Science.gov

Sample records for accuracy precision stability

  1. Accuracy and precision of manual baseline determination.

    PubMed

    Jirasek, A; Schulze, G; Yu, M M L; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2004-12-01

    Vibrational spectra often require baseline removal before further data analysis can be performed. Manual (i.e., user) baseline determination and removal is a common technique used to perform this operation. Currently, little data exists that details the accuracy and precision that can be expected with manual baseline removal techniques. This study addresses this current lack of data. One hundred spectra of varying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), signal-to-baseline ratio (SBR), baseline slope, and spectral congestion were constructed and baselines were subtracted by 16 volunteers who were categorized as being either experienced or inexperienced in baseline determination. In total, 285 baseline determinations were performed. The general level of accuracy and precision that can be expected for manually determined baselines from spectra of varying SNR, SBR, baseline slope, and spectral congestion is established. Furthermore, the effects of user experience on the accuracy and precision of baseline determination is estimated. The interactions between the above factors in affecting the accuracy and precision of baseline determination is highlighted. Where possible, the functional relationships between accuracy, precision, and the given spectral characteristic are detailed. The results provide users of manual baseline determination useful guidelines in establishing limits of accuracy and precision when performing manual baseline determination, as well as highlighting conditions that confound the accuracy and precision of manual baseline determination.

  2. Bullet trajectory reconstruction - Methods, accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Mattijssen, Erwin J A T; Kerkhoff, Wim

    2016-05-01

    Based on the spatial relation between a primary and secondary bullet defect or on the shape and dimensions of the primary bullet defect, a bullet's trajectory prior to impact can be estimated for a shooting scene reconstruction. The accuracy and precision of the estimated trajectories will vary depending on variables such as, the applied method of reconstruction, the (true) angle of incidence, the properties of the target material and the properties of the bullet upon impact. This study focused on the accuracy and precision of estimated bullet trajectories when different variants of the probing method, ellipse method, and lead-in method are applied on bullet defects resulting from shots at various angles of incidence on drywall, MDF and sheet metal. The results show that in most situations the best performance (accuracy and precision) is seen when the probing method is applied. Only for the lowest angles of incidence the performance was better when either the ellipse or lead-in method was applied. The data provided in this paper can be used to select the appropriate method(s) for reconstruction and to correct for systematic errors (accuracy) and to provide a value of the precision, by means of a confidence interval of the specific measurement. PMID:27044032

  3. Accuracy and Precision of an IGRT Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Gareth J. Rowbottom, Carl G.; Mackay, Ranald I.

    2009-07-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) can potentially improve the accuracy of delivery of radiotherapy treatments by providing high-quality images of patient anatomy in the treatment position that can be incorporated into the treatment setup. The achievable accuracy and precision of delivery of highly complex head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with an IGRT technique using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) was investigated. Four head-and-neck IMRT plans were delivered to a semi-anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom and the dose distribution was measured simultaneously by up to 20 microMOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transmitter) detectors. A volumetric kilovoltage (kV) x-ray image was then acquired in the treatment position, fused with the phantom scan within the TPS using Syntegra software, and used to recalculate the dose with the precise delivery isocenter at the actual position of each detector within the phantom. Three repeat measurements were made over a period of 2 months to reduce the effect of random errors in measurement or delivery. To ensure that the noise remained below 1.5% (1 SD), minimum doses of 85 cGy were delivered to each detector. The average measured dose was systematically 1.4% lower than predicted and was consistent between repeats. Over the 4 delivered plans, 10/76 measurements showed a systematic error > 3% (3/76 > 5%), for which several potential sources of error were investigated. The error was ultimately attributable to measurements made in beam penumbrae, where submillimeter positional errors result in large discrepancies in dose. The implementation of an image-guided technique improves the accuracy of dose verification, particularly within high-dose gradients. The achievable accuracy of complex IMRT dose delivery incorporating image-guidance is within {+-} 3% in dose over the range of sample points. For some points in high-dose gradients

  4. Accuracy-precision trade-off in visual orientation constancy.

    PubMed

    De Vrijer, M; Medendorp, W P; Van Gisbergen, J A M

    2009-02-09

    Using the subjective visual vertical task (SVV), previous investigations on the maintenance of visual orientation constancy during lateral tilt have found two opposite bias effects in different tilt ranges. The SVV typically shows accurate performance near upright but severe undercompensation at tilts beyond 60 deg (A-effect), frequently with slight overcompensation responses (E-effect) in between. Here we investigate whether a Bayesian spatial-perception model can account for this error pattern. The model interprets A- and E-effects as the drawback of a computational strategy, geared at maintaining visual stability with optimal precision at small tilt angles. In this study, we test whether these systematic errors can be seen as the consequence of a precision-accuracy trade-off when combining a veridical but noisy signal about eye orientation in space with the visual signal. To do so, we used a psychometric approach to assess both precision and accuracy of the SVV in eight subjects laterally tilted at 9 different tilt angles (-120 degrees to 120 degrees). Results show that SVV accuracy and precision worsened with tilt angle, according to a pattern that could be fitted quite adequately by the Bayesian model. We conclude that spatial vision essentially follows the rules of Bayes' optimal observer theory.

  5. [History, accuracy and precision of SMBG devices].

    PubMed

    Dufaitre-Patouraux, L; Vague, P; Lassmann-Vague, V

    2003-04-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose started only fifty years ago. Until then metabolic control was evaluated by means of qualitative urinary blood measure often of poor reliability. Reagent strips were the first semi quantitative tests to monitor blood glucose, and in the late seventies meters were launched on the market. Initially the use of such devices was intended for medical staff, but thanks to handiness improvement they became more and more adequate to patients and are now a necessary tool for self-blood glucose monitoring. The advanced technologies allow to develop photometric measurements but also more recently electrochemical one. In the nineties, improvements were made mainly in meters' miniaturisation, reduction of reaction time and reading, simplification of blood sampling and capillary blood laying. Although accuracy and precision concern was in the heart of considerations at the beginning of self-blood glucose monitoring, the recommendations of societies of diabetology came up in the late eighties. Now, the French drug agency: AFSSAPS asks for a control of meter before any launching on the market. According to recent publications very few meters meet reliability criteria set up by societies of diabetology in the late nineties. Finally because devices may be handled by numerous persons in hospitals, meters use as possible source of nosocomial infections have been recently questioned and is subject to very strict guidelines published by AFSSAPS.

  6. Stabilized Lasers and Precision Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Traces the development of stabilized lasers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology passive-stabilization experiments of the early 1960s up through the current epoch of highly stabilized helium-neon and carbon dioxide and continuous wave dye lasers. (Author/HM)

  7. MIPAS IMK/IAA CFC-11 (CCl3F) and CFC-12 (CCl2F2) measurements: accuracy, precision and long-term stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, E.; Laeng, A.; Lossow, S.; Kellmann, S.; Stiller, G.; von Clarmann, T.; Glatthor, N.; Höpfner, M.; Kiefer, M.; Oelhaf, H.; Orphal, J.; Funke, B.; Grabowski, U.; Haenel, F.; Linden, A.; Wetzel, G.; Woiwode, W.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Engel, A.; Gille, J. C.; Kolonjari, F.; Sugita, T.; Toon, G. C.; Walker, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    the comparison of HATS and MIPAS measurements taken at 3 km below the tropopause mainly stay within 10-50 pptv (corresponding to ˜ 2-10 % for CFC-12) for the RR and the FR period. Between ˜ 15 and 30 km, most comparisons agree within 10-20 pptv (10-20 %), apart from ILAS-II, which shows large differences above ˜ 17 km. Overall, relative differences are usually smaller for CFC-12 than for CFC-11. For both species - CFC-11 and CFC-12 - we find that differences at the lower end of the profile tend to be larger at higher latitudes than in tropical and subtropical regions. In addition, MIPAS profiles have a maximum in their mixing ratio around the tropopause, which is most obvious in tropical mean profiles. Comparisons of the standard deviation in a quiescent atmosphere (polar summer) show that only the CFC-12 FR error budget can fully explain the observed variability, while for the other products (CFC-11 FR and RR and CFC-12 RR) only two-thirds to three-quarters can be explained. Investigations regarding the temporal stability show very small negative drifts in MIPAS CFC-11 measurements. These instrument drifts vary between ˜ 1 and 3 % decade-1. For CFC-12, the drifts are also negative and close to zero up to ˜ 30 km. Above that altitude, larger drifts of up to ˜ 50 % decade-1 appear which are negative up to ˜ 35 km and positive, but of a similar magnitude, above.

  8. MIPAS IMK/IAA CFC-11 (CCl3F) and CFC-12 (CCl2F2) measurements: accuracy, precision and long-term stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, E.; Laeng, A.; Lossow, S.; Kellmann, S.; Stiller, G.; von Clarmann, T.; Glatthor, N.; Höpfner, M.; Kiefer, M.; Oelhaf, H.; Orphal, J.; Funke, B.; Grabowski, U.; Haenel, F.; Linden, A.; Wetzel, G.; Woiwode, W.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Engel, A.; Gille, J. C.; Kolonjari, F.; Sugita, T.; Toon, G. C.; Walker, K. A.

    2015-07-01

    the FR period. Above approximately 15 km, most comparisons are close to excellent, apart from ILAS-II, which shows large differences above ~ 17 km. Overall, percentage differences are usually smaller for CFC-12 than for CFC-11. For both species - CFC-11 and CFC-12 - we find that differences at the lower end of the profile tend to be larger at higher latitudes than in tropical and subtropical regions. In addition, MIPAS Envisat profiles have a maximum in the mixing ratio around the tropopause, which is most obvious in tropical mean profiles. Estimated measurement noise alone can, in most cases, not explain the standard deviation of the differences. This is attributed to error components not considered in the error estimate and also to natural variability which always plays a role when the compared instruments do not measure exactly the same air mass. Investigations concerning the temporal stability show very small negative drifts in MIPAS Envisat CFC-11 measurements. These drifts vary between ~ 1-3 % decade-1. For CFC-12, the drifts are also negative and close to zero up to ~ 30 km. Above that altitude larger drifts of up to ~ 50 % decade-1 appear which are negative up to ~ 35 km and positive, but of a similar magnitude, above.

  9. A study of laseruler accuracy and precision (1986-1987)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, R.S.; Armstrong, K.P.

    1989-06-22

    A study was conducted to investigate Laserruler accuracy and precision. Tests were performed on 0.050 in., 0.100 in., and 0.120 in. gauge block standards. Results showed and accuracy of 3.7 {mu}in. for the 0.12 in. standard, with higher accuracies for the two thinner blocks. The Laserruler precision was 4.83 {mu}in. for the 0.120 in. standard, 3.83 {mu}in. for the 0.100 in. standard, and 4.2 {mu}in. for the 0.050 in. standard.

  10. Precision and accuracy in diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek K

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews some of the key factors influencing the accuracy and precision of quantitative metrics derived from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data. It focuses on the study pipeline beginning at the choice of imaging protocol, through preprocessing and model fitting up to the point of extracting quantitative estimates for subsequent analysis. The aim was to provide the newcomers to the field with sufficient knowledge of how their decisions at each stage along this process might impact on precision and accuracy, to design their study/approach, and to use diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging in the clinic. More specifically, emphasis is placed on improving accuracy and precision. I illustrate how careful choices along the way can substantially affect the sample size needed to make an inference from the data.

  11. Accuracy and precision of temporal artery thermometers in febrile patients.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Margaret; Granstrom, Patsy; Pomarico, Bernie; Reimanis, Cathryn

    2013-01-01

    The noninvasive temporal artery thermometer offers a way to measure temperature when oral assessment is contraindicated, uncomfortable, or difficult to obtain. In this study, the accuracy and precision of the temporal artery thermometer exceeded levels recommended by experts for use in acute care clinical practice.

  12. Stability precision dynamic testing system on artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Li, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic feature of Weapon equipments is one of important performance index for evaluating the performance of the whole weapon system. The construction of target range in our country in fire control dynamic testing is relatively backward; therefore, it has greatly influenced the evaluation on the fire control system. In order to solve this problem, it's urgent to develop a new testing instrument so as to adjust to the armament research process and promote weapon system working more efficiently and thereby meeting the needs of modernization in national defense. This paper proposes a new measure which is used to test the stability precision of the fire control system, and it is installed on the moving base. Using the method, we develop a testing system which can test the stability precision of the fire control system and achieve a high precision results after testing. The innovation of the system is we can receive the image not only by CCD, but our eyes. It also adopts digital image-forming and image processing technique for real-time measurement and storing of the target information; it simultaneously adopts the method adjusting the platform and the corresponding fixture mounted on a sample to measure the stable precision and the precision of corner of stabilizator. In this paper, we make a description on the construction of the system and the idea of the designing of the optical system. Finally, we introduce the actual application of the system and testing results.

  13. The Plus or Minus Game - Teaching Estimation, Precision, and Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forringer, Edward R.; Forringer, Richard S.; Forringer, Daniel S.

    2016-03-01

    A quick survey of physics textbooks shows that many (Knight, Young, and Serway for example) cover estimation, significant digits, precision versus accuracy, and uncertainty in the first chapter. Estimation "Fermi" questions are so useful that there has been a column dedicated to them in TPT (Larry Weinstein's "Fermi Questions.") For several years the authors (a college physics professor, a retired algebra teacher, and a fifth-grade teacher) have been playing a game, primarily at home to challenge each other for fun, but also in the classroom as an educational tool. We call the game "The Plus or Minus Game." The game combines estimation with the principle of precision and uncertainty in a competitive and fun way.

  14. Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-06-15

    We describe a new technique, standing wave axial nanometry (SWAN), to image the axial location of a single nanoscale fluorescent object with sub-nanometer accuracy and 3.7 nm precision. A standing wave, generated by positioning an atomic force microscope tip over a focused laser beam, is used to excite fluorescence; axial position is determined from the phase of the emission intensity. We use SWAN to measure the orientation of single DNA molecules of different lengths, grafted on surfaces with different functionalities.

  15. Assessing the Accuracy of the Precise Point Positioning Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnath, S. B.; Collins, P.; Seepersad, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) GPS data processing technique has developed over the past 15 years to become a standard method for growing categories of positioning and navigation applications. The technique relies on single receiver point positioning combined with the use of precise satellite orbit and clock information and high-fidelity error modelling. The research presented here uniquely addresses the current accuracy of the technique, explains the limits of performance, and defines paths to improvements. For geodetic purposes, performance refers to daily static position accuracy. PPP processing of over 80 IGS stations over one week results in few millimetre positioning rms error in the north and east components and few centimetres in the vertical (all one sigma values). Larger error statistics for real-time and kinematic processing are also given. GPS PPP with ambiguity resolution processing is also carried out, producing slight improvements over the float solution results. These results are categorised into quality classes in order to analyse the root error causes of the resultant accuracies: "best", "worst", multipath, site displacement effects, satellite availability and geometry, etc. Also of interest in PPP performance is solution convergence period. Static, conventional solutions are slow to converge, with approximately 35 minutes required for 95% of solutions to reach the 20 cm or better horizontal accuracy. Ambiguity resolution can significantly reduce this period without biasing solutions. The definition of a PPP error budget is a complex task even with the resulting numerical assessment, as unlike the epoch-by-epoch processing in the Standard Position Service, PPP processing involving filtering. An attempt is made here to 1) define the magnitude of each error source in terms of range, 2) transform ranging error to position error via Dilution Of Precision (DOP), and 3) scale the DOP through the filtering process. The result is a deeper

  16. Scatterometry measurement precision and accuracy below 70 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendelbach, Matthew; Archie, Charles N.

    2003-05-01

    Scatterometry is a contender for various measurement applications where structure widths and heights can be significantly smaller than 70 nm within one or two ITRS generations. For example, feedforward process control in the post-lithography transistor gate formation is being actively pursued by a number of RIE tool manufacturers. Several commercial forms of scatterometry are available or under development which promise to provide satisfactory performance in this regime. Scatterometry, as commercially practiced today, involves analyzing the zeroth order reflected light from a grating of lines. Normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry, 2-theta fixed-wavelength ellipsometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry are among the optical techniques, while library based spectra matching and realtime regression are among the analysis techniques. All these commercial forms will find accurate and precise measurement a challenge when the material constituting the critical structure approaches a very small volume. Equally challenging is executing an evaluation methodology that first determines the true properties (critical dimensions and materials) of semiconductor wafer artifacts and then compares measurement performance of several scatterometers. How well do scatterometers track process induced changes in bottom CD and sidewall profile? This paper introduces a general 3D metrology assessment methodology and reports upon work involving sub-70 nm structures and several scatterometers. The methodology combines results from multiple metrologies (CD-SEM, CD-AFM, TEM, and XSEM) to form a Reference Measurement System (RMS). The methodology determines how well the scatterometry measurement tracks critical structure changes even in the presence of other noncritical changes that take place at the same time; these are key components of accuracy. Because the assessment rewards scatterometers that measure with good precision (reproducibility) and good accuracy, the most precise

  17. Large format focal plane array integration with precision alignment, metrology and accuracy capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Jay; Parlato, Russell; Tracy, Gregory; Randolph, Max

    2015-09-01

    Focal plane alignment for large format arrays and faster optical systems require enhanced precision methodology and stability over temperature. The increase in focal plane array size continues to drive the alignment capability. Depending on the optical system, the focal plane flatness of less than 25μm (.001") is required over transition temperatures from ambient to cooled operating temperatures. The focal plane flatness requirement must also be maintained in airborne or launch vibration environments. This paper addresses the challenge of the detector integration into the focal plane module and housing assemblies, the methodology to reduce error terms during integration and the evaluation of thermal effects. The driving factors influencing the alignment accuracy include: datum transfers, material effects over temperature, alignment stability over test, adjustment precision and traceability to NIST standard. The FPA module design and alignment methodology reduces the error terms by minimizing the measurement transfers to the housing. In the design, the proper material selection requires matched coefficient of expansion materials minimizes both the physical shift over temperature as well as lowering the stress induced into the detector. When required, the co-registration of focal planes and filters can achieve submicron relative positioning by applying precision equipment, interferometry and piezoelectric positioning stages. All measurements and characterizations maintain traceability to NIST standards. The metrology characterizes the equipment's accuracy, repeatability and precision of the measurements.

  18. Evaluation of precision and accuracy of selenium measurements in biological materials using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials has become increasingly important in view of the essential nature of this element for human nutrition and its possible role as a protective agent against cancer. Unfortunately, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials is often difficult for most analytical techniques for a variety of reasons, including interferences, complicated selenium chemistry due to the presence of this element in multiple oxidation states and in a variety of different organic species, stability and resistance to destruction of some of these organo-selenium species during acid dissolution, volatility of some selenium compounds, and potential for contamination. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be one of the best analytical techniques for selenium determinations in biological materials for a number of reasons. Currently, precision at the 1% level (1s) and overall accuracy at the 1 to 2% level (95% confidence interval) can be attained at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for selenium determinations in biological materials when counting statistics are not limiting (using the {sup 75}Se isotope). An example of this level of precision and accuracy is summarized. Achieving this level of accuracy, however, requires strict attention to all sources of systematic error. Precise and accurate results can also be obtained after radiochemical separations.

  19. Improved DORIS accuracy for precise orbit determination and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Pascal; Jayles, Christian; Tavernier, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 and 2002, 3 more DORIS satellites were launched. Since then, all DORIS results have been significantly improved. For precise orbit determination, 20 cm are now available in real-time with DIODE and 1.5 to 2 cm in post-processing. For geodesy, 1 cm precision can now be achieved regularly every week, making now DORIS an active part of a Global Observing System for Geodesy through the IDS.

  20. S-193 scatterometer backscattering cross section precision/accuracy for Skylab 2 and 3 missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, K.; Pounds, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures for measuring the precision and accuracy with which the S-193 scatterometer measured the background cross section of ground scenes are described. Homogeneous ground sites were selected, and data from Skylab missions were analyzed. The precision was expressed as the standard deviation of the scatterometer-acquired backscattering cross section. In special cases, inference of the precision of measurement was made by considering the total range from the maximum to minimum of the backscatter measurements within a data segment, rather than the standard deviation. For Skylab 2 and 3 missions a precision better than 1.5 dB is indicated. This procedure indicates an accuracy of better than 3 dB for the Skylab 2 and 3 missions. The estimates of precision and accuracy given in this report are for backscattering cross sections from -28 to 18 dB. Outside this range the precision and accuracy decrease significantly.

  1. [Accuracy and precision in the evaluation of computer assisted surgical systems. A definition].

    PubMed

    Strauss, G; Hofer, M; Korb, W; Trantakis, C; Winkler, D; Burgert, O; Schulz, T; Dietz, A; Meixensberger, J; Koulechov, K

    2006-02-01

    Accuracy represents the outstanding criterion for navigation systems. Surgeons have noticed a great discrepancy between the values from the literature and system specifications on one hand, and intraoperative accuracy on the other. A unitary understanding for the term accuracy does not exist in clinical practice. Furthermore, an incorrect equality for the terms precision and accuracy can be found in the literature. On top of this, clinical accuracy differs from mechanical (technical) accuracy. From a clinical point of view, we had to deal with remarkably many different terms all describing accuracy. This study has the goals of: 1. Defining "accuracy" and related terms, 2. Differentiating between "precision" and "accuracy", 3. Deriving the term "surgical accuracy", 4. Recommending use of the the term "surgical accuracy" for a navigation system. To a great extent, definitions were applied from the International Standardisation Organisation-ISO and the norm from the Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V.-DIN (the German Institute for Standardization). For defining surgical accuracy, the terms reference value, expectation, accuracy and precision are of major interest. Surgical accuracy should indicate the maximum values for the deviation between test results and the reference value (true value) A(max), and additionally indicate precision P(surg). As a basis for measurements, a standardized technical model was used. Coordinates of the model were acquired by CT. To determine statistically and reality relevant results for head surgery, 50 measurements with an accuracy of 50, 75, 100 and 150 mm from the centre of the registration geometry are adequate. In the future, we recommend labeling the system's overall performance with the following specifications: maximum accuracy deviation A(max), precision P and information on the measurement method. This could be displayed on a seal of quality.

  2. Accuracy and precision in measurements of biomass oxidative ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Masiello, C. A.; Randerson, J. T.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2005-12-01

    One fundamental property of the Earth system is the oxidative ratio (OR) of the terrestrial biosphere, or the mols CO2 fixed per mols O2 released via photosynthesis. This is also an essential, poorly constrained parameter in the calculation of the size of the terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks via atmospheric O2 and CO2 measurements. We are pursuing a number of techniques to accurately measure natural variations in above- and below-ground OR. For aboveground biomass, OR can be calculated directly from percent C, H, N, and O data measured via elemental analysis; however, the precision of this technique is a function of 4 measurements, resulting in increased data variability. It is also possible to measure OR via bomb calorimetry and percent C, using relationships between the heat of combustion of a sample and its OR. These measurements hold the potential for generation of more precise data, as error depends only on 2 measurements instead of 4. We present data comparing these two OR measurement techniques.

  3. Gamma-Ray Peak Integration: Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Richard M. Lindstrom

    2000-11-12

    The accuracy of singlet gamma-ray peak areas obtained by a peak analysis program is immaterial. If the same algorithm is used for sample measurement as for calibration and if the peak shapes are similar, then biases in the integration method cancel. Reproducibility is the only important issue. Even the uncertainty of the areas computed by the program is trivial because the true standard uncertainty can be experimentally assessed by repeated measurements of the same source. Reproducible peak integration was important in a recent standard reference material certification task. The primary tool used for spectrum analysis was SUM, a National Institute of Standards and Technology interactive program to sum peaks and subtract a linear background, using the same channels to integrate all 20 spectra. For comparison, this work examines other peak integration programs. Unlike some published comparisons of peak performance in which synthetic spectra were used, this experiment used spectra collected for a real (though exacting) analytical project, analyzed by conventional software used in routine ways. Because both components of the 559- to 564-keV doublet are from {sup 76}As, they were integrated together with SUM. The other programs, however, deconvoluted the peaks. A sensitive test of the fitting algorithm is the ratio of reported peak areas. In almost all the cases, this ratio was much more variable than expected from the reported uncertainties reported by the program. Other comparisons to be reported indicate that peak integration is still an imperfect tool in the analysis of gamma-ray spectra.

  4. Spectropolarimetry with PEPSI at the LBT: accuracy vs. precision in magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, Ilya; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Hofmann, Axel

    2009-04-01

    We present the design of the new PEPSI spectropolarimeter to be installed at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona to measure the full set of Stokes parameters in spectral lines and outline its precision and the accuracy limiting factors.

  5. Precision and Accuracy in Measurements: A Tale of Four Graduated Cylinders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1998-01-01

    Expands upon the concepts of precision and accuracy at a level suitable for general chemistry. Serves as a bridge to the more extensive treatments in analytical chemistry textbooks and the advanced literature on error analysis. Contains 22 references. (DDR)

  6. Nano-accuracy measurements and the surface profiler by use of Monolithic Hollow Penta-Prism for precision mirror testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shinan; Wayne, Lewis; Idir, Mourad

    2014-09-01

    We developed a Monolithic Hollow Penta-Prism Long Trace Profiler-NOM (MHPP-LTP-NOM) to attain nano-accuracy in testing plane- and near-plane-mirrors. A new developed Monolithic Hollow Penta-Prism (MHPP) combined with the advantages of PPLTP and autocollimator ELCOMAT of the Nano-Optic-Measuring Machine (NOM) is used to enhance the accuracy and stability of our measurements. Our precise system-alignment method by using a newly developed CCD position-monitor system (PMS) assured significant thermal stability and, along with our optimized noise-reduction analytic method, ensured nano-accuracy measurements. Herein we report our tests results; all errors are about 60 nrad rms or less in tests of plane- and near-plane- mirrors.

  7. Precision and accuracy of decay constants and age standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, I. M.

    2011-12-01

    40 years of round-robin experiments with age standards teach us that systematic errors must be present in at least N-1 labs if participants provide N mutually incompatible data. In EarthTime, the U-Pb community has produced and distributed synthetic solutions with full metrological traceability. Collector linearity is routinely calibrated under variable conditions (e.g. [1]). Instrumental mass fractionation is measured in-run with double spikes (e.g. 233U-236U). Parent-daughter ratios are metrologically traceable, so the full uncertainty budget of a U-Pb age should coincide with interlaboratory uncertainty. TIMS round-robin experiments indeed show a decrease of N towards the ideal value of 1. Comparing 235U-207Pb with 238U-206Pb ages (e.g. [2]) has resulted in a credible re-evaluation of the 235U decay constant, with lower uncertainty than gamma counting. U-Pb microbeam techniques reveal the link petrology-microtextures-microchemistry-isotope record but do not achieve the low uncertainty of TIMS. In the K-Ar community, N is large; interlaboratory bias is > 10 times self-assessed uncertainty. Systematic errors may have analytical and petrological reasons. Metrological traceability is not yet implemented (substantial advance may come from work in progress, e.g. [7]). One of the worst problems is collector stability and linearity. Using electron multipliers (EM) instead of Faraday buckets (FB) reduces both dynamic range and collector linearity. Mass spectrometer backgrounds are never zero; the extent as well as the predictability of their variability must be propagated into the uncertainty evaluation. The high isotope ratio of the atmospheric Ar requires a large dynamic range over which linearity must be demonstrated under all analytical conditions to correctly estimate mass fractionation. The only assessment of EM linearity in Ar analyses [3] points out many fundamental problems; the onus of proof is on every laboratory claiming low uncertainties. Finally, sample

  8. Accuracy and precision of silicon based impression media for quantitative areal texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Robert H; Darras, Laurent P; Purnell, Mark A

    2015-05-20

    Areal surface texture analysis is becoming widespread across a diverse range of applications, from engineering to ecology. In many studies silicon based impression media are used to replicate surfaces, and the fidelity of replication defines the quality of data collected. However, while different investigators have used different impression media, the fidelity of surface replication has not been subjected to quantitative analysis based on areal texture data. Here we present the results of an analysis of the accuracy and precision with which different silicon based impression media of varying composition and viscosity replicate rough and smooth surfaces. Both accuracy and precision vary greatly between different media. High viscosity media tested show very low accuracy and precision, and most other compounds showed either the same pattern, or low accuracy and high precision, or low precision and high accuracy. Of the media tested, mid viscosity President Jet Regular Body and low viscosity President Jet Light Body (Coltène Whaledent) are the only compounds to show high levels of accuracy and precision on both surface types. Our results show that data acquired from different impression media are not comparable, supporting calls for greater standardisation of methods in areal texture analysis.

  9. Accuracy and Precision of Silicon Based Impression Media for Quantitative Areal Texture Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Robert H.; Darras, Laurent P.; Purnell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Areal surface texture analysis is becoming widespread across a diverse range of applications, from engineering to ecology. In many studies silicon based impression media are used to replicate surfaces, and the fidelity of replication defines the quality of data collected. However, while different investigators have used different impression media, the fidelity of surface replication has not been subjected to quantitative analysis based on areal texture data. Here we present the results of an analysis of the accuracy and precision with which different silicon based impression media of varying composition and viscosity replicate rough and smooth surfaces. Both accuracy and precision vary greatly between different media. High viscosity media tested show very low accuracy and precision, and most other compounds showed either the same pattern, or low accuracy and high precision, or low precision and high accuracy. Of the media tested, mid viscosity President Jet Regular Body and low viscosity President Jet Light Body (Coltène Whaledent) are the only compounds to show high levels of accuracy and precision on both surface types. Our results show that data acquired from different impression media are not comparable, supporting calls for greater standardisation of methods in areal texture analysis. PMID:25991505

  10. Highly precise digital image stabilization scheme for a hybrid stabilizing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Hyung; Byun, Keun-Yung; Ko, Sung-Jea

    2010-07-01

    We propose a highly precise digital image stabilization (DIS) scheme for a hybrid stabilizing system. The stabilizing system adopts a hybrid method of using both optical image stabilization (OIS) and DIS. In the stabilizing system, OIS prestabilizes the original unstable image using gyro-sensors, and the resultant image obtained from OIS is post-stabilized using DIS to remove the residual jitters less than one pixel. The proposed DIS, which is newly designed using control-grid interpolation, can remove not only translational jitters but also rotational ones simultaneously. Experimental results show that the proposed hybrid image stabilizer achieves considerable performance improvement against conventional stabilization techniques.

  11. Parallaxes and Proper Motions of QSOs: A Test of Astrometric Precision and Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Hugh C.; Dahn, Conard C.; Zacharias, Norbert; Canzian, Blaise; Guetter, Harry H.; Levine, Stephen E.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Monet, Alice K. B.; Monet, David G.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Stone, Ronald C.; Subasavage, John P.; Tilleman, Trudy; Walker, Richard L.; Johnston, Kenneth J.

    2016-11-01

    Optical astrometry of 12 fields containing quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) is presented. The targets are radio sources in the International Celestial Reference Frame with accurate radio positions that also have optical counterparts. The data are used to test several quantities: the internal precision of the relative optical astrometry, the relative parallaxes and proper motions, the procedures to correct from relative to absolute parallax and proper motion, the accuracy of the absolute parallaxes and proper motions, and the stability of the optical photocenters for these optically variable QSOs. For these 12 fields, the mean error in absolute parallax is 0.38 mas and the mean error in each coordinate of absolute proper motion is 1.1 mas yr‑1. The results yield a mean absolute parallax of ‑0.03 ± 0.11 mas. For 11 targets, we find no significant systematic motions of the photocenters at the level of 1–2 mas over the 10 years of this study; for one BL Lac object, we find a possible motion of 4 mas correlated with its brightness.

  12. A Comparison of the Astrometric Precision and Accuracy of Double Star Observations with Two Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Pablo; Fishbein, Amos E.; Hyland, Michael W.; Kight, Cheyne L.; Lopez, Hairold; Navarro, Tanya; Rosas, Carlos A.; Schachter, Aubrey E.; Summers, Molly A.; Weise, Eric D.; Hoffman, Megan A.; Mires, Robert C.; Johnson, Jolyon M.; Genet, Russell M.; White, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Using a manual Meade 6" Newtonian telescope and a computerized Meade 10" Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, students from Arroyo Grande High School measured the well-known separation and position angle of the bright visual double star Albireo. The precision and accuracy of the observations from the two telescopes were compared to each other and to published values of Albireo taken as the standard. It was hypothesized that the larger, computerized telescope would be both more precise and more accurate.

  13. Evaluation of optoelectronic Plethysmography accuracy and precision in recording displacements during quiet breathing simulation.

    PubMed

    Massaroni, C; Schena, E; Saccomandi, P; Morrone, M; Sterzi, S; Silvestri, S

    2015-08-01

    Opto-electronic Plethysmography (OEP) is a motion analysis system used to measure chest wall kinematics and to indirectly evaluate respiratory volumes during breathing. Its working principle is based on the computation of marker displacements placed on the chest wall. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy and precision of OEP in measuring displacement in the range of human chest wall displacement during quiet breathing. OEP performances were investigated by the use of a fully programmable chest wall simulator (CWS). CWS was programmed to move 10 times its eight shafts in the range of physiological displacement (i.e., between 1 mm and 8 mm) at three different frequencies (i.e., 0.17 Hz, 0.25 Hz, 0.33 Hz). Experiments were performed with the aim to: (i) evaluate OEP accuracy and precision error in recording displacement in the overall calibrated volume and in three sub-volumes, (ii) evaluate the OEP volume measurement accuracy due to the measurement accuracy of linear displacements. OEP showed an accuracy better than 0.08 mm in all trials, considering the whole 2m(3) calibrated volume. The mean measurement discrepancy was 0.017 mm. The precision error, expressed as the ratio between measurement uncertainty and the recorded displacement by OEP, was always lower than 0.55%. Volume overestimation due to OEP linear measurement accuracy was always <; 12 mL (<; 3.2% of total volume), considering all settings. PMID:26736504

  14. Sex differences in accuracy and precision when judging time to arrival: data from two Internet studies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff; Sinclair, Kamila

    2011-12-01

    We report two Internet studies that investigated sex differences in the accuracy and precision of judging time to arrival. We used accuracy to mean the ability to match the actual time to arrival and precision to mean the consistency with which each participant made their judgments. Our task was presented as a computer game in which a toy UFO moved obliquely towards the participant through a virtual three-dimensional space on route to a docking station. The UFO disappeared before docking and participants pressed their space bar at the precise moment they thought the UFO would have docked. Study 1 showed it was possible to conduct quantitative studies of spatiotemporal judgments in virtual reality via the Internet and confirmed reports that men are more accurate because women underestimate, but found no difference in precision measured as intra-participant variation. Study 2 repeated Study 1 with five additional presentations of one condition to provide a better measure of precision. Again, men were more accurate than women but there were no sex differences in precision. However, within the coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) literature, of those studies that report sex differences, a majority found that males are both more accurate and more precise than females. Noting that many CAT studies report no sex differences, we discuss appropriate interpretations of such null findings. While acknowledging that CAT performance may be influenced by experience we suggest that the sex difference may have originated among our ancestors with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting and women for gathering.

  15. Synthesis of a combined system for precise stabilization of the Spektr-UF observatory: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, I. V.; Voronov, V. A.; Druzhinin, E. I.; Kozlov, R. I.; Ul'yanov, S. A.; Belyaev, B. B.; Telepnev, P. P.; Ul'yashin, A. I.

    2014-03-01

    The paper presents the second part of the results of search studies for the development of a combined system of high-precision stabilization of the optical telescope for the designed Spectr-UF international observatory [1]. A new modification of the strict method of the synthesis of nonlinear discrete-continuous stabilization systems with uncertainties is described, which is based on the minimization of the guaranteed accuracy estimate calculated using vector Lyapunov functions. Using this method, the synthesis of the feedback parameters in the mode of precise inertial stabilization of the optical telescope axis is performed taking the design nonrigidity, quantization of signals over time and level, and errors of orientation meters, as well as the errors and limitation of control moments of executive engine-flywheels into account. The results of numerical experiments that demonstrate the quality of the synthesized system are presented.

  16. Stabilization of posture by precision contact of the index finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, M.; Ventura, J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Postural sway during quiet stance increases if sight of the surroundings is denied. We studied how sensory-motor information about body displacement provided by contact of the index finger with a stationary bar can be used to stabilize balance in the absence of vision. Stabilization equivalent to the contribution conferred by vision was achieved at contact force levels less than 1 N. This value is much below that necessary to provide significant physical stabilization of the body. We interpret our findings in relation to tactile thresholds for motion detection, "precision grip," and proprioceptive and sensory-motor information about the configuration of the arm to the torso. In conditions allowing higher force levels at the fingertip (5-8 N), subjects assumed a passively stable state to stabilize their stance.

  17. Photothermal effects in ultra-precisely stabilized tunable microcavities.

    PubMed

    Brachmann, Johannes F S; Kaupp, Hanno; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2016-09-01

    We study the mechanical stability of a tunable high-finesse microcavity under ambient conditions and investigate light-induced effects that can both suppress and excite mechanical fluctuations. As an enabling step, we demonstrate the ultra-precise electronic stabilization of a microcavity. We then show that photothermal mirror expansion can provide high-bandwidth feedback and improve cavity stability by almost two orders of magnitude. At high intracavity power, we observe self-oscillations of mechanical resonances of the cavity. We explain the observations by a dynamic photothermal instability, leading to parametric driving of mechanical motion. For an optimized combination of electronic and photothermal stabilization, we achieve a feedback bandwidth of 500 kHz and a noise level of 1.1 × 10-13 m rms. PMID:27607722

  18. Photothermal effects in ultra-precisely stabilized tunable microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachmann, Johannes F. S.; Kaupp, Hanno; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2016-09-01

    We study the mechanical stability of a tunable high-finesse microcavity under ambient conditions and investigate light-induced effects that can both suppress and excite mechanical fluctuations. As an enabling step, we demonstrate the ultra-precise electronic stabilization of a microcavity. We then show that photothermal mirror expansion can provide high-bandwidth feedback and improve cavity stability by almost two orders of magnitude. At high intracavity power, we observe self-oscillations of mechanical resonances of the cavity. We explain the observations by a dynamic photothermal instability, leading to parametric driving of mechanical motion. For an optimized combination of electronic and photothermal stabilization, we achieve a feedback bandwidth of $500\\,$kHz and a noise level of $1.1 \\times 10^{-13}\\,$m rms.

  19. The Plus or Minus Game--Teaching Estimation, Precision, and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forringer, Edward R.; Forringer, Richard S.; Forringer, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    A quick survey of physics textbooks shows that many (Knight, Young, and Serway for example) cover estimation, significant digits, precision versus accuracy, and uncertainty in the first chapter. Estimation "Fermi" questions are so useful that there has been a column dedicated to them in "TPT" (Larry Weinstein's "Fermi…

  20. Commissioning Procedures for Mechanical Precision and Accuracy in a Dedicated LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Larrga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Juarez, J.; Prieto, I.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.

    2008-08-11

    Mechanical precision measurements are fundamental procedures for the commissioning of a dedicated LINAC. At our Radioneurosurgery Unit, these procedures can be suitable as quality assurance routines that allow the verification of the equipment geometrical accuracy and precision. In this work mechanical tests were performed for gantry and table rotation, obtaining mean associated uncertainties of 0.3 mm and 0.71 mm, respectively. Using an anthropomorphic phantom and a series of localized surface markers, isocenter accuracy showed to be smaller than 0.86 mm for radiosurgery procedures and 0.95 mm for fractionated treatments with mask. All uncertainties were below tolerances. The highest contribution to mechanical variations is due to table rotation, so it is important to correct variations using a localization frame with printed overlays. Mechanical precision knowledge would allow to consider the statistical errors in the treatment planning volume margins.

  1. Investigation of stability of precise geodetic instruments used in displacements monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Marek; Odziemczyk, Waldemar

    2014-05-01

    Stability of the geometry of the geodetic instrument in displacements monitoring systems is particular important. It is important to provide the robust reference system for position determination during control measurements. In measuring systems the fundamental role perform motorized tacheometers. In order to provide a high reliability and accuracy of the measurements results the testing of instruments and measuring techniques must be perform. In this paper results of laboratory and field investigations using precise tacheometers TDA5005 as well as TCRP1201+ are presented. The temperature influence on changes of geometry stability of the instruments were examined. In this paper we propose methods to avoid the negative impact on results of the displacement monitoring.

  2. Stability and accuracy control of k · p parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Carlos M. O.; Sabino, Fernando P.; Faria Junior, Paulo E.; Campos, Tiago; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.; Sipahi, Guilherme M.

    2016-10-01

    The k · p method is a successful approach to obtain band structure, optical and transport properties of semiconductors and it depends on external parameters that are obtained either from experiments, tight binding or ab initio calculations. Despite the widespread use of the k · p method, a systematic analysis of the stability and the accuracy of its parameters is not usual in the literature. In this work, we report a theoretical framework to determine the k · p parameters from state-of-the-art hybrid density functional theory including spin-orbit coupling, providing a calculation where the gap and spin-orbit energy splitting are in agreement with the experimental values. The accuracy of the set of parameters is enhanced by fitting over several directions at once, minimizing the overall deviation from the original data. This strategy allows us to systematically evaluate the stability, preserving the accuracy of the parameters, providing a tool to determine optimal parameters for specific ranges around the Γ-point. To prove our concept, we investigate the zinc blende GaAs that shows results in excellent agreement with the most reliable data in the literature.

  3. Note: electronic circuit for two-way time transfer via a single coaxial cable with picosecond accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Panek, Petr

    2012-11-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested the overall performance of the electronic circuit for the two-way time transfer between two timing devices over modest distances with sub-picosecond precision and a systematic error of a few picoseconds. The concept of the electronic circuit enables to carry out time tagging of pulses of interest in parallel to the comparison of the time scales of these timing devices. The key timing parameters of the circuit are: temperature change of the delay is below 100 fs/K, timing stability time deviation better than 8 fs for averaging time from minutes to hours, sub-picosecond time transfer precision, and a few picoseconds time transfer accuracy.

  4. Sex differences in accuracy and precision when judging time to arrival: data from two Internet studies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff; Sinclair, Kamila

    2011-12-01

    We report two Internet studies that investigated sex differences in the accuracy and precision of judging time to arrival. We used accuracy to mean the ability to match the actual time to arrival and precision to mean the consistency with which each participant made their judgments. Our task was presented as a computer game in which a toy UFO moved obliquely towards the participant through a virtual three-dimensional space on route to a docking station. The UFO disappeared before docking and participants pressed their space bar at the precise moment they thought the UFO would have docked. Study 1 showed it was possible to conduct quantitative studies of spatiotemporal judgments in virtual reality via the Internet and confirmed reports that men are more accurate because women underestimate, but found no difference in precision measured as intra-participant variation. Study 2 repeated Study 1 with five additional presentations of one condition to provide a better measure of precision. Again, men were more accurate than women but there were no sex differences in precision. However, within the coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) literature, of those studies that report sex differences, a majority found that males are both more accurate and more precise than females. Noting that many CAT studies report no sex differences, we discuss appropriate interpretations of such null findings. While acknowledging that CAT performance may be influenced by experience we suggest that the sex difference may have originated among our ancestors with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting and women for gathering. PMID:21125324

  5. The Use of Scale-Dependent Precision to Increase Forecast Accuracy in Earth System Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornes, Tobias; Duben, Peter; Palmer, Tim

    2016-04-01

    At the current pace of development, it may be decades before the 'exa-scale' computers needed to resolve individual convective clouds in weather and climate models become available to forecasters, and such machines will incur very high power demands. But the resolution could be improved today by switching to more efficient, 'inexact' hardware with which variables can be represented in 'reduced precision'. Currently, all numbers in our models are represented as double-precision floating points - each requiring 64 bits of memory - to minimise rounding errors, regardless of spatial scale. Yet observational and modelling constraints mean that values of atmospheric variables are inevitably known less precisely on smaller scales, suggesting that this may be a waste of computer resources. More accurate forecasts might therefore be obtained by taking a scale-selective approach whereby the precision of variables is gradually decreased at smaller spatial scales to optimise the overall efficiency of the model. To study the effect of reducing precision to different levels on multiple spatial scales, we here introduce a new model atmosphere developed by extending the Lorenz '96 idealised system to encompass three tiers of variables - which represent large-, medium- and small-scale features - for the first time. In this chaotic but computationally tractable system, the 'true' state can be defined by explicitly resolving all three tiers. The abilities of low resolution (single-tier) double-precision models and similar-cost high resolution (two-tier) models in mixed-precision to produce accurate forecasts of this 'truth' are compared. The high resolution models outperform the low resolution ones even when small-scale variables are resolved in half-precision (16 bits). This suggests that using scale-dependent levels of precision in more complicated real-world Earth System models could allow forecasts to be made at higher resolution and with improved accuracy. If adopted, this new

  6. Comparison between predicted and actual accuracies for an Ultra-Precision CNC measuring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.C.; Fix, B.L.

    1995-05-30

    At the 1989 CIRP annual meeting, we reported on the design of a specialized, ultra-precision CNC measuring machine, and on the error budget that was developed to guide the design process. In our paper we proposed a combinatorial rule for merging estimated and/or calculated values for all known sources of error, to yield a single overall predicted accuracy for the machine. In this paper we compare our original predictions with measured performance of the completed instrument.

  7. Measuring changes in Plasmodium falciparum transmission: precision, accuracy and costs of metrics.

    PubMed

    Tusting, Lucy S; Bousema, Teun; Smith, David L; Drakeley, Chris

    2014-01-01

    As malaria declines in parts of Africa and elsewhere, and as more countries move towards elimination, it is necessary to robustly evaluate the effect of interventions and control programmes on malaria transmission. To help guide the appropriate design of trials to evaluate transmission-reducing interventions, we review 11 metrics of malaria transmission, discussing their accuracy, precision, collection methods and costs and presenting an overall critique. We also review the nonlinear scaling relationships between five metrics of malaria transmission: the entomological inoculation rate, force of infection, sporozoite rate, parasite rate and the basic reproductive number, R0. Our chapter highlights that while the entomological inoculation rate is widely considered the gold standard metric of malaria transmission and may be necessary for measuring changes in transmission in highly endemic areas, it has limited precision and accuracy and more standardised methods for its collection are required. In areas of low transmission, parasite rate, seroconversion rates and molecular metrics including MOI and mFOI may be most appropriate. When assessing a specific intervention, the most relevant effects will be detected by examining the metrics most directly affected by that intervention. Future work should aim to better quantify the precision and accuracy of malaria metrics and to improve methods for their collection.

  8. Precision and accuracy of 3D lower extremity residua measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Pilgram, Thomas K.

    1996-04-01

    Accurate and reproducible geometric measurement of lower extremity residua is required for custom prosthetic socket design. We compared spiral x-ray computed tomography (SXCT) and 3D optical surface scanning (OSS) with caliper measurements and evaluated the precision and accuracy of each system. Spiral volumetric CT scanned surface and subsurface information was used to make external and internal measurements, and finite element models (FEMs). SXCT and OSS were used to measure lower limb residuum geometry of 13 below knee (BK) adult amputees. Six markers were placed on each subject's BK residuum and corresponding plaster casts and distance measurements were taken to determine precision and accuracy for each system. Solid models were created from spiral CT scan data sets with the prosthesis in situ under different loads using p-version finite element analysis (FEA). Tissue properties of the residuum were estimated iteratively and compared with values taken from the biomechanics literature. The OSS and SXCT measurements were precise within 1% in vivo and 0.5% on plaster casts, and accuracy was within 3.5% in vivo and 1% on plaster casts compared with caliper measures. Three-dimensional optical surface and SXCT imaging systems are feasible for capturing the comprehensive 3D surface geometry of BK residua, and provide distance measurements statistically equivalent to calipers. In addition, SXCT can readily distinguish internal soft tissue and bony structure of the residuum. FEM can be applied to determine tissue material properties interactively using inverse methods.

  9. Evaluation of Accuracy in Kinematic GPS Analyses Using a Precision Roving Antenna Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Sweeney, A.; Fujimoto, H.; Osaki, H.; Kawai, E.; Ichikawa, R.; Kondo, T.; Osada, Y.; Chadwell, C. D.

    2002-12-01

    Most tectonic plate boundaries and seismogenic zones of interplate earthquakes exist beneath the ocean and our knowledge on interplate coupling and on generation processes of those earthquakes remain limited. Seafloor geodesy will consequently play a very important role in improving our understanding of the physical process near plate boundaries. Seafloor positioning using a GPS/Acoustic technique is the one potential method to detect the displacement occurring at the ocean bottom. The accuracy of the technique depends on two parts: acoustic ranging in seawater, and kinematic GPS (KGPS) analysis. Accuracy of KGPS have evaluated with following way: 1) Static test: First, we carried out an experiment to confirm the capability of the KGPS analysis using GIPSY/OASIS-II for a long baseline of about 310 km. We used two GPS stations on land, one as a reference station in Sendai, and the other in Tokyo as a rover one, whose coordinate can vary from epoch to epoch. This baseline length is required for our project because the farthest seafloor transponder array is 280 km east of the nearest coastal GPS station. The 1 cm stability of the KGPS solution was achieved in the horizontal components of the 310-km baseline over the course of one day. The vertical component showed fluctuation probably due to parameters unmodeled in the analysis such as multipath and/or tropospheric delay. 2) Sea surface experiment: During cruise KT01-11 of the R/V Tansei-maru, Ocean Research Institute (ORI), University of Tokyo, around the Japan Trench in late July 2001, we deployed three precision acoustic transponders on both the Pacific plate (280 km from the coast, depth around 5450 m) and the landward slope (110 km from the coast, depth around 1600 m). We used a surface buoy with 3 GPS antennas, a motion sensor, a hydrophone, and a computer for data acquisition and control to make combined GPS/Acoustic observations. The buoy was towed about 80 m away from the R/V to reduce the impact of ship

  10. An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10(-18) level.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B J; Nicholson, T L; Williams, J R; Campbell, S L; Bishof, M; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Bromley, S L; Ye, J

    2014-02-01

    Progress in atomic, optical and quantum science has led to rapid improvements in atomic clocks. At the same time, atomic clock research has helped to advance the frontiers of science, affecting both fundamental and applied research. The ability to control quantum states of individual atoms and photons is central to quantum information science and precision measurement, and optical clocks based on single ions have achieved the lowest systematic uncertainty of any frequency standard. Although many-atom lattice clocks have shown advantages in measurement precision over trapped-ion clocks, their accuracy has remained 16 times worse. Here we demonstrate a many-atom system that achieves an accuracy of 6.4 × 10(-18), which is not only better than a single-ion-based clock, but also reduces the required measurement time by two orders of magnitude. By systematically evaluating all known sources of uncertainty, including in situ monitoring of the blackbody radiation environment, we improve the accuracy of optical lattice clocks by a factor of 22. This single clock has simultaneously achieved the best known performance in the key characteristics necessary for consideration as a primary standard-stability and accuracy. More stable and accurate atomic clocks will benefit a wide range of fields, such as the realization and distribution of SI units, the search for time variation of fundamental constants, clock-based geodesy and other precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature. This work also connects to the development of quantum sensors and many-body quantum state engineering (such as spin squeezing) to advance measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit.

  11. An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10(-18) level.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B J; Nicholson, T L; Williams, J R; Campbell, S L; Bishof, M; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Bromley, S L; Ye, J

    2014-02-01

    Progress in atomic, optical and quantum science has led to rapid improvements in atomic clocks. At the same time, atomic clock research has helped to advance the frontiers of science, affecting both fundamental and applied research. The ability to control quantum states of individual atoms and photons is central to quantum information science and precision measurement, and optical clocks based on single ions have achieved the lowest systematic uncertainty of any frequency standard. Although many-atom lattice clocks have shown advantages in measurement precision over trapped-ion clocks, their accuracy has remained 16 times worse. Here we demonstrate a many-atom system that achieves an accuracy of 6.4 × 10(-18), which is not only better than a single-ion-based clock, but also reduces the required measurement time by two orders of magnitude. By systematically evaluating all known sources of uncertainty, including in situ monitoring of the blackbody radiation environment, we improve the accuracy of optical lattice clocks by a factor of 22. This single clock has simultaneously achieved the best known performance in the key characteristics necessary for consideration as a primary standard-stability and accuracy. More stable and accurate atomic clocks will benefit a wide range of fields, such as the realization and distribution of SI units, the search for time variation of fundamental constants, clock-based geodesy and other precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature. This work also connects to the development of quantum sensors and many-body quantum state engineering (such as spin squeezing) to advance measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit. PMID:24463513

  12. Accuracy and precision of ice stream bed topography derived from ground-based radar surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Edward

    2016-04-01

    There is some confusion within the glaciological community as to the accuracy of the basal topography derived from radar measurements. A number of texts and papers state that basal topography cannot be determined to better than one quarter of the wavelength of the radar system. On the other hand King et al (Nature Geoscience, 2009) claimed that features of the bed topography beneath Rutford Ice Stream, Antarctica can be distinguished to +/- 3m using a 3 MHz radar system (which has a quarter wavelength of 14m in ice). These statements of accuracy are mutually exclusive. I will show in this presentation that the measurement of ice thickness is a radar range determination to a single strongly-reflective target. This measurement has much higher accuracy than the resolution of two targets of similar reflection strength, which is governed by the quarter-wave criterion. The rise time of the source signal and the sensitivity and digitisation interval of the recording system are the controlling criteria on radar range accuracy. A dataset from Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica will be used to illustrate these points, as well as the repeatability or precision of radar range measurements, and the influence of gridding parameters and positioning accuracy on the final DEM product.

  13. Wound Area Measurement with Digital Planimetry: Improved Accuracy and Precision with Calibration Based on 2 Rulers

    PubMed Central

    Foltynski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the treatment of chronic wounds the wound surface area change over time is useful parameter in assessment of the applied therapy plan. The more precise the method of wound area measurement the earlier may be identified and changed inappropriate treatment plan. Digital planimetry may be used in wound area measurement and therapy assessment when it is properly used, but the common problem is the camera lens orientation during the taking of a picture. The camera lens axis should be perpendicular to the wound plane, and if it is not, the measured area differ from the true area. Results Current study shows that the use of 2 rulers placed in parallel below and above the wound for the calibration increases on average 3.8 times the precision of area measurement in comparison to the measurement with one ruler used for calibration. The proposed procedure of calibration increases also 4 times accuracy of area measurement. It was also showed that wound area range and camera type do not influence the precision of area measurement with digital planimetry based on two ruler calibration, however the measurements based on smartphone camera were significantly less accurate than these based on D-SLR or compact cameras. Area measurement on flat surface was more precise with the digital planimetry with 2 rulers than performed with the Visitrak device, the Silhouette Mobile device or the AreaMe software-based method. Conclusion The calibration in digital planimetry with using 2 rulers remarkably increases precision and accuracy of measurement and therefore should be recommended instead of calibration based on single ruler. PMID:26252747

  14. Statistical precision and sensitivity of measures of dynamic gait stability.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M; van Dieën, Jaap H; Meijer, Onno G; Beek, Peter J

    2009-04-15

    Recently, two methods for quantifying a system's dynamic stability have been applied to human locomotion: local stability (quantified by finite time maximum Lyapunov exponents, lambda(S-stride) and lambda(L-stride)) and orbital stability (quantified as maximum Floquet multipliers, MaxFm). Thus far, however, it has remained unclear how many data points are required to obtain precise estimates of these measures during walking, and to what extent these estimates are sensitive to changes in walking behaviour. To resolve these issues, we collected long data series of healthy subjects (n=9) walking on a treadmill in three conditions (normal walking at 0.83 m/s (3 km/h) and 1.38 m/s (5 km/h), and walking at 1.38 m/s (5 km/h) while performing a Stroop dual task). Data series from 0.83 and 1.38 m/s trials were submitted to a bootstrap procedure and paired t-tests for samples of different data series lengths were performed between 0.83 and 1.38 m/s and between 1.38 m/s with and without Stroop task. Longer data series led to more precise estimates for lambda(S-stride), lambda(L-stride), and MaxFm. All variables showed an effect of data series length. Thus, when estimating and comparing these variables across conditions, data series covering an equal number of strides should be analysed. lambda(S-stride), lambda(L-stride), and MaxFm were sensitive to the change in walking speed while only lambda(S-stride) and MaxFm were sensitive enough to capture the modulations of walking induced by the Stroop task. Still, these modulations could only be detected when using a substantial number of strides (>150). PMID:19135478

  15. Precise Stabilization of the Optical Frequency of WGMRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Matsko, Andrey; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Crystalline whispering gallery mode resonators (CWGMRs) made of crystals with axial symmetry have ordinary and extraordinary families of optical modes. These modes have substantially different thermo-refractive constants. This results in a very sharp dependence of differential detuning of optical frequency on effective temperature. This frequency difference compared with clock gives an error signal for precise compensation of the random fluctuations of optical frequency. Certain crystals, like MgF2, have turnover points where the thermo-refractive effect is completely nullified. An advantage for applications using WGMRs for frequency stabilization is in the possibility of manufacturing resonators out of practically any optically transparent crystal. It is known that there are crystals with negative and zero thermal expansion at some specific temperatures. Doping changes properties of the crystals and it is possible to create an optically transparent crystal with zero thermal expansion at room temperature. With this innovation s stabilization technique, the resultant WGMR will have absolute frequency stability The expansion of the resonator s body can be completely compensated for by nonlinear elements. This results in compensation of linear thermal expansion (see figure). In three-mode, the MgF2 resonator, if tuned at the turnover thermal point, can compensate for all types of random thermal-related frequency drift. Simplified dual-mode method is also available. This creates miniature optical resonators with good short- and long-term stability for passive secondary frequency ethalon and an active resonator for active secondary frequency standard (a narrowband laser with long-term stability).

  16. Accuracy and dimensional stability of four interocclusal recording materials.

    PubMed

    Balthazar-Hart, Y; Sandrik, J L; Malone, W F; Mazur, B; Hart, T

    1981-06-01

    Four materials, zinc oxide-eugenol paste, eugenol-free-zinc oxide paste, a silicone, and polyether jaw relations registration material were studied in a controlled laboratory environment to determine their accuracy and stability in intervals over a 1-week period. The results are as follows: 1. The eugenol-free zinc-oxide paste was the only material which exhibited no statistically significant difference between the die scribes and those of the sample. 2. The setting reaction of the eugenol-free-zinc oxide paste was a saponification reaction, resulting in the production of an insoluble soap. 3. With polyether, silicone, and zinc oxide-eugenol paste, there was a statistical difference between the die and the respective samples at the immediate reading and throughout the experiment. Polyether showed the least difference, and zinc oxide-eugenol paste the greatest.

  17. Accuracy or precision: Implications of sample design and methodology on abundance estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowalewski, Lucas K.; Chizinski, Christopher J.; Powell, Larkin A.; Pope, Kevin L.; Pegg, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Sampling by spatially replicated counts (point-count) is an increasingly popular method of estimating population size of organisms. Challenges exist when sampling by point-count method, and it is often impractical to sample entire area of interest and impossible to detect every individual present. Ecologists encounter logistical limitations that force them to sample either few large-sample units or many small sample-units, introducing biases to sample counts. We generated a computer environment and simulated sampling scenarios to test the role of number of samples, sample unit area, number of organisms, and distribution of organisms in the estimation of population sizes using N-mixture models. Many sample units of small area provided estimates that were consistently closer to true abundance than sample scenarios with few sample units of large area. However, sample scenarios with few sample units of large area provided more precise abundance estimates than abundance estimates derived from sample scenarios with many sample units of small area. It is important to consider accuracy and precision of abundance estimates during the sample design process with study goals and objectives fully recognized, although and with consequence, consideration of accuracy and precision of abundance estimates is often an afterthought that occurs during the data analysis process.

  18. Automated Gravimetric Calibration to Optimize the Accuracy and Precision of TECAN Freedom EVO Liquid Handler.

    PubMed

    Bessemans, Laurent; Jully, Vanessa; de Raikem, Caroline; Albanese, Mathieu; Moniotte, Nicolas; Silversmet, Pascal; Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    High-throughput screening technologies are increasingly integrated into the formulation development process of biopharmaceuticals. The performance of liquid handling systems is dependent on the ability to deliver accurate and precise volumes of specific reagents to ensure process quality. We have developed an automated gravimetric calibration procedure to adjust the accuracy and evaluate the precision of the TECAN Freedom EVO liquid handling system. Volumes from 3 to 900 µL using calibrated syringes and fixed tips were evaluated with various solutions, including aluminum hydroxide and phosphate adjuvants, β-casein, sucrose, sodium chloride, and phosphate-buffered saline. The methodology to set up liquid class pipetting parameters for each solution was to split the process in three steps: (1) screening of predefined liquid class, including different pipetting parameters; (2) adjustment of accuracy parameters based on a calibration curve; and (3) confirmation of the adjustment. The run of appropriate pipetting scripts, data acquisition, and reports until the creation of a new liquid class in EVOware was fully automated. The calibration and confirmation of the robotic system was simple, efficient, and precise and could accelerate data acquisition for a wide range of biopharmaceutical applications. PMID:26905719

  19. The tradeoff between accuracy and precision in latent variable models of mediation processes

    PubMed Central

    Ledgerwood, Alison; Shrout, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Social psychologists place high importance on understanding mechanisms, and frequently employ mediation analyses to shed light on the process underlying an effect. Such analyses can be conducted using observed variables (e.g., a typical regression approach) or latent variables (e.g., a SEM approach), and choosing between these methods can be a more complex and consequential decision than researchers often realize. The present paper adds to the literature on mediation by examining the relative tradeoff between accuracy and precision in latent versus observed variable modeling. Whereas past work has shown that latent variable models tend to produce more accurate estimates, we demonstrate that observed variable models tend to produce more precise estimates, and examine this relative tradeoff both theoretically and empirically in a typical three-variable mediation model across varying levels of effect size and reliability. We discuss implications for social psychologists seeking to uncover mediating variables, and recommend practical approaches for maximizing both accuracy and precision in mediation analyses. PMID:21806305

  20. Automated Gravimetric Calibration to Optimize the Accuracy and Precision of TECAN Freedom EVO Liquid Handler

    PubMed Central

    Bessemans, Laurent; Jully, Vanessa; de Raikem, Caroline; Albanese, Mathieu; Moniotte, Nicolas; Silversmet, Pascal; Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening technologies are increasingly integrated into the formulation development process of biopharmaceuticals. The performance of liquid handling systems is dependent on the ability to deliver accurate and precise volumes of specific reagents to ensure process quality. We have developed an automated gravimetric calibration procedure to adjust the accuracy and evaluate the precision of the TECAN Freedom EVO liquid handling system. Volumes from 3 to 900 µL using calibrated syringes and fixed tips were evaluated with various solutions, including aluminum hydroxide and phosphate adjuvants, β-casein, sucrose, sodium chloride, and phosphate-buffered saline. The methodology to set up liquid class pipetting parameters for each solution was to split the process in three steps: (1) screening of predefined liquid class, including different pipetting parameters; (2) adjustment of accuracy parameters based on a calibration curve; and (3) confirmation of the adjustment. The run of appropriate pipetting scripts, data acquisition, and reports until the creation of a new liquid class in EVOware was fully automated. The calibration and confirmation of the robotic system was simple, efficient, and precise and could accelerate data acquisition for a wide range of biopharmaceutical applications. PMID:26905719

  1. Accuracy, precision, usability, and cost of free chlorine residual testing methods.

    PubMed

    Murray, Anna; Lantagne, Daniele

    2015-03-01

    Chlorine is the most widely used disinfectant worldwide, partially because residual protection is maintained after treatment. This residual is measured using colorimetric test kits varying in accuracy, precision, training required, and cost. Seven commercially available colorimeters, color wheel and test tube comparator kits, pool test kits, and test strips were evaluated for use in low-resource settings by: (1) measuring in quintuplicate 11 samples from 0.0-4.0 mg/L free chlorine residual in laboratory and natural light settings to determine accuracy and precision; (2) conducting volunteer testing where participants used and evaluated each test kit; and (3) comparing costs. Laboratory accuracy ranged from 5.1-40.5% measurement error, with colorimeters the most accurate and test strip methods the least. Variation between laboratory and natural light readings occurred with one test strip method. Volunteer participants found test strip methods easiest and color wheel methods most difficult, and were most confident in the colorimeter and least confident in test strip methods. Costs range from 3.50-444 USD for 100 tests. Application of a decision matrix found colorimeters and test tube comparator kits were most appropriate for use in low-resource settings; it is recommended users apply the decision matrix themselves, as the appropriate kit might vary by context.

  2. Accuracy and precision of stream reach water surface slopes estimated in the field and from maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isaak, D.J.; Hubert, W.A.; Krueger, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of five tools used to measure stream water surface slope (WSS) were evaluated. Water surface slopes estimated in the field with a clinometer or from topographic maps used in conjunction with a map wheel or geographic information system (GIS) were significantly higher than WSS estimated in the field with a surveying level (biases of 34, 41, and 53%, respectively). Accuracy of WSS estimates obtained with an Abney level did not differ from surveying level estimates, but conclusions regarding the accuracy of Abney levels and clinometers were weakened by intratool variability. The surveying level estimated WSS most precisely (coefficient of variation [CV] = 0.26%), followed by the GIS (CV = 1.87%), map wheel (CV = 6.18%), Abney level (CV = 13.68%), and clinometer (CV = 21.57%). Estimates of WSS measured in the field with an Abney level and estimated for the same reaches with a GIS used in conjunction with l:24,000-scale topographic maps were significantly correlated (r = 0.86), but there was a tendency for the GIS to overestimate WSS. Detailed accounts of the methods used to measure WSS and recommendations regarding the measurement of WSS are provided.

  3. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off ) ~ 3,000 s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100 s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements

  4. Pairwise adaptive thermostats for improved accuracy and stability in dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimkuhler, Benedict; Shang, Xiaocheng

    2016-11-01

    We examine the formulation and numerical treatment of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and momentum-conserving molecular dynamics. We show that it is possible to improve both the accuracy and the stability of DPD by employing a pairwise adaptive Langevin thermostat that precisely matches the dynamical characteristics of DPD simulations (e.g., autocorrelation functions) while automatically correcting thermodynamic averages using a negative feedback loop. In the low friction regime, it is possible to replace DPD by a simpler momentum-conserving variant of the Nosé-Hoover-Langevin method based on thermostatting only pairwise interactions; we show that this method has an extra order of accuracy for an important class of observables (a superconvergence result), while also allowing larger timesteps than alternatives. All the methods mentioned in the article are easily implemented. Numerical experiments are performed in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium settings; using Lees-Edwards boundary conditions to induce shear flow.

  5. Accuracy and precision of four common peripheral temperature measurement methods in intensive care patients

    PubMed Central

    Asadian, Simin; Khatony, Alireza; Moradi, Gholamreza; Abdi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An accurate determination of body temperature in critically ill patients is a fundamental requirement for initiating the proper process of diagnosis, and also therapeutic actions; therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and precision of four noninvasive peripheral methods of temperature measurement compared to the central nasopharyngeal measurement. Methods In this observational prospective study, 237 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of Imam Ali Hospital of Kermanshah. The patients’ body temperatures were measured by four peripheral methods; oral, axillary, tympanic, and forehead along with a standard central nasopharyngeal measurement. After data collection, the results were analyzed by paired t-test, kappa coefficient, receiver operating characteristic curve, and using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 19, software. Results There was a significant meaningful correlation between all the peripheral methods when compared with the central measurement (P<0.001). Kappa coefficients showed good agreement between the temperatures of right and left tympanic membranes and the standard central nasopharyngeal measurement (88%). Paired t-test demonstrated an acceptable precision with forehead (P=0.132), left (P=0.18) and right (P=0.318) tympanic membranes, oral (P=1.00), and axillary (P=1.00) methods. Sensitivity and specificity of both the left and right tympanic membranes were more than for other methods. Conclusion The tympanic and forehead methods had the highest and lowest accuracy for measuring body temperature, respectively. It is recommended to use the tympanic method (right and left) for assessing a patient’s body temperature in the intensive care units because of high accuracy and acceptable precision.

  6. Accuracy and precision of four common peripheral temperature measurement methods in intensive care patients

    PubMed Central

    Asadian, Simin; Khatony, Alireza; Moradi, Gholamreza; Abdi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An accurate determination of body temperature in critically ill patients is a fundamental requirement for initiating the proper process of diagnosis, and also therapeutic actions; therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and precision of four noninvasive peripheral methods of temperature measurement compared to the central nasopharyngeal measurement. Methods In this observational prospective study, 237 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of Imam Ali Hospital of Kermanshah. The patients’ body temperatures were measured by four peripheral methods; oral, axillary, tympanic, and forehead along with a standard central nasopharyngeal measurement. After data collection, the results were analyzed by paired t-test, kappa coefficient, receiver operating characteristic curve, and using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 19, software. Results There was a significant meaningful correlation between all the peripheral methods when compared with the central measurement (P<0.001). Kappa coefficients showed good agreement between the temperatures of right and left tympanic membranes and the standard central nasopharyngeal measurement (88%). Paired t-test demonstrated an acceptable precision with forehead (P=0.132), left (P=0.18) and right (P=0.318) tympanic membranes, oral (P=1.00), and axillary (P=1.00) methods. Sensitivity and specificity of both the left and right tympanic membranes were more than for other methods. Conclusion The tympanic and forehead methods had the highest and lowest accuracy for measuring body temperature, respectively. It is recommended to use the tympanic method (right and left) for assessing a patient’s body temperature in the intensive care units because of high accuracy and acceptable precision. PMID:27621673

  7. Assessing accuracy and precision for field and laboratory data: a perspective in ecosystem restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Lewis, Timothy E; Palmer, Craig J.; Middlebrook Amos, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Unlike most laboratory studies, rigorous quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures may be lacking in ecosystem restoration (“ecorestoration”) projects, despite legislative mandates in the United States. This is due, in part, to ecorestoration specialists making the false assumption that some types of data (e.g. discrete variables such as species identification and abundance classes) are not subject to evaluations of data quality. Moreover, emergent behavior manifested by complex, adapting, and nonlinear organizations responsible for monitoring the success of ecorestoration projects tend to unconsciously minimize disorder, QA/QC being an activity perceived as creating disorder. We discuss similarities and differences in assessing precision and accuracy for field and laboratory data. Although the concepts for assessing precision and accuracy of ecorestoration field data are conceptually the same as laboratory data, the manner in which these data quality attributes are assessed is different. From a sample analysis perspective, a field crew is comparable to a laboratory instrument that requires regular “recalibration,” with results obtained by experts at the same plot treated as laboratory calibration standards. Unlike laboratory standards and reference materials, the “true” value for many field variables is commonly unknown. In the laboratory, specific QA/QC samples assess error for each aspect of the measurement process, whereas field revisits assess precision and accuracy of the entire data collection process following initial calibration. Rigorous QA/QC data in an ecorestoration project are essential for evaluating the success of a project, and they provide the only objective “legacy” of the dataset for potential legal challenges and future uses.

  8. Mapping stream habitats with a global positioning system: Accuracy, precision, and comparison with traditional methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauwalter, D.C.; Fisher, W.L.; Belt, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    We tested the precision and accuracy of the Trimble GeoXT??? global positioning system (GPS) handheld receiver on point and area features and compared estimates of stream habitat dimensions (e.g., lengths and areas of riffles and pools) that were made in three different Oklahoma streams using the GPS receiver and a tape measure. The precision of differentially corrected GPS (DGPS) points was not affected by the number of GPS position fixes (i.e., geographic location estimates) averaged per DGPS point. Horizontal error of points ranged from 0.03 to 2.77 m and did not differ with the number of position fixes per point. The error of area measurements ranged from 0.1% to 110.1% but decreased as the area increased. Again, error was independent of the number of position fixes averaged per polygon corner. The estimates of habitat lengths, widths, and areas did not differ when measured using two methods of data collection (GPS and a tape measure), nor did the differences among methods change at three stream sites with contrasting morphologies. Measuring features with a GPS receiver was up to 3.3 times faster on average than using a tape measure, although signal interference from high streambanks or overhanging vegetation occasionally limited satellite signal availability and prolonged measurements with a GPS receiver. There were also no differences in precision of habitat dimensions when mapped using a continuous versus a position fix average GPS data collection method. Despite there being some disadvantages to using the GPS in stream habitat studies, measuring stream habitats with a GPS resulted in spatially referenced data that allowed the assessment of relative habitat position and changes in habitats over time, and was often faster than using a tape measure. For most spatial scales of interest, the precision and accuracy of DGPS data are adequate and have logistical advantages when compared to traditional methods of measurement. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media

  9. Accuracy, precision, and method detection limits of quantitative PCR for airborne bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Hospodsky, Denina; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Peccia, Jordan

    2010-11-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for rapid and specific enumeration of microbial agents is finding increased use in aerosol science. The goal of this study was to determine qPCR accuracy, precision, and method detection limits (MDLs) within the context of indoor and ambient aerosol samples. Escherichia coli and Bacillus atrophaeus vegetative bacterial cells and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores loaded onto aerosol filters were considered. Efficiencies associated with recovery of DNA from aerosol filters were low, and excluding these efficiencies in quantitative analysis led to underestimating the true aerosol concentration by 10 to 24 times. Precision near detection limits ranged from a 28% to 79% coefficient of variation (COV) for the three test organisms, and the majority of this variation was due to instrument repeatability. Depending on the organism and sampling filter material, precision results suggest that qPCR is useful for determining dissimilarity between two samples only if the true differences are greater than 1.3 to 3.2 times (95% confidence level at n = 7 replicates). For MDLs, qPCR was able to produce a positive response with 99% confidence from the DNA of five B. atrophaeus cells and less than one A. fumigatus spore. Overall MDL values that included sample processing efficiencies ranged from 2,000 to 3,000 B. atrophaeus cells per filter and 10 to 25 A. fumigatus spores per filter. Applying the concepts of accuracy, precision, and MDL to qPCR aerosol measurements demonstrates that sample processing efficiencies must be accounted for in order to accurately estimate bioaerosol exposure, provides guidance on the necessary statistical rigor required to understand significant differences among separate aerosol samples, and prevents undetected (i.e., nonquantifiable) values for true aerosol concentrations that may be significant.

  10. High-precision temperature control and stabilization using a cryocooler.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Daiki; Murata, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Hiroya; Komine, Takashi

    2010-09-01

    We describe a method for precisely controlling temperature using a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler that involves inserting fiber-reinforced-plastic dampers into a conventional cryosystem. Temperature fluctuations in a GM cryocooler without a large heat bath or a stainless-steel damper at 4.2 K are typically of the order of 200 mK. It is particularly difficult to control the temperature of a GM cryocooler at low temperatures. The fiber-reinforced-plastic dampers enabled us to dramatically reduce temperature fluctuations at low temperatures. A standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations of 0.21 mK could be achieved when the temperature was controlled at 4.200 0 K using a feedback temperature control system with two heaters. Adding the dampers increased the minimum achievable temperature from 3.2 to 3.3 K. Precise temperature control between 4.200 0 and 300.000 K was attained using the GM cryocooler, and the standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations was less than 1.2 mK even at 300 K. This technique makes it possible to control and stabilize the temperature using a GM cryocooler.

  11. To address accuracy and precision using methods from analytical chemistry and computational physics.

    PubMed

    Kozmutza, Cornelia; Picó, Yolanda

    2009-04-01

    In this work the pesticides were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In present study the occurrence of imidacloprid in 343 samples of oranges, tangerines, date plum, and watermelons from Valencian Community (Spain) has been investigated. The nine additional pesticides were chosen as they have been recommended for orchard treatment together with imidacloprid. The Mulliken population analysis has been applied to present the charge distribution in imidacloprid. Partitioned energy terms and the virial ratios have been calculated for certain molecules entering in interaction. A new technique based on the comparison of the decomposed total energy terms at various configurations is demonstrated in this work. The interaction ability could be established correctly in the studied case. An attempt is also made in this work to address accuracy and precision. These quantities are well-known in experimental measurements. In case precise theoretical description is achieved for the contributing monomers and also for the interacting complex structure some properties of this latter system can be predicted to quite a good accuracy. Based on simple hypothetical considerations we estimate the impact of applying computations on reducing the amount of analytical work.

  12. Accuracy and Precision in Measurements of Biomass Oxidative Ratio and Carbon Oxidation State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Masiello, C. A.; Randerson, J. T.; Chadwick, O. A.; Robertson, G. P.

    2007-12-01

    Ecosystem oxidative ratio (OR) is a critical parameter in the apportionment of anthropogenic CO2 between the terrestrial biosphere and ocean carbon reservoirs. OR is the ratio of O2 to CO2 in gas exchange fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere. Ecosystem OR is linearly related to biomass carbon oxidation state (Cox), a fundamental property of the earth system describing the bonding environment of carbon in molecules. Cox can range from -4 to +4 (CH4 to CO2). Variations in both Cox and OR are driven by photosynthesis, respiration, and decomposition. We are developing several techniques to accurately measure variations in ecosystem Cox and OR; these include elemental analysis, bomb calorimetry, and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A previous study, comparing the accuracy and precision of elemental analysis versus bomb calorimetry for pure chemicals, showed that elemental analysis-based measurements are more accurate, while calorimetry- based measurements yield more precise data. However, the limited biochemical range of natural samples makes it possible that calorimetry may ultimately prove most accurate, as well as most cost-effective. Here we examine more closely the accuracy of Cox and OR values generated by calorimetry on a large set of natural biomass samples collected from the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research (KBS-LTER) site in Michigan.

  13. Precision and accuracy of spectrophotometric pH measurements at environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Karoline; Schneider, Bernd; Kuliński, Karol; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2014-06-01

    The increasing uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans has raised an interest in precise and accurate pH measurement in order to assess the impact on the marine CO2-system. Spectrophotometric pH measurements were refined during the last decade yielding a precision and accuracy that cannot be achieved with the conventional potentiometric method. However, until now the method was only tested in oceanic systems with a relative stable and high salinity and a small pH range. This paper describes the first application of such a pH measurement system at conditions in the Baltic Sea which is characterized by a wide salinity and pH range. The performance of the spectrophotometric system at pH values as low as 7.0 (“total” scale) and salinities between 0 and 35 was examined using TRIS-buffer solutions, certified reference materials, and tests of consistency with measurements of other parameters of the marine CO2 system. Using m-cresol purple as indicator dye and a spectrophotometric measurement system designed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (B. Carter, A. Dickson), a precision better than ±0.001 and an accuracy between ±0.01 and ±0.02 was achieved within the observed pH and salinity ranges in the Baltic Sea. The influence of the indicator dye on the pH of the sample was determined theoretically and is presented as a pH correction term for the different alkalinity regimes in the Baltic Sea. Because of the encouraging tests, the ease of operation and the fact that the measurements refer to the internationally accepted “total” pH scale, it is recommended to use the spectrophotometric method also for pH monitoring and trend detection in the Baltic Sea.

  14. Improvement in precision, accuracy, and efficiency in sstandardizing the characterization of granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Jonathan R.; Shadle, Lawrence J.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Mei, Joseph; Guenther, Chris; Koepke, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Useful prediction of the kinematics, dynamics, and chemistry of a system relies on precision and accuracy in the quantification of component properties, operating mechanisms, and collected data. In an attempt to emphasize, rather than gloss over, the benefit of proper characterization to fundamental investigations of multiphase systems incorporating solid particles, a set of procedures were developed and implemented for the purpose of providing a revised methodology having the desirable attributes of reduced uncertainty, expanded relevance and detail, and higher throughput. Better, faster, cheaper characterization of multiphase systems result. Methodologies are presented to characterize particle size, shape, size distribution, density (particle, skeletal and bulk), minimum fluidization velocity, void fraction, particle porosity, and assignment within the Geldart Classification. A novel form of the Ergun equation was used to determine the bulk void fractions and particle density. Accuracy of properties-characterization methodology was validated on materials of known properties prior to testing materials of unknown properties. Several of the standard present-day techniques were scrutinized and improved upon where appropriate. Validity, accuracy, and repeatability were assessed for the procedures presented and deemed higher than present-day techniques. A database of over seventy materials has been developed to assist in model validation efforts and future desig

  15. Hepatic perfusion in a tumor model using DCE-CT: an accuracy and precision study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Errol E.; Chen, Xiaogang; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2008-08-01

    In the current study we investigate the accuracy and precision of hepatic perfusion measurements based on the Johnson and Wilson model with the adiabatic approximation. VX2 carcinoma cells were implanted into the livers of New Zealand white rabbits. Simultaneous dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and radiolabeled microsphere studies were performed under steady-state normo-, hyper- and hypo-capnia. The hepatic arterial blood flows (HABF) obtained using both techniques were compared with ANOVA. The precision was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV). Under normo-capnia the microsphere HABF were 51.9 ± 4.2, 40.7 ± 4.9 and 99.7 ± 6.0 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 while DCE-CT HABF were 50.0 ± 5.7, 37.1 ± 4.5 and 99.8 ± 6.8 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 in normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. There were no significant differences between HABF measurements obtained with both techniques (P > 0.05). Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between HABF values from both techniques: slope of 0.92 ± 0.05, intercept of 4.62 ± 2.69 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 and R2 = 0.81 ± 0.05 (P < 0.05). The Bland-Altman plot comparing DCE-CT and microsphere HABF measurements gives a mean difference of -0.13 ml min-1 (100 g)-1, which is not significantly different from zero. DCE-CT HABF is precise, with CV of 5.7, 24.9 and 1.4% in the normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. Non-invasive measurement of HABF with DCE-CT is accurate and precise. DCE-CT can be an important extension of CT to assess hepatic function besides morphology in liver diseases.

  16. Accuracy and precision of integumental linear dimensions in a three-dimensional facial imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Hwan; Jung, Woo-Young; Seo, Yu-Jin; Kim, Kyung-A; Park, Ki-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective A recently developed facial scanning method uses three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging with a light-emitting diode. Such scanning enables surface data to be captured in high-resolution color and at relatively fast speeds. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and precision of 3D images obtained using the Morpheus 3D® scanner (Morpheus Co., Seoul, Korea). Methods The sample comprised 30 subjects aged 24-34 years (mean 29.0 ± 2.5 years). To test the correlation between direct and 3D image measurements, 21 landmarks were labeled on the face of each subject. Sixteen direct measurements were obtained twice using digital calipers; the same measurements were then made on two sets of 3D facial images. The mean values of measurements obtained from both methods were compared. To investigate the precision, a comparison was made between two sets of measurements taken with each method. Results When comparing the variables from both methods, five of the 16 possible anthropometric variables were found to be significantly different. However, in 12 of the 16 cases, the mean difference was under 1 mm. The average value of the differences for all variables was 0.75 mm. Precision was high in both methods, with error magnitudes under 0.5 mm. Conclusions 3D scanning images have high levels of precision and fairly good congruence with traditional anthropometry methods, with mean differences of less than 1 mm. 3D surface imaging using the Morpheus 3D® scanner is therefore a clinically acceptable method of recording facial integumental data. PMID:26023538

  17. Accuracy improvement techniques in Precise Point Positioning method using multiple GNSS constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileios Psychas, Dimitrios; Delikaraoglou, Demitris

    2016-04-01

    The future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), including modernized GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou, offer three or more signal carriers for civilian use and much more redundant observables. The additional frequencies can significantly improve the capabilities of the traditional geodetic techniques based on GPS signals at two frequencies, especially with regard to the availability, accuracy, interoperability and integrity of high-precision GNSS applications. Furthermore, highly redundant measurements can allow for robust simultaneous estimation of static or mobile user states including more parameters such as real-time tropospheric biases and more reliable ambiguity resolution estimates. This paper presents an investigation and analysis of accuracy improvement techniques in the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method using signals from the fully operational (GPS and GLONASS), as well as the emerging (Galileo and BeiDou) GNSS systems. The main aim was to determine the improvement in both the positioning accuracy achieved and the time convergence it takes to achieve geodetic-level (10 cm or less) accuracy. To this end, freely available observation data from the recent Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service, as well as the open source program RTKLIB were used. Following a brief background of the PPP technique and the scope of MGEX, the paper outlines the various observational scenarios that were used in order to test various data processing aspects of PPP solutions with multi-frequency, multi-constellation GNSS systems. Results from the processing of multi-GNSS observation data from selected permanent MGEX stations are presented and useful conclusions and recommendations for further research are drawn. As shown, data fusion from GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou systems is becoming increasingly significant nowadays resulting in a position accuracy increase (mostly in the less favorable East direction) and a large reduction of convergence

  18. Slight pressure imbalances can affect accuracy and precision of dual inlet-based clumped isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Jens; Hofmann, Sven; Löffler, Niklas; Lüdecke, Tina; Methner, Katharina; Wacker, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that a subtle nonlinearity can occur during clumped isotope analysis of CO2 that - if remaining unaddressed - limits accuracy. The nonlinearity is induced by a negative background on the m/z 47 ion Faraday cup, whose magnitude is correlated with the intensity of the m/z 44 ion beam. The origin of the negative background remains unclear, but is possibly due to secondary electrons. Usually, CO2 gases of distinct bulk isotopic compositions are equilibrated at 1000 °C and measured along with the samples in order to be able to correct for this effect. Alternatively, measured m/z 47 beam intensities can be corrected for the contribution of secondary electrons after monitoring how the negative background on m/z 47 evolves with the intensity of the m/z 44 ion beam. The latter correction procedure seems to work well if the m/z 44 cup exhibits a wider slit width than the m/z 47 cup. Here we show that the negative m/z 47 background affects precision of dual inlet-based clumped isotope measurements of CO2 unless raw m/z 47 intensities are directly corrected for the contribution of secondary electrons. Moreover, inaccurate results can be obtained even if the heated gas approach is used to correct for the observed nonlinearity. The impact of the negative background on accuracy and precision arises from small imbalances in m/z 44 ion beam intensities between reference and sample CO2 measurements. It becomes the more significant the larger the relative contribution of secondary electrons to the m/z 47 signal is and the higher the flux rate of CO2 into the ion source is set. These problems can be overcome by correcting the measured m/z 47 ion beam intensities of sample and reference gas for the contributions deriving from secondary electrons after scaling these contributions to the intensities of the corresponding m/z 49 ion beams. Accuracy and precision of this correction are demonstrated by clumped isotope analysis of three internal carbonate standards. The

  19. Slight pressure imbalances can affect accuracy and precision of dual inlet-based clumped isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Jens; Hofmann, Sven; Löffler, Niklas; Lüdecke, Tina; Methner, Katharina; Wacker, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that a subtle nonlinearity can occur during clumped isotope analysis of CO2 that - if remaining unaddressed - limits accuracy. The nonlinearity is induced by a negative background on the m/z 47 ion Faraday cup, whose magnitude is correlated with the intensity of the m/z 44 ion beam. The origin of the negative background remains unclear, but is possibly due to secondary electrons. Usually, CO2 gases of distinct bulk isotopic compositions are equilibrated at 1000 °C and measured along with the samples in order to be able to correct for this effect. Alternatively, measured m/z 47 beam intensities can be corrected for the contribution of secondary electrons after monitoring how the negative background on m/z 47 evolves with the intensity of the m/z 44 ion beam. The latter correction procedure seems to work well if the m/z 44 cup exhibits a wider slit width than the m/z 47 cup. Here we show that the negative m/z 47 background affects precision of dual inlet-based clumped isotope measurements of CO2 unless raw m/z 47 intensities are directly corrected for the contribution of secondary electrons. Moreover, inaccurate results can be obtained even if the heated gas approach is used to correct for the observed nonlinearity. The impact of the negative background on accuracy and precision arises from small imbalances in m/z 44 ion beam intensities between reference and sample CO2 measurements. It becomes the more significant the larger the relative contribution of secondary electrons to the m/z 47 signal is and the higher the flux rate of CO2 into the ion source is set. These problems can be overcome by correcting the measured m/z 47 ion beam intensities of sample and reference gas for the contributions deriving from secondary electrons after scaling these contributions to the intensities of the corresponding m/z 49 ion beams. Accuracy and precision of this correction are demonstrated by clumped isotope analysis of three internal carbonate standards. The

  20. Optical Frequency Stabilization and Optical Phase Locked Loops: Golden Threads of Precision Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2013-07-01

    Stabilization of lasers through locking to optical cavities, atomic transitions, and molecular transitions has enabled the field of precision optical measurement since shortly after the invention of the laser. Recent advances in the field have produced an optical clock that is orders of magnitude more stable than those of just a few years prior. Phase locking of one laser to another, or to a frequency offset from another, formed the basis for linking stable lasers across the optical spectrum, such frequency chains exhibiting progressively finer precision through the years. Phase locking between the modes within a femtosecond pulsed laser has yielded the optical frequency comb, one of the most beautiful and useful instruments of our time. This talk gives an overview of these topics, from early work through to the latest 1E-16 thermal noise-limited precision recently attained for a stable laser, and the ongoing quest for ever finer precision and accuracy. The issues of understanding and measuring line widths and shapes are also studied in some depth, highlighting implications for servo design for sub-Hz line widths.

  1. Estimated results analysis and application of the precise point positioning based high-accuracy ionosphere delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-tai; Peng, Jun-huan

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of ionosphere delay estimated with precise point positioning is analyzed in this paper. The estimation, interpolation and application of the ionosphere delay are studied based on the processing of 24-h data from 5 observation stations. The results show that the estimated ionosphere delay is affected by the hardware delay bias from receiver so that there is a difference between the estimated and interpolated results. The results also show that the RMSs (root mean squares) are bigger, while the STDs (standard deviations) are better than 0.11 m. When the satellite difference is used, the hardware delay bias can be canceled. The interpolated satellite-differenced ionosphere delay is better than 0.11 m. Although there is a difference between the between the estimated and interpolated ionosphere delay results it cannot affect its application in single-frequency positioning and the positioning accuracy can reach cm level.

  2. Precision and accuracy testing of FMCW ladar-based length metrology.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Ana Baselga; Barber, Zeb W

    2015-07-01

    The calibration and traceability of high-resolution frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) ladar sources is a requirement for their use in length and volume metrology. We report the calibration of FMCW ladar length measurement systems by use of spectroscopy of molecular frequency references HCN (C-band) or CO (L-band) to calibrate the chirp rate of the FMCW sources. Propagating the stated uncertainties from the molecular calibrations provided by NIST and measurement errors provide an estimated uncertainty of a few ppm for the FMCW system. As a test of this calibration, a displacement measurement interferometer with a laser wavelength close to that of our FMCW system was built to make comparisons of the relative precision and accuracy. The comparisons performed show <10  ppm agreement, which was within the combined estimated uncertainties of the FMCW system and interferometer. PMID:26193146

  3. Accuracy improvement of protrusion angle of carbon nanotube tips by precision multiaxis nanomanipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Young Song, Won; Young Jung, Ki; O, Beom-Hoan; Park, Byong Chon

    2005-02-01

    In order to manufacture a carbon nanotube (CNT) tip in which the attachment angle and position of CNT were precisely adjusted, a nanomanipulator was installed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A CNT tip, atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe to which a nanotube is attached, is known to be the most appropriate probe for measuring the shape of high aspect ratio. The developed nanomanipulator has two sets of modules with the degree of freedom of three-directional rectilinear motion and one-directional rotational motion at an accuracy of tens of nanometers, so it enables the manufacturing of more accurate CNT tips. The present study developed a CNT tip with the error of attachment angle less then 10 deg. through three-dimensional operation of a multiwalled carbon nanotube and an AFM probe inside a SEM.

  4. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    DOE PAGES

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence ofmore » a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.« less

  5. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence of a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.

  6. The Precise Orbit and the Challenge of Long Term Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Cerri, Luca; Otten, Michiel; Bertiger, William; Zelensky, Nikita; Willis, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The computation of a precise orbit reference is a fundamental component of the altimetric measurement. Since the dawn of the modern altimeter age, orbit accuracy has been determined by the quality of the GPS, SLR, and DORIS tracking systems, the fidelity of the measurement and force models, and the choice of parameterization for the orbit solutions, and whether a dynamic or a reduced-dynamic strategy is used to calculate the orbits. At the start of the TOPEX mission, the inaccuracies in the modeling of static gravity, dynamic ocean tides, and the nonconservative forces dominated the orbit error budget. Much of the error due to dynamic mismodeling can be compensated by reduced-dynamic tracking techniques depending on the measurement system strength. In the last decade, the launch of the GRACE mission has eliminated the static gravity field as a concern, and the background force models and the terrestrial reference frame have been systematically refined. GPS systems have realized many improvements, including better modeling of the forces on the GPS spacecraft, large increases in the ground tracking network, and improved modeling of the GPS measurements. DORIS systems have achieved improvements through the use of new antennae, more stable monumentation, and of satellite receivers that can track multiple beacons, and as well as through improved modeling of the nonconservative forces. Many of these improvements have been applied in the new reprocessed time series of orbits produced for the ERS satellites, Envisat, TOPEX/Poseidon and the Jason satellites, and as well as for the most recent Cryosat-2 and HY2A. We now face the challenge of maintaining a stable orbit reference for these altimetric satellites. Changes in the time-variable gravity field of the Earth and how these are modelled have been shown to affect the orbit evolution, and the calibration of the altimetric data with tide gauges. The accuracy of the reference frame realizations, and their projection into

  7. PSR J1022+1001: profile stability and precision timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotan, A. W.; Bailes, M.; Ord, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    We present an investigation of the morphology and arrival times of integrated radio pulses from the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1022+1001. This pulsar is renowned for its poor timing properties, which have been postulated to originate from variability in its average pulse profile. Although a subclass of long-period pulsars is known to exhibit mode changes that give rise to very large deviations in their integrated profiles, this was the first millisecond pulsar thought to have an unstable mean profile. As part of a precision timing programme at the Parkes radio telescope, we observed this pulsar between 2003 January and 2004 March using a coherent de-dispersion system (the Second Caltech Parkes Swinburne Recorder). A study of morphological variability during our brightest observations suggests that the pulse profile varies by at most a few per cent, similar to the uncertainty in our calibration. Unlike previous authors, we find that this pulsar times extremely well. In 5-min integrations of 64-MHz bands, we obtain a weighted rms residual of just 2.27 μs. The reduced χ2 of our best fit is 1.43, which suggests that this pulsar can be timed to high accuracy with standard cross-correlation techniques. Combining relativistic constraints with the pulsar mass function and consideration of the Chandrasekhar mass limit on the white dwarf companion, we can constrain the inclination angle of the system to lie within the range 37° < i < 56°. For reasonable pulsar masses, this suggests that the white dwarf is at least 0.9 Msolar. We also find evidence for secular evolution of the projected semimajor axis.

  8. Accuracy and precision of estimating age of gray wolves by tooth wear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gipson, P.S.; Ballard, W.B.; Nowak, R.M.; Mech, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy and precision of tooth wear for aging gray wolves (Canis lupus) from Alaska, Minnesota, and Ontario based on 47 known-age or known-minimum-age skulls. Estimates of age using tooth wear and a commercial cementum annuli-aging service were useful for wolves up to 14 years old. The precision of estimates from cementum annuli was greater than estimates from tooth wear, but tooth wear estimates are more applicable in the field. We tended to overestimate age by 1-2 years and occasionally by 3 or 4 years. The commercial service aged young wolves with cementum annuli to within ?? 1 year of actual age, but under estimated ages of wolves ???9 years old by 1-3 years. No differences were detected in tooth wear patterns for wild wolves from Alaska, Minnesota, and Ontario, nor between captive and wild wolves. Tooth wear was not appropriate for aging wolves with an underbite that prevented normal wear or severely broken and missing teeth.

  9. Accuracy, Precision, and Reliability of Chemical Measurements in Natural Products Research

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Joseph M.; Brown, Paula N.; Roman, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products chemistry is the discipline that lies at the heart of modern pharmacognosy. The field encompasses qualitative and quantitative analytical tools that range from spectroscopy and spectrometry to chromatography. Among other things, modern research on crude botanicals is engaged in the discovery of the phytochemical constituents necessary for therapeutic efficacy, including the synergistic effects of components of complex mixtures in the botanical matrix. In the phytomedicine field, these botanicals and their contained mixtures are considered the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and pharmacognosists are increasingly called upon to supplement their molecular discovery work by assisting in the development and utilization of analytical tools for assessing the quality and safety of these products. Unlike single-chemical entity APIs, botanical raw materials and their derived products are highly variable because their chemistry and morphology depend on the genotypic and phenotypic variation, geographical origin and weather exposure, harvesting practices, and processing conditions of the source material. Unless controlled, this inherent variability in the raw material stream can result in inconsistent finished products that are under-potent, over-potent, and/or contaminated. Over the decades, natural products chemists have routinely developed quantitative analytical methods for phytochemicals of interest. Quantitative methods for the determination of product quality bear the weight of regulatory scrutiny. These methods must be accurate, precise, and reproducible. Accordingly, this review discusses the principles of accuracy (relationship between experimental and true value), precision (distribution of data values), and reliability in the quantitation of phytochemicals in natural products. PMID:20884340

  10. Transfer accuracy and precision scoring in planar bone cutting validated with ex vivo data.

    PubMed

    Milano, Federico Edgardo; Ritacco, Lucas Eduardo; Farfalli, Germán Luis; Bahamonde, Luis Alberto; Aponte-Tinao, Luis Alberto; Risk, Marcelo

    2015-05-01

    The use of interactive surgical scenarios for virtual preoperative planning of osteotomies has increased in the last 5 years. As it has been reported by several authors, this technology has been used in tumor resection osteotomies, knee osteotomies, and spine surgery with good results. A digital three-dimensional preoperative plan makes possible to quantitatively evaluate the transfer process from the virtual plan to the anatomy of the patient. We introduce an exact definition of accuracy and precision of this transfer process for planar bone cutting. We present a method to compute these properties from ex vivo data. We also propose a clinical score to assess the goodness of a cut. A computer simulation is used to characterize the definitions and the data generated by the measurement method. The definitions and method are evaluated in 17 ex vivo planar cuts of tumor resection osteotomies. The results show that the proposed method and definitions are highly correlated with a previous definition of accuracy based in ISO 1101. The score is also evaluated by showing that it distinguishes among different transfer techniques based in its distribution location and shape. The introduced definitions produce acceptable results in cases where the ISO-based definition produce counter intuitive results.

  11. Accuracy and precision of gait events derived from motion capture in horses during walk and trot.

    PubMed

    Boye, Jenny Katrine; Thomsen, Maj Halling; Pfau, Thilo; Olsen, Emil

    2014-03-21

    This study aimed to create an evidence base for detection of stance-phase timings from motion capture in horses. The objective was to compare the accuracy (bias) and precision (SD) for five published algorithms for the detection of hoof-on and hoof-off using force plates as the reference standard. Six horses were walked and trotted over eight force plates surrounded by a synchronised 12-camera infrared motion capture system. The five algorithms (A-E) were based on: (A) horizontal velocity of the hoof; (B) Fetlock angle and horizontal hoof velocity; (C) horizontal displacement of the hoof relative to the centre of mass; (D) horizontal velocity of the hoof relative to the Centre of Mass and; (E) vertical acceleration of the hoof. A total of 240 stance phases in walk and 240 stance phases in trot were included in the assessment. Method D provided the most accurate and precise results in walk for stance phase duration with a bias of 4.1% for front limbs and 4.8% for hind limbs. For trot we derived a combination of method A for hoof-on and method E for hoof-off resulting in a bias of -6.2% of stance in the front limbs and method B for the hind limbs with a bias of 3.8% of stance phase duration. We conclude that motion capture yields accurate and precise detection of gait events for horses walking and trotting over ground and the results emphasise a need for different algorithms for front limbs versus hind limbs in trot.

  12. Gaining Precision and Accuracy on Microprobe Trace Element Analysis with the Multipoint Background Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaz, J. M.; Williams, M. L.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Donovan, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Electron microprobe trace element analysis is a significant challenge, but can provide critical data when high spatial resolution is required. Due to the low peak intensity, the accuracy and precision of such analyses relies critically on background measurements, and on the accuracy of any pertinent peak interference corrections. A linear regression between two points selected at appropriate off-peak positions is a classical approach for background characterization in microprobe analysis. However, this approach disallows an accurate assessment of background curvature (usually exponential). Moreover, if present, background interferences can dramatically affect the results if underestimated or ignored. The acquisition of a quantitative WDS scan over the spectral region of interest is still a valuable option to determine the background intensity and curvature from a fitted regression of background portions of the scan, but this technique retains an element of subjectivity as the analyst has to select areas in the scan, which appear to represent background. We present here a new method, "Multi-Point Background" (MPB), that allows acquiring up to 24 off-peak background measurements from wavelength positions around the peaks. This method aims to improve the accuracy, precision, and objectivity of trace element analysis. The overall efficiency is amended because no systematic WDS scan needs to be acquired in order to check for the presence of possible background interferences. Moreover, the method is less subjective because "true" backgrounds are selected by the statistical exclusion of erroneous background measurements, reducing the need for analyst intervention. This idea originated from efforts to refine EPMA monazite U-Th-Pb dating, where it was recognised that background errors (peak interference or background curvature) could result in errors of several tens of million years on the calculated age. Results obtained on a CAMECA SX-100 "UltraChron" using monazite

  13. Systematic accuracy and precision analysis of video motion capturing systems--exemplified on the Vicon-460 system.

    PubMed

    Windolf, Markus; Götzen, Nils; Morlock, Michael

    2008-08-28

    With rising demand on highly accurate acquisition of small motion the use of video-based motion capturing becomes more and more popular. However, the performance of these systems strongly depends on a variety of influencing factors. A method was developed in order to systematically assess accuracy and precision of motion capturing systems with regard to influential system parameters. A calibration and measurement robot was designed to perform a repeatable dynamic calibration and to determine the resultant system accuracy and precision in a control volume investigating small motion magnitudes (180 x 180 x 150 mm3). The procedure was exemplified on the Vicon-460 system. Following parameters were analyzed: Camera setup, calibration volume, marker size and lens filter application. Equipped with four cameras the Vicon-460 system provided an overall accuracy of 63+/-5 microm and overall precision (noise level) of 15 microm for the most favorable parameter setting. Arbitrary changes in camera arrangement revealed variations in mean accuracy between 76 and 129 microm. The noise level normal to the cameras' projection plane was found higher compared to the other coordinate directions. Measurements including regions unaffected by the dynamic calibration reflected considerably lower accuracy (221+/-79 microm). Lager marker diameters led to higher accuracy and precision. Accuracy dropped significantly when using an optical lens filter. This study revealed significant influence of the system environment on the performance of video-based motion capturing systems. With careful configuration, optical motion capturing provides a powerful measuring opportunity for the majority of biomechanical applications.

  14. Improving accuracy and precision in biological applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Wei

    The quantitative understanding of cellular and molecular responses in living cells is important for many reasons, including identifying potential molecular targets for treatments of diseases like cancer. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can quantitatively measure these responses in living cells by producing spatially resolved images of fluorophore lifetime, and has advantages over intensity-based measurements. However, in live-cell microscopy applications using high-intensity light sources such as lasers, maintaining biological viability remains critical. Although high-speed, time-gated FLIM significantly reduces light delivered to live cells, making measurements at low light levels remains a challenge affecting quantitative FLIM results. We can significantly improve both accuracy and precision in gated FLIM applications. We use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with fluorescent proteins to detect molecular interactions in living cells: the use of FLIM, better fluorophores, and temperature/CO2 controls can improve live-cell FRET results with higher consistency, better statistics, and less non-specific FRET (for negative control comparisons, p-value = 0.93 (physiological) vs. 9.43E-05 (non-physiological)). Several lifetime determination methods are investigated to optimize gating schemes. We demonstrate a reduction in relative standard deviation (RSD) from 52.57% to 18.93% with optimized gating in an example under typical experimental conditions. We develop two novel total variation (TV) image denoising algorithms, FWTV ( f-weighted TV) and UWTV (u-weighted TV), that can achieve significant improvements for real imaging systems. With live-cell images, they improve the precision of local lifetime determination without significantly altering the global mean lifetime values (<5% lifetime changes). Finally, by combining optimal gating and TV denoising, even low-light excitation can achieve precision better than that obtained in high

  15. Astrometry with Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor number 3: Position-mode stability and precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. F.; Mcarthur, B.; Nelan, E.; Story, D.; Whipple, A. L.; Jefferys, W. H.; Wang, Q.; Shelus, P. J.; Hemenway, P. D.; Mccartney, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report results from a test exploring the long- and short-term astrometric stability of Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) #3. A test field was observed 40 times over 522 days to determine the precision and accuracy of FGS astrometry and to measure the character and magnitude of possible secular scale changes. We examine the astrometric data and the associated guide-star data to determine random errors. These data are also explored to find sources of systematic error. After correcting for some systematic effects we obtain a precision of 0.002 arcsec (2 mas) per observation (RSS of x and y). This is relative astrometry within a central 2.5 arcmin FGS field of view for any orientation. We find that the scale varies over time and confirm the sense of the trend with independent data. From the 40 observation sets we produce a catalog of an astrometry test field containing eight stars whose relative positions are known to an average 0.7 and 0.9 mas in x and y. One reference star has a relative parallax of 3.1 plus or minus 0.5 mas. Finally, we report that eleven observation sets acquired over 387 days produce parallaxes and relative positions with 1-mas precision.

  16. Precise and Continuous Time and Frequency Synchronisation at the 5×10-19 Accuracy Level

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B.; Gao, C.; Chen, W. L.; Miao, J.; Zhu, X.; Bai, Y.; Zhang, J. W.; Feng, Y. Y.; Li, T. C.; Wang, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    The synchronisation of time and frequency between remote locations is crucial for many important applications. Conventional time and frequency dissemination often makes use of satellite links. Recently, the communication fibre network has become an attractive option for long-distance time and frequency dissemination. Here, we demonstrate accurate frequency transfer and time synchronisation via an 80 km fibre link between Tsinghua University (THU) and the National Institute of Metrology of China (NIM). Using a 9.1 GHz microwave modulation and a timing signal carried by two continuous-wave lasers and transferred across the same 80 km urban fibre link, frequency transfer stability at the level of 5×10−19/day was achieved. Time synchronisation at the 50 ps precision level was also demonstrated. The system is reliable and has operated continuously for several months. We further discuss the feasibility of using such frequency and time transfer over 1000 km and its applications to long-baseline radio astronomy. PMID:22870385

  17. 13 Years of TOPEX/POSEIDON Precision Orbit Determination and the 10-fold Improvement in Expected Orbit Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Klosko, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Launched in the summer of 1992, TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) was a joint mission between NASA and the Centre National d Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French Space Agency, to make precise radar altimeter measurements of the ocean surface. After the remarkably successful 13-years of mapping the ocean surface T/P lost its ability to maneuver and was de-commissioned January 2006. T/P revolutionized the study of the Earth s oceans by vastly exceeding pre-launch estimates of surface height accuracy recoverable from radar altimeter measurements. The precision orbit lies at the heart of the altimeter measurement providing the reference frame from which the radar altimeter measurements are made. The expected quality of orbit knowledge had limited the measurement accuracy expectations of past altimeter missions, and still remains a major component in the error budget of all altimeter missions. This paper describes critical improvements made to the T/P orbit time series over the 13-years of precise orbit determination (POD) provided by the GSFC Space Geodesy Laboratory. The POD improvements from the pre-launch T/P expectation of radial orbit accuracy and Mission requirement of 13-cm to an expected accuracy of about 1.5-cm with today s latest orbits will be discussed. The latest orbits with 1.5 cm RMS radial accuracy represent a significant improvement to the 2.0-cm accuracy orbits currently available on the T/P Geophysical Data Record (GDR) altimeter product.

  18. The measurement of frequency and frequency stability of precision oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    The specification and performance of precision oscillators is discussed as a very important topic to the owners and users of these oscillators. This paper presents at the tutorial level some convenient methods of measuring the frequencies of precision oscillators -- giving advantages and disadvantages of these methods. Further it is shown that by processing the data from the frequency measurements in certain ways, one may be able to state more general characteristics of the oscillators being measured. The goal in this regard is to allow the comparisons of different manufacturers' specifications and more importantly to help assess whether these oscillators will meet the standard of performance the user may have in a particular application.

  19. Precision capacitor has improved temperature and operational stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brookshier, W. K.; Lewis, R. N.

    1967-01-01

    Vacuum dielectric capacitor is fabricated from materials with very low temperature coefficients of expansion. This precision capacitor in the 1000-2000 picofarad range has a near-zero temperature coefficient of capacitance, eliminates ion chamber action caused by air ionization in the dielectric, and minimizes electromagnetic field charging effects.

  20. Sensitivity Analysis for Characterizing the Accuracy and Precision of JEM/SMILES Mesospheric O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili Mahani, M.; Baron, P.; Kasai, Y.; Murata, I.; Kasaba, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the Superconducting sub-Millimeter Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) measurements of mesospheric ozone, O3. As the first step, the error due to the impact of Mesospheric Temperature Inversions (MTIs) on ozone retrieval has been determined. The impacts of other parameters such as pressure variability, solar events, and etc. on mesospheric O3 will also be investigated. Ozone, is known to be important due to the stratospheric O3 layer protection of life on Earth by absorbing harmful UV radiations. However, O3 chemistry can be studied purely in the mesosphere without distraction of heterogeneous situation and dynamical variations due to the short lifetime of O3 in this region. Mesospheric ozone is produced by the photo-dissociation of O2 and the subsequent reaction of O with O2. Diurnal and semi-diurnal variations of mesospheric ozone are associated with variations in solar activity. The amplitude of the diurnal variation increases from a few percent at an altitude of 50 km, to about 80 percent at 70 km. Although despite the apparent simplicity of this situation, significant disagreements exist between the predictions from the existing models and observations, which need to be resolved. SMILES is a highly sensitive radiometer with a few to several tens percent of precision from upper troposphere to the mesosphere. SMILES was developed by the Japanese Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) located at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES has successfully measured the vertical distributions and the diurnal variations of various atmospheric species in the latitude range of 38S to 65N from October 2009 to April 2010. A sensitivity analysis is being conducted to investigate the expected precision and accuracy of the mesospheric O3 profiles (from 50 to 90 km height) due to the impact of Mesospheric Temperature

  1. Accuracy and precision of total mixed rations fed on commercial dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Sova, A D; LeBlanc, S J; McBride, B W; DeVries, T J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant time and effort spent formulating total mixed rations (TMR), it is evident that the ration delivered by the producer and that consumed by the cow may not accurately reflect that originally formulated. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how TMR fed agrees with or differs from TMR formulation (accuracy), (2) determine daily variability in physical and chemical characteristics of TMR delivered (precision), and (3) investigate the relationship between daily variability in ration characteristics and group-average measures of productivity [dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield, milk components, efficiency, and feed sorting] on commercial dairy farms. Twenty-two commercial freestall herds were visited for 7 consecutive days in both summer and winter months. Fresh and refusal feed samples were collected daily to assess particle size distribution, dry matter, and chemical composition. Milk test data, including yield, fat, and protein were collected from a coinciding Dairy Herd Improvement test. Multivariable mixed-effect regression models were used to analyze associations between productivity measures and daily ration variability, measured as coefficient of variation (CV) over 7d. The average TMR [crude protein=16.5%, net energy for lactation (NEL) = 1.7 Mcal/kg, nonfiber carbohydrates = 41.3%, total digestible nutrients = 73.3%, neutral detergent fiber=31.3%, acid detergent fiber=20.5%, Ca = 0.92%, p=0.42%, Mg = 0.35%, K = 1.45%, Na = 0.41%] delivered exceeded TMR formulation for NEL (+0.05 Mcal/kg), nonfiber carbohydrates (+1.2%), acid detergent fiber (+0.7%), Ca (+0.08%), P (+0.02%), Mg (+0.02%), and K (+0.04%) and underfed crude protein (-0.4%), neutral detergent fiber (-0.6%), and Na (-0.1%). Dietary measures with high day-to-day CV were average feed refusal rate (CV = 74%), percent long particles (CV = 16%), percent medium particles (CV = 7.7%), percent short particles (CV = 6.1%), percent fine particles (CV = 13%), Ca (CV = 7

  2. High precision frequency calibration of tunable diode lasers stabilized on an internally coupled Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Clar, H J; Schieder, R; Reich, M; Winnewisser, G

    1989-05-01

    For very high precision molecular spectroscopy we use a tunable diode laser which is frequency locked to an internally coupled Fabry-Perot interferometer (icFPI). The spectra are calibrated by means of the interference pattern of an iodine stabilized He-Ne reference laser which is simultaneously coupled into the icFPI. In this paper the exact relation between the diode laser frequency and the He-Ne fringe number is derived and a convenient calibration procedure yielding a frequency accuracy of 5 x 10(-5) cm(-1) at 10 microm is described.

  3. Stability of the Electroweak Vacuum: Gauge Independence and Advanced Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, A. V.; Kniehl, B. A.; Pikelner, A. F.; Veretin, O. L.

    2015-11-01

    We perform a manifestly gauge-independent analysis of the vacuum stability in the standard model including two-loop matching, three-loop renormalization group evolution, and pure QCD corrections through four loops. All these ingredients are exact, except that light-fermion masses are neglected. We in turn apply the criterion of nullifying the Higgs self-coupling and its beta function in the modified minimal-subtraction scheme and a recently proposed consistent method for determining the true minimum of the effective Higgs potential that also avoids gauge dependence. Exploiting our knowledge of the Higgs-boson mass, we derive an upper bound on the pole mass of the top quark by requiring that the standard model be stable all the way up to the Planck mass scale and conservatively estimate the theoretical uncertainty. This bound is compatible with the Monte Carlo mass quoted by the Particle Data Group at the 1.3 σ level.

  4. Accuracy and precisions of water quality parameters retrieved from particle swarm optimisation in a sub-tropical lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Glenn; Phinn, Stuart R.

    2009-09-01

    Optical remote sensing has been used to map and monitor water quality parameters such as the concentrations of hydrosols (chlorophyll and other pigments, total suspended material, and coloured dissolved organic matter). In the inversion / optimisation approach a forward model is used to simulate the water reflectance spectra from a set of parameters and the set that gives the closest match is selected as the solution. The accuracy of the hydrosol retrieval is dependent on an efficient search of the solution space and the reliability of the similarity measure. In this paper the Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) was used to search the solution space and seven similarity measures were trialled. The accuracy and precision of this method depends on the inherent noise in the spectral bands of the sensor being employed, as well as the radiometric corrections applied to images to calculate the subsurface reflectance. Using the Hydrolight® radiative transfer model and typical hydrosol concentrations from Lake Wivenhoe, Australia, MERIS reflectance spectra were simulated. The accuracy and precision of hydrosol concentrations derived from each similarity measure were evaluated after errors associated with the air-water interface correction, atmospheric correction and the IOP measurement were modelled and applied to the simulated reflectance spectra. The use of band specific empirically estimated values for the anisotropy value in the forward model improved the accuracy of hydrosol retrieval. The results of this study will be used to improve an algorithm for the remote sensing of water quality for freshwater impoundments.

  5. Metamemory accuracy: effects of feedback and the stability of individual differences.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W B

    1998-01-01

    This study addressed two questions about metamemory accuracy: how feedback about recall performance affects confidence-recall accuracy and whether individual differences in confidence-recall accuracy are stable across different sets of test items. College students answered general knowledge questions and made confidence ratings about the correctness of the answers. Half the students were told whether their answers were correct. All students answered half the questions a second time. The results show that feedback did not produce a general improvement in metamemory accuracy; the improvement was specific to the questions for which feedback was provided. Also, individual students' metamemory accuracy showed moderate alternate-forms stability when each test was made up of 250 items. Therefore, researchers studying individual differences in metamemory accuracy on recall tasks should use tests that yield several hundred responses. PMID:9624702

  6. Simulations of thermally transferred OSL signals in quartz: Accuracy and precision of the protocols for equivalent dose evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Adamiec, Grzegorz; Athanassas, C.; Chen, Reuven; Baker, Atlee; Larsen, Meredith; Thompson, Zachary

    2011-06-01

    Thermally-transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) signals in sedimentary quartz have been the subject of several recent studies, due to the potential shown by these signals to increase the range of luminescence dating by an order of magnitude. Based on these signals, a single aliquot protocol termed the ReSAR protocol has been developed and tested experimentally. This paper presents extensive numerical simulations of this ReSAR protocol. The purpose of the simulations is to investigate several aspects of the ReSAR protocol which are believed to cause difficulties during application of the protocol. Furthermore, several modified versions of the ReSAR protocol are simulated, and their relative accuracy and precision are compared. The simulations are carried out using a recently published kinetic model for quartz, consisting of 11 energy levels. One hundred random variants of the natural samples were generated by keeping the transition probabilities between energy levels fixed, while allowing simultaneous random variations of the concentrations of the 11 energy levels. The relative intrinsic accuracy and precision of the protocols are simulated by calculating the equivalent dose (ED) within the model, for a given natural burial dose of the sample. The complete sequence of steps undertaken in several versions of the dating protocols is simulated. The relative intrinsic precision of these techniques is estimated by fitting Gaussian probability functions to the resulting simulated distribution of ED values. New simulations are presented for commonly used OSL sensitivity tests, consisting of successive cycles of sample irradiation with the same dose, followed by measurements of the sensitivity corrected L/T signals. We investigate several experimental factors which may be affecting both the intrinsic precision and intrinsic accuracy of the ReSAR protocol. The results of the simulation show that the four different published versions of the ReSAR protocol can

  7. A high-precision Jacob's staff with improved spatial accuracy and laser sighting capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patacci, Marco

    2016-04-01

    A new Jacob's staff design incorporating a 3D positioning stage and a laser sighting stage is described. The first combines a compass and a circular spirit level on a movable bracket and the second introduces a laser able to slide vertically and rotate on a plane parallel to bedding. The new design allows greater precision in stratigraphic thickness measurement while restricting the cost and maintaining speed of measurement to levels similar to those of a traditional Jacob's staff. Greater precision is achieved as a result of: a) improved 3D positioning of the rod through the use of the integrated compass and spirit level holder; b) more accurate sighting of geological surfaces by tracing with height adjustable rotatable laser; c) reduced error when shifting the trace of the log laterally (i.e. away from the dip direction) within the trace of the laser plane, and d) improved measurement of bedding dip and direction necessary to orientate the Jacob's staff, using the rotatable laser. The new laser holder design can also be used to verify parallelism of a geological surface with structural dip by creating a visual planar datum in the field and thus allowing determination of surfaces which cut the bedding at an angle (e.g., clinoforms, levees, erosion surfaces, amalgamation surfaces, etc.). Stratigraphic thickness measurements and estimates of measurement uncertainty are valuable to many applications of sedimentology and stratigraphy at different scales (e.g., bed statistics, reconstruction of palaeotopographies, depositional processes at bed scale, architectural element analysis), especially when a quantitative approach is applied to the analysis of the data; the ability to collect larger data sets with improved precision will increase the quality of such studies.

  8. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Noz, Marilyn E.; Zeleznik, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  9. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Brodén, Cyrus; Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  10. NASA hydrogen maser accuracy and stability in relation to world standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Percival, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    Frequency comparisons were made among five NASA hydrogen masers in 1969 and again in 1972 to a precision of one part in 10 to the 13th power. Frequency comparisons were also made between these masers and the cesium-beam ensembles of several international standards laboratories. The hydrogen maser frequency stabilities as related to IAT were comparable to the frequency stabilities of individual time scales with respect to IAT. The relative frequency variations among the NASA masers, measured after the three-year interval, were 2 + or - 2 parts in 10 to the 13th power. Thus time scales based on hydrogen masers would have excellent long-term stability and uniformity.

  11. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  12. Limitations on long-term stability and accuracy in atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wineland, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The limits to accuracy and long term stability in present atomic clocks are examined. Recent proposals for new frequency standards are discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of frequency standards based on such ideas as laser transitions, single atoms, and atom cooling. The applicability of some of these new techniques to existing standards is examined.

  13. Rigid body mode pointing accuracy and stability criteria for an orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandhu, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of gravity gradient torque disturbances (which is an order of magnitude greater than the other torque disturbances and is sinusoidal with a frequency of two cycles per orbit) on pointing accuracy can be predicted very precisely. However, since the sensor noise such as star tracker and gyro inherent noise, is random, their effect can only be predicted statistically. The most common method used is computer simulation with appropriate sensor model and adjusting spacecraft control laws for minimum pointing error, as presented by Harris (1972). The general investigation outlined theoretically relates spacecraft controls to pointing accuracy in terms of the sensor noise power spectrum. The results are presented in graphical form.

  14. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As research laboratories and clinics collaborate to achieve precision medicine, both communities are required to understand mandated electronic health/medical record (EHR/EMR) initiatives that will be fully implemented in all clinics in the United States by 2015. Stakeholders will need to evaluate current record keeping practices and optimize and standardize methodologies to capture nearly all information in digital format. Collaborative efforts from academic and industry sectors are crucial to achieving higher efficacy in patient care while minimizing costs. Currently existing digitized data and information are present in multiple formats and are largely unstructured. In the absence of a universally accepted management system, departments and institutions continue to generate silos of information. As a result, invaluable and newly discovered knowledge is difficult to access. To accelerate biomedical research and reduce healthcare costs, clinical and bioinformatics systems must employ common data elements to create structured annotation forms enabling laboratories and clinics to capture sharable data in real time. Conversion of these datasets to knowable information should be a routine institutionalized process. New scientific knowledge and clinical discoveries can be shared via integrated knowledge environments defined by flexible data models and extensive use of standards, ontologies, vocabularies, and thesauri. In the clinical setting, aggregated knowledge must be displayed in user-friendly formats so that physicians, non-technical laboratory personnel, nurses, data/research coordinators, and end-users can enter data, access information, and understand the output. The effort to connect astronomical numbers of data points, including '-omics'-based molecular data, individual genome sequences, experimental data, patient clinical phenotypes, and follow-up data is a monumental task. Roadblocks to this vision of integration and interoperability include ethical, legal

  15. Improving Accuracy and Precision in Gross Alpha and Beta Counting with Proportional Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abrantes, J.; Pinhao, N. R.; Melo, J.; Madruga, M. J.

    2008-08-14

    Following ambiguous results of an intercomparison exercise in 2004, we have reevaluated the sample preparation, measurement procedures and data treatment for gross alpha and beta counting. It was found that the Portuguese standards NP 4332:1996 and NP 4330:1996 do not provide enough background for correct treatment of data. This paper describes the improvements made in gross alpha and beta activities measurement with proportional detectors in simultaneous mode. These improvements include a crosstalk correction both on counting and in the minimum detectable activity; the use of adequate statistical tools for data analysis; the use of QC charts to control the stability of the detectors and the background and, attention to the traceability of results. The calibration curves were computed with an appropriate number of replicates and with a throughout evaluation of the uncertainty budget. Based on this model, we established new criteria to report results.

  16. Pupil size dynamics during fixation impact the accuracy and precision of video-based gaze estimation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kyoung Whan; Blake, Randolph; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Video-based eye tracking relies on locating pupil center to measure gaze positions. Although widely used, the technique is known to generate spurious gaze position shifts up to several degrees in visual angle because pupil centration can change without eye movement during pupil constriction or dilation. Since pupil size can fluctuate markedly from moment to moment, reflecting arousal state and cognitive processing during human behavioral and neuroimaging experiments, the pupil size artifact is prevalent and thus weakens the quality of the video-based eye tracking measurements reliant on small fixational eye movements. Moreover, the artifact may lead to erroneous conclusions if the spurious signal is taken as an actual eye movement. Here, we measured pupil size and gaze position from 23 human observers performing a fixation task and examined the relationship between these two measures. Results disclosed that the pupils contracted as fixation was prolonged, at both small (<16s) and large (∼4min) time scales, and these pupil contractions were accompanied by systematic errors in gaze position estimation, in both the ellipse and the centroid methods of pupil tracking. When pupil size was regressed out, the accuracy and reliability of gaze position measurements were substantially improved, enabling differentiation of 0.1° difference in eye position. We confirmed the presence of systematic changes in pupil size, again at both small and large scales, and its tight relationship with gaze position estimates when observers were engaged in a demanding visual discrimination task.

  17. Pupil size dynamics during fixation impact the accuracy and precision of video-based gaze estimation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kyoung Whan; Blake, Randolph; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Video-based eye tracking relies on locating pupil center to measure gaze positions. Although widely used, the technique is known to generate spurious gaze position shifts up to several degrees in visual angle because pupil centration can change without eye movement during pupil constriction or dilation. Since pupil size can fluctuate markedly from moment to moment, reflecting arousal state and cognitive processing during human behavioral and neuroimaging experiments, the pupil size artifact is prevalent and thus weakens the quality of the video-based eye tracking measurements reliant on small fixational eye movements. Moreover, the artifact may lead to erroneous conclusions if the spurious signal is taken as an actual eye movement. Here, we measured pupil size and gaze position from 23 human observers performing a fixation task and examined the relationship between these two measures. Results disclosed that the pupils contracted as fixation was prolonged, at both small (<16s) and large (∼4min) time scales, and these pupil contractions were accompanied by systematic errors in gaze position estimation, in both the ellipse and the centroid methods of pupil tracking. When pupil size was regressed out, the accuracy and reliability of gaze position measurements were substantially improved, enabling differentiation of 0.1° difference in eye position. We confirmed the presence of systematic changes in pupil size, again at both small and large scales, and its tight relationship with gaze position estimates when observers were engaged in a demanding visual discrimination task. PMID:25578924

  18. Accuracy and precision of cone beam computed tomography in periodontal defects measurement (systematic review).

    PubMed

    Anter, Enas; Zayet, Mohammed Khalifa; El-Dessouky, Sahar Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of literature was made to assess the extent of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for measurement of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect. A systematic search of PubMed electronic database and a hand search of open access journals (from 2000 to 2015) yielded abstracts that were potentially relevant. The original articles were then retrieved and their references were hand searched for possible missing articles. Only articles that met the selection criteria were included and criticized. The initial screening revealed 47 potentially relevant articles, of which only 14 have met the selection criteria; their CBCT average measurements error ranged from 0.19 mm to 1.27 mm; however, no valid meta-analysis could be made due to the high heterogeneity between the included studies. Under the limitation of the number and strength of the available studies, we concluded that CBCT provides an assessment of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect with a minimum reported mean measurements error of 0.19 ± 0.11 mm and a maximum reported mean measurements error of 1.27 ± 1.43 mm, and there is no agreement between the studies regarding the direction of the deviation whether over or underestimation. However, we should emphasize that the evidence to this data is not strong. PMID:27563194

  19. A simple device for high-precision head image registration: Preliminary performance and accuracy tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pallotta, Stefania

    2007-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new device for multimodal head study registration and to examine its performance in preliminary tests. The device consists of a system of eight markers fixed to mobile carbon pipes and bars which can be easily mounted on the patient's head using the ear canals and the nasal bridge. Four graduated scales fixed to the rigid support allow examiners to find the same device position on the patient's head during different acquisitions. The markers can be filled with appropriate substances for visualisation in computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance, single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography images. The device's rigidity and its position reproducibility were measured in 15 repeated CT acquisitions of the Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom and in two SPECT studies of a patient. The proposed system displays good rigidity and reproducibility characteristics. A relocation accuracy of less than 1,5 mm was found in more than 90% of the results. The registration parameters obtained using such a device were compared to those obtained using fiducial markers fixed on phantom and patient heads, resulting in differences of less than 1 deg. and 1 mm for rotation and translation parameters, respectively. Residual differences between fiducial marker coordinates in reference and in registered studies were less than 1 mm in more than 90% of the results, proving that the device performed as accurately as noninvasive stereotactic devices. Finally, an example of multimodal employment of the proposed device is reported.

  20. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms. PMID:27686111

  1. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms.

  2. Accuracy and precision of cone beam computed tomography in periodontal defects measurement (systematic review)

    PubMed Central

    Anter, Enas; Zayet, Mohammed Khalifa; El-Dessouky, Sahar Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of literature was made to assess the extent of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for measurement of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect. A systematic search of PubMed electronic database and a hand search of open access journals (from 2000 to 2015) yielded abstracts that were potentially relevant. The original articles were then retrieved and their references were hand searched for possible missing articles. Only articles that met the selection criteria were included and criticized. The initial screening revealed 47 potentially relevant articles, of which only 14 have met the selection criteria; their CBCT average measurements error ranged from 0.19 mm to 1.27 mm; however, no valid meta-analysis could be made due to the high heterogeneity between the included studies. Under the limitation of the number and strength of the available studies, we concluded that CBCT provides an assessment of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect with a minimum reported mean measurements error of 0.19 ± 0.11 mm and a maximum reported mean measurements error of 1.27 ± 1.43 mm, and there is no agreement between the studies regarding the direction of the deviation whether over or underestimation. However, we should emphasize that the evidence to this data is not strong. PMID:27563194

  3. Accuracy and precision of cone beam computed tomography in periodontal defects measurement (systematic review).

    PubMed

    Anter, Enas; Zayet, Mohammed Khalifa; El-Dessouky, Sahar Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of literature was made to assess the extent of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for measurement of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect. A systematic search of PubMed electronic database and a hand search of open access journals (from 2000 to 2015) yielded abstracts that were potentially relevant. The original articles were then retrieved and their references were hand searched for possible missing articles. Only articles that met the selection criteria were included and criticized. The initial screening revealed 47 potentially relevant articles, of which only 14 have met the selection criteria; their CBCT average measurements error ranged from 0.19 mm to 1.27 mm; however, no valid meta-analysis could be made due to the high heterogeneity between the included studies. Under the limitation of the number and strength of the available studies, we concluded that CBCT provides an assessment of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect with a minimum reported mean measurements error of 0.19 ± 0.11 mm and a maximum reported mean measurements error of 1.27 ± 1.43 mm, and there is no agreement between the studies regarding the direction of the deviation whether over or underestimation. However, we should emphasize that the evidence to this data is not strong.

  4. Synthesis of a combined precision stabilization system for a space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, R. I.; Druzhynin, E. I.; Ulyanov, S. A.; Voronov, V. A.; Belyaev, B. B.

    2012-11-01

    Some results of the investigation related to design of a precision stabilization system for a high-orbit space telescope with flexible elements, whose contribution to the inertia tensor reaches 80%, are discussed. The stabilization system represents a combined control system with open and closed control loops, in which the actuators are represented by a gyro system having four control moment gyros and four reactive wheels. The open loop control is employed to orient the telescope's optical axis to the attraction domain in accordance with the feedback control law. The closed loop is used both in the slewing mode for stabilizing programmed motions and in the basic (fine pointing) mode.

  5. A Method of Determining Accuracy and Precision for Dosimeter Systems Using Accreditation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Cummings and John Flood

    2010-12-01

    A study of the uncertainty of dosimeter results is required by the national accreditation programs for each dosimeter model for which accreditation is sought. Typically, the methods used to determine uncertainty have included the partial differentiation method described in the U.S. Guide to Uncertainty in Measurements or the use of Monte Carlo techniques and probability distribution functions to generate simulated dose results. Each of these techniques has particular strengths and should be employed when the areas of uncertainty are required to be understood in detail. However, the uncertainty of dosimeter results can also be determined using a Model II One-Way Analysis of Variance technique and accreditation testing data. The strengths of the technique include (1) the method is straightforward and the data are provided under accreditation testing and (2) the method provides additional data for the analysis of long-term uncertainty using Statistical Process Control (SPC) techniques. The use of SPC to compare variances and standard deviations over time is described well in other areas and is not discussed in detail in this paper. The application of Analysis of Variance to historic testing data indicated that the accuracy in a representative dosimetry system (Panasonic® Model UD-802) was 8.2%, 5.1%, and 4.8% and the expanded uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were 10.7%, 14.9%, and 15.2% for the Accident, Protection Level-Shallow, and Protection Level-Deep test categories in the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program, respectively. The 95% level of confidence ranges were (0.98 to 1.19), (0.90 to 1.20), and (0.90 to 1.20) for the three groupings of test categories, respectively.

  6. A method of determining accuracy and precision for dosimeter systems using accreditation data.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Frederick; Flood, John R

    2010-12-01

    A study of the uncertainty of dosimeter results is required by the national accreditation programs for each dosimeter model for which accreditation is sought. Typically, the methods used to determine uncertainty have included the partial differentiation method described in the U.S. Guide to Uncertainty in Measurements or the use of Monte Carlo techniques and probability distribution functions to generate simulated dose results. Each of these techniques has particular strengths and should be employed when the areas of uncertainty are required to be understood in detail. However, the uncertainty of dosimeter results can also be determined using a Model II One-Way Analysis of Variance technique and accreditation testing data. The strengths of the technique include (1) the method is straightforward and the data are provided under accreditation testing and (2) the method provides additional data for the analysis of long-term uncertainty using Statistical Process Control (SPC) techniques. The use of SPC to compare variances and standard deviations over time is described well in other areas and is not discussed in detail in this paper. The application of Analysis of Variance to historic testing data indicated that the accuracy in a representative dosimetry system (Panasonic® Model UD-802) was 8.2%, 5.1%, and 4.8% and the expanded uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were 10.7%, 14.9%, and 15.2% for the Accident, Protection Level-Shallow, and Protection Level-Deep test categories in the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program, respectively. The 95% level of confidence ranges were (0.98 to 1.19), (0.90 to 1.20), and (0.90 to 1.20) for the three groupings of test categories, respectively. PMID:21068596

  7. Accuracy and Precision of Equine Gait Event Detection during Walking with Limb and Trunk Mounted Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Emil; Andersen, Pia Haubro; Pfau, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    The increased variations of temporal gait events when pathology is present are good candidate features for objective diagnostic tests. We hypothesised that the gait events hoof-on/off and stance can be detected accurately and precisely using features from trunk and distal limb-mounted Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). Four IMUs were mounted on the distal limb and five IMUs were attached to the skin over the dorsal spinous processes at the withers, fourth lumbar vertebrae and sacrum as well as left and right tuber coxae. IMU data were synchronised to a force plate array and a motion capture system. Accuracy (bias) and precision (SD of bias) was calculated to compare force plate and IMU timings for gait events. Data were collected from seven horses. One hundred and twenty three (123) front limb steps were analysed; hoof-on was detected with a bias (SD) of −7 (23) ms, hoof-off with 0.7 (37) ms and front limb stance with −0.02 (37) ms. A total of 119 hind limb steps were analysed; hoof-on was found with a bias (SD) of −4 (25) ms, hoof-off with 6 (21) ms and hind limb stance with 0.2 (28) ms. IMUs mounted on the distal limbs and sacrum can detect gait events accurately and precisely. PMID:22969392

  8. Relationships between postural balance, rifle stability and shooting accuracy among novice rifle shooters.

    PubMed

    Mononen, K; Konttinen, N; Viitasalo, J; Era, P

    2007-04-01

    The present study examined the relationships between shooting accuracy and shooters' behavioral performance, i.e., postural balance and gun barrel stability, among novice rifle shooters in intra- and inter-individual levels. Postural balance and rifle stability were assessed in terms of anteroposterior (VEL(AP)) and mediolateral (VEL(ML)) sway velocity of the movement of center of pressure, and horizontal (DEV(H)) and vertical (DEV(V)) deviation of the aiming point. The participants (n=58) performed 30 shots in the standing position at a distance of 10 m from the target. The data showed that shooting accuracy was related to postural balance and rifle stability, but only at the inter-individual level. The correlation coefficients between shooting score and behavioral performance variables ranged from -0.29 to -0.45. The stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that the VEL(ML) and the DEV(H) as independent variables accounted for 26% of the variance in the shooting score. The results also suggested that postural balance is related to the shooting accuracy both directly and indirectly through rifle stability. As the role of postural balance appeared to be important in shooting performance, the use of additional balance training programs to improve a shooter's postural skills should be encouraged.

  9. Accuracy, Precision, Ease-Of-Use, and Cost of Methods to Test Ebola-Relevant Chlorine Solutions.

    PubMed

    Wells, Emma; Wolfe, Marlene K; Murray, Anna; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    To prevent transmission in Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is recommended to disinfect living things (hands and people) with 0.05% chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% chlorine solution. In the current West African EVD outbreak, these solutions (manufactured from calcium hypochlorite (HTH), sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)) have been widely used in both Ebola Treatment Unit and community settings. To ensure solution quality, testing is necessary, however test method appropriateness for these Ebola-relevant concentrations has not previously been evaluated. We identified fourteen commercially-available methods to test Ebola-relevant chlorine solution concentrations, including two titration methods, four DPD dilution methods, and six test strips. We assessed these methods by: 1) determining accuracy and precision by measuring in quintuplicate five different 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions manufactured from NaDCC, HTH, and NaOCl; 2) conducting volunteer testing to assess ease-of-use; and, 3) determining costs. Accuracy was greatest in titration methods (reference-12.4% error compared to reference method), then DPD dilution methods (2.4-19% error), then test strips (5.2-48% error); precision followed this same trend. Two methods had an accuracy of <10% error across all five chlorine solutions with good precision: Hach digital titration for 0.05% and 0.5% solutions (recommended for contexts with trained personnel and financial resources), and Serim test strips for 0.05% solutions (recommended for contexts where rapid, inexpensive, and low-training burden testing is needed). Measurement error from test methods not including pH adjustment varied significantly across the five chlorine solutions, which had pH values 5-11. Volunteers found test strip easiest and titration hardest; costs per 100 tests were $14-37 for test strips and $33-609 for titration. Given the

  10. Accuracy, Precision, Ease-Of-Use, and Cost of Methods to Test Ebola-Relevant Chlorine Solutions.

    PubMed

    Wells, Emma; Wolfe, Marlene K; Murray, Anna; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    To prevent transmission in Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is recommended to disinfect living things (hands and people) with 0.05% chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% chlorine solution. In the current West African EVD outbreak, these solutions (manufactured from calcium hypochlorite (HTH), sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)) have been widely used in both Ebola Treatment Unit and community settings. To ensure solution quality, testing is necessary, however test method appropriateness for these Ebola-relevant concentrations has not previously been evaluated. We identified fourteen commercially-available methods to test Ebola-relevant chlorine solution concentrations, including two titration methods, four DPD dilution methods, and six test strips. We assessed these methods by: 1) determining accuracy and precision by measuring in quintuplicate five different 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions manufactured from NaDCC, HTH, and NaOCl; 2) conducting volunteer testing to assess ease-of-use; and, 3) determining costs. Accuracy was greatest in titration methods (reference-12.4% error compared to reference method), then DPD dilution methods (2.4-19% error), then test strips (5.2-48% error); precision followed this same trend. Two methods had an accuracy of <10% error across all five chlorine solutions with good precision: Hach digital titration for 0.05% and 0.5% solutions (recommended for contexts with trained personnel and financial resources), and Serim test strips for 0.05% solutions (recommended for contexts where rapid, inexpensive, and low-training burden testing is needed). Measurement error from test methods not including pH adjustment varied significantly across the five chlorine solutions, which had pH values 5-11. Volunteers found test strip easiest and titration hardest; costs per 100 tests were $14-37 for test strips and $33-609 for titration. Given the

  11. Accuracy, Precision, Ease-Of-Use, and Cost of Methods to Test Ebola-Relevant Chlorine Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Emma; Wolfe, Marlene K.; Murray, Anna; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    To prevent transmission in Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is recommended to disinfect living things (hands and people) with 0.05% chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% chlorine solution. In the current West African EVD outbreak, these solutions (manufactured from calcium hypochlorite (HTH), sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)) have been widely used in both Ebola Treatment Unit and community settings. To ensure solution quality, testing is necessary, however test method appropriateness for these Ebola-relevant concentrations has not previously been evaluated. We identified fourteen commercially-available methods to test Ebola-relevant chlorine solution concentrations, including two titration methods, four DPD dilution methods, and six test strips. We assessed these methods by: 1) determining accuracy and precision by measuring in quintuplicate five different 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions manufactured from NaDCC, HTH, and NaOCl; 2) conducting volunteer testing to assess ease-of-use; and, 3) determining costs. Accuracy was greatest in titration methods (reference-12.4% error compared to reference method), then DPD dilution methods (2.4–19% error), then test strips (5.2–48% error); precision followed this same trend. Two methods had an accuracy of <10% error across all five chlorine solutions with good precision: Hach digital titration for 0.05% and 0.5% solutions (recommended for contexts with trained personnel and financial resources), and Serim test strips for 0.05% solutions (recommended for contexts where rapid, inexpensive, and low-training burden testing is needed). Measurement error from test methods not including pH adjustment varied significantly across the five chlorine solutions, which had pH values 5–11. Volunteers found test strip easiest and titration hardest; costs per 100 tests were $14–37 for test strips and $33–609 for titration

  12. Accuracy and precision of minimally-invasive cardiac output monitoring in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Koichi; Joosten, Alexandre; Murphy, Linda Suk-Ling; Desebbe, Olivier; Alexander, Brenton; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Cannesson, Maxime

    2016-10-01

    Several minimally-invasive technologies are available for cardiac output (CO) measurement in children, but the accuracy and precision of these devices have not yet been evaluated in a systematic review and meta-analysis. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature in PubMed, Cochrane Library of Clinical Trials, Scopus, and Web of Science from its inception to June 2014 assessing the accuracy and precision of all minimally-invasive CO monitoring systems used in children when compared with CO monitoring reference methods. Pooled mean bias, standard deviation, and mean percentage error of included studies were calculated using a random-effects model. The inter-study heterogeneity was also assessed using an I(2) statistic. A total of 20 studies (624 patients) were included. The overall random-effects pooled bias, and mean percentage error were 0.13 ± 0.44 l min(-1) and 29.1 %, respectively. Significant inter-study heterogeneity was detected (P < 0.0001, I(2) = 98.3 %). In the sub-analysis regarding the device, electrical cardiometry showed the smallest bias (-0.03 l min(-1)) and lowest percentage error (23.6 %). Significant residual heterogeneity remained after conducting sensitivity and subgroup analyses based on the various study characteristics. By meta-regression analysis, we found no independent effects of study characteristics on weighted mean difference between reference and tested methods. Although the pooled bias was small, the mean pooled percentage error was in the gray zone of clinical applicability. In the sub-group analysis, electrical cardiometry was the device that provided the most accurate measurement. However, a high heterogeneity between studies was found, likely due to a wide range of study characteristics. PMID:26315477

  13. Community-based Approaches to Improving Accuracy, Precision, and Reproducibility in U-Pb and U-Th Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, N. M.; Condon, D. J.; Bowring, S. A.; Schoene, B.; Dutton, A.; Rubin, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The last two decades have seen a grassroots effort by the international geochronology community to "calibrate Earth history through teamwork and cooperation," both as part of the EARTHTIME initiative and though several daughter projects with similar goals. Its mission originally challenged laboratories "to produce temporal constraints with uncertainties approaching 0.1% of the radioisotopic ages," but EARTHTIME has since exceeded its charge in many ways. Both the U-Pb and Ar-Ar chronometers first considered for high-precision timescale calibration now regularly produce dates at the sub-per mil level thanks to instrumentation, laboratory, and software advances. At the same time new isotope systems, including U-Th dating of carbonates, have developed comparable precision. But the larger, inter-related scientific challenges envisioned at EARTHTIME's inception remain - for instance, precisely calibrating the global geologic timescale, estimating rates of change around major climatic perturbations, and understanding evolutionary rates through time - and increasingly require that data from multiple geochronometers be combined. To solve these problems, the next two decades of uranium-daughter geochronology will require further advances in accuracy, precision, and reproducibility. The U-Th system has much in common with U-Pb, in that both parent and daughter isotopes are solids that can easily be weighed and dissolved in acid, and have well-characterized reference materials certified for isotopic composition and/or purity. For U-Pb, improving lab-to-lab reproducibility has entailed dissolving precisely weighed U and Pb metals of known purity and isotopic composition together to make gravimetric solutions, then using these to calibrate widely distributed tracers composed of artificial U and Pb isotopes. To mimic laboratory measurements, naturally occurring U and Pb isotopes were also mixed in proportions to mimic samples of three different ages, to be run as internal

  14. Cascade impactor (CI) mensuration--an assessment of the accuracy and precision of commercially available optical measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Frank; Ali, Aziz; Mitchell, Jolyon; Shelton, Christopher; Nichols, Steve

    2010-03-01

    Multi-stage cascade impactors (CIs) are the preferred measurement technique for characterizing the aerodynamic particle size distribution of an inhalable aerosol. Stage mensuration is the recommended pharmacopeial method for monitoring CI "fitness for purpose" within a GxP environment. The Impactor Sub-Team of the European Pharmaceutical Aerosol Group has undertaken an inter-laboratory study to assess both the precision and accuracy of a range of makes and models of instruments currently used for optical inspection of impactor stages. Measurement of two Andersen 8-stage 'non-viable' cascade impactor "reference" stages that were representative of jet sizes for this instrument type (stages 2 and 7) confirmed that all instruments evaluated were capable of reproducible jet measurement, with the overall capability being within the current pharmacopeial stage specifications for both stages. In the assessment of absolute accuracy, small, but consistent differences (ca. 0.6% of the certified value) observed between 'dots' and 'spots' of a calibrated chromium-plated reticule were observed, most likely the result of treatment of partially lit pixels along the circumference of this calibration standard. Measurements of three certified ring gauges, the smallest having a nominal diameter of 1.0 mm, were consistent with the observation where treatment of partially illuminated pixels at the periphery of the projected image can result in undersizing. However, the bias was less than 1% of the certified diameter. The optical inspection instruments evaluated are fully capable of confirming cascade impactor suitability in accordance with pharmacopeial practice.

  15. Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boucher, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suitability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment such as steel tapes, or they were taken continuously, using automated data recorders and pressure transducers. This report presents precision range and accuracy data established for manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, 1988-90. Precision and accuracy ranges were determined for all phases of the water-level measuring process, and overall accuracy ranges are presented. Precision ranges were determined for three steel tapes using a total of 462 data points. Mean precision ranges of these three tapes ranged from 0.014 foot to 0.026 foot. A mean precision range of 0.093 foot was calculated for the multiconductor cable, using 72 data points. Mean accuracy values were calculated on the basis of calibrations of the steel tapes and the multiconductor cable against a reference steel tape. The mean accuracy values of the steel tapes ranged from 0.053 foot, based on three data points to 0.078, foot based on six data points. The mean accuracy of the multiconductor cable was O. 15 foot, based on six data points. Overall accuracy of the water-level measurements was calculated by taking the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual accuracy values. Overall accuracy was calculated to be 0.36 foot for water-level measurements taken with steel tapes, without accounting for the inaccuracy of borehole deviations from vertical. An overall accuracy of 0.36 foot for measurements made with steel tapes is considered satisfactory for this project.

  16. An in-depth evaluation of accuracy and precision in Hg isotopic analysis via pneumatic nebulization and cold vapor generation multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rua-Ibarz, Ana; Bolea-Fernandez, Eduardo; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) isotopic analysis via multi-collector inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can provide relevant biogeochemical information by revealing sources, pathways, and sinks of this highly toxic metal. In this work, the capabilities and limitations of two different sample introduction systems, based on pneumatic nebulization (PN) and cold vapor generation (CVG), respectively, were evaluated in the context of Hg isotopic analysis via MC-ICP-MS. The effect of (i) instrument settings and acquisition parameters, (ii) concentration of analyte element (Hg), and internal standard (Tl)-used for mass discrimination correction purposes-and (iii) different mass bias correction approaches on the accuracy and precision of Hg isotope ratio results was evaluated. The extent and stability of mass bias were assessed in a long-term study (18 months, n = 250), demonstrating a precision ≤0.006% relative standard deviation (RSD). CVG-MC-ICP-MS showed an approximately 20-fold enhancement in Hg signal intensity compared with PN-MC-ICP-MS. For CVG-MC-ICP-MS, the mass bias induced by instrumental mass discrimination was accurately corrected for by using either external correction in a sample-standard bracketing approach (SSB) or double correction, consisting of the use of Tl as internal standard in a revised version of the Russell law (Baxter approach), followed by SSB. Concomitant matrix elements did not affect CVG-ICP-MS results. Neither with PN, nor with CVG, any evidence for mass-independent discrimination effects in the instrument was observed within the experimental precision obtained. CVG-MC-ICP-MS was finally used for Hg isotopic analysis of reference materials (RMs) of relevant environmental origin. The isotopic composition of Hg in RMs of marine biological origin testified of mass-independent fractionation that affected the odd-numbered Hg isotopes. While older RMs were used for validation purposes, novel Hg isotopic data are provided for the

  17. An evaluation of the accuracy and precision of a stand-alone submersible continuous ruminal pH measurement system.

    PubMed

    Penner, G B; Beauchemin, K A; Mutsvangwa, T

    2006-06-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to develop and evaluate the accuracy and precision of a new stand-alone submersible continuous ruminal pH measurement system called the Lethbridge Research Centre ruminal pH measurement system (LRCpH; Experiment 1); 2) to establish the accuracy and precision of a well-documented, previously used continuous indwelling ruminal pH system (CIpH) to ensure that the new system (LRCpH) was as accurate and precise as the previous system (CIpH; Experiment 2); and 3) to determine the required frequency for pH electrode standardization by comparing baseline millivolt readings of pH electrodes in pH buffers 4 and 7 after 0, 24, 48, and 72 h of ruminal incubation (Experiment 3). In Experiment 1, 6 pregnant Holstein heifers, 3 lactating, primiparous Holstein cows, and 2 Black Angus heifers were used. All experimental animals were fitted with permanent ruminal cannulas. In Experiment 2, the 3 cannulated, lactating, primiparous Holstein cows were used. In both experiments, ruminal pH was determined continuously using indwelling pH electrodes. Subsequently, mean pH values were then compared with ruminal pH values obtained using spot samples of ruminal fluid (MANpH) obtained at the same time. A correlation coefficient accounting for repeated measures was calculated and results were used to calculate the concordance correlation to examine the relationships between the LRCpH-derived values and MANpH, and the CIpH-derived values and MANpH. In Experiment 3, the 6 pregnant Holstein heifers were used along with 6 new submersible pH electrodes. In Experiments 1 and 2, the comparison of the LRCpH output (1- and 5-min averages) to MANpH had higher correlation coefficients after accounting for repeated measures (0.98 and 0.97 for 1- and 5-min averages, respectively) and concordance correlation coefficients (0.96 and 0.97 for 1- and 5-min averages, respectively) than the comparison of CIpH to MANpH (0.88 and 0.87, correlation coefficient and concordance

  18. Using AIRS and IASI Data to Evaluate Absolute Radiometric Accuracy and Stability for Climate Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    The creation of multi-decadal data sets for climate research requires better than 100 mK absolute calibration accuracy for the full range of spectral temperatures encountered under global conditions. Validation that this accuracy is achieved by the operational hyperspectral sounders from polar orbit is facilitated by comparing data from two instruments. Extreme radiometric calibration stability is critical to allow a long time series of noisy, but presumably long-term accurate truth measurements to be used for the validation of absolute accuracy at the 100 mK level. We use the RTGSST in the tropical oceans as ground truth. The difference between the AIRS derived sst2616 and the RTGSST based on six years of data shows a systematic cold bias of about 250 mK, but better than 4 mK/year stability. The double difference between AIRS and the RTGSST and IASI and the RTGSST with less than one year of data already allows statements at the 100 mK absolute level. It shows a 60 mK difference between the AIRS and the IASI calibration at 2616 cm-(sup 1) and 300 K, with a statistically insignificant 20 mK shift in six months.

  19. Single-frequency receivers as master permanent stations in GNSS networks: precision and accuracy of the positioning in mixed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabove, Paolo; Manzino, Ambrogio Maria

    2015-04-01

    The use of GPS/GNSS instruments is a common practice in the world at both a commercial and academic research level. Since last ten years, Continuous Operating Reference Stations (CORSs) networks were born in order to achieve the possibility to extend a precise positioning more than 15 km far from the master station. In this context, the Geomatics Research Group of DIATI at the Politecnico di Torino has carried out several experiments in order to evaluate the achievable precision obtainable with different GNSS receivers (geodetic and mass-market) and antennas if a CORSs network is considered. This work starts from the research above described, in particular focusing the attention on the usefulness of single frequency permanent stations in order to thicken the existing CORSs, especially for monitoring purposes. Two different types of CORSs network are available today in Italy: the first one is the so called "regional network" and the second one is the "national network", where the mean inter-station distances are about 25/30 and 50/70 km respectively. These distances are useful for many applications (e.g. mobile mapping) if geodetic instruments are considered but become less useful if mass-market instruments are used or if the inter-station distance between master and rover increases. In this context, some innovative GNSS networks were developed and tested, analyzing the performance of rover's positioning in terms of quality, accuracy and reliability both in real-time and post-processing approach. The use of single frequency GNSS receivers leads to have some limits, especially due to a limited baseline length, the possibility to obtain a correct fixing of the phase ambiguity for the network and to fix the phase ambiguity correctly also for the rover. These factors play a crucial role in order to reach a positioning with a good level of accuracy (as centimetric o better) in a short time and with an high reliability. The goal of this work is to investigate about the

  20. Standardization of Operator-Dependent Variables Affecting Precision and Accuracy of the Disk Diffusion Method for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Maurer, Florian P; Pfiffner, Tamara; Böttger, Erik C; Furrer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    Parameters like zone reading, inoculum density, and plate streaking influence the precision and accuracy of disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). While improved reading precision has been demonstrated using automated imaging systems, standardization of the inoculum and of plate streaking have not been systematically investigated yet. This study analyzed whether photometrically controlled inoculum preparation and/or automated inoculation could further improve the standardization of disk diffusion. Suspensions of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 of 0.5 McFarland standard were prepared by 10 operators using both visual comparison to turbidity standards and a Densichek photometer (bioMérieux), and the resulting CFU counts were determined. Furthermore, eight experienced operators each inoculated 10 Mueller-Hinton agar plates using a single 0.5 McFarland standard bacterial suspension of E. coli ATCC 25922 using regular cotton swabs, dry flocked swabs (Copan, Brescia, Italy), or an automated streaking device (BD-Kiestra, Drachten, Netherlands). The mean CFU counts obtained from 0.5 McFarland standard E. coli ATCC 25922 suspensions were significantly different for suspensions prepared by eye and by Densichek (P < 0.001). Preparation by eye resulted in counts that were closer to the CLSI/EUCAST target of 10(8) CFU/ml than those resulting from Densichek preparation. No significant differences in the standard deviations of the CFU counts were observed. The interoperator differences in standard deviations when dry flocked swabs were used decreased significantly compared to the differences when regular cotton swabs were used, whereas the mean of the standard deviations of all operators together was not significantly altered. In contrast, automated streaking significantly reduced both interoperator differences, i.e., the individual standard deviations, compared to the standard deviations for the manual method, and the mean of

  1. Standardization of Operator-Dependent Variables Affecting Precision and Accuracy of the Disk Diffusion Method for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Maurer, Florian P; Pfiffner, Tamara; Böttger, Erik C; Furrer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    Parameters like zone reading, inoculum density, and plate streaking influence the precision and accuracy of disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). While improved reading precision has been demonstrated using automated imaging systems, standardization of the inoculum and of plate streaking have not been systematically investigated yet. This study analyzed whether photometrically controlled inoculum preparation and/or automated inoculation could further improve the standardization of disk diffusion. Suspensions of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 of 0.5 McFarland standard were prepared by 10 operators using both visual comparison to turbidity standards and a Densichek photometer (bioMérieux), and the resulting CFU counts were determined. Furthermore, eight experienced operators each inoculated 10 Mueller-Hinton agar plates using a single 0.5 McFarland standard bacterial suspension of E. coli ATCC 25922 using regular cotton swabs, dry flocked swabs (Copan, Brescia, Italy), or an automated streaking device (BD-Kiestra, Drachten, Netherlands). The mean CFU counts obtained from 0.5 McFarland standard E. coli ATCC 25922 suspensions were significantly different for suspensions prepared by eye and by Densichek (P < 0.001). Preparation by eye resulted in counts that were closer to the CLSI/EUCAST target of 10(8) CFU/ml than those resulting from Densichek preparation. No significant differences in the standard deviations of the CFU counts were observed. The interoperator differences in standard deviations when dry flocked swabs were used decreased significantly compared to the differences when regular cotton swabs were used, whereas the mean of the standard deviations of all operators together was not significantly altered. In contrast, automated streaking significantly reduced both interoperator differences, i.e., the individual standard deviations, compared to the standard deviations for the manual method, and the mean of

  2. Precision and accuracy in the quantitative analysis of biological samples by accelerator mass spectrometry: application in microdose absolute bioavailability studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lan; Li, Jing; Kasserra, Claudia; Song, Qi; Arjomand, Ali; Hesk, David; Chowdhury, Swapan K

    2011-07-15

    Determination of the pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of an experimental compound, SCH 900518, following a 89.7 nCi (100 μg) intravenous (iv) dose of (14)C-SCH 900518 2 h post 200 mg oral administration of nonradiolabeled SCH 900518 to six healthy male subjects has been described. The plasma concentration of SCH 900518 was measured using a validated LC-MS/MS system, and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used for quantitative plasma (14)C-SCH 900518 concentration determination. Calibration standards and quality controls were included for every batch of sample analysis by AMS to ensure acceptable quality of the assay. Plasma (14)C-SCH 900518 concentrations were derived from the regression function established from the calibration standards, rather than directly from isotopic ratios from AMS measurement. The precision and accuracy of quality controls and calibration standards met the requirements of bioanalytical guidance (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Center for Veterinary Medicine. Guidance for Industry: Bioanalytical Method Validation (ucm070107), May 2001. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceCompilanceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm070107.pdf ). The AMS measurement had a linear response range from 0.0159 to 9.07 dpm/mL for plasma (14)C-SCH 900158 concentrations. The CV and accuracy were 3.4-8.5% and 94-108% (82-119% for the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ)), respectively, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The absolute bioavailability was calculated from the dose-normalized area under the curve of iv and oral doses after the plasma concentrations were plotted vs the sampling time post oral dose. The mean absolute bioavailability of SCH 900518 was 40.8% (range 16.8-60.6%). The typical accuracy and standard deviation in AMS quantitative analysis of drugs from human plasma samples have been reported for the first time, and the impact of these

  3. The influence of feature selection methods on accuracy, stability and interpretability of molecular signatures.

    PubMed

    Haury, Anne-Claire; Gestraud, Pierre; Vert, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Biomarker discovery from high-dimensional data is a crucial problem with enormous applications in biology and medicine. It is also extremely challenging from a statistical viewpoint, but surprisingly few studies have investigated the relative strengths and weaknesses of the plethora of existing feature selection methods. In this study we compare 32 feature selection methods on 4 public gene expression datasets for breast cancer prognosis, in terms of predictive performance, stability and functional interpretability of the signatures they produce. We observe that the feature selection method has a significant influence on the accuracy, stability and interpretability of signatures. Surprisingly, complex wrapper and embedded methods generally do not outperform simple univariate feature selection methods, and ensemble feature selection has generally no positive effect. Overall a simple Student's t-test seems to provide the best results.

  4. Determination of the precision and accuracy of morphological measurements using the Kinect™ sensor: comparison with standard stereophotogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Bonnechère, B; Jansen, B; Salvia, P; Bouzahouene, H; Sholukha, V; Cornelis, J; Rooze, M; Van Sint Jan, S

    2014-01-01

    The recent availability of the Kinect™ sensor, a low-cost Markerless Motion Capture (MMC) system, could give new and interesting insights into ergonomics (e.g. the creation of a morphological database). Extensive validation of this system is still missing. The aim of the study was to determine if the Kinect™ sensor can be used as an easy, cheap and fast tool to conduct morphology estimation. A total of 48 subjects were analysed using MMC. Results were compared with measurements obtained from a high-resolution stereophotogrammetric system, a marker-based system (MBS). Differences between MMC and MBS were found; however, these differences were systematically correlated and enabled regression equations to be obtained to correct MMC results. After correction, final results were in agreement with MBS data (p = 0.99). Results show that measurements were reproducible and precise after applying regression equations. Kinect™ sensors-based systems therefore seem to be suitable for use as fast and reliable tools to estimate morphology. Practitioner Summary: The Kinect™ sensor could eventually be used for fast morphology estimation as a body scanner. This paper presents an extensive validation of this device for anthropometric measurements in comparison to manual measurements and stereophotogrammetric devices. The accuracy is dependent on the segment studied but the reproducibility is excellent. PMID:24646374

  5. Strategy for high-accuracy-and-precision retrieval of atmospheric methane from the mid-infrared FTIR network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussmann, R.; Forster, F.; Rettinger, M.; Jones, N.

    2011-05-01

    We present a strategy (MIR-GBM v1.0) for the retrieval of column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of methane (XCH4) with a precision <0.3 % (1-σ diurnal variation, 7-min integration) and a seasonal bias <0.14 % from mid-infrared ground-based solar FTIR measurements of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, comprising 22 FTIR stations). This makes NDACC methane data useful for satellite validation and for the inversion of regional-scale sources and sinks in addition to long-term trend analysis. Such retrievals complement the high accuracy and precision near-infrared observations of the younger Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) with time series dating back 15 yr or so before TCCON operations began. MIR-GBM v1.0 is using HITRAN 2000 (including the 2001 update release) and 3 spectral micro windows (2613.70-2615.40 cm-1, 2835.50-2835.80 cm-1, 2921.00-2921.60 cm-1). A first-order Tikhonov constraint is applied to the state vector given in units of per cent of volume mixing ratio. It is tuned to achieve minimum diurnal variation without damping seasonality. Final quality selection of the retrievals uses a threshold for the ratio of root-mean-square spectral residuals and information content (<0.15 %). Column-averaged dry-air mole fractions are calculated using the retrieved methane profiles and four-times-daily pressure-temperature-humidity profiles from National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) interpolated to the time of measurement. MIR-GBM v1.0 is the optimum of 24 tested retrieval strategies (8 different spectral micro-window selections, 3 spectroscopic line lists: HITRAN 2000, 2004, 2008). Dominant errors of the non-optimum retrieval strategies are HDO/H2O-CH4 interference errors (seasonal bias up to ≈4 %). Therefore interference errors have been quantified at 3 test sites covering clear-sky integrated water vapor levels representative for all NDACC sites (Wollongong maximum = 44.9 mm, Garmisch mean = 14.9 mm

  6. Strategy for high-accuracy-and-precision retrieval of atmospheric methane from the mid-infrared FTIR network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussmann, R.; Forster, F.; Rettinger, M.; Jones, N.

    2011-09-01

    We present a strategy (MIR-GBM v1.0) for the retrieval of column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of methane (XCH4) with a precision <0.3% (1-σ diurnal variation, 7-min integration) and a seasonal bias <0.14% from mid-infrared ground-based solar FTIR measurements of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, comprising 22 FTIR stations). This makes NDACC methane data useful for satellite validation and for the inversion of regional-scale sources and sinks in addition to long-term trend analysis. Such retrievals complement the high accuracy and precision near-infrared observations of the younger Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) with time series dating back 15 years or so before TCCON operations began. MIR-GBM v1.0 is using HITRAN 2000 (including the 2001 update release) and 3 spectral micro windows (2613.70-2615.40 cm-1, 2835.50-2835.80 cm-1, 2921.00-2921.60 cm-1). A first-order Tikhonov constraint is applied to the state vector given in units of per cent of volume mixing ratio. It is tuned to achieve minimum diurnal variation without damping seasonality. Final quality selection of the retrievals uses a threshold for the goodness of fit (χ2 < 1) as well as for the ratio of root-mean-square spectral noise and information content (<0.15%). Column-averaged dry-air mole fractions are calculated using the retrieved methane profiles and four-times-daily pressure-temperature-humidity profiles from National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) interpolated to the time of measurement. MIR-GBM v1.0 is the optimum of 24 tested retrieval strategies (8 different spectral micro-window selections, 3 spectroscopic line lists: HITRAN 2000, 2004, 2008). Dominant errors of the non-optimum retrieval strategies are systematic HDO/H2O-CH4 interference errors leading to a seasonal bias up to ≈5%. Therefore interference errors have been quantified at 3 test sites covering clear-sky integrated water vapor levels representative for all NDACC

  7. Precision blood-leak detector with high long-time stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Christos; Kleuver, Wolfram

    1999-11-01

    With this publication a precision blood-leak-detector is presented. The blood-leak-detector is used for recognition of fractures in the dialyzer of a kidney-machine. It has to detect safely a blood flow of ml/min to exclude any risk for the patient. A lot of systems exist for blood-leak-detection. All of them use the same principle. They detect the light absorption in the dialyze fluid. The actual used detectors are inferior to the new developed sensor in resolution and long-time stability. Regular test of the existing systems and high failure rates are responsible for the high maintenance.

  8. Simultaneous enhancements of conductivity and stability for anion exchange membranes (AEMs) through precise structure design.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jin; Wu, Liang; Wei, Bing; Chen, Yaoyao; Xu, Tongwen

    2014-09-26

    Polymeric materials as anion exchange membranes (AEMs) play an essential role in the field of energy and environment. The achievement of high performance AEMs by the precise manipulation of macromolecular architecture remains a daunting challenge. Herein, we firstly report a novel rod-coil graft copolymer AEM, possessing rigid hydrophobic main chains and soft hydrophilic graft chains. The low graft density, which can alleviate the adverse influences of ionic graft chains on the main chains, was obtained by using the living polymerization technique. Consequently, the grafted ionic groups which result in the degradation of polymer backbone was decreased to a small degree. Moreover, the relatively long graft chains induced the nanophase separation between the hydrophobic polymer chains and hydrophilic graft chains, which creates a convenient pathway for high hydroxide ion mobility. Such an accurate molecular design simultaneously improves the hydroxide ion conductivity and alkaline stability as well as dimensional stability.

  9. Quantitative analysis of factors affecting intraoperative precision and stability of optoelectronic and electromagnetic tracking systems.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A; Schicho, K; Birkfellner, W; Figl, M; Seemann, R; König, F; Kainberger, Franz; Ewers, R

    2002-05-01

    This study aims to provide a quantitative analysis of the factors affecting the actual precision and stability of optoelectronic and electromagnetic tracking systems in computer-aided surgery under real clinical/intraoperative conditions. A "phantom-skull" with five precisely determined reference distances between marker spheres is used for all measurements. Three optoelectronic and one electromagnetic tracking systems are included in this study. The experimental design is divided into three parts: (1) evaluation of serial- and multislice-CT (computed tomography) images of the phantom-skull for the precision of distance measurements by means of navigation software without a digitizer, (2) digitizer measurements under realistic intraoperative conditions with the factors OR-lamp (radiating into the field of view of the digitizer) or/and "handling with ferromagnetic surgical instruments" (in the field of view of the digitizer) and (3) "point-measurements" to analyze the influence of changes in the angle of inclination of the stylus axis. Deviations between reference distances and measured values are statistically investigated by means of analysis of variance. Computerized measurements of distances based on serial-CT data were more precise than based on multislice-CT data. All tracking systems included in this study proved to be considerably less precise under realistic OR conditions when compared to the technical specifications in the manuals of the systems. Changes in the angle of inclination of the stylus axis resulted in deviations of up to 3.40 mm (mean deviations for all systems ranging from 0.49 to 1.42 mm, variances ranging from 0.09 to 1.44 mm), indicating a strong need for improvements of stylus design. The electromagnetic tracking system investigated in this study was not significantly affected by small ferromagnetic surgical instruments.

  10. Evaluation of dimensional stability and accuracy of autoclavable polyvinyl siloxane impression material.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Subash M; Vijitha, D; Karthikeyan, S; Balasubramanian, R; Satish, A

    2013-12-01

    Dimensionally stable autoclavable impressions will be effective in controlling the cross-infection and contamination caused by patient's saliva and other oral secretions. The accuracy of newly introduced autoclavable polyvinyl siloxane impression material was assessed for its dimensional stability and accuracy. A standard metal model (Dentoform, U-501, Columbia) was customised for impression making. The impressions were made using the newly introduced polyvinyl siloxane impression materials (AFFINIS, Coltene/Whaledent AG, 9450 Alstalten, Switzerland). Fifty impressions were made and were divided into two groups A and B of 25 each. Group A was the control sample (non-autoclaved impressions) and group B was the test sample (autoclaved impressions), which was subjected to the steam autoclave procedure at 134 °C for 18 min, casts were poured in type IV gypsum products. The customised metal model, casts obtained from control and test group were subjected to laboratory evaluation with help of a travelling microscope (×10 magnification), and digital vernier calliper (0.01 mm/10 μm accuracy). Data analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and One-Sample t test to evaluate the overall accuracy (P < 0.005). As a result, there was an average reduction of 0.016 μm in overall dimension between the test and the control group when compared with the master model, which is not statistically or clinically significant. The newly introduced polyvinyl siloxane impression material is accurate and dimensional stable for clinical use when steam autoclaved at 134 °C for 18 min.

  11. Creating high-stability high-precision bipolar trim power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Merz, William A.

    2012-07-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is founded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) office of science for the technology advancement and physics research in electron beam accelerator. This facility has the state of the art technology to carry out world-class cutting-edge experiments for the nucleus composition and atomic characteristics identification and exploration for the nature of the matter in the universe. A continuous wave electron beam is featured for such experiments, thus precise and stable trim power supply is required to meet such purpose. This paper demonstrates the challenges and solutions to design, assemble, fabrication and test such high-precision high-stability power supplies. This paper presents the novel design and first article test of the ±20A ±75V bipolar, 100ppm stability level current-regulated high-power trim power supplies for the beam manipulation. This special design can provide valuable documentation and reference values for future designs and special applications in particle accelerator power supply creation.

  12. Highly precise stabilization of intracavity prism-based Er:fiber frequency comb using optical-microwave phase detector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuangyou; Wu, Jiutao; Leng, Jianxiao; Lai, Shunnan; Zhao, Jianye

    2014-11-15

    In this Letter, we demonstrate a fully stabilized Er:fiber frequency comb by using a fiber-based, high-precision optical-microwave phase detector. To achieve high-precision and long-term phase locking of the repetition rate to a microwave reference, frequency control techniques (tuning pump power and cavity length) are combined together as its feedback. Since the pump power has been used for stabilization of the repetition rate, we introduce a pair of intracavity prisms as a regulator for carrier-envelope offset frequency, thereby phase locking one mode of the comb to the rubidium saturated absorption transition line. The stabilized comb performs the same high stability as the reference for the repetition rate and provides a residual frequency instability of 3.6×10(-13) for each comb mode. The demonstrated stabilization scheme could provide a high-precision comb for optical communication, direct frequency comb spectroscopy.

  13. Accuracy, precision and response time of consumer fork, remote digital probe and disposable indicator thermometers for cooked ground beef patties and chicken breasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine different commercially available instant-read consumer thermometers (forks, remotes, digital probe and disposable color change indicators) were tested for accuracy and precision compared to a calibrated thermocouple in 80 percent and 90 percent lean ground beef patties, and boneless and bone-in...

  14. An Examination of the Precision and Technical Accuracy of the First Wave of Group-Randomized Trials Funded by the Institute of Education Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Raudenbush, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the power analyses for the first wave of group-randomized trials funded by the Institute of Education Sciences. Specifically, it assesses the precision and technical accuracy of the studies. The authors identified the appropriate experimental design and estimated the minimum detectable standardized effect size (MDES) for each…

  15. [Research on Accuracy and Stability of Inversing Vegetation Chlorophyll Content by Spectral Index Method].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-ling; Yang, Hang; Chen, Xiao-ping; Wang, Shu-dong; Li, Xue-ke; Liu, Kai; Cen, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Spectral index method was widely applied to the inversion of crop chlorophyll content. In the present study, PSR3500 spectrometer and SPAD-502 chlorophyll fluorometer were used to acquire the spectrum and relative chlorophyll content (SPAD value) of winter wheat leaves on May 2nd 2013 when it was at the jointing stage of winter wheat. Then the measured spectra were resampled to simulate TM multispectral data and Hyperion hyperspectral data respectively, using the Gaussian spectral response function. We chose four typical spectral indices including normalized difference vegetation index (NDVD, triangle vegetation index (TVI), the ratio of modified transformed chlorophyll absorption ratio index (MCARI) to optimized soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) (MCARI/OSAVI) and vegetation index based on universal pattern decomposition (VIUPD), which were constructed with the feature bands sensitive to the vegetation chlorophyll. After calculating these spectral indices based on the resampling TM and Hyperion data, the regression equation between spectral indices and chlorophyll content was established. For TM, the result indicates that VIUPD has the best correlation with chlorophyll (R2 = 0.819 7) followed by NDVI (R2 = 0.791 8), while MCARI/OSAVI and TVI also show a good correlation with R2 higher than 0.5. For the simulated Hyperion data, VIUPD again ranks first with R2 = 0.817 1, followed by MCARI/OSAVI (R2 = 0.658 6), while NDVI and TVI show very low values with R2 less than 0.2. It was demonstrated that VIUPD has the best accuracy and stability to estimate chlorophyll of winter wheat whether using simulated TM data or Hyperion data, which reaffirms that VIUPD is comparatively sensor independent. The chlorophyll estimation accuracy and stability of MCARI/OSAVI also works well, partly because OSAVI could reduce the influence of backgrounds. Two broadband spectral indices NDVI and TVI are weak for the chlorophyll estimation of simulated Hyperion data mainly because of

  16. Deformable Image Registration for Adaptive Radiation Therapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Accuracy and Precision in the Presence of Tumor Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Mencarelli, Angelo; Kranen, Simon Robert van; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Beek, Suzanne van; Nico Rasch, Coenraad Robert; Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare deformable image registration (DIR) accuracy and precision for normal and tumor tissues in head and neck cancer patients during the course of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with oropharyngeal tumors, who underwent submucosal implantation of small gold markers (average 6, range 4-10) around the tumor and were treated with RT were retrospectively selected. Two observers identified 15 anatomical features (landmarks) representative of normal tissues in the planning computed tomography (pCT) scan and in weekly cone beam CTs (CBCTs). Gold markers were digitally removed after semiautomatic identification in pCTs and CBCTs. Subsequently, landmarks and gold markers on pCT were propagated to CBCTs, using a b-spline-based DIR and, for comparison, rigid registration (RR). To account for observer variability, the pair-wise difference analysis of variance method was applied. DIR accuracy (systematic error) and precision (random error) for landmarks and gold markers were quantified. Time trend of the precisions for RR and DIR over the weekly CBCTs were evaluated. Results: DIR accuracies were submillimeter and similar for normal and tumor tissue. DIR precision (1 SD) on the other hand was significantly different (P<.01), with 2.2 mm vector length in normal tissue versus 3.3 mm in tumor tissue. No significant time trend in DIR precision was found for normal tissue, whereas in tumor, DIR precision was significantly (P<.009) degraded during the course of treatment by 0.21 mm/week. Conclusions: DIR for tumor registration proved to be less precise than that for normal tissues due to limited contrast and complex non-elastic tumor response. Caution should therefore be exercised when applying DIR for tumor changes in adaptive procedures.

  17. Copper-64-alloyed gold nanoparticles for cancer imaging: improved radiolabel stability and diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongfeng; Sultan, Deborah; Detering, Lisa; Cho, Sangho; Sun, Guorong; Pierce, Richard; Wooley, Karen L; Liu, Yongjian

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles, especially positron-emitter- labeled gold nanostructures, have gained steadily increasing attention in biomedical applications. Of the radionuclides used for nanoparticle positron emission tomography imaging, radiometals such as (64) Cu have been widely employed. Currently, radiolabeling through macrocyclic chelators is the most commonly used strategy. However, the radiolabel stability may be a limiting factor for further translational research. We report the integration of (64) Cu into the structures of gold nanoparticles. With this approach, the specific radioactivity of the alloyed gold nanoparticles could be freely and precisely controlled by the addition of the precursor (64) CuCl2 to afford sensitive detection. The direct incorporation of (64) Cu into the lattice of the gold nanoparticle structure ensured the radiolabel stability for accurate localization in vivo. The superior pharmacokinetic and positron emission tomography imaging capabilities demonstrate high passive tumor targeting and contrast ratios in a mouse breast cancer model, as well as the great potential of this unique alloyed nanostructure for preclinical and translational imaging.

  18. Truncation effect on Taylor-Aris dispersion in lattice Boltzmann schemes: Accuracy towards stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina; Roux, Laetitia

    2015-10-01

    The Taylor dispersion in parabolic velocity field provides a well-known benchmark for advection-diffusion (ADE) schemes and serves as a first step towards accurate modeling of the high-order non-Gaussian effects in heterogeneous flow. While applying the Lattice Boltzmann ADE two-relaxation-times (TRT) scheme for a transport with given Péclet number (Pe) one should select six free-tunable parameters, namely, (i) molecular-diffusion-scale, equilibrium parameter; (ii) three families of equilibrium weights, assigned to the terms of mass, velocity and numerical-diffusion-correction, and (iii) two relaxation rates. We analytically and numerically investigate the respective roles of all these degrees of freedom in the accuracy and stability in the evolution of a Gaussian plume. For this purpose, the third- and fourth-order transient multi-dimensional analysis of the recurrence equations of the TRT ADE scheme is extended for a spatially-variable velocity field. The key point is in the coupling of the truncation and Taylor dispersion analysis which allows us to identify the second-order numerical correction δkT to Taylor dispersivity coefficient kT. The procedure is exemplified for a straight Poiseuille flow where δkT is given in a closed analytical form in equilibrium and relaxation parameter spaces. The predicted longitudinal dispersivity is in excellent agreement with the numerical experiments over a wide parameter range. In relatively small Pe-range, the relative dispersion error increases with Péclet number. This deficiency reduces in the intermediate and high Pe-range where it becomes Pe-independent and velocity-amplitude independent. Eliminating δkT by a proper parameter choice and employing specular reflection for zero flux condition on solid boundaries, the d2Q9 TRT ADE scheme may reproduce the Taylor-Aris result quasi-exactly, from very coarse to fine grids, and from very small to arbitrarily high Péclet numbers. Since free-tunable product of two

  19. Development of a High Precision and Stability Ambient N2O and CO Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jingang; Hoffnagle, John; Tan, Sze; Dong, Feng; Fleck, Derek; Yiu, John; Huang, Kuan; Leggett, Graham; He, Yonggang

    2016-04-01

    With a global warming potential of nearly 300, N2O is a critically important greenhouse gas, contributing about 5 % of the US total GHG emissions. Agriculture soil management practices are the dominant source of anthropogenic N2O emissions, contributing nearly 75 % of US N2O emissions. In urban areas, vehicle tailpipe emissions and waste water treatment plants are significant sources of N2O. We report here a new mid-infrared laser-based cavity ring-down spectrometer (Picarro G5310) that was recently developed to simultaneously measure sub-ppb ambient concentrations of two key greenhouse gas species, N2O and CO, while measuring H2O as well. It combines a quantum cascade laser with a proprietary 3-mirror optical cavity. The ambient N2O and CO measurement precisions are 0.1ppb (10sec), 0.014ppb (600sec), and 0.006ppb (3000sec); and the measurements could even be averaged down over 3 hours, giving measurement precisions of 0.003ppb. The measurable N2O and CO ranges have been tested up to 2.5ppm. With the high precision and unparalleled stability, G5310 is believed a promising tool for long-term monitoring in atmospheric sciences. The new optical analyzer was set up to monitor N2O and CO (G5310), along with CO2 and CH4(G4301), in ambient air obtained from a 10 meter tower in Santa Clara, California. Evidence of contributions from traffic and a nearby sewage treatment facility were expected in the measurement data.

  20. International normalised ratio (INR) measured on the CoaguChek S and XS compared with the laboratory for determination of precision and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas D; Larsen, Torben B; Jensen, Claus; Maegaard, Marianne; Sørensen, Benny

    2009-03-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy is monitored by the use of international normalised ratio (INR). Patients performing self-management estimate INR using a coagulometer, but studies have been partly flawed regarding the estimated precision and accuracy. The objective was to estimate the imprecision and accuracy for two different coagulometers (CoaguChek S and XS). Twenty-four patients treated with coumarin were prospectively followed for six weeks. INR's were analyzed weekly in duplicates on both coagulometers, and compared with results from the hospital laboratory. Statistical analysis included Bland-Altman plot, 95% limits of agreement, coefficient of variance (CV), and an analysis of variance using a mixed effect model. Comparing 141 duplicate measurements (a total of 564 measurements) of INR, we found that the CoaguChek S and CoaguChek XS had a precision (CV) of 3.4% and 2.3%, respectively. Regarding analytical accuracy, the INR measurements tended to be lower on the coagulometers, and regarding diagnostic accuracy the CoaguChek S and CoaguChek XS deviated more than 15% from the laboratory measurements in 40% and 43% of the measurements, respectively. In conclusion, the precision of the coagulometers was found to be good, but only the CoaguChek XS had a precision within the predefined limit of 3%. Regarding analytical accuracy, the INR measurements tended to be lower on the coagulometers, compared to the laboratory. A large proportion of measurement of the coagulometers deviated more than 15% from the laboratory measurements. Whether this will have a clinical impact awaits further studies.

  1. Towards the GEOSAT Follow-On Precise Orbit Determination Goals of High Accuracy and Near-Real-Time Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Beckley, Brian D.; Lillibridge, John L.

    2006-01-01

    The US Navy's GEOSAT Follow-On spacecraft (GFO) primary mission objective is to map the oceans using a radar altimeter. Satellite laser ranging data, especially in combination with altimeter crossover data, offer the only means of determining high-quality precise orbits. Two tuned gravity models, PGS7727 and PGS7777b, were created at NASA GSFC for GFO that reduce the predicted radial orbit through degree 70 to 13.7 and 10.0 mm. A macromodel was developed to model the nonconservative forces and the SLR spacecraft measurement offset was adjusted to remove a mean bias. Using these improved models, satellite-ranging data, altimeter crossover data, and Doppler data are used to compute both daily medium precision orbits with a latency of less than 24 hours. Final precise orbits are also computed using these tracking data and exported with a latency of three to four weeks to NOAA for use on the GFO Geophysical Data Records (GDR s). The estimated orbit precision of the daily orbits is between 10 and 20 cm, whereas the precise orbits have a precision of 5 cm.

  2. The precision and accuracy of iterative and non-iterative methods of photopeak integration in activation analysis, with particular reference to the analysis of multiplets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    The relative precisions obtainable using two digital methods, and three iterative least squares fitting procedures of photopeak integration have been compared empirically using 12 replicate counts of a test sample with 14 photopeaks of varying intensity. The accuracy by which the various iterative fitting methods could analyse synthetic doublets has also been evaluated, and compared with a simple non-iterative approach. ?? 1977 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  3. Precision of high-resolution multibeam echo sounding coupled with high-accuracy positioning in a shallow water coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstsen, Verner B.; Noormets, Riko; Hebbeln, Dierk; Bartholomä, Alex; Flemming, Burg W.

    2006-09-01

    Over 4 years, repetitive bathymetric measurements of a shipwreck in the Grådyb tidal inlet channel in the Danish Wadden Sea were carried out using a state-of-the-art high-resolution multibeam echosounder (MBES) coupled with a real-time long range kinematic (LRK™) global positioning system. Seven measurements during a single survey in 2003 ( n=7) revealed a horizontal and vertical precision of the MBES system of ±20 and ±2 cm, respectively, at a 95% confidence level. By contrast, four annual surveys from 2002 to 2005 ( n=4) yielded a horizontal and vertical precision (at 95% confidence level) of only ±30 and ±8 cm, respectively. This difference in precision can be explained by three main factors: (1) the dismounting of the system between the annual surveys, (2) rougher sea conditions during the survey in 2004 and (3) the limited number of annual surveys. In general, the precision achieved here did not correspond to the full potential of the MBES system, as this could certainly have been improved by an increase in coverage density (soundings/m2), achievable by reducing the survey speed of the vessel. Nevertheless, precision was higher than that reported to date for earlier offshore test surveys using comparable equipment.

  4. Accuracy and stability of impression materials subjected to chemical disinfection - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kotsiomiti, E; Tzialla, A; Hatjivasiliou, K

    2008-04-01

    Disinfection of impressions by immersion or spraying with disinfecting solutions is considered nowadays mandatory for effective infection control. The purpose of this review was to examine existing evidence on the effects that chemical disinfection may have on critical qualities of impressions, namely dimensional accuracy and stability over time. A PubMed search was conducted to include original laboratory research articles written in English, published between 1980 and 2005 in peer-reviewed journals and investigating the effect of chemical disinfection, by immersion or spraying, on the dimensional changes that the impression materials experience after setting. Studies were also sought manually, by tracing the references cited in the retrieved articles. The reports on dimensional changes of disinfected impression materials, although rather numerous, are difficult to compare and analyze because of variations of the experimental design. The investigations broadly agree that the disinfection process does not generally affect the dimensional integrity of the impressions, in spite of the statistically significant differences occasionally found. However, the immersion in the disinfecting solution encourages water absorption phenomena in the case of the so-called hydrophilic impression materials, especially after the long-term immersion. Chemical interactions between impressions and disinfectants may occur, but they do not appear to influence the dimensional behaviour of the former. The overall effect of the disinfection is influenced not only by the changes experienced by the impression per se, but also by the alterations of the acrylic tray containing the impression and of the gypsum product poured in it.

  5. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome

    PubMed Central

    SHIMOKAWA, Nobuyuki; ABE, Junya; SATOH, Hidetoshi; ARIMA, Hironori; TAKAMI, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  6. The improvement of OPC accuracy and stability by the model parameters' analysis and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, No-Young; Choi, Woon-Hyuk; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Sung-Il; Lee, Sun-Yong

    2007-10-01

    The OPC model is very critical in the sub 45nm device because the Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) is so tight to meet the device performance and the process window latitude for the production level. The OPC model is generally composed of an optical model and a resist model. Each of them has physical terms to be calculated without any wafer data and empirical terms to be fitted with real wafer data to make the optical modeling and the resist modeling. Empirical terms are usually related to the OPC accuracy, but are likely to be overestimated with the wafer data and so those terms can deteriorate OPC stability in case of being overestimated by a small cost function. Several physical terms have been used with ideal value in the optical property and even weren't be considered because those parameters didn't give a critical impact on the OPC accuracy, but these parameters become necessary to be applied to the OPC modeling at the low k1 process. Currently, real optic parameter instead of ideal optical parameter like the laser bandwidth, source map, pupil polarization including the phase and intensity difference start to be measured and those real measured value are used for the OPC modeling. These measured values can improve the model accuracy and stability. In the other hand these parameters can make the OPC model to overcorrect the process proximity errors without careful handling. The laser bandwidth, source map, pupil polarization, and focus centering for the optical modeling are analyzed and the sample data weight scheme and resist model terms are investigated, too. The image blurring by actual laser bandwidth in the exposure system is modeled and the modeling result shows that the extraction of the 2D patterns is necessary to get a reasonable result due to the 2D patterns' measurement noise in the SEM. The source map data from the exposure machine shows lots of horizontal and vertical intensity difference and this phenomenon must come from the measurement noise

  7. Accuracy and precision of a custom camera-based system for 2D and 3D motion tracking during speech and nonspeech motor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories, and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable alternative, provided that they offer high temporal resolution and sub-millimeter accuracy. Method We examined the accuracy and precision of 2D and 3D data recorded with a system that combines consumer-grade digital cameras capturing 60, 120, or 240 frames per second (fps), retro-reflective markers, commercially-available computer software (APAS, Ariel Dynamics), and a custom calibration device. Results Overall mean error (RMSE) across tests was 0.15 mm for static tracking and 0.26 mm for dynamic tracking, with corresponding precision (SD) values of 0.11 and 0.19 mm, respectively. The effect of frame rate varied across conditions, but, generally, accuracy was reduced at 240 fps. The effect of marker size (3 vs. 6 mm diameter) was negligible at all frame rates for both 2D and 3D data. Conclusion Motion tracking with consumer-grade digital cameras and the APAS software can achieve sub-millimeter accuracy at frame rates that are appropriate for kinematic analyses of lip/jaw movements for both research and clinical purposes. PMID:24686484

  8. The Effects of Random Vibration on the Dimensional Stability of Precision Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edeson, Ruben L.; Aglietti, Guglielmo S.; Tatnall, Adrian R.

    2012-07-01

    Precision structures for space-based optical systems are typically subjected to brief periods of random vibration during the launch and ground testing phases. Such events pose a potential threat to the dimensional stability of such structures, which may be required to maintain positional tolerances on large optics in the low 10s of microns to meet optical performance requirements. Whilst there is an abundance of information in the literature on structural instability caused by hygrothermal cycling, there appears to have been little work done on the effects of random vibration. This issue has recently been addressed at RAL with a series of tests aimed at characterizing the behavior of dimensional instability in structures for high-resolution Earth-imaging cameras subject to random vibration. Firstly, a breadboard model of a typical “conventional” CFRP-based optical payload structure was produced and subjected to a range of environmental tests. The effects of random vibration were compared to those of other environmental stressors (such as thermal vacuum testing) and found to be significant. Next, controlled tests were performed on specific structural areas in order to assess the specific contributions of each area to overall instability. These tests made use of novel test setups and metrology techniques to assess the dimensional stability response of material samples and bolted joints to random vibration exposure. The tests were able to measure dimensional instability, characterize it over a series of tests of increasing vibration levels, and assess variability in results between identical samples. Finally, a predictive technique using a Finite Element Model with nonlinear kinematic hardening was produced. A time domain solution was obtained, using an analogy to Miner’s Rule to determine load cycle amplitudes. This model correlated reasonably well with test results. This paper presents this program of work, and the results. It also proposes ways to minimize

  9. Arabidopsis DET1 degrades HFR1 but stabilizes PIF1 to precisely regulate seed germination.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hui; Wang, Xin; Mo, Xiaorong; Tang, Chao; Zhong, Shangwei; Deng, Xing Wang

    2015-03-24

    Seed is an essential propagation organ and a critical strategy adopted by terrestrial flowering plants to colonize the land. The ability of seeds to accurately respond to light is vital for plant survival. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we reveal a circuit of triple feed-forward loops adopted by Arabidopsis seeds to exclusively repress germination in dark conditions and precisely initiate germination under diverse light conditions. We identify that de-etiolated 1 (DET1), an evolutionarily conserved protein, is a central repressor of light-induced seed germination. Genetic analysis demonstrates that DET1 functions upstream of long hypocotyl in far-red 1 (HFR1) and phytochrome interacting factor 1 (PIF1), the key positive and negative transcription regulators in seed germination. We further find that DET1 and constitutive photomorphogenic 10 (COP10) target HFR1 for protein degradation by assembling a COP10-DET1-damaged DNA binding protein 1-cullin4 E3 ligase complex. Moreover, DET1 and COP10 directly interact with and promote the protein stability of PIF1. Computational modeling reveals that phytochrome B (phyB)-DET1-HFR1-PIF1 and phyB-DET1-Protease-PIF1 are new signaling pathways, independent of the previously identified phyB-PIF1 pathway, respectively mediating the rapid and time-lapse responses to light irradiation. The model-simulated results are highly consistent with their experimental validations, suggesting that our mathematical model captures the essence of Arabidopsis seed germination networks. Taken together, this study provides a comprehensive molecular framework for light-regulated seed germination, improving our understanding of how plants respond to changeable environments.

  10. Arabidopsis DET1 degrades HFR1 but stabilizes PIF1 to precisely regulate seed germination

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hui; Wang, Xin; Mo, Xiaorong; Tang, Chao; Zhong, Shangwei; Deng, Xing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Seed is an essential propagation organ and a critical strategy adopted by terrestrial flowering plants to colonize the land. The ability of seeds to accurately respond to light is vital for plant survival. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we reveal a circuit of triple feed-forward loops adopted by Arabidopsis seeds to exclusively repress germination in dark conditions and precisely initiate germination under diverse light conditions. We identify that de-etiolated 1 (DET1), an evolutionarily conserved protein, is a central repressor of light-induced seed germination. Genetic analysis demonstrates that DET1 functions upstream of long hypocotyl in far-red 1 (HFR1) and phytochrome interacting factor 1 (PIF1), the key positive and negative transcription regulators in seed germination. We further find that DET1 and constitutive photomorphogenic 10 (COP10) target HFR1 for protein degradation by assembling a COP10–DET1–damaged DNA binding protein 1–cullin4 E3 ligase complex. Moreover, DET1 and COP10 directly interact with and promote the protein stability of PIF1. Computational modeling reveals that phytochrome B (phyB)–DET1–HFR1–PIF1 and phyB–DET1–Protease–PIF1 are new signaling pathways, independent of the previously identified phyB-PIF1 pathway, respectively mediating the rapid and time-lapse responses to light irradiation. The model-simulated results are highly consistent with their experimental validations, suggesting that our mathematical model captures the essence of Arabidopsis seed germination networks. Taken together, this study provides a comprehensive molecular framework for light-regulated seed germination, improving our understanding of how plants respond to changeable environments. PMID:25775589

  11. Numerical Stability and Accuracy of Temporally Coupled Multi-Physics Modules in Wind-Turbine CAE Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Gasmi, A.; Sprague, M. A.; Jonkman, J. M.; Jones, W. B.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we examine the stability and accuracy of numerical algorithms for coupling time-dependent multi-physics modules relevant to computer-aided engineering (CAE) of wind turbines. This work is motivated by an in-progress major revision of FAST, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) premier aero-elastic CAE simulation tool. We employ two simple examples as test systems, while algorithm descriptions are kept general. Coupled-system governing equations are framed in monolithic and partitioned representations as differential-algebraic equations. Explicit and implicit loose partition coupling is examined. In explicit coupling, partitions are advanced in time from known information. In implicit coupling, there is dependence on other-partition data at the next time step; coupling is accomplished through a predictor-corrector (PC) approach. Numerical time integration of coupled ordinary-differential equations (ODEs) is accomplished with one of three, fourth-order fixed-time-increment methods: Runge-Kutta (RK), Adams-Bashforth (AB), and Adams-Bashforth-Moulton (ABM). Through numerical experiments it is shown that explicit coupling can be dramatically less stable and less accurate than simulations performed with the monolithic system. However, PC implicit coupling restored stability and fourth-order accuracy for ABM; only second-order accuracy was achieved with RK integration. For systems without constraints, explicit time integration with AB and explicit loose coupling exhibited desired accuracy and stability.

  12. Optimizing the accuracy and precision of the single-pulse Laue technique for synchrotron photo-crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, Radosław; Graber, Timothy; Benedict, Jason B.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Scheins, Stephan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Coppens, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy that can be achieved in single-pulse pump-probe Laue experiments is discussed. It is shown that with careful tuning of the experimental conditions a reproducibility of the intensity ratios of equivalent intensities obtained in different measurements of 3–4% can be achieved. The single-pulse experiments maximize the time resolution that can be achieved and, unlike stroboscopic techniques in which the pump-probe cycle is rapidly repeated, minimize the temperature increase due to the laser exposure of the sample. PMID:20567080

  13. Accuracy and precision of polyurethane dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional subtractive rapid prototyping method with an intraoral scanning technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of polyurethane (PUT) dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional (3D) subtractive rapid prototyping (RP) method with an intraoral scanning technique by comparing linear measurements obtained from PUT models and conventional plaster models. Methods Ten plaster models were duplicated using a selected standard master model and conventional impression, and 10 PUT models were duplicated using the 3D subtractive RP technique with an oral scanner. Six linear measurements were evaluated in terms of x, y, and z-axes using a non-contact white light scanner. Accuracy was assessed using mean differences between two measurements, and precision was examined using four quantitative methods and the Bland-Altman graphical method. Repeatability was evaluated in terms of intra-examiner variability, and reproducibility was assessed in terms of inter-examiner and inter-method variability. Results The mean difference between plaster models and PUT models ranged from 0.07 mm to 0.33 mm. Relative measurement errors ranged from 2.2% to 7.6% and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.93 to 0.96, when comparing plaster models and PUT models. The Bland-Altman plot showed good agreement. Conclusions The accuracy and precision of PUT dental models for evaluating the performance of oral scanner and subtractive RP technology was acceptable. Because of the recent improvements in block material and computerized numeric control milling machines, the subtractive RP method may be a good choice for dental arch models. PMID:24696823

  14. Progress integrating ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology with accessory mineral geochemistry: towards better accuracy and higher precision time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoene, B.; Samperton, K. M.; Crowley, J. L.; Cottle, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly common that hand samples of plutonic and volcanic rocks contain zircon with dates that span between zero and >100 ka. This recognition comes from the increased application of U-series geochronology on young volcanic rocks and the increased precision to better than 0.1% on single zircons by the U-Pb ID-TIMS method. It has thus become more difficult to interpret such complicated datasets in terms of ashbed eruption or magma emplacement, which are critical constraints for geochronologic applications ranging from biotic evolution and the stratigraphic record to magmatic and metamorphic processes in orogenic belts. It is important, therefore, to develop methods that aid in interpreting which minerals, if any, date the targeted process. One promising tactic is to better integrate accessory mineral geochemistry with high-precision ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology. These dual constraints can 1) identify cogenetic populations of minerals, and 2) record magmatic or metamorphic fluid evolution through time. Goal (1) has been widely sought with in situ geochronology and geochemical analysis but is limited by low-precision dates. Recent work has attempted to bridge this gap by retrieving the typically discarded elution from ion exchange chemistry that precedes ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology and analyzing it by ICP-MS (U-Pb TIMS-TEA). The result integrates geochemistry and high-precision geochronology from the exact same volume of material. The limitation of this method is the relatively coarse spatial resolution compared to in situ techniques, and thus averages potentially complicated trace element profiles through single minerals or mineral fragments. In continued work, we test the effect of this on zircon by beginning with CL imaging to reveal internal zonation and growth histories. This is followed by in situ LA-ICPMS trace element transects of imaged grains to reveal internal geochemical zonation. The same grains are then removed from grain-mount, fragmented, and

  15. Clock accuracy and precision evolve as a consequence of selection for adult emergence in a narrow window of time in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Nisha N; Vaze, Koustubh M; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2012-10-15

    Although circadian clocks are believed to have evolved under the action of periodic selection pressures (selection on phasing) present in the geophysical environment, there is very little rigorous and systematic empirical evidence to support this. In the present study, we examined the effect of selection for adult emergence in a narrow window of time on the circadian rhythms of fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. Selection was imposed in every generation by choosing flies that emerged during a 1 h window of time close to the emergence peak of baseline/control flies under 12 h:12 h light:dark cycles. To study the effect of selection on circadian clocks we estimated several quantifiable features that reflect inter- and intra-individual variance in adult emergence and locomotor activity rhythms. The results showed that with increasing generations, incidence of adult emergence and activity of adult flies during the 1 h selection window increased gradually in the selected populations. Flies from the selected populations were more homogenous in their clock period, were more coherent in their phase of entrainment, and displayed enhanced accuracy and precision in their emergence and activity rhythms compared with controls. These results thus suggest that circadian clocks in D. melanogaster evolve enhanced accuracy and precision when subjected to selection for emergence in a narrow window of time.

  16. Accuracy and Precision in the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) Dataset in Light of the JOSIE-2000 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Thompson, Anne M.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Oltmans, S. J.; Smit, H. G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1998 the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) project has provided over 2000 ozone profiles over eleven southern hemisphere tropical and subtropical stations. Balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes are used to measure ozone. The data are archived at: &ttp://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/shadoz>. In analysis of ozonesonde imprecision within the SHADOZ dataset, Thompson et al. [JGR, 108,8238,20031 we pointed out that variations in ozonesonde technique (sensor solution strength, instrument manufacturer, data processing) could lead to station-to-station biases within the SHADOZ dataset. Imprecisions and accuracy in the SHADOZ dataset are examined in light of new data. First, SHADOZ total ozone column amounts are compared to version 8 TOMS (2004 release). As for TOMS version 7, satellite total ozone is usually higher than the integrated column amount from the sounding. Discrepancies between the sonde and satellite datasets decline two percentage points on average, compared to version 7 TOMS offsets. Second, the SHADOZ station data are compared to results of chamber simulations (JOSE-2000, Juelich Ozonesonde Intercomparison Experiment) in which the various SHADOZ techniques were evaluated. The range of JOSE column deviations from a standard instrument (-10%) in the chamber resembles that of the SHADOZ station data. It appears that some systematic variations in the SHADOZ ozone record are accounted for by differences in solution strength, data processing and instrument type (manufacturer).

  17. The JPL Hg(sup +) Extended Linear Ion Trap Frequency Standard: Status, Stability, and Accuracy Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    Microwave frequency standards based on room temperature (sup 199)Hg(sup +) ions in a Linear Ion Trap (LITS) presently achieve a Signal to Noise and line Q inferred short frequency stability. Long term stability has been measured for averaging intervals up to 5 months with apparent sensitivity to variations in ion number/temperature limiting the flicker floor.

  18. TanDEM-X IDEM precision and accuracy assessment based on a large assembly of differential GNSS measurements in Kruger National Park, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baade, J.; Schmullius, C.

    2016-09-01

    High resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM) represent fundamental data for a wide range of Earth surface process studies. Over the past years, the German TanDEM-X mission acquired data for a new, truly global Digital Elevation Model with unprecedented geometric resolution, precision and accuracy. First TanDEM Intermediate Digital Elevation Models (i.e. IDEM) with a geometric resolution from 0.4 to 3 arcsec have been made available for scientific purposes in November 2014. This includes four 1° × 1° tiles covering the Kruger National Park in South Africa. Here, we document the results of a local scale IDEM height accuracy validation exercise utilizing over 10,000 RTK-GNSS-based ground survey points from fourteen sites characterized by mainly pristine Savanna vegetation. The vertical precision of the ground checkpoints is 0.02 m (1σ). Selected precursor data sets (SRTMGL1, SRTM41, ASTER-GDEM2) are included in the analysis to facilitate the comparison. Although IDEM represents an intermediate product on the way to the new global TanDEM-X DEM, expected to be released in late 2016, it allows first insight into the properties of the forthcoming product. Remarkably, the TanDEM-X tiles include a number of auxiliary files providing detailed information pertinent to a user-based quality assessment. We present examples for the utilization of this information in the framework of a local scale study including the identification of height readings contaminated by water. Furthermore, this study provides evidence for the high precision and accuracy of IDEM height readings and the sensitivity to canopy cover. For open terrain, the 0.4 arcsec resolution edition (IDEM04) yields an average bias of 0.20 ± 0.05 m (95% confidence interval, Cl95), a RMSE = 1.03 m and an absolute vertical height error (LE90) of 1.5 [1.4, 1.7] m (Cl95). The corresponding values for the lower resolution IDEM editions are about the same and provide evidence for the high quality of the IDEM products

  19. The science of and advanced technology for cost-effective manufacture of high precision engineering products. Volume 4. Thermal effects on the accuracy of numerically controlled machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, R.; Barash, M. M.; Liu, C. R.

    1985-10-01

    Thermal effects on the accuracy of numerically controlled machine tools are specially important in the context of unmanned manufacture or under conditions of precision metal cutting. Removal of the operator from the direct control of the metal cutting process has created problems in terms of maintaining accuracy. The objective of this research is to study thermal effects on the accuracy of numerically controlled machine tools. The initial part of the research report is concerned with the analysis of a hypothetical machine. The thermal characteristics of this machine are studied. Numerical methods for evaluating the errors exhibited by the slides of the machine are proposed and the possibility of predicting thermally induced errors by the use of regression equations is investigated. A method for computing the workspace error is also presented. The final part is concerned with the actual measurement of errors on a modern CNC machining center. Thermal influences on the errors is the main objective of the experimental work. Thermal influences on the errors of machine tools are predictable. Techniques for determining thermal effects on machine tools at a design stage are also presented. ; Error models and prediction; Metrology; Automation.

  20. SU-E-J-147: Monte Carlo Study of the Precision and Accuracy of Proton CT Reconstructed Relative Stopping Power Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Dedes, G; Asano, Y; Parodi, K; Arbor, N; Dauvergne, D; Testa, E; Letang, J; Rit, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of the intrinsic performances of proton computed tomography (pCT) as a modality for treatment planning in proton therapy. The performance of an ideal pCT scanner is studied as a function of various parameters. Methods: Using GATE/Geant4, we simulated an ideal pCT scanner and scans of several cylindrical phantoms with various tissue equivalent inserts of different sizes. Insert materials were selected in order to be of clinical relevance. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm taking into account the scattering of protons into the phantom. To quantify the performance of the ideal pCT scanner, we study the precision and the accuracy with respect to the theoretical relative stopping power ratios (RSP) values for different beam energies, imaging doses, insert sizes and detector positions. The planning range uncertainty resulting from the reconstructed RSP is also assessed by comparison with the range of the protons in the analytically simulated phantoms. Results: The results indicate that pCT can intrinsically achieve RSP resolution below 1%, for most examined tissues at beam energies below 300 MeV and for imaging doses around 1 mGy. RSP maps accuracy of less than 0.5 % is observed for most tissue types within the studied dose range (0.2–1.5 mGy). Finally, the uncertainty in the proton range due to the accuracy of the reconstructed RSP map is well below 1%. Conclusion: This work explores the intrinsic performance of pCT as an imaging modality for proton treatment planning. The obtained results show that under ideal conditions, 3D RSP maps can be reconstructed with an accuracy better than 1%. Hence, pCT is a promising candidate for reducing the range uncertainties introduced by the use of X-ray CT alongside with a semiempirical calibration to RSP.Supported by the DFG Cluster of Excellence Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  1. Measuring the bias, precision, accuracy, and validity of self-reported height and weight in assessing overweight and obesity status among adolescents using a surveillance system

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding bias, precision, and accuracy in adolescent self-reported height and weight across demographic subpopulations is lacking. The bias, precision, and accuracy of adolescent self-reported height and weight across subpopulations were examined using a large, diverse and representative sample of adolescents. A second objective was to develop correction equations for self-reported height and weight to provide more accurate estimates of body mass index (BMI) and weight status. Methods A total of 24,221 students from 8th and 11th grade in Texas participated in the School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) surveillance system in years 2000–2002 and 2004–2005. To assess bias, the differences between the self-reported and objective measures, for height and weight were estimated. To assess precision and accuracy, the Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient was used. BMI was estimated for self-reported and objective measures. The prevalence of students’ weight status was estimated using self-reported and objective measures; absolute (bias) and relative error (relative bias) were assessed subsequently. Correction equations for sex and race/ethnicity subpopulations were developed to estimate objective measures of height, weight and BMI from self-reported measures using weighted linear regression. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values of weight status classification using self-reported measures and correction equations are assessed by sex and grade. Results Students in 8th- and 11th-grade overestimated their height from 0.68cm (White girls) to 2.02 cm (African-American boys), and underestimated their weight from 0.4 kg (Hispanic girls) to 0.98 kg (African-American girls). The differences in self-reported versus objectively-measured height and weight resulted in underestimation of BMI ranging from -0.23 kg/m2 (White boys) to -0.7 kg/m2 (African-American girls). The sensitivity of self-reported measures to classify weight

  2. An experimental analysis of accuracy and precision of a high-speed strain-gage system based on the direct-resistance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, P.; del Prete, Z.

    1992-03-01

    An experimental study on the relative merits of using a high-speed digital-acquisition system to measure directly the strain-gage resistance, rather than using a conventional Wheatstone bridge, is carried out. Both strain gages, with a nominal resistance of 120 ohm and 1 kohm, were simulated with precision resistors, and the output signals were acquired over a time of 48 and 144 hours; furthermore, the effects in metrological performances caused by a statistical filtering were evaluated. The results show that the implementation of the statistical filtering gains a considerable improvement in gathering strain-gage-resistance readings. On the other hand, such a procedure causes, obviously, a loss of performance with regard to the acquisition rate, and therefore to the dynamic data-collecting capabilities. In any case, the intrinsic resolution of the 12-bit a/d converter, utilized in the present experimental analysis, causes a limitation for measurement accuracy in the range of hundreds microns/m.

  3. High-precision, high-accuracy ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography using vertical cavity surface emitting laser light source.

    PubMed

    Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Liu, Jonathan J; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Jiang, James; Fujimoto, James G; Cable, Alex E

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using vertical cavity surface emitting laser technology. The ability to adjust laser parameters and high-speed acquisition enables imaging ranges from a few centimeters up to meters using the same instrument. We discuss the challenges of long-range OCT imaging. In vivo human-eye imaging and optical component characterization are presented. The precision and accuracy of OCT-based measurements are assessed and are important for ocular biometry and reproducible intraocular distance measurement before cataract surgery. Additionally, meter-range measurement of fiber length and multicentimeter-range imaging are reported. 3D visualization supports a class of industrial imaging applications of OCT.

  4. In situ sulfur isotope analysis of sulfide minerals by SIMS: Precision and accuracy, with application to thermometry of ~3.5Ga Pilbara cherts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozdon, R.; Kita, N.T.; Huberty, J.M.; Fournelle, J.H.; Johnson, C.A.; Valley, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurement of sulfur isotope ratios is a potentially powerful technique for in situ studies in many areas of Earth and planetary science. Tests were performed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of sulfur isotope analysis by SIMS in a set of seven well-characterized, isotopically homogeneous natural sulfide standards. The spot-to-spot and grain-to-grain precision for δ34S is ± 0.3‰ for chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite, and ± 0.2‰ for pyrite (2SD) using a 1.6 nA primary beam that was focused to 10 µm diameter with a Gaussian-beam density distribution. Likewise, multiple δ34S measurements within single grains of sphalerite are within ± 0.3‰. However, between individual sphalerite grains, δ34S varies by up to 3.4‰ and the grain-to-grain precision is poor (± 1.7‰, n = 20). Measured values of δ34S correspond with analysis pit microstructures, ranging from smooth surfaces for grains with high δ34S values, to pronounced ripples and terraces in analysis pits from grains featuring low δ34S values. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) shows that individual sphalerite grains are single crystals, whereas crystal orientation varies from grain-to-grain. The 3.4‰ variation in measured δ34S between individual grains of sphalerite is attributed to changes in instrumental bias caused by different crystal orientations with respect to the incident primary Cs+ beam. High δ34S values in sphalerite correlate to when the Cs+ beam is parallel to the set of directions , from [111] to [110], which are preferred directions for channeling and focusing in diamond-centered cubic crystals. Crystal orientation effects on instrumental bias were further detected in galena. However, as a result of the perfect cleavage along {100} crushed chips of galena are typically cube-shaped and likely to be preferentially oriented, thus crystal orientation effects on instrumental bias may be obscured. Test were made to improve the analytical

  5. Improving Precision and Accuracy of Isotope Ratios from Short Transient Laser Ablation-Multicollector-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Signals: Application to Micrometer-Size Uranium Particles.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Fanny; Hubert, Amélie; Berail, Sylvain; Donard, Ariane; Pointurier, Fabien; Pécheyran, Christophe

    2016-04-19

    The isotope drift encountered on short transient signals measured by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) is related to differences in detector time responses. Faraday to Faraday and Faraday to ion counter time lags were determined and corrected using VBA data processing based on the synchronization of the isotope signals. The coefficient of determination of the linear fit between the two isotopes was selected as the best criterion to obtain accurate detector time lag. The procedure was applied to the analysis by laser ablation-MC-ICPMS of micrometer sized uranium particles (1-3.5 μm). Linear regression slope (LRS) (one isotope plotted over the other), point-by-point, and integration methods were tested to calculate the (235)U/(238)U and (234)U/(238)U ratios. Relative internal precisions of 0.86 to 1.7% and 1.2 to 2.4% were obtained for (235)U/(238)U and (234)U/(238)U, respectively, using LRS calculation, time lag, and mass bias corrections. A relative external precision of 2.1% was obtained for (235)U/(238)U ratios with good accuracy (relative difference with respect to the reference value below 1%). PMID:27031645

  6. Bayesian approach increases accuracy when selecting cowpea genotypes with high adaptability and phenotypic stability.

    PubMed

    Barroso, L M A; Teodoro, P E; Nascimento, M; Torres, F E; Dos Santos, A; Corrêa, A M; Sagrilo, E; Corrêa, C C G; Silva, F A; Ceccon, G

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to verify that a Bayesian approach could be used for the selection of upright cowpea genotypes with high adaptability and phenotypic stability, and the study also evaluated the efficiency of using informative and minimally informative a priori distributions. Six trials were conducted in randomized blocks, and the grain yield of 17 upright cowpea genotypes was assessed. To represent the minimally informative a priori distributions, a probability distribution with high variance was used, and a meta-analysis concept was adopted to represent the informative a priori distributions. Bayes factors were used to conduct comparisons between the a priori distributions. The Bayesian approach was effective for selection of upright cowpea genotypes with high adaptability and phenotypic stability using the Eberhart and Russell method. Bayes factors indicated that the use of informative a priori distributions provided more accurate results than minimally informative a priori distributions. PMID:26985961

  7. Bayesian approach increases accuracy when selecting cowpea genotypes with high adaptability and phenotypic stability.

    PubMed

    Barroso, L M A; Teodoro, P E; Nascimento, M; Torres, F E; Dos Santos, A; Corrêa, A M; Sagrilo, E; Corrêa, C C G; Silva, F A; Ceccon, G

    2016-03-11

    This study aimed to verify that a Bayesian approach could be used for the selection of upright cowpea genotypes with high adaptability and phenotypic stability, and the study also evaluated the efficiency of using informative and minimally informative a priori distributions. Six trials were conducted in randomized blocks, and the grain yield of 17 upright cowpea genotypes was assessed. To represent the minimally informative a priori distributions, a probability distribution with high variance was used, and a meta-analysis concept was adopted to represent the informative a priori distributions. Bayes factors were used to conduct comparisons between the a priori distributions. The Bayesian approach was effective for selection of upright cowpea genotypes with high adaptability and phenotypic stability using the Eberhart and Russell method. Bayes factors indicated that the use of informative a priori distributions provided more accurate results than minimally informative a priori distributions.

  8. Using Lunar Observations to Validate Pointing Accuracy and Geolocation, Detector Sensitivity Stability and Static Point Response of the CERES Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Janet L.; Smith, G. Louis; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Validation of in-orbit instrument performance is a function of stability in both instrument and calibration source. This paper describes a method using lunar observations scanning near full moon by the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. The Moon offers an external source whose signal variance is predictable and non-degrading. From 2006 to present, these in-orbit observations have become standardized and compiled for the Flight Models -1 and -2 aboard the Terra satellite, for Flight Models-3 and -4 aboard the Aqua satellite, and beginning 2012, for Flight Model-5 aboard Suomi-NPP. Instrument performance measurements studied are detector sensitivity stability, pointing accuracy and static detector point response function. This validation method also shows trends per CERES data channel of 0.8% per decade or less for Flight Models 1-4. Using instrument gimbal data and computed lunar position, the pointing error of each detector telescope, the accuracy and consistency of the alignment between the detectors can be determined. The maximum pointing error was 0.2 Deg. in azimuth and 0.17 Deg. in elevation which corresponds to an error in geolocation near nadir of 2.09 km. With the exception of one detector, all instruments were found to have consistent detector alignment from 2006 to present. All alignment error was within 0.1o with most detector telescopes showing a consistent alignment offset of less than 0.02 Deg.

  9. The impact of 3D volume of interest definition on accuracy and precision of activity estimation in quantitative SPECT and planar processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate and precise estimation of organ activities is essential for treatment planning in targeted radionuclide therapy. We have previously evaluated the impact of processing methodology, statistical noise and variability in activity distribution and anatomy on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained with quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) and planar (QPlanar) processing. Another important factor impacting the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates is accuracy of and variability in the definition of organ regions of interest (ROI) or volumes of interest (VOI). The goal of this work was thus to systematically study the effects of VOI definition on the reliability of activity estimates. To this end, we performed Monte Carlo simulation studies using randomly perturbed and shifted VOIs to assess the impact on organ activity estimates. The 3D NCAT phantom was used with activities that modeled clinically observed 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan distributions. In order to study the errors resulting from misdefinitions due to manual segmentation errors, VOIs of the liver and left kidney were first manually defined. Each control point was then randomly perturbed to one of the nearest or next-nearest voxels in three ways: with no, inward or outward directional bias, resulting in random perturbation, erosion or dilation, respectively, of the VOIs. In order to study the errors resulting from the misregistration of VOIs, as would happen, e.g. in the case where the VOIs were defined using a misregistered anatomical image, the reconstructed SPECT images or projections were shifted by amounts ranging from -1 to 1 voxels in increments of with 0.1 voxels in both the transaxial and axial directions. The activity estimates from the shifted reconstructions or projections were compared to those from the originals, and average errors were computed for the QSPECT and QPlanar methods, respectively. For misregistration, errors in organ activity estimations were

  10. The impact of 3D volume of interest definition on accuracy and precision of activity estimation in quantitative SPECT and planar processing methods.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C

    2010-06-21

    Accurate and precise estimation of organ activities is essential for treatment planning in targeted radionuclide therapy. We have previously evaluated the impact of processing methodology, statistical noise and variability in activity distribution and anatomy on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained with quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) and planar (QPlanar) processing. Another important factor impacting the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates is accuracy of and variability in the definition of organ regions of interest (ROI) or volumes of interest (VOI). The goal of this work was thus to systematically study the effects of VOI definition on the reliability of activity estimates. To this end, we performed Monte Carlo simulation studies using randomly perturbed and shifted VOIs to assess the impact on organ activity estimates. The 3D NCAT phantom was used with activities that modeled clinically observed (111)In ibritumomab tiuxetan distributions. In order to study the errors resulting from misdefinitions due to manual segmentation errors, VOIs of the liver and left kidney were first manually defined. Each control point was then randomly perturbed to one of the nearest or next-nearest voxels in three ways: with no, inward or outward directional bias, resulting in random perturbation, erosion or dilation, respectively, of the VOIs. In order to study the errors resulting from the misregistration of VOIs, as would happen, e.g. in the case where the VOIs were defined using a misregistered anatomical image, the reconstructed SPECT images or projections were shifted by amounts ranging from -1 to 1 voxels in increments of with 0.1 voxels in both the transaxial and axial directions. The activity estimates from the shifted reconstructions or projections were compared to those from the originals, and average errors were computed for the QSPECT and QPlanar methods, respectively. For misregistration, errors in organ activity estimations were

  11. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan

    2007-09-15

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3 ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9 ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5 ps/K, and the long term stability is better than {+-}0.2 ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis.

  12. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan

    2007-09-01

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5ps/K, and the long term stability is better than ±0.2ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis.

  13. Guidelines for Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Analysis of Trabecular Bone-Rich Regions in Mice: Improved Precision, Accuracy, and Sensitivity for Assessing Longitudinal Bone Changes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiayu; Lee, Soonchul; Uyeda, Michael; Tanjaya, Justine; Kim, Jong Kil; Pan, Hsin Chuan; Reese, Patricia; Stodieck, Louis; Lin, Andy; Ting, Kang; Kwak, Jin Hee; Soo, Chia

    2016-05-01

    Trabecular bone is frequently studied in osteoporosis research because changes in trabecular bone are the most common cause of osteoporotic fractures. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) analysis specific to trabecular bone-rich regions is crucial to longitudinal osteoporosis research. The purpose of this study is to define a novel method for accurately analyzing trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA. This method will be utilized to analyze scans obtained from the International Space Station in an upcoming study of microgravity-induced bone loss. Thirty 12-week-old BALB/c mice were studied. The novel method was developed by preanalyzing trabecular bone-rich sites in the distal femur, proximal tibia, and lumbar vertebrae via high-resolution X-ray imaging followed by DXA and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The key DXA steps described by the novel method were (1) proper mouse positioning, (2) region of interest (ROI) sizing, and (3) ROI positioning. The precision of the new method was assessed by reliability tests and a 14-week longitudinal study. The bone mineral content (BMC) data from DXA was then compared to the BMC data from micro-CT to assess accuracy. Bone mineral density (BMD) intra-class correlation coefficients of the new method ranging from 0.743 to 0.945 and Levene's test showing that there was significantly lower variances of data generated by new method both verified its consistency. By new method, a Bland-Altman plot displayed good agreement between DXA BMC and micro-CT BMC for all sites and they were strongly correlated at the distal femur and proximal tibia (r=0.846, p<0.01; r=0.879, p<0.01, respectively). The results suggest that the novel method for site-specific analysis of trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA yields more precise, accurate, and repeatable BMD measurements than the conventional method.

  14. Guidelines for Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Analysis of Trabecular Bone-Rich Regions in Mice: Improved Precision, Accuracy, and Sensitivity for Assessing Longitudinal Bone Changes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiayu; Lee, Soonchul; Uyeda, Michael; Tanjaya, Justine; Kim, Jong Kil; Pan, Hsin Chuan; Reese, Patricia; Stodieck, Louis; Lin, Andy; Ting, Kang; Kwak, Jin Hee; Soo, Chia

    2016-05-01

    Trabecular bone is frequently studied in osteoporosis research because changes in trabecular bone are the most common cause of osteoporotic fractures. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) analysis specific to trabecular bone-rich regions is crucial to longitudinal osteoporosis research. The purpose of this study is to define a novel method for accurately analyzing trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA. This method will be utilized to analyze scans obtained from the International Space Station in an upcoming study of microgravity-induced bone loss. Thirty 12-week-old BALB/c mice were studied. The novel method was developed by preanalyzing trabecular bone-rich sites in the distal femur, proximal tibia, and lumbar vertebrae via high-resolution X-ray imaging followed by DXA and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The key DXA steps described by the novel method were (1) proper mouse positioning, (2) region of interest (ROI) sizing, and (3) ROI positioning. The precision of the new method was assessed by reliability tests and a 14-week longitudinal study. The bone mineral content (BMC) data from DXA was then compared to the BMC data from micro-CT to assess accuracy. Bone mineral density (BMD) intra-class correlation coefficients of the new method ranging from 0.743 to 0.945 and Levene's test showing that there was significantly lower variances of data generated by new method both verified its consistency. By new method, a Bland-Altman plot displayed good agreement between DXA BMC and micro-CT BMC for all sites and they were strongly correlated at the distal femur and proximal tibia (r=0.846, p<0.01; r=0.879, p<0.01, respectively). The results suggest that the novel method for site-specific analysis of trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA yields more precise, accurate, and repeatable BMD measurements than the conventional method. PMID:26956416

  15. Stability, precision, and near-24-hour period of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeisler, C. A.; Duffy, J. F.; Shanahan, T. L.; Brown, E. N.; Mitchell, J. F.; Rimmer, D. W.; Ronda, J. M.; Silva, E. J.; Allan, J. S.; Emens, J. S.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of circadian period in humans was thought to differ from that of other species, with the period of the activity rhythm reported to range from 13 to 65 hours (median 25.2 hours) and the period of the body temperature rhythm reported to average 25 hours in adulthood, and to shorten with age. However, those observations were based on studies of humans exposed to light levels sufficient to confound circadian period estimation. Precise estimation of the periods of the endogenous circadian rhythms of melatonin, core body temperature, and cortisol in healthy young and older individuals living in carefully controlled lighting conditions has now revealed that the intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker averages 24.18 hours in both age groups, with a tight distribution consistent with other species. These findings have important implications for understanding the pathophysiology of disrupted sleep in older people.

  16. Stabilization of posture by precision touch of the index finger with rigid and flexible filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Rabin, E.; DiZio, P.

    2001-01-01

    Light touch of the index finger with a stationary surface at non-mechanically supportive force levels (<100 g) greatly attenuates the body sway of standing subjects. In three experiments, we evaluated the properties of finger contact and of the contacted object necessary to produce postural stabilization in subjects standing heel-to-toe with eyes closed, as well as how accurately hand position can be controlled. Experiment 1 involved finger contact with flexible filaments of different bending strengths, a flat surface, and an imagined spatial position. Contact with the flat surface was most effective in attenuating sway; the flexible filaments were much less effective but still significantly better than imagined contact. Experiment 2 compared the effectiveness of finger contact with a flexible filament, a rigid filament of the same diameter, a flat surface, and an imagined spatial position. The rigid filament and flat surface conditions were equally effective in attenuating body sway and were greatly superior to contact with the flexible filament, which was superior to imagined contact. Experiment 3 included five conditions: arms by sides; finger "contact" with an imagined spatial position; finger contact with a flat surface; finger contact with a flexible filament attempting to maintain it bent; and contact with the flexible filament attempting not to bend it. The arms by sides and finger "contact" with an imagined position conditions did not differ significantly; all three conditions involving actual finger contact showed significantly less center of pressure and hand sway, but contact with the flat surface was most effective in attenuating both postural and hand displacement. In all three experiments, the level of force applied in fingertip contact conditions was far below that necessary to provide mechanical stabilization. Our findings indicate that: (1) stimulation of a small number of receptors in the fingertip is adequate to allow stabilization of sway, (2

  17. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  18. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  19. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now. PMID:27250477

  20. Cognitive models of risky choice: parameter stability and predictive accuracy of prospect theory.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Andreas; Pachur, Thorsten

    2012-04-01

    In the behavioral sciences, a popular approach to describe and predict behavior is cognitive modeling with adjustable parameters (i.e., which can be fitted to data). Modeling with adjustable parameters allows, among other things, measuring differences between people. At the same time, parameter estimation also bears the risk of overfitting. Are individual differences as measured by model parameters stable enough to improve the ability to predict behavior as compared to modeling without adjustable parameters? We examined this issue in cumulative prospect theory (CPT), arguably the most widely used framework to model decisions under risk. Specifically, we examined (a) the temporal stability of CPT's parameters; and (b) how well different implementations of CPT, varying in the number of adjustable parameters, predict individual choice relative to models with no adjustable parameters (such as CPT with fixed parameters, expected value theory, and various heuristics). We presented participants with risky choice problems and fitted CPT to each individual's choices in two separate sessions (which were 1 week apart). All parameters were correlated across time, in particular when using a simple implementation of CPT. CPT allowing for individual variability in parameter values predicted individual choice better than CPT with fixed parameters, expected value theory, and the heuristics. CPT's parameters thus seem to pick up stable individual differences that need to be considered when predicting risky choice.

  1. Combining independent, weighted P-values: achieving computational stability by a systematic expansion with controllable accuracy.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Given the expanding availability of scientific data and tools to analyze them, combining different assessments of the same piece of information has become increasingly important for social, biological, and even physical sciences. This task demands, to begin with, a method-independent standard, such as the P-value, that can be used to assess the reliability of a piece of information. Good's formula and Fisher's method combine independent P-values with respectively unequal and equal weights. Both approaches may be regarded as limiting instances of a general case of combining P-values from m groups; P-values within each group are weighted equally, while weight varies by group. When some of the weights become nearly degenerate, as cautioned by Good, numeric instability occurs in computation of the combined P-values. We deal explicitly with this difficulty by deriving a controlled expansion, in powers of differences in inverse weights, that provides both accurate statistics and stable numerics. We illustrate the utility of this systematic approach with a few examples. In addition, we also provide here an alternative derivation for the probability distribution function of the general case and show how the analytic formula obtained reduces to both Good's and Fisher's methods as special cases. A C++ program, which computes the combined P-values with equal numerical stability regardless of whether weights are (nearly) degenerate or not, is available for download at our group website http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads/CoinedPValues.html.

  2. Does the Precision and Stability of Value-Added Estimates of Teacher Performance Depend on the Types of Students They Serve? Working Paper #35

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Brian; Reckase, Mark; Wooldridge, Jeffrey; Guarino, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates how the precision and stability of a teacher's value-added estimate relates to the characteristics of the teacher's students. Using a large administrative data set and a variety of teacher value-added estimators, it finds that the stability over time of teacher value-added estimates can depend on the previous achievement…

  3. A Study of Lipid Bilayer Membrane Stability Using Precise Measurements of Specific Capacitance

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephen H.

    1970-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the specific capacitance (Cm) of lipid bilayer membranes with an estimated experimental error of only 1%. The gross capacitance was measured with an AC Wheatstone bridge and a photographic technique was used to determine the area of thin membrane. The results of measurements on oxidized cholesterol-decane membranes formed in 1 × 10-2 M KCl show that Cm depends upon temperature, voltage, time, and the age of the bulk membrane solutions. For a freshly thinned membrane (from 5 week old solution), Cm increases exponentially from an initial value of 0.432 ±0.021 (SD) μF/cm2 with a time constant of ∼15 min. A 100 mv potential applied across the membrane for 10-20 min prior to making measurements eliminated this time dependence and produced final-state membranes. Cm of final-state membranes depends upon applied voltage (Va) and obeys the equation Cm = C0 + βVa2 where Va ≃ VDC + VrmsAC. C0 and β depend upon temperature; C0 decreases linearly with temperature while β increases linearly. At 20°C, C0 = 0.559 ±0.01 (SD) μF/cm2 and β = 0.0123 ±0.0036 (SD) (μF/cm2)/(mv2) and at 34°C, C0 = 0.472 ±0.01 and β = 0.0382 ±0.0039. These variations in Cm are interpreted as resulting from thickness changes. The possibility that they result from diffuse layer and/or membrane dielectric phenomena is discussed and found to be unlikely. The results are discussed in terms of membrane stability by constructing hypothetical potential energy vs. thickness curves. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:5489777

  4. Improved Accuracy and Precision in LA-ICP-MS U-Th/Pb Dating of Zircon through the Reduction of Crystallinity Related Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, W.; McDonald, A.; Hamilton, B.; Guest, B.

    2015-12-01

    The accuracy of zircon U-Th/Pb ages generated by LA-ICP-MS is limited by systematic bias resulting from differences in crystallinity of the primary reference and that of the unknowns being analyzed. In general, the use of a highly crystalline primary reference will tend to bias analyses of materials of lesser crystallinity toward older ages. When dating igneous rocks, bias can be minimized by matching the crystallinity of the primary reference to that of the unknowns. However, the crystallinity of the unknowns is often not well constrained prior to ablation, as it is a function of U and Th concentration, crystallization age, and thermal history. Likewise, selecting an appropriate primary reference is impossible when dating detrital rocks where zircons with differing ages, protoliths, and thermal histories are analyzed in the same session. We investigate the causes of systematic bias using Raman spectroscopy and measurements of the ablated pit geometry. The crystallinity of five zircon reference materials with ages between 28.2 Ma and 2674 Ma was estimated using Raman spectroscopy. Zircon references varied from being highly crystalline to highly metamict, with individual reference materials plotting as distinct clusters in peak wavelength versus Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) space. A strong positive correlation (R2=0.69) was found between the FWHM for the band at ~1000 cm-1 in the Raman spectrum of the zircon and its ablation rate, suggesting the degree of crystallinity is a primary control on ablation rate in zircons. A moderate positive correlation (R2=0.37) was found between ablation rate and the difference between the age determined by LA-ICP-MS and the accepted ID-TIMS age (ΔAge). We use the measured, intra-sessional relationship between ablation rate and ΔAge of secondary references to reduce systematic bias. Rapid, high-precision measurement of ablated pit geometries using an optical profilometer and custom MatLab algorithm facilitates the implementation

  5. Technical Note: Precision and accuracy of a commercially available CT optically stimulated luminescent dosimetry system for the measurement of CT dose index

    SciTech Connect

    Vrieze, Thomas J.; Sturchio, Glenn M.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the precision and accuracy of CTDI{sub 100} measurements made using commercially available optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters (Landaur, Inc.) as beam width, tube potential, and attenuating material were varied. Methods: One hundred forty OSL dosimeters were individually exposed to a single axial CT scan, either in air, a 16-cm (head), or 32-cm (body) CTDI phantom at both center and peripheral positions. Scans were performed using nominal total beam widths of 3.6, 6, 19.2, and 28.8 mm at 120 kV and 28.8 mm at 80 kV. Five measurements were made for each of 28 parameter combinations. Measurements were made under the same conditions using a 100-mm long CTDI ion chamber. Exposed OSL dosimeters were returned to the manufacturer, who reported dose to air (in mGy) as a function of distance along the probe, integrated dose, and CTDI{sub 100}. Results: The mean precision averaged over 28 datasets containing five measurements each was 1.4%{+-} 0.6%, range = 0.6%-2.7% for OSL and 0.08%{+-} 0.06%, range = 0.02%-0.3% for ion chamber. The root mean square (RMS) percent differences between OSL and ion chamber CTDI{sub 100} values were 13.8%, 6.4%, and 8.7% for in-air, head, and body measurements, respectively, with an overall RMS percent difference of 10.1%. OSL underestimated CTDI{sub 100} relative to the ion chamber 21/28 times (75%). After manual correction of the 80 kV measurements, the RMS percent differences between OSL and ion chamber measurements were 9.9% and 10.0% for 80 and 120 kV, respectively. Conclusions: Measurements of CTDI{sub 100} with commercially available CT OSL dosimeters had a percent standard deviation of 1.4%. After energy-dependent correction factors were applied, the RMS percent difference in the measured CTDI{sub 100} values was about 10%, with a tendency of OSL to underestimate CTDI relative to the ion chamber. Unlike ion chamber methods, however, OSL dosimeters allow measurement of the radiation dose profile.

  6. Technical Note: Precision and accuracy of a commercially available CT optically stimulated luminescent dosimetry system for the measurement of CT dose index

    PubMed Central

    Vrieze, Thomas J.; Sturchio, Glenn M.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the precision and accuracy of CTDI100 measurements made using commercially available optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters (Landaur, Inc.) as beam width, tube potential, and attenuating material were varied. Methods: One hundred forty OSL dosimeters were individually exposed to a single axial CT scan, either in air, a 16-cm (head), or 32-cm (body) CTDI phantom at both center and peripheral positions. Scans were performed using nominal total beam widths of 3.6, 6, 19.2, and 28.8 mm at 120 kV and 28.8 mm at 80 kV. Five measurements were made for each of 28 parameter combinations. Measurements were made under the same conditions using a 100-mm long CTDI ion chamber. Exposed OSL dosimeters were returned to the manufacturer, who reported dose to air (in mGy) as a function of distance along the probe, integrated dose, and CTDI100. Results: The mean precision averaged over 28 datasets containing five measurements each was 1.4% ± 0.6%, range = 0.6%–2.7% for OSL and 0.08% ± 0.06%, range = 0.02%–0.3% for ion chamber. The root mean square (RMS) percent differences between OSL and ion chamber CTDI100 values were 13.8%, 6.4%, and 8.7% for in-air, head, and body measurements, respectively, with an overall RMS percent difference of 10.1%. OSL underestimated CTDI100 relative to the ion chamber 21/28 times (75%). After manual correction of the 80 kV measurements, the RMS percent differences between OSL and ion chamber measurements were 9.9% and 10.0% for 80 and 120 kV, respectively. Conclusions: Measurements of CTDI100 with commercially available CT OSL dosimeters had a percent standard deviation of 1.4%. After energy-dependent correction factors were applied, the RMS percent difference in the measured CTDI100 values was about 10%, with a tendency of OSL to underestimate CTDI relative to the ion chamber. Unlike ion chamber methods, however, OSL dosimeters allow measurement of the radiation dose profile. PMID:23127052

  7. Precise measurement of the 222Rn half-life: A probe to monitor the stability of radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, E.; Broggini, C.; Di Carlo, G.; Laubenstein, M.; Menegazzo, R.

    2015-04-01

    We give the results of a study on the 222Rn decay we performed in the Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS) by detecting the gamma rays from the radon progeny. The motivation was to monitor the stability of radioactivity measuring several times per year the half-life of a short lifetime (days) source instead of measuring over a long period the activity of a long lifetime (tens or hundreds of years) source. In particular, we give a possible reason of the large periodical fluctuations in the count rate of the gamma rays due to radon inside a closed canister which has been described in literature and which has been attributed to a possible influence of a component in the solar irradiation affecting the nuclear decay rates. We then provide the result of four half-life measurements we performed underground at LNGS in the period from May 2014 to January 2015 with radon diffused into olive oil. Briefly, we did not measure any change of the 222Rn half-life with a 8 ṡ10-5 precision. Finally, we provide the most precise value for the 222Rn half-life: 3.82146(16)stat(4)syst days.

  8. High-accuracy EUV reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, U.; Fokoua, M.; Chichkov, B.

    2007-03-01

    Developers and users of EUV-optics need precise tools for the characterization of their products. Often a measurement accuracy of 0.1% or better is desired to detect and study slow-acting aging effect or degradation by organic contaminants. To achieve a measurement accuracy of 0.1% an EUV-source is required which provides an excellent long-time stability, namely power stability, spatial stability and spectral stability. Naturally, it should be free of debris. An EUV-source particularly suitable for this task is an advanced electron-based EUV-tube. This EUV source provides an output of up to 300 μW at 13.5 nm. Reflectometers benefit from the excellent long-time stability of this tool. We design and set up different reflectometers using EUV-tubes for the precise characterisation of EUV-optics, such as debris samples, filters, multilayer mirrors, grazing incidence optics, collectors and masks. Reflectivity measurements from grazing incidence to near normal incidence as well as transmission studies were realised at a precision of down to 0.1%. The reflectometers are computer-controlled and allow varying and scanning all important parameters online. The concepts of a sample reflectometer is discussed and results are presented. The devices can be purchased from the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

  9. Accuracy and stability of measuring GABA, glutamate, and glutamine by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A phantom study at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Michael E.; Lauriat, Tara L.; Shanahan, Meghan; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2011-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the potential to provide valuable information about alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutamine (Gln) in psychiatric and neurological disorders. In order to use this technique effectively, it is important to establish the accuracy and reproducibility of the methodology. In this study, phantoms with known metabolite concentrations were used to compare the accuracy of 2D J-resolved MRS, single-echo 30 ms PRESS, and GABA-edited MEGA-PRESS for measuring all three aforementioned neurochemicals simultaneously. The phantoms included metabolite concentrations above and below the physiological range and scans were performed at baseline, 1 week, and 1 month time-points. For GABA measurement, MEGA-PRESS proved optimal with a measured-to-target correlation of R2 = 0.999, with J-resolved providing R2 = 0.973 for GABA. All three methods proved effective in measuring Glu with R2 = 0.987 (30 ms PRESS), R2 = 0.996 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.910 (MEGA-PRESS). J-resolved and MEGA-PRESS yielded good results for Gln measures with respective R2 = 0.855 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.815 (MEGA-PRESS). The 30 ms PRESS method proved ineffective in measuring GABA and Gln. When measurement stability at in vivo concentration was assessed as a function of varying spectral quality, J-resolved proved the most stable and immune to signal-to-noise and linewidth fluctuation compared to MEGA-PRESS and 30 ms PRESS.

  10. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y.-L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to a vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average, 91 % of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our setup, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our setup were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  11. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average 91% of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our set-up, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our set-up were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  12. WebRASP: a server for computing energy scores to assess the accuracy and stability of RNA 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Norambuena, Tomas; Cares, Jorge F.; Capriotti, Emidio; Melo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The understanding of the biological role of RNA molecules has changed. Although it is widely accepted that RNAs play important regulatory roles without necessarily coding for proteins, the functions of many of these non-coding RNAs are unknown. Thus, determining or modeling the 3D structure of RNA molecules as well as assessing their accuracy and stability has become of great importance for characterizing their functional activity. Here, we introduce a new web application, WebRASP, that uses knowledge-based potentials for scoring RNA structures based on distance-dependent pairwise atomic interactions. This web server allows the users to upload a structure in PDB format, select several options to visualize the structure and calculate the energy profile. The server contains online help, tutorials and links to other related resources. We believe this server will be a useful tool for predicting and assessing the quality of RNA 3D structures. Availability and implementation: The web server is available at http://melolab.org/webrasp. It has been tested on the most popular web browsers and requires Java plugin for Jmol visualization. Contact: fmelo@bio.puc.cl PMID:23929030

  13. The effect of relining on the accuracy and stability of maxillary complete dentures--an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Barco, M T; Moore, B K; Swartz, M L; Boone, M E; Dykema, R W; Phillips, R W

    1979-07-01

    A technique was developed for evaluating in vitro the accuracy or fit of experimental denture bases using a low-viscosity impression material for determining the space between the master die and the processed denture base. These measurements indicated that relining heat-cured maxillary denture bases with autopolymerizing acrylic resin improved their adaptation to the ridges. Interestingly, if no teeth were present in the heat-cured denture base, markedly less distortion occurred after processing. Limited clinical measurements on the stability of maxillary dentures in function showed no statistically significant change in stability after relining, but the trend was toward increased stability with the relined denture.

  14. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ellens, N; Farahani, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  15. Detecting declines in the abundance of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) population: Understanding the accuracy, precision, and costs of our efforts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Al-Chokhachy, R.; Budy, P.; Conner, M.

    2009-01-01

    Using empirical field data for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), we evaluated the trade-off between power and sampling effort-cost using Monte Carlo simulations of commonly collected mark-recapture-resight and count data, and we estimated the power to detect changes in abundance across different time intervals. We also evaluated the effects of monitoring different components of a population and stratification methods on the precision of each method. Our results illustrate substantial variability in the relative precision, cost, and information gained from each approach. While grouping estimates by age or stage class substantially increased the precision of estimates, spatial stratification of sampling units resulted in limited increases in precision. Although mark-resight methods allowed for estimates of abundance versus indices of abundance, our results suggest snorkel surveys may be a more affordable monitoring approach across large spatial scales. Detecting a 25% decline in abundance after 5 years was not possible, regardless of technique (power = 0.80), without high sampling effort (48% of study site). Detecting a 25% decline was possible after 15 years, but still required high sampling efforts. Our results suggest detecting moderate changes in abundance of freshwater salmonids requires considerable resource and temporal commitments and highlight the difficulties of using abundance measures for monitoring bull trout populations.

  16. Wide-capture-range, high-precision wavelength stabilization within ±50 MHz for flexible-grid wavelength division multiplexing by photomixing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Jun; Kuboki, Takeshi; Kato, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    The lasers for the flexible-grid wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) system are required to have high precision of wavelength stability. Previously, we proposed the wavelength-controlling system of the distributed feedback laser diode (DFB-LD) with the photomixing technique and a microwave filter to precisely measure the optical frequency error from the target value. To enlarge the wavelength-capture range, we improve the system to detect the wavelength error with two different microwave filters in parallel. Experimental results show that the wavelength-capture range is extended up to 4 GHz while the wavelength error is still kept within ±50 MHz.

  17. The application of the model of coordinate S-transformation for stability analysis of datum points in high-precision GPS deformation monitoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiming; Zhou, Mingduan; Wang, Chao; Mei, Lianhui

    2012-11-01

    Based on the model of coordinate S-transformation, a novel method of stability analysis of datum points in high-precision GPS deformation monitoring networks is proposed. The model of coordinate S-transformation is used to calculate seven transformation parameters in adjacent two measurement stages, in order to confirm the stability of stations by coordinate differences. To judge the stability of stations, in comparison to the traditional method by a fixed the same datum point, the "threshold approach" and "statistical test approach" have been developed and applied to evaluate the stability of datum points of a first-order GPS deformation monitoring network of a hydropower station located in the West Region of China.

  18. Propagation and stability characteristics of a 500-m-long laser-based fiducial line for high-precision alignment of long-distance linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Masanori; Telada, Souichi; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2013-09-01

    A laser-based alignment system with a He-Ne laser has been newly developed in order to precisely align accelerator units at the KEKB injector linac. The laser beam was first implemented as a 500-m-long fiducial straight line for alignment measurements. We experimentally investigated the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam passing through laser pipes in vacuum. The pointing stability at the last fiducial point was successfully obtained with the transverse displacements of ±40 μm level in one standard deviation by applying a feedback control. This pointing stability corresponds to an angle of ±0.08 μrad. This report contains a detailed description of the experimental investigation for the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam in the laser-based alignment system for long-distance linear accelerators.

  19. Propagation and stability characteristics of a 500-m-long laser-based fiducial line for high-precision alignment of long-distance linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Masanori; Telada, Souichi; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2013-09-15

    A laser-based alignment system with a He-Ne laser has been newly developed in order to precisely align accelerator units at the KEKB injector linac. The laser beam was first implemented as a 500-m-long fiducial straight line for alignment measurements. We experimentally investigated the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam passing through laser pipes in vacuum. The pointing stability at the last fiducial point was successfully obtained with the transverse displacements of ±40 μm level in one standard deviation by applying a feedback control. This pointing stability corresponds to an angle of ±0.08 μrad. This report contains a detailed description of the experimental investigation for the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam in the laser-based alignment system for long-distance linear accelerators.

  20. Spinal Cord Contusion Based on Precise Vertebral Stabilization and Tissue Displacement Measured by Combined Assessment to Discriminate Small Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi Ping; Burke, Darlene A.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Chekmenev, Sergey Y.; Dincman, Toros; Zhang, Yongjie; Zheng, Yiyan; Smith, Rebecca R.; Benton, Richard L.; DeVries, William H.; Hu, Xiaoling; Magnuson, David S.K.; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) is the most common type of spinal injury seen clinically. Several rat contusion SCI models have been described, and all have strengths and weaknesses with respect to sensitivity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance. We developed the Louisville Injury System Apparatus (LISA), which contains a novel spine-stabilizing device that enables precise and stable spine fixation, and is based on tissue displacement to determine the severity of injury. Injuries graded from mild to moderately severe were produced using 0.2-, 0.4-, 0.6-, 0.8-, 1.0-, and 1.2-mm spinal cord displacement in rats. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) and Louisville Swim Score (LSS) could not significantly distinguish between 0.2-mm lesion severities, except those of 0.6- and 0.8-mm BBB scores, but could between 0.4-mm injury differences or if the data were grouped (0.2–0.4, 0.6–0.8, and 1.0–1.2). Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potential (tcMMEP) response amplitudes were decreased 10-fold at 0.2-mm displacement, barely detected at 0.4-mm displacement, and absent with greater displacement injuries. In contrast, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were recorded at 0.2- and 0.4-mm displacements with normal amplitudes and latencies but were detected at lower amplitudes at 0.6-mm displacement and absent with more severe injuries. Analyzing combined BBB, tcMMEP, and SSEP results enabled statistically significant discrimination between 0.2-, 0.4-, 0.6-, and 0.8-mm displacement injuries but not the more severe injuries. Present data document that the LISA produces reliable and reproducible SCI whose parameters of injury can be adjusted to more accurately reflect clinical SCI. Moreover, multiple outcome measures are necessary to accurately detect small differences in functional deficits and/or recovery. This is of crucial importance when trying to detect functional improvement after therapeutic intervention to treat SCI. PMID:18986224

  1. A novel small area fast block matching algorithm based on high-accuracy gyro in digital image stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Zhao, Yuejin; Yu, Fei; Zhu, Weiwen; Lang, Guanqing; Dong, Liquan

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a novel fast block matching algorithm based on high-accuracy Gyro for steadying shaking image. It acquires motion vector from Gyro firstly. Then determines searching initial position and divides image motion into three modes of small, medium and large using the motion vector from Gyro. Finally, fast block matching algorithm is designed by improving four types of templates (square, diamond, hexagon, octagon). Experimental result shows that the algorithm can speed up 50% over common method (such as NTSS, FSS, DS) and maintain the same accuracy.

  2. Improved precision and accuracy for high-performance liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric exact mass measurement of small molecules from the simultaneous and controlled introduction of internal calibrants via a second electrospray nebuliser.

    PubMed

    Herniman, Julie M; Bristow, Tony W T; O'Connor, Gavin; Jarvis, Jackie; Langley, G John

    2004-01-01

    The use of a second electrospray nebuliser has proved to be highly successful for exact mass measurement during high-performance liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HPLC/FTICRMS). Much improved accuracy and precision of mass measurement were afforded by the introduction of the internal calibration solution, thus overcoming space charge issues due to the lack of control over relative ion abundances of the species eluting from the HPLC column. Further, issues of suppression of ionisation, observed when using a T-piece method, are addressed and this simple system has significant benefits over other more elaborate approaches providing data that compares very favourably with these other approaches. The technique is robust, flexible and transferable and can be used in conjunction with HPLC, infusion or flow injection analysis (FIA) to provide constant internal calibration signals to allow routine, accurate and precise mass measurements to be recorded.

  3. Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988--1990; Water-resources investigations report 93-4025

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, M.S.

    1994-05-01

    Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suit-ability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment such as steel tapes, or they were taken continuously, using automated data recorders and pressure transducers. This report presents precision range and accuracy data established for manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, 1988--90.

  4. Method and system using power modulation for maskless vapor deposition of spatially graded thin film and multilayer coatings with atomic-level precision and accuracy

    DOEpatents

    Montcalm, Claude; Folta, James Allen; Tan, Swie-In; Reiss, Ira

    2002-07-30

    A method and system for producing a film (preferably a thin film with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) on a flat or graded substrate (such as concave or convex optics), by sweeping the substrate across a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution. In preferred embodiments, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. A user selects a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a predetermined desired thickness profile of the deposited film. The method relies on precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

  5. Accuracy and precision of reconstruction of complex refractive index in near-field single-distance propagation-based phase-contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gureyev, Timur; Mohammadi, Sara; Nesterets, Yakov; Dullin, Christian; Tromba, Giuliana

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the quantitative accuracy and noise sensitivity of reconstruction of the 3D distribution of complex refractive index, n(r)=1-δ(r)+iβ(r), in samples containing materials with different refractive indices using propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PB-CT). Our present study is limited to the case of parallel-beam geometry with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, but can be readily extended to cone-beam CT and partially coherent polychromatic X-rays at least in the case of weakly absorbing samples. We demonstrate that, except for regions near the interfaces between distinct materials, the distribution of imaginary part of the refractive index, β(r), can be accurately reconstructed from a single projection image per view angle using phase retrieval based on the so-called homogeneous version of the Transport of Intensity equation (TIE-Hom) in combination with conventional CT reconstruction. In contrast, the accuracy of reconstruction of δ(r) depends strongly on the choice of the "regularization" parameter in TIE-Hom. We demonstrate by means of an instructive example that for some multi-material samples, a direct application of the TIE-Hom method in PB-CT produces qualitatively incorrect results for δ(r), which can be rectified either by collecting additional projection images at each view angle, or by utilising suitable a priori information about the sample. As a separate observation, we also show that, in agreement with previous reports, it is possible to significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio by increasing the sample-to-detector distance in combination with TIE-Hom phase retrieval in PB-CT compared to conventional ("contact") CT, with the maximum achievable gain of the order of 0.3δ /β. This can lead to improved image quality and/or reduction of the X-ray dose delivered to patients in medical imaging.

  6. GO annotation in InterPro: why stability does not indicate accuracy in a sea of changing annotations.

    PubMed

    Sangrador-Vegas, Amaia; Mitchell, Alex L; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Yong, Siew-Yit; Finn, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    The removal of annotation from biological databases is often perceived as an indicator of erroneous annotation. As a corollary, annotation stability is considered to be a measure of reliability. However, diverse data-driven events can affect the stability of annotations in both primary protein sequence databases and the protein family databases that are built upon the sequence databases and used to help annotate them. Here, we describe some of these events and their consequences for the InterPro database, and demonstrate that annotation removal or reassignment is not always linked to incorrect annotation by the curator. Database URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro.

  7. Postoperative skeletal stability and accuracy of a new combined Le Fort I and horseshoe osteotomy for superior repositioning of the maxilla.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, I; Khanal, A; Kodama, M; Furuta, N; Tominaga, K

    2009-12-01

    Postoperative skeletal stability and accuracy were evaluated in a combination of Le Fort I and horseshoe osteotomies for superior repositioning of maxilla in bi-maxillary surgeries in 19 consecutive patients. 9 underwent Le Fort I osteotomy alone (preoperative planned superior movement <3.5 mm). 10 underwent Le Fort I and horseshoe osteotomy (combination group) (preoperative planned superior movement >3.5 mm). The maxilla was osteotomized and fixed with 4 titanium Le Fort plates followed by bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy of the mandible, fixed with 2 semi-rigid titanium miniplates. Maxillomandibular fixation was performed for 1 week. Lateral cephalograms were obtained preoperatively, 1 week postoperatively, 3, 6, 12 months later. The changes in point A, point of maxillary tuberosity, and upper molar mesial cusp tip were examined. Discrepancy between the planned and measured superior movement of the maxilla in the Le Fort I and combination groups was 0.30 and 0.23 mm, respectively. The maxillae in both groups were repositioned close to their planned positions during surgery. 1 year later, both groups showed skeletal stability with no significant postoperative changes. When high superior repositioning of the maxilla is indicated, horseshoe osteotomy combined with Le Fort I is reliable and useful for accuracy and postoperative stability.

  8. The accuracy and precision of a micro computer tomography volumetric measurement technique for the analysis of in-vitro tested total disc replacements.

    PubMed

    Vicars, R; Fisher, J; Hall, R M

    2009-04-01

    Total disc replacements (TDRs) in the spine have been clinically successful in the short term, but there are concerns over long-term failure due to wear, as seen in other joint replacements. Simulators have been used to investigate the wear of TDRs, but only gravimetric measurements have been used to assess material loss. Micro computer tomography (microCT) has been used for volumetric measurement of explanted components but has yet to be used for in-vitro studies with the wear typically less than < 20 mm3 per 10(6) cycles. The aim of this study was to compare microCT volume measurements with gravimetric measurements and to assess whether microCT can quantify wear volumes of in-vitro tested TDRs. microCT measurements of TDR polyethylene cores were undertaken and the results compared with gravimetric assessments. The effects of repositioning, integration time, and scan resolution were investigated. The best volume measurement resolution was found to be +/- 3 mm3, at least three orders of magnitude greater than those determined for gravimetric measurements. In conclusion, the microCT measurement technique is suitable for quantifying in-vitro TDR polyethylene wear volumes and can provide qualitative data (e.g. wear location), and also further quantitative data (e.g. height loss), assisting comparisons with in-vivo and ex-vivo data. It is best used alongside gravimetric measurements to maintain the high level of precision that these measurements provide.

  9. Leaf Vein Length per Unit Area Is Not Intrinsically Dependent on Image Magnification: Avoiding Measurement Artifacts for Accuracy and Precision1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Lawren; Caringella, Marissa; Scoffoni, Christine; Mason, Chase; Rawls, Michael; Markesteijn, Lars; Poorter, Lourens

    2014-01-01

    Leaf vein length per unit leaf area (VLA; also known as vein density) is an important determinant of water and sugar transport, photosynthetic function, and biomechanical support. A range of software methods are in use to visualize and measure vein systems in cleared leaf images; typically, users locate veins by digital tracing, but recent articles introduced software by which users can locate veins using thresholding (i.e. based on the contrasting of veins in the image). Based on the use of this method, a recent study argued against the existence of a fixed VLA value for a given leaf, proposing instead that VLA increases with the magnification of the image due to intrinsic properties of the vein system, and recommended that future measurements use a common, low image magnification for measurements. We tested these claims with new measurements using the software LEAFGUI in comparison with digital tracing using ImageJ software. We found that the apparent increase of VLA with magnification was an artifact of (1) using low-quality and low-magnification images and (2) errors in the algorithms of LEAFGUI. Given the use of images of sufficient magnification and quality, and analysis with error-free software, the VLA can be measured precisely and accurately. These findings point to important principles for improving the quantity and quality of important information gathered from leaf vein systems. PMID:25096977

  10. High-accuracy, high-precision, high-resolution, continuous monitoring of urban greenhouse gas emissions? Results to date from INFLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. J.; Brewer, A.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Deng, A.; Hardesty, M.; Gurney, K. R.; Heimburger, A. M. F.; Karion, A.; Lauvaux, T.; Lopez-Coto, I.; McKain, K.; Miles, N. L.; Patarasuk, R.; Prasad, K.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Richardson, S.; Sarmiento, D. P.; Shepson, P. B.; Sweeney, C.; Turnbull, J. C.; Whetstone, J. R.; Wu, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) is testing the boundaries of our ability to use atmospheric measurements to quantify urban greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The project brings together inventory assessments, tower-based and aircraft-based atmospheric measurements, and atmospheric modeling to provide high-accuracy, high-resolution, continuous monitoring of emissions of GHGs from the city. Results to date include a multi-year record of tower and aircraft based measurements of the urban CO2 and CH4 signal, long-term atmospheric modeling of GHG transport, and emission estimates for both CO2 and CH4 based on both tower and aircraft measurements. We will present these emissions estimates, the uncertainties in each, and our assessment of the primary needs for improvements in these emissions estimates. We will also present ongoing efforts to improve our understanding of atmospheric transport and background atmospheric GHG mole fractions, and to disaggregate GHG sources (e.g. biogenic vs. fossil fuel CO2 fluxes), topics that promise significant improvement in urban GHG emissions estimates.

  11. Accuracy and Precision in the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) Dataset 1998-2000 in Light of the JOSIE-2000 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, J. C.; Thompson, A. M.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Oltmans, S. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Smit, H. G. J.

    2003-01-01

    A network of 12 southern hemisphere tropical and subtropical stations in the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) project has provided over 2000 profiles of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone since 1998. Balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes are used with standard radiosondes for pressure, temperature and relative humidity measurements. The archived data are available at:http: //croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/shadoz. In Thompson et al., accuracies and imprecisions in the SHADOZ 1998- 2000 dataset were examined using ground-based instruments and the TOMS total ozone measurement (version 7) as references. Small variations in ozonesonde technique introduced possible biases from station-to-station. SHADOZ total ozone column amounts are now compared to version 8 TOMS; discrepancies between the two datasets are reduced 2\\% on average. An evaluation of ozone variations among the stations is made using the results of a series of chamber simulations of ozone launches (JOSIE-2000, Juelich Ozonesonde Intercomparison Experiment) in which a standard reference ozone instrument was employed with the various sonde techniques used in SHADOZ. A number of variations in SHADOZ ozone data are explained when differences in solution strength, data processing and instrument type (manufacturer) are taken into account.

  12. The effect of dilution and the use of a post-extraction nucleic acid purification column on the accuracy, precision, and inhibition of environmental DNA samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna M.; Spear, Stephen F.; Pierson, Todd W.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of environmental DNA (eDNA) is an increasingly common method for detecting presence and assessing relative abundance of rare or elusive species in aquatic systems via the isolation of DNA from environmental samples and the amplification of species-specific sequences using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Co-extracted substances that inhibit qPCR can lead to inaccurate results and subsequent misinterpretation about a species’ status in the tested system. We tested three treatments (5-fold and 10-fold dilutions, and spin-column purification) for reducing qPCR inhibition from 21 partially and fully inhibited eDNA samples collected from coastal plain wetlands and mountain headwater streams in the southeastern USA. All treatments reduced the concentration of DNA in the samples. However, column purified samples retained the greatest sensitivity. For stream samples, all three treatments effectively reduced qPCR inhibition. However, for wetland samples, the 5-fold dilution was less effective than other treatments. Quantitative PCR results for column purified samples were more precise than the 5-fold and 10-fold dilutions by 2.2× and 3.7×, respectively. Column purified samples consistently underestimated qPCR-based DNA concentrations by approximately 25%, whereas the directional bias in qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed between stream and wetland samples for both dilution treatments. While the directional bias of qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed among treatments and locations, the magnitude of inaccuracy did not. Our results suggest that 10-fold dilution and column purification effectively reduce qPCR inhibition in mountain headwater stream and coastal plain wetland eDNA samples, and if applied to all samples in a study, column purification may provide the most accurate relative qPCR-based DNA concentrations estimates while retaining the greatest assay sensitivity.

  13. An investigation into the accuracy, stability and parallel performance of a highly stable explicit technique for stiff reaction-transport PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, A., LLNL

    1998-02-17

    The numerical simulation of chemically reacting flows is a topic, that has attracted a great deal of current research At the heart of numerical reactive flow simulations are large sets of coupled, nonlinear Partial Differential Equations (PDES). Due to the stiffness that is usually present, explicit time differencing schemes are not used despite their inherent simplicity and efficiency on parallel and vector machines, since these schemes require prohibitively small numerical stepsizes. Implicit time differencing schemes, although possessing good stability characteristics, introduce a great deal of computational overhead necessary to solve the simultaneous algebraic system at each timestep. This thesis examines an algorithm based on a preconditioned time differencing scheme. The algorithm is explicit and permits a large stable time step. An investigation of the algorithm`s accuracy, stability and performance on a parallel architecture is presented

  14. Re-Os geochronology of the El Salvador porphyry Cu-Mo deposit, Chile: Tracking analytical improvements in accuracy and precision over the past decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Stein, Holly J.; Morgan, John W.; Markey, Richard J.; Watanabe, Yasushi

    2014-04-01

    deposit geochronology. The timing and duration of mineralization from Re-Os dating of ore minerals is more precise than estimates from previously reported 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages on alteration minerals. The Re-Os results suggest that the mineralization is temporally distinct from pre-mineral rhyolite porphyry (42.63 ± 0.28 Ma) and is immediately prior to or overlapping with post-mineral latite dike emplacement (41.16 ± 0.48 Ma). Based on the Re-Os and other geochronologic data, the Middle Eocene intrusive activity in the El Salvador district is divided into three pulses: (1) 44-42.5 Ma for weakly mineralized porphyry intrusions, (2) 41.8-41.2 Ma for intensely mineralized porphyry intrusions, and (3) ∼41 Ma for small latite dike intrusions without major porphyry stocks. The orientation of igneous dikes and porphyry stocks changed from NNE-SSW during the first pulse to WNW-ESE for the second and third pulses. This implies that the WNW-ESE striking stress changed from σ3 (minimum principal compressive stress) during the first pulse to σHmax (maximum principal compressional stress in a horizontal plane) during the second and third pulses. Therefore, the focus of intense porphyry Cu-Mo mineralization occurred during a transient geodynamic reconfiguration just before extinction of major intrusive activity in the region.

  15. Basic investigations on the performance of a normoxic polymer gel with tetrakis-hydroxy-methyl-phosphonium chloride as an oxygen scavenger: Reproducibility, accuracy, stability, and dose rate dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Bayreder, Christian; Georg, Dietmar; Moser, Ewald; Berg, Andreas

    2006-07-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-based polymer gel dosimetry using normoxic polymer gels, represents a new dosimetric method specially suited for high-resolution three-dimensional dosimetric problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose response with regard to stability, accuracy, reproducibility, and the dose rate dependence. Tetrakis-hydroxy-methyl-phosphonium chloride (THPC) is used as an oxygen scavenger, and methacrylic acid as a monomer. Accuracy, reproducibility, and dose resolution were determined for MR protocols at low spatial resolution (typical for clinical scanners), medium, and microimaging-resolution protocols at three different dose levels. The dose-response stability and preirradiation-induced variations in R2, related to the time interval between preparation and irradiation of the polymer gel, were investigated. Also postirradiation stability of the polymer gel was considered. These experiments were performed using a {sup 60}Co beam (E=1.2 MV) in a water phantom. Moreover, we investigated the dose rate dependence in the low, medium, and saturation dose region of the normoxic polymer gel using a linear accelerator at photon energy of 25 MV. MR scanning was performed on a 3 T whole body scanner (MEDSPEC 30/80, BRUKER BIOSPIN, Ettlingen, Germany) using several coils and different gradient systems adapted to the acquired spatial resolution investigated. For T2-parameter selective imaging and determination of the relaxation rate R2=1/T2, a multiple spin echo sequence with 20 equidistant echoes was used. With regard to preirradiation induced variations R2 increases significantly with the increasing time interval between the polymer gel preparation and irradiation. Only a slight increase in R2 can be observed for varying the postirradiation-time solely. The dose reproducibility at voxel volumes of about 1.4x1.4x2 mm{sup 3} is better than 2%. The accuracy strongly depends on the calibration curve. THPC represents a very effective oxygen scavenger in

  16. Glucose sensing using near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: gold surfaces, 10-day stability, and improved accuracy.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Douglas A; Yonzon, Chanda Ranjit; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lyandres, Olga; Shah, Nilam C; Glucksberg, Matthew R; Walsh, Joseph T; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2005-07-01

    This research presents the achievement of significant milestones toward the development of a minimally invasive, continuously monitoring, glucose-sensing platform based on the optical quantitation of glucose in interstitial fluid. We expand our initial successes in the measurement of glucose by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), demonstrating substantial improvements not only in the quality and optical properties of the substrate system itself but also in the robustness of the measurement methodology and the amenability of the technique to compact, diode laser-based instrumentation. Herein, we compare the long-term stability of gold to silver film over nanosphere (AuFON, AgFON) substrates functionalized with a partitioning self-assembled monolayer (SAM) using both electrochemical and SERS measurements. AuFONs were found to be stable for a period of at least 11 days. The switch to AuFONs not only provides a more stable surface for SAM formation but also yields better chemometric results, with improved calibration and validation over a range of 0.5-44 mM (10-800 mg/dL). Measured values for glucose concentrations in phosphate-buffered saline (pH approximately 7.4) based on 160 independent SERS measurements on AuFONs have a root-mean-square error of prediction of 2.7 mM (49.5 mg/dL), with 91% of the values falling within an extended A-B range on an expanded Clarke error grid. Furthermore, AuFONs exhibit surface plasmon resonances at longer wavelengths than similar AgFONs, which make them more efficient for SERS at near-infrared wavelengths, enabling the use of low-power diode lasers in future devices.

  17. Acceptability, Precision and Accuracy of 3D Photonic Scanning for Measurement of Body Shape in a Multi-Ethnic Sample of Children Aged 5-11 Years: The SLIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathan C. K.; Stocks, Janet; Bonner, Rachel; Raywood, Emma; Legg, Sarah; Lee, Simon; Treleaven, Philip; Lum, Sooky

    2015-01-01

    Background Information on body size and shape is used to interpret many aspects of physiology, including nutritional status, cardio-metabolic risk and lung function. Such data have traditionally been obtained through manual anthropometry, which becomes time-consuming when many measurements are required. 3D photonic scanning (3D-PS) of body surface topography represents an alternative digital technique, previously applied successfully in large studies of adults. The acceptability, precision and accuracy of 3D-PS in young children have not been assessed. Methods We attempted to obtain data on girth, width and depth of the chest and waist, and girth of the knee and calf, manually and by 3D-PS in a multi-ethnic sample of 1484 children aged 5–11 years. The rate of 3D-PS success, and reasons for failure, were documented. Precision and accuracy of 3D-PS were assessed relative to manual measurements using the methods of Bland and Altman. Results Manual measurements were successful in all cases. Although 97.4% of children agreed to undergo 3D-PS, successful scans were only obtained in 70.7% of these. Unsuccessful scans were primarily due to body movement, or inability of the software to extract shape outputs. The odds of scan failure, and the underlying reason, differed by age, size and ethnicity. 3D-PS measurements tended to be greater than those obtained manually (p<0.05), however ranking consistency was high (r2>0.90 for most outcomes). Conclusions 3D-PS is acceptable in children aged ≥5 years, though with current hardware/software, and body movement artefacts, approximately one third of scans may be unsuccessful. The technique had poorer technical success than manual measurements, and had poorer precision when the measurements were viable. Compared to manual measurements, 3D-PS showed modest average biases but acceptable limits of agreement for large surveys, and little evidence that bias varied substantially with size. Most of the issues we identified could be

  18. A method to improve the stability and accuracy of ANN- and SVM-based time series models for long-term groundwater level predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Heesung; Hyun, Yunjung; Ha, Kyoochul; Lee, Kang-Kun; Kim, Gyoo-Bum

    2016-05-01

    The prediction of long-term groundwater level fluctuations is necessary to effectively manage groundwater resources and to assess the effects of changes in rainfall patterns on groundwater resources. In the present study, a weighted error function approach was utilised to improve the performance of artificial neural network (ANN)- and support vector machine (SVM)-based recursive prediction models for the long-term prediction of groundwater levels in response to rainfall. The developed time series models were applied to groundwater level data from 5 groundwater-monitoring stations in South Korea. The results demonstrated that the weighted error function approach can improve the stability and accuracy of recursive prediction models, especially for ANN models. The comparison of the model performance showed that the recursive prediction performance of the SVM was superior to the performance of the ANN in this case study.

  19. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  20. Dose Calculation on KV Cone Beam CT Images: An Investigation of the Hu-Density Conversion Stability and Dose Accuracy Using the Site-Specific Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi

    2010-10-01

    Precise calibration of Hounsfield units (HU) to electron density (HU-density) is essential to dose calculation. On-board kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is used predominantly for patients' positioning, but will potentially be used for dose calculation. The impacts of varying 3 imaging parameters (mAs, source-imager distance [SID], and cone angle) and phantom size on the HU number accuracy and HU-density calibrations for CBCT imaging were studied. We proposed a site-specific calibration method to achieve higher accuracy in CBCT image-based dose calculation. Three configurations of the Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS) water equivalent electron density phantom were used to simulate sites including head, lungs, and lower body (abdomen/pelvis). The planning computed tomography (CT) scan was used as the baseline for comparisons. CBCT scans of these phantom configurations were performed using Varian Trilogy{sup TM} system in a precalibrated mode with fixed tube voltage (125 kVp), but varied mAs, SID, and cone angle. An HU-density curve was generated and evaluated for each set of scan parameters. Three HU-density tables generated using different phantom configurations with the same imaging parameter settings were selected for dose calculation on CBCT images for an accuracy comparison. Changing mAs or SID had small impact on HU numbers. For adipose tissue, the HU discrepancy from the baseline was 20 HU in a small phantom, but 5 times lager in a large phantom. Yet, reducing the cone angle significantly decreases the HU discrepancy. The HU-density table was also affected accordingly. By performing dose comparison between CT and CBCT image-based plans, results showed that using the site-specific HU-density tables to calibrate CBCT images of different sites improves the dose accuracy to {approx}2%. Our phantom study showed that CBCT imaging can be a feasible option for dose computation in adaptive radiotherapy approach if the site

  1. Accuracy of laser beam center and width calculations.

    PubMed

    Mana, G; Massa, E; Rovera, A

    2001-03-20

    The application of lasers in high-precision measurements and the demand for accuracy make the plane-wave model of laser beams unsatisfactory. Measurements of the variance of the transverse components of the photon impulse are essential for wavelength determination. Accuracy evaluation of the relevant calculations is thus an integral part of the assessment of the wavelength of stabilized-laser radiation. We present a propagation-of-error analysis on variance calculations when digitized intensity profiles are obtained by means of silicon video cameras. Image clipping criteria are obtained that maximize the accuracy of the computed result.

  2. Loop gain stabilizing with an all-digital automatic-gain-control method for high-precision fiber-optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Chunxi; Li, Lijing; Song, Lailiang; Chen, Wen

    2016-06-10

    For a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) using electronic dithers to suppress the dead zone, without a fixed loop gain, the deterministic compensation for the dither signals in the control loop of the FOG cannot remain accurate, resulting in the dither residuals in the FOG rotation rate output and the navigation errors in the inertial navigation system. An all-digital automatic-gain-control method for stabilizing the loop gain of the FOG is proposed. By using a perturbation square wave to measure the loop gain of the FOG and adding an automatic gain control loop in the conventional control loop of the FOG, we successfully obtain the actual loop gain and make the loop gain converge to the reference value. The experimental results show that in the case of 20% variation in the loop gain, the dither residuals are successfully eliminated and the standard deviation of the FOG sampling outputs is decreased from 2.00  deg/h to 0.62  deg/h (sampling period 2.5 ms, 10 points smoothing). With this method, the loop gain of the FOG can be stabilized over the operation temperature range and in the long-time application, which provides a solid foundation for the engineering applications of the high-precision FOG.

  3. Loop gain stabilizing with an all-digital automatic-gain-control method for high-precision fiber-optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Chunxi; Li, Lijing; Song, Lailiang; Chen, Wen

    2016-06-10

    For a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) using electronic dithers to suppress the dead zone, without a fixed loop gain, the deterministic compensation for the dither signals in the control loop of the FOG cannot remain accurate, resulting in the dither residuals in the FOG rotation rate output and the navigation errors in the inertial navigation system. An all-digital automatic-gain-control method for stabilizing the loop gain of the FOG is proposed. By using a perturbation square wave to measure the loop gain of the FOG and adding an automatic gain control loop in the conventional control loop of the FOG, we successfully obtain the actual loop gain and make the loop gain converge to the reference value. The experimental results show that in the case of 20% variation in the loop gain, the dither residuals are successfully eliminated and the standard deviation of the FOG sampling outputs is decreased from 2.00  deg/h to 0.62  deg/h (sampling period 2.5 ms, 10 points smoothing). With this method, the loop gain of the FOG can be stabilized over the operation temperature range and in the long-time application, which provides a solid foundation for the engineering applications of the high-precision FOG. PMID:27409016

  4. Comparative Analysis of the Equivital EQ02 Lifemonitor with Holter Ambulatory ECG Device for Continuous Measurement of ECG, Heart Rate, and Heart Rate Variability: A Validation Study for Precision and Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Akintola, Abimbola A.; van de Pol, Vera; Bimmel, Daniel; Maan, Arie C.; van Heemst, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Equivital (EQ02) is a multi-parameter telemetric device offering both real-time and/or retrospective, synchronized monitoring of ECG, HR, and HRV, respiration, activity, and temperature. Unlike the Holter, which is the gold standard for continuous ECG measurement, EQO2 continuously monitors ECG via electrodes interwoven in the textile of a wearable belt. Objective: To compare EQ02 with the Holter for continuous home measurement of ECG, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV). Methods: Eighteen healthy participants wore, simultaneously for 24 h, the Holter and EQ02 monitors. Per participant, averaged HR, and HRV per 5 min from the two devices were compared using Pearson correlation, paired T-test, and Bland-Altman analyses. Accuracy and precision metrics included mean absolute relative difference (MARD). Results: Artifact content of EQ02 data varied widely between (range 1.93–56.45%) and within (range 0.75–9.61%) participants. Comparing the EQ02 to the Holter, the Pearson correlations were respectively 0.724, 0.955, and 0.997 for datasets containing all data and data with < 50 or < 20% artifacts respectively. For datasets containing respectively all data, data with < 50, or < 20% artifacts, bias estimated by Bland-Altman analysis was −2.8, −1.0, and −0.8 beats per minute and 24 h MARD was 7.08, 3.01, and 1.5. After selecting a 3-h stretch of data containing 1.15% artifacts, Pearson correlation was 0.786 for HRV measured as standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN). Conclusions: Although the EQ02 can accurately measure ECG and HRV, its accuracy and precision is highly dependent on artifact content. This is a limitation for clinical use in individual patients. However, the advantages of the EQ02 (ability to simultaneously monitor several physiologic parameters) may outweigh its disadvantages (higher artifact load) for research purposes and/ or for home monitoring in larger groups of study participants. Further studies can be aimed

  5. Using measurements of muscle color, pH, and electrical impedance to augment the current USDA beef quality grading standards and improve the accuracy and precision of sorting carcasses into palatability groups.

    PubMed

    Wulf, D M; Page, J K

    2000-10-01

    This research was conducted to determine whether objective measures of muscle color, muscle pH, and(or) electrical impedance are useful in segregating palatable beef from unpalatable beef, and to determine whether the current USDA quality grading standards for beef carcasses could be revised to improve their effectiveness at distinguishing palatable from unpalatable beef. One hundred beef carcasses were selected from packing plants in Texas, Illinois, and Ohio to represent the full range of muscle color observed in the U.S. beef carcass population. Steaks from these 100 carcasses were used to determine shear force on eight cooked beef muscles and taste panel ratings on three cooked beef muscles. It was discovered that the darkest-colored 20 to 25% of the beef carcasses sampled were less palatable and considerably less consistent than the other 75 to 80% sampled. Marbling score, by itself, explained 12% of the variation in beef palatability; hump height, by itself, explained 8% of the variation in beef palatability; measures of muscle color or pH, by themselves, explained 15 to 23% of the variation in beef palatability. When combined together, marbling score, hump height, and some measure of muscle color or pH explained 36 to 46% of the variation in beef palatability. Alternative quality grading systems were proposed to improve the accuracy and precision of sorting carcasses into palatability groups. The two proposed grading systems decreased palatability variation by 29% and 39%, respectively, within the Choice grade and decreased palatability variation by 37% and 12%, respectively, within the Select grade, when compared with current USDA standards. The percentage of unpalatable Choice carcasses was reduced from 14% under the current USDA grading standards to 4% and 1%, respectively, for the two proposed systems. The percentage of unpalatable Select carcasses was reduced from 36% under the current USDA standards to 7% and 29%, respectively, for the proposed systems

  6. Relative Accuracy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  7. The High-Pathogenicity Island of Yersinia enterocolitica Ye8081 Undergoes Low-Frequency Deletion but Not Precise Excision, Suggesting Recent Stabilization in the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Sandrine; Buchrieser, Carmen; Prentice, Michael; Guiyoule, Annie; Msadek, Tarek; Carniel, Elisabeth

    1999-01-01

    Highly pathogenic strains of Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica are characterized by the possession of a pathogenicity island designated the high-pathogenicity island (HPI). This 35- to 45-kb island carries an iron uptake system named the yersiniabactin locus. While the HPIs of Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis are subject to high-frequency spontaneous deletion from the chromosome, we were initially unable to obtain HPI-deleted Y. enterocolitica 1B isolates. In the present study, using a positive selection strategy, we identified three HPI-deleted mutants of Y. enterocolitica strain Ye8081. In these three independent clones, the chromosomal deletion was not limited to the HPI but encompassed a larger DNA fragment of approximately 140 kb. Loss of this fragment, which occurred at a frequency of approximately 5 × 10−7, resulted in the disappearance of several phenotypic traits, such as growth in a minimal medium, hydrolysis of o-nitrophenyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside, Tween esterase activity, and motility, and in a decreased virulence for mice. However, no precise excision of the Ye8081 HPI was observed. To gain more insight into the molecular basis for this phenomenon, the putative machinery of HPI excision in Y. enterocolitica was analyzed and compared to that in Y. pseudotuberculosis. We show that the probable reasons for failure of precise excision of the HPI of Y. enterocolitica Ye8081 are (i) the interruption of the P4-like integrase gene located close to its right-hand boundary by a premature stop codon and (ii) lack of conservation of 17-bp att-like sequences at both extremities of the HPI. These mutations may represent a process of HPI stabilization in the species Y. enterocolitica. PMID:10496882

  8. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chudakov, Eugene A.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. M{\\o}ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at ~300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100\\%-polarized electron target for M{\\o}ller polarimetry.

  9. Precision electron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudakov, E.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. Mo/ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at 300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100%-polarized electron target for Mo/ller polarimetry.

  10. Precision Environmental Radiation Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Popov, Pavel Degtiarenko

    2010-07-01

    A new precision low-level environmental radiation monitoring system has been developed and tested at Jefferson Lab. This system provides environmental radiation measurements with accuracy and stability of the order of 1 nGy/h in an hour, roughly corresponding to approximately 1% of the natural cosmic background at the sea level. Advanced electronic front-end has been designed and produced for use with the industry-standard High Pressure Ionization Chamber detector hardware. A new highly sensitive readout electronic circuit was designed to measure charge from the virtually suspended ionization chamber ion collecting electrode. New signal processing technique and dedicated data acquisition were tested together with the new readout. The designed system enabled data collection in a remote Linux-operated computer workstation, which was connected to the detectors using a standard telephone cable line. The data acquisition system algorithm is built around the continuously running 24-bit resolution 192 kHz data sampling analog to digital convertor. The major features of the design include: extremely low leakage current in the input circuit, true charge integrating mode operation, and relatively fast response to the intermediate radiation change. These features allow operating of the device as an environmental radiation monitor, at the perimeters of the radiation-generating installations in densely populated areas, like in other monitoring and security applications requiring high precision and long-term stability. Initial system evaluation results are presented.

  11. SU-E-P-54: Evaluation of the Accuracy and Precision of IGPS-O X-Ray Image-Guided Positioning System by Comparison with On-Board Imager Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D; Wang, W; Jiang, B; Fu, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the positioning accuracy and precision of IGPS-O system which is a novel radiographic kilo-voltage x-ray image-guided positioning system developed for clinical IGRT applications. Methods: IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system consists of two oblique sets of radiographic kilo-voltage x-ray projecting and imaging devices which were equiped on the ground and ceiling of treatment room. This system can determine the positioning error in the form of three translations and three rotations according to the registration of two X-ray images acquired online and the planning CT image. An anthropomorphic head phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were used for this study. The phantom was set up on the treatment table with correct position and various “planned” setup errors. Both IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system and the commercial On-board Imager Cone-beam Computed Tomography (OBI CBCT) were used to obtain the setup errors of the phantom. Difference of the Result between the two image-guided positioning systems were computed and analyzed. Results: The setup errors measured by IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system and the OBI CBCT system showed a general agreement, the means and standard errors of the discrepancies between the two systems in the left-right, anterior-posterior, superior-inferior directions were −0.13±0.09mm, 0.03±0.25mm, 0.04±0.31mm, respectively. The maximum difference was only 0.51mm in all the directions and the angular discrepancy was 0.3±0.5° between the two systems. Conclusion: The spatial and angular discrepancies between IGPS-O system and OBI CBCT for setup error correction was minimal. There is a general agreement between the two positioning system. IGPS-O x-ray image-guided positioning system can achieve as good accuracy as CBCT and can be used in the clinical IGRT applications.

  12. Application of AFINCH as a Tool for Evaluating the Effects of Streamflow-Gaging-Network Size and Composition on the Accuracy and Precision of Streamflow Estimates at Ungaged Locations in the Southeast Lake Michigan Hydrologic Subregion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.; Holtschlag, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Bootstrapping techniques employing random subsampling were used with the AFINCH (Analysis of Flows In Networks of CHannels) model to gain insights into the effects of variation in streamflow-gaging-network size and composition on the accuracy and precision of streamflow estimates at ungaged locations in the 0405 (Southeast Lake Michigan) hydrologic subregion. AFINCH uses stepwise-regression techniques to estimate monthly water yields from catchments based on geospatial-climate and land-cover data in combination with available streamflow and water-use data. Calculations are performed on a hydrologic-subregion scale for each catchment and stream reach contained in a National Hydrography Dataset Plus (NHDPlus) subregion. Water yields from contributing catchments are multiplied by catchment areas and resulting flow values are accumulated to compute streamflows in stream reaches which are referred to as flow lines. AFINCH imposes constraints on water yields to ensure that observed streamflows are conserved at gaged locations. Data from the 0405 hydrologic subregion (referred to as Southeast Lake Michigan) were used for the analyses. Daily streamflow data were measured in the subregion for 1 or more years at a total of 75 streamflow-gaging stations during the analysis period which spanned water years 1971-2003. The number of streamflow gages in operation each year during the analysis period ranged from 42 to 56 and averaged 47. Six sets (one set for each censoring level), each composed of 30 random subsets of the 75 streamflow gages, were created by censoring (removing) approximately 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 75 percent of the streamflow gages (the actual percentage of operating streamflow gages censored for each set varied from year to year, and within the year from subset to subset, but averaged approximately the indicated percentages). Streamflow estimates for six flow lines each were aggregated by censoring level, and results were analyzed to assess (a) how the size

  13. Stability and accuracy of power and phase measurements of a VVM system designed for online quality control of the BSD-2000 (-3D) DHT system.

    PubMed

    Lee, W M; Ameziane, A; van den Biggelaar, A M C; Rietveld, P J M; van Rhoon, G C

    2003-01-01

    Accurate control of power and phase is essential for the quality assurance of hyperthermia treatments. Hereto, an external measurement device was inserted, built around a Vector Voltmeter (VVM), in order to assess online the performance of the steering capability of the BSD-2000 and later the BSD-2000-3D system. This paper only concerns the power and phase calibration of the signal in the path between the power and phase detection probes of the BSD-system and power and phase measurement point of the VVM. The calibration is performed in the frequency range of 60-120 MHz using a network analyser with a frequency range of 0.01-500 MHz. More importantly, by repeating the calibration periodically over the last 3 years, the stability and accuracy of the power and phase measurements were determined using the VVM system. The results of the power calibration show that the VVM system, concerning its power and phase measurement, is stable in time. The variation of the power measured with the VVM system is less than 0.22 dB (5.2%) for the latest configuration of the BSD-2000-3D system. The variation of the VVM-based phase measurements of the latter configurations is 1.1 degrees or less. From the results of the power and phase measurements in the BSD 2000 system reported in previous studies using other measurement systems, it follows that the uncertainties of the power and phase measurements with the currently proposed VVM system are small enough to assess accurately the performance of the BSD system concerning its steering capability. PMID:12519713

  14. Absolute Quantitation of Met Using Mass Spectrometry for Clinical Application: Assay Precision, Stability, and Correlation with MET Gene Amplification in FFPE Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V. T.; Liao, Wei-Li; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Henderson, Les; Xu, Peng; Zhao, Lei; Rambo, Brittany; Hart, John; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Bengali, Kathleen; Uzzell, Jamar; Darfler, Marlene; Krizman, David B.; Cecchi, Fabiola; Bottaro, Donald P.; Karrison, Theodore; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Hembrough, Todd; Burrows, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Met tyrosine kinase receptor is associated with poor prognosis. Overexpression, and particularly MET amplification, are predictive of response to Met-specific therapy in preclinical models. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is currently used to select for ‘high Met’ expressing tumors for Met inhibitor trials. IHC suffers from antibody non-specificity, lack of quantitative resolution, and, when quantifying multiple proteins, inefficient use of scarce tissue. Methods After describing the development of the Liquid-Tissue-Selected Reaction Monitoring-mass spectrometry (LT-SRM-MS) Met assay, we evaluated the expression level of Met in 130 FFPE gastroesophageal cancer (GEC) tissues. We assessed the correlation of SRM Met expression to IHC and mean MET gene copy number (GCN)/nucleus or MET/CEP7 ratio by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Proteomic mapping of recombinant Met identified 418TEFTTALQR426 as the optimal SRM peptide. Limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for this peptide were 150 and 200 amol/µg tumor protein, respectively. The assay demonstrated excellent precision and temporal stability of measurements in serial sections analyzed one year apart. Expression levels of 130 GEC tissues ranged (<150 amol/µg to 4669.5 amol/µg. High correlation was observed between SRM Met expression and both MET GCN and MET/CEP7 ratio as determined by FISH (n = 30; R2 = 0.898). IHC did not correlate well with SRM (n = 44; R2 = 0.537) nor FISH GCN (n = 31; R2 = 0.509). A Met SRM level of ≥1500 amol/µg was 100% sensitive (95% CI 0.69–1) and 100% specific (95% CI 0.92–1) for MET amplification. Conclusions The Met SRM assay measured the absolute Met levels in clinical tissues with high precision. Compared to IHC, SRM provided a quantitative and linear measurement of Met expression, reliably distinguishing between non-amplified and amplified MET

  15. Proceedings of the Fourth Precise Time and Time Interval Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acrivos, H. N. (Compiler); Wardrip, S. C. (Compiler)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on Precise Time and Time Interval Planning are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) satellite timing techniques, precision frequency sources, and very long baseline interferometry, (2) frequency stabilities and communications, and (3) very low frequency and ultrahigh frequency propagation and use. Emphasis is placed on the accuracy of time discrimination obtained with time measuring equipment and specific applications of time measurement to military operations and civilian research projects.

  16. Precision frequency synthesizing sources with excellent time/frequency performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Liren; Lin, Hai

    1994-01-01

    Precision frequency synthesizing sources are needed in the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards, telemetry, communication, and radar systems. This kind of frequency synthesizing source possesses high frequency accuracy and excellent long term and short term frequency stability. Several precision frequency synthesizing sources developed by Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement (BIRMM) which have been successfully applied to the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards system, and radar system are described. In addition, the working principle, implementation approach, and the main technical specifications of the frequency synthesizing sources are also given.

  17. Soviet precision timekeeping research and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Vessot, R.F.C.; Allan, D.W.; Crampton, S.J.B.; Cutler, L.S.; Kern, R.H.; McCoubrey, A.O.; White, J.D.

    1991-08-01

    This report is the result of a study of Soviet progress in precision timekeeping research and timekeeping capability during the last two decades. The study was conducted by a panel of seven US scientists who have expertise in timekeeping, frequency control, time dissemination, and the direct applications of these disciplines to scientific investigation. The following topics are addressed in this report: generation of time by atomic clocks at the present level of their technology, new and emerging technologies related to atomic clocks, time and frequency transfer technology, statistical processes involving metrological applications of time and frequency, applications of precise time and frequency to scientific investigations, supporting timekeeping technology, and a comparison of Soviet research efforts with those of the United States and the West. The number of Soviet professionals working in this field is roughly 10 times that in the United States. The Soviet Union has facilities for large-scale production of frequency standards and has concentrated its efforts on developing and producing rubidium gas cell devices (relatively compact, low-cost frequency standards of modest accuracy and stability) and atomic hydrogen masers (relatively large, high-cost standards of modest accuracy and high stability). 203 refs., 45 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Precise attitude rate estimation using star images obtained by mission telescope for satellite missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, Takaya; Hosonuma, Takayuki; Ikari, Satoshi; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Sako, Nobutada; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    2015-02-01

    Recently, small satellites have been employed in various satellite missions such as astronomical observation and remote sensing. During these missions, the attitudes of small satellites should be stabilized to a higher accuracy to obtain accurate science data and images. To achieve precise attitude stabilization, these small satellites should estimate their attitude rate under the strict constraints of mass, space, and cost. This research presents a new method for small satellites to precisely estimate angular rate using star blurred images by employing a mission telescope to achieve precise attitude stabilization. In this method, the angular velocity is estimated by assessing the quality of a star image, based on how blurred it appears to be. Because the proposed method utilizes existing mission devices, a satellite does not require additional precise rate sensors, which makes it easier to achieve precise stabilization given the strict constraints possessed by small satellites. The research studied the relationship between estimation accuracy and parameters used to achieve an attitude rate estimation, which has a precision greater than 1 × 10-6 rad/s. The method can be applied to all attitude sensors, which use optics systems such as sun sensors and star trackers (STTs). Finally, the method is applied to the nano astrometry satellite Nano-JASMINE, and we investigate the problems that are expected to arise with real small satellites by performing numerical simulations.

  19. Precision Nova operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.B.; Miller, J.L.; Saunders, R.L.; Thompson, C.E.; Weiland, T.L.; Laumann, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    To improve the symmetry of x-ray drive on indirectly driven ICF capsules, we have increased the accuracy of operating procedures and diagnostics on the Nova laser. Precision Nova operations includes routine precision power balance to within 10% rms in the ``foot`` and 5% nns in the peak of shaped pulses, beam synchronization to within 10 ps rms, and pointing of the beams onto targets to within 35 {mu}m rms. We have also added a ``fail-safe chirp`` system to avoid Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in optical components during high energy shots.

  20. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  1. Precise Orbit Determination for ALOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Ryo; Nakamura, Shinichi; Kudo, Nobuo; Katagiri, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has been developed to contribute to the fields of mapping, precise regional land coverage observation, disaster monitoring, and resource surveying. Because the mounted sensors need high geometrical accuracy, precise orbit determination for ALOS is essential for satisfying the mission objectives. So ALOS mounts a GPS receiver and a Laser Reflector (LR) for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). This paper deals with the precise orbit determination experiments for ALOS using Global and High Accuracy Trajectory determination System (GUTS) and the evaluation of the orbit determination accuracy by SLR data. The results show that, even though the GPS receiver loses lock of GPS signals more frequently than expected, GPS-based orbit is consistent with SLR-based orbit. And considering the 1 sigma error, orbit determination accuracy of a few decimeters (peak-to-peak) was achieved.

  2. New multi-station and multi-decadal trend data on precipitable water. Recipe to match FTIR retrievals from NDACC long-time records to radio sondes within 1 mm accuracy/precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussmann, R.; Borsdorff, T.; Rettinger, M.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Demoulin, P.; Duchatelet, P.; Mahieu, E.

    2009-04-01

    We present an original optimum strategy for retrieval of precipitable water from routine ground-based mid-infrared FTS measurements performed at a number globally distributed stations within the NDACC network. The strategy utilizes FTIR retrievals which are set in a way to match standard radio sonde operations. Thereby, an unprecedented accuracy and precision for measurements of precipitable water can be demonstrated: the correlation between Zugspitze FTIR water vapor columns from a 3 months measurement campaign with total columns derived from coincident radio sondes shows a regression coefficient of R = 0.988, a bias of 0.05 mm, a standard deviation of 0.28 mm, an intercept of 0.01 mm, and a slope of 1.01. This appears to be even better than what can be achieved with state-of-the-art micro wave techniques, see e.g., Morland et al. (2006, Fig. 9 therein). Our approach is based upon a careful selection of spectral micro windows, comprising a set of both weak and strong water vapor absorption lines between 839.4 - 840.6 cm-1, 849.0 - 850.2 cm-1, and 852.0 - 853.1 cm-1, which is not contaminated by interfering absorptions of any other trace gases. From existing spectroscopic line lists, a careful selection of the best available parameter set was performed, leading to nearly perfect spectral fits without significant forward model parameter errors. To set up the FTIR water vapor profile inversion, a set of FTIR measurements and coincident radio sondes has been utilized. To eliminate/minimize mismatch in time and space, the Tobin best estimate of the state of the atmosphere principle has been applied to the radio sondes. This concept uses pairs of radio sondes launched with a 1-hour separation, and derives the gradient from the two radio sonde measurements, in order to construct a virtual PTU profile for a certain time and location. Coincident FTIR measurements of water vapor columns (two hour mean values) have then been matched to the water columns obtained by

  3. The low-cost and precise piston gas pressure regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudasik, Mateusz; Skoczylas, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    The present paper discusses the concept and functioning of an innovative instrument for precise stabilization of gas pressure. The piston gas pressure regulator was constructed at the Strata Mechanics Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The tests to which the instrument was subjected involved observing the values of stabilized pressure at the level of 10 bar and 3 bar, for various gas flow rates at the outlet of the instrument. The piston gas pressure regulator operates within the range of 0-10 bar and the gas flow range of 0-240 cm3 min-1. The precision of the process of stabilizing the initial pressure is  ±0.005 bar, regardless of the gas pressure value and the flow rate observed at the outlet of the instrument. Although the pressure transducer’s accuracy is 0.25% of the full range, the conducted tests of the regulator demonstrated that the obtained changeability of the stabilized pressure is at least two times lower. Unlike some other gas pressure regulators available on the market, the instrument constructed by the authors of the present paper is highly precise when it comes to the process of stabilization, and inexpensive to build.

  4. Precise verification of a fibre link for frequency transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthee, C. F.; Burger, J. P.; Kritzinger, R.

    2014-06-01

    A new electrically insensitive optical fibre link was installed between two buildings using commercially available equipment. The aim of the link was to transfer the frequency accuracy from the South African National Measure- ment Standard for Time and Frequency (derived from caesium atomic clocks) to an optical frequency comb. This enables direct traceability of optical frequency measurements to internationally verified time standards (UTC), via the timing links at the National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA). A clean-up oscillator is used to improve any degrading of the stability caused by the laser link. Highly precise loop-back experiments were done to verify the accuracy and stability of the fibre link and clean-up oscillator combination. The nature and results of such experiments are presented here, in order to demonstrate the traceability of the fibre link, and therefore the traceable link between the optical frequency comb and the National Measurement Standards for Time and Frequency of South Africa.

  5. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  6. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  7. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  8. Glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The IC Lithography roadmap foresees manufacturing of devices with critical dimension of < 20 nm. Overlay specification of single digit nanometer asking for nanometer positioning accuracy requiring sub nanometer position measurement accuracy. The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR® to full fill the ever tighter CTE specification for wafer stepper components. In this paper we present the ZERODUR® Lithography Roadmap on the CTE metrology and tolerance. Additionally, simulation calculations based on a physical model are presented predicting the long term CTE behavior of ZERODUR® components to optimize dimensional stability of precision positioning devices. CTE data of several low thermal expansion materials are compared regarding their temperature dependence between - 50°C and + 100°C. ZERODUR® TAILORED 22°C is full filling the tight CTE tolerance of +/- 10 ppb / K within the broadest temperature interval compared to all other materials of this investigation. The data presented in this paper explicitly demonstrates the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the nanometer precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  9. State of the Field: Extreme Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Arriagada, Pamela; Baluev, Roman V.; Bean, Jacob L.; Bouchy, Francois; Buchhave, Lars A.; Carroll, Thorsten; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Crepp, Justin R.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Diddams, Scott A.; Dumusque, Xavier; Eastman, Jason D.; Endl, Michael; Figueira, Pedro; Ford, Eric B.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Fournier, Paul; Fűrész, Gabor; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gregory, Philip C.; Grundahl, Frank; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hébrard, Guillaume; Herrero, Enrique; Hogg, David W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Jorden, Paul; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Latham, David W.; Laughlin, Greg; Loredo, Thomas J.; Lovis, Christophe; Mahadevan, Suvrath; McCracken, Tyler M.; Pepe, Francesco; Perez, Mario; Phillips, David F.; Plavchan, Peter P.; Prato, Lisa; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reiners, Ansgar; Robertson, Paul; Santos, Nuno C.; Sawyer, David; Segransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Steinmetz, Tilo; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stéphane; Valenti, Jeff A.; Wang, Sharon X.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2016-06-01

    The Second Workshop on Extreme Precision Radial Velocities defined circa 2015 the state of the art Doppler precision and identified the critical path challenges for reaching 10 cm s-1 measurement precision. The presentations and discussion of key issues for instrumentation and data analysis and the workshop recommendations for achieving this bold precision are summarized here. Beginning with the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher spectrograph, technological advances for precision radial velocity (RV) measurements have focused on building extremely stable instruments. To reach still higher precision, future spectrometers will need to improve upon the state of the art, producing even higher fidelity spectra. This should be possible with improved environmental control, greater stability in the illumination of the spectrometer optics, better detectors, more precise wavelength calibration, and broader bandwidth spectra. Key data analysis challenges for the precision RV community include distinguishing center of mass (COM) Keplerian motion from photospheric velocities (time correlated noise) and the proper treatment of telluric contamination. Success here is coupled to the instrument design, but also requires the implementation of robust statistical and modeling techniques. COM velocities produce Doppler shifts that affect every line identically, while photospheric velocities produce line profile asymmetries with wavelength and temporal dependencies that are different from Keplerian signals. Exoplanets are an important subfield of astronomy and there has been an impressive rate of discovery over the past two decades. However, higher precision RV measurements are required to serve as a discovery technique for potentially habitable worlds, to confirm and characterize detections from transit missions, and to provide mass measurements for other space-based missions. The future of exoplanet science has very different trajectories depending on the precision that can

  10. State of the Field: Extreme Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Arriagada, Pamela; Baluev, Roman V.; Bean, Jacob L.; Bouchy, Francois; Buchhave, Lars A.; Carroll, Thorsten; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Crepp, Justin R.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Diddams, Scott A.; Dumusque, Xavier; Eastman, Jason D.; Endl, Michael; Figueira, Pedro; Ford, Eric B.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Fournier, Paul; Fűrész, Gabor; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gregory, Philip C.; Grundahl, Frank; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hébrard, Guillaume; Herrero, Enrique; Hogg, David W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Jorden, Paul; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Latham, David W.; Laughlin, Greg; Loredo, Thomas J.; Lovis, Christophe; Mahadevan, Suvrath; McCracken, Tyler M.; Pepe, Francesco; Perez, Mario; Phillips, David F.; Plavchan, Peter P.; Prato, Lisa; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reiners, Ansgar; Robertson, Paul; Santos, Nuno C.; Sawyer, David; Segransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Steinmetz, Tilo; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stéphane; Valenti, Jeff A.; Wang, Sharon X.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2016-06-01

    The Second Workshop on Extreme Precision Radial Velocities defined circa 2015 the state of the art Doppler precision and identified the critical path challenges for reaching 10 cm s‑1 measurement precision. The presentations and discussion of key issues for instrumentation and data analysis and the workshop recommendations for achieving this bold precision are summarized here. Beginning with the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher spectrograph, technological advances for precision radial velocity (RV) measurements have focused on building extremely stable instruments. To reach still higher precision, future spectrometers will need to improve upon the state of the art, producing even higher fidelity spectra. This should be possible with improved environmental control, greater stability in the illumination of the spectrometer optics, better detectors, more precise wavelength calibration, and broader bandwidth spectra. Key data analysis challenges for the precision RV community include distinguishing center of mass (COM) Keplerian motion from photospheric velocities (time correlated noise) and the proper treatment of telluric contamination. Success here is coupled to the instrument design, but also requires the implementation of robust statistical and modeling techniques. COM velocities produce Doppler shifts that affect every line identically, while photospheric velocities produce line profile asymmetries with wavelength and temporal dependencies that are different from Keplerian signals. Exoplanets are an important subfield of astronomy and there has been an impressive rate of discovery over the past two decades. However, higher precision RV measurements are required to serve as a discovery technique for potentially habitable worlds, to confirm and characterize detections from transit missions, and to provide mass measurements for other space-based missions. The future of exoplanet science has very different trajectories depending on the precision that

  11. Precision GPS ephemerides and baselines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Based on the research, the area of precise ephemerides for GPS satellites, the following observations can be made pertaining to the status and future work needed regarding orbit accuracy. There are several aspects which need to be addressed in discussing determination of precise orbits, such as force models, kinematic models, measurement models, data reduction/estimation methods, etc. Although each one of these aspects was studied at CSR in research efforts, only points pertaining to the force modeling aspect are addressed.

  12. Assessing the Accuracy and Precision of Inorganic Geochemical Data Produced through Flux Fusion and Acid Digestions: Multiple (60+) Comprehensive Analyses of BHVO-2 and the Development of Improved "Accepted" Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Scudder, R.; Dunlea, A. G.; Anderson, C. H.; Murray, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    The use of geological standard reference materials (SRMs) to assess both the accuracy and the reproducibility of geochemical data is a vital consideration in determining the major and trace element abundances of geologic, oceanographic, and environmental samples. Calibration curves commonly are generated that are predicated on accurate analyses of these SRMs. As a means to verify the robustness of these calibration curves, a SRM can also be run as an unknown item (i.e., not included as a data point in the calibration). The experimentally derived composition of the SRM can thus be compared to the certified (or otherwise accepted) value. This comparison gives a direct measure of the accuracy of the method used. Similarly, if the same SRM is analyzed as an unknown over multiple analytical sessions, the external reproducibility of the method can be evaluated. Two common bulk digestion methods used in geochemical analysis are flux fusion and acid digestion. The flux fusion technique is excellent at ensuring complete digestion of a variety of sample types, is quick, and does not involve much use of hazardous acids. However, this technique is hampered by a high amount of total dissolved solids and may be accompanied by an increased analytical blank for certain trace elements. On the other hand, acid digestion (using a cocktail of concentrated nitric, hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids) provides an exceptionally clean digestion with very low analytical blanks. However, this technique results in a loss of Si from the system and may compromise results for a few other elements (e.g., Ge). Our lab uses flux fusion for the determination of major elements and a few key trace elements by ICP-ES, while acid digestion is used for Ti and trace element analyses by ICP-MS. Here we present major and trace element data for BHVO-2, a frequently used SRM derived from a Hawaiian basalt, gathered over a period of over two years (30+ analyses by each technique). We show that both digestion

  13. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Ultra precision machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debra, Daniel B.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Binford, Thomas

    1990-05-01

    There are a number of fields that require or can use to advantage very high precision in machining. For example, further development of high energy lasers and x ray astronomy depend critically on the manufacture of light weight reflecting metal optical components. To fabricate these optical components with machine tools they will be made of metal with mirror quality surface finish. By mirror quality surface finish, it is meant that the dimensions tolerances on the order of 0.02 microns and surface roughness of 0.07. These accuracy targets fall in the category of ultra precision machining. They cannot be achieved by a simple extension of conventional machining processes and techniques. They require single crystal diamond tools, special attention to vibration isolation, special isolation of machine metrology, and on line correction of imperfection in the motion of the machine carriages on their way.

  15. Precision Pointing System Development

    SciTech Connect

    BUGOS, ROBERT M.

    2003-03-01

    The development of precision pointing systems has been underway in Sandia's Electronic Systems Center for over thirty years. Important areas of emphasis are synthetic aperture radars and optical reconnaissance systems. Most applications are in the aerospace arena, with host vehicles including rockets, satellites, and manned and unmanned aircraft. Systems have been used on defense-related missions throughout the world. Presently in development are pointing systems with accuracy goals in the nanoradian regime. Future activity will include efforts to dramatically reduce system size and weight through measures such as the incorporation of advanced materials and MEMS inertial sensors.

  16. Precise Point Positioning Based on BDS and GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, ZhouZheng; Zhang, Hongping; Shen, Wenbin

    2014-05-01

    BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has obtained the ability applying initial navigation and precise point services for the Asian-Pacific regions at the end of 2012 with the constellation of 5 Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), 5 Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) and 4 Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). Till 2020, it will consist with 5 GEO, 3 IGSO and 27 MEO, and apply global navigation service similar to GPS and GLONASS. As we known, GPS precise point positioning (PPP) is a powerful tool for crustal deformation monitoring, GPS meteorology, orbit determination of low earth orbit satellites, high accuracy kinematic positioning et al. However, it accuracy and convergence time are influenced by the quality of pseudo-range observations and the observing geometry between user and Global navigation satellites system (GNSS) satellites. Usually, it takes more than 30 minutes even hours to obtain centimeter level position accuracy for PPP while using GPS dual-frequency observations only. In recent years, many researches have been done to solve this problem. One of the approaches is smooth pseudo-range by carrier-phase observations to improve pseudo-range accuracy. By which can improve PPP initial position accuracy and shorten PPP convergence time. Another sachems is to change position dilution of precision (PDOP) with multi-GNSS observations. Now, BDS has the ability to service whole Asian-Pacific regions, which make it possible to use GPS and BDS for precise positioning. In addition, according to researches on GNSS PDOP distribution, BDS can improve PDOP obviously. Therefore, it necessary to do some researches on PPP performance using both GPS observations and BDS observations, especially in Asian-Pacific regions currently. In this paper, we focus on the influences of BDS to GPS PPP mainly in three terms including BDS PPP accuracy, PDOP improvement and convergence time of PPP based on GPS and BDS observations. Here, the GPS and BDS two-constellation data are collected from

  17. Impact of assay parameters on the accuracy of free PSA test: source and stability of calibrator, calibration curve fitting, and level of total PSA in the serum.

    PubMed

    Liu, G H; Wu, J T

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of PSA is recommended for men over 50 years of age for screening of prostate cancer. However, proper differentiation of prostate cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) relies on an accurate measurement of free PSA (fPSA) and a correct calculation of percent fPSA. Because of the extremely low concentration of fPSA in the serum, any slight deviation from its true value may produce large errors in percent fPSA calculated. Therefore, we undertook a study examining carefully those parameters of the fPSA assay which might affect the fPSA determination. We found that the integrity of the calibrator, the computer curve-fitting program selected, the source of the calibrator, and the total PSA or fPSA + PSA complexes (tPSA) concentration of the specimen all had an impact on the accuracy of the fPSA value assayed. We found that an examination of the slope of the calibration curve was important to reveal whether the calibrator had or had not been denatured during storage. We also found that the 4-parameter cure fitting program was best suited for plotting the fPSA calibration curve. The calibrator we isolated from LNCaP cells was acceptable for our assay because it had an affinity for the assay antibody very similar to that of serum fPSA. We also determined the effect of tPSA concentration on the fPSA determinations and found that within the concentration range of 4-10 ng/mL the impact on the percent fPSA calculated was not significant. We believe that our assay produces accurate fPSA values when all these assay parameters are well controlled.

  18. Free-Standing Zone Plate Optimized for He II 30.4 nm Solar Irradiance Measurements Having High Accuracy and Stability in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; McMullin, D. R.; Vest, R.; Sakdinawat, A.; Chang, C.; Jones, A. R.; Bremer, J.

    2015-12-01

    A zone plate was designed to record the He II 30.4 nm solar irradiance, was fabricated using electron beam lithography, and was absolutely calibrated using the NIST SURF synchrotron. The zone plate has an open support grid identical to those used to successfully launch transmission gratings in previous solar radiometers and is otherwise free-standing with no support membrane that would absorb EUV radiation. The measured efficiency of 3.0 ± 0.1% at 30.4 nm is consistent with detailed modeling of the efficiency and accounting for the geometrical transmittance of the support grid. The binary nature of the zone plate, consisting of opaque gold bars and open spaces with no support membrane, results in excellent long-term stability in space against contamination, radiation damage, and other effects that could alter the efficiency and instrument throughput. The zone plate's focusing property enables the rejection of out-of-band radiation by small apertures and high signal to background values that are superior to previous radiometers. The 4 mm outer diameter of the zone plate and the 25 mm focal length for 30.4 nm radiation enable a compact instrument that is attractive for small CubeSats and other space flight missions where resources are extremely limited.

  19. Precision orbit determination for Topex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Schutz, B. E.; Ries, J. C.; Shum, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of radar altimeters to measure the distance from a satellite to the ocean surface with a precision of the order of 2 cm imposes unique requirements for the orbit determination accuracy. The orbit accuracy requirements will be especially demanding for the joint NASA/CNES Ocean Topography Experiment (Topex/Poseidon). For this mission, a radial orbit accuracy of 13 centimeters will be required for a mission period of three to five years. This is an order of magnitude improvement in the accuracy achieved during any previous satellite mission. This investigation considers the factors which limit the orbit accuracy for the Topex mission. Particular error sources which are considered include the geopotential, the radiation pressure and the atmospheric drag model.

  20. Accuracy and precision of gravitational-wave models of inspiraling neutron star-black hole binaries with spin: Comparison with matter-free numerical relativity in the low-frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Barkett, Kevin; Bhagwat, Swetha; Afshari, Nousha; Brown, Duncan A.; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2015-11-01

    Coalescing binaries of neutron stars and black holes are one of the most important sources of gravitational waves for the upcoming network of ground-based detectors. Detection and extraction of astrophysical information from gravitational-wave signals requires accurate waveform models. The effective-one-body and other phenomenological models interpolate between analytic results and numerical relativity simulations, that typically span O (10 ) orbits before coalescence. In this paper we study the faithfulness of these models for neutron star-black hole binaries. We investigate their accuracy using new numerical relativity (NR) simulations that span 36-88 orbits, with mass ratios q and black hole spins χBH of (q ,χBH)=(7 ,±0.4 ),(7 ,±0.6 ) , and (5 ,-0.9 ). These simulations were performed treating the neutron star as a low-mass black hole, ignoring its matter effects. We find that (i) the recently published SEOBNRv1 and SEOBNRv2 models of the effective-one-body family disagree with each other (mismatches of a few percent) for black hole spins χBH≥0.5 or χBH≤-0.3 , with waveform mismatch accumulating during early inspiral; (ii) comparison with numerical waveforms indicates that this disagreement is due to phasing errors of SEOBNRv1, with SEOBNRv2 in good agreement with all of our simulations; (iii) phenomenological waveforms agree with SEOBNRv2 only for comparable-mass low-spin binaries, with overlaps below 0.7 elsewhere in the neutron star-black hole binary parameter space; (iv) comparison with numerical waveforms shows that most of this model's dephasing accumulates near the frequency interval where it switches to a phenomenological phasing prescription; and finally (v) both SEOBNR and post-Newtonian models are effectual for neutron star-black hole systems, but post-Newtonian waveforms will give a significant bias in parameter recovery. Our results suggest that future gravitational-wave detection searches and parameter estimation efforts would benefit

  1. X-Ray Comb Generation from Nuclear-Resonance-Stabilized X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Fundamental Physics and Precision Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K. -J.

    2015-03-31

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as Fe-57 as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as Ta-181 or Sc-45.

  2. The reliability of single precision computations in the simulation of deep soil heat diffusion in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Richard; Verseghy, Diana L.

    2016-06-01

    Climate models need discretized numerical algorithms and finite precision arithmetic to solve their differential equations. Most efforts to date have focused on reducing truncation errors due to discretization effects, whereas rounding errors due to the use of floating-point arithmetic have received little attention. However, there are increasing concerns about more frequent occurrences of rounding errors in larger parallel computing platforms (due to the conflicting needs of stability and accuracy vs. performance), and while this has not been the norm in climate and forecast models using double precision, this could change with some models that are now compiled with single precision, which raises questions about the validity of using such low precision in climate applications. For example, processes occurring over large time scales such as permafrost thawing are potentially more vulnerable to this issue. In this study we analyze the theoretical and experimental effects of using single and double precision on simulated deep soil temperature from the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS), a state-of-the-art land surface model. We found that reliable single precision temperatures are limited to depths of less than about 20-25 m while double precision shows no loss of accuracy to depths of at least several hundred meters. We also found that, for a given precision level, model accuracy deteriorates when using smaller time steps, further reducing the usefulness of single precision. There is thus a clear danger of using single precision in some climate model applications, in particular any scientifically meaningful study of deep soil permafrost must at least use double precision. In addition, climate modelling teams might well benefit from paying more attention to numerical precision and roundoff issues to offset the potentially more frequent numerical anomalies in future large-scale parallel climate applications.

  3. NOTE: Analysis of the measurement precision of an amorphous silicon EPID used for MLC leaf position quality control and the long-term calibration stability of an optically controlled MLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budgell, G. J.; Clarke, M. F.

    2008-08-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been shown to be suitable for multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positioning quality control (QC). In our centre, a continuous dataset is available of 2 years of film measurements followed by 3 years of EPID measurements on five MLC-equipped linear accelerators of identical head design. The aim of this work was to analyse this unique dataset in order to determine the relative precision of film and EPID for MLC leaf positioning measurements and to determine the long-term stability of the MLC calibration. The QC dataset was examined and periods without MLC adjustments that contained at least four successive collimator position measurements (a minimum of 6 months) were identified. By calculating the standard deviations (SD) of these results, the reproducibility of the measurements can be determined. Comparison of the film and EPID results enables their relative measurement precision to be assessed; on average film gave an SD of 0.52 mm compared to 0.13 mm for EPIDs. The MLC and conventional collimator results were compared to assess MLC calibration stability; on average, for EPID measurements, the MLC gave an SD of 0.12 mm compared to 0.14 mm for a conventional collimator. The long-term relative individual leaf positions were compared and found to vary between 0.07 and 0.15 mm implying that they are stable over long time periods. These results suggest that the calibration of an optically controlled MLC is inherently very stable between disturbances to the optical system which normally occur on service days.

  4. Nickel solution prepared for precision electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Lightweight, precision optical reflectors are made by electroforming nickel onto masters. Steps for the plating bath preparation, process control testing, and bath composition adjustments are prescribed to avoid internal stresses and maintain dimensional accuracy of the electrodeposited metal.

  5. High accuracy wall thickness loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacsi, Attila; Cegla, Frederic

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of wall thickness in pipes is a standard technique applied widely in the petrochemical industry. The potential precision of repeat measurements with permanently installed ultrasonic sensors however significantly surpasses that of handheld sensors as uncertainties associated with coupling fluids and positional offsets are eliminated. With permanently installed sensors the precise evaluation of very small wall loss rates becomes feasible in a matter of hours. The improved accuracy and speed of wall loss rate measurements can be used to evaluate and develop more effective mitigation strategies. This paper presents an overview of factors causing variability in the ultrasonic measurements which are then systematically addressed and an experimental setup with the best achievable stability based on these considerations is presented. In the experimental setup galvanic corrosion is used to induce predictable and very small wall thickness loss. Furthermore, it is shown that the experimental measurements can be used to assess the effect of reduced wall loss that is produced by the injection of corrosion inhibitor. The measurements show an estimated standard deviation of about 20nm, which in turn allows us to evaluate the effect and behaviour of corrosion inhibitors within less than an hour.

  6. The MAGSAT vector magnetometer: A precision fluxgate magnetometer for the measurement of the geomagnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Scearce, C. S.; Seek, J.; Scheifele, J.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the precision triaxial fluxgate magnetometer to be flown aboard the MAGSAT spacecraft is presented. The instrument covers the range of + or - 64,000 nT with a resolution of + or - 0.5 nT, an intrinsic accuracy of + or - 0.001% of full scale and an angular alignment stability of the order of 2 seconds of arc. It was developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and represents the state-of-the-art in precision vector magnetometers developed for spaceflight use.

  7. Precise clock synchronization protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luit, E. J.; Martin, J. M. M.

    1993-12-01

    A distributed clock synchronization protocol is presented which achieves a very high precision without the need for very frequent resynchronizations. The protocol tolerates failures of the clocks: clocks may be too slow or too fast, exhibit omission failures and report inconsistent values. Synchronization takes place in synchronization rounds as in many other synchronization protocols. At the end of each round, clock times are exchanged between the clocks. Each clock applies a convergence function (CF) to the values obtained. This function estimates the difference between its clock and an average clock and corrects its clock accordingly. Clocks are corrected for drift relative to this average clock during the next synchronization round. The protocol is based on the assumption that clock reading errors are small with respect to the required precision of synchronization. It is shown that the CF resynchronizes the clocks with high precision even when relatively large clock drifts are possible. It is also shown that the drift-corrected clocks remain synchronized until the end of the next synchronization round. The stability of the protocol is proven.

  8. High precision innovative micropump for artificial pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappel, E.; Mefti, S.; Lettieri, G.-L.; Proennecke, S.; Conan, C.

    2014-03-01

    The concept of artificial pancreas, which comprises an insulin pump, a continuous glucose meter and a control algorithm, is a major step forward in managing patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The stability of the control algorithm is based on short-term precision micropump to deliver rapid-acting insulin and to specific integrated sensors able to monitor any failure leading to a loss of accuracy. Debiotech's MEMS micropump, based on the membrane pump principle, is made of a stack of 3 silicon wafers. The pumping chamber comprises a pillar check-valve at the inlet, a pumping membrane which is actuated against stop limiters by a piezo cantilever, an anti-free-flow outlet valve and a pressure sensor. The micropump inlet is tightly connected to the insulin reservoir while the outlet is in direct communication with the patient skin via a cannula. To meet the requirement of a pump dedicated to closed-loop application for diabetes care, in addition to the well-controlled displacement of the pumping membrane, the high precision of the micropump is based on specific actuation profiles that balance effect of pump elasticity in low-consumption push-pull mode.

  9. Precision spectroscopy of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Cancio, P.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; De Natale, P.; De Mauro, C.; Krachmalnicoff, V.; Inguscio, M.

    2005-05-05

    Accurate Quantum-Electrodynamics (QED) tests of the simplest bound three body atomic system are performed by precise laser spectroscopic measurements in atomic Helium. In this paper, we present a review of measurements between triplet states at 1083 nm (23S-23P) and at 389 nm (23S-33P). In 4He, such data have been used to measure the fine structure of the triplet P levels and, then, to determine the fine structure constant when compared with equally accurate theoretical calculations. Moreover, the absolute frequencies of the optical transitions have been used for Lamb-shift determinations of the levels involved with unprecedented accuracy. Finally, determination of the He isotopes nuclear structure and, in particular, a measurement of the nuclear charge radius, are performed by using hyperfine structure and isotope-shift measurements.

  10. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  11. Application of Millisecond Pulsar Timing to the Long-Term Stability of Clock Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Roger S.; Matsakis, Demetrios N.

    1996-01-01

    We review the application of millisecond pulsars to define a precise long-term standard and positional reference system in a nearly inertial reference frame. We quantify the current timing precision of the best millisecond pulsars and define the required precise time and time interval (PTTI) accuracy and stability to enable time transfer via pulsars. Pulsars may prove useful as independent standards to examine decade-long timing stability and provide an independent natural system within which to calibrate any new, perhaps vastly improved atomic time scale. Since pulsar stability appears to be related to the lifetime of the pulsar, the new millisecond pulsar J173+0747 is projected to have a 100-day accuracy equivalent to a single HP5071 cesium standard. Over the last five years, dozens of new millisecond pulsars have been discovered. A few of the new millisecond pulsars may have even better timing properties.

  12. Global positioning system measurements for crustal deformation: Precision and accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, W.H.; Davis, J.L.; Svarc, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 27 repeated observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) position-difference vectors, up to 11 kilometers in length, indicates that the standard deviation of the measurements is 4 millimeters for the north component, 6 millimeters for the east component, and 10 to 20 millimeters for the vertical component. The uncertainty grows slowly with increasing vector length. At 225 kilometers, the standard deviation of the measurement is 6, 11, and 40 millimeters for the north, east, and up components, respectively. Measurements with GPS and Geodolite, an electromagnetic distance-measuring system, over distances of 10 to 40 kilometers agree within 0.2 part per million. Measurements with GPS and very long baseline interferometry of the 225-kilometer vector agree within 0.05 part per million.

  13. Tomography & Geochemistry: Precision, Repeatability, Accuracy and Joint Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, G. R.; Panza, G. F.; Artemieva, I. M.; Bastow, I. D.; Cammarano, F.; Doglioni, C.; Evans, J. R.; Hamilton, W. B.; Julian, B. R.; Lustrino, M.; Thybo, H.; Yanovskaya, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tomography can reveal the spatial seismic structure of the mantle, but has little ability to constrain composition, phase or temperature. In contrast, petrology and geochemistry can give insights into mantle composition, but have severely limited spatial control on magma sources. For these reasons, results from these three disciplines are often interpreted jointly. Nevertheless, the limitations of each method are often underestimated, and underlying assumptions de-emphasized. Examples of the limitations of seismic tomography include its ability to image in detail the three-dimensional structure of the mantle or to determine with certainty the strengths of anomalies. Despite this, published seismic anomaly strengths are often unjustifiably translated directly into physical parameters. Tomography yields seismological parameters such as wave speed and attenuation, not geological or thermal parameters. Much of the mantle is poorly sampled by seismic waves, and resolution- and error-assessment methods do not express the true uncertainties. These and other problems have become highlighted in recent years as a result of multiple tomography experiments performed by different research groups, in areas of particular interest e.g., Yellowstone. The repeatability of the results is often poorer than the calculated resolutions. The ability of geochemistry and petrology to identify magma sources and locations is typically overestimated. These methods have little ability to determine source depths. Models that assign geochemical signatures to specific layers in the mantle, including the transition zone, the lower mantle, and the core-mantle boundary, are based on speculative models that cannot be verified and for which viable, less-astonishing alternatives are available. Our knowledge is poor of the size, distribution and location of protoliths, and of metasomatism of magma sources, the nature of the partial-melting and melt-extraction process, the mixing of disparate melts, and the re-assimilation of crust and mantle lithosphere by rising melt. Interpretations of seismic tomography, petrologic and geochemical observations, and all three together, are ambiguous, and this needs to be emphasized more in presenting interpretations so that the viability of the models can be assessed more reliably.

  14. Precision and accuracy of visual foliar injury assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Gumpertz, M.L.; Tingey, D.T.; Hogsett, W.E.

    1982-07-01

    The study compared three measures of foliar injury: (i) mean percent leaf area injured of all leaves on the plant, (ii) mean percent leaf area injured of the three most injured leaves, and (iii) the proportion of injured leaves to total number of leaves. For the first measure, the variation caused by reader biases and day-to-day variations were compared with the innate plant-to-plant variation. Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Pinto'), pea (Pisum sativum 'Little Marvel'), radish (Rhaphanus sativus 'Cherry Belle'), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea 'Northland') plants were exposed to either 3 ..mu..L L/sup -1/ SO/sub 2/ or 0.3 ..mu..L L/sup -1/ ozone for 2 h. Three leaf readers visually assessed the percent injury on every leaf of each plant while a fourth reader used a transparent grid to make an unbiased assessment for each plant. The mean leaf area injured of the three most injured leaves was highly correlated with all leaves on the plant only if the three most injured leaves were <100% injured. The proportion of leaves injured was not highly correlated with percent leaf area injured of all leaves on the plant for any species in this study. The largest source of variation in visual assessments was plant-to-plant variation, which ranged from 44 to 97% of the total variance, followed by variation among readers (0-32% of the variance). Except for radish exposed to ozone, the day-to-day variation accounted for <18% of the total. Reader bias in assessment of ozone injury was significant but could be adjusted for each reader by a simple linear regression (R/sup 2/ = 0.89-0.91) of the visual assessments against the grid assessments.

  15. Quality, precision and accuracy of the maximum No. 40 anemometer

    SciTech Connect

    Obermeir, J.; Blittersdorf, D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper synthesizes available calibration data for the Maximum No. 40 anemometer. Despite its long history in the wind industry, controversy surrounds the choice of transfer function for this anemometer. Many users are unaware that recent changes in default transfer functions in data loggers are producing output wind speed differences as large as 7.6%. Comparison of two calibration methods used for large samples of Maximum No. 40 anemometers shows a consistent difference of 4.6% in output speeds. This difference is significantly larger than estimated uncertainty levels. Testing, initially performed to investigate related issues, reveals that Gill and Maximum cup anemometers change their calibration transfer functions significantly when calibrated in the open atmosphere compared with calibration in a laminar wind tunnel. This indicates that atmospheric turbulence changes the calibration transfer function of cup anemometers. These results call into question the suitability of standard wind tunnel calibration testing for cup anemometers. 6 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Global positioning system measurements for crustal deformation: precision and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Prescott, W H; Davis, J L; Svarc, J L

    1989-06-16

    Analysis of 27 repeated observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) position-difference vectors, up to 11 kilometers in length, indicates that the standard deviation of the measurements is 4 millimeters for the north component, 6 millimeters for the east component, and 10 to 20 millimeters for the vertical component. The uncertainty grows slowly with increasing vector length. At 225 kilometers, the standard deviation of the measurement is 6, 11, and 40 millimeters for the north, east, and up components, respectively. Measurements with GPS and Geodolite, an electromagnetic distance-measuring system, over distances of 10 to 40 kilometers agree within 0.2 part per million. Measurements with GPS and very long baseline interferometry of the 225-kilometer vector agree within 0.05 part per million. PMID:17820661

  17. Mixed-Precision Spectral Deferred Correction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, Ray W. S.

    2015-09-02

    Convergence of spectral deferred correction (SDC), where low-order time integration methods are used to construct higher-order methods through iterative refinement, can be accelerated in terms of computational effort by using mixed-precision methods. Using ideas from multi-level SDC (in turn based on FAS multigrid ideas), some of the SDC correction sweeps can use function values computed in reduced precision without adversely impacting the accuracy of the final solution. This is particularly beneficial for the performance of combustion solvers such as S3D [6] which require double precision accuracy but are performance limited by the cost of data motion.

  18. Arrival Metering Precision Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeffrey; Hunt, Sarah; Gomez, Ashley; Bienert, Nancy; Omar, Faisal; Kraut, Joshua; Brasil, Connie; Wu, Minghong, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the background, method and results of the Arrival Metering Precision Study (AMPS) conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center in May 2014. The simulation study measured delivery accuracy, flight efficiency, controller workload, and acceptability of time-based metering operations to a meter fix at the terminal area boundary for different resolution levels of metering delay times displayed to the air traffic controllers and different levels of airspeed information made available to the Time-Based Flow Management (TBFM) system computing the delay. The results show that the resolution of the delay countdown timer (DCT) on the controllers display has a significant impact on the delivery accuracy at the meter fix. Using the 10 seconds rounded and 1 minute rounded DCT resolutions resulted in more accurate delivery than 1 minute truncated and were preferred by the controllers. Using the speeds the controllers entered into the fourth line of the data tag to update the delay computation in TBFM in high and low altitude sectors increased air traffic control efficiency and reduced fuel burn for arriving aircraft during time based metering.

  19. Long-Term Stability of an Area-Reversible Atom-Interferometer Sagnac Gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Durfee, D. S.; Shaham, Y. K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2006-12-15

    We report the first demonstration of a matter-wave interference gyroscope that meets both the short-term noise and long-term stability requirements for high accuracy navigation. This performance level resulted from implementation of a novel technique to precisely reverse the input axis of the gyroscope.

  20. Long-Term Stability of an Area-Reversible Atom-Interferometer Sagnac Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, D. S.; Shaham, Y. K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    We report the first demonstration of a matter-wave interference gyroscope that meets both the short-term noise and long-term stability requirements for high accuracy navigation. This performance level resulted from implementation of a novel technique to precisely reverse the input axis of the gyroscope.

  1. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    LRO definitive and predictive accuracy requirements were easily met in the nominal mission orbit, using the LP150Q lunar gravity model. center dot Accuracy of the LP150Q model is poorer in the extended mission elliptical orbit. center dot Later lunar gravity models, in particular GSFC-GRAIL-270, improve OD accuracy in the extended mission. center dot Implementation of a constrained plane when the orbit is within 45 degrees of the Earth-Moon line improves cross-track accuracy. center dot Prediction accuracy is still challenged during full-Sun periods due to coarse spacecraft area modeling - Implementation of a multi-plate area model with definitive attitude input can eliminate prediction violations. - The FDF is evaluating using analytic and predicted attitude modeling to improve full-Sun prediction accuracy. center dot Comparison of FDF ephemeris file to high-precision ephemeris files provides gross confirmation that overlap compares properly assess orbit accuracy.

  2. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.; Baker, D.

    1994-01-01

    This document presents a compilation of the attitude accuracy attained by a number of satellites that have been supported by the Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It starts with a general description of the factors that influence spacecraft attitude accuracy. After brief descriptions of the missions supported, it presents the attitude accuracy results for currently active and older missions, including both three-axis stabilized and spin-stabilized spacecraft. The attitude accuracy results are grouped by the sensor pair used to determine the attitudes. A supplementary section is also included, containing the results of theoretical computations of the effects of variation of sensor accuracy on overall attitude accuracy.

  3. Precision Spectroscopy of Tellurium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, J.; Furneaux, J. E.

    2013-06-01

    Tellurium (Te_2) is widely used as a frequency reference, largely due to the fact that it has an optical transition roughly every 2-3 GHz throughout a large portion of the visible spectrum. Although a standard atlas encompassing over 5200 cm^{-1} already exists [1], Doppler broadening present in that work buries a significant portion of the features [2]. More recent studies of Te_2 exist which do not exhibit Doppler broadening, such as Refs. [3-5], and each covers different parts of the spectrum. This work adds to that knowledge a few hundred transitions in the vicinity of 444 nm, measured with high precision in order to improve measurement of the spectroscopic constants of Te_2's excited states. Using a Fabry Perot cavity in a shock-absorbing, temperature and pressure regulated chamber, locked to a Zeeman stabilized HeNe laser, we measure changes in frequency of our diode laser to ˜1 MHz precision. This diode laser is scanned over 1000 GHz for use in a saturated-absorption spectroscopy cell filled with Te_2 vapor. Details of the cavity and its short and long-term stability are discussed, as well as spectroscopic properties of Te_2. References: J. Cariou, and P. Luc, Atlas du spectre d'absorption de la molecule de tellure, Laboratoire Aime-Cotton (1980). J. Coker et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B {28}, 2934 (2011). J. Verges et al., Physica Scripta {25}, 338 (1982). Ph. Courteille et al., Appl. Phys. B {59}, 187 (1994) T.J. Scholl et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B {22}, 1128 (2005).

  4. Precise Phase Comparator for Nearly Equal Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Adams, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    New circuit precisely compares phases of two RF signals nearly equal in frequency, such as two hydrogen-maser frequency standards. Measuring circuit minimizes interactions between two sources. Also stabilized against thermal effects and against noise that could produce erroneous readings. Heat sinking, buffer amplifiers, and low-noise zero-crossing detector make picosecond precision possible.

  5. Precision injection molding of freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Precision injection molding is the most efficient mass production technology for manufacturing plastic optics. Applications of plastic optics in field of imaging, illumination, and concentration demonstrate a variety of complex surface forms, developing from conventional plano and spherical surfaces to aspheric and freeform surfaces. It requires high optical quality with high form accuracy and lower residual stresses, which challenges both optical tool inserts machining and precision injection molding process. The present paper reviews recent progress in mold tool machining and precision injection molding, with more emphasis on precision injection molding. The challenges and future development trend are also discussed.

  6. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  7. Airborne Topographic Mapper Calibration Procedures and Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Chreston F.; Krabill, William B.; Manizade, Serdar S.; Russell, Rob L.; Sonntag, John G.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Description of NASA Airborn Topographic Mapper (ATM) lidar calibration procedures including analysis of the accuracy and consistancy of various ATM instrument parameters and the resulting influence on topographic elevation measurements. The ATM elevations measurements from a nominal operating altitude 500 to 750 m above the ice surface was found to be: Horizontal Accuracy 74 cm, Horizontal Precision 14 cm, Vertical Accuracy 6.6 cm, Vertical Precision 3 cm.

  8. Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, June 28-July 1, 1982, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig, H. W.

    1983-03-01

    The present conference on electromagnetic measurement techniques discusses the measurement of high voltages by means of electron speed filtering, improvements in the U.K. National Microwave Attenuation Standards, international comparisons of laser power measurements in the visible region, the design of an automated, high accuracy antenna test facility, wide band device modeling using time-domain reflectometry, the reduction of Kelvin ratio arm errors in an AC double bridge using electronic control, and a high precision automatic digital AC bridge. Also discussed are the characterization of frequency stability, a compact hydrogen maser with long term stability, the distributed parameter analysis of shielded loops, a laser frequency redefinition of the meter, a high accuracy Josephson potentiometer, and a point-contact Josephson voltage standard. For individual items see A83-31277 to A83-31295

  9. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W. Bruce; McNeilly, David R.; Thacker, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp unction which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  10. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

    1984-08-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  11. Increasing Accuracy in Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacksier, Tracey; Fernandes, Adelino; Matthew, Matt; Lehmann, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Human activity is increasing the concentrations of green house gases (GHG) in the atmosphere which results in temperature increases. High precision is a key requirement of atmospheric measurements to study the global carbon cycle and its effect on climate change. Natural air containing stable isotopes are used in GHG monitoring to calibrate analytical equipment. This presentation will examine the natural air and isotopic mixture preparation process, for both molecular and isotopic concentrations, for a range of components and delta values. The role of precisely characterized source material will be presented. Analysis of individual cylinders within multiple batches will be presented to demonstrate the ability to dynamically fill multiple cylinders containing identical compositions without isotopic fractionation. Additional emphasis will focus on the ability to adjust isotope ratios to more closely bracket sample types without the reliance on combusting naturally occurring materials, thereby improving analytical accuracy.

  12. Precision Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy of H3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yu-chan; Liao, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Yung-Hsiang; Peng, Jin-Long; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2016-06-01

    In our previous work on the Lamb dips of the νb{2} fundamental band of H3+, the saturated absorption spectrum was obtained by the third-derivative spectroscopy using frequency modulation [1]. However, the frequency modulation also causes error in absolute frequency determination. To solve this problem, we have built an offset-locking system to lock the OPO pump frequency to an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser. With this modification, we are able to scan the OPO idler frequency precisely and obtain the profile of the Lamb dips. Double modulation (amplitude modulation of the idler power and concentration modulation of the ion) is employed to subtract the interference fringes of the signal and increase the signal-to-noise ratio effectively. To Determine the absolute frequency of the idler wave, the pump wave is offset locked on the R(56) 32-0 a10 hyperfine component of 127I2, and the signal wave is locked on a GPS disciplined fiber optical frequency comb (OFC). All references and lock systems have absolute frequency accuracy better than 10 kHz. Here, we demonstrate its performance by measuring one transition of methane and sixteen transitions of H3+. This instrument could pave the way for the high-resolution spectroscopy of a variety of molecular ions. [1] H.-C. Chen, C.-Y. Hsiao, J.-L. Peng, T. Amano, and J.-T. Shy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 263002 (2012).

  13. High-precision arithmetic in mathematical physics

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2015-05-12

    For many scientific calculations, particularly those involving empirical data, IEEE 32-bit floating-point arithmetic produces results of sufficient accuracy, while for other applications IEEE 64-bit floating-point is more appropriate. But for some very demanding applications, even higher levels of precision are often required. Furthermore, this article discusses the challenge of high-precision computation, in the context of mathematical physics, and highlights what facilities are required to support future computation, in light of emerging developments in computer architecture.

  14. High accuracy motor controller for positioning optical filters in the CLAES Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thatcher, John B.

    1989-01-01

    The Etalon Drive Motor (EDM), a precision etalon control system designed for accurate positioning of etalon filters in the IR spectrometer of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment is described. The EDM includes a brushless dc torque motor, which has an infinite resolution for setting an etalon filter to any desired angle, a four-filter etalon wheel, and an electromechanical resolver for angle information. An 18-bit control loop provides high accuracy, resolution, and stability. Dynamic computer interaction allows the user to optimize the step response. A block diagram of the motor controller is presented along with a schematic of the digital/analog converter circuit.

  15. Intercomparison of satellite laser ranging accuracy of three NASA stations through collocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, T.; Husson, V.; Wetzel, S.; Degnan, J. J.; Zagwodzki, T.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of laser ranging has been evaluated through comparisons of simultaneous LAGEOS satellite-borne laser ranging data received at three NASA tracking stations in support of the Crustal Dynamics project. Single-shot satellite ranging precisions of 8, 14, and 30 mm have been demonstrated at the three ground stations, with a stability better than 3 mm. The data-processing software used were POLYQUICK and GEODYN; a consistent degree of agreement between the three stations of less than 1 cm is obtained.

  16. Precision CW laser automatic tracking system investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, K. T.; Lucy, R. F.; Mcgann, E. J.; Peters, C. J.

    1966-01-01

    Precision laser tracker capable of tracking a low acceleration target to an accuracy of about 20 microradians rms is being constructed and tested. This laser tracking has the advantage of discriminating against other optical sources and the capability of simultaneously measuring range.

  17. High precision Wind measurements in the upper Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuelling, F.; Goldstein, J.; Kostiuk, T.; Hewagama, T.; Zipoy, D.

    2000-10-01

    We will present high accuracy measurements of line-of-sight wind velocities in the upper Venus atmosphere and models of the implied global circulation. The measurements were performed using the NASA/GSFC Infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer at the NASA IRTF. Thermospheric altitudes between 100 and 120 km were probed using 12C16O2 solar-pumped, non-thermal emission. The observed signal-to-noise allowed determination of line center frequencies to a precision of 0.1 MHz (1 m/s at 10 μ m). Absolute frequency calibration was possible to better than 0.1 MHz due to the extremely high frequency stability of the Lamb-dip stabilized heterodyne system. The quality of the data together with the instrument stability allowed measurement of line-of-sight wind velocities across the illuminated crescent to 1 m/s. Data were acquired just before and after inferior conjunction in 1990 and 1991. In combination, these two data sets allowed modeling of the global wind field. Modeled horizontal wind velocities will be presented for a sub-solar to anti-solar flow and a zonal retrograde super-rotation.

  18. Wafer-Scale Precise Patterning of Organic Single-Crystal Nanowire Arrays via a Photolithography-Assisted Spin-Coating Method.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wang, Liang; Wang, Jincheng; Shang, Qixun; Zhang, Xiaohong; Huang, Liming; Jie, Jiansheng

    2015-12-01

    A photolithography-assisted spin-coating approach is developed to produce single-crystal organic nanowire (NW) arrays at designated locations with high precision and high efficiency. This strategy enables the large-scale fabrication of organic NW arrays with nearly the same accuracy, reliability, and flexibility as photolithography. The high mobilities of the organic NWs enable the control of the switch of multicolored light-emitting devices with good stability.

  19. Using satellite data to increase accuracy of PMF calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Mettel, M.C.

    1992-03-01

    The accuracy of a flood severity estimate depends on the data used. The more detailed and precise the data, the more accurate the estimate. Earth observation satellites gather detailed data for determining the probable maximum flood at hydropower projects.

  20. Precision performance lamp technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Dean A.; Kiesa, James E.; Dean, Raymond A.

    1997-09-01

    A principal function of a lamp is to produce light output with designated spectra, intensity, and/or geometric radiation patterns. The function of a precision performance lamp is to go beyond these parameters and into the precision repeatability of performance. All lamps are not equal. There are a variety of incandescent lamps, from the vacuum incandescent indictor lamp to the precision lamp of a blood analyzer. In the past the definition of a precision lamp was described in terms of wattage, light center length (LCL), filament position, and/or spot alignment. This paper presents a new view of precision lamps through the discussion of a new segment of lamp design, which we term precision performance lamps. The definition of precision performance lamps will include (must include) the factors of a precision lamp. But what makes a precision lamp a precision performance lamp is the manner in which the design factors of amperage, mscp (mean spherical candlepower), efficacy (lumens/watt), life, not considered individually but rather considered collectively. There is a statistical bias in a precision performance lamp for each of these factors; taken individually and as a whole. When properly considered the results can be dramatic to the system design engineer, system production manage and the system end-user. It can be shown that for the lamp user, the use of precision performance lamps can translate to: (1) ease of system design, (2) simplification of electronics, (3) superior signal to noise ratios, (4) higher manufacturing yields, (5) lower system costs, (6) better product performance. The factors mentioned above are described along with their interdependent relationships. It is statistically shown how the benefits listed above are achievable. Examples are provided to illustrate how proper attention to precision performance lamp characteristics actually aid in system product design and manufacturing to build and market more, market acceptable product products in the

  1. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes a compilation of attitude determination accuracies attained by a number of satellites supported by the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Facility. The compilation is designed to assist future mission planners in choosing and placing attitude hardware and selecting the attitude determination algorithms needed to achieve given accuracy requirements. The major goal of the compilation is to indicate realistic accuracies achievable using a given sensor complement based on mission experience. It is expected that the use of actual spacecraft experience will make the study especially useful for mission design. A general description of factors influencing spacecraft attitude accuracy is presented. These factors include determination algorithms, inertial reference unit characteristics, and error sources that can affect measurement accuracy. Possible techniques for mitigating errors are also included. Brief mission descriptions are presented with the attitude accuracies attained, grouped by the sensor pairs used in attitude determination. The accuracies for inactive missions represent a compendium of missions report results, and those for active missions represent measurements of attitude residuals. Both three-axis and spin stabilized missions are included. Special emphasis is given to high-accuracy sensor pairs, such as two fixed-head star trackers (FHST's) and fine Sun sensor plus FHST. Brief descriptions of sensor design and mode of operation are included. Also included are brief mission descriptions and plots summarizing the attitude accuracy attained using various sensor complements.

  2. A Precise Lunar Photometric Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.

    1996-03-01

    The Clementine multispectral dataset will enable compositional mapping of the entire lunar surface at a resolution of ~100-200 m, but a highly accurate photometric normalization is needed to achieve challenging scientific objectives such as mapping petrographic or elemental compositions. The goal of this work is to normalize the Clementine data to an accuracy of 1% for the UVVIS images (0.415, 0.75, 0.9, 0.95, and 1.0 micrometers) and 2% for NIR images (1.1, 1.25, 1.5, 2.0, 2.6, and 2.78 micrometers), consistent with radiometric calibration goals. The data will be normalized to R30, the reflectance expected at an incidence angle (i) and phase angle (alpha) of 30 degrees and emission angle (e) of 0 degree, matching the photometric geometry of lunar samples measured at the reflectance laboratory (RELAB) at Brown University The focus here is on the precision of the normalization, not the putative physical significance of the photometric function parameters. The 2% precision achieved is significantly better than the ~10% precision of a previous normalization.

  3. High Precision Laser Range Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge (Inventor); Lay, Oliver P. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is an improved distance measuring interferometer that includes high speed phase modulators and additional phase meters to generate and analyze multiple heterodyne signal pairs with distinct frequencies. Modulation sidebands with large frequency separation are generated by the high speed electro-optic phase modulators, requiring only a single frequency stable laser source and eliminating the need for a fist laser to be tuned or stabilized relative to a second laser. The combination of signals produced by the modulated sidebands is separated and processed to give the target distance. The resulting metrology apparatus enables a sensor with submicron accuracy or better over a multi- kilometer ambiguity range.

  4. Precision volume measuring system

    SciTech Connect

    Klevgard, P.A.

    1984-11-01

    An engineering study was undertaken to calibrate and certify a precision volume measurement system that uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) to ratio a known to an unknown volume. The constant-temperature, computer-controlled system was tested for thermodynamic instabilities, for precision (0.01%), and for bias (0.01%). Ratio scaling was used to optimize the quartz crystal pressure transducer calibration.

  5. Assessing the Intraoperative Accuracy of Pedicle Screw Placement by Using a Bone-Mounted Miniature Robot System through Secondary Registration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Chang, Chih-Hui; Lin, Chih-Lung; Tsai, Tai-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pedicle screws are commonly employed to restore spinal stability and correct deformities. The Renaissance robotic system was developed to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. Purpose In this study, we developed an intraoperative classification system for evaluating the accuracy of pedicle screw placements through secondary registration. Furthermore, we evaluated the benefits of using the Renaissance robotic system in pedicle screw placement and postoperative evaluations. Finally, we examined the factors affecting the accuracy of pedicle screw implantation. Results Through use of the Renaissance robotic system, the accuracy of Kirschner-wire (K-wire) placements deviating <3 mm from the planned trajectory was determined to be 98.74%. According to our classification system, the robot-guided pedicle screw implantation attained an accuracy of 94.00% before repositioning and 98.74% after repositioning. However, the malposition rate before repositioning was 5.99%; among these placements, 4.73% were immediately repositioned using the robot system and 1.26% were manually repositioned after a failed robot repositioning attempt. Most K-wire entry points deviated caudally and laterally. Conclusion The Renaissance robotic system offers high accuracy in pedicle screw placement. Secondary registration improves the accuracy through increasing the precision of the positioning; moreover, intraoperative evaluation enables immediate repositioning. Furthermore, the K-wire tends to deviate caudally and laterally from the entry point because of skiving, which is characteristic of robot-assisted pedicle screw placement. PMID:27054360

  6. Precision goniometer equipped with a 22-bit absolute rotary encoder.

    PubMed

    Xiaowei, Z; Ando, M; Jidong, W

    1998-05-01

    The calibration of a compact precision goniometer equipped with a 22-bit absolute rotary encoder is presented. The goniometer is a modified Huber 410 goniometer: the diffraction angles can be coarsely generated by a stepping-motor-driven worm gear and precisely interpolated by a piezoactuator-driven tangent arm. The angular accuracy of the precision rotary stage was evaluated with an autocollimator. It was shown that the deviation from circularity of the rolling bearing utilized in the precision rotary stage restricts the angular positioning accuracy of the goniometer, and results in an angular accuracy ten times larger than the angular resolution of 0.01 arcsec. The 22-bit encoder was calibrated by an incremental rotary encoder. It became evident that the accuracy of the absolute encoder is approximately 18 bit due to systematic errors.

  7. Precision aerial application for site-specific rice crop management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture includes different technologies that allow agricultural professional to use information management tools to optimize agriculture production. The new technologies allow aerial application applicators to improve application accuracy and efficiency, which saves time and money for...

  8. Precision positioning device

    DOEpatents

    McInroy, John E.

    2005-01-18

    A precision positioning device is provided. The precision positioning device comprises a precision measuring/vibration isolation mechanism. A first plate is provided with the precision measuring mean secured to the first plate. A second plate is secured to the first plate. A third plate is secured to the second plate with the first plate being positioned between the second plate and the third plate. A fourth plate is secured to the third plate with the second plate being positioned between the third plate and the fourth plate. An adjusting mechanism for adjusting the position of the first plate, the second plate, the third plate, and the fourth plate relative to each other.

  9. Accuracy assessment of novel two-axes rotating and single-axis translating calibration equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Ye, Dong; Che, Rensheng

    2009-11-01

    There is a new method that the rocket nozzle 3D motion is measured by a motion tracking system based on the passive optical markers. However, an important issue is required to resolve-how to assess the accuracy of rocket nozzle motion test. Therefore, calibration equipment is designed and manufactured for generating the truth of nozzle model motion such as translation, angle, velocity, angular velocity, etc. It consists of a base, a lifting platform, a rotary table and a rocket nozzle model with precise geometry size. The nozzle model associated with the markers is installed on the rotary table, which can translate or rotate at the known velocity. The general accuracy of rocket nozzle motion test is evaluated by comparing the truth value with the static and dynamic test data. This paper puts emphasis on accuracy assessment of novel two-axes rotating and single-axis translating calibration equipment. By substituting measured value of the error source into error model, the pointing error reaches less than 0.005deg, rotation center position error reaches 0.08mm, and the rate stability is less than 10-3. The calibration equipment accuracy is much higher than the accuracy of nozzle motion test system, thus the former can be used to assess and calibrate the later.

  10. Research on high accuracy diameter measurement system with CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bo; Duan, Guoteng

    2011-08-01

    Non-touch measurement is an important technology in many domains such as the monitoring of tool breakage and tool wear, et al. Based on the method of curve fitting and demanding inflection point, we present a high accuracy non-touch diameter measurement system. The measurement system comprise linear array CCD, CCD driving circuit, power supply, workseat, light source, data acquisition card and so on. The picture element of the linear array CCD is 2048, and the size of every pixel and the spacing of adjacent pixels have the same size of 14μmx14μm. The stabilized voltage supply has a constant voltage output of 3V. The light is generated by a halogen tungsten lamp, which does not represent any risk to the health of the whole system. The data acquisition card converts the analog signal to digital signal with the accuracy of 12 bit. The error of non-uniform of the CCD pixels in sensitivity and the electrical noise error are indicated in detail. The measurement system has a simple structure, high measuring precision, and can be carried out automatically. Experiment proves that the diameter measurement of the system is within the range of Φ0.5~Φ10mm, and the total measuring unstability of the system is within the range of +/- 1.4μm.

  11. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  12. Precision Pointing Control System (PPCS) system design and analysis. [for gimbaled experiment platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frew, A. M.; Eisenhut, D. F.; Farrenkopf, R. L.; Gates, R. F.; Iwens, R. P.; Kirby, D. K.; Mann, R. J.; Spencer, D. J.; Tsou, H. S.; Zaremba, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    The precision pointing control system (PPCS) is an integrated system for precision attitude determination and orientation of gimbaled experiment platforms. The PPCS concept configures the system to perform orientation of up to six independent gimbaled experiment platforms to design goal accuracy of 0.001 degrees, and to operate in conjunction with a three-axis stabilized earth-oriented spacecraft in orbits ranging from low altitude (200-2500 n.m., sun synchronous) to 24 hour geosynchronous, with a design goal life of 3 to 5 years. The system comprises two complementary functions: (1) attitude determination where the attitude of a defined set of body-fixed reference axes is determined relative to a known set of reference axes fixed in inertial space; and (2) pointing control where gimbal orientation is controlled, open-loop (without use of payload error/feedback) with respect to a defined set of body-fixed reference axes to produce pointing to a desired target.

  13. Precision Mass Measurements at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascar, D.; van Schelt, J.; Savard, G.; Caldwell, S.; Chaudhuri, A.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Sternberg, M.; Sun, T.; Zabransky, B. J.; Segel, R.; Sharma, K.

    2010-02-01

    Neutron separation energies (Sn) are essential inputs to models of explosive r-process nucleosynthesis. However, for nuclei farther from stability, the precision of Sn decreases as production decreases and observation of those nuclei become more difficult. Many of the most critical inputs to the models are based on extrapolations from measurements of masses closer to stability than the predicted r-process path. Measuring masses that approach and lie on the predicted r-process path will further constrain the systematic uncertainties in these extrapolated values. The Canadian Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer (CPT) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has measured the masses of more than 160 nuclei to high precision. A recent move to the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) at ANL has given the CPT unique access to weakly produced nuclei that cannot be easily reached via proton induced fission of ^238U. CARIBU will eventually use a 1 Ci source of ^252Cf to produce these nuclei. Installation of the CPT at CARIBU as well as the first CPT mass measurements of neutron rich nuclei at CARIBU will be discussed. )

  14. Precision Teaching: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Richard P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Precision teaching is introduced as a method of helping students develop fluency or automaticity in the performance of academic skills. Precision teaching involves being aware of the relationship between teaching and learning, measuring student performance regularly and frequently, and analyzing the measurements to develop instructional and…

  15. Precision Optics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert L.; And Others

    This guide outlines the competency-based, two-year precision optics curriculum that the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association has proposed to fill the void that it suggests will soon exist as many of the master opticians currently employed retire. The model, which closely resembles the old European apprenticeship model, calls for 300…

  16. Accuracy Of Stereometry In Assessing Orthognathic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Geoffrey E.; Bays, R. A.

    1983-07-01

    An X-ray stereometric technique has been developed for the determination of 3-dimensional coordinates of spherical metallic markers previously implanted in monkey skulls. The accuracy of the technique is better than 0.5mm. and uses readily available demountable X-ray equipment. The technique is used to study the effects and stability of experimental orthognathic surgery.

  17. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  18. Classification accuracy improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Improvements made in processing system designed for MIDAS (prototype multivariate interactive digital analysis system) effects higher accuracy in classification of pixels, resulting in significantly-reduced processing time. Improved system realizes cost reduction factor of 20 or more.

  19. High precision predictions for exclusive VH production at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Ye; Liu, Xiaohui

    2014-06-04

    We present a resummation-improved prediction for pp → VH + 0 jets at the Large Hadron Collider. We focus on highly-boosted final states in the presence of jet veto to suppress the tt¯ background. In this case, conventional fixed-order calculations are plagued by the existence of large Sudakov logarithms αnslogm(pvetoT/Q) for Q ~ mV + mH which lead to unreliable predictions as well as large theoretical uncertainties, and thus limit the accuracy when comparing experimental measurements to the Standard Model. In this work, we show that the resummation of Sudakov logarithms beyond the next-to-next-to-leading-log accuracy, combined with the next-to-next-to-leading ordermore » calculation, reduces the scale uncertainty and stabilizes the perturbative expansion in the region where the vector bosons carry large transverse momentum. Thus, our result improves the precision with which Higgs properties can be determined from LHC measurements using boosted Higgs techniques.« less

  20. Precision and performance of polysilicon micromirrors for hybrid integrated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solgaard, Olav; Tien, Norman C.; Daneman, Michael J.; Kiang, Meng-Hsiung; Friedberger, Alois; Muller, Richard S.; Lau, Kam Y.

    1995-05-01

    We have designed and built integrated, movable micromirrors for on-chip alignment in silicon- optical-bench technology. The mirrors are fabricated using surface micromachining with three polysilicon layers. A polysilicon-hinge technology was used to achieve the required vertical dimensions and functionality for alignment in hybrid photonic integrated circuits. The positioning accuracy of the mirrors is measured to be on the order of 0.2 micrometers . This precision is shown theoretically and experimentally to be sufficient for laser-to-fiber coupling. In the experimental verification, we used external actuators to position the micromirror and obtained 45% coupling efficiency from a semiconductor laser (operating at 1.3 micrometers ) to a standard single-mode optical fiber. The stability and robustness of the micromirrors were demonstrated in shock and vibration tests that showed that the micromirrors will withstand normal handling and operation without the need for welding or gluing. This micromirror technology combines the low-cost advantage of passive alignment and the accuracy of active alignment. In addition to optoelectronic packaging, the micromirrors can be expected to find applications in grating-tuned external-cavity lasers, scanning lasers, and interferometers.

  1. High precision measurements in crustal dynamic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, F.; Berger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high-precision instrumentation for monitoring benchmark stability and evaluating coseismic strain and tilt signals is reviewed. Laser strainmeter and tilt observations are presented. Examples of coseismic deformation in several geographic locations are given. Evidence suggests that the Earth undergoes elastic response to abrupt faulting.

  2. Precision and Power Grip Priming by Observed Grasping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vainio, Lari; Tucker, Mike; Ellis, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The coupling of hand grasping stimuli and the subsequent grasp execution was explored in normal participants. Participants were asked to respond with their right- or left-hand to the accuracy of an observed (dynamic) grasp while they were holding precision or power grasp response devices in their hands (e.g., precision device/right-hand; power…

  3. A widely tunable 10-μm quantum cascade laser phase-locked to a state-of-the-art mid-infrared reference for precision molecular spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sow, P. L. T.; Mejri, S.; Tokunaga, S. K.; Lopez, O.; Argence, B.; Chardonnet, C.; Darquié, B.; Goncharov, A.; Amy-Klein, A.; Daussy, C.

    2014-06-30

    We report the coherent phase-locking of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 10-μm to the secondary frequency standard of this spectral region, a CO{sub 2} laser stabilized on a saturated absorption line of OsO{sub 4}. The stability and accuracy of the standard are transferred to the QCL resulting in a line width of the order of 10 Hz, and leading to the narrowest QCL to date. The locked QCL is then used to perform absorption spectroscopy spanning 6 GHz of NH{sub 3} and methyltrioxorhenium, two species of interest for applications in precision measurements.

  4. A 3-D Multilateration: A Precision Geodetic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobal, P. R.; Fliegel, H. F.; Jaffe, R. M.; Muller, P. M.; Ong, K. M.; Vonroos, O. H.

    1972-01-01

    A system was designed with the capability of determining 1-cm accuracy station positions in three dimensions using pulsed laser earth satellite tracking stations coupled with strictly geometric data reduction. With this high accuracy, several crucial geodetic applications become possible, including earthquake hazards assessment, precision surveying, plate tectonics, and orbital determination.

  5. Programming supramolecular biohybrids as precision therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ng, David Yuen Wah; Wu, Yuzhou; Kuan, Seah Ling; Weil, Tanja

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Chemical programming of macromolecular structures to instill a set of defined chemical properties designed to behave in a sequential and precise manner is a characteristic vision for creating next generation nanomaterials. In this context, biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids provide an attractive platform for the integration of complex chemical design due to their sequence specificity and geometric definition, which allows accurate translation of chemical functionalities to biological activity. Coupled with the advent of amino acid specific modification techniques, "programmable" areas of a protein chain become exclusively available for any synthetic customization. We envision that chemically reprogrammed hybrid proteins will bridge the vital link to overcome the limitations of synthetic and biological materials, providing a unique strategy for tailoring precision therapeutics. In this Account, we present our work toward the chemical design of protein- derived hybrid polymers and their supramolecular responsiveness, while summarizing their impact and the advancement in biomedicine. Proteins, in their native form, represent the central framework of all biological processes and are an unrivaled class of macromolecular drugs with immense specificity. Nonetheless, the route of administration of protein therapeutics is often vastly different from Nature's biosynthesis. Therefore, it is imperative to chemically reprogram these biopolymers to direct their entry and activity toward the designated target. As a consequence of the innate structural regularity of proteins, we show that supramolecular interactions facilitated by stimulus responsive chemistry can be intricately designed as a powerful tool to customize their functions, stability, activity profiles, and transportation capabilities. From another perspective, a protein in its denatured, unfolded form serves as a monodispersed, biodegradable polymer scaffold decorated with functional side

  6. Precision of archerfish C-starts is fully temperature compensated.

    PubMed

    Krupczynski, Philipp; Schuster, Stefan

    2013-09-15

    Hunting archerfish precisely adapt their predictive C-starts to the initial movement of dislodged prey so that turn angle and initial speed are matched to the place and time of the later point of catch. The high accuracy and the known target point of the starts allow a sensitive straightforward assay of how temperature affects the underlying circuits. Furthermore, archerfish face rapid temperature fluctuations in their mangrove biotopes that could compromise performance. Here, we show that after a brief acclimation period the function of the C-starts was fully maintained over a range of operating temperatures: (i) full responsiveness was maintained at all temperatures, (ii) at all temperatures the fish selected accurate turns and were able to do so over the full angular range, (iii) at all temperatures speed attained immediately after the end of the C-start was matched - with equal accuracy - to 'virtual speed', i.e. the ratio of remaining distance to the future landing point and remaining time. While precision was fully temperature compensated, C-start latency was not and increased by about 4 ms per 1°C cooling. Also, kinematic aspects of the C-start were only partly temperature compensated. Above 26°C, the duration of the two major phases of the C-start were temperature compensated. At lower temperatures, however, durations increased similar to latency. Given the accessibility of the underlying networks, the archerfish predictive start should be an excellent model to assay the degree of plasticity and functional stability of C-start motor patterns. PMID:23737557

  7. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  8. Accuracy of analyses of microelectronics nanostructures in atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurpillot, F.; Rolland, N.; Estivill, R.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2016-07-01

    The routine use of atom probe tomography (APT) as a nano-analysis microscope in the semiconductor industry requires the precise evaluation of the metrological parameters of this instrument (spatial accuracy, spatial precision, composition accuracy or composition precision). The spatial accuracy of this microscope is evaluated in this paper in the analysis of planar structures such as high-k metal gate stacks. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that the in-depth accuracy of reconstructed APT images is perturbed when analyzing this structure composed of an oxide layer of high electrical permittivity (higher-k dielectric constant) that separates the metal gate and the semiconductor channel of a field emitter transistor. Large differences in the evaporation field between these layers (resulting from large differences in material properties) are the main sources of image distortions. An analytic model is used to interpret inaccuracy in the depth reconstruction of these devices in APT.

  9. Overview of the national precision database for ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Mikel, D.K.

    1999-07-01

    One of the most important ambient air monitoring quality assurance indicators is the precision test. Code of Federal Regulation Title 40, Section 58 (40 CFR 58) Appendix A1 states that all automated analyzers must have precision tests performed at least once every two weeks. Precision tests can be the best indicator of quality of data for the following reasons: Precision tests are performed once every two weeks. There are approximately 24 to 26 tests per year per instrument. Accuracy tests (audits) usually occur only 1--2 times per year. Precision tests and the subsequent statistical tests can be used to calculate the bias in a set of data. Precision test are used to calculate 95% confidence (probability) limits for the data set. This is important because the confidence of any data point can be determined. If the authors examine any exceedances or near exceedances of the ozone NAAQS, the confidence limits must be examined as well. Precision tests are performed by the monitoring staff and the precision standards are certified against the internal agency primary standards. Precision data are submitted by all state and local agencies that are required to submit criteria pollutant data to the Aerometric and Information Retrieval System (AIRS) database. This subset of the AIRS database is named Precision and Accuracy Retrieval Systems (PARS). In essence, the precision test is an internally performed test performed by the agency collecting and reporting the data.

  10. Laser precision ranger based on beat-wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wu, Yanhua; Weia, Huang

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a laser precision ranger based on beat wave interferometry. A frequency-stabilized double longitudinal modes He-Ne laser with thermoregulation is used as the light source. The two beams of double longitudinal modes generated in the same resonator of the laser are naturally coaxial. They have a frequency difference of about 790MHz and a beat wavelength of 380mm. Their stability is the same as the laser, which is better than 10-7 in open air. The node of the beat wave is used as the sampling flag. An adaptive filter and a wavelet transform program are used to eliminate the noise and to improve the accuracy of node detection. The distance between the node and the measur ed point is measured with a double frequency interferometer, which is incorporated in the same optical system and has a resolution of 0.08μm. Experimental results indicate that the measuring range is 20m and the uncertainty 30μm /10m.

  11. Reaching sub-milimag photometric precision on Beta Pictoris with a nanosat: the PicSat mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.; Lacour, S.; Lapeyrère, V.; David, L.; Crouzier, A.; Dufoing, C.; Faiz, H.; Lemoult, T.; Trébuchet, P.

    2016-07-01

    PicSat is a nanosatellite currently being developed to observe the transit of the giant planet β Pictoris, expected some time between July 2017 and June 2018. The mission is based on a Cubesat architecture, with a small but ambitious 2 kg opto-mechanical payload specifically designed for high precision photometry. The satellite will be launched in early 2017, probably on a 600 km Sun synchronous orbit. The main objective of the mission is the constant monitoring of the brightness of Pic at an unprecedented combination of reliability and precision (200 ppm per hour, with interruptions of at most 30 minutes) to finely characterize the transiting exoplanet and detect exocomets in the Pictoris system. To achieve this difficult objective, the payload is designed with a 3.5 cm effective aperture telescope which injects the light in a single-mode optical fiber linked to an avalanche photodioode. A two-axis piezoelectric actuation system, driven by a tailor-made feedback loop control algorithm, is used to lock the fiber on the center of the star in the focal plane. These actuators complement the attitude determination and control system of the satellite to maintain the sub-arcsecond pointing accuracy required to reach the excellent level of photometric precision. Overall, the mission raises multiple very difficult challenges: high temperature stability of the avalanche detector (achieved with a thermoelectric colling device), high pointing accuracy and stability, and short timeframe for the development.

  12. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  13. Precision Measurement in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quake, Stephen

    Is biology a quantitative science like physics? I will discuss the role of precision measurement in both physics and biology, and argue that in fact both fields can be tied together by the use and consequences of precision measurement. The elementary quanta of biology are twofold: the macromolecule and the cell. Cells are the fundamental unit of life, and macromolecules are the fundamental elements of the cell. I will describe how precision measurements have been used to explore the basic properties of these quanta, and more generally how the quest for higher precision almost inevitably leads to the development of new technologies, which in turn catalyze further scientific discovery. In the 21st century, there are no remaining experimental barriers to biology becoming a truly quantitative and mathematical science.

  14. Precision controllability of the F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, T. R.; Matheny, N. W.

    1979-01-01

    A flying qualities evaluation conducted on a preproduction F-15 airplane permitted an assessment to be made of its precision controllability in the high subsonic and low transonic flight regime over the allowable angle of attack range. Precision controllability, or gunsight tracking, studies were conducted in windup turn maneuvers with the gunsight in the caged pipper mode and depressed 70 mils. This evaluation showed the F-15 airplane to experience severe buffet and mild-to-moderate wing rock at the higher angles of attack. It showed the F-15 airplane radial tracking precision to vary from approximately 6 to 20 mils over the load factor range tested. Tracking in the presence of wing rock essentially doubled the radial tracking error generated at the lower angles of attack. The stability augmentation system affected the tracking precision of the F-15 airplane more than it did that of previous aircraft studied.

  15. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  16. Development of a precision nanoindentation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, B. K.; Smith, D. T.; Smith, S. T.; Correa, L. F.; Cook, R. F.

    2013-07-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a surface-referenced nanoindentation instrument, termed a precision nanoindentation platform (PNP), are presented. The PNP is a symmetrically designed instrument with a centrally located indenter tip attached to a force cell for measuring the forces between the tip and a specimen. Penetration of the indenter tip into the specimen surface is measured using two proximity sensors placed symmetrically about the indenter. Each proximity sensor is attached to a piezoelectric actuator that is servo controlled to maintain the sensor and the reference frame to which it is attached at a constant height relative to the specimen surface. As the indenter tip penetrates the specimen surface, the movement of the tip relative to the two surface reference frames is measured using capacitance gauges and the average of these displacements is used as a measure of penetration depth. The current indenter is capable of applying indentation forces of up to 150 mN with a noise floor below 2 μN rms for a sampling rate of 1 kHz, and measuring displacement with 0.4 nm rms noise for the same sampling rate. The proximity sensors are capable of maintaining surface height variations of less than 1.0 nm with penetration depths of up to 10 μm. Long-term stability tests indicate a total uncertainty in indentation depth less than 10 nm for periods as long as 12 h. To demonstrate instrument accuracy, repeated indention cycles were performed on a fused silica specimen using incrementally increasing indention force. From this test, an average value of 72 GPa ± 1.5 GPa for the Young's modulus was obtained from the elastic unloading curves for 10 measurements ranging in maximum force from 5 mN to 50 mN. To demonstrate longer-term instrument stability, a poly(methyl methacrylate) specimen was subjected to a fixed 5 mN indentation force for 4 h; two distinct creep-like mechanisms were observed.

  17. Few-Nucleon Charge Radii and a Precision Isotope Shift Measurement in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, David

    2015-10-01

    Recent improvements in atomic theory and experiment provide a valuable method to precisely determine few nucleon charge radii, complementing the more direct scattering approaches, and providing sensitive tests of few-body nuclear theory. Some puzzles with respect to this method exist, particularly in the muonic and electronic measurements of the proton radius, known as the proton puzzle. Perhaps this puzzle will also exist in nuclear size measurements in helium. Muonic helium measurements are ongoing while our new electronic results will be discussed here. We measured precisely the isotope shift of the 23S - 23P transitions in 3He and 4He. The result is almost an order of magnitude more accurate than previous measured values. To achieve this accuracy, we implemented various experimental techniques. We used a tunable laser frequency discriminator and electro-optic modulation technique to precisely control the frequency and intensity. We select and stabilize the intensity of the required sideband and eliminate unused sidebands. The technique uses a MEMS fiber switch (ts = 10 ms) and several temperature stabilized narrow band (3 GHz) fiber gratings. A beam with both species of helium is achieved using a custom fiber laser for simultaneous optical pumping. A servo-controlled retro-reflected laser beam eliminates Doppler effects. Careful detection design and software are essential for unbiased data collection. Our new results will be compared to previous measurements.

  18. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  19. Precise Orbit Determination of GPS Satellites Using Phase Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Myung-Kook; Choi, Kyu-Hong; Park, Pil-Ho

    1997-12-01

    The accuracy of user position by GPS is heavily dependent upon the accuracy of satellite position which is usually transmitted to GPS users in radio signals. The real-time satellite position information directly obtained from broadcast ephimerides has the accuracy of 3 x 10 meters which is very unsatisfactory to measure 100km baseline to the accuracy of less than a few mili-meters. There are globally at present seven orbit analysis centers capable of generating precise GPS ephimerides and their orbit quality is of the order of about 10cm. Therefore, precise orbit model and phase processing technique were reviewed and consequently precise GPS ephimerides were produced after processing the phase observables of 28 global GPS stations for 1 day. Initial 6 orbit parameters and 2 solar radiation coefficients were estimated using batch least square algorithm and the final results were compared with the orbit of IGS, the International GPS Service for Geodynamics.

  20. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/sqrt{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/sqrt{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  1. Precision orbit determination using TOPEX/Poseidon TDRSS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teles, Jerome; Putney, B.; Phelps, J.; Mccarthy, J.; Eddy, W.; Klosko, S.

    1993-01-01

    The TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) Mission carries a variety of packages to support experimental, precision and operational orbit determination. Included are a GPS transponder, laser retro-reflectors, the French-developed Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) Doppler tracking system and a Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) transponder. Presently, TDRSS tracking is used for operational orbit support and is processed with force and measurement modeling consistent with this purpose. However, the low noise and extensive geographical coverage of the TDRSS/TOPEX data allows an assessment of TDRSS Precision Orbit Determination (POD) capabilities by comparison to the T/P precision orbit determination. The Geodynamics (GEODYN) Orbit Determination System is used to process laser and DORIS data to produce the precision orbits for the T/P Project. GEODYN has been modified recently to support the TDRSS observations. TDRSS data analysis can now benefit from the extensive force modeling and reference frame stability needed to meet the orbit determination (OD) goals of the T/P Mission. This analysis has concentrated on the strongest of the TDRSS measurement types, its two-way average range rate. Both the TDRSS and T/P orbits have been assessed in combination with the global satellite laser ranging (SLR) data and by themselves. These results indicate that significant improvement in the TDRSS ephemerides is obtained when the T/P orbit is well determined by SLR, and the TDRSS/TOPEX Doppler link is used to position TDRSS. Meter-level TDRSS positioning uncertainty is achieved using this approach. When the TDRSS orbit location is provided by this approach, the two-way range rate from a single TDRSS (i.e. West only) can provide T/P orbits with sub-meter radial accuracies and two meter RMS total position agreement with SLR defined orbits. These preliminary results indicate improved modeling of the TDRSS measurement through the elimination of heretofore

  2. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  3. How Physics Got Precise

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppner, Daniel

    2005-01-19

    Although the ancients knew the length of the year to about ten parts per million, it was not until the end of the 19th century that precision measurements came to play a defining role in physics. Eventually such measurements made it possible to replace human-made artifacts for the standards of length and time with natural standards. For a new generation of atomic clocks, time keeping could be so precise that the effects of the local gravitational potentials on the clock rates would be important. This would force us to re-introduce an artifact into the definition of the second - the location of the primary clock. I will describe some of the events in the history of precision measurements that have led us to this pleasing conundrum, and some of the unexpected uses of atomic clocks today.

  4. Precision Muonium Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2016-09-01

    The muonium atom is the purely leptonic bound state of a positive muon and an electron. It has a lifetime of 2.2 µs. The absence of any known internal structure provides for precision experiments to test fundamental physics theories and to determine accurate values of fundamental constants. In particular ground state hyperfine structure transitions can be measured by microwave spectroscopy to deliver the muon magnetic moment. The frequency of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen-like atom can be determined with laser spectroscopy to obtain the muon mass. With such measurements fundamental physical interactions, in particular quantum electrodynamics, can also be tested at highest precision. The results are important input parameters for experiments on the muon magnetic anomaly. The simplicity of the atom enables further precise experiments, such as a search for muonium-antimuonium conversion for testing charged lepton number conservation and searches for possible antigravity of muons and dark matter.

  5. Precision Heating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A heat sealing process was developed by SEBRA based on technology that originated in work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The project involved connecting and transferring blood and fluids between sterile plastic containers while maintaining a closed system. SEBRA markets the PIRF Process to manufacturers of medical catheters. It is a precisely controlled method of heating thermoplastic materials in a mold to form or weld catheters and other products. The process offers advantages in fast, precise welding or shape forming of catheters as well as applications in a variety of other industries.

  6. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Malcolm J.; Bellman, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  7. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, M.J.; Bellman, R.A.

    1982-09-27

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  8. Precision gravimetric survey at the conditions of urban agglomerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Tatiana; Lygin, Ivan; Fadeev, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    internal convergence are independent on transportation mode. Actually, measurements differ just by the processing time and appropriate number of readings. Important, that the internal convergence is the individual attribute of particular device. For the investigated gravimeters it varies from ±3 up to ±8 μGals. Various stability of the gravimeters location base. The most stable basis (minimum microseisms) in this experiment was a concrete pedestal, the least stable - point on the 28th floor. There is no direct dependence of the measurement results variance at the external noise level. Moreover, the external dispersion between different gravimeters is minimal in the point of the highest microseisms. Conclusions. The quality of the modern high-precision gravimeters Scintrex CG-5 Autograv measurements is determined by stability of the particular device, its standard deviation value and the nonlinearity drift degree. Despite the fact, that mentioned parameters of the tested gravimeters, generally corresponded to the factory characters, for the surveys required accuracy ±2-5 μGals, the best gravimeters should be selected. Practical gravimetric survey with such accuracy allowed reliable determination of the position of technical communication boxes and underground walkway in the urban area, indicated by gravity minimums with the amplitudes from 6-8 μGals and 1 - 15 meters width. The holes' parameters, obtained as the result of interpretationare well aligned with priori data.

  9. An ultrahigh stability, low-noise laser current driver with digital control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Van Zijll, Marshall; Doermann, Greg; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2008-07-01

    We present a low-noise, high modulation-bandwidth design for a laser current driver with excellent long-term stability. The driver improves upon the commonly used Hall-Libbrecht design. The current driver can be operated remotely by way of a microprocessing unit, which controls the current set point digitally. This allows precise repeatability and improved accuracy and stability. It also allows the driver to be placed near the laser for reduced noise and for lower phase lag when using the modulation input. We present the theory of operation for our driver in detail, and give a thorough characterization of its stability, noise, set-point accuracy and repeatability, temperature dependence, transient response, and modulation bandwidth.

  10. Asymptotic accuracy of two-class discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.K.; Baird, H.S.

    1994-12-31

    Poor quality-e.g. sparse or unrepresentative-training data is widely suspected to be one cause of disappointing accuracy of isolated-character classification in modern OCR machines. We conjecture that, for many trainable classification techniques, it is in fact the dominant factor affecting accuracy. To test this, we have carried out a study of the asymptotic accuracy of three dissimilar classifiers on a difficult two-character recognition problem. We state this problem precisely in terms of high-quality prototype images and an explicit model of the distribution of image defects. So stated, the problem can be represented as a stochastic source of an indefinitely long sequence of simulated images labeled with ground truth. Using this sequence, we were able to train all three classifiers to high and statistically indistinguishable asymptotic accuracies (99.9%). This result suggests that the quality of training data was the dominant factor affecting accuracy. The speed of convergence during training, as well as time/space trade-offs during recognition, differed among the classifiers.

  11. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  12. Precision adjustable stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  13. Precision bolometer bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. R.

    1968-01-01

    Prototype precision bolometer calibration bridge is manually balanced device for indicating dc bias and balance with either dc or ac power. An external galvanometer is used with the bridge for null indication, and the circuitry monitors voltage and current simultaneously without adapters in testing 100 and 200 ohm thin film bolometers.

  14. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  15. Precision physics at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1997-05-01

    In this talk the author gives a brief survey of some physics topics that will be addressed by the Large Hadron Collider currently under construction at CERN. Instead of discussing the reach of this machine for new physics, the author gives examples of the types of precision measurements that might be made if new physics is discovered.

  16. Precision in Stereochemical Terminology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Leroy G., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of relatively new terminology that has given multiple definitions often resulting in students learning principles that are actually false is presented with an example of the new term stereogenic atom introduced by Mislow and Siegel. The Mislow terminology would be useful in some cases if it were used precisely and correctly, but it is…

  17. High Precision Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam

    2012-10-01

    This |*|program |*|uses |*|the |*|enhanced |*|astrometric |*|precision |*|enabled |*|by |*|spatial |*|scanning |*|to |*|calibrate |*|remaining |*|obstacles |*|toreaching |*|<<40 |*|microarc|*|second |*|astrometry |*|{<1 |*|millipixel} |*|with |*|WFC3/UVIS |*|by |*|1} |*|improving |*|geometric |*|distor-on |*|2} |*|calibratingthe |*|e|*|ect |*|of |*|breathing |*|on |*|astrometry|*|3} |*|calibrating |*|the |*|e|*|ect |*|of |*|CTE |*|on |*|astrometry, |*|4} |*|characterizing |*|the |*|boundaries |*|andorientations |*|of |*|the |*|WFC3 |*|lithograph |*|cells.

  18. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, Michael E.; Sullivan, William H.

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  19. Precision Falling Body Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James A.; Koenig, R.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a simple apparatus to determine acceleration due to gravity. It utilizes direct contact switches in lieu of conventional photocells to time the fall of a ball bearing. Accuracies to better than one part in a thousand were obtained. (SL)

  20. Precision frequency sources. [development and characteristics of oscillators for precise time measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoubrey, A. O.; Kern, R. H.

    1962-01-01

    The development of precision oscillators for time and frequency standards is discussed. The applications of the oscillators to radio communication, research projects, navigation systems, and calibration sources are reported. The status of a cesium beam stabilized oscillator is examined. Photographs of the components are provided. The performance of quartz and rubidium oscillators is compared with the performance of cesium resonators.

  1. High-precision positioning of radar scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dheenathayalan, Prabu; Small, David; Schubert, Adrian; Hanssen, Ramon F.

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing radar satellites cover wide areas and provide spatially dense measurements, with millions of scatterers. Knowledge of the precise position of each radar scatterer is essential to identify the corresponding object and interpret the estimated deformation. The absolute position accuracy of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scatterers in a 2D radar coordinate system, after compensating for atmosphere and tidal effects, is in the order of centimeters for TerraSAR-X (TSX) spotlight images. However, the absolute positioning in 3D and its quality description are not well known. Here, we exploit time-series interferometric SAR to enhance the positioning capability in three dimensions. The 3D positioning precision is parameterized by a variance-covariance matrix and visualized as an error ellipsoid centered at the estimated position. The intersection of the error ellipsoid with objects in the field is exploited to link radar scatterers to real-world objects. We demonstrate the estimation of scatterer position and its quality using 20 months of TSX stripmap acquisitions over Delft, the Netherlands. Using trihedral corner reflectors (CR) for validation, the accuracy of absolute positioning in 2D is about 7 cm. In 3D, an absolute accuracy of up to ˜ 66 cm is realized, with a cigar-shaped error ellipsoid having centimeter precision in azimuth and range dimensions, and elongated in cross-range dimension with a precision in the order of meters (the ratio of the ellipsoid axis lengths is 1/3/213, respectively). The CR absolute 3D position, along with the associated error ellipsoid, is found to be accurate and agree with the ground truth position at a 99 % confidence level. For other non-CR coherent scatterers, the error ellipsoid concept is validated using 3D building models. In both cases, the error ellipsoid not only serves as a quality descriptor, but can also help to associate radar scatterers to real-world objects.

  2. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  3. The Precision Field Lysimeter Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, J.

    2009-04-01

    The understanding and interpretation of leaching processes have improved significantly during the past decades. Unlike laboratory experiments, which are mostly performed under very controlled conditions (e.g. homogeneous, uniform packing of pre-treated test material, saturated steady-state flow conditions, and controlled uniform hydraulic conditions), lysimeter experiments generally simulate actual field conditions. Lysimeters may be classified according to different criteria such as type of soil block used (monolithic or reconstructed), drainage (drainage by gravity or vacuum or a water table may be maintained), or weighing or non-weighing lysimeters. In 2004 experimental investigations have been set up to assess the impact of different farming systems on groundwater quality of the shallow floodplain aquifer of the river Mur in Wagna (Styria, Austria). The sediment is characterized by a thin layer (30 - 100 cm) of sandy Dystric Cambisol and underlying gravel and sand. Three precisely weighing equilibrium tension block lysimeters have been installed in agricultural test fields to compare water flow and solute transport under (i) organic farming, (ii) conventional low input farming and (iii) extensification by mulching grass. Specific monitoring equipment is used to reduce the well known shortcomings of lysimeter investigations: The lysimeter core is excavated as an undisturbed monolithic block (circular, 1 m2 surface area, 2 m depth) to prevent destruction of the natural soil structure, and pore system. Tracing experiments have been achieved to investigate the occurrence of artificial preferential flow and transport along the walls of the lysimeters. The results show that such effects can be neglected. Precisely weighing load cells are used to constantly determine the weight loss of the lysimeter due to evaporation and transpiration and to measure different forms of precipitation. The accuracy of the weighing apparatus is 0.05 kg, or 0.05 mm water equivalent

  4. A passion for precision

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  5. A passion for precision

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-19

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  6. Towards precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Euan A

    2016-08-16

    There is great potential for genome sequencing to enhance patient care through improved diagnostic sensitivity and more precise therapeutic targeting. To maximize this potential, genomics strategies that have been developed for genetic discovery - including DNA-sequencing technologies and analysis algorithms - need to be adapted to fit clinical needs. This will require the optimization of alignment algorithms, attention to quality-coverage metrics, tailored solutions for paralogous or low-complexity areas of the genome, and the adoption of consensus standards for variant calling and interpretation. Global sharing of this more accurate genotypic and phenotypic data will accelerate the determination of causality for novel genes or variants. Thus, a deeper understanding of disease will be realized that will allow its targeting with much greater therapeutic precision. PMID:27528417

  7. Principles and techniques for designing precision machines

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C

    1999-02-01

    This thesis is written to advance the reader's knowledge of precision-engineering principles and their application to designing machines that achieve both sufficient precision and minimum cost. It provides the concepts and tools necessary for the engineer to create new precision machine designs. Four case studies demonstrate the principles and showcase approaches and solutions to specific problems that generally have wider applications. These come from projects at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in which the author participated: the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine, Accuracy Enhancement of High- Productivity Machine Tools, the National Ignition Facility, and Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography. Although broad in scope, the topics go into sufficient depth to be useful to practicing precision engineers and often fulfill more academic ambitions. The thesis begins with a chapter that presents significant principles and fundamental knowledge from the Precision Engineering literature. Following this is a chapter that presents engineering design techniques that are general and not specific to precision machines. All subsequent chapters cover specific aspects of precision machine design. The first of these is Structural Design, guidelines and analysis techniques for achieving independently stiff machine structures. The next chapter addresses dynamic stiffness by presenting several techniques for Deterministic Damping, damping designs that can be analyzed and optimized with predictive results. Several chapters present a main thrust of the thesis, Exact-Constraint Design. A main contribution is a generalized modeling approach developed through the course of creating several unique designs. The final chapter is the primary case study of the thesis, the Conceptual Design of a Horizontal Machining Center.

  8. Precision orbit determination of altimetric satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, C. K.; Ries, John C.; Tapley, Byron D.

    1994-11-01

    The ability to determine accurate global sea level variations is important to both detection and understanding of changes in climate patterns. Sea level variability occurs over a wide spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, and precise global measurements are only recently possible with the advent of spaceborne satellite radar altimetry missions. One of the inherent requirements for accurate determination of absolute sea surface topography is that the altimetric satellite orbits be computed with sub-decimeter accuracy within a well defined terrestrial reference frame. SLR tracking in support of precision orbit determination of altimetric satellites is significant. Recent examples are the use of SLR as the primary tracking systems for TOPEX/Poseidon and for ERS-1 precision orbit determination. The current radial orbit accuracy for TOPEX/Poseidon is estimated to be around 3-4 cm, with geographically correlated orbit errors around 2 cm. The significance of the SLR tracking system is its ability to allow altimetric satellites to obtain absolute sea level measurements and thereby provide a link to other altimetry measurement systems for long-term sea level studies. SLR tracking allows the production of precise orbits which are well centered in an accurate terrestrial reference frame. With proper calibration of the radar altimeter, these precise orbits, along with the altimeter measurements, provide long term absolute sea level measurements. The U.S. Navy's Geosat mission is equipped with only Doppler beacons and lacks laser retroreflectors. However, its orbits, and even the Geosat orbits computed using the available full 40-station Tranet tracking network, yield orbits with significant north-south shifts with respect to the IERS terrestrial reference frame. The resulting Geosat sea surface topography will be tilted accordingly, making interpretation of long-term sea level variability studies difficult.

  9. Ultra-Precision Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Under a Joint Sponsored Research Agreement with Goddard Space Flight Center, SEMATECH, Inc., the Silicon Valley Group, Inc. and Tinsley Laboratories, known as SVG-Tinsley, developed an Ultra-Precision Optics Manufacturing System for space and microlithographic applications. Continuing improvements in optics manufacture will be able to meet unique NASA requirements and the production needs of the lithography industry for many years to come.

  10. Precision Experiments at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, W.

    2015-07-01

    The Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) established the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics with unprecedented precision, including all its radiative corrections. These led to predictions for the masses of the top quark and Higgs boson, which were beautifully confirmed later on. After these precision measurements the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 1999 jointly to 't Hooft and Veltman "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics". Another hallmark of the LEP results were the precise measurements of the gauge coupling constants, which excluded unification of the forces within the SM, but allowed unification within the supersymmetric extension of the SM. This increased the interest in Supersymmetry (SUSY) and Grand Unified Theories, especially since the SM has no candidate for the elusive dark matter, while SUSY provides an excellent candidate for dark matter. In addition, SUSY removes the quadratic divergencies of the SM and predicts the Higgs mechanism from radiative electroweak symmetry breaking with a SM-like Higgs boson having a mass below 130 GeV in agreement with the Higgs boson discovery at the LHC. However, the predicted SUSY particles have not been found either because they are too heavy for the present LHC energy and luminosity or Nature has found alternative ways to circumvent the shortcomings of the SM.

  11. Precision Experiments at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, W.

    2015-09-01

    The Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) established the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics with unprecedented precision, including all its radiative corrections. These led to predictions for the masses of the top quark and Higgs boson, which were beautifully confirmed later on. After these precision measurements the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 1999 jointly to 't Hooft and Veltman "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics". Another hallmark of the LEP results were the precise measurements of the gauge coupling constants, which excluded unification of the forces within the SM, but allowed unification within the supersymmetric extension of the SM. This increased the interest in Supersymmetry (SUSY) and Grand Unified Theories, especially since the SM has no candidate for the elusive dark matter, while Supersymmetry provides an excellent candidate for dark matter. In addition, Supersymmetry removes the quadratic divergencies of the SM and {\\it predicts} the Higgs mechanism from radiative electroweak symmetry breaking with a SM-like Higgs boson having a mass below 130 GeV in agreement with the Higgs boson discovery at the LHC. However, the predicted SUSY particles have not been found either because they are too heavy for the present LHC energy and luminosity or Nature has found alternative ways to circumvent the shortcomings of the SM.

  12. Standardization of radon measurements. 2. Accuracy and proficiency testing

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszek, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of in situ environmental radon measurement techniques is reviewed and new data for charcoal canister, alpha-track (track-etch) and electret detectors are presented. Deficiencies reported at the 1987 meeting in Wurenlingen, Federal Republic of Germany, for measurements using charcoal detectors are confirmed by the new results. Accuracy and precision of the alpha-track measurements laboratory were better than in 1987. Electret detectors appear to provide a convenient, accurate, and precise system for the measurement of radon concentration. The need for a comprehensive, blind proficiency-testing programs is discussed.

  13. Airborne Precision Spacing: A Trajectory-based Approach to Improve Terminal Area Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Airborne Precision Spacing has been developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) over the past seven years as an attempt to benefit from the capabilities of the flight deck to precisely space their aircraft relative to another aircraft. This development has leveraged decades of work on improving terminal area operations, especially the arrival phase. With APS operations, the air traffic controller instructs the participating aircraft to achieve an assigned inter-arrival spacing interval at the runway threshold, relative to another aircraft. The flight crew then uses airborne automation to manage the aircraft s speed to achieve the goal. The spacing tool is designed to keep the speed within acceptable operational limits, promote system-wide stability, and meet the assigned goal. This reallocation of tasks with the controller issuing strategic goals and the flight crew managing the tactical achievement of those goals has been shown to be feasible through simulation and flight test. A precision of plus or minus 2-3 seconds is generally achievable. Simulations of long strings of arriving traffic show no signs of instabilities or compression waves. Subject pilots have rated the workload to be similar to current-day operations and eye-tracking data substantiate this result. This paper will present a high-level review of research results over the past seven years from a variety of tests and experiments. The results will focus on the precision and accuracy achievable, flow stability and some major sources of uncertainty. The paper also includes a summary of the flight crew s procedures and interface and a brief concept overview.

  14. Accuracy metrics for judging time scale algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Jacques, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time scales have been constructed in different ways to meet the many demands placed upon them for time accuracy, frequency accuracy, long-term stability, and robustness. Usually, no single time scale is optimum for all purposes. In the context of the impending availability of high-accuracy intermittently-operated cesium fountains, we reconsider the question of evaluating the accuracy of time scales which use an algorithm to span interruptions of the primary standard. We consider a broad class of calibration algorithms that can be evaluated and compared quantitatively for their accuracy in the presence of frequency drift and a full noise model (a mixture of white PM, flicker PM, white FM, flicker FM, and random walk FM noise). We present the analytic techniques for computing the standard uncertainty for the full noise model and this class of calibration algorithms. The simplest algorithm is evaluated to find the average-frequency uncertainty arising from the noise of the cesium fountain's local oscillator and from the noise of a hydrogen maser transfer-standard. This algorithm and known noise sources are shown to permit interlaboratory frequency transfer with a standard uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15) for periods of 30-100 days.

  15. Highly Parallel, High-Precision Numerical Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2005-04-22

    This paper describes a scheme for rapidly computing numerical values of definite integrals to very high accuracy, ranging from ordinary machine precision to hundreds or thousands of digits, even for functions with singularities or infinite derivatives at endpoints. Such a scheme is of interest not only in computational physics and computational chemistry, but also in experimental mathematics, where high-precision numerical values of definite integrals can be used to numerically discover new identities. This paper discusses techniques for a parallel implementation of this scheme, then presents performance results for 1-D and 2-D test suites. Results are also given for a certain problem from mathematical physics, which features a difficult singularity, confirming a conjecture to 20,000 digit accuracy. The performance rate for this latter calculation on 1024 CPUs is 690 Gflop/s. We believe that this and one other 20,000-digit integral evaluation that we report are the highest-precision non-trivial numerical integrations performed to date.

  16. Thermocouple Calibration and Accuracy in a Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Nathal, M. V.; Keller, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    A consolidation of information has been provided that can be used to define procedures for enhancing and maintaining accuracy in temperature measurements in materials testing laboratories. These studies were restricted to type R and K thermocouples (TCs) tested in air. Thermocouple accuracies, as influenced by calibration methods, thermocouple stability, and manufacturer's tolerances were all quantified in terms of statistical confidence intervals. By calibrating specific TCs the benefits in accuracy can be as great as 6 C or 5X better compared to relying on manufacturer's tolerances. The results emphasize strict reliance on the defined testing protocol and on the need to establish recalibration frequencies in order to maintain these levels of accuracy.

  17. High-Accuracy Ring Laser Gyroscopes: Earth Rotation Rate and Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beverini, N.; Di Virgilio, A.; Belfi, J.; Ortolan, A.; Schreiber, K. U.; Gebauer, A.; Klügel, T.

    2016-06-01

    The Gross Ring G is a square ring laser gyroscope, built as a monolithic Zerodur structure with 4 m length on all sides. It has demonstrated that a large ring laser provides a sensitivity high enough to measure the rotational rate of the Earth with a high precision of ΔΩE < 10-8. It is possible to show that further improvement in accuracy could allow the observation of the metric frame dragging, produced by the Earth rotating mass (Lense-Thirring effect), as predicted by General Relativity. Furthermore, it can provide a local measurement of the Earth rotational rate with a sensitivity near to that provided by the international system IERS. The GINGER project is intending to take this level of sensitivity further and to improve the accuracy and the long-term stability. A monolithic structure similar to the G ring laser is not available for GINGER. Therefore the preliminary goal is the demonstration of the feasibility of a larger gyroscope structure, where the mechanical stability is obtained through an active control of the geometry. A prototype moderate size gyroscope (GP-2) has been set up in Pisa in order to test this active control of the ring geometry, while a second structure (GINGERino) has been installed inside the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in order to investigate the properties of a deep underground laboratory in view of an installation of a future GINGER apparatus. The preliminary data on these two latter instruments are presented.

  18. Stabilized Zeeman split laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of a stablized Zeeman split laser for use in a polarization profilometer is discussed. A Hewlett-Packard laser was modified to stabilize the Zeeman split beat frequency thereby increasing the phase measurement accuracy from the Hewlett-Packard 3 degrees to an accuracy of .01 degrees. The addition of a two layered inductive winding converts the laser to a current controlled oscillator whose frequency is linearly related to coil current. This linear relationship between coil current and laser frequency permits phase locking the laser frequency to a stable crystal controlled reference frequency. The stability of the system is examined and the equipment operation procedures are outlined.

  19. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  20. Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) accuracy assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szajgin, John; Pettinger, L.R.; Linden, D.S.; Ohlen, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative accuracy assessment was performed for the vegetation classification map produced as part of the Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) project. This project was a cooperative effort between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center. The objective of the accuracy assessment was to estimate (with a precision of ?10 percent at the 90 percent confidence level) the comission error in each of the eight level II hierarchical vegetation cover types. A stratified two-phase (double) cluster sample was used. Phase I consisted of 160 photointerpreted plots representing clusters of Landsat pixels, and phase II consisted of ground data collection at 80 of the phase I cluster sites. Ground data were used to refine the phase I error estimates by means of a linear regression model. The classified image was stratified by assigning each 15-pixel cluster to the stratum corresponding to the dominant cover type within each cluster. This method is known as stratified plurality sampling. Overall error was estimated to be 36 percent with a standard error of 2 percent. Estimated error for individual vegetation classes ranged from a low of 10 percent ?6 percent for evergreen woodland to 81 percent ?7 percent for cropland and pasture. Total cost of the accuracy assessment was $106,950 for the one-million-hectare study area. The combination of the stratified plurality sampling (SPS) method of sample allocation with double sampling provided the desired estimates within the required precision levels. The overall accuracy results confirmed that highly accurate digital classification of vegetation is difficult to perform in semiarid environments, due largely to the sparse vegetation cover. Nevertheless, these techniques show promise for providing more accurate information than is presently available for many BLM-administered lands.

  1. Manufacturing Precise, Lightweight Paraboloidal Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, Frederick Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating a precise, diffraction- limited, ultra-lightweight, composite- material (matrix/fiber) paraboloidal telescope mirror has been devised. Unlike the traditional process of fabrication of heavier glass-based mirrors, this process involves a minimum of manual steps and subjective judgment. Instead, this process involves objectively controllable, repeatable steps; hence, this process is better suited for mass production. Other processes that have been investigated for fabrication of precise composite-material lightweight mirrors have resulted in print-through of fiber patterns onto reflecting surfaces, and have not provided adequate structural support for maintenance of stable, diffraction-limited surface figures. In contrast, this process does not result in print-through of the fiber pattern onto the reflecting surface and does provide a lightweight, rigid structure capable of maintaining a diffraction-limited surface figure in the face of changing temperature, humidity, and air pressure. The process consists mainly of the following steps: 1. A precise glass mandrel is fabricated by conventional optical grinding and polishing. 2. The mandrel is coated with a release agent and covered with layers of a carbon- fiber composite material. 3. The outer surface of the outer layer of the carbon-fiber composite material is coated with a surfactant chosen to provide for the proper flow of an epoxy resin to be applied subsequently. 4. The mandrel as thus covered is mounted on a temperature-controlled spin table. 5. The table is heated to a suitable temperature and spun at a suitable speed as the epoxy resin is poured onto the coated carbon-fiber composite material. 6. The surface figure of the optic is monitored and adjusted by use of traditional Ronchi, Focault, and interferometric optical measurement techniques while the speed of rotation and the temperature are adjusted to obtain the desired figure. The proper selection of surfactant, speed or rotation

  2. HIGH-PRECISION ASTROMETRY WITH A DIFFRACTIVE PUPIL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Guyon, Olivier; Eisner, Josh A.; Angel, Roger; Woolf, Neville J.; Bendek, Eduardo A.; Milster, Thomas D.; Mark Ammons, S.; Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Nemati, Bijan; Pitman, Joe; Woodruff, Robert A.; Belikov, Ruslan

    2012-06-01

    Astrometric detection and mass determination of Earth-mass exoplanets require sub-{mu}as accuracy, which is theoretically possible with an imaging space telescope using field stars as an astrometric reference. The measurement must, however, overcome astrometric distortions, which are much larger than the photon noise limit. To address this issue, we propose to generate faint stellar diffraction spikes using a two-dimensional grid of regularly spaced small dark spots added to the surface of the primary mirror (PM). Accurate astrometric motion of the host star is obtained by comparing the position of the spikes to the background field stars. The spikes do not contribute to scattered light in the central part of the field and therefore allow unperturbed coronagraphic observation of the star's immediate surroundings. Because the diffraction spikes are created on the PM and imaged on the same focal plane detector as the background stars, astrometric distortions affect equally the diffraction spikes and the background stars and are therefore calibrated. We describe the technique, detail how the data collected by the wide-field camera are used to derive astrometric motion, and identify the main sources of astrometric error using numerical simulations and analytical derivations. We find that the 1.4 m diameter telescope, 0.3 deg{sup 2} field we adopt as a baseline design achieves 0.2 {mu}as single measurement astrometric accuracy. The diffractive pupil concept thus enables sub-{mu}as astrometry without relying on the accurate pointing, external metrology, or high-stability hardware required with previously proposed high-precision astrometry concepts.

  3. Galvanometer deflection: a precision high-speed system.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, D P; Raamot, J

    1976-06-01

    An X-Y galvanometer deflection system capable of high precision in a random access mode of operation is described. Beam positional information in digitized form is obtained by employing a Ronchi grating with a sophisticated optical detection scheme. This information is used in a control interface to locate the beam to the required precision. The system is characterized by high accuracy at maximum speed and is designed for operation in a variable environment, with particular attention placed on thermal insensitivity.

  4. Galvanometer deflection: a precision high-speed system.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, D P; Raamot, J

    1976-06-01

    An X-Y galvanometer deflection system capable of high precision in a random access mode of operation is described. Beam positional information in digitized form is obtained by employing a Ronchi grating with a sophisticated optical detection scheme. This information is used in a control interface to locate the beam to the required precision. The system is characterized by high accuracy at maximum speed and is designed for operation in a variable environment, with particular attention placed on thermal insensitivity. PMID:20165203

  5. Precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} and {ital p{anti p}} colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct {ital m{sub t}} measurements. Using the world`s electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs` mass are discussed.

  6. Precision Robotic Assembly Machine

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The world's largest laser system is the National Ignition Facility (NIF), located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF's 192 laser beams are amplified to extremely high energy, and then focused onto a tiny target about the size of a BB, containing frozen hydrogen gas. The target must be perfectly machined to incredibly demanding specifications. The Laboratory's scientists and engineers have developed a device called the "Precision Robotic Assembly Machine" for this purpose. Its unique design won a prestigious R&D-100 award from R&D Magazine.

  7. Instrument Attitude Precision Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach is presented in this paper to analyze attitude precision and control for an instrument gimbaled to a spacecraft subject to an internal disturbance caused by a moving component inside the instrument. Nonlinear differential equations of motion for some sample cases are derived and solved analytically to gain insight into the influence of the disturbance on the attitude pointing error. A simple control law is developed to eliminate the instrument pointing error caused by the internal disturbance. Several cases are presented to demonstrate and verify the concept presented in this paper.

  8. Precision Robotic Assembly Machine

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-14

    The world's largest laser system is the National Ignition Facility (NIF), located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF's 192 laser beams are amplified to extremely high energy, and then focused onto a tiny target about the size of a BB, containing frozen hydrogen gas. The target must be perfectly machined to incredibly demanding specifications. The Laboratory's scientists and engineers have developed a device called the "Precision Robotic Assembly Machine" for this purpose. Its unique design won a prestigious R&D-100 award from R&D Magazine.

  9. Precision mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gläser, M.; Borys, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mass as a physical quantity and its measurement are described. After some historical remarks, a short summary of the concept of mass in classical and modern physics is given. Principles and methods of mass measurements, for example as energy measurement or as measurement of weight forces and forces caused by acceleration, are discussed. Precision mass measurement by comparing mass standards using balances is described in detail. Measurement of atomic masses related to 12C is briefly reviewed as well as experiments and recent discussions for a future new definition of the kilogram, the SI unit of mass.

  10. Determination of the accuracy and operating constants in a digitally biased ring core magnetometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    By using a very stable voltage reference and a high precision digital-to-analog converter to set bias in digital increments, the inherently high stability and accuracy of a ring core magnetometer can be significantly enhanced. In this case it becomes possible to measure not only variations about the bias level, but to measure the entire value of the field along each magnetometer sensing axis in a nearly absolute sense. To accomplish this, one must accurately determine the value of the digital bias increment for each axis, the zero field offset value for each axis, the scale values, and the transfer coefficients (or nonorthogonality angles) for pairs of axes. This determination can be carried out very simply, using only the Earth's field, a proton magnetometer, and a tripod-mounted fixture which is capable of rotations about two axes that are mutually perpendicular to the Earth's magnetic field vector. ?? 1990.

  11. Numerically stable approach for high-precision orbit integration using Encke's method and equinoctial elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellmer, Matthias; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Future gravity missions like GRACE-FO and beyond will deliver low-low satellite-to-satellite (ll-sst) ranging measurements of much increased precision. This necessitates a re-evaluation of the processes used in gravity field determination with an eye to numerical stability. When computing gravity fields from ll-sst data, precise positions of both satellites are needed in the setup of the observation equations. These positions thus have an immediate effect on the sought-after gravity field parameters. We use reduced-dynamic orbits which are computed through integration of all accelerations experienced by the satellite, as determined through a priori models and observed through the accelerometer. Our simulations showed that computing the orbit of the satellite through complete integration of all acting forces leads to numeric instabilities magnitudes larger than the expected ranging accuracy. We introduce a numerically stable approach employing a best-fit keplerian reference orbit based on Encke's method. Our investigations revealed that using canonical formulations for the evaluation of the reference keplerian orbit and accelerations lead to insufficient precision, necessitating an alternative formulation like the equinoctial elements.

  12. A micro-computer based system for high precision temperature measurement using Platinum RTD's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthew, W. T.

    1982-07-01

    A micro-computer controlled system for 10 channel high precision temperature data acquisition has been developed. The temperature sensing elements are Platinum Resistance Thermometer Devices (RTD's). Probe construction, using standard, commercially available RTD elements is described and wiring and switching requirements for the 4-wire resistance measurements are noted. The system consists of a Digital Equipment Corp. MINC-11 Computer linked, via IEEE-488 interface bus cables, to a HP (Hewlett-Packard) 34555A Digital Volt/Ohm Meter, an HP-3495A Scanner/Multiplexer, and, during calibration, a HP 2804A Quartz Thermometer. Two programs are employed: one for probe calibration and the other for the temperature measurement application. In the calibration program, the ten probes are individually calibrated against the Quartz Thermometer which has an absolute accuracy specification of + or 0.04 C. A proportional control water bath having a thermal stability specification of + or - 0.004 C provided the common thermal medium during calibration. Currently a three point calibration spanning 6 C (37 to 43 C) is employed. The individual probe constants are computed and recorded on a computer file for access via the temperature measurement program. An initial evaluation of the precision of the calibrated RTD system against the Quartz Thermometer reading yielded an overall precision of + or - 0.0004 C and worst case error of less than + or - 0.01 C.

  13. PRECISE ANGLE MONITOR BASED ON THE CONCEPT OF PENCIL-BEAM INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    QIAN,S.; TAKACS,P.

    2000-07-30

    The precise angle monitoring is a very important metrology task for research, development and industrial applications. Autocollimator is one of the most powerful and widely applied instruments for small angle monitoring, which is based on the principle of geometric optics. In this paper the authors introduce a new precise angle monitoring system, Pencil-beam Angle Monitor (PAM), base on pencil beam interferometry. Its principle of operation is a combination of physical and geometrical optics. The angle calculation method is similar to the autocollimator. However, the autocollimator creates a cross image but the precise pencil-beam angle monitoring system produces an interference fringe on the focal plane. The advantages of the PAM are: high angular sensitivity, long-term stability character making angle monitoring over long time periods possible, high measurement accuracy in the order of sub-microradian, simultaneous measurement ability in two perpendicular directions or on two different objects, dynamic measurement possibility, insensitive to the vibration and air turbulence, automatic display, storage and analysis by use of the computer, small beam diameter making the alignment extremely easy and longer test distance. Some test examples are presented.

  14. Monitoring of stability of ASG-EUPOS network coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figurski, M.; Szafranek, K.; Wrona, M.

    2009-04-01

    ASG-EUPOS (Active Geodetic Network - European Position Determination System) is the national system of precise satellite positioning in Poland, which increases a density of regional and global GNSS networks and is widely used by public administration, national institutions, entrepreneurs and citizens (especially surveyors). In near future ASG-EUPOS is to take role of main national network. Control of proper activity of stations and realization of ETRS'89 is a necessity. User of the system needs to be sure that observations quality and coordinates accuracy are high enough. Coordinates of IGS (International GNSS Service) and EPN (European Permanent Network) stations are precisely determined and any changes are monitored all the time. Observations are verified before they are archived in regional and global databases. The same applies to ASG-EUPOS. This paper concerns standardization of GNSS observations from different stations (uniform adjustment), examination of solutions correctness according to IGS and EPN standards and stability of solutions and sites activity

  15. Architectures, stability and optimization for clock distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carareto, Rodrigo; Orsatti, Fernando M.; Piqueira, José Roberto C.

    2012-12-01

    Synchronous telecommunication networks, distributed control systems and integrated circuits have its accuracy of operation dependent on the existence of a reliable time basis signal extracted from the line data stream and acquirable to each node. In this sense, the existence of a sub-network (inside the main network) dedicated to the distribution of the clock signals is crucially important. There are different solutions for the architecture of the time distribution sub-network and choosing one of them depends on cost, precision, reliability and operational security. In this work we expose: (i) the possible time distribution networks and their usual topologies and arrangements. (ii) How parameters of the network nodes can affect the reachability and stability of the synchronous state of a network. (iii) Optimizations methods for synchronous networks which can provide low cost architectures with operational precision, reliability and security.

  16. Positioning accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography in combination with a HexaPOD robot treatment table

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Juergen . E-mail: juergen.meyer@canterbury.ac.nz; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Guckenberger, Matthias; Richter, Anne; Sauer, Otto; Flentje, Michael

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To scrutinize the positioning accuracy and reproducibility of a commercial hexapod robot treatment table (HRTT) in combination with a commercial cone-beam computed tomography system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: The mechanical stability of the X-ray volume imaging (XVI) system was tested in terms of reproducibility and with a focus on the moveable parts, i.e., the influence of kV panel and the source arm on the reproducibility and accuracy of both bone and gray value registration using a head-and-neck phantom. In consecutive measurements the accuracy of the HRTT for translational, rotational, and a combination of translational and rotational corrections was investigated. The operational range of the HRTT was also determined and analyzed. Results: The system performance of the XVI system alone was very stable with mean translational and rotational errors of below 0.2 mm and below 0.2{sup o}, respectively. The mean positioning accuracy of the HRTT in combination with the XVI system summarized over all measurements was below 0.3 mm and below 0.3{sup o} for translational and rotational corrections, respectively. The gray value match was more accurate than the bone match. Conclusion: The XVI image acquisition and registration procedure were highly reproducible. Both translational and rotational positioning errors can be corrected very precisely with the HRTT. The HRTT is therefore well suited to complement cone-beam computed tomography to take full advantage of position correction in six degrees of freedom for IGRT. The combination of XVI and the HRTT has the potential to improve the accuracy of high-precision treatments.

  17. Precision and power grip priming by observed grasping.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Lari; Tucker, Mike; Ellis, Rob

    2007-11-01

    The coupling of hand grasping stimuli and the subsequent grasp execution was explored in normal participants. Participants were asked to respond with their right- or left-hand to the accuracy of an observed (dynamic) grasp while they were holding precision or power grasp response devices in their hands (e.g., precision device/right-hand; power device/left-hand). The observed hand was making either accurate or inaccurate precision or power grasps and participants signalled the accuracy of the observed grip by making one or other response depending on instructions. Responses were made faster when they matched the observed grip type. The two grasp types differed in their sensitivity to the end-state (i.e., accuracy) of the observed grip. The end-state influenced the power grasp congruency effect more than the precision grasp effect when the observed hand was performing the grasp without any goal object (Experiments 1 and 2). However, the end-state also influenced the precision grip congruency effect (Experiment 3) when the action was object-directed. The data are interpreted as behavioural evidence of the automatic imitation coding of the observed actions. The study suggests that, in goal-oriented imitation coding, the context of an action (e.g., being object-directed) is more important factor in coding precision grips than power grips.

  18. Precision flyer initiator

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Alan M.; Lee, Ronald S.

    1998-01-01

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or "flyer" is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices.

  19. Precision flyer initiator

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.M.; Lee, R.S.

    1998-05-26

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or ``flyer`` is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices. 10 figs.

  20. Precision Joining Center

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.W.; Westphal, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10--12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of US industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  1. Precision measurements in supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.L.

    1995-05-01

    Supersymmetry is a promising framework in which to explore extensions of the standard model. If candidates for supersymmetric particles are found, precision measurements of their properties will then be of paramount importance. The prospects for such measurements and their implications are the subject of this thesis. If charginos are produced at the LEP II collider, they are likely to be one of the few available supersymmetric signals for many years. The author considers the possibility of determining fundamental supersymmetry parameters in such a scenario. The study is complicated by the dependence of observables on a large number of these parameters. He proposes a straightforward procedure for disentangling these dependences and demonstrate its effectiveness by presenting a number of case studies at representative points in parameter space. In addition to determining the properties of supersymmetric particles, precision measurements may also be used to establish that newly-discovered particles are, in fact, supersymmetric. Supersymmetry predicts quantitative relations among the couplings and masses of superparticles. The author discusses tests of such relations at a future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider, using measurements that exploit the availability of polarizable beams. Stringent tests of supersymmetry from chargino production are demonstrated in two representative cases, and fermion and neutralino processes are also discussed.

  2. The neglected tool in the Bayesian ecologist's shed: a case study testing informative priors' effect on model accuracy.

    PubMed

    Morris, William K; Vesk, Peter A; McCarthy, Michael A; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Baker, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Despite benefits for precision, ecologists rarely use informative priors. One reason that ecologists may prefer vague priors is the perception that informative priors reduce accuracy. To date, no ecological study has empirically evaluated data-derived informative priors' effects on precision and accuracy. To determine the impacts of priors, we evaluated mortality models for tree species using data from a forest dynamics plot in Thailand. Half the models used vague priors, and the remaining half had informative priors. We found precision was greater when using informative priors, but effects on accuracy were more variable. In some cases, prior information improved accuracy, while in others, it was reduced. On average, models with informative priors were no more or less accurate than models without. Our analyses provide a detailed case study on the simultaneous effect of prior information on precision and accuracy and demonstrate that when priors are specified appropriately, they lead to greater precision without systematically reducing model accuracy.

  3. New High Precision Linelist of H_3^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; Perry, Adam J.; Markus, Charles; Jenkins, Paul A., II; Kocheril, G. Stephen; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2014-06-01

    As the simplest polyatomic molecule, H_3^+ serves as an ideal benchmark for theoretical predictions of rovibrational energy levels. By strictly ab initio methods, the current accuracy of theoretical predictions is limited to an impressive one hundredth of a wavenumber, which has been accomplished by consideration of relativistic, adiabatic, and non-adiabatic corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer PES. More accurate predictions rely on a treatment of quantum electrodynamic effects, which have improved the accuracies of vibrational transitions in molecular hydrogen to a few MHz. High precision spectroscopy is of the utmost importance for extending the frontiers of ab initio calculations, as improved precision and accuracy enable more rigorous testing of calculations. Additionally, measuring rovibrational transitions of H_3^+ can be used to predict its forbidden rotational spectrum. Though the existing data can be used to determine rotational transition frequencies, the uncertainties are prohibitively large. Acquisition of rovibrational spectra with smaller experimental uncertainty would enable a spectroscopic search for the rotational transitions. The technique Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy, or NICE-OHVMS has been previously used to precisely and accurately measure transitions of H_3^+, CH_5^+, and HCO^+ to sub-MHz uncertainty. A second module for our optical parametric oscillator has extended our instrument's frequency coverage from 3.2-3.9 μm to 2.5-3.9 μm. With extended coverage, we have improved our previous linelist by measuring additional transitions. O. L. Polyansky, et al. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A (2012), 370, 5014--5027. J. Komasa, et al. J. Chem. Theor. Comp. (2011), 7, 3105--3115. C. M. Lindsay, B. J. McCall, J. Mol. Spectrosc. (2001), 210, 66--83. J. N. Hodges, et al. J. Chem. Phys. (2013), 139, 164201.

  4. Fiber Scrambling for High Precision Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Zachary; Spronck, J. F. P.; Fischer, D.

    2011-05-01

    The detection of Earth-like exoplanets with the radial velocity method requires extreme Doppler precision and long-term stability in order to measure tiny reflex velocities in the host star. Recent planet searches have led to the detection of so called "super-Earths” (up to a few Earth masses) that induce radial velocity changes of about 1 m/s. However, the detection of true Earth analogs requires a precision of 10 cm/s. One of the largest factors limiting Doppler precision is variation in the Point Spread Function (PSF) from observation to observation due to changes in the illumination of the slit and spectrograph optics. Thus, this stability has become a focus of current instrumentation work. Fiber optics have been used since the 1980's to couple telescopes to high-precision spectrographs, initially for simpler mechanical design and control. However, fiber optics are also naturally efficient scramblers. Scrambling refers to a fiber's ability to produce an output beam independent of input. Our research is focused on characterizing the scrambling properties of several types of fibers, including circular, square and octagonal fibers. By measuring the intensity distribution after the fiber as a function of input beam position, we can simulate guiding errors that occur at an observatory. Through this, we can determine which fibers produce the most uniform outputs for the severest guiding errors, improving the PSF and allowing sub-m/s precision. However, extensive testing of fibers of supposedly identical core diameter, length and shape from the same manufacturer has revealed the "personality” of individual fibers. Personality describes differing intensity patterns for supposedly duplicate fibers illuminated identically. Here, we present our results on scrambling characterization as a function of fiber type, while studying individual fiber personality.

  5. Development of a precision large deployable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoji; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Noda, Takahiko; Tamai, Yasuo; Ebisui, Takashi; Miura, Koryo; Takano, Tadashi

    This paper describes the results of a study of a precision large deployable antenna for the space VLBI satellite 'MUSES-B'. An antenna with high gain and pointing accuracy is required for the mission objective. The frequency bands required are 22, 5 and 1.6 GHz. The required aperture diameter of the reflector is 10 meters. A displaced axis Cassegrain antenna is adopted with a mesh reflector formed in a tension truss concept. Analysis shows the possibility to achieve aperture efficiency of 60 percent at 22.15 GHz and surface accuracy of 0.5 mm rms. A one-fourth scale model of the reflector has been assembled in order to verify the design and clarify problems in manufacturing and assembly processes.

  6. Precise autofocusing microscope with rapid response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Sheng; Jiang, Sheng-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The rapid on-line or off-line automated vision inspection is a critical operation in the manufacturing fields. Accordingly, this present study designs and characterizes a novel precise optics-based autofocusing microscope with a rapid response and no reduction in the focusing accuracy. In contrast to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes with centroid method, the proposed microscope comprises a high-speed rotating optical diffuser in which the variation of the image centroid position is reduced and consequently the focusing response is improved. The proposed microscope is characterized and verified experimentally using a laboratory-built prototype. The experimental results show that compared to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes, the proposed microscope achieves a more rapid response with no reduction in the focusing accuracy. Consequently, the proposed microscope represents another solution for both existing and emerging industrial applications of automated vision inspection.

  7. Stability constant estimator user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Rustad, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the Stability Constant Estimator (SCE) program is to estimate aqueous stability constants for 1:1 complexes of metal ions with ligands by using trends in existing stability constant data. Such estimates are useful to fill gaps in existing thermodynamic databases and to corroborate the accuracy of reported stability constant values.

  8. Development and Evaluation of a UAV-Photogrammetry System for Precise 3D Environmental Modeling.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mozhdeh; Sohn, Gunho; Théau, Jérôme; Menard, Patrick

    2015-10-30

    The specific requirements of UAV-photogrammetry necessitate particular solutions for system development, which have mostly been ignored or not assessed adequately in recent studies. Accordingly, this paper presents the methodological and experimental aspects of correctly implementing a UAV-photogrammetry system. The hardware of the system consists of an electric-powered helicopter, a high-resolution digital camera and an inertial navigation system. The software of the system includes the in-house programs specifically designed for camera calibration, platform calibration, system integration, on-board data acquisition, flight planning and on-the-job self-calibration. The detailed features of the system are discussed, and solutions are proposed in order to enhance the system and its photogrammetric outputs. The developed system is extensively tested for precise modeling of the challenging environment of an open-pit gravel mine. The accuracy of the results is evaluated under various mapping conditions, including direct georeferencing and indirect georeferencing with different numbers, distributions and types of ground control points. Additionally, the effects of imaging configuration and network stability on modeling accuracy are assessed. The experiments demonstrated that 1.55 m horizontal and 3.16 m vertical absolute modeling accuracy could be achieved via direct geo-referencing, which was improved to 0.4 cm and 1.7 cm after indirect geo-referencing.

  9. Development and Evaluation of a UAV-Photogrammetry System for Precise 3D Environmental Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mozhdeh; Sohn, Gunho; Théau, Jérôme; Menard, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The specific requirements of UAV-photogrammetry necessitate particular solutions for system development, which have mostly been ignored or not assessed adequately in recent studies. Accordingly, this paper presents the methodological and experimental aspects of correctly implementing a UAV-photogrammetry system. The hardware of the system consists of an electric-powered helicopter, a high-resolution digital camera and an inertial navigation system. The software of the system includes the in-house programs specifically designed for camera calibration, platform calibration, system integration, on-board data acquisition, flight planning and on-the-job self-calibration. The detailed features of the system are discussed, and solutions are proposed in order to enhance the system and its photogrammetric outputs. The developed system is extensively tested for precise modeling of the challenging environment of an open-pit gravel mine. The accuracy of the results is evaluated under various mapping conditions, including direct georeferencing and indirect georeferencing with different numbers, distributions and types of ground control points. Additionally, the effects of imaging configuration and network stability on modeling accuracy are assessed. The experiments demonstrated that 1.55 m horizontal and 3.16 m vertical absolute modeling accuracy could be achieved via direct geo-referencing, which was improved to 0.4 cm and 1.7 cm after indirect geo-referencing. PMID:26528976

  10. Development and Evaluation of a UAV-Photogrammetry System for Precise 3D Environmental Modeling.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mozhdeh; Sohn, Gunho; Théau, Jérôme; Menard, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The specific requirements of UAV-photogrammetry necessitate particular solutions for system development, which have mostly been ignored or not assessed adequately in recent studies. Accordingly, this paper presents the methodological and experimental aspects of correctly implementing a UAV-photogrammetry system. The hardware of the system consists of an electric-powered helicopter, a high-resolution digital camera and an inertial navigation system. The software of the system includes the in-house programs specifically designed for camera calibration, platform calibration, system integration, on-board data acquisition, flight planning and on-the-job self-calibration. The detailed features of the system are discussed, and solutions are proposed in order to enhance the system and its photogrammetric outputs. The developed system is extensively tested for precise modeling of the challenging environment of an open-pit gravel mine. The accuracy of the results is evaluated under various mapping conditions, including direct georeferencing and indirect georeferencing with different numbers, distributions and types of ground control points. Additionally, the effects of imaging configuration and network stability on modeling accuracy are assessed. The experiments demonstrated that 1.55 m horizontal and 3.16 m vertical absolute modeling accuracy could be achieved via direct geo-referencing, which was improved to 0.4 cm and 1.7 cm after indirect geo-referencing. PMID:26528976

  11. Visual inspection reliability for precision manufactured parts

    SciTech Connect

    See, Judi E.

    2015-09-04

    Sandia National Laboratories conducted an experiment for the National Nuclear Security Administration to determine the reliability of visual inspection of precision manufactured parts used in nuclear weapons. In addition visual inspection has been extensively researched since the early 20th century; however, the reliability of visual inspection for nuclear weapons parts has not been addressed. In addition, the efficacy of using inspector confidence ratings to guide multiple inspections in an effort to improve overall performance accuracy is unknown. Further, the workload associated with inspection has not been documented, and newer measures of stress have not been applied.

  12. Precision Electroforming For Optical Disk Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodia, Carl M.

    1985-04-01

    Precision electroforming in replication of optical discs is discussed with overview of electro-forming technology capabilities, limitations, and tolerance criteria. Use of expendable and reusable mandrels is treated along with techniques for resist master preparation and processing. A review of applications and common reasons for success and failure is offered. Problems such as tensile/compressive stress, roughness and flatness are discussed. Advice is given on approaches, classic and novel, for remedying and avoiding specific problems. An abridged process description of optical memory disk mold electroforming is presented from resist master through metallization and electroforming. Emphasis is placed on methods of achieving accuracy and quality assurance.

  13. The GBT precision telescope control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestage, Richard M.; Constantikes, Kim T.; Balser, Dana S.; Condon, James J.

    2004-10-01

    The NRAO Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is a 100m diameter advanced single dish radio telescope designed for a wide range of astronomical projects with special emphasis on precision imaging. Open-loop adjustments of the active surface, and real-time corrections to pointing and focus on the basis of structural temperatures already allow observations at frequencies up to 50GHz. Our ultimate goal is to extend the observing frequency limit up to 115GHz; this will require a two dimensional tracking error better than 1.3", and an rms surface accuracy better than 210μm. The Precision Telescope Control System project has two main components. One aspect is the continued deployment of appropriate metrology systems, including temperature sensors, inclinometers, laser rangefinders and other devices. An improved control system architecture will harness this measurement capability with the existing servo systems, to deliver the precision operation required. The second aspect is the execution of a series of experiments to identify, understand and correct the residual pointing and surface accuracy errors. These can have multiple causes, many of which depend on variable environmental conditions. A particularly novel approach is to solve simultaneously for gravitational, thermal and wind effects in the development of the telescope pointing and focus tracking models. Our precision temperature sensor system has already allowed us to compensate for thermal gradients in the antenna, which were previously responsible for the largest "non-repeatable" pointing and focus tracking errors. We are currently targetting the effects of wind as the next, currently uncompensated, source of error.

  14. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-06-30

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1-7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%-40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  15. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1-7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%-40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  16. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1–7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%–40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  17. Precise Orbit Determination for LEO Spacecraft Using GNSS Tracking Data from Multiple Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Da; Bertiger, William; Desai, Shailen; Haines, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    To support various applications, certain Earth-orbiting spacecrafts (e.g., SRTM, COSMIC) use multiple GNSS antennas to provide tracking data for precise orbit determination (POD). POD using GNSS tracking data from multiple antennas poses some special technical issues compared to the typical single-antenna approach. In this paper, we investigate some of these issues using both real and simulated data. Recommendations are provided for POD with multiple GNSS antennas and for antenna configuration design. The observability of satellite position with multiple antennas data is compared against single antenna case. The impact of differential clock (line biases) and line-of-sight (up, along-track, and cross-track) on kinematic and reduced-dynamic POD is evaluated. The accuracy of monitoring the stability of the spacecraft structure by simultaneously performing POD of the spacecraft and relative positioning of the multiple antennas is also investigated.

  18. Precise computer controlled positioning of robot end effectors using force sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Mcinnis, B. C.; Wang, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    A thorough study of combined position/force control using sensory feedback for a one-dimensional manipulator model, which may count for the spacecraft docking problem or be extended to the multi-joint robot manipulator problem, was performed. The additional degree of freedom introduced by the compliant force sensor is included in the system dynamics in the design of precise position control. State feedback based on the pole placement method and with integral control is used to design the position controller. A simple constant gain force controller is used as an example to illustrate the dependence of the stability and steady-state accuracy of the overall position/force control upon the design of the inner position controller. Supportive simulation results are also provided.

  19. Reticence, Accuracy and Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2015-12-01

    James Hansen has cautioned the scientific community against "reticence," by which he means a reluctance to speak in public about the threat of climate change. This may contribute to social inaction, with the result that society fails to respond appropriately to threats that are well understood scientifically. Against this, others have warned against the dangers of "crying wolf," suggesting that reticence protects scientific credibility. We argue that both these positions are missing an important point: that reticence is not only a matter of style but also of substance. In previous work, Bysse et al. (2013) showed that scientific projections of key indicators of climate change have been skewed towards the low end of actual events, suggesting a bias in scientific work. More recently, we have shown that scientific efforts to be responsive to contrarian challenges have led scientists to adopt the terminology of a "pause" or "hiatus" in climate warming, despite the lack of evidence to support such a conclusion (Lewandowsky et al., 2015a. 2015b). In the former case, scientific conservatism has led to under-estimation of climate related changes. In the latter case, the use of misleading terminology has perpetuated scientific misunderstanding and hindered effective communication. Scientific communication should embody two equally important goals: 1) accuracy in communicating scientific information and 2) efficacy in expressing what that information means. Scientists should strive to be neither conservative nor adventurous but to be accurate, and to communicate that accurate information effectively.

  20. Truss Assembly and Welding by Intelligent Precision Jigging Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR) prototype that enables the precise alignment and welding of titanium space telescope optical benches. The IPJR, equipped with micron accuracy sensors and actuators, worked in tandem with a lower precision remote controlled manipulator. The combined system assembled and welded a 2 m truss from stock titanium components. The calibration of the IPJR, and the difference between the predicted and the truss dimensions as-built, identified additional sources of error that should be addressed in the next generation of IPJRs in 2D and 3D.

  1. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a Precision Joining Center (PJC) is proposed. The PJC will be a cooperatively operated center with participation from U.S. private industry, the Colorado School of Mines, and various government agencies, including the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The PJC's primary mission will be as a training center for advanced joining technologies. This will accomplish the following objectives: (1) it will provide an effective mechanism to transfer joining technology from the NWC to private industry; (2) it will provide a center for testing new joining processes for the NWC and private industry; and (3) it will provide highly trained personnel to support advance joining processes for the NWC and private industry.

  2. Precision laser cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Anglin, C.D.; Ramos, T.J.

    1990-01-19

    Many materials that are otherwise difficult to fabricate can be cut precisely with lasers. This presentation discusses the advantages and limitations of laser cutting for refractory metals, ceramics, and composites. Cutting in these materials was performed with a 400-W, pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Important cutting parameters such as beam power, pulse waveforms, cutting gases, travel speed, and laser coupling are outlined. The effects of process parameters on cut quality are evaluated. Three variables are used to determine the cut quality: kerf width, slag adherence, and metallurgical characteristics of recast layers and heat-affected zones around the cuts. Results indicate that ductile materials with good coupling characteristics (such as stainless steel alloys and tantalum) cut well. Materials lacking one or both of these properties (such as tungsten and ceramics) are difficult to cut without proper part design, stress relief, or coupling aids. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. 40 CFR 91.314 - Analyzer accuracy and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 91.314 Section 91.314 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Provisions § 91.314 Analyzer accuracy and specifications. (a) Measurement accuracy—general. The analyzers... precision is defined as 2.5 times the standard deviation(s) of 10 repetitive responses to a...

  4. 40 CFR 91.314 - Analyzer accuracy and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 91.314 Section 91.314 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Provisions § 91.314 Analyzer accuracy and specifications. (a) Measurement accuracy—general. The analyzers... precision is defined as 2.5 times the standard deviation(s) of 10 repetitive responses to a...

  5. Operating a real time high accuracy positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Hanley, J.; Russell, D.; Vooght, A.

    2003-04-01

    The paper shall review the history and development of real time DGPS services prior to then describing the design of a high accuracy GPS commercial augmentation system and service currently delivering over a wide area to users of precise positioning products. The infrastructure and system shall be explained in relation to the need for high accuracy and high integrity of positioning for users. A comparison of the different techniques for the delivery of data shall be provided to outline the technical approach taken. Examples of the performance of the real time system shall be shown in various regions and modes to outline the current achievable accuracies. Having described and established the current GPS based situation, a review of the potential of the Galileo system shall be presented. Following brief contextual information relating to the Galileo project, core system and services, the paper will identify possible key applications and the main user communities for sub decimetre level precise positioning. The paper will address the Galileo and modernised GPS signals in space that are relevant to commercial precise positioning for the future and will discuss the implications for precise positioning performance. An outline of the proposed architecture shall be described and associated with pointers towards a successful implementation. Central to this discussion will be an assessment of the likely evolution of system infrastructure and user equipment implementation, prospects for new applications and their effect upon the business case for precise positioning services.

  6. High precision anatomy for MEG.

    PubMed

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bradbury, David; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-02-01

    Precise MEG estimates of neuronal current flow are undermined by uncertain knowledge of the head location with respect to the MEG sensors. This is either due to head movements within the scanning session or systematic errors in co-registration to anatomy. Here we show how such errors can be minimized using subject-specific head-casts produced using 3D printing technology. The casts fit the scalp of the subject internally and the inside of the MEG dewar externally, reducing within session and between session head movements. Systematic errors in matching to MRI coordinate system are also reduced through the use of MRI-visible fiducial markers placed on the same cast. Bootstrap estimates of absolute co-registration error were of the order of 1mm. Estimates of relative co-registration error were <1.5mm between sessions. We corroborated these scalp based estimates by looking at the MEG data recorded over a 6month period. We found that the between session sensor variability of the subject's evoked response was of the order of the within session noise, showing no appreciable noise due to between-session movement. Simulations suggest that the between-session sensor level amplitude SNR improved by a factor of 5 over conventional strategies. We show that at this level of coregistration accuracy there is strong evidence for anatomical models based on the individual rather than canonical anatomy; but that this advantage disappears for errors of greater than 5mm. This work paves the way for source reconstruction methods which can exploit very high SNR signals and accurate anatomical models; and also significantly increases the sensitivity of longitudinal studies with MEG. PMID:23911673

  7. Precision laser automatic tracking system.

    PubMed

    Lucy, R F; Peters, C J; McGann, E J; Lang, K T

    1966-04-01

    A precision laser tracker has been constructed and tested that is capable of tracking a low-acceleration target to an accuracy of about 25 microrad root mean square. In tracking high-acceleration targets, the error is directly proportional to the angular acceleration. For an angular acceleration of 0.6 rad/sec(2), the measured tracking error was about 0.1 mrad. The basic components in this tracker, similar in configuration to a heliostat, are a laser and an image dissector, which are mounted on a stationary frame, and a servocontrolled tracking mirror. The daytime sensitivity of this system is approximately 3 x 10(-10) W/m(2); the ultimate nighttime sensitivity is approximately 3 x 10(-14) W/m(2). Experimental tests were performed to evaluate both dynamic characteristics of this system and the system sensitivity. Dynamic performance of the system was obtained, using a small rocket covered with retroreflective material launched at an acceleration of about 13 g at a point 204 m from the tracker. The daytime sensitivity of the system was checked, using an efficient retroreflector mounted on a light aircraft. This aircraft was tracked out to a maximum range of 15 km, which checked the daytime sensitivity of the system measured by other means. The system also has been used to track passively stars and the Echo I satellite. Also, the system tracked passively a +7.5 magnitude star, and the signal-to-noise ratio in this experiment indicates that it should be possible to track a + 12.5 magnitude star.

  8. High precision anatomy for MEG☆

    PubMed Central

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bradbury, David; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Precise MEG estimates of neuronal current flow are undermined by uncertain knowledge of the head location with respect to the MEG sensors. This is either due to head movements within the scanning session or systematic errors in co-registration to anatomy. Here we show how such errors can be minimized using subject-specific head-casts produced using 3D printing technology. The casts fit the scalp of the subject internally and the inside of the MEG dewar externally, reducing within session and between session head movements. Systematic errors in matching to MRI coordinate system are also reduced through the use of MRI-visible fiducial markers placed on the same cast. Bootstrap estimates of absolute co-registration error were of the order of 1 mm. Estimates of relative co-registration error were < 1.5 mm between sessions. We corroborated these scalp based estimates by looking at the MEG data recorded over a 6 month period. We found that the between session sensor variability of the subject's evoked response was of the order of the within session noise, showing no appreciable noise due to between-session movement. Simulations suggest that the between-session sensor level amplitude SNR improved by a factor of 5 over conventional strategies. We show that at this level of coregistration accuracy there is strong evidence for anatomical models based on the individual rather than canonical anatomy; but that this advantage disappears for errors of greater than 5 mm. This work paves the way for source reconstruction methods which can exploit very high SNR signals and accurate anatomical models; and also significantly increases the sensitivity of longitudinal studies with MEG. PMID:23911673

  9. High accuracy wavelength calibration for a scanning visible spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Scotti, Filippo; Bell, Ronald E.

    2010-10-15

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies {<=}0.2 A. An automated calibration, which is stable over time and environmental conditions without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement, was developed for a scanning spectrometer to achieve high wavelength accuracy over the visible spectrum. This method fits all relevant spectrometer parameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a stepping-motor controlled sine drive, an accuracy of {approx}0.25 A has been demonstrated. With the addition of a high resolution (0.075 arc sec) optical encoder on the grating stage, greater precision ({approx}0.005 A) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements within {approx}0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively.

  10. High Accuracy Wavelength Calibration For A Scanning Visible Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Filippo Scotti and Ronald Bell

    2010-07-29

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies ≤ 0.2Â. An automated calibration for a scanning spectrometer has been developed to achieve a high wavelength accuracy overr the visible spectrum, stable over time and environmental conditions, without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement. The method fits all relevant spectrometer paraameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a steping-motor controlled sine-drive, accuracies of ~0.025 Â have been demonstrated. With the addition of high resolution (0.075 aresec) optical encoder on the grading stage, greater precision (~0.005 Â) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements with ~0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively.

  11. Precision cosmological parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, William Ashton, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    Experimental efforts of the last few decades have brought. a golden age to mankind's endeavor to understand tine physical properties of the Universe throughout its history. Recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide strong confirmation of the standard big bang paradigm, as well as introducing new mysteries, to unexplained by current physical models. In the following decades. even more ambitious scientific endeavours will begin to shed light on the new physics by looking at the detailed structure of the Universe both at very early and recent times. Modern data has allowed us to begins to test inflationary models of the early Universe, and the near future will bring higher precision data and much stronger tests. Cracking the codes hidden in these cosmological observables is a difficult and computationally intensive problem. The challenges will continue to increase as future experiments bring larger and more precise data sets. Because of the complexity of the problem, we are forced to use approximate techniques and make simplifying assumptions to ease the computational workload. While this has been reasonably sufficient until now, hints of the limitations of our techniques have begun to come to light. For example, the likelihood approximation used for analysis of CMB data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anistropy Probe (WMAP) satellite was shown to have short falls, leading to pre-emptive conclusions drawn about current cosmological theories. Also it can he shown that an approximate method used by all current analysis codes to describe the recombination history of the Universe will not be sufficiently accurate for future experiments. With a new CMB satellite scheduled for launch in the coming months, it is vital that we develop techniques to improve the analysis of cosmological data. This work develops a novel technique of both avoiding the use of approximate computational codes as well as allowing the application of new, more precise analysis

  12. Ground Truth Accuracy Tests of GPS Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elosegui, P.; Oberlander, D. J.; Davis, J. L.; Baena, R.; Ekstrom, G.

    2005-12-01

    As the precision of GPS determinations of site position continues to improve the detection of smaller and faster geophysical signals becomes possible. However, lack of independent measurements of these signals often precludes an assessment of the accuracy of such GPS position determinations. This may be particularly true for high-rate GPS applications. We have built an apparatus to assess the accuracy of GPS position determinations for high-rate applications, in particular the application known as "GPS seismology." The apparatus consists of a bidirectional, single-axis positioning table coupled to a digitally controlled stepping motor. The motor, in turn, is connected to a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chip that synchronously sequences through real historical earthquake profiles stored in Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory's (EPROM). A GPS antenna attached to this positioning table undergoes the simulated seismic motions of the Earth's surface while collecting high-rate GPS data. Analysis of the time-dependent position estimates can then be compared to the "ground truth," and the resultant GPS error spectrum can be measured. We have made extensive measurements with this system while inducing simulated seismic motions either in the horizontal plane or the vertical axis. A second stationary GPS antenna at a distance of several meters was simultaneously collecting high-rate (5 Hz) GPS data. We will present the calibration of this system, describe the GPS observations and data analysis, and assess the accuracy of GPS for high-rate geophysical applications and natural hazards mitigation.

  13. A Precision Variable, Double Prism Attenuator for CO(2) Lasers.

    PubMed

    Oseki, T; Saito, S

    1971-01-01

    A precision, double prism attenuator for CO(2) lasers, calibrated by its gap capacitance, was constructed to evaluate its possible use as a standard for attenuation measurements. It was found that the accuracy was about 0.1 dB with a dynamic range of about 40 dB.

  14. EVALUATION OF METRIC PRECISION FOR A RIPARIAN FOREST SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the performance of a protocol to monitor riparian forests in western Oregon based on the quality of the data obtained from a recent field survey. Precision and accuracy are the criteria used to determine the quality of 19 field metrics. The field survey con...

  15. Improving the precision of lake ecosystem metabolism estimates by identifying predictors of model uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Jordan S.; Read, Emily K.; Solomon, Christopher T.; Adrian, Rita; Hanson, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Diel changes in dissolved oxygen are often used to estimate gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) in aquatic ecosystems. Despite the widespread use of this approach to understand ecosystem metabolism, we are only beginning to understand the degree and underlying causes of uncertainty for metabolism model parameter estimates. Here, we present a novel approach to improve the precision and accuracy of ecosystem metabolism estimates by identifying physical metrics that indicate when metabolism estimates are highly uncertain. Using datasets from seventeen instrumented GLEON (Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network) lakes, we discovered that many physical characteristics correlated with uncertainty, including PAR (photosynthetically active radiation, 400-700 nm), daily variance in Schmidt stability, and wind speed. Low PAR was a consistent predictor of high variance in GPP model parameters, but also corresponded with low ER model parameter variance. We identified a threshold (30% of clear sky PAR) below which GPP parameter variance increased rapidly and was significantly greater in nearly all lakes compared with variance on days with PAR levels above this threshold. The relationship between daily variance in Schmidt stability and GPP model parameter variance depended on trophic status, whereas daily variance in Schmidt stability was consistently positively related to ER model parameter variance. Wind speeds in the range of ~0.8-3 m s–1 were consistent predictors of high variance for both GPP and ER model parameters, with greater uncertainty in eutrophic lakes. Our findings can be used to reduce ecosystem metabolism model parameter uncertainty and identify potential sources of that uncertainty.

  16. Precision space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.

    1985-01-01

    NASA large space structures efforts to date aimed towards large, flexible antenna-like structures (30-100M) with relatively long wavelengths (1-30cm) and moderate disturbances leading to some structure-control interaction. Potential missions in the OPTICS regime require small reflectors/mirrors, short wavelengths (visible to 100 microns), very tight tolerances in surface, alignment, pointing stability, as well as the potential of considerable on-board disturbances. For optics systems: figure/surface control can be quasi-static, active/passive isolation schemes are possible, vibration control is necessary, and the attitude control system can be low BW - Ground testing of reflectors and mirrors is more feasible than with antennas.

  17. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, T.C.; Morgan, J.P.; Marchant, N.J.; Bolton, S.M.

    1994-04-26

    A high precision pressure transducer system is described for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display. 2 figures.

  18. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, Thomas C.; Morgan, John P.; Marchant, Norman J.; Bolton, Steven M.

    1994-01-01

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum florescent display.

  19. Backward smoothing for precise GNSS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaclavovic, Pavel; Dousa, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The Extended Kalman filter is widely used for its robustness and simple implementation. Parameters estimated for solving dynamical systems usually require certain time to converge and need to be smoothed by a dedicated algorithms. The purpose of our study was to implement smoothing algorithms for processing both code and carrier phase observations with Precise Point Positioning method. We implemented and used the well known Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoother (RTS). It has been found out that the RTS suffer from significant numerical instability in smoothed state covariance matrix determination. We improved the processing with algorithms based on Singular Value Decomposition, which was more robust. Observations from many permanent stations have been processed with final orbits and clocks provided by the International GNSS service (IGS), and the smoothing improved stability and precision in every cases. Moreover, (re)convergence of the parameters were always successfully eliminated.

  20. Precision Radial Velocities in the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Hugh

    2007-08-01

    The Precision Radial Velocity Spectrometer (PRVS) is designed to provide high throughput Doppler reflex measurements. PRVS is designed to always be available and provide 1.0 to 1.8 micron high-resolution spectroscopy with very high stability over several years. We have constructed models simulating likely candidates and demonstrated the ability to recover exoplanetary RV signals in the infrared. We have conducted limited experiments with a brass-board instrument to explore real-world issues yielding precisions of better than 10 m/s. We are thus confident that PRVS can provide for the detection of terrestrial-mass extra-solar planets in the habitable zones of low-mass stars. PRVS is scheduled to be the next ASPEN-process instrument for the Gemini telescopes and if funded in 2007 first light is expected by 2011.

  1. Precision bridge circuit using a temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A precision bridge measurement circuit connected to a current source providing a linear output voltage versus resistance change of a variable resistance (resistance temperature transducer) including a voltage follower in one branch of the bridge so that the zero setting of the transducer resistance does not depend upon the current source or upon an excitation voltage. The zero setting depends only on the precision and stability of the three resistances. By connecting the output of an instrumentation amplifier to a feedback resistor and then to the output of the voltage follower, minor nonlinearities in the resistance-vs-temperature output of a resistance-temperature transducer, such as a platinum temperature sensor, may be corrected. Sensors which have nonlinearity opposite in polarity to platinum, such as nickel-iron sensors, may be linearized by inserting an inverting amplifier into the feedback loop.

  2. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, T. C.; Morgan, J. P.; Marchant, N. J.; Bolton, S. M.

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank is presented. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in a battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on-board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display.

  3. Prompt and Precise Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For Sanders Design International, Inc., of Wilton, New Hampshire, every passing second between the concept and realization of a product is essential to succeed in the rapid prototyping industry where amongst heavy competition, faster time-to-market means more business. To separate itself from its rivals, Sanders Design aligned with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop what it considers to be the most accurate rapid prototyping machine for fabrication of extremely precise tooling prototypes. The company's Rapid ToolMaker System has revolutionized production of high quality, small-to-medium sized prototype patterns and tooling molds with an exactness that surpasses that of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining devices. Created with funding and support from Marshall under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Rapid ToolMaker is a dual-use technology with applications in both commercial and military aerospace fields. The advanced technology provides cost savings in the design and manufacturing of automotive, electronic, and medical parts, as well as in other areas of consumer interest, such as jewelry and toys. For aerospace applications, the Rapid ToolMaker enables fabrication of high-quality turbine and compressor blades for jet engines on unmanned air vehicles, aircraft, and missiles.

  4. Environment Assisted Precision Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellaro, P.; Goldstein, G.; Maze, J. R.; Jiang, L.; Hodges, J. S.; Sorensen, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.

    2010-03-01

    We describe a method to enhance the sensitivity of magnetometry and achieve nearly Heisenberg-limited precision measurement using a novel class of entangled states. An individual qubit is used to sense the dynamics of surrounding ancillary qubits, which are in turn affected by the external field to be measured. The resulting sensitivity enhancement is determined by the number of ancillas strongly coupled to the sensor qubit, it does not depend on the exact values of the couplings (allowing to use disordered systems), and is resilient to decoherence. As a specific example we consider electronic spins in the solid-state, where the ancillary system is associated with the surrounding spin bath. The conventional approach has been to consider these spins only as a source of decoherence and to adopt decoupling scheme to mitigate their effects. Here we describe novel control techniques that transform the environment spins into a resource used to amplify the sensor spin response to weak external perturbations, while maintaining the beneficial effects of dynamical decoupling sequences. We discuss specific applications to improve magnetic sensing with diamond nano-crystals, using one Nitrogen-Vacancy center spin coupled to Nitrogen electronic spins.

  5. The research of the high precision universal stable reconnaissance platform in near space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-tao; Cao, Jian-zhong; Fan, Zhe-yuan; Chen, Wei-ning

    2011-08-01

    The appliance of military was recognized more and more ,It is important that pod can bear the weight of the availability payload achieve the observation to the earth in 20km-100km area and work in the all-weather. The stable platform can load high imaging spectrometer, the thermal infrared imager, the infrared radiometer, the millimeter waves radar, the laser weapon and so on,in order to realize reconnaissance and attacking integrative and warning the long-distant missile. The stabilization accuracy of platform is prior to 20μrad and burden heavy load to the best of one's abilities. It used high precision velocity and acceleration gyroscope to fulfill the stabilization of the platform. Light-weight design by using new composite material and optimizing design. It was adapt to the near space environment better by structure design and simulation analysis.Enhance its basic frequency and sure the rigid of the frame platform .In addition, the structure of platform apply the two-axis and four-frame and use the method of FEA to fulfill the optimum design in order to attain the object of light-weight.In consider to the precision of the platform I establish the math model and make use of the monte carlo method to appraise and analysis the error that affect the precision of the platform. After emulating by the software of the Matlab to verify the results. It is apply the method that link the platform and aerocraft by mounting the no angular displacement shock absorbers on the elevator mechanism. This kind of design insulate the angular vibration and minish the linear vibration to ensure the image quality.

  6. Test of CCD Precision Limits for Differential Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, L. B.; Wei, M. Z.; Borucki, W. J.; Dunham, E. W.; Ford, C. H.; Granados, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Results of tests to demonstrate the very high differential-photometric stability of CCD light sensors are presented. The measurements reported here demonstrate that in a controlled laboratory environment, a front-illuminated CCD can provide differential-photometric measurements with reproducible precision approaching one part in 10(exp 5). Practical limitations to the precision of differential-photometric measurements with CCDs and implications for spaceborne applications are discussed.

  7. Test of CCD Precision Limits for Differential Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Dunham, E. W.; Wei, M. Z.; Robinson, L. B.; Ford, C. H.; Granados, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Results of tests to demonstrate the very high differential-photometric stability of CCD light sensors are presented. The measurements reported here demonstrate that in a controlled laboratory environment, a front-illuminated CCD can provide differential-photometric measurements with reproducible precision approaching one part in 105. Practical limitations to the precision of differential-photometric measurements with CCDs and implications for spaceborne applications are discussed.

  8. Improving the precision of astrometry for space debris

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Rongyu; Zhao, Changyin; Zhang, Xiaoxiang

    2014-03-01

    The data reduction method for optical space debris observations has many similarities with the one adopted for surveying near-Earth objects; however, due to several specific issues, the image degradation is particularly critical, which makes it difficult to obtain precise astrometry. An automatic image reconstruction method was developed to improve the astrometry precision for space debris, based on the mathematical morphology operator. Variable structural elements along multiple directions are adopted for image transformation, and then all the resultant images are stacked to obtain a final result. To investigate its efficiency, trial observations are made with Global Positioning System satellites and the astrometry accuracy improvement is obtained by comparison with the reference positions. The results of our experiments indicate that the influence of degradation in astrometric CCD images is reduced, and the position accuracy of both objects and stellar stars is improved distinctly. Our technique will contribute significantly to optical data reduction and high-order precision astrometry for space debris.

  9. Landsat classification accuracy assessment procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mead, R. R.; Szajgin, John

    1982-01-01

    A working conference was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 12-14 November, 1980 dealing with Landsat classification Accuracy Assessment Procedures. Thirteen formal presentations were made on three general topics: (1) sampling procedures, (2) statistical analysis techniques, and (3) examples of projects which included accuracy assessment and the associated costs, logistical problems, and value of the accuracy data to the remote sensing specialist and the resource manager. Nearly twenty conference attendees participated in two discussion sessions addressing various issues associated with accuracy assessment. This paper presents an account of the accomplishments of the conference.

  10. Precision positioning of earth orbiting remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, William G.; Yunck, T. P.; Wu, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    Decimeter tracking accuracy is sought for a number of precise earth sensing satellites to be flown in the 1990's. This accuracy can be achieved with techniques which use the Global Positioning System (GPS) in a differential mode. A precisely located global network of GPS ground receivers and a receiver aboard the user satellite are needed, and all techniques simultaneously estimate the user and GPS satellite states. Three basic navigation approaches include classical dynamic, wholly nondynamic, and reduced dynamic or hybrid formulations. The first two are simply special cases of the third, which promises to deliver subdecimeter accuracy for dynamically unpredictable vehicles down to the lowest orbit altitudes. The potential of these techniques for tracking and gravity field recovery will be demonstrated on NASA's Topex satellite beginning in 1991. Applications to the Shuttle, Space Station, and dedicated remote sensing platforms are being pursued.

  11. Precision medicine in myasthenia graves: begin from the data precision

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu; Xie, Yanchen; Hao, Hong-Jun; Sun, Ren-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a prototypic autoimmune disease with overt clinical and immunological heterogeneity. The data of MG is far from individually precise now, partially due to the rarity and heterogeneity of this disease. In this review, we provide the basic insights of MG data precision, including onset age, presenting symptoms, generalization, thymus status, pathogenic autoantibodies, muscle involvement, severity and response to treatment based on references and our previous studies. Subgroups and quantitative traits of MG are discussed in the sense of data precision. The role of disease registries and scientific bases of precise analysis are also discussed to ensure better collection and analysis of MG data. PMID:27127759

  12. Precise Truss Assembly using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    We describe an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly of commodity parts with low-precision bonding. We present preliminary experiments in 2D that are motivated by the problem of assembling a space telescope optical bench on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local assembly site in place while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (in this case, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. We report the challenges of designing the IPJR hardware and software, analyze the error in assembly, document the test results over several experiments including a large-scale ring structure, and describe future work to implement the IPJR in 3D and with micron precision.

  13. Precise Truss Assembly Using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, W. R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Hardware and software design and system integration for an intelligent precision jigging robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly using commodity parts and low-precision bonding, is described. Preliminary 2D experiments that are motivated by the problem of assembling space telescope optical benches and very large manipulators on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding are also described. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local structure assembly site in place, while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (for this prototype, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. The analysis of the assembly error and the results of building a square structure and a ring structure are discussed. Options for future work, to extend the IPJR paradigm to building in 3D structures at micron precision are also summarized.

  14. Precision mass measurements of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mane, E.; MacDonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    The reputation of Penning trap mass spectrometry for accuracy and precision was established with singly charged ions (SCI); however, the achievable precision and resolving power can be extended by using highly charged ions (HCI). The TITAN facility has demonstrated these enhancements for long-lived (T1/2>=50 ms) isobars and low-lying isomers, including ^71Ge^21+, ^74Rb^8+, ^78Rb^8+, and ^98Rb^15+. The Q-value of ^71Ge enters into the neutrino cross section, and the use of HCI reduced the resolving power required to distinguish the isobars from 3 x 10^5 to 20. The precision achieved in the measurement of ^74Rb^8+, a superallowed β-emitter and candidate to test the CVC hypothesis, rivaled earlier measurements with SCI in a fraction of the time. The 111.19(22) keV isomeric state in ^78Rb was resolved from the ground state. Mass measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes near A = 100 aid in determining the r-process pathway. Advanced ion manipulation techniques and recent results will be presented.

  15. Accuracy Evaluation of Electron-Probe Microanalysis as Applied to Semiconductors and Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Armstrong, John

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation of precision and accuracy will be presented for representative semiconductor and silicate compositions. The accuracy of electron-probe analysis depends on high precision measurements and instrumental calibration, as well as correction algorithms and fundamental parameter data sets. A critical assessment of correction algorithms and mass absorption coefficient data sets can be made using the alpha factor technique. Alpha factor analysis can be used to identify systematic errors in data sets and also of microprobe standards used for calibration.

  16. Stability of steviol glycosides in several food matrices.

    PubMed

    Jooken, Etienne; Amery, Ruis; Struyf, Tom; Duquenne, Barbara; Geuns, Jan; Meesschaert, Boudewijn

    2012-10-24

    As steviol glycosides are now allowed as a food additive in the European market, it is important to assess the stability of these steviol glycosides after they have been added to different food matrices. We analyzed and tested the stability of steviol glycosides in semiskimmed milk, soy drink, fermented milk drink, ice cream, full-fat and skimmed set yogurt, dry biscuits, and jam. The fat was removed by centrifugation from the dairy and soy drink samples. Proteins were precipitated by the addition of acetonitrile and also removed by centrifugation. Samples of jam were extracted with water. Dry biscuits were extracted with ethanol. The resulting samples were concentrated with solid-phase extraction and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 stationary phase and a gradient of acetonitrile/aqueous 25 mM phosphoric acid. The accuracy was checked using a standard addition on some samples. For assessing the stability of the steviol glycosides, samples were stored in conditions relevant to each food matrix and analyzed periodically. The results indicate that steviol glycosides can be analyzed with good precision and accuracy in these food categories. The recovery was between 96 and 103%. The method was also validated by standard addition, which showed excellent agreement with the external calibration curve. No sign of decomposition of steviol glycosides was found in any of the samples.

  17. Test Expectancy Affects Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theory suggests that the accuracy of metacognitive monitoring is affected by the cues used to judge learning. Researchers have improved monitoring accuracy by directing attention to more appropriate cues; however, this is the first study to more directly point students to more appropriate cues using instructions regarding tests and…

  18. Atmospheric effects and ultimate ranging accuracy for lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Douglas G.; Prochazka, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    The deployment of next generation lunar laser retroreflectors is planned in the near future. With proper robotic deployment, these will support single shot single photo-electron ranging accuracy at the 100 micron level or better. There are available technologies for the support at this accuracy by advanced ground stations, however, the major question is the ultimate limit imposed on the ranging accuracy due to the changing timing delays due to turbulence and horizontal gradients in the earth's atmosphere. In particular, there are questions of the delay and temporal broadening of a very narrow laser pulse. Theoretical and experimental results will be discussed that address estimates of the magnitudes of these effects and the issue of precision vs. accuracy.

  19. What do we mean by accuracy in geomagnetic measurements?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    High accuracy is what distinguishes measurements made at the world's magnetic observatories from other types of geomagnetic measurements. High accuracy in determining the absolute values of the components of the Earth's magnetic field is essential to studying geomagnetic secular variation and processes at the core mantle boundary, as well as some magnetospheric processes. In some applications of geomagnetic data, precision (or resolution) of measurements may also be important. In addition to accuracy and resolution in the amplitude domain, it is necessary to consider these same quantities in the frequency and space domains. New developments in geomagnetic instruments and communications make real-time, high accuracy, global geomagnetic observatory data sets a real possibility. There is a growing realization in the scientific community of the unique relevance of geomagnetic observatory data to the principal contemporary problems in solid Earth and space physics. Together, these factors provide the promise of a 'renaissance' of the world's geomagnetic observatory system. ?? 1990.

  20. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  1. Positional Accuracy of Gps Satellite Almanac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihua; Zhou, Shangli

    2014-12-01

    How to accelerate signal acquisition and shorten starting time are key problems in the Global Positioning System (GPS). GPS satellite almanac plays an important role in signal reception period. Almanac accuracy directly affects the speed of GPS signal acquisition, the start time of the receiver, and even the system performance to some extent. Combined with precise ephemeris products released by the International GNSS Service (IGS), the authors analyse GPS satellite almanac from the first day to the third day in the 1805th GPS week (from August 11 to 13, 2014 in the Gregorian calendar). The results show that mean of position errors in three-dimensional coordinate system varies from about 1 kilometer to 3 kilometers, which can satisfy the needs of common users.

  2. Measuring and balancing dynamic unbalance of precision centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yafei; Huo, Xin

    2008-10-01

    A precision centrifuge is used to test and calibrate accelerometer model parameters. Its dynamic unbalance may cause the perturbation of the centrifuge to deteriorate the test and calibration accuracy of an accelerometer. By analyzing the causes of dynamic unbalance, the influences on precision centrifuge from static unbalance and couple unbalance are developed. It is considered measuring and balancing of static unbalance is a key to resolving a dynamic unbalance problem of precision centrifuge with a disk in structure. Measuring means and calculating formulas of static unbalance amount are given, and balancing principle and method are provided. The correctness and effectiveness of this method are confirmed by experiments on a device under tuning, thereby the accurate and high-effective measuring and balancing method of dynamic unbalance of this precision centrifuge was provided.

  3. High-precision thermal and electrical characterization of thermoelectric modules

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodner, Paul

    2014-05-15

    This paper describes an apparatus for performing high-precision electrical and thermal characterization of thermoelectric modules (TEMs). The apparatus is calibrated for operation between 20 °C and 80 °C and is normally used for measurements of heat currents in the range 0–10 W. Precision thermometry based on miniature thermistor probes enables an absolute temperature accuracy of better than 0.010 °C. The use of vacuum isolation, thermal guarding, and radiation shielding, augmented by a careful accounting of stray heat leaks and uncertainties, allows the heat current through the TEM under test to be determined with a precision of a few mW. The fractional precision of all measured parameters is approximately 0.1%.

  4. French Meteor Network for High Precision Orbits of Meteoroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, P.; Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Bouley, S.; Gaillard, B.; Sauli, I.; Kwon, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of precise meteoroids orbit from video observations as most of the meteor stations use off-the-shelf CCD cameras. Few meteoroids orbit with precise semi-major axis are available using film photographic method. Precise orbits are necessary to compute the dust flux in the Earth s vicinity, and to estimate the ejection time of the meteoroids accurately by comparing them with the theoretical evolution model. We investigate the use of large CCD sensors to observe multi-station meteors and to compute precise orbit of these meteoroids. An ideal spatial and temporal resolution to get an accuracy to those similar of photographic plates are discussed. Various problems faced due to the use of large CCD, such as increasing the spatial and the temporal resolution at the same time and computational problems in finding the meteor position are illustrated.

  5. The Accuracy of Webcams in 2D Motion Analysis: Sources of Error and Their Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, A.; Moreno, R.; Candelas, P.; Belmar, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we show the potential of webcams as precision measuring instruments in a physics laboratory. Various sources of error appearing in 2D coordinate measurements using low-cost commercial webcams are discussed, quantifying their impact on accuracy and precision, and simple procedures to control these sources of error are presented.…

  6. Photo- and thermal-stability studies on benzimidazole anthelmintics by HPLC and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ragno, Gaetano; Risoli, Antonella; Ioele, Giuseppina; De Luca, Michele

    2006-06-01

    Photo- and thermal-stability of the anthelmintics Albendazole, Mebendazole and Fenbendazole as in solid as in solution form has been investigated, by using a Xenon arc lamp as a radiation source, according to the ICH guideline for the drug stability tests. The degradation process was monitored by a HPLC method. All drugs showed high photosensitivity in solution but a reliable stability in solid form and when exposed to a temperature up to 50 degrees C. Two main degradation products from hydrolysis of the carbamic groups were identified by GC-MS. Validation studies demonstrated high accuracy (recovery 94 to 106%) and precision (RSD under 4.6%) of the HPLC method. The analytical procedure was successfully applied to the control of the drugs in the respective pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:16755047

  7. Stability studies of expired tablets of metoprolol tartrate and propranolol hydrochloride. Part 1. Content determination.

    PubMed

    Jasińska, Magdalena; Karwowski, Bolesław; Orszulak-Michalak, Daria; Kurczewska, Urszula

    2009-01-01

    In recent years the growing interest in drug stability problem has been observed. The stability of pharmaceutical products seems to play an important role from the economical point of view. However, there are not many studies that reported about the stability of drugs past their expiration dates. The objective of the current study was to determine tablet content of expired tablets and tablets with expiry date has not been exceeded. The analyzed tablets contained metoprolol tartrate (50 mg) and propranolol hydrochloride (10 mg), respectively. Content determination was performed using HPLC method with UV detection. The proposed method was validated with regard to linearity, sensitivity, intermediate accuracy and precision. No discrepancies between the results of determination and the declared values range for all the analyzed tablets were observed. The results of performed study might suggest that storage of analyzed batches of tablets over time period exceeding the expiry date given by the manufacturer did not influence their contents. PMID:20050534

  8. MEASUREMENT AND PRECISION, EXPERIMENTAL VERSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS AN EXPERIMENTAL VERSION OF A PROGRAMED TEXT ON MEASUREMENT AND PRECISION. PART I CONTAINS 24 FRAMES DEALING WITH PRECISION AND SIGNIFICANT FIGURES ENCOUNTERED IN VARIOUS MATHEMATICAL COMPUTATIONS AND MEASUREMENTS. PART II BEGINS WITH A BRIEF SECTION ON EXPERIMENTAL DATA, COVERING SUCH POINTS AS (1) ESTABLISHING THE ZERO POINT, (2)…

  9. More Questions on Precision Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raybould, E. C.; Solity, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Precision teaching can accelerate basic skills progress of special needs children. Issues discussed include using probes as performance tests, charting daily progress, using the charted data to modify teaching methods, determining appropriate age levels, assessing the number of students to be precision taught, and carefully allocating time. (JDD)

  10. Precision Teaching: Discoveries and Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsley, Ogden R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper defines precision teaching; describes its monitoring methods by displaying a standard celeration chart and explaining charting conventions; points out precision teaching's roots in laboratory free-operant conditioning; discusses its learning tactics and performance principles; and describes its effectiveness in producing learning gains.…

  11. Maintaining the Accuracy of a Sea Surface Height Climate Data Record from Multi-mission Altimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Yang, X.; Mitchum, G. T.; Ricko, M.; Desai, S.; Brown, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The determination of the rate of change of mean sea level (MSL) has undeniable societal significance. The measurement of geocentric sea level change from satellite altimetry requires an extreme stability of the altimeter measurement system since the signal being measured is at the level of a few mm/yr. Many of the obstacles previously impeding the measurement and validation of estimates of GMSL from satellite altimetry have been overcome (Fu and Haines, 2012). Nonetheless, measuring sea level rates at the precision required for climate science continues to be challenging for at least two reasons: (1) the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) realizations are determined using space geodetic data over finite time spans, and must be periodically updated; (2) the dynamic nature of the Earth engenders global and regional variations in the geopotential which if not properly modeled ultimately cause errors in the computed sea level. Recent developments in Precise Orbit Determinations (POD) due to in particular to revisions to the terrestrial reference frame (i.e. updates to ITRF2008, and the expected availability of ITRF2013) and the development of improved time variable gravity (TVG) models continue to provide improvements to the accuracy and stability of the POD that directly affect mean sea level estimates. Long-term and reliable MSL estimates that rely on data from multiple altimeter missions require the highest possible orbit accuracy and consistency in the use of applied geophysical models in POD computations. The stringent GMSL accuracy requirements are particularly essential for closure of the mass budget over the relative short time period where measurements from Jason-1&2, GRACE, and Argo are coincident. In this presentation we describe the development, utility, and the accuracy maintenance of the MEaSURE's TPJAOS V3.0 sea surface height Climate Data Record (http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/dataset/MERGED_TP_J1_OSTM_OST_ALL). We provide an assessment of recent

  12. System dynamic simulation of precision segmented reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Choon-Foo; Lou, Michael C.

    1991-01-01

    A joint effort was undertaken on a Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) Project. The missions in which the PSR is to be used will use large (up to 20 m in diameter) telescopes. The essential requirement for the telescopes is that the reflector surface of the primary mirror must be made extremely precise to allow no more than a few microns of errors and, additionally, this high surface precision must be maintained when the telescope is subjected to on-orbital mechanical and thermal disturbances. Based on the mass, size, and stability considerations, reflector surface formed by segmented, probably actively or passively controlled, composite panels are regarded as most suitable for future space based astronomical telescope applications. In addition to the design and fabrication of composite panels with a surface error of less than 3 microns RMS, PSR also develops related reflector structures, materials, control, and sensing technologies. As part of the planning effort for PSR Technology Demonstration, a system model which couples the reflector, consisting of panels, support truss and actuators, and the optical bench was assembled for dynamic simulations. Random vibration analyses using seismic data obtained from actual measurements at the test site designated for PSR Technology Demonstration are described.

  13. Stability of streamwise vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, M. K.; Grosch, C. E.; Ash, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of some theoretical and computational studies of the stability of streamwise vortices is given. The local induction model and classical hydrodynamic vortex stability theories are discussed in some detail. The importance of the three-dimensionality of the mean velocity profile to the results of stability calculations is discussed briefly. The mean velocity profile is provided by employing the similarity solution of Donaldson and Sullivan. The global method of Bridges and Morris was chosen for the spatial stability calculations for the nonlinear eigenvalue problem. In order to test the numerical method, a second order accurate central difference scheme was used to obtain the coefficient matrices. It was shown that a second order finite difference method lacks the required accuracy for global eigenvalue calculations. Finally the problem was formulated using spectral methods and a truncated Chebyshev series.

  14. Sources, Sinks, and Model Accuracy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial demographic models are a necessary tool for understanding how to manage landscapes sustainably for animal populations. These models, therefore, must offer precise and testable predications about animal population dynamics and how animal demographic parameters respond to ...

  15. Military applications of high accuracy frequency standards and clocks.

    PubMed

    Vig, J R

    1993-01-01

    The application of frequency control and timing devices in modern military electronics systems is reviewed. The manner in which the stability and accuracy of these devices impact the performance of military communication, navigation, surveillance, electronic warfare, missile guidance, and identification-friend-or-foe (IFF) systems is discussed.

  16. High Precision Bright-Star Astrometry with the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secrest, Nathan; Dudik, Rachel; Berghea, Ciprian T.; Hennessy, Greg; Dorland, Bryan

    2015-05-01

    While GAIA will provide excellent positional measurements of hundreds of millions of stars between 5 < mag < 20, an ongoing challenge in the field of high-precision differential astrometry is the positional accuracy of very bright stars (mag < 5), due to the enormous dynamic range between bright stars of interest, such as those in the Hipparcos catalog, and their background field stars, which are especially important for differential astrometry. Over the past few years, we have been testing the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System (UAHC), which utilizes an H4RG-10 detector in windowing mode, as a possible solution to the NOFS USNO Bright Star Astrometric Database (UBAD). In this work, we discuss the results of an astrometric analysis of single-epoch Hipparcos data taken with the UAHC from the 1.55m Kaj Strand Astrometric Reflector at NOFS from June 27-30, 2014. We discuss the calibration of this data, as well as an astrometric analysis pipeline we developed that will enable multi-epoch differential and absolute astrometry with the UAHC. We find that while the overall differential astrometric stability of data taken with the UAHC is good (5-10 mas single-measurement precision) and comparable to other ground-based astrometric camera systems, bright stars in the detector window suffer from several systematic effects, such as insufficient window geometry and centroiding failures due to read-out artifacts - both of which can be significantly improved with modifications to the electronics, read-out speed and microcode.

  17. Optimization design about gimbal structure of high-precision autonomous celestial navigation tracking mirror system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Xiao-xu; Han, Jun-feng; Wei, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Mei-lin; Yue, Peng

    2016-01-01

    High precision tracking platform of celestial navigation with control mirror servo structure form, to solve the disadvantages of big volume and rotational inertia, slow response speed, and so on. It improved the stability and tracking accuracy of platform. Due to optical sensor and mirror are installed on the middle-gimbal, stiffness and resonant frequency requirement for high. Based on the application of finite element modality analysis theory, doing Research on dynamic characteristics of the middle-gimbal, and ANSYS was used for the finite element dynamic emulator analysis. According to the result of the computer to find out the weak links of the structure, and Put forward improvement suggestions and reanalysis. The lowest resonant frequency of optimization middle-gimbal avoid the bandwidth of the platform servo mechanism, and much higher than the disturbance frequency of carrier aircraft, and reduces mechanical resonance of the framework. Reaching provides a theoretical basis for the whole machine structure optimization design of high-precision of autonomous Celestial navigation tracking mirror system.

  18. Status of Precise Orbit Determination for Jason-2 Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melachroinos, S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    The JASON-2 satellite, launched in June 2008, is the latest follow-on to the successful TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) and JASON-I altimetry missions. JASON-2 is equipped with a TRSR Blackjack GPS dual-frequency receiver, a laser retroreflector array, and a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination (POD). The most recent time series of orbits computed at NASA GSFC, based on SLR/DORIS data have been completed using both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008. These orbits have been shown to agree radially at 1 cm RMS for dynamic vs SLRlDORIS reduced-dynamic orbits and in comparison with orbits produced by other analysis centers (Lemoine et al., 2010; Zelensky et al., 2010; Cerri et al., 2010). We have recently upgraded the GEODYN software to implement model improvements for GPS processing. We describe the implementation of IGS standards to the Jason2 GEODYN GPS processing, and other dynamical and measurement model improvements. Our GPS-only JASON-2 orbit accuracy is assessed using a number of tests including analysis of independent SLR and altimeter crossover residuals, orbit overlap differences, and direct comparison to orbits generated at GSFC using SLR and DORIS tracking, and to orbits generated externally at other centers. Tests based on SLR and the altimeter crossover residuals provide the best performance indicator for independent validation of the NASAlGSFC GPS-only reduced dynamic orbits. For the ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 implementation of our GPS-only obits we are using the IGS05 and IGS08 standards. Reduced dynamic versus dynamic orbit differences are used to characterize the remaining force model error and TRF instability. We evaluate the GPS vs SLR & DORIS orbits produced using the GEODYN software and assess in particular their consistency radially and the stability of the altimeter satellite reference frame in the Z direction for both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 as a proxy to assess the consistency of the reference frame for altimeter satellite POD.

  19. High precision predictions for exclusive VH production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ye; Liu, Xiaohui

    2014-06-04

    We present a resummation-improved prediction for pp → VH + 0 jets at the Large Hadron Collider. We focus on highly-boosted final states in the presence of jet veto to suppress the tt¯ background. In this case, conventional fixed-order calculations are plagued by the existence of large Sudakov logarithms αnslogm(pvetoT/Q) for Q ~ mV + mH which lead to unreliable predictions as well as large theoretical uncertainties, and thus limit the accuracy when comparing experimental measurements to the Standard Model. In this work, we show that the resummation of Sudakov logarithms beyond the next-to-next-to-leading-log accuracy, combined with the next-to-next-to-leading order calculation, reduces the scale uncertainty and stabilizes the perturbative expansion in the region where the vector bosons carry large transverse momentum. Thus, our result improves the precision with which Higgs properties can be determined from LHC measurements using boosted Higgs techniques.

  20. Metrology system for the calibration of multi-dof precision mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Lorenzo; Sarajlic, Mirsad; Chevalley, Fabien; Yang, Dehua

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a novel metrology system for precision XY measurements based on a concept developed originally in an industrial vision context by which USB cameras observe a target with a special dots pattern. The system has then been extended to Rx-Ry (tip-tilt), Z and Rz measurements by adding more cameras within a suitable configuration. The basic principle is described, first validated on a preliminary experimental implementation used for testing a new type of hexapod. We then illustrate the setup designed as calibration bench for hexapods used as positioning devices of the secondary mirrors of astronomical telescopes. While work is still ongoing for improving this new metrology system, currently achieved performances are a stability of is <=1 μm along linear degrees of freedom, respectively 0.5 arcsec for tip-tilt; absolute accuracy over ranges of a few millimeters is 5-10 μm , respectively arcsec; incremental accuracy is 2-3 μm, respectively 5 arcsec.