision spectroscopy of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Cancio, P.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; De Natale, P.; De Mauro, C.; Krachmalnicoff, V.; Inguscio, M.

    2005-05-05

    Accurate Quantum-Electrodynamics (QED) tests of the simplest bound three body atomic system are performed by precise laser spectroscopic measurements in atomic Helium. In this paper, we present a review of measurements between triplet states at 1083 nm (23S-23P) and at 389 nm (23S-33P). In 4He, such data have been used to measure the fine structure of the triplet P levels and, then, to determine the fine structure constant when compared with equally accurate theoretical calculations. Moreover, the absolute frequencies of the optical transitions have been used for Lamb-shift determinations of the levels involved with unprecedented accuracy. Finally, determination of the He isotopes nuclear structure and, in particular, a measurement of the nuclear charge radius, are performed by using hyperfine structure and isotope-shift measurements.

  15. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    large molecular weight, net negative charge and hydrophilicity of synthetic small interfering RNAs makes it hard for the molecules to cross the plasma membrane and enter the cell cytoplasm. Immune responses can also diminish the effectiveness of this approach. In this issue, Shiri Weinstein and Dan Peer from Tel Aviv University provide an overview of the challenges and recent progress in the use of nanocarriers for delivering RNAi effector molecules into target tissues and cells more effectively [5]. Also in this issue, researchers in Korea report new results that demonstrate the potential of nanostructures in neural network engineering [6]. Min Jee Jang et al report directional growth of neurites along linear carbon nanotube patterns, demonstrating great progress in neural engineering and the scope for using nanotechnology to treat neural diseases. Modern medicine cannot claim to have abolished the pain and suffering that accompany disease. But a comparison between the ghastly and often ineffective iron implements of early medicine and the smart gadgets and treatments used in hospitals today speaks volumes for the extraordinary progress that has been made, and the motivation behind this research. References [1] Wallis F 2000 Signs and senses: diagnosis and prognosis in early medieval pulse and urine texts Soc. Hist. Med. 13 265-78 [2] Arntz Y, Seelig J D, Lang H P, Zhang J, Hunziker P, Ramseyer J P, Meyer E, Hegner M and Gerber Ch 2003 Label-free protein assay based on a nanomechanical cantiliever array Nanotechnology 14 86-90 [3] Gowtham S, Scheicher R H, Pandey R, Karna S P and Ahuja R 2008 First-principles study of physisorption of nucleic acid bases on small-diameter carbon nanotubes Nanotechnology 19 125701 [4] Wang H-N and Vo-Dinh T 2009 Multiplex detection of breast cancer biomarkers using plasmonic molecular sentinel nanoprobes Nanotechnology 20 065101 [5] Weinstein S and Peer D 2010 RNAi nanomedicines: challenges and opportunities within the immune system

  16. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    large molecular weight, net negative charge and hydrophilicity of synthetic small interfering RNAs makes it hard for the molecules to cross the plasma membrane and enter the cell cytoplasm. Immune responses can also diminish the effectiveness of this approach. In this issue, Shiri Weinstein and Dan Peer from Tel Aviv University provide an overview of the challenges and recent progress in the use of nanocarriers for delivering RNAi effector molecules into target tissues and cells more effectively [5]. Also in this issue, researchers in Korea report new results that demonstrate the potential of nanostructures in neural network engineering [6]. Min Jee Jang et al report directional growth of neurites along linear carbon nanotube patterns, demonstrating great progress in neural engineering and the scope for using nanotechnology to treat neural diseases. Modern medicine cannot claim to have abolished the pain and suffering that accompany disease. But a comparison between the ghastly and often ineffective iron implements of early medicine and the smart gadgets and treatments used in hospitals today speaks volumes for the extraordinary progress that has been made, and the motivation behind this research. References [1] Wallis F 2000 Signs and senses: diagnosis and prognosis in early medieval pulse and urine texts Soc. Hist. Med. 13 265-78 [2] Arntz Y, Seelig J D, Lang H P, Zhang J, Hunziker P, Ramseyer J P, Meyer E, Hegner M and Gerber Ch 2003 Label-free protein assay based on a nanomechanical cantiliever array Nanotechnology 14 86-90 [3] Gowtham S, Scheicher R H, Pandey R, Karna S P and Ahuja R 2008 First-principles study of physisorption of nucleic acid bases on small-diameter carbon nanotubes Nanotechnology 19 125701 [4] Wang H-N and Vo-Dinh T 2009 Multiplex detection of breast cancer biomarkers using plasmonic molecular sentinel nanoprobes Nanotechnology 20 065101 [5] Weinstein S and Peer D 2010 RNAi nanomedicines: challenges and opportunities within the immune system

  17. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  18. Global positioning system measurements for crustal deformation: Precision and accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, W.H.; Davis, J.L.; Svarc, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 27 repeated observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) position-difference vectors, up to 11 kilometers in length, indicates that the standard deviation of the measurements is 4 millimeters for the north component, 6 millimeters for the east component, and 10 to 20 millimeters for the vertical component. The uncertainty grows slowly with increasing vector length. At 225 kilometers, the standard deviation of the measurement is 6, 11, and 40 millimeters for the north, east, and up components, respectively. Measurements with GPS and Geodolite, an electromagnetic distance-measuring system, over distances of 10 to 40 kilometers agree within 0.2 part per million. Measurements with GPS and very long baseline interferometry of the 225-kilometer vector agree within 0.05 part per million.

  19. Tomography & Geochemistry: Precision, Repeatability, Accuracy and Joint Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, G. R.; Panza, G. F.; Artemieva, I. M.; Bastow, I. D.; Cammarano, F.; Doglioni, C.; Evans, J. R.; Hamilton, W. B.; Julian, B. R.; Lustrino, M.; Thybo, H.; Yanovskaya, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tomography can reveal the spatial seismic structure of the mantle, but has little ability to constrain composition, phase or temperature. In contrast, petrology and geochemistry can give insights into mantle composition, but have severely limited spatial control on magma sources. For these reasons, results from these three disciplines are often interpreted jointly. Nevertheless, the limitations of each method are often underestimated, and underlying assumptions de-emphasized. Examples of the limitations of seismic tomography include its ability to image in detail the three-dimensional structure of the mantle or to determine with certainty the strengths of anomalies. Despite this, published seismic anomaly strengths are often unjustifiably translated directly into physical parameters. Tomography yields seismological parameters such as wave speed and attenuation, not geological or thermal parameters. Much of the mantle is poorly sampled by seismic waves, and resolution- and error-assessment methods do not express the true uncertainties. These and other problems have become highlighted in recent years as a result of multiple tomography experiments performed by different research groups, in areas of particular interest e.g., Yellowstone. The repeatability of the results is often poorer than the calculated resolutions. The ability of geochemistry and petrology to identify magma sources and locations is typically overestimated. These methods have little ability to determine source depths. Models that assign geochemical signatures to specific layers in the mantle, including the transition zone, the lower mantle, and the core-mantle boundary, are based on speculative models that cannot be verified and for which viable, less-astonishing alternatives are available. Our knowledge is poor of the size, distribution and location of protoliths, and of metasomatism of magma sources, the nature of the partial-melting and melt-extraction process, the mixing of disparate melts, and the re-assimilation of crust and mantle lithosphere by rising melt. Interpretations of seismic tomography, petrologic and geochemical observations, and all three together, are ambiguous, and this needs to be emphasized more in presenting interpretations so that the viability of the models can be assessed more reliably.

  20. Quality, precision and accuracy of the maximum No. 40 anemometer

    SciTech Connect

    Obermeir, J.; Blittersdorf, D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper synthesizes available calibration data for the Maximum No. 40 anemometer. Despite its long history in the wind industry, controversy surrounds the choice of transfer function for this anemometer. Many users are unaware that recent changes in default transfer functions in data loggers are producing output wind speed differences as large as 7.6%. Comparison of two calibration methods used for large samples of Maximum No. 40 anemometers shows a consistent difference of 4.6% in output speeds. This difference is significantly larger than estimated uncertainty levels. Testing, initially performed to investigate related issues, reveals that Gill and Maximum cup anemometers change their calibration transfer functions significantly when calibrated in the open atmosphere compared with calibration in a laminar wind tunnel. This indicates that atmospheric turbulence changes the calibration transfer function of cup anemometers. These results call into question the suitability of standard wind tunnel calibration testing for cup anemometers. 6 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Global positioning system measurements for crustal deformation: precision and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Prescott, W H; Davis, J L; Svarc, J L

    1989-06-16

    Analysis of 27 repeated observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) position-difference vectors, up to 11 kilometers in length, indicates that the standard deviation of the measurements is 4 millimeters for the north component, 6 millimeters for the east component, and 10 to 20 millimeters for the vertical component. The uncertainty grows slowly with increasing vector length. At 225 kilometers, the standard deviation of the measurement is 6, 11, and 40 millimeters for the north, east, and up components, respectively. Measurements with GPS and Geodolite, an electromagnetic distance-measuring system, over distances of 10 to 40 kilometers agree within 0.2 part per million. Measurements with GPS and very long baseline interferometry of the 225-kilometer vector agree within 0.05 part per million. PMID:17820661

  2. Mixed-Precision Spectral Deferred Correction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, Ray W. S.

    2015-09-02

    Convergence of spectral deferred correction (SDC), where low-order time integration methods are used to construct higher-order methods through iterative refinement, can be accelerated in terms of computational effort by using mixed-precision methods. Using ideas from multi-level SDC (in turn based on FAS multigrid ideas), some of the SDC correction sweeps can use function values computed in reduced precision without adversely impacting the accuracy of the final solution. This is particularly beneficial for the performance of combustion solvers such as S3D [6] which require double precision accuracy but are performance limited by the cost of data motion.

  3. Arrival Metering Precision Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeffrey; Hunt, Sarah; Gomez, Ashley; Bienert, Nancy; Omar, Faisal; Kraut, Joshua; Brasil, Connie; Wu, Minghong, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the background, method and results of the Arrival Metering Precision Study (AMPS) conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center in May 2014. The simulation study measured delivery accuracy, flight efficiency, controller workload, and acceptability of time-based metering operations to a meter fix at the terminal area boundary for different resolution levels of metering delay times displayed to the air traffic controllers and different levels of airspeed information made available to the Time-Based Flow Management (TBFM) system computing the delay. The results show that the resolution of the delay countdown timer (DCT) on the controllers display has a significant impact on the delivery accuracy at the meter fix. Using the 10 seconds rounded and 1 minute rounded DCT resolutions resulted in more accurate delivery than 1 minute truncated and were preferred by the controllers. Using the speeds the controllers entered into the fourth line of the data tag to update the delay computation in TBFM in high and low altitude sectors increased air traffic control efficiency and reduced fuel burn for arriving aircraft during time based metering.

  4. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    LRO definitive and predictive accuracy requirements were easily met in the nominal mission orbit, using the LP150Q lunar gravity model. center dot Accuracy of the LP150Q model is poorer in the extended mission elliptical orbit. center dot Later lunar gravity models, in particular GSFC-GRAIL-270, improve OD accuracy in the extended mission. center dot Implementation of a constrained plane when the orbit is within 45 degrees of the Earth-Moon line improves cross-track accuracy. center dot Prediction accuracy is still challenged during full-Sun periods due to coarse spacecraft area modeling - Implementation of a multi-plate area model with definitive attitude input can eliminate prediction violations. - The FDF is evaluating using analytic and predicted attitude modeling to improve full-Sun prediction accuracy. center dot Comparison of FDF ephemeris file to high-precision ephemeris files provides gross confirmation that overlap compares properly assess orbit accuracy.

  5. Assignment of Calibration Information to Deeper Phylogenetic Nodes is More Effective in Obtaining Precise and Accurate Divergence Time Estimates.

    PubMed

    Mello, Beatriz; Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-01-01

    Divergence time estimation has become an essential tool for understanding macroevolutionary events. Molecular dating aims to obtain reliable inferences, which, within a statistical framework, means jointly increasing the accuracy and precision of estimates. Bayesian dating methods exhibit the propriety of a linear relationship between uncertainty and estimated divergence dates. This relationship occurs even if the number of sites approaches infinity and places a limit on the maximum precision of node ages. However, how the placement of calibration information may affect the precision of divergence time estimates remains an open question. In this study, relying on simulated and empirical data, we investigated how the location of calibration within a phylogeny affects the accuracy and precision of time estimates. We found that calibration priors set at median and deep phylogenetic nodes were associated with higher precision values compared to analyses involving calibration at the shallowest node. The results were independent of the tree symmetry. An empirical mammalian dataset produced results that were consistent with those generated by the simulated sequences. Assigning time information to the deeper nodes of a tree is crucial to guarantee the accuracy and precision of divergence times. This finding highlights the importance of the appropriate choice of outgroups in molecular dating. PMID:24855333

  6. High precision during food recruitment of experienced (reactivated) foragers in the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana (Apidae, Meliponini)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Daniel; Nieh, James C.; Hénaut, Yann; Cruz, Leopoldo; Vandame, Rémy

    Several studies have examined the existence of recruitment communication mechanisms in stingless bees. However, the spatial accuracy of location-specific recruitment has not been examined. Moreover, the location-specific recruitment of reactivated foragers, i.e., foragers that have previously experienced the same food source at a different location and time, has not been explicitly examined. However, such foragers may also play a significant role in colony foraging, particularly in small colonies. Here we report that reactivated Scaptotrigona mexicana foragers can recruit with high precision to a specific food location. The recruitment precision of reactivated foragers was evaluated by placing control feeders to the left and the right of the training feeder (direction-precision tests) and between the nest and the training feeder and beyond it (distance-precision tests). Reactivated foragers arrived at the correct location with high precision: 98.44% arrived at the training feeder in the direction trials (five-feeder fan-shaped array, accuracy of at least +/-6° of azimuth at 50 m from the nest), and 88.62% arrived at the training feeder in the distance trials (five-feeder linear array, accuracy of at least +/-5 m or +/-10% at 50 m from the nest). Thus, S. mexicana reactivated foragers can find the indicated food source at a specific distance and direction with high precision, higher than that shown by honeybees, Apis mellifera, which do not communicate food location at such close distances to the nest.

  7. One high-accuracy camera calibration algorithm based on computer vision images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Huang, Jianming; Wei, Xiangquan

    2015-12-01

    Camera calibration is the first step of computer vision and one of the most active research fields nowadays. In order to improve the measurement precision, the internal parameters of the camera should be accurately calibrated. So one high-accuracy camera calibration algorithm is proposed based on the images of planar targets or tridimensional targets. By using the algorithm, the internal parameters of the camera are calibrated based on the existing planar target at the vision-based navigation experiment. The experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed algorithm is obviously improved compared with the conventional linear algorithm, Tsai general algorithm, and Zhang Zhengyou calibration algorithm. The algorithm proposed by the article can satisfy the need of computer vision and provide reference for precise measurement of the relative position and attitude.

  8. Precision measurements in supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.L.

    1995-05-01

    Supersymmetry is a promising framework in which to explore extensions of the standard model. If candidates for supersymmetric particles are found, precision measurements of their properties will then be of paramount importance. The prospects for such measurements and their implications are the subject of this thesis. If charginos are produced at the LEP II collider, they are likely to be one of the few available supersymmetric signals for many years. The author considers the possibility of determining fundamental supersymmetry parameters in such a scenario. The study is complicated by the dependence of observables on a large number of these parameters. He proposes a straightforward procedure for disentangling these dependences and demonstrate its effectiveness by presenting a number of case studies at representative points in parameter space. In addition to determining the properties of supersymmetric particles, precision measurements may also be used to establish that newly-discovered particles are, in fact, supersymmetric. Supersymmetry predicts quantitative relations among the couplings and masses of superparticles. The author discusses tests of such relations at a future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider, using measurements that exploit the availability of polarizable beams. Stringent tests of supersymmetry from chargino production are demonstrated in two representative cases, and fermion and neutralino processes are also discussed.

  9. Precision evaluation of calibration factor of a superconducting gravimeter using an absolute gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jin-yang; Wu, Shu-qing; Li, Chun-jian; Su, Duo-wu; Xu, Jin-yi; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The precision of the calibration factor of a superconducting gravimeter (SG) using an absolute gravimeter (AG) is analyzed based on linear least square fitting and error propagation theory and factors affecting the accuracy are discussed. It can improve the accuracy to choose the observation period of solid tide as a significant change or increase the calibration time. Simulation is carried out based on synthetic gravity tides calculated with T-soft at observed site from Aug. 14th to Sept. 2nd in 2014. The result indicates that the highest precision using half a day's observation data is below 0.28% and the precision exponentially increases with the increase of peak-to-peak gravity change. The comparison of results obtained from the same observation time indicated that using properly selected observation data has more beneficial on the improvement of precision. Finally, the calibration experiment of the SG iGrav-012 is introduced and the calibration factor is determined for the first time using AG FG5X-249. With 2.5 days' data properly selected from solid tide period with large tidal amplitude, the determined calibration factor of iGrav-012 is (-92.54423+/-0.13616) μGal/V (1μGal=10-8m/s2), with the relative accuracy of about 0.15%.

  10. Precision injection molding of freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Precision injection molding is the most efficient mass production technology for manufacturing plastic optics. Applications of plastic optics in field of imaging, illumination, and concentration demonstrate a variety of complex surface forms, developing from conventional plano and spherical surfaces to aspheric and freeform surfaces. It requires high optical quality with high form accuracy and lower residual stresses, which challenges both optical tool inserts machining and precision injection molding process. The present paper reviews recent progress in mold tool machining and precision injection molding, with more emphasis on precision injection molding. The challenges and future development trend are also discussed.

  11. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  12. Linear thermal expansion data for tuffs from the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, B.M.; Chocas, C.S.

    1992-07-01

    Experiment results are presented for linear thermal expansion measurements on tuffaceous rocks from the unsaturated accuracy of the unconfined data collected between 50 and 250{degrees}C is better than 1.8 percent, with the precision better than 4.5 ;percent. The accuracy of the unconfined data collected between ambient temperature and 50{degrees}C and is approximately 11 percent deviation from the true value, with a precision of 12 percent of the mean value. Because of experiment design and the lack of information related calibrations, the accuracy and precision of the confined thermal expansion measurements could not be determined.

  13. High-accuracy EUV reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, U.; Fokoua, M.; Chichkov, B.

    2007-03-01

    Developers and users of EUV-optics need precise tools for the characterization of their products. Often a measurement accuracy of 0.1% or better is desired to detect and study slow-acting aging effect or degradation by organic contaminants. To achieve a measurement accuracy of 0.1% an EUV-source is required which provides an excellent long-time stability, namely power stability, spatial stability and spectral stability. Naturally, it should be free of debris. An EUV-source particularly suitable for this task is an advanced electron-based EUV-tube. This EUV source provides an output of up to 300 μW at 13.5 nm. Reflectometers benefit from the excellent long-time stability of this tool. We design and set up different reflectometers using EUV-tubes for the precise characterisation of EUV-optics, such as debris samples, filters, multilayer mirrors, grazing incidence optics, collectors and masks. Reflectivity measurements from grazing incidence to near normal incidence as well as transmission studies were realised at a precision of down to 0.1%. The reflectometers are computer-controlled and allow varying and scanning all important parameters online. The concepts of a sample reflectometer is discussed and results are presented. The devices can be purchased from the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

  14. Airborne Topographic Mapper Calibration Procedures and Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Chreston F.; Krabill, William B.; Manizade, Serdar S.; Russell, Rob L.; Sonntag, John G.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Description of NASA Airborn Topographic Mapper (ATM) lidar calibration procedures including analysis of the accuracy and consistancy of various ATM instrument parameters and the resulting influence on topographic elevation measurements. The ATM elevations measurements from a nominal operating altitude 500 to 750 m above the ice surface was found to be: Horizontal Accuracy 74 cm, Horizontal Precision 14 cm, Vertical Accuracy 6.6 cm, Vertical Precision 3 cm.

  15. High precision triangular waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, Theodore R.

    1983-01-01

    An ultra-linear ramp generator having separately programmable ascending and descending ramp rates and voltages is provided. Two constant current sources provide the ramp through an integrator. Switching of the current at current source inputs rather than at the integrator input eliminates switching transients and contributes to the waveform precision. The triangular waveforms produced by the waveform generator are characterized by accurate reproduction and low drift over periods of several hours. The ascending and descending slopes are independently selectable.

  16. Multiple linear regression for isotopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Alonso, J. I.

    2012-04-01

    There are two typical applications of isotopic measurements: the detection of natural variations in isotopic systems and the detection man-made variations using enriched isotopes as indicators. For both type of measurements accurate and precise isotope ratio measurements are required. For the so-called non-traditional stable isotopes, multicollector ICP-MS instruments are usually applied. In many cases, chemical separation procedures are required before accurate isotope measurements can be performed. The off-line separation of Rb and Sr or Nd and Sm is the classical procedure employed to eliminate isobaric interferences before multicollector ICP-MS measurement of Sr and Nd isotope ratios. Also, this procedure allows matrix separation for precise and accurate Sr and Nd isotope ratios to be obtained. In our laboratory we have evaluated the separation of Rb-Sr and Nd-Sm isobars by liquid chromatography and on-line multicollector ICP-MS detection. The combination of this chromatographic procedure with multiple linear regression of the raw chromatographic data resulted in Sr and Nd isotope ratios with precisions and accuracies typical of off-line sample preparation procedures. On the other hand, methods for the labelling of individual organisms (such as a given plant, fish or animal) are required for population studies. We have developed a dual isotope labelling procedure which can be unique for a given individual, can be inherited in living organisms and it is stable. The detection of the isotopic signature is based also on multiple linear regression. The labelling of fish and its detection in otoliths by Laser Ablation ICP-MS will be discussed using trout and salmon as examples. As a conclusion, isotope measurement procedures based on multiple linear regression can be a viable alternative in multicollector ICP-MS measurements.

  17. Increasing Accuracy in Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacksier, Tracey; Fernandes, Adelino; Matthew, Matt; Lehmann, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Human activity is increasing the concentrations of green house gases (GHG) in the atmosphere which results in temperature increases. High precision is a key requirement of atmospheric measurements to study the global carbon cycle and its effect on climate change. Natural air containing stable isotopes are used in GHG monitoring to calibrate analytical equipment. This presentation will examine the natural air and isotopic mixture preparation process, for both molecular and isotopic concentrations, for a range of components and delta values. The role of precisely characterized source material will be presented. Analysis of individual cylinders within multiple batches will be presented to demonstrate the ability to dynamically fill multiple cylinders containing identical compositions without isotopic fractionation. Additional emphasis will focus on the ability to adjust isotope ratios to more closely bracket sample types without the reliance on combusting naturally occurring materials, thereby improving analytical accuracy.

  18. Optimal diving maneuver strategy considering guidance accuracy for hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianwen; Liu, Luhua; Tang, Guojian; Bao, Weimin

    2014-11-01

    An optimal maneuver strategy considering terminal guidance accuracy for hypersonic vehicle in dive phase is investigated in this paper. First, it derives the complete three-dimensional nonlinear coupled motion equation without any approximations based on diving relative motion relationship directly, and converts it into linear decoupled state space equation with the same relative degree by feedback linearization. Second, the diving guidance law is designed based on the decoupled equation to meet the terminal impact point and falling angle constraints. In order to further improve the interception capability, it constructs maneuver control model through adding maneuver control item to the guidance law. Then, an integrated performance index consisting of maximum line-of-sight angle rate and minimum energy consumption is designed, and optimal control is employed to obtain optimal maneuver strategy when the encounter time is determined and undetermined, respectively. Furthermore, the performance index and suboptimal strategy are reconstructed to deal with the control capability constraint and the serous influence on terminal guidance accuracy caused by maneuvering flight. Finally, the approach is tested using the Common Aero Vehicle-H model. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed strategy can achieve high precision guidance and effective maneuver at the same time, and the indices are also optimized.

  19. Research on high accuracy diameter measurement system with CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bo; Duan, Guoteng

    2011-08-01

    Non-touch measurement is an important technology in many domains such as the monitoring of tool breakage and tool wear, et al. Based on the method of curve fitting and demanding inflection point, we present a high accuracy non-touch diameter measurement system. The measurement system comprise linear array CCD, CCD driving circuit, power supply, workseat, light source, data acquisition card and so on. The picture element of the linear array CCD is 2048, and the size of every pixel and the spacing of adjacent pixels have the same size of 14μmx14μm. The stabilized voltage supply has a constant voltage output of 3V. The light is generated by a halogen tungsten lamp, which does not represent any risk to the health of the whole system. The data acquisition card converts the analog signal to digital signal with the accuracy of 12 bit. The error of non-uniform of the CCD pixels in sensitivity and the electrical noise error are indicated in detail. The measurement system has a simple structure, high measuring precision, and can be carried out automatically. Experiment proves that the diameter measurement of the system is within the range of Φ0.5~Φ10mm, and the total measuring unstability of the system is within the range of +/- 1.4μm.

  20. Design tradeoffs for a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mika, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The heart of the multispectral linear array (MLA) design problem is to develop an instrument concept which concurrently provides a wide field-of-view with high resolution, spectral separation with precise band-to band registration, and excellent radiometric accuracy. Often, these requirements have conflicting design implications which can only be resolved by careful tradeoffs that consider performance, cost, fabrication feasibility and development risk. The key design tradeoffs for an MLA instrument are addressed, and elements of a baseline instrument concept are presented.

  1. High-precision arithmetic in mathematical physics

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2015-05-12

    For many scientific calculations, particularly those involving empirical data, IEEE 32-bit floating-point arithmetic produces results of sufficient accuracy, while for other applications IEEE 64-bit floating-point is more appropriate. But for some very demanding applications, even higher levels of precision are often required. Furthermore, this article discusses the challenge of high-precision computation, in the context of mathematical physics, and highlights what facilities are required to support future computation, in light of emerging developments in computer architecture.

  2. Matter power spectrum and the challenge of percent accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Aurel; Teyssier, Romain; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Onions, Julian; Reed, Darren S.; Smith, Robert E.; Springel, Volker; Pearce, Frazer R.; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Future galaxy surveys require one percent precision in the theoretical knowledge of the power spectrum over a large range including very nonlinear scales. While this level of accuracy is easily obtained in the linear regime with perturbation theory, it represents a serious challenge for small scales where numerical simulations are required. In this paper we quantify the precision of present-day N-body methods, identifying main potential error sources from the set-up of initial conditions to the measurement of the final power spectrum. We directly compare three widely used N-body codes, Ramses, Pkdgrav3, and Gadget3 which represent three main discretisation techniques: the particle-mesh method, the tree method, and a hybrid combination of the two. For standard run parameters, the codes agree to within one percent at k<=1 h Mpc‑1 and to within three percent at k<=10 h Mpc‑1. We also consider the bispectrum and show that the reduced bispectra agree at the sub-percent level for k<= 2 h Mpc‑1. In a second step, we quantify potential errors due to initial conditions, box size, and resolution using an extended suite of simulations performed with our fastest code Pkdgrav3. We demonstrate that the simulation box size should not be smaller than L=0.5 h‑1Gpc to avoid systematic finite-volume effects (while much larger boxes are required to beat down the statistical sample variance). Furthermore, a maximum particle mass of Mp=109 h‑1Msolar is required to conservatively obtain one percent precision of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, numerical simulations covering large survey volumes of upcoming missions such as DES, LSST, and Euclid will need more than a trillion particles to reproduce clustering properties at the targeted accuracy.

  3. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  4. Based on linear spectral mixture model (LSMM) unmixing remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaodi; Cao, Weibin

    2011-06-01

    There are mixed pixels in remote sensing images ordinarily, this is a difficulty of the pixel classification (ie, unmixing) in remote sensing image processing.Linear spectral separation, estimating the value end of Genpo degree, for spatial modeling, through the non-constrained mixed pixel decomposition,with cotton, corn, tomatoes and soil four endmembers to decompose mixed pixels, Got four endmember abundance images and the RMS error image, the planting area of cotton and cotton-growing area of the measurement in the decomposition of mixed pixel block, and obtained unmixing accuracy. Experimental results show that: a simple linear mixed model modeling, and computation is greatly reduced, high precision, strong adaptability.

  5. Accuracy in determining voice source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, A. S.; Sorokin, V. N.

    2014-11-01

    The paper addresses the accuracy of an approximate solution to the inverse problem of retrieving the shape of a voice source from a speech signal for a known signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is shown that if the source is found as a function of time with the A.N. Tikhonov regularization method, the accuracy of the found approximation is worse than the accuracy of speech signal recording by an order of magnitude. In contrast, adequate parameterization of the source ensures approximate solution accuracy comparable with the accuracy of the problem data. A corresponding algorithm is considered. On the basis of linear (in terms of data errors) estimates of approximate parametric solution accuracy, parametric models with the best accuracy can be chosen. This comparison has been carried out for the known voice source models, i.e., model [17] and the LF model [18]. The advantages of the latter are shown. Thus, for SNR = 40 dB, the relative accuracy of an approximate solution found with this algorithm is about 1% for the LF model and about 2% for model [17] as compared to an accuracy of 7-8% in the regularization method. The role of accuracy estimates found in speaker identification problems is discussed.

  6. Geometric accuracy of Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper images.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borgeson, W.T.; Batson, R.M.; Kieffer, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The geometric accuracy of the Landsat Thematic Mappers was assessed by a linear least-square comparison of the positions of conspicuous ground features in digital images with their geographic locations as determined from 1:24 000-scale maps. For a Landsat-5 image, the single-dimension standard deviations of the standard digital product, and of this image with additional linear corrections, are 11.2 and 10.3 m, respectively (0.4 pixel). An F-test showed that skew and affine distortion corrections are not significant. At this level of accuracy, the granularity of the digital image and the probable inaccuracy of the 1:24 000 maps began to affect the precision of the comparison. The tested image, even with a moderate accuracy loss in the digital-to-graphic conversion, meets National Horizontal Map Accuracy standards for scales of 1:100 000 and smaller. Two Landsat-4 images, obtained with the Multispectral Scanner on and off, and processed by an interim software system, contain significant skew and affine distortions. -Authors

  7. Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    An overview of linear collider programs is given. The history and technical challenges are described and the pioneering electron-positron linear collider, the SLC, is first introduced. For future energy frontier linear collider projects, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced and their technical features are discussed. The ILC is based on superconducting RF technology and the CLIC is based on two-beam acceleration technology. The ILC collaboration completed the Technical Design Report in 2013, and has come to the stage of "Design to Reality." The CLIC collaboration published the Conceptual Design Report in 2012, and the key technology demonstration is in progress. The prospects for further advanced acceleration technology are briefly discussed for possible long-term future linear colliders.

  8. Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    An overview of linear collider programs is given. The history and technical challenges are described and the pioneering electron-positron linear collider, the SLC, is first introduced. For future energy frontier linear collider projects, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced and their technical features are discussed. The ILC is based on superconducting RF technology and the CLIC is based on two-beam acceleration technology. The ILC collaboration completed the Technical Design Report in 2013, and has come to the stage of "Design to Reality." The CLIC collaboration published the Conceptual Design Report in 2012, and the key technology demonstration is in progress. The prospects for further advanced acceleration technology are briefly discussed for possible long-term future linear colliders.

  9. Precision CW laser automatic tracking system investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, K. T.; Lucy, R. F.; Mcgann, E. J.; Peters, C. J.

    1966-01-01

    Precision laser tracker capable of tracking a low acceleration target to an accuracy of about 20 microradians rms is being constructed and tested. This laser tracking has the advantage of discriminating against other optical sources and the capability of simultaneously measuring range.

  10. Using satellite data to increase accuracy of PMF calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Mettel, M.C.

    1992-03-01

    The accuracy of a flood severity estimate depends on the data used. The more detailed and precise the data, the more accurate the estimate. Earth observation satellites gather detailed data for determining the probable maximum flood at hydropower projects.

  11. Design for H type co-planar precision stage based on closed air bearing guideway with vacuum attraction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Shi, Zhaoyao; Lin, Jiachun; Zhang, Hua

    2011-12-01

    The accuracy of traditional two-dimensional precision stage is limited not only by the accuracy of each guideway but also by the configuration of the stage. It is not easy to calculate and compensate the total accuracy of the stage due to the complicated influence caused by the different position of the slides. An air bearing guideways with vacuum attraction forces has been designed with closed slide structure to enhance the stiffness and avoid the deformation caused by the weight of slide and workpieces. An H style two-dimension ultra-precision stage with co-planar structure has been developed based on the air bearing guideways to avoid the multi-influence by the axes. Driven by linear motors, the position of the workpiece is encoded by length scales with resolution of 50nm and thermal expansion of 0.6 μm/m/°C (0 °C to 30 °C). The travel span of the stage is 320x320mm, during which each axis has a positioning accuracy of +/-1μm, a repeatability of +/-0.3μm and a straightness of +/-0.5μm. The stage can be applied in precision manufacturing and measurement.

  12. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (p<0.001). Precision of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0

  13. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (p<0.001). Precision of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0

  14. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (p<0.001). Precision of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0

  15. Precision performance lamp technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Dean A.; Kiesa, James E.; Dean, Raymond A.

    1997-09-01

    A principal function of a lamp is to produce light output with designated spectra, intensity, and/or geometric radiation patterns. The function of a precision performance lamp is to go beyond these parameters and into the precision repeatability of performance. All lamps are not equal. There are a variety of incandescent lamps, from the vacuum incandescent indictor lamp to the precision lamp of a blood analyzer. In the past the definition of a precision lamp was described in terms of wattage, light center length (LCL), filament position, and/or spot alignment. This paper presents a new view of precision lamps through the discussion of a new segment of lamp design, which we term precision performance lamps. The definition of precision performance lamps will include (must include) the factors of a precision lamp. But what makes a precision lamp a precision performance lamp is the manner in which the design factors of amperage, mscp (mean spherical candlepower), efficacy (lumens/watt), life, not considered individually but rather considered collectively. There is a statistical bias in a precision performance lamp for each of these factors; taken individually and as a whole. When properly considered the results can be dramatic to the system design engineer, system production manage and the system end-user. It can be shown that for the lamp user, the use of precision performance lamps can translate to: (1) ease of system design, (2) simplification of electronics, (3) superior signal to noise ratios, (4) higher manufacturing yields, (5) lower system costs, (6) better product performance. The factors mentioned above are described along with their interdependent relationships. It is statistically shown how the benefits listed above are achievable. Examples are provided to illustrate how proper attention to precision performance lamp characteristics actually aid in system product design and manufacturing to build and market more, market acceptable product products in the

  16. Linear Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, T. A.; Newby, N. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of linear collisions between two or three objects is related to a junior-level course in analytical mechanics. The theoretical discussion uses a geometrical approach that treats elastic and inelastic collisions from a unified point of view. Experiments with a linear air track are described. (Author/TS)

  17. A Precise Lunar Photometric Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.

    1996-03-01

    The Clementine multispectral dataset will enable compositional mapping of the entire lunar surface at a resolution of ~100-200 m, but a highly accurate photometric normalization is needed to achieve challenging scientific objectives such as mapping petrographic or elemental compositions. The goal of this work is to normalize the Clementine data to an accuracy of 1% for the UVVIS images (0.415, 0.75, 0.9, 0.95, and 1.0 micrometers) and 2% for NIR images (1.1, 1.25, 1.5, 2.0, 2.6, and 2.78 micrometers), consistent with radiometric calibration goals. The data will be normalized to R30, the reflectance expected at an incidence angle (i) and phase angle (alpha) of 30 degrees and emission angle (e) of 0 degree, matching the photometric geometry of lunar samples measured at the reflectance laboratory (RELAB) at Brown University The focus here is on the precision of the normalization, not the putative physical significance of the photometric function parameters. The 2% precision achieved is significantly better than the ~10% precision of a previous normalization.

  18. Precision robotic control of agricultural vehicles on realistic farm trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Thomas

    High-precision "autofarming", or precise agricultural vehicle guidance, is rapidly becoming a reality thanks to increasing computing power and carrier-phase differential GPS ("CPDGPS") position and attitude sensors. Realistic farm trajectories will include not only rows but also arcs created by smoothly joining rows or path-planning algorithms, spirals for farming center-pivot irrigated fields, and curved trajectories dictated by nonlinear field boundaries. In addition, fields are often sloped, and accurate control may be required either on linear trajectories or on curved contours. A three-dimensional vehicle model which adapts to changing vehicle and ground conditions was created, and a low-order model for controller synthesis was extracted based on nominal conditions. The model was extended to include a towed implement. Experimentation showed that an extended Kalman filter could identify the vehicle's state in real-time. An approximation was derived for the additional positional uncertainty introduced by the noisy "lever-arm correction" necessary to translate the GPS position measurement at the roof antenna to the vehicle's control point on the ground; this approximation was then used to support the assertion that attitude measurement accuracy was as important to control point position measurement as the original position measurement accuracy at the GPS antenna. The low-order vehicle control model was transformed to polar coordinates for control on arcs and spirals. Experimental data showed that the tractor's control, point tracked an arc to within a -0.3 cm mean and a 3.4 cm standard deviation and a spiral to within a -0.2 cm mean and a 5.3 cm standard deviation. Cubic splines were used to describe curve trajectories, and a general expression for the time-rate-of-change of curve-related parameters was derived. Four vehicle control algorithms were derived for curve tracking: linear local-error control based on linearizing the vehicle about the curve's radius of

  19. Precision volume measuring system

    SciTech Connect

    Klevgard, P.A.

    1984-11-01

    An engineering study was undertaken to calibrate and certify a precision volume measurement system that uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) to ratio a known to an unknown volume. The constant-temperature, computer-controlled system was tested for thermodynamic instabilities, for precision (0.01%), and for bias (0.01%). Ratio scaling was used to optimize the quartz crystal pressure transducer calibration.

  20. Precision goniometer equipped with a 22-bit absolute rotary encoder.

    PubMed

    Xiaowei, Z; Ando, M; Jidong, W

    1998-05-01

    The calibration of a compact precision goniometer equipped with a 22-bit absolute rotary encoder is presented. The goniometer is a modified Huber 410 goniometer: the diffraction angles can be coarsely generated by a stepping-motor-driven worm gear and precisely interpolated by a piezoactuator-driven tangent arm. The angular accuracy of the precision rotary stage was evaluated with an autocollimator. It was shown that the deviation from circularity of the rolling bearing utilized in the precision rotary stage restricts the angular positioning accuracy of the goniometer, and results in an angular accuracy ten times larger than the angular resolution of 0.01 arcsec. The 22-bit encoder was calibrated by an incremental rotary encoder. It became evident that the accuracy of the absolute encoder is approximately 18 bit due to systematic errors.

  1. Precision aerial application for site-specific rice crop management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture includes different technologies that allow agricultural professional to use information management tools to optimize agriculture production. The new technologies allow aerial application applicators to improve application accuracy and efficiency, which saves time and money for...

  2. Precision positioning device

    DOEpatents

    McInroy, John E.

    2005-01-18

    A precision positioning device is provided. The precision positioning device comprises a precision measuring/vibration isolation mechanism. A first plate is provided with the precision measuring mean secured to the first plate. A second plate is secured to the first plate. A third plate is secured to the second plate with the first plate being positioned between the second plate and the third plate. A fourth plate is secured to the third plate with the second plate being positioned between the third plate and the fourth plate. An adjusting mechanism for adjusting the position of the first plate, the second plate, the third plate, and the fourth plate relative to each other.

  3. Single-frequency precise point positioning: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterle, Oskar; Stopar, Bojan; Pavlovčič Prešeren, Polona

    2015-08-01

    An analytical approach to single-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is discussed in this paper. To obtain highest precision results, all biases must be eliminated or modelled to centimetre level. The use of the GRAPHIC ionosphere-free linear combination that is based on single-frequency phase and code observations eliminates the ionosphere bias; however, the rank deficient Gauss-Markov model is obtained. We explicitly determine rank deficiency of a Gauss-Markov model as a number of all ambiguity clusters, each of them defined as a set of all ambiguities overlapping in time. On the basis of S-transformation we prove that the single-frequency PPP represents an unbiased estimator for station coordinates and troposphere parameters, while it presents a biased estimator for ambiguities and receiver-clock error parameters. Additionally we describe the estimable parameters in each ambiguity cluster as the differences between ambiguity parameters and the sum of receiver-clock parameters with one of the ambiguities. We also show that any other particular solution on the basis of S-transformation is obtained only when the common least-squares estimation in single step is applied. The recursive least-squares estimation with parameter pre-elimination only determines the vector of unknowns as possible to transform through S-transformation, whereas the same does not hold for the cofactor matrix of unknowns. For a case study, we present our method on GPS data from 19 permanent stations (14 IGS and 5 EPN) in Europe, for 89 consecutive days in the beginning of 2013. The static case study revealed the precision of daily coordinates as 7.6, 11.7 and 19.6 mm for , and , respectively. The accuracies of the , and components were determined as 6.9, 13.5 and 31.4 mm, respectively, and were calculated using the Helmert transformation of weighted-mean daily single-frequency PPP and IGb08 coordinates. The estimated convergence times were relatively diverse, expanding from 1.75 h (CAGL

  4. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  5. Precision Hyperfine Structure of 2;^3P State of ^3He with External Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qixue; Drake, G. W. F.

    2007-06-01

    The theory of the Zeeman effect can be used to extrapolate precise measurements for the fine structure or the hyperfine structure to zero-field strength. In the present work, the hyperfine structure of 2;^3P state of ^3He with external magnetic fields is precisely calculated. The values of the fields for 32 crossings and five anticrossings of the magnetic sublevels are theoretically predicted for magnetic field strengths up to 1 Tesla. The results are compared with experimental work. We include the linear terms, diamagnetic terms, and the 2̂ relativistic correction terms in the Zeeman Hamiltonian. All related matrix elements are calculated with high accuracy by the use of double basis set Hylleraas type variational wave functions[1,2].[1] Z. -C. Yan and G.W.F. Drake, Phys. Rev. A 50, R1980 (1994).[2] Q. Wu and G.W.F. Drake, J. Phys. B 40, 393 (2007).

  6. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  7. Precision tracking control of dual-stage actuation system for optical manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Tang, J.

    2009-03-01

    Actuators with high linear motion speed, high positioning resolution and long motion stroke are needed in many precision machining systems. In some current systems, voice coil motors (VCMs) are implemented for servo control. While the voice coil motors may provide long motion stroke needed in many applications, the main obstacle that hinders the improvement of the machining accuracy and efficiency is its limited bandwidth. To fundamentally solve this issue, we propose to develop a dual-stage actuation system that consists of a voice coil motor that covers the coarse motion and a piezoelectric stack actuator that induces the fine motion to enhance the positioning accuracy. A flexure hinge-based mechanism is developed to connect these two actuators together. A series of numerical and experimental studies are carried out to facilitate the system design and preliminary control development.

  8. Precision Teaching: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Richard P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Precision teaching is introduced as a method of helping students develop fluency or automaticity in the performance of academic skills. Precision teaching involves being aware of the relationship between teaching and learning, measuring student performance regularly and frequently, and analyzing the measurements to develop instructional and…

  9. Precision Optics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert L.; And Others

    This guide outlines the competency-based, two-year precision optics curriculum that the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association has proposed to fill the void that it suggests will soon exist as many of the master opticians currently employed retire. The model, which closely resembles the old European apprenticeship model, calls for 300…

  10. Electrostatic Microactuators for Precise Positioning of Neural Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jain, Tilak; Gilletti, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays used for monitoring single and multineuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time likely due to micromotion of neurons away from the microelectrode, gliosis around the recording site and also brain movement due to behavior. We report here novel electrostatic microactuated microelectrodes that will enable precise repositioning of the microelectrodes within the brain tissue. Electrostatic comb-drive microactuators and associated microelectrodes are fabricated using the SUMMiT V™ (Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel MEMS Technology) process, a five-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, NM. The microfabricated microactuators enable precise bidirectional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with accuracy in the order of 1 μm. The microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multiunit activity. The microactuators are capable of driving the microelectrodes in the brain tissue with forces in the order of several micro-Newtons. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats in acute experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the insulation, packaging and interconnect issues will be necessary before this technology can be validated in long-term experiments. PMID:16235660

  11. Precision positioning system based on intelligent Fuzzy-PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Liqiong; Li, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To break through the limitations of static and dynamic characteristics of conventional step motor driven open-loop positioning devices, a two-dimensional precision positioning system with a travel range of 100mm×100mm has been developed. This paper presents its structure, control principle and performance experiments. This system, equipped with cross roller guides working as linear guiding elements, is driven by step motors through ball screw transmission. A threeaxis dual-frequency laser interferometric measurement system is established for real-time measurement and feedback of system's movements in three degrees of freedom (DOF) and an intelligent Fuzzy-PID controller is implemented for this system's motion control. In the controller, the PID module calculates the output from motor drivers and its initial parameters are tuned through expansion of critical proportioning method; the Fuzzy module optimizes PID parameters to fulfill specific requirements of different movement stages. A dead zone control mechanism is developed in this controller to minimize the oscillations around target position. Experimental results indicate that system with Fuzzy-PID controller shows faster response than that with ordinary PID controller. Moreover, with this controller implemented, the developed precision positioning system achieves better repeatability (+/-2μm) and accuracy (+/-2.5μm) within the full range than open-loop system using step motor.

  12. Expressing precision and bias in calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hauck, Danielle K; Croft, Stephen; Bracken, David S

    2010-01-01

    The calibration and calibration verification of a nuclear calorimeter represents a substantial investment of time in part because a single calorimeter measurement takes of the order of 2 to 24h to complete. The time to complete a measurement generally increases with the size of the calorimeter measurement well. It is therefore important to plan the sequence of measurements rather carefully so as to cover the dynamic range and achieve the required accuracy within a reasonable time frame. This work will discuss how calibrations and their verification has been done in the past and what we consider to be good general practice in this regard. A proposed approach to calibration and calibration verification is presented which, in the final analysis, makes use of all the available data - both calibration and verification collectively - in order to obtain the best (in a best fit sense) possible calibration. The combination of sample variance and percent recovery are traditionally taken as sufficient to capture the random (precision) and systematic (bias) contributions to the uncertainty in a calorimetric assay. These terms have been defined as well as formulated for a basic calibration. It has been tradition to assume that sensitivity is a linear function of power. However, the availability of computer power and statistical packages should be utilized to fit the response function as accurately as possible using whatever functions are deemed most suitable. Allowing for more flexibility in the response function fit will enable the calibration to be updated according to the results from regular validation measurements through the year. In a companion paper to be published elsewhere we plan to discuss alternative fitting functions.

  13. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  14. Classification accuracy improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Improvements made in processing system designed for MIDAS (prototype multivariate interactive digital analysis system) effects higher accuracy in classification of pixels, resulting in significantly-reduced processing time. Improved system realizes cost reduction factor of 20 or more.

  15. Precision and Power Grip Priming by Observed Grasping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vainio, Lari; Tucker, Mike; Ellis, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The coupling of hand grasping stimuli and the subsequent grasp execution was explored in normal participants. Participants were asked to respond with their right- or left-hand to the accuracy of an observed (dynamic) grasp while they were holding precision or power grasp response devices in their hands (e.g., precision device/right-hand; power…

  16. Estimating Standardized Linear Contrasts of Means with Desired Precision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonett, Douglas G.

    2009-01-01

    L. Wilkinson and the Task Force on Statistical Inference (1999) recommended reporting confidence intervals for measures of effect sizes. If the sample size is too small, the confidence interval may be too wide to provide meaningful information. Recently, K. Kelley and J. R. Rausch (2006) used an iterative approach to computer-generate tables of…

  17. Developing and implementing a high precision setup system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lee-Cheng

    The demand for high-precision radiotherapy (HPRT) was first implemented in stereotactic radiosurgery using a rigid, invasive stereotactic head frame. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a frameless device was developed along a growing interest in sophisticated treatment with a tight margin and high-dose gradient. This dissertation establishes the complete management for HPRT in the process of frameless SRT, including image-guided localization, immobilization, and dose evaluation. The most ideal and precise positioning system can allow for ease of relocation, real-time patient movement assessment, high accuracy, and no additional dose in daily use. A new image-guided stereotactic positioning system (IGSPS), the Align RT3C 3D surface camera system (ART, VisionRT), which combines 3D surface images and uses a real-time tracking technique, was developed to ensure accurate positioning at the first place. The uncertainties of current optical tracking system, which causes patient discomfort due to additional bite plates using the dental impression technique and external markers, are found. The accuracy and feasibility of ART is validated by comparisons with the optical tracking and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems. Additionally, an effective daily quality assurance (QA) program for the linear accelerator and multiple IGSPSs is the most important factor to ensure system performance in daily use. Currently, systematic errors from the phantom variety and long measurement time caused by switching phantoms were discovered. We investigated the use of a commercially available daily QA device to improve the efficiency and thoroughness. Reasonable action level has been established by considering dosimetric relevance and clinic flow. As for intricate treatments, the effect of dose deviation caused by setup errors remains uncertain on tumor coverage and toxicity on OARs. The lack of adequate dosimetric simulations based on the true treatment coordinates from

  18. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  19. Precision In Situ Field Geologic Contact Mapping by MERA, Columbia Hills, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumpler, L. S.

    2006-12-01

    The positions of identified lithologic contacts, outcrops, traverse landforms, and data derived from in situ measurements of outcrop materials by the Athena instrument suite have been determined by stereo-ranging and rover tracking along the traverse by MERA (Spirit) within the Columbia Hills. High precision geologic maps of several sites and moderate precision transect maps between sites have been constructed fro these data showing the geology of Spirit's path through the Columbia Hills. The overall accuracy of contact locations with respect to global position reflects the overall accuracy of knowledge about the rover location. But measurements of contacts from multiple (as many as five) positions agree remarkably well and are well within the standards and limitations acceptable within terrestrial field geologic contact mapping precision. Orthographic maps of the results along the traverse also agree well with features in narrow angle MOC images crossed during the traverse. Some site-to-site variations in lithology and chemistry within the Columbia Hills reflect possible variations in surficial materials. But other differences between outcrops could be a result of variations in alteration of a limited range of protoliths draped as either distal crater ejecta or volcanic air fall materials over a Columbia Hills substrate. Large scale changes in lithology along the traverse, and particularly abrupt discontinuities coincident with through-going linear trends are evidence for possible structural (faulting) control on exposures that expose fundamental differences in basement or substrate materials. The geological complexity of the Columbia Hills appears comparable to that of some ancient continental basement terrains.

  20. A 3-D Multilateration: A Precision Geodetic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobal, P. R.; Fliegel, H. F.; Jaffe, R. M.; Muller, P. M.; Ong, K. M.; Vonroos, O. H.

    1972-01-01

    A system was designed with the capability of determining 1-cm accuracy station positions in three dimensions using pulsed laser earth satellite tracking stations coupled with strictly geometric data reduction. With this high accuracy, several crucial geodetic applications become possible, including earthquake hazards assessment, precision surveying, plate tectonics, and orbital determination.

  1. The Mira-Titan Universe: Precision Predictions for Dark Energy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, Katrin; Bingham, Derek; Lawrence, Earl; Bergner, Steven; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David; Pope, Adrian; Biswas, Rahul; Finkel, Hal; Frontiere, Nicholas; Bhattacharya, Suman

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale simulations of cosmic structure formation play an important role in interpreting cosmological observations at high precision. The simulations must cover a parameter range beyond the standard six cosmological parameters and need to be run at high mass and force resolution. A key simulation-based task is the generation of accurate theoretical predictions for observables using a finite number of simulation runs, via the method of emulation. Using a new sampling technique, we explore an eight-dimensional parameter space including massive neutrinos and a variable equation of state of dark energy. We construct trial emulators using two surrogate models (the linear power spectrum and an approximate halo mass function). The new sampling method allows us to build precision emulators from just 26 cosmological models and to systematically increase the emulator accuracy by adding new sets of simulations in a prescribed way. Emulator fidelity can now be continuously improved as new observational data sets become available and higher accuracy is required. Finally, using one ΛCDM cosmology as an example, we study the demands imposed on a simulation campaign to achieve the required statistics and accuracy when building emulators for investigations of dark energy.

  2. Optimal design of robot accuracy compensators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, H.; Roth, Z.S. . Robotics Center and Electrical Engineering Dept.); Hamano, Fumio . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    The problem of optimal design of robot accuracy compensators is addressed. Robot accuracy compensation requires that actual kinematic parameters of a robot be previously identified. Additive corrections of joint commands, including those at singular configurations, can be computed without solving the inverse kinematics problem for the actual robot. This is done by either the damped least-squares (DLS) algorithm or the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) algorithm, which is a recursive version of the DLS algorithm. The weight matrix in the performance index can be selected to achieve specific objectives, such as emphasizing end-effector's positioning accuracy over orientation accuracy or vice versa, or taking into account proximity to robot joint travel limits and singularity zones. The paper also compares the LQR and the DLS algorithms in terms of computational complexity, storage requirement, and programming convenience. Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the algorithms.

  3. A study on the fabrication of main scale of linear encoder using continuous roller imprint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanjin; Shi, Yongsheng; Yin, Lei; Feng, Long; Liu, Hongzhong

    2013-10-01

    Linear encoder composed of main and index scales has an extensive application in the field of modern precision measurement. The main scale is the key component of linear encoder as measuring basis. In this article, the continuous roller imprint technology is applied to the manufacturing of the main scale, this method can realize the high efficiency and low cost manufacturing of the ultra-long main scale. By means of the plastic deformation of the soft metal film substrate, the grating microstructure on the surface of the cylinder mold is replicated to the soft metal film substrate directly. Through the high precision control of continuous rotational motion of the mold, ultra-long high precision grating microstructure is obtained. This paper mainly discusses the manufacturing process of the high precision cylinder mold and the effects of the roller imprint pressure and roller rotation speed on the imprint replication quality. The above process parameters were optimized to manufacture the high quality main scale. At last, the reading test of a linear encoder contains the main scale made by the above method was conducted to evaluate its measurement accuracy, the result demonstrated the feasibility of the continuous roller imprint method.

  4. Accuracy of analyses of microelectronics nanostructures in atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurpillot, F.; Rolland, N.; Estivill, R.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2016-07-01

    The routine use of atom probe tomography (APT) as a nano-analysis microscope in the semiconductor industry requires the precise evaluation of the metrological parameters of this instrument (spatial accuracy, spatial precision, composition accuracy or composition precision). The spatial accuracy of this microscope is evaluated in this paper in the analysis of planar structures such as high-k metal gate stacks. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that the in-depth accuracy of reconstructed APT images is perturbed when analyzing this structure composed of an oxide layer of high electrical permittivity (higher-k dielectric constant) that separates the metal gate and the semiconductor channel of a field emitter transistor. Large differences in the evaporation field between these layers (resulting from large differences in material properties) are the main sources of image distortions. An analytic model is used to interpret inaccuracy in the depth reconstruction of these devices in APT.

  5. Long distance magnetic conveyor for precise positioning of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, R.; Rom, T.; Hänsel, W.; Hänsch, T. W.; Reichel, J.

    2005-08-01

    We describe a chip-based magnetic conveyor that transports ultracold atoms with high positioning accuracy over long distances, into an interaction region which is well separated from the magneto-optical trap and gives good optical access to the atoms. The conveyor can work in two different modes, with or without external bias field. The transport potential is generated by a two-layer conductor pattern, enabling a significantly smoother transport than our earlier single-layer conveyor. This is confirmed by numerical field calculations, using an optimization procedure that minimizes shape deformations as well as deviations from the linear transport path. We experimentally demonstrate the use of this conveyor in the mode with external bias field, transporting a cloud of cold atoms over a linear distance of 6 cm and a total distance of 24 cm. We also describe an on-chip quadrupole trap that can be rotated by π/2. This trap is used to remove design constraints on the orientation of the laser beams in the surface magneto-optical trap. The long-distance conveyor is a versatile tool for experiments with trapped cold atoms, and can achieve sub-micrometric positioning precision. Possible applications of this tool are discussed.

  6. Overview of the national precision database for ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Mikel, D.K.

    1999-07-01

    One of the most important ambient air monitoring quality assurance indicators is the precision test. Code of Federal Regulation Title 40, Section 58 (40 CFR 58) Appendix A1 states that all automated analyzers must have precision tests performed at least once every two weeks. Precision tests can be the best indicator of quality of data for the following reasons: Precision tests are performed once every two weeks. There are approximately 24 to 26 tests per year per instrument. Accuracy tests (audits) usually occur only 1--2 times per year. Precision tests and the subsequent statistical tests can be used to calculate the bias in a set of data. Precision test are used to calculate 95% confidence (probability) limits for the data set. This is important because the confidence of any data point can be determined. If the authors examine any exceedances or near exceedances of the ozone NAAQS, the confidence limits must be examined as well. Precision tests are performed by the monitoring staff and the precision standards are certified against the internal agency primary standards. Precision data are submitted by all state and local agencies that are required to submit criteria pollutant data to the Aerometric and Information Retrieval System (AIRS) database. This subset of the AIRS database is named Precision and Accuracy Retrieval Systems (PARS). In essence, the precision test is an internally performed test performed by the agency collecting and reporting the data.

  7. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  8. Precision Measurement in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quake, Stephen

    Is biology a quantitative science like physics? I will discuss the role of precision measurement in both physics and biology, and argue that in fact both fields can be tied together by the use and consequences of precision measurement. The elementary quanta of biology are twofold: the macromolecule and the cell. Cells are the fundamental unit of life, and macromolecules are the fundamental elements of the cell. I will describe how precision measurements have been used to explore the basic properties of these quanta, and more generally how the quest for higher precision almost inevitably leads to the development of new technologies, which in turn catalyze further scientific discovery. In the 21st century, there are no remaining experimental barriers to biology becoming a truly quantitative and mathematical science.

  9. Precision Environmental Radiation Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Popov, Pavel Degtiarenko

    2010-07-01

    A new precision low-level environmental radiation monitoring system has been developed and tested at Jefferson Lab. This system provides environmental radiation measurements with accuracy and stability of the order of 1 nGy/h in an hour, roughly corresponding to approximately 1% of the natural cosmic background at the sea level. Advanced electronic front-end has been designed and produced for use with the industry-standard High Pressure Ionization Chamber detector hardware. A new highly sensitive readout electronic circuit was designed to measure charge from the virtually suspended ionization chamber ion collecting electrode. New signal processing technique and dedicated data acquisition were tested together with the new readout. The designed system enabled data collection in a remote Linux-operated computer workstation, which was connected to the detectors using a standard telephone cable line. The data acquisition system algorithm is built around the continuously running 24-bit resolution 192 kHz data sampling analog to digital convertor. The major features of the design include: extremely low leakage current in the input circuit, true charge integrating mode operation, and relatively fast response to the intermediate radiation change. These features allow operating of the device as an environmental radiation monitor, at the perimeters of the radiation-generating installations in densely populated areas, like in other monitoring and security applications requiring high precision and long-term stability. Initial system evaluation results are presented.

  10. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  11. General linear chirplet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Gang; Zhou, Yiqi

    2016-03-01

    Time-frequency (TF) analysis (TFA) method is an effective tool to characterize the time-varying feature of a signal, which has drawn many attentions in a fairly long period. With the development of TFA, many advanced methods are proposed, which can provide more precise TF results. However, some restrictions are introduced inevitably. In this paper, we introduce a novel TFA method, termed as general linear chirplet transform (GLCT), which can overcome some limitations existed in current TFA methods. In numerical and experimental validations, by comparing with current TFA methods, some advantages of GLCT are demonstrated, which consist of well-characterizing the signal of multi-component with distinct non-linear features, being independent to the mathematical model and initial TFA method, allowing for the reconstruction of the interested component, and being non-sensitivity to noise.

  12. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  13. Receiver Widelane Analysis and Its Effect on Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsobeiey, M.

    2014-11-01

    Typically, differential carrier-phase-based methods have been used in positioning applications that require high accuracy. The main advantage of differential methods is solving the carrier-phase ambiguities and obtain millimetre-level accuracy carrier-phase measurements. Recent studies showed that it is possible to fix the un-differenced carrier-phase ambiguities into integers which is well-known as un-differenced carrier-phase ambiguity resolution. Unfortunately, the IGS neglects satellite hardware delay during satellite clock corrections estimation process. In case of differential methods, however, this will not affect the user as all common errors between the reference and rover receivers will be cancelled out by. Point positioning, on the other hand, will be affected by neglecting satellite hardware delays as those hardware delays will be lumped into the carrier-phase ambiguities destroying its integer nature. To solve this problem, satellite clock corrections must be estimated based on clock correction for each observable bases. The user, on the other hand, can form the ionosphere-free linear combination and divide and fix its two components, namely widelane and narrowlane. If both ambiguities are successfully fixed, few millimetres level of accuracy measurements are then obtained. In this paper, one month (December, 2013) of GPS data is used to study the receiver widelane bias, its behaviour over time, and receiver dependency are provided. It is shown that the receiver widelane bias is receiver dependent, stable over time for high-grade geodetic receivers. These results are expected to have a great impact on precise point positioning (PPP) conversion time and PPP carrierphase ambiguity resolution.

  14. Precise Orbit Determination of GPS Satellites Using Phase Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Myung-Kook; Choi, Kyu-Hong; Park, Pil-Ho

    1997-12-01

    The accuracy of user position by GPS is heavily dependent upon the accuracy of satellite position which is usually transmitted to GPS users in radio signals. The real-time satellite position information directly obtained from broadcast ephimerides has the accuracy of 3 x 10 meters which is very unsatisfactory to measure 100km baseline to the accuracy of less than a few mili-meters. There are globally at present seven orbit analysis centers capable of generating precise GPS ephimerides and their orbit quality is of the order of about 10cm. Therefore, precise orbit model and phase processing technique were reviewed and consequently precise GPS ephimerides were produced after processing the phase observables of 28 global GPS stations for 1 day. Initial 6 orbit parameters and 2 solar radiation coefficients were estimated using batch least square algorithm and the final results were compared with the orbit of IGS, the International GPS Service for Geodynamics.

  15. Linear equality constraints in the general linear mixed model.

    PubMed

    Edwards, L J; Stewart, P W; Muller, K E; Helms, R W

    2001-12-01

    Scientists may wish to analyze correlated outcome data with constraints among the responses. For example, piecewise linear regression in a longitudinal data analysis can require use of a general linear mixed model combined with linear parameter constraints. Although well developed for standard univariate models, there are no general results that allow a data analyst to specify a mixed model equation in conjunction with a set of constraints on the parameters. We resolve the difficulty by precisely describing conditions that allow specifying linear parameter constraints that insure the validity of estimates and tests in a general linear mixed model. The recommended approach requires only straightforward and noniterative calculations to implement. We illustrate the convenience and advantages of the methods with a comparison of cognitive developmental patterns in a study of individuals from infancy to early adulthood for children from low-income families.

  16. Design of a low noise and high accuracy readout integrated circuit for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Zhou, Hang-yu; Wang, Jian

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a low noise and high accuracy readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for Infrared detectors is presented. The circuit is made up of capacitor trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA) and correlation double sampling (CDS) circuit. First, the accuracy, and injection efficiency of the CTIA structure which is used to convert the photo-current into voltage are fully discussed. The readout accuracy of weak current signal can be obviously improved by the using of CTIA. Then, the CDS structure with offset calibration technique is used to reduce the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of CTIA. Thus, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the designed readout circuit is improved. By utilizing the above two techniques, the influence of noise on this circuit was greatly reduced and the precision of the ROIC was improved. Besides, the design of amplifier in CTIA is discussed in more detail, which will bring about important effect on performance of the whole circuit. Simulation results at Cadence Spectre demonstrated that the readout circuit had reached the requirement of application. The final chip was fabricated with Chartered 0.35um standard CMOS process. Testing results show that the linearity of CTIA is 99%, and that the readout accuracy is 10-bit, while the detecting current varies from 10pA to 10nA. Furthermore, the infrared image is shown in this paper, which means that the ROIC has a good performance at the practical application.

  17. Accuracy Validation of Large-scale Block Adjustment without Control of ZY3 Images over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Mapping from optical satellite images without ground control is one of the goals of photogrammetry. Using 8802 three linear array stereo images (a total of 26406 images) of ZY3 over China, we propose a large-scale and non-control block adjustment method of optical satellite images based on the RPC model, in which a single image is regarded as an adjustment unit to be organized. To overcome the block distortion caused by unstable adjustment without ground control and the excessive accumulation of errors, we use virtual control points created by the initial RPC model of the images as the weighted observations and add them into the adjustment model to refine the adjustment. We use 8000 uniformly distributed high precision check points to evaluate the geometric accuracy of the DOM (Digital Ortho Model) and DSM (Digital Surface Model) production, for which the standard deviations of plane and elevation are 3.6 m and 4.2 m respectively. The geometric accuracy is consistent across the whole block and the mosaic accuracy of neighboring DOM is within a pixel, thus, the seamless mosaic could take place. This method achieves the goal of an accuracy of mapping without ground control better than 5 m for the whole China from ZY3 satellite images.

  18. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/sqrt{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/sqrt{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  19. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  20. How Physics Got Precise

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppner, Daniel

    2005-01-19

    Although the ancients knew the length of the year to about ten parts per million, it was not until the end of the 19th century that precision measurements came to play a defining role in physics. Eventually such measurements made it possible to replace human-made artifacts for the standards of length and time with natural standards. For a new generation of atomic clocks, time keeping could be so precise that the effects of the local gravitational potentials on the clock rates would be important. This would force us to re-introduce an artifact into the definition of the second - the location of the primary clock. I will describe some of the events in the history of precision measurements that have led us to this pleasing conundrum, and some of the unexpected uses of atomic clocks today.

  1. Precision Muonium Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2016-09-01

    The muonium atom is the purely leptonic bound state of a positive muon and an electron. It has a lifetime of 2.2 µs. The absence of any known internal structure provides for precision experiments to test fundamental physics theories and to determine accurate values of fundamental constants. In particular ground state hyperfine structure transitions can be measured by microwave spectroscopy to deliver the muon magnetic moment. The frequency of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen-like atom can be determined with laser spectroscopy to obtain the muon mass. With such measurements fundamental physical interactions, in particular quantum electrodynamics, can also be tested at highest precision. The results are important input parameters for experiments on the muon magnetic anomaly. The simplicity of the atom enables further precise experiments, such as a search for muonium-antimuonium conversion for testing charged lepton number conservation and searches for possible antigravity of muons and dark matter.

  2. Students' Accuracy of Measurement Estimation: Context, Units, and Logical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Gardner, Grant E.; Taylor, Amy R.; Forrester, Jennifer H.; Andre, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study examined students' accuracy of measurement estimation for linear distances, different units of measure, task context, and the relationship between accuracy estimation and logical thinking. Middle school students completed a series of tasks that included estimating the length of various objects in different contexts and completed a test…

  3. Precision Heating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A heat sealing process was developed by SEBRA based on technology that originated in work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The project involved connecting and transferring blood and fluids between sterile plastic containers while maintaining a closed system. SEBRA markets the PIRF Process to manufacturers of medical catheters. It is a precisely controlled method of heating thermoplastic materials in a mold to form or weld catheters and other products. The process offers advantages in fast, precise welding or shape forming of catheters as well as applications in a variety of other industries.

  4. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Malcolm J.; Bellman, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  5. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, M.J.; Bellman, R.A.

    1982-09-27

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  6. Asynchronous RTK precise DGNSS positioning method for deriving a low-latency high-rate output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhang; Hanfeng, Lv; Dingjie, Wang; Yanqing, Hou; Jie, Wu

    2015-07-01

    Low-latency high-rate (1 Hz) precise real-time kinematic (RTK) can be applied in high-speed scenarios such as aircraft automatic landing, precise agriculture and intelligent vehicle. The classic synchronous RTK (SRTK) precise differential GNSS (DGNSS) positioning technology, however, is not able to obtain a low-latency high-rate output for the rover receiver because of long data link transmission time delays (DLTTD) from the reference receiver. To overcome the long DLTTD, this paper proposes an asynchronous real-time kinematic (ARTK) method using asynchronous observations from two receivers. The asynchronous observation model (AOM) is developed based on undifferenced carrier phase observation equations of the two receivers at different epochs with short baseline. The ephemeris error and atmosphere delay are the possible main error sources on positioning accuracy in this model, and they are analyzed theoretically. In a short DLTTD and during a period of quiet ionosphere activity, the main error sources decreasing positioning accuracy are satellite orbital errors: the "inverted ephemeris error" and the integration of satellite velocity error which increase linearly along with DLTTD. The cycle slip of asynchronous double-differencing carrier phase is detected by TurboEdit method and repaired by the additional ambiguity parameter method. The AOM can deal with synchronous observation model (SOM) and achieve precise positioning solution with synchronous observations as well, since the SOM is only a specific case of AOM. The proposed method not only can reduce the cost of data collection and transmission, but can also support the mobile phone network data link transfer mode for the data of the reference receiver. This method can avoid data synchronizing process besides ambiguity initialization step, which is very convenient for real-time navigation of vehicles. The static and kinematic experiment results show that this method achieves 20 Hz or even higher rate output in

  7. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  8. Asymptotic accuracy of two-class discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.K.; Baird, H.S.

    1994-12-31

    Poor quality-e.g. sparse or unrepresentative-training data is widely suspected to be one cause of disappointing accuracy of isolated-character classification in modern OCR machines. We conjecture that, for many trainable classification techniques, it is in fact the dominant factor affecting accuracy. To test this, we have carried out a study of the asymptotic accuracy of three dissimilar classifiers on a difficult two-character recognition problem. We state this problem precisely in terms of high-quality prototype images and an explicit model of the distribution of image defects. So stated, the problem can be represented as a stochastic source of an indefinitely long sequence of simulated images labeled with ground truth. Using this sequence, we were able to train all three classifiers to high and statistically indistinguishable asymptotic accuracies (99.9%). This result suggests that the quality of training data was the dominant factor affecting accuracy. The speed of convergence during training, as well as time/space trade-offs during recognition, differed among the classifiers.

  9. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  10. Precision bolometer bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. R.

    1968-01-01

    Prototype precision bolometer calibration bridge is manually balanced device for indicating dc bias and balance with either dc or ac power. An external galvanometer is used with the bridge for null indication, and the circuitry monitors voltage and current simultaneously without adapters in testing 100 and 200 ohm thin film bolometers.

  11. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  12. Precision physics at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1997-05-01

    In this talk the author gives a brief survey of some physics topics that will be addressed by the Large Hadron Collider currently under construction at CERN. Instead of discussing the reach of this machine for new physics, the author gives examples of the types of precision measurements that might be made if new physics is discovered.

  13. Precision in Stereochemical Terminology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Leroy G., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of relatively new terminology that has given multiple definitions often resulting in students learning principles that are actually false is presented with an example of the new term stereogenic atom introduced by Mislow and Siegel. The Mislow terminology would be useful in some cases if it were used precisely and correctly, but it is…

  14. High Precision Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam

    2012-10-01

    This |*|program |*|uses |*|the |*|enhanced |*|astrometric |*|precision |*|enabled |*|by |*|spatial |*|scanning |*|to |*|calibrate |*|remaining |*|obstacles |*|toreaching |*|<<40 |*|microarc|*|second |*|astrometry |*|{<1 |*|millipixel} |*|with |*|WFC3/UVIS |*|by |*|1} |*|improving |*|geometric |*|distor-on |*|2} |*|calibratingthe |*|e|*|ect |*|of |*|breathing |*|on |*|astrometry|*|3} |*|calibrating |*|the |*|e|*|ect |*|of |*|CTE |*|on |*|astrometry, |*|4} |*|characterizing |*|the |*|boundaries |*|andorientations |*|of |*|the |*|WFC3 |*|lithograph |*|cells.

  15. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, Michael E.; Sullivan, William H.

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  16. [Remote sensing techniques of apple orchard information extraction based on linear spectral unmixing with measured data].

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Zhao, Geng-Xing; Wang, Ling; Zhu, Xi-Cun; Chang, Chun-Yan

    2012-12-01

    Taking Qixia City, Shandong Province of China as the research region, and by using pixel unmixing for the TM image at apple flowering stage, the apple orchard information was extracted. Based on the measured spectral end-members, wavelet transform was adopted to improve the linear unmixing model. The improved linear spectral unmixing model, measured end-member based linear spectral unmixing model, and TM image end-member based linear spectral unmixing model were employed to extract the apple orchard information, and the ALOS data were used for accuracy estimation. After the accurate atmospheric and topographic correction, it was feasible to use the measured spectral end-members for pixel unmixing, and the area precision of apple orchard information acquisition was greater than 97%. The regression analysis on the NDVI of abundance image and the average NDVI of ALOS data showed that the R2 was higher than 0.8. Therefore, using wavelet transform to improve the linear spectral unmixing model could improve the unmixing accuracy to a certain degree.

  17. Linear Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03667 Linear Clouds

    These clouds are located near the edge of the south polar region. The cloud tops are the puffy white features in the bottom half of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1N, Longitude 52.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  19. Precision Falling Body Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James A.; Koenig, R.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a simple apparatus to determine acceleration due to gravity. It utilizes direct contact switches in lieu of conventional photocells to time the fall of a ball bearing. Accuracies to better than one part in a thousand were obtained. (SL)

  20. High-precision positioning of radar scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dheenathayalan, Prabu; Small, David; Schubert, Adrian; Hanssen, Ramon F.

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing radar satellites cover wide areas and provide spatially dense measurements, with millions of scatterers. Knowledge of the precise position of each radar scatterer is essential to identify the corresponding object and interpret the estimated deformation. The absolute position accuracy of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scatterers in a 2D radar coordinate system, after compensating for atmosphere and tidal effects, is in the order of centimeters for TerraSAR-X (TSX) spotlight images. However, the absolute positioning in 3D and its quality description are not well known. Here, we exploit time-series interferometric SAR to enhance the positioning capability in three dimensions. The 3D positioning precision is parameterized by a variance-covariance matrix and visualized as an error ellipsoid centered at the estimated position. The intersection of the error ellipsoid with objects in the field is exploited to link radar scatterers to real-world objects. We demonstrate the estimation of scatterer position and its quality using 20 months of TSX stripmap acquisitions over Delft, the Netherlands. Using trihedral corner reflectors (CR) for validation, the accuracy of absolute positioning in 2D is about 7 cm. In 3D, an absolute accuracy of up to ˜ 66 cm is realized, with a cigar-shaped error ellipsoid having centimeter precision in azimuth and range dimensions, and elongated in cross-range dimension with a precision in the order of meters (the ratio of the ellipsoid axis lengths is 1/3/213, respectively). The CR absolute 3D position, along with the associated error ellipsoid, is found to be accurate and agree with the ground truth position at a 99 % confidence level. For other non-CR coherent scatterers, the error ellipsoid concept is validated using 3D building models. In both cases, the error ellipsoid not only serves as a quality descriptor, but can also help to associate radar scatterers to real-world objects.

  1. Precision bridge circuit using a temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A precision bridge measurement circuit connected to a current source providing a linear output voltage versus resistance change of a variable resistance (resistance temperature transducer) including a voltage follower in one branch of the bridge so that the zero setting of the transducer resistance does not depend upon the current source or upon an excitation voltage. The zero setting depends only on the precision and stability of the three resistances. By connecting the output of an instrumentation amplifier to a feedback resistor and then to the output of the voltage follower, minor nonlinearities in the resistance-vs-temperature output of a resistance-temperature transducer, such as a platinum temperature sensor, may be corrected. Sensors which have nonlinearity opposite in polarity to platinum, such as nickel-iron sensors, may be linearized by inserting an inverting amplifier into the feedback loop.

  2. The Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, J.R.

    1989-10-01

    April, 1989, the first Z zero particle was observed at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The SLC collides high-energy beams of electrons and positrons into each other. In break with tradition the SLC aims two linear beams at each other. Strong motives impelled the Stanford team to choose the route of innovation. One reason being that linear colliders promise to be less expensive to build and operate than storage ring colliders. An equally powerful motive was the desire to build an Z zero factory, a facility at which the Z zero particle can be studied in detail. More than 200 Z zero particles have been detected at the SLC and more continue to be churned out regularly. It is in measuring the properties of the Z zero that the SLC has a seminal contribution to make. One of the primary goals of the SLC experimental program is to determine the mass of the Z zero as precisely as possible.In the end, the SLC's greatest significance will be in having proved a new accelerator technology. 7 figs.

  3. Portable Linear Sled (PLS) for biomedical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallotton, Will; Matsuhiro, Dennis; Wynn, Tom; Temple, John

    1993-01-01

    The PLS is a portable linear motion generating device conceived by researchers at Ames Research Center's Vestibular Research Facility and designed by engineers at Ames for the study of motion sickness in space. It is an extremely smooth apparatus, powered by linear motors and suspended on air bearings which ride on precision ground ceramic ways.

  4. Precision of a Mammalian Circadian Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Sharma, Vijay; Chandrashekaran, Maroli K.

    This paper reports study of day-to-day instability in the locomotor activity rhythm of the nocturnal field mouse Mus booduga. The free-running period (τ) of this rhythm was estimated in constant darkness in n=347 adult male mice. The "onset" and "offset" of locomotor activity rhythm were used as phase markers of the circadian clock. The precision of the onset of locomotor activity was observed to be a non-linear function of τ, with maximal precision at τ close to 24h. The precision of the offset of locomotor activity was found to increase with increasing τ. These results suggest that the homeostasis of τ is tighter when τ is close to 24h.

  5. Iterative Precise Conductivity Measurement with IDEs.

    PubMed

    Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-05-22

    The paper presents a new approach in the field of precise electrolytic conductivity measurements with planar thin- and thick-film electrodes. This novel measuring method was developed for measurement with comb-like electrodes called interdigitated electrodes (IDEs). Correction characteristics over a wide range of specific conductivities were determined from an interface impedance characterization of the thick-film IDEs. The local maximum of the capacitive part of the interface impedance is used for corrections to get linear responses. The measuring frequency was determined at a wide range of measured conductivity. An iteration mode of measurements was suggested to precisely measure the conductivity at the right frequency in order to achieve a highly accurate response. The method takes precise conductivity measurements in concentration ranges from 10(-6) to 1 M without electrode cell replacement.

  6. High-precision triangular-waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, T.R.

    1981-11-14

    An ultra-linear ramp generator having separately programmable ascending and decending ramp rates and voltages is provided. Two constant current sources provide the ramp through an integrator. Switching of the current at current source inputs rather than at the integrator input eliminates switching transients and contributes to the waveform precision. The triangular waveforms produced by the waveform generator are characterized by accurate reproduction and low drift over periods of several hours. The ascending and descending slopes are independently selectable.

  7. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  8. Precision contour gage

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, L.F.

    1990-12-11

    An apparatus for gaging the contour of a machined part includes a rotary slide assembly, a kinematic mount to move the apparatus into and out of position for measuring the part while the part is still on the machining apparatus, a linear probe assembly with a suspension arm and a probe assembly including as probe tip for providing a measure of linear displacement of the tip on the surface of the part, a means for changing relative positions between the part and the probe tip, and a means for recording data points representing linear positions of the probe tip at prescribed rotation intervals in the position changes between the part and the probe tip. 5 figs.

  9. Precision contour gage

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    1990-12-11

    An apparatus for gaging the contour of a machined part includes a rotary slide assembly, a kinematic mount to move the apparatus into and out of position for measuring the part while the part is still on the machining apparatus, a linear probe assembly with a suspension arm and a probe assembly including as probe tip for providing a measure of linear displacement of the tip on the surface of the part, a means for changing relative positions between the part and the probe tip, and a means for recording data points representing linear positions of the probe tip at prescribed rotation intervals in the position changes between the part and the probe tip.

  10. The Precision Field Lysimeter Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, J.

    2009-04-01

    The understanding and interpretation of leaching processes have improved significantly during the past decades. Unlike laboratory experiments, which are mostly performed under very controlled conditions (e.g. homogeneous, uniform packing of pre-treated test material, saturated steady-state flow conditions, and controlled uniform hydraulic conditions), lysimeter experiments generally simulate actual field conditions. Lysimeters may be classified according to different criteria such as type of soil block used (monolithic or reconstructed), drainage (drainage by gravity or vacuum or a water table may be maintained), or weighing or non-weighing lysimeters. In 2004 experimental investigations have been set up to assess the impact of different farming systems on groundwater quality of the shallow floodplain aquifer of the river Mur in Wagna (Styria, Austria). The sediment is characterized by a thin layer (30 - 100 cm) of sandy Dystric Cambisol and underlying gravel and sand. Three precisely weighing equilibrium tension block lysimeters have been installed in agricultural test fields to compare water flow and solute transport under (i) organic farming, (ii) conventional low input farming and (iii) extensification by mulching grass. Specific monitoring equipment is used to reduce the well known shortcomings of lysimeter investigations: The lysimeter core is excavated as an undisturbed monolithic block (circular, 1 m2 surface area, 2 m depth) to prevent destruction of the natural soil structure, and pore system. Tracing experiments have been achieved to investigate the occurrence of artificial preferential flow and transport along the walls of the lysimeters. The results show that such effects can be neglected. Precisely weighing load cells are used to constantly determine the weight loss of the lysimeter due to evaporation and transpiration and to measure different forms of precipitation. The accuracy of the weighing apparatus is 0.05 kg, or 0.05 mm water equivalent

  11. A passion for precision

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  12. A passion for precision

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-19

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  13. Towards precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Euan A

    2016-08-16

    There is great potential for genome sequencing to enhance patient care through improved diagnostic sensitivity and more precise therapeutic targeting. To maximize this potential, genomics strategies that have been developed for genetic discovery - including DNA-sequencing technologies and analysis algorithms - need to be adapted to fit clinical needs. This will require the optimization of alignment algorithms, attention to quality-coverage metrics, tailored solutions for paralogous or low-complexity areas of the genome, and the adoption of consensus standards for variant calling and interpretation. Global sharing of this more accurate genotypic and phenotypic data will accelerate the determination of causality for novel genes or variants. Thus, a deeper understanding of disease will be realized that will allow its targeting with much greater therapeutic precision. PMID:27528417

  14. Principles and techniques for designing precision machines

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C

    1999-02-01

    This thesis is written to advance the reader's knowledge of precision-engineering principles and their application to designing machines that achieve both sufficient precision and minimum cost. It provides the concepts and tools necessary for the engineer to create new precision machine designs. Four case studies demonstrate the principles and showcase approaches and solutions to specific problems that generally have wider applications. These come from projects at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in which the author participated: the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine, Accuracy Enhancement of High- Productivity Machine Tools, the National Ignition Facility, and Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography. Although broad in scope, the topics go into sufficient depth to be useful to practicing precision engineers and often fulfill more academic ambitions. The thesis begins with a chapter that presents significant principles and fundamental knowledge from the Precision Engineering literature. Following this is a chapter that presents engineering design techniques that are general and not specific to precision machines. All subsequent chapters cover specific aspects of precision machine design. The first of these is Structural Design, guidelines and analysis techniques for achieving independently stiff machine structures. The next chapter addresses dynamic stiffness by presenting several techniques for Deterministic Damping, damping designs that can be analyzed and optimized with predictive results. Several chapters present a main thrust of the thesis, Exact-Constraint Design. A main contribution is a generalized modeling approach developed through the course of creating several unique designs. The final chapter is the primary case study of the thesis, the Conceptual Design of a Horizontal Machining Center.

  15. Precision orbit determination of altimetric satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, C. K.; Ries, John C.; Tapley, Byron D.

    1994-11-01

    The ability to determine accurate global sea level variations is important to both detection and understanding of changes in climate patterns. Sea level variability occurs over a wide spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, and precise global measurements are only recently possible with the advent of spaceborne satellite radar altimetry missions. One of the inherent requirements for accurate determination of absolute sea surface topography is that the altimetric satellite orbits be computed with sub-decimeter accuracy within a well defined terrestrial reference frame. SLR tracking in support of precision orbit determination of altimetric satellites is significant. Recent examples are the use of SLR as the primary tracking systems for TOPEX/Poseidon and for ERS-1 precision orbit determination. The current radial orbit accuracy for TOPEX/Poseidon is estimated to be around 3-4 cm, with geographically correlated orbit errors around 2 cm. The significance of the SLR tracking system is its ability to allow altimetric satellites to obtain absolute sea level measurements and thereby provide a link to other altimetry measurement systems for long-term sea level studies. SLR tracking allows the production of precise orbits which are well centered in an accurate terrestrial reference frame. With proper calibration of the radar altimeter, these precise orbits, along with the altimeter measurements, provide long term absolute sea level measurements. The U.S. Navy's Geosat mission is equipped with only Doppler beacons and lacks laser retroreflectors. However, its orbits, and even the Geosat orbits computed using the available full 40-station Tranet tracking network, yield orbits with significant north-south shifts with respect to the IERS terrestrial reference frame. The resulting Geosat sea surface topography will be tilted accordingly, making interpretation of long-term sea level variability studies difficult.

  16. Ultra-Precision Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Under a Joint Sponsored Research Agreement with Goddard Space Flight Center, SEMATECH, Inc., the Silicon Valley Group, Inc. and Tinsley Laboratories, known as SVG-Tinsley, developed an Ultra-Precision Optics Manufacturing System for space and microlithographic applications. Continuing improvements in optics manufacture will be able to meet unique NASA requirements and the production needs of the lithography industry for many years to come.

  17. Precise clock synchronization protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luit, E. J.; Martin, J. M. M.

    1993-12-01

    A distributed clock synchronization protocol is presented which achieves a very high precision without the need for very frequent resynchronizations. The protocol tolerates failures of the clocks: clocks may be too slow or too fast, exhibit omission failures and report inconsistent values. Synchronization takes place in synchronization rounds as in many other synchronization protocols. At the end of each round, clock times are exchanged between the clocks. Each clock applies a convergence function (CF) to the values obtained. This function estimates the difference between its clock and an average clock and corrects its clock accordingly. Clocks are corrected for drift relative to this average clock during the next synchronization round. The protocol is based on the assumption that clock reading errors are small with respect to the required precision of synchronization. It is shown that the CF resynchronizes the clocks with high precision even when relatively large clock drifts are possible. It is also shown that the drift-corrected clocks remain synchronized until the end of the next synchronization round. The stability of the protocol is proven.

  18. Precision Experiments at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, W.

    2015-07-01

    The Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) established the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics with unprecedented precision, including all its radiative corrections. These led to predictions for the masses of the top quark and Higgs boson, which were beautifully confirmed later on. After these precision measurements the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 1999 jointly to 't Hooft and Veltman "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics". Another hallmark of the LEP results were the precise measurements of the gauge coupling constants, which excluded unification of the forces within the SM, but allowed unification within the supersymmetric extension of the SM. This increased the interest in Supersymmetry (SUSY) and Grand Unified Theories, especially since the SM has no candidate for the elusive dark matter, while SUSY provides an excellent candidate for dark matter. In addition, SUSY removes the quadratic divergencies of the SM and predicts the Higgs mechanism from radiative electroweak symmetry breaking with a SM-like Higgs boson having a mass below 130 GeV in agreement with the Higgs boson discovery at the LHC. However, the predicted SUSY particles have not been found either because they are too heavy for the present LHC energy and luminosity or Nature has found alternative ways to circumvent the shortcomings of the SM.

  19. Precision Experiments at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, W.

    2015-09-01

    The Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) established the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics with unprecedented precision, including all its radiative corrections. These led to predictions for the masses of the top quark and Higgs boson, which were beautifully confirmed later on. After these precision measurements the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 1999 jointly to 't Hooft and Veltman "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics". Another hallmark of the LEP results were the precise measurements of the gauge coupling constants, which excluded unification of the forces within the SM, but allowed unification within the supersymmetric extension of the SM. This increased the interest in Supersymmetry (SUSY) and Grand Unified Theories, especially since the SM has no candidate for the elusive dark matter, while Supersymmetry provides an excellent candidate for dark matter. In addition, Supersymmetry removes the quadratic divergencies of the SM and {\\it predicts} the Higgs mechanism from radiative electroweak symmetry breaking with a SM-like Higgs boson having a mass below 130 GeV in agreement with the Higgs boson discovery at the LHC. However, the predicted SUSY particles have not been found either because they are too heavy for the present LHC energy and luminosity or Nature has found alternative ways to circumvent the shortcomings of the SM.

  20. Using Genetic Distance to Infer the Accuracy of Genomic Prediction.

    PubMed

    Scutari, Marco; Mackay, Ian; Balding, David

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of phenotypic traits using high-density genomic data has many applications such as the selection of plants and animals of commercial interest; and it is expected to play an increasing role in medical diagnostics. Statistical models used for this task are usually tested using cross-validation, which implicitly assumes that new individuals (whose phenotypes we would like to predict) originate from the same population the genomic prediction model is trained on. In this paper we propose an approach based on clustering and resampling to investigate the effect of increasing genetic distance between training and target populations when predicting quantitative traits. This is important for plant and animal genetics, where genomic selection programs rely on the precision of predictions in future rounds of breeding. Therefore, estimating how quickly predictive accuracy decays is important in deciding which training population to use and how often the model has to be recalibrated. We find that the correlation between true and predicted values decays approximately linearly with respect to either FST or mean kinship between the training and the target populations. We illustrate this relationship using simulations and a collection of data sets from mice, wheat and human genetics. PMID:27589268

  1. Using Genetic Distance to Infer the Accuracy of Genomic Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Scutari, Marco; Mackay, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of phenotypic traits using high-density genomic data has many applications such as the selection of plants and animals of commercial interest; and it is expected to play an increasing role in medical diagnostics. Statistical models used for this task are usually tested using cross-validation, which implicitly assumes that new individuals (whose phenotypes we would like to predict) originate from the same population the genomic prediction model is trained on. In this paper we propose an approach based on clustering and resampling to investigate the effect of increasing genetic distance between training and target populations when predicting quantitative traits. This is important for plant and animal genetics, where genomic selection programs rely on the precision of predictions in future rounds of breeding. Therefore, estimating how quickly predictive accuracy decays is important in deciding which training population to use and how often the model has to be recalibrated. We find that the correlation between true and predicted values decays approximately linearly with respect to either FST or mean kinship between the training and the target populations. We illustrate this relationship using simulations and a collection of data sets from mice, wheat and human genetics. PMID:27589268

  2. Standardization of radon measurements. 2. Accuracy and proficiency testing

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszek, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of in situ environmental radon measurement techniques is reviewed and new data for charcoal canister, alpha-track (track-etch) and electret detectors are presented. Deficiencies reported at the 1987 meeting in Wurenlingen, Federal Republic of Germany, for measurements using charcoal detectors are confirmed by the new results. Accuracy and precision of the alpha-track measurements laboratory were better than in 1987. Electret detectors appear to provide a convenient, accurate, and precise system for the measurement of radon concentration. The need for a comprehensive, blind proficiency-testing programs is discussed.

  3. Analysis of precision in tumor tracking based on optical positioning system during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Shen, Junshu; Li, Bing; Chen, Junting; Zhu, Xixu; Ge, Yun; Wang, Yongjian

    2016-03-19

    Tumor tracking is performed during patient set-up and monitoring of respiratory motion in radiotherapy. In the clinical setting, there are several types of equipment for this set-up such as the Electronic Portal imaging Device (EPID) and Cone Beam CT (CBCT). Technically, an optical positioning system tracks the difference between the infra ball reflected from body and machine isocenter. Our objective is to compare the clinical positioning error of patient setup between Cone Beam CT (CBCT) with the Optical Positioning System (OPS), and to evaluate the traditional positioning systems and OPS based on our proposed approach of patient positioning. In our experiments, a phantom was used, and we measured its setup errors in three directions. Specifically, the deviations in the left-to-right (LR), anterior-to-posterior (AP) and inferior-to-superior (IS) directions were measured by vernier caliper on a graph paper using the Varian Linear accelerator. Then, we verified the accuracy of OPS based on this experimental study. In order to verify the accuracy of phantom experiment, 40 patients were selected in our radiotherapy experiment. To illustrate the precise of optical positioning system, we designed clinical trials using EPID. From our radiotherapy procedure, we can conclude that OPS has higher precise than conventional positioning methods, and is a comparatively fast and efficient positioning method with respect to the CBCT guidance system. PMID:27257880

  4. Improved 6-Plex Tandem Mass Tags Quantification Throughput Using a Linear Ion Trap-High-Energy Collision Induced Dissociation MS(3) Scan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jane M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hess, Sonja

    2016-08-01

    The use of tandem mass tags (TMT) as an isobaric labeling strategy is a powerful method for quantitative proteomics, yet its accuracy has traditionally suffered from interference. This interference can be largely overcome by selecting MS(2) fragment precursor ions for high-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) MS(3) analysis in an Orbitrap scan. While this approach minimizes the interference effect, sensitivity suffers due to the high AGC targets and long acquisition times associated with MS(3) Orbitrap detection. We investigated whether acquiring the MS(3) scan in a linear ion trap with its lower AGC target would increase overall quantification levels with a minimal effect on precision and accuracy. Trypsin-digested proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were tagged with 6-plex TMT reagents. The sample was subjected to replicate analyses using either the Orbitrap or the linear ion trap for the HCD MS(3) scan. HCD MS(3) detection in the linear ion trap vs Orbitrap increased protein identification by 66% with minor loss in precision and accuracy. Thus, the use of a linear ion trap-HCD MS(3) scan during a 6-plex TMT experiment can improve overall identification levels while maintaining the power of multiplexed quantitative analysis. PMID:27377715

  5. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  6. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  7. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-08-12

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison.

  8. Highly Parallel, High-Precision Numerical Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2005-04-22

    This paper describes a scheme for rapidly computing numerical values of definite integrals to very high accuracy, ranging from ordinary machine precision to hundreds or thousands of digits, even for functions with singularities or infinite derivatives at endpoints. Such a scheme is of interest not only in computational physics and computational chemistry, but also in experimental mathematics, where high-precision numerical values of definite integrals can be used to numerically discover new identities. This paper discusses techniques for a parallel implementation of this scheme, then presents performance results for 1-D and 2-D test suites. Results are also given for a certain problem from mathematical physics, which features a difficult singularity, confirming a conjecture to 20,000 digit accuracy. The performance rate for this latter calculation on 1024 CPUs is 690 Gflop/s. We believe that this and one other 20,000-digit integral evaluation that we report are the highest-precision non-trivial numerical integrations performed to date.

  9. High Accuracy Decoding of Dynamical Motion from a Large Retinal Population.

    PubMed

    Marre, Olivier; Botella-Soler, Vicente; Simmons, Kristina D; Mora, Thierry; Tkačik, Gašper; Berry, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Motion tracking is a challenge the visual system has to solve by reading out the retinal population. It is still unclear how the information from different neurons can be combined together to estimate the position of an object. Here we recorded a large population of ganglion cells in a dense patch of salamander and guinea pig retinas while displaying a bar moving diffusively. We show that the bar's position can be reconstructed from retinal activity with a precision in the hyperacuity regime using a linear decoder acting on 100+ cells. We then took advantage of this unprecedented precision to explore the spatial structure of the retina's population code. The classical view would have suggested that the firing rates of the cells form a moving hill of activity tracking the bar's position. Instead, we found that most ganglion cells in the salamander fired sparsely and idiosyncratically, so that their neural image did not track the bar. Furthermore, ganglion cell activity spanned an area much larger than predicted by their receptive fields, with cells coding for motion far in their surround. As a result, population redundancy was high, and we could find multiple, disjoint subsets of neurons that encoded the trajectory with high precision. This organization allows for diverse collections of ganglion cells to represent high-accuracy motion information in a form easily read out by downstream neural circuits. PMID:26132103

  10. Characterizations of linear sufficient statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. C., Jr.; Reoner, R.; Decell, H. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A surjective bounded linear operator T from a Banach space X to a Banach space Y must be a sufficient statistic for a dominated family of probability measures defined on the Borel sets of X. These results were applied, so that they characterize linear sufficient statistics for families of the exponential type, including as special cases the Wishart and multivariate normal distributions. The latter result was used to establish precisely which procedures for sampling from a normal population had the property that the sample mean was a sufficient statistic.

  11. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  12. An EPID based method for efficient and precise asymmetric jaw alignment quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Clews, Luke; Greer, Peter B.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to investigate the use of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for regular quality assurance of linear accelerator asymmetric jaw junctioning. Methods: The method uses the beam central axis position on the EPID measured to subpixel accuracy found from two EPID images with 180 degree sign opposing collimator angles. Individual zero jaw position (''half-beam blocked'') images are then acquired and the jaw position precisely determined for each using penumbra interpolation. The accuracy of determining jaw position with the EPID method was measured by translating a block (simulating a jaw) by known distances, using a translation stage, and then measuring each translation distance with the EPID. To establish the utility of EPID based junction dose measurements, radiographic film measurements of junction dose maxima/minima as a function of jaw gap/overlap were made and compared to EPID measurements. Using the method, the long-term stability of zero jaw positioning was assessed for four linear accelerators over a 1-1.5 yr time period. The stability at nonzero gantry angles was assessed over a shorter time period. Results: The accuracy of determining jaw translations with the method was within 0.14 mm found using the translation stage [standard deviation (SD) of 0.037 mm]. The junction doses measured with the EPID were different from film due to the nonwater equivalent EPID scattering properties and hence different penumbra profile. The doses were approximately linear with gap or overlap, and a correction factor was derived to convert EPID measured junction dose to film measured equivalent. Over a 1 yr period, the zero jaw positions at gantry zero position were highly reproducible with an average SD of 0.07 mm for the 16 collimator jaws examined. However, the average jaw positions ranged from -0.7 to 0.9 mm relative to central axis for the different jaws. The zero jaw position was also reproducible at gantry 90

  13. An improved methodology for precise geoid/quasigeoid modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvadba, Otakar; Holota, Petr

    2016-04-01

    The paper describes recent development of the computational procedure useful for precise local quasigeoid modelling. The overall methodology is primarily based on a solution of the so-called gravimetric boundary value problem for an ellipsoidal domain (exterior to an oblate spheroid), which means that gravity disturbances on the ellipsoid are used in quality of input data. The problem of a difference between the Earth's topography and the chosen ellipsoidal surface is solved iteratively, by analytical continuation of the gravity disturbances to the computational ellipsoid. The methodology covers an interpolation technique of the discrete gravity data, which, considering a priori adopted covariance function, provides the best linear unbiased estimate of the respective quantity, numerical integration technique developed on the surface of ellipsoid in the spectral domain, an iterative procedure of analytical continuation in ellipsoidal coordinates, remove and restore of the atmospheric masses, an estimate of the far-zones contribution (in a case of regional data coverage) and the restore step of the obtained disturbing gravity potential to the target height anomaly. All the computational steps of the procedure are modest in the consumption of compute resources, thus the methodology can be used on a common personal computer, free of any accuracy or resolution penalty. Finally, the performance of the developed methodology is demonstrated on the real-case examples related to the territories of France (Auvergne regional quasigeoid) and the Czech Republic.

  14. Modeling issues in precision orbit determination for Mars orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Rosborough, George W.; Smith, David E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the accuracy of recent Mars gravity models and the importance of perturbations due to the Mars radiation pressure and the Martian moons, Phobos and Deimos, on the trajectories of Mars orbiters. A linear orbit perturbation theory is used to characterize the patterns of gravity field near resonances for the Viking and Mariner 9 spacecraft. These resonances are shown to have considerable power and their potential for contributing to Mars gravity solutions is emphasized. It is shown that some of the same resonance orders which appear in the Viking orbits, dominate the radial orbit error spectrum for Mars Observer. Results of orbit determination simulations at the Goddard Space Flight Center show that the perturbations caused by the Martian moons and the Mars radiation pressure are larger than 0.1 mm/s, the expected precision of the Mars Observer Doppler tracking data. Tests with the Viking Doppler data indicate that best analysis of these data mandates the inclusion of the Phobos gravitational perturbation in the modeling of Viking spacecraft trajectories.

  15. Galvanometer deflection: a precision high-speed system.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, D P; Raamot, J

    1976-06-01

    An X-Y galvanometer deflection system capable of high precision in a random access mode of operation is described. Beam positional information in digitized form is obtained by employing a Ronchi grating with a sophisticated optical detection scheme. This information is used in a control interface to locate the beam to the required precision. The system is characterized by high accuracy at maximum speed and is designed for operation in a variable environment, with particular attention placed on thermal insensitivity.

  16. Galvanometer deflection: a precision high-speed system.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, D P; Raamot, J

    1976-06-01

    An X-Y galvanometer deflection system capable of high precision in a random access mode of operation is described. Beam positional information in digitized form is obtained by employing a Ronchi grating with a sophisticated optical detection scheme. This information is used in a control interface to locate the beam to the required precision. The system is characterized by high accuracy at maximum speed and is designed for operation in a variable environment, with particular attention placed on thermal insensitivity. PMID:20165203

  17. Precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} and {ital p{anti p}} colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct {ital m{sub t}} measurements. Using the world`s electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs` mass are discussed.

  18. Precision Robotic Assembly Machine

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The world's largest laser system is the National Ignition Facility (NIF), located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF's 192 laser beams are amplified to extremely high energy, and then focused onto a tiny target about the size of a BB, containing frozen hydrogen gas. The target must be perfectly machined to incredibly demanding specifications. The Laboratory's scientists and engineers have developed a device called the "Precision Robotic Assembly Machine" for this purpose. Its unique design won a prestigious R&D-100 award from R&D Magazine.

  19. Instrument Attitude Precision Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach is presented in this paper to analyze attitude precision and control for an instrument gimbaled to a spacecraft subject to an internal disturbance caused by a moving component inside the instrument. Nonlinear differential equations of motion for some sample cases are derived and solved analytically to gain insight into the influence of the disturbance on the attitude pointing error. A simple control law is developed to eliminate the instrument pointing error caused by the internal disturbance. Several cases are presented to demonstrate and verify the concept presented in this paper.

  20. Precision Robotic Assembly Machine

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-14

    The world's largest laser system is the National Ignition Facility (NIF), located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF's 192 laser beams are amplified to extremely high energy, and then focused onto a tiny target about the size of a BB, containing frozen hydrogen gas. The target must be perfectly machined to incredibly demanding specifications. The Laboratory's scientists and engineers have developed a device called the "Precision Robotic Assembly Machine" for this purpose. Its unique design won a prestigious R&D-100 award from R&D Magazine.

  1. Precision mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gläser, M.; Borys, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mass as a physical quantity and its measurement are described. After some historical remarks, a short summary of the concept of mass in classical and modern physics is given. Principles and methods of mass measurements, for example as energy measurement or as measurement of weight forces and forces caused by acceleration, are discussed. Precision mass measurement by comparing mass standards using balances is described in detail. Measurement of atomic masses related to 12C is briefly reviewed as well as experiments and recent discussions for a future new definition of the kilogram, the SI unit of mass.

  2. Precision and power grip priming by observed grasping.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Lari; Tucker, Mike; Ellis, Rob

    2007-11-01

    The coupling of hand grasping stimuli and the subsequent grasp execution was explored in normal participants. Participants were asked to respond with their right- or left-hand to the accuracy of an observed (dynamic) grasp while they were holding precision or power grasp response devices in their hands (e.g., precision device/right-hand; power device/left-hand). The observed hand was making either accurate or inaccurate precision or power grasps and participants signalled the accuracy of the observed grip by making one or other response depending on instructions. Responses were made faster when they matched the observed grip type. The two grasp types differed in their sensitivity to the end-state (i.e., accuracy) of the observed grip. The end-state influenced the power grasp congruency effect more than the precision grasp effect when the observed hand was performing the grasp without any goal object (Experiments 1 and 2). However, the end-state also influenced the precision grip congruency effect (Experiment 3) when the action was object-directed. The data are interpreted as behavioural evidence of the automatic imitation coding of the observed actions. The study suggests that, in goal-oriented imitation coding, the context of an action (e.g., being object-directed) is more important factor in coding precision grips than power grips.

  3. Precision flyer initiator

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Alan M.; Lee, Ronald S.

    1998-01-01

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or "flyer" is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices.

  4. Precision flyer initiator

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.M.; Lee, R.S.

    1998-05-26

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or ``flyer`` is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices. 10 figs.

  5. Precision Joining Center

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.W.; Westphal, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10--12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of US industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  6. Development of a machine for automatically measuring static/dynamic running parallelism in linear guideways.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tung-Hsien; Huang, Hsueh-Liang; Jywe, Wen-Yuh; Liu, Chien-Hung

    2014-03-01

    This work develops a machine for automatically measuring static/dynamic running parallelism for use in the linear guideway manufacturing industry. The automatic static/dynamic running parallelism measurement machine consists of a running parallelism measurement system, a linear motor, a precision granite air-suspension table, and a PC-based human-machine interface. The machine can be used simultaneously to measure the horizontal and vertical running parallelism of a linear guideway and automatically determine its accuracy. The measured parallelism is digitalized and analyzed to detect turning points in the linear guideway. The results concerning the accuracy of the running parallelism are not affected by the measurement platform. Experimental results showed that the standard deviation of the running parallelism measurement system is 0.4 μm and the measuring time is about 10 s for every 1000 mm of length (equal to a measuring speed of 0.1 m/s); this measurement time is 80% shorter than that of a traditional measurement system (which has a maximum speed of 1 m/s, a maximum sampling frequency of 100 kHz, and a maximum measurement length of 2000 mm). PMID:24689628

  7. Development of a machine for automatically measuring static/dynamic running parallelism in linear guideways.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tung-Hsien; Huang, Hsueh-Liang; Jywe, Wen-Yuh; Liu, Chien-Hung

    2014-03-01

    This work develops a machine for automatically measuring static/dynamic running parallelism for use in the linear guideway manufacturing industry. The automatic static/dynamic running parallelism measurement machine consists of a running parallelism measurement system, a linear motor, a precision granite air-suspension table, and a PC-based human-machine interface. The machine can be used simultaneously to measure the horizontal and vertical running parallelism of a linear guideway and automatically determine its accuracy. The measured parallelism is digitalized and analyzed to detect turning points in the linear guideway. The results concerning the accuracy of the running parallelism are not affected by the measurement platform. Experimental results showed that the standard deviation of the running parallelism measurement system is 0.4 μm and the measuring time is about 10 s for every 1000 mm of length (equal to a measuring speed of 0.1 m/s); this measurement time is 80% shorter than that of a traditional measurement system (which has a maximum speed of 1 m/s, a maximum sampling frequency of 100 kHz, and a maximum measurement length of 2000 mm).

  8. The neglected tool in the Bayesian ecologist's shed: a case study testing informative priors' effect on model accuracy.

    PubMed

    Morris, William K; Vesk, Peter A; McCarthy, Michael A; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Baker, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Despite benefits for precision, ecologists rarely use informative priors. One reason that ecologists may prefer vague priors is the perception that informative priors reduce accuracy. To date, no ecological study has empirically evaluated data-derived informative priors' effects on precision and accuracy. To determine the impacts of priors, we evaluated mortality models for tree species using data from a forest dynamics plot in Thailand. Half the models used vague priors, and the remaining half had informative priors. We found precision was greater when using informative priors, but effects on accuracy were more variable. In some cases, prior information improved accuracy, while in others, it was reduced. On average, models with informative priors were no more or less accurate than models without. Our analyses provide a detailed case study on the simultaneous effect of prior information on precision and accuracy and demonstrate that when priors are specified appropriately, they lead to greater precision without systematically reducing model accuracy.

  9. New High Precision Linelist of H_3^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; Perry, Adam J.; Markus, Charles; Jenkins, Paul A., II; Kocheril, G. Stephen; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2014-06-01

    As the simplest polyatomic molecule, H_3^+ serves as an ideal benchmark for theoretical predictions of rovibrational energy levels. By strictly ab initio methods, the current accuracy of theoretical predictions is limited to an impressive one hundredth of a wavenumber, which has been accomplished by consideration of relativistic, adiabatic, and non-adiabatic corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer PES. More accurate predictions rely on a treatment of quantum electrodynamic effects, which have improved the accuracies of vibrational transitions in molecular hydrogen to a few MHz. High precision spectroscopy is of the utmost importance for extending the frontiers of ab initio calculations, as improved precision and accuracy enable more rigorous testing of calculations. Additionally, measuring rovibrational transitions of H_3^+ can be used to predict its forbidden rotational spectrum. Though the existing data can be used to determine rotational transition frequencies, the uncertainties are prohibitively large. Acquisition of rovibrational spectra with smaller experimental uncertainty would enable a spectroscopic search for the rotational transitions. The technique Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy, or NICE-OHVMS has been previously used to precisely and accurately measure transitions of H_3^+, CH_5^+, and HCO^+ to sub-MHz uncertainty. A second module for our optical parametric oscillator has extended our instrument's frequency coverage from 3.2-3.9 μm to 2.5-3.9 μm. With extended coverage, we have improved our previous linelist by measuring additional transitions. O. L. Polyansky, et al. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A (2012), 370, 5014--5027. J. Komasa, et al. J. Chem. Theor. Comp. (2011), 7, 3105--3115. C. M. Lindsay, B. J. McCall, J. Mol. Spectrosc. (2001), 210, 66--83. J. N. Hodges, et al. J. Chem. Phys. (2013), 139, 164201.

  10. Accuracy of laser beam center and width calculations.

    PubMed

    Mana, G; Massa, E; Rovera, A

    2001-03-20

    The application of lasers in high-precision measurements and the demand for accuracy make the plane-wave model of laser beams unsatisfactory. Measurements of the variance of the transverse components of the photon impulse are essential for wavelength determination. Accuracy evaluation of the relevant calculations is thus an integral part of the assessment of the wavelength of stabilized-laser radiation. We present a propagation-of-error analysis on variance calculations when digitized intensity profiles are obtained by means of silicon video cameras. Image clipping criteria are obtained that maximize the accuracy of the computed result.

  11. High-precision measurement of satellite range and velocity using the EISCAT radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkanen, J.; Nygrén, T.; Markkanen, M.; Voiculescu, M.; Aikio, A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper is a continuation of an earlier work by Nygrén et al. (2012), where the velocity of a hard target was determined from a set of echo pulses reflected by the target flying through the radar beam. Here the method is extended to include the determination of range at a high accuracy. The method is as follows. First, the flight time of the pulse from the transmitter to the target is determined at an accuracy essentially better than the accuracy given by the sampling interval. This method makes use of the fact that the receiver filtering creates slopes at the phase flips of the phase modulated echo pulse. A precise flight time is found by investigating the echo amplitude within this slope. A value of velocity is calculated from each echo pulse as explained in the earlier paper. Next, the ranges together with velocities from a single beam pass are combined to a measurement vector for a linear inversion problem. The solution of the inversion problem gives the time-dependent range and velocity from the time interval of satellite flight through the radar beam. The method is demonstrated using the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter) UHF radar and radio pulses reflected by a satellite. The achieved standard deviations of range are about 5-50 cm and those of velocity are about 3-25 mm s-1.

  12. Development of a precision large deployable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoji; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Noda, Takahiko; Tamai, Yasuo; Ebisui, Takashi; Miura, Koryo; Takano, Tadashi

    This paper describes the results of a study of a precision large deployable antenna for the space VLBI satellite 'MUSES-B'. An antenna with high gain and pointing accuracy is required for the mission objective. The frequency bands required are 22, 5 and 1.6 GHz. The required aperture diameter of the reflector is 10 meters. A displaced axis Cassegrain antenna is adopted with a mesh reflector formed in a tension truss concept. Analysis shows the possibility to achieve aperture efficiency of 60 percent at 22.15 GHz and surface accuracy of 0.5 mm rms. A one-fourth scale model of the reflector has been assembled in order to verify the design and clarify problems in manufacturing and assembly processes.

  13. Precise autofocusing microscope with rapid response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Sheng; Jiang, Sheng-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The rapid on-line or off-line automated vision inspection is a critical operation in the manufacturing fields. Accordingly, this present study designs and characterizes a novel precise optics-based autofocusing microscope with a rapid response and no reduction in the focusing accuracy. In contrast to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes with centroid method, the proposed microscope comprises a high-speed rotating optical diffuser in which the variation of the image centroid position is reduced and consequently the focusing response is improved. The proposed microscope is characterized and verified experimentally using a laboratory-built prototype. The experimental results show that compared to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes, the proposed microscope achieves a more rapid response with no reduction in the focusing accuracy. Consequently, the proposed microscope represents another solution for both existing and emerging industrial applications of automated vision inspection.

  14. Visual inspection reliability for precision manufactured parts

    SciTech Connect

    See, Judi E.

    2015-09-04

    Sandia National Laboratories conducted an experiment for the National Nuclear Security Administration to determine the reliability of visual inspection of precision manufactured parts used in nuclear weapons. In addition visual inspection has been extensively researched since the early 20th century; however, the reliability of visual inspection for nuclear weapons parts has not been addressed. In addition, the efficacy of using inspector confidence ratings to guide multiple inspections in an effort to improve overall performance accuracy is unknown. Further, the workload associated with inspection has not been documented, and newer measures of stress have not been applied.

  15. Precision Electroforming For Optical Disk Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodia, Carl M.

    1985-04-01

    Precision electroforming in replication of optical discs is discussed with overview of electro-forming technology capabilities, limitations, and tolerance criteria. Use of expendable and reusable mandrels is treated along with techniques for resist master preparation and processing. A review of applications and common reasons for success and failure is offered. Problems such as tensile/compressive stress, roughness and flatness are discussed. Advice is given on approaches, classic and novel, for remedying and avoiding specific problems. An abridged process description of optical memory disk mold electroforming is presented from resist master through metallization and electroforming. Emphasis is placed on methods of achieving accuracy and quality assurance.

  16. The GBT precision telescope control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestage, Richard M.; Constantikes, Kim T.; Balser, Dana S.; Condon, James J.

    2004-10-01

    The NRAO Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is a 100m diameter advanced single dish radio telescope designed for a wide range of astronomical projects with special emphasis on precision imaging. Open-loop adjustments of the active surface, and real-time corrections to pointing and focus on the basis of structural temperatures already allow observations at frequencies up to 50GHz. Our ultimate goal is to extend the observing frequency limit up to 115GHz; this will require a two dimensional tracking error better than 1.3", and an rms surface accuracy better than 210μm. The Precision Telescope Control System project has two main components. One aspect is the continued deployment of appropriate metrology systems, including temperature sensors, inclinometers, laser rangefinders and other devices. An improved control system architecture will harness this measurement capability with the existing servo systems, to deliver the precision operation required. The second aspect is the execution of a series of experiments to identify, understand and correct the residual pointing and surface accuracy errors. These can have multiple causes, many of which depend on variable environmental conditions. A particularly novel approach is to solve simultaneously for gravitational, thermal and wind effects in the development of the telescope pointing and focus tracking models. Our precision temperature sensor system has already allowed us to compensate for thermal gradients in the antenna, which were previously responsible for the largest "non-repeatable" pointing and focus tracking errors. We are currently targetting the effects of wind as the next, currently uncompensated, source of error.

  17. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  18. Reticence, Accuracy and Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2015-12-01

    James Hansen has cautioned the scientific community against "reticence," by which he means a reluctance to speak in public about the threat of climate change. This may contribute to social inaction, with the result that society fails to respond appropriately to threats that are well understood scientifically. Against this, others have warned against the dangers of "crying wolf," suggesting that reticence protects scientific credibility. We argue that both these positions are missing an important point: that reticence is not only a matter of style but also of substance. In previous work, Bysse et al. (2013) showed that scientific projections of key indicators of climate change have been skewed towards the low end of actual events, suggesting a bias in scientific work. More recently, we have shown that scientific efforts to be responsive to contrarian challenges have led scientists to adopt the terminology of a "pause" or "hiatus" in climate warming, despite the lack of evidence to support such a conclusion (Lewandowsky et al., 2015a. 2015b). In the former case, scientific conservatism has led to under-estimation of climate related changes. In the latter case, the use of misleading terminology has perpetuated scientific misunderstanding and hindered effective communication. Scientific communication should embody two equally important goals: 1) accuracy in communicating scientific information and 2) efficacy in expressing what that information means. Scientists should strive to be neither conservative nor adventurous but to be accurate, and to communicate that accurate information effectively.

  19. Truss Assembly and Welding by Intelligent Precision Jigging Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR) prototype that enables the precise alignment and welding of titanium space telescope optical benches. The IPJR, equipped with micron accuracy sensors and actuators, worked in tandem with a lower precision remote controlled manipulator. The combined system assembled and welded a 2 m truss from stock titanium components. The calibration of the IPJR, and the difference between the predicted and the truss dimensions as-built, identified additional sources of error that should be addressed in the next generation of IPJRs in 2D and 3D.

  20. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a Precision Joining Center (PJC) is proposed. The PJC will be a cooperatively operated center with participation from U.S. private industry, the Colorado School of Mines, and various government agencies, including the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The PJC's primary mission will be as a training center for advanced joining technologies. This will accomplish the following objectives: (1) it will provide an effective mechanism to transfer joining technology from the NWC to private industry; (2) it will provide a center for testing new joining processes for the NWC and private industry; and (3) it will provide highly trained personnel to support advance joining processes for the NWC and private industry.

  1. Precision laser cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Anglin, C.D.; Ramos, T.J.

    1990-01-19

    Many materials that are otherwise difficult to fabricate can be cut precisely with lasers. This presentation discusses the advantages and limitations of laser cutting for refractory metals, ceramics, and composites. Cutting in these materials was performed with a 400-W, pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Important cutting parameters such as beam power, pulse waveforms, cutting gases, travel speed, and laser coupling are outlined. The effects of process parameters on cut quality are evaluated. Three variables are used to determine the cut quality: kerf width, slag adherence, and metallurgical characteristics of recast layers and heat-affected zones around the cuts. Results indicate that ductile materials with good coupling characteristics (such as stainless steel alloys and tantalum) cut well. Materials lacking one or both of these properties (such as tungsten and ceramics) are difficult to cut without proper part design, stress relief, or coupling aids. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 40 CFR 91.314 - Analyzer accuracy and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 91.314 Section 91.314 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Provisions § 91.314 Analyzer accuracy and specifications. (a) Measurement accuracy—general. The analyzers... precision is defined as 2.5 times the standard deviation(s) of 10 repetitive responses to a...

  3. 40 CFR 91.314 - Analyzer accuracy and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 91.314 Section 91.314 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Provisions § 91.314 Analyzer accuracy and specifications. (a) Measurement accuracy—general. The analyzers... precision is defined as 2.5 times the standard deviation(s) of 10 repetitive responses to a...

  4. Precision Spectroscopy of Tellurium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, J.; Furneaux, J. E.

    2013-06-01

    Tellurium (Te_2) is widely used as a frequency reference, largely due to the fact that it has an optical transition roughly every 2-3 GHz throughout a large portion of the visible spectrum. Although a standard atlas encompassing over 5200 cm^{-1} already exists [1], Doppler broadening present in that work buries a significant portion of the features [2]. More recent studies of Te_2 exist which do not exhibit Doppler broadening, such as Refs. [3-5], and each covers different parts of the spectrum. This work adds to that knowledge a few hundred transitions in the vicinity of 444 nm, measured with high precision in order to improve measurement of the spectroscopic constants of Te_2's excited states. Using a Fabry Perot cavity in a shock-absorbing, temperature and pressure regulated chamber, locked to a Zeeman stabilized HeNe laser, we measure changes in frequency of our diode laser to ˜1 MHz precision. This diode laser is scanned over 1000 GHz for use in a saturated-absorption spectroscopy cell filled with Te_2 vapor. Details of the cavity and its short and long-term stability are discussed, as well as spectroscopic properties of Te_2. References: J. Cariou, and P. Luc, Atlas du spectre d'absorption de la molecule de tellure, Laboratoire Aime-Cotton (1980). J. Coker et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B {28}, 2934 (2011). J. Verges et al., Physica Scripta {25}, 338 (1982). Ph. Courteille et al., Appl. Phys. B {59}, 187 (1994) T.J. Scholl et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B {22}, 1128 (2005).

  5. Development and Preliminary Testing of a High Precision Long Stroke Slit Change Mechanism for the SPICE Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciotti, Gabriel; Humphries, Martin; Rottmeier, Fabrice; Blecha, Luc

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of ESA's Solar Orbiter scientific mission, Almatech has been selected to design, develop and test the Slit Change Mechanism of the SPICE (SPectral Imaging of the Coronal Environment) instrument. In order to guaranty optical cleanliness level while fulfilling stringent positioning accuracies and repeatability requirements for slit positioning in the optical path of the instrument, a linear guiding system based on a double flexible blade arrangement has been selected. The four different slits to be used for the SPICE instrument resulted in a total stroke of 16.5 mm in this linear slit changer arrangement. The combination of long stroke and high precision positioning requirements has been identified as the main design challenge to be validated through breadboard models testing. This paper presents the development of SPICE's Slit Change Mechanism (SCM) and the two-step validation tests successfully performed on breadboard models of its flexible blade support system. The validation test results have demonstrated the full adequacy of the flexible blade guiding system implemented in SPICE's Slit Change Mechanism in a stand-alone configuration. Further breadboard test results, studying the influence of the compliant connection to the SCM linear actuator on an enhanced flexible guiding system design have shown significant enhancements in the positioning accuracy and repeatability of the selected flexible guiding system. Preliminary evaluation of the linear actuator design, including a detailed tolerance analyses, has shown the suitability of this satellite roller screw based mechanism for the actuation of the tested flexible guiding system and compliant connection. The presented development and preliminary testing of the high-precision long-stroke Slit Change Mechanism for the SPICE Instrument are considered fully successful such that future tests considering the full Slit Change Mechanism can be performed, with the gained confidence, directly on a

  6. Operating a real time high accuracy positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Hanley, J.; Russell, D.; Vooght, A.

    2003-04-01

    The paper shall review the history and development of real time DGPS services prior to then describing the design of a high accuracy GPS commercial augmentation system and service currently delivering over a wide area to users of precise positioning products. The infrastructure and system shall be explained in relation to the need for high accuracy and high integrity of positioning for users. A comparison of the different techniques for the delivery of data shall be provided to outline the technical approach taken. Examples of the performance of the real time system shall be shown in various regions and modes to outline the current achievable accuracies. Having described and established the current GPS based situation, a review of the potential of the Galileo system shall be presented. Following brief contextual information relating to the Galileo project, core system and services, the paper will identify possible key applications and the main user communities for sub decimetre level precise positioning. The paper will address the Galileo and modernised GPS signals in space that are relevant to commercial precise positioning for the future and will discuss the implications for precise positioning performance. An outline of the proposed architecture shall be described and associated with pointers towards a successful implementation. Central to this discussion will be an assessment of the likely evolution of system infrastructure and user equipment implementation, prospects for new applications and their effect upon the business case for precise positioning services.

  7. High precision anatomy for MEG.

    PubMed

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bradbury, David; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-02-01

    Precise MEG estimates of neuronal current flow are undermined by uncertain knowledge of the head location with respect to the MEG sensors. This is either due to head movements within the scanning session or systematic errors in co-registration to anatomy. Here we show how such errors can be minimized using subject-specific head-casts produced using 3D printing technology. The casts fit the scalp of the subject internally and the inside of the MEG dewar externally, reducing within session and between session head movements. Systematic errors in matching to MRI coordinate system are also reduced through the use of MRI-visible fiducial markers placed on the same cast. Bootstrap estimates of absolute co-registration error were of the order of 1mm. Estimates of relative co-registration error were <1.5mm between sessions. We corroborated these scalp based estimates by looking at the MEG data recorded over a 6month period. We found that the between session sensor variability of the subject's evoked response was of the order of the within session noise, showing no appreciable noise due to between-session movement. Simulations suggest that the between-session sensor level amplitude SNR improved by a factor of 5 over conventional strategies. We show that at this level of coregistration accuracy there is strong evidence for anatomical models based on the individual rather than canonical anatomy; but that this advantage disappears for errors of greater than 5mm. This work paves the way for source reconstruction methods which can exploit very high SNR signals and accurate anatomical models; and also significantly increases the sensitivity of longitudinal studies with MEG. PMID:23911673

  8. Precision laser automatic tracking system.

    PubMed

    Lucy, R F; Peters, C J; McGann, E J; Lang, K T

    1966-04-01

    A precision laser tracker has been constructed and tested that is capable of tracking a low-acceleration target to an accuracy of about 25 microrad root mean square. In tracking high-acceleration targets, the error is directly proportional to the angular acceleration. For an angular acceleration of 0.6 rad/sec(2), the measured tracking error was about 0.1 mrad. The basic components in this tracker, similar in configuration to a heliostat, are a laser and an image dissector, which are mounted on a stationary frame, and a servocontrolled tracking mirror. The daytime sensitivity of this system is approximately 3 x 10(-10) W/m(2); the ultimate nighttime sensitivity is approximately 3 x 10(-14) W/m(2). Experimental tests were performed to evaluate both dynamic characteristics of this system and the system sensitivity. Dynamic performance of the system was obtained, using a small rocket covered with retroreflective material launched at an acceleration of about 13 g at a point 204 m from the tracker. The daytime sensitivity of the system was checked, using an efficient retroreflector mounted on a light aircraft. This aircraft was tracked out to a maximum range of 15 km, which checked the daytime sensitivity of the system measured by other means. The system also has been used to track passively stars and the Echo I satellite. Also, the system tracked passively a +7.5 magnitude star, and the signal-to-noise ratio in this experiment indicates that it should be possible to track a + 12.5 magnitude star.

  9. High precision anatomy for MEG☆

    PubMed Central

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bradbury, David; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Precise MEG estimates of neuronal current flow are undermined by uncertain knowledge of the head location with respect to the MEG sensors. This is either due to head movements within the scanning session or systematic errors in co-registration to anatomy. Here we show how such errors can be minimized using subject-specific head-casts produced using 3D printing technology. The casts fit the scalp of the subject internally and the inside of the MEG dewar externally, reducing within session and between session head movements. Systematic errors in matching to MRI coordinate system are also reduced through the use of MRI-visible fiducial markers placed on the same cast. Bootstrap estimates of absolute co-registration error were of the order of 1 mm. Estimates of relative co-registration error were < 1.5 mm between sessions. We corroborated these scalp based estimates by looking at the MEG data recorded over a 6 month period. We found that the between session sensor variability of the subject's evoked response was of the order of the within session noise, showing no appreciable noise due to between-session movement. Simulations suggest that the between-session sensor level amplitude SNR improved by a factor of 5 over conventional strategies. We show that at this level of coregistration accuracy there is strong evidence for anatomical models based on the individual rather than canonical anatomy; but that this advantage disappears for errors of greater than 5 mm. This work paves the way for source reconstruction methods which can exploit very high SNR signals and accurate anatomical models; and also significantly increases the sensitivity of longitudinal studies with MEG. PMID:23911673

  10. Precision of cortical bone reconstruction based on 3D CT scans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Ye, Ming; Liu, Zhongtang; Wang, Chengtao

    2009-04-01

    The precision and accuracy of human cortical bone reconstruction using 3D CT scans was evaluated using machined bone segments. Both linear and angular errors were measured. Cadaver adult femoral and tibial cortical bone segments were obtained and machined in six orthogonal planes with a precision milling machine. CT scans were then obtained and the bone segments were reconstructed as digital replicas. Dimensional and angular measurements errors were evaluated for the machined bone segments and the results were compared with known dimensions based on milling machine settings to calculate errors due to scanning and model reconstruction. The model dimensional error in the coronal, sagittal and axial directions had a mean of 0.21 mm, with standard a deviation of 0.12 mm and a maximum error of 0.47 mm. The mean percent error was 0.74% and the maximum percent error was 1.9%. The angular error of models in the coronal, sagittal and axial directions was calculated, yielding a mean of 0.47 degrees with a standard deviation of 0.37 degrees and a maximum of 1.33 degrees. The error in the cross-sectional axial direction had a mean of 0.54 mm with a maximum error of 0.83 mm, depending on the slice interval. The main error source was of the image processing, which was about 70% of the total error. We found that machining cortical bone segments prior to CT scanning is an effective method for accuracy evaluation of CT-based bone reconstruction. This method can provide a reference for assessing the sensitivity, reliability and accuracy of CT-based applications in the study of movement, finite element modeling, and prosthesis construction.

  11. Gain determination of non-linear IR detectors with the differential photon transfer curve (dPTC) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Hilbert, Bryan; Leisenring, Jarron M.; Misselt, Karl; Rieke, Marcia; Robberto, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Conversion gain is a basic detector property which relates the raw counts in a pixel in data numbers (DN) to the number of electrons detected. The standard method for determining the gain is called the Photon Transfer Curve (PTC) method and involves the measurement the change in variance as a function of signal level. For non-linear IR detectors, this method depends strongly on the non-linearity correction and is therefore susceptible to systematic biases due to calibration issues. We have developed a new, robust, and fast method, the differential Photon Transfer Curve (dPTC) method, which is independent of non-linearity corrections, but still delivers gain values similar in precision but higher in accuracy.

  12. High accuracy wavelength calibration for a scanning visible spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Scotti, Filippo; Bell, Ronald E.

    2010-10-15

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies {<=}0.2 A. An automated calibration, which is stable over time and environmental conditions without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement, was developed for a scanning spectrometer to achieve high wavelength accuracy over the visible spectrum. This method fits all relevant spectrometer parameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a stepping-motor controlled sine drive, an accuracy of {approx}0.25 A has been demonstrated. With the addition of a high resolution (0.075 arc sec) optical encoder on the grating stage, greater precision ({approx}0.005 A) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements within {approx}0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively.

  13. High Accuracy Wavelength Calibration For A Scanning Visible Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Filippo Scotti and Ronald Bell

    2010-07-29

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies ≤ 0.2Â. An automated calibration for a scanning spectrometer has been developed to achieve a high wavelength accuracy overr the visible spectrum, stable over time and environmental conditions, without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement. The method fits all relevant spectrometer paraameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a steping-motor controlled sine-drive, accuracies of ~0.025 Â have been demonstrated. With the addition of high resolution (0.075 aresec) optical encoder on the grading stage, greater precision (~0.005 Â) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements with ~0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively.

  14. Precision cosmological parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, William Ashton, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    Experimental efforts of the last few decades have brought. a golden age to mankind's endeavor to understand tine physical properties of the Universe throughout its history. Recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide strong confirmation of the standard big bang paradigm, as well as introducing new mysteries, to unexplained by current physical models. In the following decades. even more ambitious scientific endeavours will begin to shed light on the new physics by looking at the detailed structure of the Universe both at very early and recent times. Modern data has allowed us to begins to test inflationary models of the early Universe, and the near future will bring higher precision data and much stronger tests. Cracking the codes hidden in these cosmological observables is a difficult and computationally intensive problem. The challenges will continue to increase as future experiments bring larger and more precise data sets. Because of the complexity of the problem, we are forced to use approximate techniques and make simplifying assumptions to ease the computational workload. While this has been reasonably sufficient until now, hints of the limitations of our techniques have begun to come to light. For example, the likelihood approximation used for analysis of CMB data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anistropy Probe (WMAP) satellite was shown to have short falls, leading to pre-emptive conclusions drawn about current cosmological theories. Also it can he shown that an approximate method used by all current analysis codes to describe the recombination history of the Universe will not be sufficiently accurate for future experiments. With a new CMB satellite scheduled for launch in the coming months, it is vital that we develop techniques to improve the analysis of cosmological data. This work develops a novel technique of both avoiding the use of approximate computational codes as well as allowing the application of new, more precise analysis

  15. Precision Adjustable Liquid Regulator (ALR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, R.; Parker, M.

    2004-10-01

    A passive mechanical regulator has been developed for the control of fuel or oxidizer flow to a 450N class bipropellant engine for use on commercial and interplanetary spacecraft. There are several potential benefits to the propulsion system, depending on mission requirements and spacecraft design. This system design enables more precise control of main engine mixture ratio and inlet pressure, and simplifies the pressurization system by transferring the function of main engine flow rate control from the pressurization/propellant tank assemblies, to a single component, the ALR. This design can also reduce the thermal control requirements on the propellant tanks, avoid costly Qualification testing of biprop engines for missions with more stringent requirements, and reduce the overall propulsion system mass and power usage. In order to realize these benefits, the ALR must meet stringent design requirements. The main advantage of this regulator over other units available in the market is that it can regulate about its nominal set point to within +/-0.85%, and change its regulation set point in flight +/-4% about that nominal point. The set point change is handled actively via a stepper motor driven actuator, which converts rotary into linear motion to affect the spring preload acting on the regulator. Once adjusted to a particular set point, the actuator remains in its final position unpowered, and the regulator passively maintains outlet pressure. The very precise outlet regulation pressure is possible due to new technology developed by Moog, Inc. which reduces typical regulator mechanical hysteresis to near zero. The ALR requirements specified an outlet pressure set point range from 225 to 255 psi, and equivalent water flow rates required were in the 0.17 lb/sec range. The regulation output pressure is maintained at +/-2 psi about the set point from a P (delta or differential pressure) of 20 to over 100 psid. Maximum upstream system pressure was specified at 320 psi

  16. Ground Truth Accuracy Tests of GPS Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elosegui, P.; Oberlander, D. J.; Davis, J. L.; Baena, R.; Ekstrom, G.

    2005-12-01

    As the precision of GPS determinations of site position continues to improve the detection of smaller and faster geophysical signals becomes possible. However, lack of independent measurements of these signals often precludes an assessment of the accuracy of such GPS position determinations. This may be particularly true for high-rate GPS applications. We have built an apparatus to assess the accuracy of GPS position determinations for high-rate applications, in particular the application known as "GPS seismology." The apparatus consists of a bidirectional, single-axis positioning table coupled to a digitally controlled stepping motor. The motor, in turn, is connected to a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chip that synchronously sequences through real historical earthquake profiles stored in Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory's (EPROM). A GPS antenna attached to this positioning table undergoes the simulated seismic motions of the Earth's surface while collecting high-rate GPS data. Analysis of the time-dependent position estimates can then be compared to the "ground truth," and the resultant GPS error spectrum can be measured. We have made extensive measurements with this system while inducing simulated seismic motions either in the horizontal plane or the vertical axis. A second stationary GPS antenna at a distance of several meters was simultaneously collecting high-rate (5 Hz) GPS data. We will present the calibration of this system, describe the GPS observations and data analysis, and assess the accuracy of GPS for high-rate geophysical applications and natural hazards mitigation.

  17. A Precision Variable, Double Prism Attenuator for CO(2) Lasers.

    PubMed

    Oseki, T; Saito, S

    1971-01-01

    A precision, double prism attenuator for CO(2) lasers, calibrated by its gap capacitance, was constructed to evaluate its possible use as a standard for attenuation measurements. It was found that the accuracy was about 0.1 dB with a dynamic range of about 40 dB.

  18. EVALUATION OF METRIC PRECISION FOR A RIPARIAN FOREST SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the performance of a protocol to monitor riparian forests in western Oregon based on the quality of the data obtained from a recent field survey. Precision and accuracy are the criteria used to determine the quality of 19 field metrics. The field survey con...

  19. Precision Orbit Derived Atmospheric Density: Development and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, C.; Hiatt, A.; Lechtenberg, T.; Fattig, E.; Mehta, P.

    2012-09-01

    Precision orbit ephemerides (POE) are used to estimate atmospheric density along the orbits of CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) and GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment). The densities are calibrated against accelerometer derived densities and considering ballistic coefficient estimation results. The 14-hour density solutions are stitched together using a linear weighted blending technique to obtain continuous solutions over the entire mission life of CHAMP and through 2011 for GRACE. POE derived densities outperform the High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model (HASDM), Jacchia 71 model, and NRLMSISE-2000 model densities when comparing cross correlation and RMS with accelerometer derived densities. Drag is the largest error source for estimating and predicting orbits for low Earth orbit satellites. This is one of the major areas that should be addressed to improve overall space surveillance capabilities; in particular, catalog maintenance. Generally, density is the largest error source in satellite drag calculations and current empirical density models such as Jacchia 71 and NRLMSISE-2000 have significant errors. Dynamic calibration of the atmosphere (DCA) has provided measurable improvements to the empirical density models and accelerometer derived densities of extremely high precision are available for a few satellites. However, DCA generally relies on observations of limited accuracy and accelerometer derived densities are extremely limited in terms of measurement coverage at any given time. The goal of this research is to provide an additional data source using satellites that have precision orbits available using Global Positioning System measurements and/or satellite laser ranging. These measurements strike a balance between the global coverage provided by DCA and the precise measurements of accelerometers. The temporal resolution of the POE derived density estimates is around 20-30 minutes, which is significantly worse than that of accelerometer

  20. Estimating trend precision and power to detect trends across grouped count data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, B.R.; Burlew, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Ecologists commonly use grouped or clustered count data to estimate temporal trends in counts, abundance indices, or abundance. For example, the U.S. Breeding Bird Survey data represent multiple counts of birds from within each of multiple, spatially defined routes. Despite a reliance on grouped counts, analytical methods for prospectively estimating precision of trend estimates or statistical power to detect trends that explicitly acknowledge the characteristics of grouped count data are undescribed. These characteristics include the fact that the sampling variance is an increasing function of the mean, and that sampling and group-level variance estimates are generally estimated on different scales (the sampling and log scales, respectively). We address these issues for repeated sampling of a single population using an analytical approach that has the flavor of a generalized linear mixed model, specifically that of a negative binomial-distributed count variable with random group effects. The count mean, including grand intercept, trend, and random group effects, is modeled linearly on the log scale, while sampling variance of the mean is estimated on the log scale via the delta method. Results compared favorably with those derived using Monte Carlo simulations. For example, at trend = 5% per temporal unit, differences in standard errors and in power were modest relative to those estimated by simulation (???|11|% and ???|16|%, respectively), with relative differences among power estimates decreasing to ???|7|% when power estimated by simulations was ???0.50. Similar findings were obtained using data from nine surveys of fingernail clams in the Mississippi River. The proposed method is suggested (1) where simulations are not practical and relative precision or power is desired, or (2) when multiple precision or power calculations are required and where the accuracy of a fraction of those calculations will be confirmed using simulations. ?? 2007 by the Ecological

  1. Soviet precision timekeeping research and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Vessot, R.F.C.; Allan, D.W.; Crampton, S.J.B.; Cutler, L.S.; Kern, R.H.; McCoubrey, A.O.; White, J.D.

    1991-08-01

    This report is the result of a study of Soviet progress in precision timekeeping research and timekeeping capability during the last two decades. The study was conducted by a panel of seven US scientists who have expertise in timekeeping, frequency control, time dissemination, and the direct applications of these disciplines to scientific investigation. The following topics are addressed in this report: generation of time by atomic clocks at the present level of their technology, new and emerging technologies related to atomic clocks, time and frequency transfer technology, statistical processes involving metrological applications of time and frequency, applications of precise time and frequency to scientific investigations, supporting timekeeping technology, and a comparison of Soviet research efforts with those of the United States and the West. The number of Soviet professionals working in this field is roughly 10 times that in the United States. The Soviet Union has facilities for large-scale production of frequency standards and has concentrated its efforts on developing and producing rubidium gas cell devices (relatively compact, low-cost frequency standards of modest accuracy and stability) and atomic hydrogen masers (relatively large, high-cost standards of modest accuracy and high stability). 203 refs., 45 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The IC Lithography roadmap foresees manufacturing of devices with critical dimension of < 20 nm. Overlay specification of single digit nanometer asking for nanometer positioning accuracy requiring sub nanometer position measurement accuracy. The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR® to full fill the ever tighter CTE specification for wafer stepper components. In this paper we present the ZERODUR® Lithography Roadmap on the CTE metrology and tolerance. Additionally, simulation calculations based on a physical model are presented predicting the long term CTE behavior of ZERODUR® components to optimize dimensional stability of precision positioning devices. CTE data of several low thermal expansion materials are compared regarding their temperature dependence between - 50°C and + 100°C. ZERODUR® TAILORED 22°C is full filling the tight CTE tolerance of +/- 10 ppb / K within the broadest temperature interval compared to all other materials of this investigation. The data presented in this paper explicitly demonstrates the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the nanometer precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  3. Prompt and Precise Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For Sanders Design International, Inc., of Wilton, New Hampshire, every passing second between the concept and realization of a product is essential to succeed in the rapid prototyping industry where amongst heavy competition, faster time-to-market means more business. To separate itself from its rivals, Sanders Design aligned with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop what it considers to be the most accurate rapid prototyping machine for fabrication of extremely precise tooling prototypes. The company's Rapid ToolMaker System has revolutionized production of high quality, small-to-medium sized prototype patterns and tooling molds with an exactness that surpasses that of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining devices. Created with funding and support from Marshall under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Rapid ToolMaker is a dual-use technology with applications in both commercial and military aerospace fields. The advanced technology provides cost savings in the design and manufacturing of automotive, electronic, and medical parts, as well as in other areas of consumer interest, such as jewelry and toys. For aerospace applications, the Rapid ToolMaker enables fabrication of high-quality turbine and compressor blades for jet engines on unmanned air vehicles, aircraft, and missiles.

  4. Environment Assisted Precision Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellaro, P.; Goldstein, G.; Maze, J. R.; Jiang, L.; Hodges, J. S.; Sorensen, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.

    2010-03-01

    We describe a method to enhance the sensitivity of magnetometry and achieve nearly Heisenberg-limited precision measurement using a novel class of entangled states. An individual qubit is used to sense the dynamics of surrounding ancillary qubits, which are in turn affected by the external field to be measured. The resulting sensitivity enhancement is determined by the number of ancillas strongly coupled to the sensor qubit, it does not depend on the exact values of the couplings (allowing to use disordered systems), and is resilient to decoherence. As a specific example we consider electronic spins in the solid-state, where the ancillary system is associated with the surrounding spin bath. The conventional approach has been to consider these spins only as a source of decoherence and to adopt decoupling scheme to mitigate their effects. Here we describe novel control techniques that transform the environment spins into a resource used to amplify the sensor spin response to weak external perturbations, while maintaining the beneficial effects of dynamical decoupling sequences. We discuss specific applications to improve magnetic sensing with diamond nano-crystals, using one Nitrogen-Vacancy center spin coupled to Nitrogen electronic spins.

  5. Linearity optimization in a class of analog phase modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the ultimate modulating linearity attainable with a phase modulation technique based on the linear addition of quadrature phase carrier signals which have been multiplied by precisely defined nonlinear transformations of the modulating signal. Optimum gain coefficients are derived and plotted to permit implementation of analog phase modulators capable of exceptionally good linearity of phase deviations as large as 5 radians.

  6. Improving the precision of astrometry for space debris

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Rongyu; Zhao, Changyin; Zhang, Xiaoxiang

    2014-03-01

    The data reduction method for optical space debris observations has many similarities with the one adopted for surveying near-Earth objects; however, due to several specific issues, the image degradation is particularly critical, which makes it difficult to obtain precise astrometry. An automatic image reconstruction method was developed to improve the astrometry precision for space debris, based on the mathematical morphology operator. Variable structural elements along multiple directions are adopted for image transformation, and then all the resultant images are stacked to obtain a final result. To investigate its efficiency, trial observations are made with Global Positioning System satellites and the astrometry accuracy improvement is obtained by comparison with the reference positions. The results of our experiments indicate that the influence of degradation in astrometric CCD images is reduced, and the position accuracy of both objects and stellar stars is improved distinctly. Our technique will contribute significantly to optical data reduction and high-order precision astrometry for space debris.

  7. Landsat classification accuracy assessment procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mead, R. R.; Szajgin, John

    1982-01-01

    A working conference was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 12-14 November, 1980 dealing with Landsat classification Accuracy Assessment Procedures. Thirteen formal presentations were made on three general topics: (1) sampling procedures, (2) statistical analysis techniques, and (3) examples of projects which included accuracy assessment and the associated costs, logistical problems, and value of the accuracy data to the remote sensing specialist and the resource manager. Nearly twenty conference attendees participated in two discussion sessions addressing various issues associated with accuracy assessment. This paper presents an account of the accomplishments of the conference.

  8. Precision positioning of earth orbiting remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, William G.; Yunck, T. P.; Wu, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    Decimeter tracking accuracy is sought for a number of precise earth sensing satellites to be flown in the 1990's. This accuracy can be achieved with techniques which use the Global Positioning System (GPS) in a differential mode. A precisely located global network of GPS ground receivers and a receiver aboard the user satellite are needed, and all techniques simultaneously estimate the user and GPS satellite states. Three basic navigation approaches include classical dynamic, wholly nondynamic, and reduced dynamic or hybrid formulations. The first two are simply special cases of the third, which promises to deliver subdecimeter accuracy for dynamically unpredictable vehicles down to the lowest orbit altitudes. The potential of these techniques for tracking and gravity field recovery will be demonstrated on NASA's Topex satellite beginning in 1991. Applications to the Shuttle, Space Station, and dedicated remote sensing platforms are being pursued.

  9. Precision medicine in myasthenia graves: begin from the data precision

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu; Xie, Yanchen; Hao, Hong-Jun; Sun, Ren-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a prototypic autoimmune disease with overt clinical and immunological heterogeneity. The data of MG is far from individually precise now, partially due to the rarity and heterogeneity of this disease. In this review, we provide the basic insights of MG data precision, including onset age, presenting symptoms, generalization, thymus status, pathogenic autoantibodies, muscle involvement, severity and response to treatment based on references and our previous studies. Subgroups and quantitative traits of MG are discussed in the sense of data precision. The role of disease registries and scientific bases of precise analysis are also discussed to ensure better collection and analysis of MG data. PMID:27127759

  10. Precise Truss Assembly using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    We describe an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly of commodity parts with low-precision bonding. We present preliminary experiments in 2D that are motivated by the problem of assembling a space telescope optical bench on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local assembly site in place while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (in this case, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. We report the challenges of designing the IPJR hardware and software, analyze the error in assembly, document the test results over several experiments including a large-scale ring structure, and describe future work to implement the IPJR in 3D and with micron precision.

  11. Precise Truss Assembly Using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, W. R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Hardware and software design and system integration for an intelligent precision jigging robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly using commodity parts and low-precision bonding, is described. Preliminary 2D experiments that are motivated by the problem of assembling space telescope optical benches and very large manipulators on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding are also described. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local structure assembly site in place, while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (for this prototype, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. The analysis of the assembly error and the results of building a square structure and a ring structure are discussed. Options for future work, to extend the IPJR paradigm to building in 3D structures at micron precision are also summarized.

  12. Linear approximation of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectra.

    PubMed

    Binietoglou, Ioannis; Giampouras, Paris; Belegante, Livio

    2016-09-20

    Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering is the basis of many remote sensing techniques, including high spectral resolution lidar measurements of aerosols and wind. Rayleigh-Brillouin spectra can be accurately estimated using physics-based models like the so-called Tenti's S6 and Pan's S7 models. Unfortunately, these are computationally expensive and can be the bottleneck for real-time lidar processing and iterative parameter estimation problems. This short article describes a very efficient linear approximation of the Rayleigh-Brillouin spectra based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Using PCA, the outputs of the above models can be approximated with very high accuracy using a single matrix multiplication. The described method can be applied to the output of any detailed scattering model, thus it can be used for a wide range of problems, e.g., for scattering from different gases (Air, N2, O2,…) and for different ranges of temperature and pressure. The precision of the approximation can be adapted to the requirements of the studied problem, and can easily exceed the actual accuracy of the reference models. PMID:27661601

  13. Precision mass measurements of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mane, E.; MacDonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    The reputation of Penning trap mass spectrometry for accuracy and precision was established with singly charged ions (SCI); however, the achievable precision and resolving power can be extended by using highly charged ions (HCI). The TITAN facility has demonstrated these enhancements for long-lived (T1/2>=50 ms) isobars and low-lying isomers, including ^71Ge^21+, ^74Rb^8+, ^78Rb^8+, and ^98Rb^15+. The Q-value of ^71Ge enters into the neutrino cross section, and the use of HCI reduced the resolving power required to distinguish the isobars from 3 x 10^5 to 20. The precision achieved in the measurement of ^74Rb^8+, a superallowed β-emitter and candidate to test the CVC hypothesis, rivaled earlier measurements with SCI in a fraction of the time. The 111.19(22) keV isomeric state in ^78Rb was resolved from the ground state. Mass measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes near A = 100 aid in determining the r-process pathway. Advanced ion manipulation techniques and recent results will be presented.

  14. Accuracy Evaluation of Electron-Probe Microanalysis as Applied to Semiconductors and Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Armstrong, John

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation of precision and accuracy will be presented for representative semiconductor and silicate compositions. The accuracy of electron-probe analysis depends on high precision measurements and instrumental calibration, as well as correction algorithms and fundamental parameter data sets. A critical assessment of correction algorithms and mass absorption coefficient data sets can be made using the alpha factor technique. Alpha factor analysis can be used to identify systematic errors in data sets and also of microprobe standards used for calibration.

  15. BLAS- BASIC LINEAR ALGEBRA SUBPROGRAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is a collection of FORTRAN callable routines for employing standard techniques in performing the basic operations of numerical linear algebra. The BLAS library was developed to provide a portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebraic computations. The subprograms available in the library cover the operations of dot product, multiplication of a scalar and a vector, vector plus a scalar times a vector, Givens transformation, modified Givens transformation, copy, swap, Euclidean norm, sum of magnitudes, and location of the largest magnitude element. Since these subprograms are to be used in an ANSI FORTRAN context, the cases of single precision, double precision, and complex data are provided for. All of the subprograms have been thoroughly tested and produce consistent results even when transported from machine to machine. BLAS contains Assembler versions and FORTRAN test code for any of the following compilers: Lahey F77L, Microsoft FORTRAN, or IBM Professional FORTRAN. It requires the Microsoft Macro Assembler and a math co-processor. The PC implementation allows individual arrays of over 64K. The BLAS library was developed in 1979. The PC version was made available in 1986 and updated in 1988.

  16. Test Expectancy Affects Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theory suggests that the accuracy of metacognitive monitoring is affected by the cues used to judge learning. Researchers have improved monitoring accuracy by directing attention to more appropriate cues; however, this is the first study to more directly point students to more appropriate cues using instructions regarding tests and…

  17. [The High Precision Analysis Research of Multichannel BOTDR Scattering Spectral Information Based on the TTDF and CNS Algorithm].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-jun; Liu, Wen-zhe; Fu, Xing-hu; Bi, Wei-hong

    2015-07-01

    Traditional BOTDR optical fiber sensing system uses single channel sensing fiber to measure the information features. Uncontrolled factors such as cross-sensitivity can lead to a lower scattering spectrum fitting precision and make the information analysis deflection get worse. Therefore, a BOTDR system for detecting the multichannel sensor information at the same time is proposed. Also it provides a scattering spectrum analysis method for multichannel Brillouin optical time-domain reflection (BOT-DR) sensing system in order to extract high precision spectrum feature. This method combines the three times data fusion (TTDF) and the cuckoo Newton search (CNS) algorithm. First, according to the rule of Dixon and Grubbs criteria, the method uses the ability of TTDF algorithm in data fusion to eliminate the influence of abnormal value and reduce the error signal. Second, it uses the Cuckoo Newton search algorithm to improve the spectrum fitting and enhance the accuracy of Brillouin scattering spectrum information analysis. We can obtain the global optimal solution by smart cuckoo search. By using the optimal solution as the initial value of Newton algorithm for local optimization, it can ensure the spectrum fitting precision. The information extraction at different linewidths is analyzed in temperature information scattering spectrum under the condition of linear weight ratio of 1:9. The variances of the multichannel data fusion is about 0.0030, the center frequency of scattering spectrum is 11.213 GHz and the temperature error is less than 0.15 K. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the algorithm can be used in multichannel distributed optical fiber sensing system based on Brillouin optical time domain reflection. It can improve the accuracy of multichannel sensing signals and the precision of Brillouin scattering spectrum analysis effectively. PMID:26717729

  18. Atmospheric effects and ultimate ranging accuracy for lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Douglas G.; Prochazka, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    The deployment of next generation lunar laser retroreflectors is planned in the near future. With proper robotic deployment, these will support single shot single photo-electron ranging accuracy at the 100 micron level or better. There are available technologies for the support at this accuracy by advanced ground stations, however, the major question is the ultimate limit imposed on the ranging accuracy due to the changing timing delays due to turbulence and horizontal gradients in the earth's atmosphere. In particular, there are questions of the delay and temporal broadening of a very narrow laser pulse. Theoretical and experimental results will be discussed that address estimates of the magnitudes of these effects and the issue of precision vs. accuracy.

  19. What do we mean by accuracy in geomagnetic measurements?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    High accuracy is what distinguishes measurements made at the world's magnetic observatories from other types of geomagnetic measurements. High accuracy in determining the absolute values of the components of the Earth's magnetic field is essential to studying geomagnetic secular variation and processes at the core mantle boundary, as well as some magnetospheric processes. In some applications of geomagnetic data, precision (or resolution) of measurements may also be important. In addition to accuracy and resolution in the amplitude domain, it is necessary to consider these same quantities in the frequency and space domains. New developments in geomagnetic instruments and communications make real-time, high accuracy, global geomagnetic observatory data sets a real possibility. There is a growing realization in the scientific community of the unique relevance of geomagnetic observatory data to the principal contemporary problems in solid Earth and space physics. Together, these factors provide the promise of a 'renaissance' of the world's geomagnetic observatory system. ?? 1990.

  20. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off