Science.gov

Sample records for accuracy requirements e911

  1. 76 FR 23713 - Wireless E911 Location Accuracy Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... carriers using network-based technologies to provide Enhanced 911 (E911) Phase II service may exclude from... carriers wireless carriers using handset-based technologies to provide Enhanced 911 (E911) Phase II service... confidence and uncertainty levels in a county or PSAP service area, ongoing accuracy shall be monitored...

  2. 76 FR 59916 - Interconnected VoIP Service; Wireless E911 Location Accuracy Requirements; E911 Requirements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... wireless carriers by retaining the existing handset-based and network-based location accuracy standards and... Report and Order but providing for phasing out the network-based standard over time. We also require all Commercial Mobile Radio Service (CMRS) providers, launching new stand-alone networks, to comply with...

  3. 76 FR 47114 - Wireless E911 Location Accuracy Requirements; E911 Requirements for IP-Enabled Service Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... subscribers use their service indoors or in urban environments, making GPS less effective if satellite transmissions are reflected off buildings and other obstructions or satellite connectivity is lost when VoIP... entering the building, a location accuracy of 100/300 meters or cell-tower only would only identify...

  4. 75 FR 70604 - Wireless E911 Location Accuracy Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... carriers are unable to recover the substantial cost of constructing a large number of additional cell sites... natural and network topographies (for example, foliage levels, terrain characteristics, cell site density... location fix is reduced because the tree cover obstructs the transmission path between the satellites...

  5. 76 FR 1126 - Wireless E911 Location Accuracy Requirements; E911 Requirements for IP-Enabled Service Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... voice communications technologies, including new broadband technologies associated with the deployment... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... Service Providers AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule; extension of...

  6. 75 FR 67321 - Wireless E911 Location Accuracy Requirements; E911 Requirements for IP-Enabled Service Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ..., hotels, municipalities, etc.).'' Nokia stated that interconnected VoIP services ``should not be subject... of firms, including Apple, HTC, LG, Motorola, Nokia, Palm, RIM, Samsung and Sony-Ericsson.''...

  7. 47 CFR 9.5 - E911 Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false E911 Service. 9.5 Section 9.5 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INTERCONNECTED VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL SERVICES § 9.5 E911 Service. (a) Scope of Section. The following requirements are only applicable to providers...

  8. 47 CFR 9.5 - E911 Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false E911 Service. 9.5 Section 9.5 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INTERCONNECTED VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL SERVICES § 9.5 E911 Service. (a) Scope of Section. The following requirements are only applicable to providers...

  9. 47 CFR 9.5 - E911 Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false E911 Service. 9.5 Section 9.5 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INTERCONNECTED VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL SERVICES § 9.5 E911 Service. (a) Scope of Section. The following requirements are only applicable to providers...

  10. 47 CFR 9.5 - E911 Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false E911 Service. 9.5 Section 9.5 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INTERCONNECTED VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL SERVICES § 9.5 E911 Service. (a) Scope of Section. The following requirements are only applicable to providers...

  11. 77 FR 43536 - Wireless E911 Phase II Location Accuracy Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ..., Policy and Licensing Division, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, at (202) 418- 2413, or email... other for- profit entities; Not-for-profit institutions; Federal Government; and State, Local, or Tribal... 20.18 and deploying networks subsequent to the effective date of the Third Report and Order that...

  12. 47 CFR 9.5 - E911 Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Registered Location is in a geographic area served by a Wireline E911 Network (which, as defined in § 9.3... Network all 911 calls to the PSAP, designated statewide default answering point, or appropriate local... default answering point, or appropriate local emergency authority that serves the caller's...

  13. 47 CFR Appendix B to Part 400 - Initial Certification for E-911 Grant Applicants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Initial Certification for E-911 Grant... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. B Appendix B to Part 400—Initial Certification for E-911...

  14. 47 CFR Appendix C to Part 400 - Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. C Appendix C to Part 400—Annual Certification for E-911...

  15. 47 CFR Appendix C to Part 400 - Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. C Appendix C to Part 400—Annual Certification for E-911...

  16. 47 CFR Appendix B to Part 400 - Initial Certification for E-911 Grant Applicants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial Certification for E-911 Grant... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. B Appendix B to Part 400—Initial Certification for E-911...

  17. 47 CFR Appendix C to Part 400 - Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. C Appendix C to Part 400—Annual Certification for E-911...

  18. 47 CFR Appendix B to Part 400 - Initial Certification for E-911 Grant Applicants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Initial Certification for E-911 Grant... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. B Appendix B to Part 400—Initial Certification for E-911...

  19. 47 CFR Appendix B to Part 400 - Initial Certification for E-911 Grant Applicants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Initial Certification for E-911 Grant... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. B Appendix B to Part 400—Initial Certification for E-911...

  20. 47 CFR Appendix C to Part 400 - Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. C Appendix C to Part 400—Annual Certification for E-911...

  1. 47 CFR Appendix C to Part 400 - Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual Certification for E-911 Grant Recipients... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. C Appendix C to Part 400—Annual Certification for E-911...

  2. 47 CFR Appendix B to Part 400 - Initial Certification for E-911 Grant Applicants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Initial Certification for E-911 Grant... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM Pt. 400, App. B Appendix B to Part 400—Initial Certification for E-911...

  3. 47 CFR 9.7 - Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. 9.7 Section 9.7 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INTERCONNECTED VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL SERVICES § 9.7 Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. (a) Access. Subject to...

  4. 47 CFR 9.7 - Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. 9.7 Section 9.7 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INTERCONNECTED VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL SERVICES § 9.7 Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. (a) Access. Subject to...

  5. 47 CFR 9.7 - Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. 9.7 Section 9.7 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INTERCONNECTED VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL SERVICES § 9.7 Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. (a) Access. Subject to...

  6. 47 CFR 9.7 - Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. 9.7 Section 9.7 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INTERCONNECTED VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL SERVICES § 9.7 Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. (a) Access. Subject to...

  7. 47 CFR 9.7 - Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. 9.7 Section 9.7 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INTERCONNECTED VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL SERVICES § 9.7 Access to 911 and E911 service capabilities. (a) Access. Subject to...

  8. Climate Change Accuracy: Requirements and Economic Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielicki, B. A.; Cooke, R.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Lukashin, C.; Thome, K. J.; Baize, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Higher than normal accuracy is required to rigorously observe decadal climate change. But what level is needed? How can this be quantified? This presentation will summarize a new more rigorous and quantitative approach to determining the required accuracy for climate change observations (Wielicki et al., 2013, BAMS). Most current global satellite observations cannot meet this accuracy level. A proposed new satellite mission to resolve this challenge is CLARREO (Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory). CLARREO is designed to achieve advances of a factor of 10 for reflected solar spectra and a factor of 3 to 5 for thermal infrared spectra (Wielicki et al., Oct. 2013 BAMS). The CLARREO spectrometers are designed to serve as SI traceable benchmarks for the Global Satellite Intercalibration System (GSICS) and to greatly improve the utility of a wide range of LEO and GEO infrared and reflected solar passive satellite sensors for climate change observations (e.g. CERES, MODIS, VIIIRS, CrIS, IASI, Landsat, SPOT, etc). Providing more accurate decadal change trends can in turn lead to more rapid narrowing of key climate science uncertainties such as cloud feedback and climate sensitivity. A study has been carried out to quantify the economic benefits of such an advance as part of a rigorous and complete climate observing system. The study concludes that the economic value is $12 Trillion U.S. dollars in Net Present Value for a nominal discount rate of 3% (Cooke et al. 2013, J. Env. Sys. Dec.). A brief summary of these two studies and their implications for the future of climate science will be presented.

  9. Accuracy requirements. [for monitoring of climate changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgenio, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    Satellite and surface measurements, if they are to serve as a climate monitoring system, must be accurate enough to permit detection of changes of climate parameters on decadal time scales. The accuracy requirements are difficult to define a priori since they depend on unknown future changes of climate forcings and feedbacks. As a framework for evaluation of candidate Climsat instruments and orbits, we estimate the accuracies that would be needed to measure changes expected over two decades based on theoretical considerations including GCM simulations and on observational evidence in cases where data are available for rates of change. One major climate forcing known with reasonable accuracy is that caused by the anthropogenic homogeneously mixed greenhouse gases (CO2, CFC's, CH4 and N2O). Their net forcing since the industrial revolution began is about 2 W/sq m and it is presently increasing at a rate of about 1 W/sq m per 20 years. Thus for a competing forcing or feedback to be important, it needs to be of the order of 0.25 W/sq m or larger on this time scale. The significance of most climate feedbacks depends on their sensitivity to temperature change. Therefore we begin with an estimate of decadal temperature change. Presented are the transient temperature trends simulated by the GISS GCM when subjected to various scenarios of trace gas concentration increases. Scenario B, which represents the most plausible near-term emission rates and includes intermittent forcing by volcanic aerosols, yields a global mean surface air temperature increase Delta Ts = 0.7 degrees C over the time period 1995-2015. This is consistent with the IPCC projection of about 0.3 degrees C/decade global warming (IPCC, 1990). Several of our estimates below are based on this assumed rate of warming.

  10. 47 CFR 12.3 - 911 and E911 analyses and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... wireless 911 rules set forth in § 20.18 of this chapter; and interconnected Voice over Internet Protocol... generation Internet Protocol-based E911 platform. (b) These reports are due 120 days from the date that...

  11. 47 CFR 12.3 - 911 and E911 analyses and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reliability of those networks and/or systems: Local exchange carriers (LECs), including incumbent LECs (ILECS... wireless 911 rules set forth in § 20.18 of this chapter; and interconnected Voice over Internet Protocol... generation Internet Protocol-based E911 platform. (b) These reports are due 120 days from the date that...

  12. 47 CFR 12.3 - 911 and E911 analyses and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reliability of those networks and/or systems: Local exchange carriers (LECs), including incumbent LECs (ILECS... wireless 911 rules set forth in § 20.18 of this chapter; and interconnected Voice over Internet Protocol... generation Internet Protocol-based E911 platform. (b) These reports are due 120 days from the date that...

  13. 47 CFR 12.3 - 911 and E911 analyses and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... wireless 911 rules set forth in § 20.18 of this chapter; and interconnected Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) service providers. LECs that meet the definition of a Class B company set forth in § 32.11(b)(2... generation Internet Protocol-based E911 platform. (b) These reports are due 120 days from the date that...

  14. 47 CFR 12.3 - 911 and E911 analyses and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 911 and E911 analyses and reports. 12.3 Section 12.3 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RESILIENCY, REDUNDANCY AND... redundancy, resiliency, and reliability of those networks and/or systems: Local exchange carriers...

  15. 30 CFR 74.8 - Measurement, accuracy, and reliability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Measurement, accuracy, and reliability... Monitors § 74.8 Measurement, accuracy, and reliability requirements. (a) Breathing zone measurement... demonstrates the following: (1) For full-shift measurements of 8 hours or more, a 95 percent confidence...

  16. Geomasking sensitive health data and privacy protection: an evaluation using an E911 database.

    PubMed

    Allshouse, William B; Fitch, Molly K; Hampton, Kristen H; Gesink, Dionne C; Doherty, Irene A; Leone, Peter A; Serre, Marc L; Miller, William C

    2010-10-01

    Geomasking is used to provide privacy protection for individual address information while maintaining spatial resolution for mapping purposes. Donut geomasking and other random perturbation geomasking algorithms rely on the assumption of a homogeneously distributed population to calculate displacement distances, leading to possible under-protection of individuals when this condition is not met. Using household data from 2007, we evaluated the performance of donut geomasking in Orange County, North Carolina. We calculated the estimated k-anonymity for every household based on the assumption of uniform household distribution. We then determined the actual k-anonymity by revealing household locations contained in the county E911 database. Census block groups in mixed-use areas with high population distribution heterogeneity were the most likely to have privacy protection below selected criteria. For heterogeneous populations, we suggest tripling the minimum displacement area in the donut to protect privacy with a less than 1% error rate.

  17. Climate Change Observation Accuracy: Requirements and Economic Value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce; Cooke, Roger; Golub, Alexander; Baize, Rosemary; Mlynczak, Martin; Lukashin, Constantin; Thome, Kurt; Shea, Yolanda; Kopp, Greg; Pilewskie, Peter; Revercomb, Henry; Best, Fred

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will summarize a new quantitative approach to determining the required accuracy for climate change observations. Using this metric, most current global satellite observations struggle to meet this accuracy level. CLARREO (Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory) is a new satellite mission designed to resolve this challenge is by achieving advances of a factor of 10 for reflected solar spectra and a factor of 3 to 5 for thermal infrared spectra. The CLARREO spectrometers can serve as SI traceable benchmarks for the Global Satellite Intercalibration System (GSICS) and greatly improve the utility of a wide range of LEO and GEO infrared and reflected solar satellite sensors for climate change observations (e.g. CERES, MODIS, VIIIRS, CrIS, IASI, Landsat, etc). A CLARREO Pathfinder mission for flight on the International Space Station is included in the U.S. Presidentâ€"TM"s fiscal year 2016 budget, with launch in 2019 or 2020. Providing more accurate decadal change trends can in turn lead to more rapid narrowing of key climate science uncertainties such as cloud feedback and climate sensitivity. A new study has been carried out to quantify the economic benefits of such an advance and concludes that the economic value is $9 Trillion U.S. dollars. The new value includes the cost of carbon emissions reductions.

  18. 47 CFR 400.4 - Application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.4 Application requirements. (a) Contents. A State's application for funds for the E-911 grant program...

  19. 47 CFR 400.4 - Application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.4 Application requirements. (a) Contents. A State's application for funds for the E-911 grant program...

  20. 47 CFR 400.4 - Application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.4 Application requirements. (a) Contents. A State's application for funds for the E-911 grant program...

  1. 47 CFR 400.4 - Application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.4 Application requirements. (a) Contents. A State's application for funds for the E-911 grant program...

  2. 47 CFR 400.4 - Application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.4 Application requirements. (a) Contents. A State's application for funds for the E-911 grant program...

  3. NUCLEAR DATA TARGET ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR MA BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2011-06-01

    A nuclear data target accuracy assessment has been carried out for two types of transmuters: a critical sodium fast reactor(SFR) and an accelerator driven system (ADMAB). Results are provided for a 7 group energy structure. Considerations about fuel cycle parameters uncertainties illustrate their dependence from the isotope final densities at end of cycle.

  4. IMPACT OF ENERGY GROUP STRUCTURE ON NUCLEAR DATA TARGET ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED REACTOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; H. Hiruta

    2011-06-01

    A target accuracy assessment study using both a fine and a broad energy structure has shown that less stringent nuclear data accuracy requirements are needed for the latter energy structure. However, even though a reduction is observed, still the requirements will be very difficult to be met unless integral experiments are also used to reduce nuclear data uncertainties. Target accuracy assessment is the inverse problem of the uncertainty evaluation. To establish priorities and target accuracies on data uncertainty reduction, a formal approach can be adopted by defining target accuracy on design parameters and finding out required accuracy on data in order to meet them. In fact, the unknown uncertainty data requirements can be obtained by solving a minimization problem where the sensitivity coefficients in conjunction with the constraints on the integral parameters provide the needed quantities for finding the solutions.

  5. Wind Tunnel Flow Quality and Data Accuracy Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    sity to accurately determine the intake buzz boundaries and the general pressure recovery . Flow unsteadiness - The requirements that <Pt>/Pt S 0.01 «Pt...friction formulae for incompres- sible turbulent flow. aCDf = _ 0.50982 Swe aRe Re (10910 Re) 3.58 s- 10 2.8 Swe 2.6 S 2.4 8 6 20 0 4 18 ~~ x 16 -l~Cl 0

  6. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of P91, P92 and E911 Alloy Steels in Dry andWet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiazhagan, Palanivel; Khanna, Anand Sawroop

    2011-04-01

    The oxidation behavior has been studied under both dry and wet oxidation atmosphere at 873 K to 1073 K. In dry atmosphere the oxidation resistance of these alloys has been described by the formation of a protective oxide FeCr2O4 at 873 K to 973 K. At 1073 K, the kinetics are parabolic with fast growing oxide leading to spalling of oxide for P92 alloy. Oxide scale formed in air was protective with a chromium rich scale at 873-973 K, while double layered oxides were formed at 1073 K with iron oxide an outer layer and inner Cr-rich spinel FeCr2O4. In wet atmosphere oxide scale was reasonably different. The oxide layer showed porous in wet atmospheres where as dense oxide layer formed during dry oxidation. The oxidation rate of P92 alloy is about 3, 2 and 1 orders of magnitude higher than the P9, P91 and E911 alloys in wet atmospheres.

  7. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Goodman, Joseph W.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy requirements of optical processors in adaptive optics systems are determined by estimating the required accuracy in a general optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) that results in a smaller average residual aberration than that achieved with a conventional electronic digital processor with some specific computation speed. Special attention is given to an error analysis of a general OLAP with regard to the residual aberration that is created in an adaptive mirror system by the inaccuracies of the processor, and to the effect of computational speed of an electronic processor on the correction. Results are presented on the ability of an OLAP to compete with a digital processor in various situations.

  8. Accuracy in Blood Glucose Measurement: What Will a Tightening of Requirements Yield?

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Lodwig, Volker; Freckmann, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, almost all persons with diabetes—at least those using antidiabetic drug therapy—use one of a plethora of meters commercially available for self-monitoring of blood glucose. The accuracy of blood glucose (BG) measurement using these meters has been presumed to be adequate; that is, the accuracy of these devices was not usually questioned until recently. Health authorities in the United States (Food and Drug Administration) and in other countries are currently endeavoring to tighten the requirements for the accuracy of these meters above the level that is currently stated in the standard ISO 15197. At first glance, this does not appear to be a problem and is hardly worth further consideration, but a closer look reveals a considerable range of critical aspects that will be discussed in this commentary. In summary, one could say that as a result of modern production methods and ongoing technical advances, the demands placed on the quality of measurement results obtained with BG meters can be increased to a certain degree. One should also take into consideration that the system accuracy (which covers many more aspects as the analytical accuracy) required to make correct therapeutical decisions certainly varies for different types of therapy. At the end, in addition to analytical accuracy, thorough and systematic training of patients and regular refresher training is important to minimize errors. Only under such circumstances will patients make appropriate therapeutic interventions to optimize and maintain metabolic control. PMID:22538158

  9. 75 FR 29914 - Telecommunications Relay Services, Speech-to-Speech Services, E911 Requirements for IP-Enabled...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ..., 2008. The OMB Control Number is 3060-1089. The Commission publishes this document as an announcement of..., DC 20554. Please include the OMB Control Number, 3060-1089, in your correspondence. The Commission... and Order and the Commission's rules at 47 CFR 64.605. The OMB Control Number is 3060- 1089. The...

  10. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1990-01-01

    A ground-based adaptive optics imaging telescope system attempts to improve image quality by detecting and correcting for atmospherically induced wavefront aberrations. The required control computations during each cycle will take a finite amount of time. Longer time delays result in larger values of residual wavefront error variance since the atmosphere continues to change during that time. Thus an optical processor may be well-suited for this task. This paper presents a study of the accuracy requirements in a general optical processor that will make it competitive with, or superior to, a conventional digital computer for the adaptive optics application. An optimization of the adaptive optics correction algorithm with respect to an optical processor's degree of accuracy is also briefly discussed.

  11. Accuracy and time requirements of a bar-code inventory system for medical supplies.

    PubMed

    Hanson, L B; Weinswig, M H; De Muth, J E

    1988-02-01

    The effects of implementing a bar-code system for issuing medical supplies to nursing units at a university teaching hospital were evaluated. Data on the time required to issue medical supplies to three nursing units at a 480-bed, tertiary-care teaching hospital were collected (1) before the bar-code system was implemented (i.e., when the manual system was in use), (2) one month after implementation, and (3) four months after implementation. At the same times, the accuracy of the central supply perpetual inventory was monitored using 15 selected items. One-way analysis of variance tests were done to determine any significant differences between the bar-code and manual systems. Using the bar-code system took longer than using the manual system because of a significant difference in the time required for order entry into the computer. Multiple-use requirements of the central supply computer system made entering bar-code data a much slower process. There was, however, a significant improvement in the accuracy of the perpetual inventory. Using the bar-code system for issuing medical supplies to the nursing units takes longer than using the manual system. However, the accuracy of the perpetual inventory was significantly improved with the implementation of the bar-code system.

  12. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Downie, J D; Goodman, J W

    1989-10-15

    A ground-based adaptive optics imaging telescope system attempts to improve image quality by measuring and correcting for atmospherically induced wavefront aberrations. The necessary control computations during each cycle will take a finite amount of time, which adds to the residual error variance since the atmosphere continues to change during that time. Thus an optical processor may be well-suited for this task. This paper investigates this possibility by studying the accuracy requirements in a general optical processor that will make it competitive with, or superior to, a conventional digital computer for adaptive optics use.

  13. The requirements for the future e-beam mask writer: statistical analysis of pattern accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Hee; Choi, Jin; Kim, Hee Bom; Kim, Byung Gook; Cho, Han-Ku

    2011-11-01

    As semiconductor features shrink in size and pitch, the extreme control of CD uniformity, MTT and image placement is needed for mask fabrication with e-beam lithography. Among the many sources of CD and image placement error, the error resulting from e-beam mask writer becomes more important than before. CD and positioning error by e-beam mask writer is mainly related to the imperfection of e-beam deflection accuracy in optic system and the charging and contamination of column. To avoid these errors, the e-beam mask writer should be designed taking into account for these effects. However, the writing speed is considered for machine design with the highest priority, because the e-beam shot count is increased rapidly due to design shrink and aggressive OPC. The increment of shot count can make the pattern shift problem due to statistical issue resulting from e-beam deflection error and the total shot count in layout. And it affects the quality of CD and image placement too. In this report, the statistical approach on CD and image placement error caused by e-beam shot position error is presented. It is estimated for various writing conditions including the intrinsic e-beam positioning error of VSB writer. From the simulation study, the required e-beam shot position accuracy to avoid pattern shift problem in 22nm node and beyond is estimated taking into account for total shot count. And the required local CD uniformity is calculated for various e-beam writing conditions. The image placement error is also simulated for various conditions including e-beam writing field position error. Consequently, the requirements for the future e-beam mask writer and the writing conditions are discussed. And in terms of e-beam shot noise, LER caused by exposure dose and shot position error is studied for future e-beam mask writing for 22nm node and beyond.

  14. Impact of Required Versus Optional Remake of a Preparation on Pharmacy Students’ Compounding Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Elizabeth L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This retrospective study investigated the impact of a required vs an optional remake requirement on student performance in a compounding laboratory course in which students’ compounded preparations were analyzed. Methods. The analysis data for several preparations made by students over a 3-year period were compared for differences in the analyzed content of the active principal ingredient and the number of students who successfully compounded the preparation on the first attempt. Results. Students’ compounding accuracy was significantly better for the ketoprofen (pluronic lecithin organogel [PLO]) emulsion (p= 0.003) and mock co-enzyme Q10 troches (p< 0.001) when remaking an inaccurate preparation was optional rather than required. There were no significant differences in the parameters for the other compounded preparations. Conclusion. Student performance did not decrease when students were given the option to remake an inaccurate preparation. Factors such as the difficulty of the preparation, time spent compounding, and impact on the student’s final course grade also may have influenced student performance. PMID:23716741

  15. Effects of postural task requirements on the speed-accuracy trade-off.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Marcos; Latash, Mark L

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the speed-accuracy trade-off in a task of pointing with the big toe of the right foot by a standing person that was designed to accentuate the importance of postural adjustments. This was done to test two hypotheses: (1) movement time during foot pointing will scale linearly with ID during target width changes, but the scaling will differ across movement distances; and (2) variations in movement time will be reflected in postural preparations to foot motion. Ten healthy adults stood on the force plate and were instructed to point with the big toe of the right foot at a target (with widths varying from 2 to 10 cm) placed on the floor in front of the subject at a distance varying from 10 to 100 cm. The instruction given to the subjects was typical for Fitts' paradigm: "be as fast and as accurate as possible in your pointing movement". The results have shown that movement time during foot pointing movements scaled with both target distance (D) and target width (W), but the two dependences could not be reduced to a single function of W/D, confirming the first hypothesis. With respect to the second hypothesis, we found that changes in task parameters led to proportional variations in movement speed and indices of variability of the postural adjustments prior to leg movement initiation, confirming the second hypothesis. Both groups of observations were valid over the whole range of distances despite the switch of the movement strategy in the middle of this range. We conclude that the speed-accuracy trade-off in a task with postural adjustments originates at the level of movement planning. The different dependences of movement time on D and W may be related to spontaneous postural sway (migration of the point of application of the resultant force acting on the body of the standing person). The results may have practical implications for posture and gait rehabilitation techniques that use modifications of stepping accuracy.

  16. Assessment of Required Accuracy of Digital Elevation Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenward, T.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of vertical accuracy of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) on hydrologic models is evaluated by comparing three DEMs and resulting hydrologic model predictions applied to a 7.2 sq km USDA - ARS watershed at Mahantango Creek, PA. The high resolution (5 m) DEM was resempled to a 30 m resolution using method that constrained the spatial structure of the elevations to be comparable with the USGS and SIR-C DEMs. This resulting 30 m DEM was used as the reference product for subsequent comparisons. Spatial fields of directly derived quantities, such as elevation differences, slope, and contributing area, were compared to the reference product, as were hydrologic model output fields derived using each of the three DEMs at the common 30 m spatial resolution.

  17. Aerodynamic Data Accuracy and Quality: Requirements and Capabilities in Wind Tunnel Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    coordinate, origin at the leading edge cn local normal force coefficient A - b 2 /8 aspect ratio of wing C oa icigmmn taper ratio coefficient cp static...from the pitching moment curves. These discrepancies were too large to ignore and required that an immediate inquiry was made into their origins . The...aircraft needs and initiated the V-22 program ( originally A - 4-2 called JVX). In June of 1982, a Joint Technology Asmesment Croup determined that the tilt

  18. Improving Ocean Color Data Products using a Purely Empirical Approach: Reducing the Requirement for Radiometric Calibration Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2008-01-01

    Radiometric calibration is the foundation upon which ocean color remote sensing is built. Quality derived geophysical products, such as chlorophyll, are assumed to be critically dependent upon the quality of the radiometric calibration. Unfortunately, the goals of radiometric calibration are not typically met in global and large-scale regional analyses, and are especially deficient in coastal regions. The consequences of the uncertainty in calibration are very large in terms of global and regional ocean chlorophyll estimates. In fact, stability in global chlorophyll requires calibration uncertainty much greater than the goals, and outside of modern capabilities. Using a purely empirical approach, we show that stable and consistent global chlorophyll values can be achieved over very wide ranges of uncertainty. Furthermore, the approach yields statistically improved comparisons with in situ data, suggesting improved quality. The results suggest that accuracy requirements for radiometric calibration cab be reduced if alternative empirical approaches are used.

  19. An analysis of approach navigation accuracy and guidance requirements for the grand tour mission to the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    The navigation and guidance process for the Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus planetary encounter phases of the 1977 Grand Tour interior mission was simulated. Reference approach navigation accuracies were defined and the relative information content of the various observation types were evaluated. Reference encounter guidance requirements were defined, sensitivities to assumed simulation model parameters were determined and the adequacy of the linear estimation theory was assessed. A linear sequential estimator was used to provide an estimate of the augmented state vector, consisting of the six state variables of position and velocity plus the three components of a planet position bias. The guidance process was simulated using a nonspherical model of the execution errors. Computation algorithms which simulate the navigation and guidance process were derived from theory and implemented into two research-oriented computer programs, written in FORTRAN.

  20. Effects of ozone prediction accuracy and choice of chemical mechanism on NMHC control requirements as calculated using EKMA. [Nonmethane hydrocarbon control

    SciTech Connect

    Montz, A.C.

    1984-07-01

    Two issues important in the evaluation of results obtained when using the Emprical Kinetic Modeling Approach (EKMA) to determine nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) control requirements are addressed. As used here NMHC is considered synonymous with reactive volatile organic compounds (RVOC). The first issue is the effect that the accuracy of the ozone prediction has on the calculation of NMHC emission reduction requirements. The second issue is the effect that the use of various chemical mechanisms have on the calculation of NMHC emission reduction requirements. Control requirements calculated with different mechanisms have different sensitivities to NMHC emissions and to other sources of hydrocarbons. EKMA diagrams generated using the computer code OZIPP are used to examine the effects of accuracy and chemical mechanism selection. The conclusions that may be drawn from the study include: comparing two calculations of control requirements for the same case, the analysis with the lower peak ozone value prediction will trend to have the lower control requirement; the more sensitive ozone is to NMHC changes, as described by the chemical mechanism, the lower the control requirements will tend to be; the two tendencies identified may be additive or compensating; and in the cases examined, use of the Carbon Bond mechanism results in predictions of lower control requirements.

  1. Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Irons, James; Spruce, Joseph P.; Underwood, Lauren W.; Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate than the more common Modulation Transfer Function or Point Spread Function. For these reasons, recent data specifications, such as those for the LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission), have used GSD and edge response to specify spatial resolution. For this study, we have defined a 400-800 m diameter center pivot irrigation area with a large 25 K temperature step associated with a 300 K well-watered field surrounded by an infinite 325 K dry area. In this context, we defined the benchmark problem as an easily modeled, highly common stressing case. By parametrically varying GSD (30-240 m) and edge slope, we determined the number of pixels and field area fraction that meet a given temperature accuracy estimate for 400-m, 600-m, and 800-m diameter field sizes. Results of this project will help assess the utility of proposed specifications for the LDCM and other future thermal remote sensing missions and for water resource management.

  2. Efficient system of homologous RNA recombination in brome mosaic virus: sequence and structure requirements and accuracy of crossovers.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, P D; Bujarski, J J

    1995-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a tripartite positive-stranded RNA virus of plants engineered to support intersegment RNA recombination, was used for the determination of sequence and structural requirements of homologous crossovers. A 60-nucleotide (nt) sequence, common between wild-type RNA2 and mutant RNA3, supported efficient repair (90%) of a modified 3' noncoding region in the RNA3 segment by homologous recombination with wild-type RNA2 3' noncoding sequences. Deletions within this sequence in RNA3 demonstrated that a nucleotide identity as short as 15 nt can support efficient homologous recombination events, while shorter (5-nt) sequence identity resulted in reduced recombination frequency (5%) within this region. Three or more mismatches within a downstream portion of the common 60-nt RNA3 sequence affected both the incidence of recombination and the distribution of crossover sites, suggesting that besides the length, the extent of sequence identity between two recombining BMV RNAs is an important factor in homologous recombination. Site-directed mutagenesis of the common sequence in RNA3 did not reveal a clear correlation between the stability of predicted secondary structures and recombination activity. This indicates that homologous recombination does not require similar secondary structures between two recombining RNAs at the sites of crossovers. Nearly 20% of homologous recombinants were imprecise (aberrant), containing either nucleotide mismatches, small deletions, or small insertions within the region of crossovers. This implies that homologous RNA recombination is not as accurate as proposed previously. Our results provide experimental evidence that the requirements and thus the mechanism of homologous recombination in BMV differ from those of previously described heteroduplex-mediated nonhomologous recombination (P. D. Nagy and J. J. Bujarski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:6390-6394, 1993). PMID:7983703

  3. Achieving Accuracy Requirements for Forest Biomass Mapping: A Data Fusion Method for Estimating Forest Biomass and LiDAR Sampling Error with Spaceborne Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesano, P. M.; Cook, B. D.; Sun, G.; Simard, M.; Zhang, Z.; Nelson, R. F.; Ranson, K. J.; Lutchke, S.; Blair, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    The synergistic use of active and passive remote sensing (i.e., data fusion) demonstrates the ability of spaceborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and multispectral imagery for achieving the accuracy requirements of a global forest biomass mapping mission. This data fusion approach also provides a means to extend 3D information from discrete spaceborne LiDAR measurements of forest structure across scales much larger than that of the LiDAR footprint. For estimating biomass, these measurements mix a number of errors including those associated with LiDAR footprint sampling over regional - global extents. A general framework for mapping above ground live forest biomass (AGB) with a data fusion approach is presented and verified using data from NASA field campaigns near Howland, ME, USA, to assess AGB and LiDAR sampling errors across a regionally representative landscape. We combined SAR and Landsat-derived optical (passive optical) image data to identify forest patches, and used image and simulated spaceborne LiDAR data to compute AGB and estimate LiDAR sampling error for forest patches and 100m, 250m, 500m, and 1km grid cells. Forest patches were delineated with Landsat-derived data and airborne SAR imagery, and simulated spaceborne LiDAR (SSL) data were derived from orbit and cloud cover simulations and airborne data from NASA's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (L VIS). At both the patch and grid scales, we evaluated differences in AGB estimation and sampling error from the combined use of LiDAR with both SAR and passive optical and with either SAR or passive optical alone. This data fusion approach demonstrates that incorporating forest patches into the AGB mapping framework can provide sub-grid forest information for coarser grid-level AGB reporting, and that combining simulated spaceborne LiDAR with SAR and passive optical data are most useful for estimating AGB when measurements from LiDAR are limited because they minimized

  4. The requirement for proper storage of nuclear and related decommissioning samples to safeguard accuracy of tritium data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daeji; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E

    2012-04-30

    Large volumes of potentially tritium-contaminated waste materials are generated during nuclear decommissioning that require accurate characterisation prior to final waste sentencing. The practice of initially determining a radionuclide waste fingerprint for materials from an operational area is often used to save time and money but tritium cannot be included because of its tendency to be chemically mobile. This mobility demands a specific measurement for tritium and also poses a challenge in terms of sampling, storage and reliable analysis. This study shows that the extent of any tritium redistribution during storage will depend on its form or speciation and the physical conditions of storage. Any weakly or moderately bound tritium (e.g. adsorbed water, waters of hydration or crystallisation) may be variably lost at temperatures over the range 100-300 °C whereas for more strongly bound tritium (e.g. chemically bound or held in mineral lattices) the liberation temperature can be delayed up to 800 °C. For tritium that is weakly held the emanation behaviour at different temperatures becomes particularly important. The degree of (3)H loss and cross-contamination that can arise after sampling and before analysis can be reduced by appropriate storage. Storing samples in vapour tight containers at the point of sampling, the use of triple enclosures, segregating high activity samples and using a freezer all lead to good analytical practice.

  5. Survey mirrors and lenses and their required surface accuracy. Volume 1. Technical report. Final report for September 15, 1978-December 1, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Beesing, M. E.; Buchholz, R. L.; Evans, R. A.; Jaminski, R. W.; Mathur, A. K.; Rausch, R. A.; Scarborough, S.; Smith, G. A.; Waldhauer, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the optical performance of a variety of concentrating solar collectors is reported. The study addresses two important issues: the accuracy of reflective or refractive surfaces required to achieve specified performance goals, and the effect of environmental exposure on the performance concentrators. To assess the importance of surface accuracy on optical performance, 11 tracking and nontracking concentrator designs were selected for detailed evaluation. Mathematical models were developed for each design and incorporated into a Monte Carlo ray trace computer program to carry out detailed calculations. Results for the 11 concentrators are presented in graphic form. The models and computer program are provided along with a user's manual. A survey data base was established on the effect of environmental exposure on the optical degradation of mirrors and lenses. Information on environmental and maintenance effects was found to be insufficient to permit specific recommendations for operating and maintenance procedures, but the available information is compiled and reported and does contain procedures that other workers have found useful.

  6. High-Capacity Communications from Martian Distances Part 4: Assessment of Spacecraft Pointing Accuracy Capabilities Required For Large Ka-Band Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Richard E.; Sands, O. Scott; Huang, John; Bassily, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Improved surface accuracy for deployable reflectors has brought with it the possibility of Ka-band reflector antennas with extents on the order of 1000 wavelengths. Such antennas are being considered for high-rate data delivery from planetary distances. To maintain losses at reasonable levels requires a sufficiently capable Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) onboard the spacecraft. This paper provides an assessment of currently available ADCS strategies and performance levels. In addition to other issues, specific factors considered include: (1) use of "beaconless" or open loop tracking versus use of a beacon on the Earth side of the link, and (2) selection of fine pointing strategy (body-fixed/spacecraft pointing, reflector pointing or various forms of electronic beam steering). Capabilities of recent spacecraft are discussed.

  7. Quantitative assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation using pencil beam and Monte Carlo algorithms and requirements for clinical quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    To compare the doses calculated using the BrainLAB pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for tumors located in various sites including the lung and evaluate quality assurance procedures required for the verification of the accuracy of dose calculation. The dose-calculation accuracy of PB and MC was also assessed quantitatively with measurement using ionization chamber and Gafchromic films placed in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms. The dose was calculated using PB convolution and MC algorithms in the iPlan treatment planning system from BrainLAB. The dose calculation was performed on the patient's computed tomography images with lesions in various treatment sites including 5 lungs, 5 prostates, 4 brains, 2 head and necks, and 2 paraspinal tissues. A combination of conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans was used in dose calculation. The leaf sequence from intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or beam shapes from conformal plans and monitor units and other planning parameters calculated by the PB were identical for calculating dose with MC. Heterogeneity correction was considered in both PB and MC dose calculations. Dose-volume parameters such as V95 (volume covered by 95% of prescription dose), dose distributions, and gamma analysis were used to evaluate the calculated dose by PB and MC. The measured doses by ionization chamber and EBT GAFCHROMIC film in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms were used to quantitatively asses the accuracy of dose calculated by PB and MC. The dose-volume histograms and dose distributions calculated by PB and MC in the brain, prostate, paraspinal, and head and neck were in good agreement with one another (within 5%) and provided acceptable planning target volume coverage. However, dose distributions of the patients with lung cancer had large discrepancies. For a plan optimized with PB, the dose coverage was shown as clinically acceptable, whereas in reality, the MC showed a

  8. Quantitative assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation using pencil beam and Monte Carlo algorithms and requirements for clinical quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2013-01-01

    To compare the doses calculated using the BrainLAB pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for tumors located in various sites including the lung and evaluate quality assurance procedures required for the verification of the accuracy of dose calculation. The dose-calculation accuracy of PB and MC was also assessed quantitatively with measurement using ionization chamber and Gafchromic films placed in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms. The dose was calculated using PB convolution and MC algorithms in the iPlan treatment planning system from BrainLAB. The dose calculation was performed on the patient's computed tomography images with lesions in various treatment sites including 5 lungs, 5 prostates, 4 brains, 2 head and necks, and 2 paraspinal tissues. A combination of conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans was used in dose calculation. The leaf sequence from intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or beam shapes from conformal plans and monitor units and other planning parameters calculated by the PB were identical for calculating dose with MC. Heterogeneity correction was considered in both PB and MC dose calculations. Dose-volume parameters such as V95 (volume covered by 95% of prescription dose), dose distributions, and gamma analysis were used to evaluate the calculated dose by PB and MC. The measured doses by ionization chamber and EBT GAFCHROMIC film in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms were used to quantitatively asses the accuracy of dose calculated by PB and MC. The dose-volume histograms and dose distributions calculated by PB and MC in the brain, prostate, paraspinal, and head and neck were in good agreement with one another (within 5%) and provided acceptable planning target volume coverage. However, dose distributions of the patients with lung cancer had large discrepancies. For a plan optimized with PB, the dose coverage was shown as clinically acceptable, whereas in reality, the MC showed a

  9. How much detail and accuracy is required in plant growth sub-models to address questions about optimal management strategies in agricultural systems?

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Simulations that integrate sub-models of important biological processes can be used to ask questions about optimal management strategies in agricultural and ecological systems. Building sub-models with more detail and aiming for greater accuracy and realism may seem attractive, but is likely to be more expensive and time-consuming and result in more complicated models that lack transparency. This paper illustrates a general integrated approach for constructing models of agricultural and ecological systems that is based on the principle of starting simple and then directly testing for the need to add additional detail and complexity. Methodology The approach is demonstrated using LUSO (Land Use Sequence Optimizer), an agricultural system analysis framework based on simulation and optimization. A simple sensitivity analysis and functional perturbation analysis is used to test to what extent LUSO's crop–weed competition sub-model affects the answers to a number of questions at the scale of the whole farming system regarding optimal land-use sequencing strategies and resulting profitability. Principal results The need for accuracy in the crop–weed competition sub-model within LUSO depended to a small extent on the parameter being varied, but more importantly and interestingly on the type of question being addressed with the model. Only a small part of the crop–weed competition model actually affects the answers to these questions. Conclusions This study illustrates an example application of the proposed integrated approach for constructing models of agricultural and ecological systems based on testing whether complexity needs to be added to address particular questions of interest. We conclude that this example clearly demonstrates the potential value of the general approach. Advantages of this approach include minimizing costs and resources required for model construction, keeping models transparent and easy to analyse, and ensuring the model

  10. Accuracy of dietary reference intake predictive equation for estimated energy requirements in female tennis athletes and non-athlete college students: comparison with the doubly labeled water method

    PubMed Central

    Ndahimana, Didace; Lee, Sun-Hee; Kim, Ye-Jin; Son, Hee-Ryoung; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Park, Jonghoon

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of a dietary reference intake (DRI) predictive equation for estimated energy requirements (EER) in female college tennis athletes and non-athlete students using doubly labeled water (DLW) as a reference method. MATERIALS/METHODS Fifteen female college students, including eight tennis athletes and seven non-athlete subjects (aged between 19 to 24 years), were involved in the study. Subjects' total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured by the DLW method, and EER were calculated using the DRI predictive equation. The accuracy of this equation was assessed by comparing the EER calculated using the DRI predictive equation (EERDRI) and TEE measured by the DLW method (TEEDLW) based on calculation of percentage difference mean and percentage of accurate prediction. The agreement between the two methods was assessed by the Bland-Altman method. RESULTS The percentage difference mean between the methods was -1.1% in athletes and 1.8% in non-athlete subjects, whereas the percentage of accurate prediction was 37.5% and 85.7%, respectively. In the case of athletic subjects, the DRI predictive equation showed a clear bias negatively proportional to the subjects' TEE. CONCLUSIONS The results from this study suggest that the DRI predictive equation could be used to obtain EER in non-athlete female college students at a group level. However, this equation would be difficult to use in the case of athletes at the group and individual levels. The development of a new and more appropriate equation for the prediction of energy expenditure in athletes is proposed. PMID:28194265

  11. Geocoding accuracy and the recovery of relationships between environmental exposures and health

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Soumya; Rushton, Gerard; Smith, Brian J; Zimmerman, Dale L; Donham, Kelley J

    2008-01-01

    Background This research develops methods for determining the effect of geocoding quality on relationships between environmental exposures and health. The likelihood of detecting an existing relationship – statistical power – between measures of environmental exposures and health depends not only on the strength of the relationship but also on the level of positional accuracy and completeness of the geocodes from which the measures of environmental exposure are made. This paper summarizes the results of simulation studies conducted to examine the impact of inaccuracies of geocoded addresses generated by three types of geocoding processes: a) addresses located on orthophoto maps, b) addresses matched to TIGER files (U.S Census or their derivative street files); and, c) addresses from E-911 geocodes (developed by local authorities for emergency dispatch purposes). Results The simulated odds of disease using exposures modelled from the highest quality geocodes could be sufficiently recovered using other, more commonly used, geocoding processes such as TIGER and E-911; however, the strength of the odds relationship between disease exposures modelled at geocodes generally declined with decreasing geocoding accuracy. Conclusion Although these specific results cannot be generalized to new situations, the methods used to determine the sensitivity of results can be used in new situations. Estimated measures of positional accuracy must be used in the interpretation of results of analyses that investigate relationships between health outcomes and exposures measured at residential locations. Analyses similar to those employed in this paper can be used to validate interpretation of results from empirical analyses that use geocoded locations with estimated measures of positional accuracy. PMID:18387189

  12. Numerical accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1988-12-01

    A framework is provided for numerical accuracy assessment. The purpose of numerical flow simulations is formulated. This formulation concerns the classes of aeronautical configurations (boundaries), the desired flow physics (flow equations and their properties), the classes of flow conditions on flow boundaries (boundary conditions), and the initial flow conditions. Next, accuracy and economical performance requirements are defined; the final numerical flow simulation results of interest should have a guaranteed accuracy, and be produced for an acceptable FLOP-price. Within this context, the validation of numerical processes with respect to the well known topics of consistency, stability, and convergence when the mesh is refined must be done by numerical experimentation because theory gives only partial answers. This requires careful design of text cases for numerical experimentation. Finally, the results of a few recent evaluation exercises of numerical experiments with a large number of codes on a few test cases are summarized.

  13. Analytical Performance Requirements for Systems for Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose With Focus on System Accuracy: Relevant Differences Among ISO 15197:2003, ISO 15197:2013, and Current FDA Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Freckmann, Guido; Schmid, Christina; Baumstark, Annette; Rutschmann, Malte; Haug, Cornelia; Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-07-01

    In the European Union (EU), the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 15197 standard is applicable for the evaluation of systems for self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) before the market approval. In 2013, a revised version of this standard was published. Relevant revisions in the analytical performance requirements are the inclusion of the evaluation of influence quantities, for example, hematocrit, and some changes in the testing procedures for measurement precision and system accuracy evaluation, for example, number of test strip lots. Regarding system accuracy evaluation, the most important change is the inclusion of more stringent accuracy criteria. In 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States published their own guidance document for the premarket evaluation of SMBG systems with even more stringent system accuracy criteria than stipulated by ISO 15197:2013. The establishment of strict accuracy criteria applicable for the premarket evaluation is a possible approach to further improve the measurement quality of SMBG systems. However, the system accuracy testing procedure is quite complex, and some critical aspects, for example, systematic measurement difference between the reference measurement procedure and a higher-order procedure, may potentially limit the apparent accuracy of a given system. Therefore, the implementation of a harmonized reference measurement procedure for which traceability to standards of higher order is verified through an unbroken, documented chain of calibrations is desirable. In addition, the establishment of regular and standardized post-marketing evaluations of distributed test strip lots should be considered as an approach toward an improved measurement quality of available SMBG systems.

  14. Artemis is required to improve the accuracy of repair of double-strand breaks with 5'-blocked termini generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Svitlana; Castore, Reneau; Shi, Runhua; Harrison, Lynn

    2013-05-01

    Clustered DNA lesions are defined as ≥2 damage events within 20 bp. Oxidised bases, abasic (AP) sites, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) exist in radiation-induced clusters, and these lesions are more difficult to repair and can be more mutagenic than single lesions. Understanding clustered lesion repair is therefore important for the design of complementary treatments to enhance radiotherapy. Non-DSB-clustered lesions consisting of opposing AP sites can be converted to DSBs by base excision repair, and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) plays a role in repairing these DSBs. Artemis is an endonuclease that removes blocking groups from DSB termini during NHEJ. Hence, we hypothesised that Artemis plays a role in the processing of DSBs or complex DSBs generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions. We examined the repair of clusters containing two or three lesions in wild-type (WT) or Artemis-deficient (ART(-/-)) mouse fibroblasts using a reporter plasmid. Each cluster contained two opposing tetrahydrofurans (an AP site analogue), which AP endonuclease can convert to a DSB with blocked 5' termini. Loss of Artemis did not decrease plasmid survival, but did result in more mutagenic repair with plasmids containing larger deletions. This increase in deletions did not occur with ClaI-linearised plasmid. Since Mre11 has been implicated in deletional NHEJ, we used small interfering RNA to reduce Mre11 in WT and ART(-/-) cells, but decreasing Mre11 did not change the size of deletions in the repair products. This work implicates Artemis in limiting the deletions introduced during repair of 5'-blocked termini DSBs generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions. Decreasing repair accuracy without decreasing repair capacity could result in mutated cells surviving irradiation. Inhibiting Artemis in normal cells could promote carcinogenesis, while in tumour cells enhanced mutagenic repair following irradiation could promote tumour recurrence.

  15. Acoustic environmental accuracy requirements for response determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettitt, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    A general purpose computer program was developed for the prediction of vehicle interior noise. This program, named VIN, has both modal and statistical energy analysis capabilities for structural/acoustic interaction analysis. The analytic models and their computer implementation were verified through simple test cases with well-defined experimental results. The model was also applied in a space shuttle payload bay launch acoustics prediction study. The computer program processes large and small problems with equal efficiency because all arrays are dynamically sized by program input variables at run time. A data base is built and easily accessed for design studies. The data base significantly reduces the computational costs of such studies by allowing the reuse of the still-valid calculated parameters of previous iterations.

  16. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  17. Landsat wildland mapping accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, William J.; Gehring, Dale G.; Haman, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    A Landsat-aided classification of ten wildland resource classes was developed for the Shivwits Plateau region of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Single stage cluster sampling (without replacement) was used to verify the accuracy of each class.

  18. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  19. Towards Arbitrary Accuracy Inviscid Surface Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Hixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions are currently limited to third order accuracy in time for non-moving surfaces and actually reduce to first order in time when the surfaces move. For steady-state calculations it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is required for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady phenomena. A surprisingly simple technique is shown here that can be used to correct the normal pressure derivatives of the flow at a surface on a Cartesian grid so that arbitrarily high order time accuracy is achieved in idealized cases. This work demonstrates that nonlinear high order time accuracy at a solid surface is possible and desirable, but it also shows that the current practice of only correcting the pressure is inadequate.

  20. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  1. Anatomy-aware measurement of segmentation accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizhoosh, H. R.; Othman, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying the accuracy of segmentation and manual delineation of organs, tissue types and tumors in medical images is a necessary measurement that suffers from multiple problems. One major shortcoming of all accuracy measures is that they neglect the anatomical significance or relevance of different zones within a given segment. Hence, existing accuracy metrics measure the overlap of a given segment with a ground-truth without any anatomical discrimination inside the segment. For instance, if we understand the rectal wall or urethral sphincter as anatomical zones, then current accuracy measures ignore their significance when they are applied to assess the quality of the prostate gland segments. In this paper, we propose an anatomy-aware measurement scheme for segmentation accuracy of medical images. The idea is to create a "master gold" based on a consensus shape containing not just the outline of the segment but also the outlines of the internal zones if existent or relevant. To apply this new approach to accuracy measurement, we introduce the anatomy-aware extensions of both Dice coefficient and Jaccard index and investigate their effect using 500 synthetic prostate ultrasound images with 20 different segments for each image. We show that through anatomy-sensitive calculation of segmentation accuracy, namely by considering relevant anatomical zones, not only the measurement of individual users can change but also the ranking of users' segmentation skills may require reordering.

  2. Accuracy of perturbative master equations.

    PubMed

    Fleming, C H; Cummings, N I

    2011-03-01

    We consider open quantum systems with dynamics described by master equations that have perturbative expansions in the system-environment interaction. We show that, contrary to intuition, full-time solutions of order-2n accuracy require an order-(2n+2) master equation. We give two examples of such inaccuracies in the solutions to an order-2n master equation: order-2n inaccuracies in the steady state of the system and order-2n positivity violations. We show how these arise in a specific example for which exact solutions are available. This result has a wide-ranging impact on the validity of coupling (or friction) sensitive results derived from second-order convolutionless, Nakajima-Zwanzig, Redfield, and Born-Markov master equations.

  3. Increasing Accuracy in Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacksier, Tracey; Fernandes, Adelino; Matthew, Matt; Lehmann, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Human activity is increasing the concentrations of green house gases (GHG) in the atmosphere which results in temperature increases. High precision is a key requirement of atmospheric measurements to study the global carbon cycle and its effect on climate change. Natural air containing stable isotopes are used in GHG monitoring to calibrate analytical equipment. This presentation will examine the natural air and isotopic mixture preparation process, for both molecular and isotopic concentrations, for a range of components and delta values. The role of precisely characterized source material will be presented. Analysis of individual cylinders within multiple batches will be presented to demonstrate the ability to dynamically fill multiple cylinders containing identical compositions without isotopic fractionation. Additional emphasis will focus on the ability to adjust isotope ratios to more closely bracket sample types without the reliance on combusting naturally occurring materials, thereby improving analytical accuracy.

  4. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  5. Radiocarbon dating accuracy improved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scientists have extended the accuracy of carbon-14 (14C) dating by correlating dates older than 8,000 years with uranium-thorium dates that span from 8,000 to 30,000 years before present (ybp, present = 1950). Edouard Bard, Bruno Hamelin, Richard Fairbanks and Alan Zindler, working at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, dated corals from reefs off Barbados using both 14C and uranium-234/thorium-230 by thermal ionization mass spectrometry techniques. They found that the two age data sets deviated in a regular way, allowing the scientists to correlate the two sets of ages. The 14C dates were consistently younger than those determined by uranium-thorium, and the discrepancy increased to about 3,500 years at 20,000 ybp.

  6. 27 CFR 19.185 - Testing scale tanks for accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing scale tanks for... Requirements Tank Requirements § 19.185 Testing scale tanks for accuracy. (a) A proprietor who uses a scale tank for tax determination must ensure the accuracy of the scale through periodic testing. Testing...

  7. 27 CFR 19.185 - Testing scale tanks for accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing scale tanks for... Requirements Tank Requirements § 19.185 Testing scale tanks for accuracy. (a) A proprietor who uses a scale tank for tax determination must ensure the accuracy of the scale through periodic testing. Testing...

  8. 27 CFR 19.185 - Testing scale tanks for accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing scale tanks for... Requirements Tank Requirements § 19.185 Testing scale tanks for accuracy. (a) A proprietor who uses a scale tank for tax determination must ensure the accuracy of the scale through periodic testing. Testing...

  9. 27 CFR 19.185 - Testing scale tanks for accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing scale tanks for... Requirements Tank Requirements § 19.185 Testing scale tanks for accuracy. (a) A proprietor who uses a scale tank for tax determination must ensure the accuracy of the scale through periodic testing. Testing...

  10. Navigation Accuracy Guidelines for Orbital Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Alfriend, Kyle T.

    2004-01-01

    Some simple guidelines based on the accuracy in determining a satellite formation s semi-major axis differences are useful in making preliminary assessments of the navigation accuracy needed to support such missions. These guidelines are valid for any elliptical orbit, regardless of eccentricity. Although maneuvers required for formation establishment, reconfiguration, and station-keeping require accurate prediction of the state estimate to the maneuver time, and hence are directly affected by errors in all the orbital elements, experience has shown that determination of orbit plane orientation and orbit shape to acceptable levels is less challenging than the determination of orbital period or semi-major axis. Furthermore, any differences among the member s semi-major axes are undesirable for a satellite formation, since it will lead to differential along-track drift due to period differences. Since inevitable navigation errors prevent these differences from ever being zero, one may use the guidelines this paper presents to determine how much drift will result from a given relative navigation accuracy, or conversely what navigation accuracy is required to limit drift to a given rate. Since the guidelines do not account for non-two-body perturbations, they may be viewed as useful preliminary design tools, rather than as the basis for mission navigation requirements, which should be based on detailed analysis of the mission configuration, including all relevant sources of uncertainty.

  11. Neural Mechanisms of Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff

    PubMed Central

    Heitz, Richard P.; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Intelligent agents balance speed of responding with accuracy of deciding. Stochastic accumulator models commonly explain this speed-accuracy tradeoff by strategic adjustment of response threshold. Several laboratories identify specific neurons in prefrontal and parietal cortex with this accumulation process, yet no neurophysiological correlates of speed-accuracy tradeoff have been described. We trained macaque monkeys to trade speed for accuracy on cue during visual search and recorded the activity of neurons in the frontal eye field. Unpredicted by any model, we discovered that speed-accuracy tradeoff is accomplished through several distinct adjustments. Visually responsive neurons modulated baseline firing rate, sensory gain, and the duration of perceptual processing. Movement neurons triggered responses with activity modulated in a direction opposite of model predictions. Thus, current stochastic accumulator models provide an incomplete description of the neural processes accomplishing speed-accuracy tradeoffs. The diversity of neural mechanisms was reconciled with the accumulator framework through an integrated accumulator model constrained by requirements of the motor system. PMID:23141072

  12. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  13. Reticence, Accuracy and Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2015-12-01

    James Hansen has cautioned the scientific community against "reticence," by which he means a reluctance to speak in public about the threat of climate change. This may contribute to social inaction, with the result that society fails to respond appropriately to threats that are well understood scientifically. Against this, others have warned against the dangers of "crying wolf," suggesting that reticence protects scientific credibility. We argue that both these positions are missing an important point: that reticence is not only a matter of style but also of substance. In previous work, Bysse et al. (2013) showed that scientific projections of key indicators of climate change have been skewed towards the low end of actual events, suggesting a bias in scientific work. More recently, we have shown that scientific efforts to be responsive to contrarian challenges have led scientists to adopt the terminology of a "pause" or "hiatus" in climate warming, despite the lack of evidence to support such a conclusion (Lewandowsky et al., 2015a. 2015b). In the former case, scientific conservatism has led to under-estimation of climate related changes. In the latter case, the use of misleading terminology has perpetuated scientific misunderstanding and hindered effective communication. Scientific communication should embody two equally important goals: 1) accuracy in communicating scientific information and 2) efficacy in expressing what that information means. Scientists should strive to be neither conservative nor adventurous but to be accurate, and to communicate that accurate information effectively.

  14. Groves model accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Matthew C.

    1991-08-01

    The United States Air Force Environmental Technical Applications Center (USAFETAC) was tasked to review the scientific literature for studies of the Groves Neutral Density Climatology Model and compare the Groves Model with others in the 30-60 km range. The tasking included a request to investigate the merits of comparing accuracy of the Groves Model to rocketsonde data. USAFETAC analysts found the Groves Model to be state of the art for middle-atmospheric climatological models. In reviewing previous comparisons with other models and with space shuttle-derived atmospheric densities, good density vs altitude agreement was found in almost all cases. A simple technique involving comparison of the model with range reference atmospheres was found to be the most economical way to compare the Groves Model with rocketsonde data; an example of this type is provided. The Groves 85 Model is used routinely in USAFETAC's Improved Point Analysis Model (IPAM). To create this model, Dr. Gerald Vann Groves produced tabulations of atmospheric density based on data derived from satellite observations and modified by rocketsonde observations. Neutral Density as presented here refers to the monthly mean density in 10-degree latitude bands as a function of altitude. The Groves 85 Model zonal mean density tabulations are given in their entirety.

  15. High Accuracy Transistor Compact Model Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hembree, Charles E.; Mar, Alan; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-09-01

    Typically, transistors are modeled by the application of calibrated nominal and range models. These models consists of differing parameter values that describe the location and the upper and lower limits of a distribution of some transistor characteristic such as current capacity. Correspond- ingly, when using this approach, high degrees of accuracy of the transistor models are not expected since the set of models is a surrogate for a statistical description of the devices. The use of these types of models describes expected performances considering the extremes of process or transistor deviations. In contrast, circuits that have very stringent accuracy requirements require modeling techniques with higher accuracy. Since these accurate models have low error in transistor descriptions, these models can be used to describe part to part variations as well as an accurate description of a single circuit instance. Thus, models that meet these stipulations also enable the calculation of quantifi- cation of margins with respect to a functional threshold and uncertainties in these margins. Given this need, new model high accuracy calibration techniques for bipolar junction transis- tors have been developed and are described in this report.

  16. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  17. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  18. Test Expectancy Affects Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theory suggests that the accuracy of metacognitive monitoring is affected by the cues used to judge learning. Researchers have improved monitoring accuracy by directing attention to more appropriate cues; however, this is the first study to more directly point students to more appropriate cues using instructions regarding tests and…

  19. Accuracy of distance measurements in biplane angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toennies, Klaus D.; Oishi, Satoru; Koster, David; Schroth, Gerhard

    1997-05-01

    Distance measurements of the vascular system of the brain can be derived from biplanar digital subtraction angiography (2p-DSA). The measurements are used for planning of minimal invasive surgical procedures. Our 90 degree-fixed-angle G- ring angiography system has the potential of acquiring pairs of such images with high geometric accuracy. The sizes of vessels and aneurysms are estimated applying a fast and accurate extraction method in order to select an appropriate surgical strategy. Distance computation from 2p-DSA is carried out in three steps. First, the boundary of the structure to be measured is detected based on zero-crossings and closeness to user-specified end points. Subsequently, the 3D location of the center of the structure is computed from the centers of gravity of its two projections. This location is used to reverse the magnification factor caused by the cone-shaped projection of the x-rays. Since exact measurements of possibly very small structures are crucial to the usefulness in surgical planning, we identified mechanical and computational influences on the geometry which may have an impact on the measurement accuracy. A study with phantoms is presented distinguishing between the different effects and enabling the computation of an optimal overall exactness. Comparing this optimum with results of distance measurements on phantoms whose exact size and shape is known, we found, that the measurement error for structures of size of 20 mm was less than 0.05 mm on average and 0.50 mm at maximum. The maximum achievable accuracy of 0.15 mm was in most cases exceeded by less than 0.15 mm. This accuracy surpasses by far the requirements for the above mentioned surgery application. The mechanic accuracy of the fixed-angle biplanar system meets the requirements for computing a 3D reconstruction of the small vessels of the brain. It also indicates, that simple measurements will be possible on systems being less accurate.

  20. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  1. High accuracy radiation efficiency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozakoff, D. J.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The relatively large antenna subarrays (tens of meters) to be used in the Solar Power Satellite, and the desire to accurately quantify antenna performance, dictate the requirement for specialized measurement techniques. The error contributors associated with both far-field and near-field antenna measurement concepts were quantified. As a result, instrumentation configurations with measurement accuracy potential were identified. In every case, advances in the state of the art of associated electronics were found to be required. Relative cost trade-offs between a candidate far-field elevated antenna range and near-field facility were also performed.

  2. Assessing and Ensuring GOES-R Magnetometer Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Delano R.; Todirita, Monica; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer subsystem accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma. Error comes both from outside the magnetometers, e.g. spacecraft fields and misalignments, as well as inside, e.g. zero offset and scale factor errors. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it will be necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance before launch, we have used Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analysis. Both behave as expected, and their accuracy predictions agree within 30%. With the proposed calibration regimen, both suggest that the GOES-R magnetometer subsystem will meet its accuracy requirements.

  3. Assessing and Ensuring GOES-R Magnetometer Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Carter, Delano R.; Todirita, Monica; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma. To achieve this, the sensor itself has better than 1 nT accuracy. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it is also necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance, we used covariance analysis and attempted to corroborate it with simulations. Although not perfect, the two generally agree and show the expected behaviors. With the annual calibration regimen, these predictions suggest that the magnetometers will meet their accuracy requirements.

  4. When Does Choice of Accuracy Measure Alter Imputation Accuracy Assessments?

    PubMed Central

    Ramnarine, Shelina; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Li-Shiun; Culverhouse, Robert; Duan, Weimin; Hancock, Dana B.; Hartz, Sarah M.; Johnson, Eric O.; Olfson, Emily; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Saccone, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Imputation, the process of inferring genotypes for untyped variants, is used to identify and refine genetic association findings. Inaccuracies in imputed data can distort the observed association between variants and a disease. Many statistics are used to assess accuracy; some compare imputed to genotyped data and others are calculated without reference to true genotypes. Prior work has shown that the Imputation Quality Score (IQS), which is based on Cohen’s kappa statistic and compares imputed genotype probabilities to true genotypes, appropriately adjusts for chance agreement; however, it is not commonly used. To identify differences in accuracy assessment, we compared IQS with concordance rate, squared correlation, and accuracy measures built into imputation programs. Genotypes from the 1000 Genomes reference populations (AFR N = 246 and EUR N = 379) were masked to match the typed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) coverage of several SNP arrays and were imputed with BEAGLE 3.3.2 and IMPUTE2 in regions associated with smoking behaviors. Additional masking and imputation was conducted for sequenced subjects from the Collaborative Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence and the Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence in African Americans (N = 1,481 African Americans and N = 1,480 European Americans). Our results offer further evidence that concordance rate inflates accuracy estimates, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. For common variants, squared correlation, BEAGLE R2, IMPUTE2 INFO, and IQS produce similar assessments of imputation accuracy. However, for rare and low frequency variants, compared to IQS, the other statistics tend to be more liberal in their assessment of accuracy. IQS is important to consider when evaluating imputation accuracy, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. PMID:26458263

  5. High Accuracy Time Transfer Synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    HIGH ACCURACY TIME TRANSFER SYNCHRONIZATION Paul Wheeler, Paul Koppang, David Chalmers, Angela Davis, Anthony Kubik and William Powell U.S. Naval...Observatory Washington, DC 20392 Abstract In July 1994, the US Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a...field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchro- nization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance

  6. Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    0 1 4 3 NDARDS THE NATIONAL February 1982 Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control RESEARCH PROG RAM U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime...SUBTITLE Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...examples are contained in Appendix C. Included, are examples of how “A/C” process - analysis leads to design improvement and how a change in sequence can

  7. 30 CFR 74.8 - Measurement, accuracy, and reliability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., for intrashift measurements within such equivalent concentration ranges. (c) Reliability of... Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Persons may obtain a copy at the address below: NIOSH-Publications Dissemination, 4676 Columbia...

  8. 30 CFR 74.8 - Measurement, accuracy, and reliability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard deviation shall be less than 0.1275 without bias for both full-shift measurements of 8 hours or...) Bias. The bias of the CPDM measurements shall be limited such that the uncorrectable discrepancy... testing shall be no greater than 10 percent. Bias must be constant over the range of dust...

  9. Audiovisual biofeedback improves motion prediction accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of motion prediction, utilized to overcome the system latency of motion management radiotherapy systems, is hampered by irregularities present in the patients’ respiratory pattern. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been shown to reduce respiratory irregularities. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that AV biofeedback improves the accuracy of motion prediction. Methods: An AV biofeedback system combined with real-time respiratory data acquisition and MR images were implemented in this project. One-dimensional respiratory data from (1) the abdominal wall (30 Hz) and (2) the thoracic diaphragm (5 Hz) were obtained from 15 healthy human subjects across 30 studies. The subjects were required to breathe with and without the guidance of AV biofeedback during each study. The obtained respiratory signals were then implemented in a kernel density estimation prediction algorithm. For each of the 30 studies, five different prediction times ranging from 50 to 1400 ms were tested (150 predictions performed). Prediction error was quantified as the root mean square error (RMSE); the RMSE was calculated from the difference between the real and predicted respiratory data. The statistical significance of the prediction results was determined by the Student's t-test. Results: Prediction accuracy was considerably improved by the implementation of AV biofeedback. Of the 150 respiratory predictions performed, prediction accuracy was improved 69% (103/150) of the time for abdominal wall data, and 78% (117/150) of the time for diaphragm data. The average reduction in RMSE due to AV biofeedback over unguided respiration was 26% (p < 0.001) and 29% (p < 0.001) for abdominal wall and diaphragm respiratory motion, respectively. Conclusions: This study was the first to demonstrate that the reduction of respiratory irregularities due to the implementation of AV biofeedback improves prediction accuracy. This would result in increased efficiency of motion

  10. High Accuracy Fuel Flowmeter, Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, C.; Rose, L.; Chan, A.; Chin, B.; Gregory, W.

    1983-01-01

    Technology related to aircraft fuel mass - flowmeters was reviewed to determine what flowmeter types could provide 0.25%-of-point accuracy over a 50 to one range in flowrates. Three types were selected and were further analyzed to determine what problem areas prevented them from meeting the high accuracy requirement, and what the further development needs were for each. A dual-turbine volumetric flowmeter with densi-viscometer and microprocessor compensation was selected for its relative simplicity and fast response time. An angular momentum type with a motor-driven, spring-restrained turbine and viscosity shroud was selected for its direct mass-flow output. This concept also employed a turbine for fast response and a microcomputer for accurate viscosity compensation. The third concept employed a vortex precession volumetric flowmeter and was selected for its unobtrusive design. Like the turbine flowmeter, it uses a densi-viscometer and microprocessor for density correction and accurate viscosity compensation.

  11. Astronomic Position Accuracy Capability Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    portion of F. E. Warren AFB, Wyoming. The three points were called THEODORE ECC , TRACY, and JIM and consisted of metal tribrachs plastered to cinder...sets were computed as a deviation from the standard. Accuracy figures were determined from these residuals. Homo - geneity of variances was tested using

  12. The hidden KPI registration accuracy.

    PubMed

    Shorrosh, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Determining the registration accuracy rate is fundamental to improving revenue cycle key performance indicators. A registration quality assurance (QA) process allows errors to be corrected before bills are sent and helps registrars learn from their mistakes. Tools are available to help patient access staff who perform registration QA manually.

  13. Improving Speaking Accuracy through Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormer, Jan Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Increased English learner accuracy can be achieved by leading students through six stages of awareness. The first three awareness stages build up students' motivation to improve, and the second three provide learners with crucial input for change. The final result is "sustained language awareness," resulting in ongoing…

  14. Inventory accuracy in 60 days!

    PubMed

    Miller, G J

    1997-08-01

    Despite great advances in manufacturing technology and management science, thousands of organizations still don't have a handle on basic inventory accuracy. Many companies don't even measure it properly, or at all, and lack corrective action programs to improve it. This article offers an approach that has proven successful a number of times, when companies were quite serious about making improvements. Not only can it be implemented, but also it can likely be implemented within 60 days per area, if properly managed. The hardest part is selling people on the need to improve and then keeping them motivated. The net cost of such a program? Probably less than nothing, since the benefits gained usually far exceed the costs. Improved inventory accuracy can aid in enhancing customer service, determining purchasing and manufacturing priorities, reducing operating costs, and increasing the accuracy of financial records. This article also addresses the gap in contemporary literature regarding accuracy program features for repetitive, JIT, cellular, and process- and project-oriented environments.

  15. Improved accuracies for satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammeyer, P. C.; Fiala, A. D.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera on an optical telescope which follows the stars can be used to provide high accuracy comparisons between the line of sight to a satellite, over a large range of satellite altitudes, and lines of sight to nearby stars. The CCD camera can be rotated so the motion of the satellite is down columns of the CCD chip, and charge can be moved from row to row of the chip at a rate which matches the motion of the optical image of the satellite across the chip. Measurement of satellite and star images, together with accurate timing of charge motion, provides accurate comparisons of lines of sight. Given lines of sight to stars near the satellite, the satellite line of sight may be determined. Initial experiments with this technique, using an 18 cm telescope, have produced TDRS-4 observations which have an rms error of 0.5 arc second, 100 m at synchronous altitude. Use of a mosaic of CCD chips, each having its own rate of charge motion, in the focal place of a telescope would allow point images of a geosynchronous satellite and of stars to be formed simultaneously in the same telescope. The line of sight of such a satellite could be measured relative to nearby star lines of sight with an accuracy of approximately 0.03 arc second. Development of a star catalog with 0.04 arc second rms accuracy and perhaps ten stars per square degree would allow determination of satellite lines of sight with 0.05 arc second rms absolute accuracy, corresponding to 10 m at synchronous altitude. Multiple station time transfers through a communications satellite can provide accurate distances from the satellite to the ground stations. Such observations can, if calibrated for delays, determine satellite orbits to an accuracy approaching 10 m rms.

  16. Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) accuracy assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szajgin, John; Pettinger, L.R.; Linden, D.S.; Ohlen, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative accuracy assessment was performed for the vegetation classification map produced as part of the Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) project. This project was a cooperative effort between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center. The objective of the accuracy assessment was to estimate (with a precision of ?10 percent at the 90 percent confidence level) the comission error in each of the eight level II hierarchical vegetation cover types. A stratified two-phase (double) cluster sample was used. Phase I consisted of 160 photointerpreted plots representing clusters of Landsat pixels, and phase II consisted of ground data collection at 80 of the phase I cluster sites. Ground data were used to refine the phase I error estimates by means of a linear regression model. The classified image was stratified by assigning each 15-pixel cluster to the stratum corresponding to the dominant cover type within each cluster. This method is known as stratified plurality sampling. Overall error was estimated to be 36 percent with a standard error of 2 percent. Estimated error for individual vegetation classes ranged from a low of 10 percent ?6 percent for evergreen woodland to 81 percent ?7 percent for cropland and pasture. Total cost of the accuracy assessment was $106,950 for the one-million-hectare study area. The combination of the stratified plurality sampling (SPS) method of sample allocation with double sampling provided the desired estimates within the required precision levels. The overall accuracy results confirmed that highly accurate digital classification of vegetation is difficult to perform in semiarid environments, due largely to the sparse vegetation cover. Nevertheless, these techniques show promise for providing more accurate information than is presently available for many BLM-administered lands.

  17. MAPPING SPATIAL THEMATIC ACCURACY WITH FUZZY SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thematic map accuracy is not spatially homogenous but variable across a landscape. Properly analyzing and representing spatial pattern and degree of thematic map accuracy would provide valuable information for using thematic maps. However, current thematic map accuracy measures (...

  18. Assessing and ensuring GOES-R magnetometer accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Delano; Todirita, Monica; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer subsystem accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma error per axis. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma error per axis. Error comes both from outside the magnetometers, e.g. spacecraft fields and misalignments, as well as inside, e.g. zero offset and scale factor errors. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it will be necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance before launch, we have used Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analysis. With the proposed calibration regimen, both suggest that the magnetometer subsystem will meet its accuracy requirements.

  19. Accuracy Assessment of Coastal Topography Derived from Uav Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, N.; Millescamps, B.; Pouget, F.; Dumon, A.; Lachaussée, N.; Bertin, X.

    2016-06-01

    To monitor coastal environments, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is a low-cost and easy to use solution to enable data acquisition with high temporal frequency and spatial resolution. Compared to Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) or Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), this solution produces Digital Surface Model (DSM) with a similar accuracy. To evaluate the DSM accuracy on a coastal environment, a campaign was carried out with a flying wing (eBee) combined with a digital camera. Using the Photoscan software and the photogrammetry process (Structure From Motion algorithm), a DSM and an orthomosaic were produced. Compared to GNSS surveys, the DSM accuracy is estimated. Two parameters are tested: the influence of the methodology (number and distribution of Ground Control Points, GCPs) and the influence of spatial image resolution (4.6 cm vs 2 cm). The results show that this solution is able to reproduce the topography of a coastal area with a high vertical accuracy (< 10 cm). The georeferencing of the DSM require a homogeneous distribution and a large number of GCPs. The accuracy is correlated with the number of GCPs (use 19 GCPs instead of 10 allows to reduce the difference of 4 cm); the required accuracy should be dependant of the research problematic. Last, in this particular environment, the presence of very small water surfaces on the sand bank does not allow to improve the accuracy when the spatial resolution of images is decreased.

  20. Accuracy of remotely sensed data: Sampling and analysis procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congalton, R. G.; Oderwald, R. G.; Mead, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A review and update of the discrete multivariate analysis techniques used for accuracy assessment is given. A listing of the computer program written to implement these techniques is given. New work on evaluating accuracy assessment using Monte Carlo simulation with different sampling schemes is given. The results of matrices from the mapping effort of the San Juan National Forest is given. A method for estimating the sample size requirements for implementing the accuracy assessment procedures is given. A proposed method for determining the reliability of change detection between two maps of the same area produced at different times is given.

  1. Air traffic control surveillance accuracy and update rate study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craigie, J. H.; Morrison, D. D.; Zipper, I.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an air traffic control surveillance accuracy and update rate study are presented. The objective of the study was to establish quantitative relationships between the surveillance accuracies, update rates, and the communication load associated with the tactical control of aircraft for conflict resolution. The relationships are established for typical types of aircraft, phases of flight, and types of airspace. Specific cases are analyzed to determine the surveillance accuracies and update rates required to prevent two aircraft from approaching each other too closely.

  2. Accuracy Test of Microsoft Kinect for Human Morphologic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, B.; Toth, C. K.; Detrekői, A.

    2012-08-01

    The Microsoft Kinect sensor, a popular gaming console, is widely used in a large number of applications, including close-range 3D measurements. This low-end device is rather inexpensive compared to similar active imaging systems. The Kinect sensors include an RGB camera, an IR projector, an IR camera and an audio unit. The human morphologic measurements require high accuracy with fast data acquisition rate. To achieve the highest accuracy, the depth sensor and the RGB camera should be calibrated and co-registered to achieve high-quality 3D point cloud as well as optical imagery. Since this is a low-end sensor, developed for different purpose, the accuracy could be critical for 3D measurement-based applications. Therefore, two types of accuracy test are performed: (1) for describing the absolute accuracy, the ranging accuracy of the device in the range of 0.4 to 15 m should be estimated, and (2) the relative accuracy of points depending on the range should be characterized. For the accuracy investigation, a test field was created with two spheres, while the relative accuracy is described by sphere fitting performance and the distance estimation between the sphere center points. Some other factors can be also considered, such as the angle of incidence or the material used in these tests. The non-ambiguity range of the sensor is from 0.3 to 4 m, but, based on our experiences, it can be extended up to 20 m. Obviously, this methodology raises some accuracy issues which make accuracy testing really important.

  3. Modeling individual differences in response time and accuracy in numeracy.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Roger; Thompson, Clarissa A; McKoon, Gail

    2015-04-01

    In the study of numeracy, some hypotheses have been based on response time (RT) as a dependent variable and some on accuracy, and considerable controversy has arisen about the presence or absence of correlations between RT and accuracy, between RT or accuracy and individual differences like IQ and math ability, and between various numeracy tasks. In this article, we show that an integration of the two dependent variables is required, which we accomplish with a theory-based model of decision making. We report data from four tasks: numerosity discrimination, number discrimination, memory for two-digit numbers, and memory for three-digit numbers. Accuracy correlated across tasks, as did RTs. However, the negative correlations that might be expected between RT and accuracy were not obtained; if a subject was accurate, it did not mean that they were fast (and vice versa). When the diffusion decision-making model was applied to the data (Ratcliff, 1978), we found significant correlations across the tasks between the quality of the numeracy information (drift rate) driving the decision process and between the speed/accuracy criterion settings, suggesting that similar numeracy skills and similar speed-accuracy settings are involved in the four tasks. In the model, accuracy is related to drift rate and RT is related to speed-accuracy criteria, but drift rate and criteria are not related to each other across subjects. This provides a theoretical basis for understanding why negative correlations were not obtained between accuracy and RT. We also manipulated criteria by instructing subjects to maximize either speed or accuracy, but still found correlations between the criteria settings between and within tasks, suggesting that the settings may represent an individual trait that can be modulated but not equated across subjects. Our results demonstrate that a decision-making model may provide a way to reconcile inconsistent and sometimes contradictory results in numeracy

  4. ACCURACY LIMITATIONS IN LONG TRACE PROFILOMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    TAKACS,P.Z.; QIAN,S.

    2003-08-25

    As requirements for surface slope error quality of grazing incidence optics approach the 100 nanoradian level, it is necessary to improve the performance of the measuring instruments to achieve accurate and repeatable results at this level. We have identified a number of internal error sources in the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that affect measurement quality at this level. The LTP is sensitive to phase shifts produced within the millimeter diameter of the pencil beam probe by optical path irregularities with scale lengths of a fraction of a millimeter. We examine the effects of mirror surface ''macroroughness'' and internal glass homogeneity on the accuracy of the LTP through experiment and theoretical modeling. We will place limits on the allowable surface ''macroroughness'' and glass homogeneity required to achieve accurate measurements in the nanoradian range.

  5. Accuracy of implant impression techniques.

    PubMed

    Assif, D; Marshak, B; Schmidt, A

    1996-01-01

    Three impression techniques were assessed for accuracy in a laboratory cast that simulated clinical practice. The first technique used autopolymerizing acrylic resin to splint the transfer copings. The second involved splinting of the transfer copings directly to an acrylic resin custom tray. In the third, only impression material was used to orient the transfer copings. The accuracy of stone casts with implant analogs was measured against a master framework. The fit of the framework on the casts was tested using strain gauges. The technique using acrylic resin to splint transfer copings in the impression material was significantly more accurate than the two other techniques. Stresses observed in the framework are described and discussed with suggestions to improve clinical and laboratory techniques.

  6. A high accuracy sun sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, H.

    The High Accuracy Sun Sensor (HASS) is described, concentrating on measurement principle, the CCD detector used, the construction of the sensorhead and the operation of the sensor electronics. Tests on a development model show that the main aim of a 0.01-arcsec rms stability over a 10-minute period is closely approached. Remaining problem areas are associated with the sensor sensitivity to illumination level variations, the shielding of the detector, and the test and calibration equipment.

  7. Enhancing and evaluating diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Swets, J A; Getty, D J; Pickett, R M; D'Orsi, C J; Seltzer, S E; McNeil, B J

    1991-01-01

    Techniques that may enhance diagnostic accuracy in clinical settings were tested in the context of mammography. Statistical information about the relevant features among those visible in a mammogram and about their relative importances in the diagnosis of breast cancer was the basis of two decision aids for radiologists: a checklist that guides the radiologist in assigning a scale value to each significant feature of the images of a particular case, and a computer program that merges those scale values optimally to estimate a probability of malignancy. A test set of approximately 150 proven cases (including normals and benign and malignant lesions) was interpreted by six radiologists, first in their usual manner and later with the decision aids. The enhancing effect of these feature-analytic techniques was analyzed across subsets of cases that were restricted progressively to more and more difficult cases, where difficulty was defined in terms of the radiologists' judgements in the standard reading condition. Accuracy in both standard and enhanced conditions decreased regularly and substantially as case difficulty increased, but differentially, such that the enhancement effect grew regularly and substantially. For the most difficult case sets, the observed increases in accuracy translated into an increase of about 0.15 in sensitivity (true-positive proportion) for a selected specificity (true-negative proportion) of 0.85 or a similar increase in specificity for a selected sensitivity of 0.85. That measured accuracy can depend on case-set difficulty to different degrees for two diagnostic approaches has general implications for evaluation in clinical medicine. Comparative, as well as absolute, assessments of diagnostic performances--for example, of alternative imaging techniques--may be distorted by inadequate treatments of this experimental variable. Subset analysis, as defined and illustrated here, can be useful in alleviating the problem.

  8. Municipal water consumption forecast accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Thomas M.; Molina, Angel L.

    2010-06-01

    Municipal water consumption planning is an active area of research because of infrastructure construction and maintenance costs, supply constraints, and water quality assurance. In spite of that, relatively few water forecast accuracy assessments have been completed to date, although some internal documentation may exist as part of the proprietary "grey literature." This study utilizes a data set of previously published municipal consumption forecasts to partially fill that gap in the empirical water economics literature. Previously published municipal water econometric forecasts for three public utilities are examined for predictive accuracy against two random walk benchmarks commonly used in regional analyses. Descriptive metrics used to quantify forecast accuracy include root-mean-square error and Theil inequality statistics. Formal statistical assessments are completed using four-pronged error differential regression F tests. Similar to studies for other metropolitan econometric forecasts in areas with similar demographic and labor market characteristics, model predictive performances for the municipal water aggregates in this effort are mixed for each of the municipalities included in the sample. Given the competitiveness of the benchmarks, analysts should employ care when utilizing econometric forecasts of municipal water consumption for planning purposes, comparing them to recent historical observations and trends to insure reliability. Comparative results using data from other markets, including regions facing differing labor and demographic conditions, would also be helpful.

  9. Measuring Diagnoses: ICD Code Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Kimberly J; Cook, Karon F; Price, Matt D; Wildes, Kimberly Raiford; Hurdle, John F; Ashton, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine potential sources of errors at each step of the described inpatient International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding process. Data Sources/Study Setting The use of disease codes from the ICD has expanded from classifying morbidity and mortality information for statistical purposes to diverse sets of applications in research, health care policy, and health care finance. By describing a brief history of ICD coding, detailing the process for assigning codes, identifying where errors can be introduced into the process, and reviewing methods for examining code accuracy, we help code users more systematically evaluate code accuracy for their particular applications. Study Design/Methods We summarize the inpatient ICD diagnostic coding process from patient admission to diagnostic code assignment. We examine potential sources of errors at each step and offer code users a tool for systematically evaluating code accuracy. Principle Findings Main error sources along the “patient trajectory” include amount and quality of information at admission, communication among patients and providers, the clinician's knowledge and experience with the illness, and the clinician's attention to detail. Main error sources along the “paper trail” include variance in the electronic and written records, coder training and experience, facility quality-control efforts, and unintentional and intentional coder errors, such as misspecification, unbundling, and upcoding. Conclusions By clearly specifying the code assignment process and heightening their awareness of potential error sources, code users can better evaluate the applicability and limitations of codes for their particular situations. ICD codes can then be used in the most appropriate ways. PMID:16178999

  10. Accuracy Assessment of Altimeter Derived Geostrophic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leben, R. R.; Powell, B. S.; Born, G. H.; Guinasso, N. L.

    2002-12-01

    Along track sea surface height anomaly gradients are proportional to cross track geostrophic velocity anomalies allowing satellite altimetry to provide much needed satellite observations of changes in the geostrophic component of surface ocean currents. Often, surface height gradients are computed from altimeter data archives that have been corrected to give the most accurate absolute sea level, a practice that may unnecessarily increase the error in the cross track velocity anomalies and thereby require excessive smoothing to mitigate noise. Because differentiation along track acts as a high-pass filter, many of the path length corrections applied to altimeter data for absolute height accuracy are unnecessary for the corresponding gradient calculations. We report on a study to investigate appropriate altimetric corrections and processing techniques for improving geostrophic velocity accuracy. Accuracy is assessed by comparing cross track current measurements from two moorings placed along the descending TOPEX/POSEIDON ground track number 52 in the Gulf of Mexico to the corresponding altimeter velocity estimates. The buoys are deployed and maintained by the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS) under Interagency Contracts with Texas A&M University. The buoys telemeter observations in near real-time via satellite to the TABS station located at the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) at Texas A&M. Buoy M is located in shelf waters of 57 m depth with a second, Buoy N, 38 km away on the shelf break at 105 m depth. Buoy N has been operational since the beginning of 2002 and has a current meter at 2m depth providing in situ measurements of surface velocities coincident with Jason and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter over flights. This allows one of the first detailed comparisons of shallow water near surface current meter time series to coincident altimetry.

  11. [True color accuracy in digital forensic photography].

    PubMed

    Ramsthaler, Frank; Birngruber, Christoph G; Kröll, Ann-Katrin; Kettner, Mattias; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2016-01-01

    Forensic photographs not only need to be unaltered and authentic and capture context-relevant images, along with certain minimum requirements for image sharpness and information density, but color accuracy also plays an important role, for instance, in the assessment of injuries or taphonomic stages, or in the identification and evaluation of traces from photos. The perception of color not only varies subjectively from person to person, but as a discrete property of an image, color in digital photos is also to a considerable extent influenced by technical factors such as lighting, acquisition settings, camera, and output medium (print, monitor). For these reasons, consistent color accuracy has so far been limited in digital photography. Because images usually contain a wealth of color information, especially for complex or composite colors or shades of color, and the wavelength-dependent sensitivity to factors such as light and shadow may vary between cameras, the usefulness of issuing general recommendations for camera capture settings is limited. Our results indicate that true image colors can best and most realistically be captured with the SpyderCheckr technical calibration tool for digital cameras tested in this study. Apart from aspects such as the simplicity and quickness of the calibration procedure, a further advantage of the tool is that the results are independent of the camera used and can also be used for the color management of output devices such as monitors and printers. The SpyderCheckr color-code patches allow true colors to be captured more realistically than with a manual white balance tool or an automatic flash. We therefore recommend that the use of a color management tool should be considered for the acquisition of all images that demand high true color accuracy (in particular in the setting of injury documentation).

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Needle Technique Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Angela N.; Peiffer, Jeffery S.; Halmann, Nahi; Delaney, Luke; Owen, Cindy A.; Hersh, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia facilitates an approach to sensitive targets such as nerve clusters without contact or inadvertent puncture. We compared accuracy of needle placement with a novel passive magnetic ultrasound needle guidance technology (NGT) versus conventional ultrasound (CU) with echogenic needles. Methods Sixteen anesthesiologists and 19 residents performed a series of 16 needle insertion tasks each, 8 using NGT (n = 280) and 8 using CU (n = 280), in high-fidelity porcine phantoms. Tasks were stratified based on aiming to contact (target-contact) or place in close proximity with (target-proximity) targets, needle gauge (no. 18/no. 22), and in-plane (IP) or out-of-plane (OOP) approach. Distance to the target, task completion by aim, number of passes, and number of tasks completed on the first pass were reported. Results Needle guidance technology significantly improved distance, task completion, number of passes, and completion on the first pass compared with CU for both IP and OOP approaches (P ≤ 0.001). Average NGT distance to target was lower by 57.1% overall (n = 560, 1.5 ± 2.4 vs 3.5 ± 3.7 mm), 38.5% IP (n = 140, 1.6 ± 2.6 vs 2.6 ± 2.8 mm), and 68.2% OOP (n = 140, 1.4 ± 2.2 vs 4.4 ± 4.3 mm) (all P ≤ 0.01). Subgroup analyses revealed accuracy gains were largest among target-proximity tasks performed by residents and for OOP approaches. Needle guidance technology improved first-pass completion from 214 (76.4%) per 280 to 249 (88.9%) per 280, a significant improvement of 16.4% (P = 0.001). Conclusions Passive magnetic NGT can improve accuracy of needle procedures, particularly among OOP procedures requiring close approach to sensitive targets, such as nerve blocks in anesthesiology practice. PMID:28079754

  13. Numerical accuracy of mean-field calculations in coordinate space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryssens, W.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bender, M.

    2015-12-01

    Background: Mean-field methods based on an energy density functional (EDF) are powerful tools used to describe many properties of nuclei in the entirety of the nuclear chart. The accuracy required of energies for nuclear physics and astrophysics applications is of the order of 500 keV and much effort is undertaken to build EDFs that meet this requirement. Purpose: Mean-field calculations have to be accurate enough to preserve the accuracy of the EDF. We study this numerical accuracy in detail for a specific numerical choice of representation for mean-field equations that can accommodate any kind of symmetry breaking. Method: The method that we use is a particular implementation of three-dimensional mesh calculations. Its numerical accuracy is governed by three main factors: the size of the box in which the nucleus is confined, the way numerical derivatives are calculated, and the distance between the points on the mesh. Results: We examine the dependence of the results on these three factors for spherical doubly magic nuclei, neutron-rich 34Ne , the fission barrier of 240Pu , and isotopic chains around Z =50 . Conclusions: Mesh calculations offer the user extensive control over the numerical accuracy of the solution scheme. When appropriate choices for the numerical scheme are made the achievable accuracy is well below the model uncertainties of mean-field methods.

  14. Systematic Calibration for Ultra-High Accuracy Inertial Measurement Units.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qingzhong; Yang, Gongliu; Song, Ningfang; Liu, Yiliang

    2016-06-22

    An inertial navigation system (INS) has been widely used in challenging GPS environments. With the rapid development of modern physics, an atomic gyroscope will come into use in the near future with a predicted accuracy of 5 × 10(-6)°/h or better. However, existing calibration methods and devices can not satisfy the accuracy requirements of future ultra-high accuracy inertial sensors. In this paper, an improved calibration model is established by introducing gyro g-sensitivity errors, accelerometer cross-coupling errors and lever arm errors. A systematic calibration method is proposed based on a 51-state Kalman filter and smoother. Simulation results show that the proposed calibration method can realize the estimation of all the parameters using a common dual-axis turntable. Laboratory and sailing tests prove that the position accuracy in a five-day inertial navigation can be improved about 8% by the proposed calibration method. The accuracy can be improved at least 20% when the position accuracy of the atomic gyro INS can reach a level of 0.1 nautical miles/5 d. Compared with the existing calibration methods, the proposed method, with more error sources and high order small error parameters calibrated for ultra-high accuracy inertial measurement units (IMUs) using common turntables, has a great application potential in future atomic gyro INSs.

  15. Systematic Calibration for Ultra-High Accuracy Inertial Measurement Units

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qingzhong; Yang, Gongliu; Song, Ningfang; Liu, Yiliang

    2016-01-01

    An inertial navigation system (INS) has been widely used in challenging GPS environments. With the rapid development of modern physics, an atomic gyroscope will come into use in the near future with a predicted accuracy of 5 × 10−6°/h or better. However, existing calibration methods and devices can not satisfy the accuracy requirements of future ultra-high accuracy inertial sensors. In this paper, an improved calibration model is established by introducing gyro g-sensitivity errors, accelerometer cross-coupling errors and lever arm errors. A systematic calibration method is proposed based on a 51-state Kalman filter and smoother. Simulation results show that the proposed calibration method can realize the estimation of all the parameters using a common dual-axis turntable. Laboratory and sailing tests prove that the position accuracy in a five-day inertial navigation can be improved about 8% by the proposed calibration method. The accuracy can be improved at least 20% when the position accuracy of the atomic gyro INS can reach a level of 0.1 nautical miles/5 d. Compared with the existing calibration methods, the proposed method, with more error sources and high order small error parameters calibrated for ultra-high accuracy inertial measurement units (IMUs) using common turntables, has a great application potential in future atomic gyro INSs. PMID:27338408

  16. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  17. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  18. Accuracy of analyses of microelectronics nanostructures in atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurpillot, F.; Rolland, N.; Estivill, R.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2016-07-01

    The routine use of atom probe tomography (APT) as a nano-analysis microscope in the semiconductor industry requires the precise evaluation of the metrological parameters of this instrument (spatial accuracy, spatial precision, composition accuracy or composition precision). The spatial accuracy of this microscope is evaluated in this paper in the analysis of planar structures such as high-k metal gate stacks. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that the in-depth accuracy of reconstructed APT images is perturbed when analyzing this structure composed of an oxide layer of high electrical permittivity (higher-k dielectric constant) that separates the metal gate and the semiconductor channel of a field emitter transistor. Large differences in the evaporation field between these layers (resulting from large differences in material properties) are the main sources of image distortions. An analytic model is used to interpret inaccuracy in the depth reconstruction of these devices in APT.

  19. Accuracy of flow hoods in residential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2002-05-01

    To assess whether houses can meet performance expectations, the new practice of residential commissioning will likely use flow hoods to measure supply and return grille airflows in HVAC systems. Depending on hood accuracy, these measurements can be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow for heating and cooling, to determine flow imbalances between different building spaces, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. This paper discusses these flow hood applications and the accuracy requirements in each case. Laboratory tests of several residential flow hoods showed that these hoods can be inadequate to measure flows in residential systems. Potential errors are about 20% to 30% of measured flow, due to poor calibrations, sensitivity to grille flow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. Active flow hoods equipped with measurement devices that are insensitive to grille airflow patterns have an order of magnitude less error, and are more reliable and consistent in most cases. Our tests also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, a new standard for flow hood calibration needs to be developed, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow hoods. Lastly, field evaluation of a selection of flow hoods showed that it is possible to obtain reasonable results using some flow hoods if the field tests are carefully done, the grilles are appropriate, and grille location does not restrict flow hood placement.

  20. Pedometer accuracy in slow walking older adults

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jessica B.; Krč, Katarina M.; Mitchell, Emily A.; Eng, Janice J.; Noble, Jeremy W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine pedometer accuracy during slow overground walking in older adults (Mean age = 63.6 years). A total of 18 participants (6 males, 12 females) wore 5 different brands of pedometers over 3 pre-set cadences that elicited walking speeds between 0.3 and 0.9 m/s and one self-selected cadence over 80 meters of indoor track. Pedometer accuracy decreased with slower walking speeds with mean percent errors across all devices combined of 56%, 40%, 19% and 9% at cadences of 50, 66, and 80 steps/min, and self selected cadence, respectively. Percent error ranged from 45.3% for Omron HJ105 to 66.9% for Yamax Digiwalker 200. Due to the high level of error across the slowest cadences of all 5 devices, the use of pedometers to monitor step counts in healthy older adults with slower gait speeds is problematic. Further research is required to develop pedometer mechanisms that accurately measure steps at slower walking speeds. PMID:24795762

  1. Improvements on the accuracy of beam bugs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y J; Fessenden, T

    1998-09-02

    At LLNL resistive wall monitors are used to measure the current and position used on ETA-II show a droop in signal due to a fast redistribution time constant of the signals. This paper presents the analysis and experimental test of the beam bugs used for beam current and position measurements in and after the fast kicker. It concludes with an outline of present and future changes that can be made to improve the accuracy of these beam bugs. of intense electron beams in electron induction linacs and beam transport lines. These, known locally as "beam bugs", have been used throughout linear induction accelerators as essential diagnostics of beam current and location. Recently, the development of a fast beam kicker has required improvement in the accuracy of measuring the position of beams. By picking off signals at more than the usual four positions around the monitor, beam position measurement error can be greatly reduced. A second significant source of error is the mechanical variation of the resistor around the bug.

  2. Improvements on the accuracy of beam bugs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.J.; Fessenden, T.

    1998-08-17

    At LLNL resistive wall monitors are used to measure the current and position used on ETA-II show a droop in signal due to a fast redistribution time constant of the signals. This paper presents the analysis and experimental test of the beam bugs used for beam current and position measurements in and after the fast kicker. It concludes with an outline of present and future changes that can be made to improve the accuracy of these beam bugs. of intense electron beams in electron induction linacs and beam transport lines. These, known locally as ''beam bugs'', have been used throughout linear induction accelerators as essential diagnostics of beam current and location. Recently, the development of a fast beam kicker has required improvement in the accuracy of measuring the position of beams. By picking off signals at more than the usual four positions around the monitor, beam position measurement error can be greatly reduced. A second significant source of error is the mechanical variation of the resistor around the bug.

  3. Environmental Assessment for Central Tennessee Relay Node Site No. RN 8E911TN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-19

    perimeter of the ground plane to protect the ground plane and guy anchors and to prevent inadvertent exposure to electric shock resulting from the buildup of...a plateau intermediate in elevation between the Cumberland Plateau to the east and the Central Nashville Basin to the west. The land is generally...flat with areas of gently roiing hills, though the southern part of Arnold AFB, near Woods Reservoir, has steep slopes of 10 percent or greater

  4. Presentation accuracy of Web animation methods.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W C

    2001-05-01

    Several Web animation methods were independently assessed on fast and slow systems running two popular Web browsers under MacOS and Windows. The methods assessed included those requiring programming (Authorware, Java, Javascript/Jscript), browser extensions (Flash and Authorware), or neither (animated GIF). The number of raster scans that an image in an animation was presented for was counted. This was used as an estimate of the minimum presentation time for the image when the software was set to update the animation as quickly as possible. In a second condition, the image was set to be displayed for 100 msec, and differences between observed and expected presentations were used to assess accuracy. In general, all the methods except Java deteriorated as a function of the speed of the computer system, with the poorest temporal resolutions and greatest variability occurring on slower systems. For some animation methods, poor performance was dependent on browser, operating system, system speed, or combinations of these.

  5. Accuracy of the vivofit activity tracker.

    PubMed

    Alsubheen, Sana'a A; George, Amanda M; Baker, Alicia; Rohr, Linda E; Basset, Fabien A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of the vivofit activity tracker in assessing energy expenditure and step count. Thirteen participants wore the vivofit activity tracker for five days. Participants were required to independently perform 1 h of self-selected activity each day of the study. On day four, participants came to the lab to undergo BMR and a treadmill-walking task (TWT). On day five, participants completed 1 h of office-type activities. BMR values estimated by the vivofit were not significantly different from the values measured through indirect calorimetry (IC). The vivofit significantly underestimated EE for treadmill walking, but responded to the differences in the inclination. Vivofit underestimated step count for level walking but provided an accurate estimate for incline walking. There was a strong correlation between EE and the exercise intensity. The vivofit activity tracker is on par with similar devices and can be used to track physical activity.

  6. High Accuracy Wavelength Calibration For A Scanning Visible Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Filippo Scotti and Ronald Bell

    2010-07-29

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies ≤ 0.2Â. An automated calibration for a scanning spectrometer has been developed to achieve a high wavelength accuracy overr the visible spectrum, stable over time and environmental conditions, without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement. The method fits all relevant spectrometer paraameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a steping-motor controlled sine-drive, accuracies of ~0.025 Â have been demonstrated. With the addition of high resolution (0.075 aresec) optical encoder on the grading stage, greater precision (~0.005 Â) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements with ~0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively.

  7. A Nonparametric Approach to Estimate Classification Accuracy and Consistency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Quinn N.; Cheng, Ying

    2014-01-01

    When cut scores for classifications occur on the total score scale, popular methods for estimating classification accuracy (CA) and classification consistency (CC) require assumptions about a parametric form of the test scores or about a parametric response model, such as item response theory (IRT). This article develops an approach to estimate CA…

  8. 10 CFR 72.11 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 72.11 Section 72.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS...

  9. Navigation Accuracy Guidelines for Orbital Formation Flying Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Alfriend, Kyle T.

    2003-01-01

    Some simple guidelines based on the accuracy in determining a satellite formation's semi-major axis differences are useful in making preliminary assessments of the navigation accuracy needed to support such missions. These guidelines are valid for any elliptical orbit, regardless of eccentricity. Although maneuvers required for formation establishment, reconfiguration, and station-keeping require accurate prediction of the state estimate to the maneuver we, and hence are directly affected by errors in all the orbital elements, experience has shown that determination of orbit plane orientation and orbit shape to acceptable levels is less challenging than the determination of orbital period or semi-major axis. Furthermore, any differences among the member s semi-major axes are undesirable for a satellite formation, since it will lead to differential along-track drift due to period differences. Since inevitable navigation errors prevent these differences from ever being zero, one may use the guidelines this paper presents to determine how much drift will result from a given relative navigation accuracy, or conversely what navigation accuracy is required to limit drift to a given rate. Since the guidelines do not account for non-two-body perturbations, they may be viewed as useful preliminary design tools, rather than as the basis for mission navigation requirements, which should be based on detailed analysis of the mission configuration, including all relevant sources of uncertainty.

  10. 10 CFR 72.11 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 72.11 Section 72.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS...

  11. Machine tool accuracy characterization workshops. Final report, May 5, 1992--November 5 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-06

    The ability to assess the accuracy of machine tools is required by both tool builders and users. Builders must have this ability in order to predict the accuracy capability of a machine tool for different part geometry`s, to provide verifiable accuracy information for sales purposes, and to locate error sources for maintenance, troubleshooting, and design enhancement. Users require the same ability in order to make intelligent choices in selecting or procuring machine tools, to predict component manufacturing accuracy, and to perform maintenance and troubleshooting. In both instances, the ability to fully evaluate the accuracy capabilities of a machine tool and the source of its limitations is essential for using the tool to its maximum accuracy and productivity potential. This project was designed to transfer expertise in modern machine tool accuracy testing methods from LLNL to US industry, and to educate users on the use and application of emerging standards for machine tool performance testing.

  12. 47 CFR 64.605 - Emergency calling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Registered Location is in a geographic area served by a Wireline E911 Network and is available to the... statewide default answering point, or appropriate local emergency authority that corresponds to the caller's... answering point, or appropriate local emergency authority, at the outset of the outbound leg of an...

  13. New Reconstruction Accuracy Metric for 3D PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpayee, Abhishek; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction for 3D PIV typically relies on recombining images captured from different viewpoints via multiple cameras/apertures. Ideally, the quality of reconstruction dictates the accuracy of the derived velocity field. A reconstruction quality parameter Q is commonly used as a measure of the accuracy of reconstruction algorithms. By definition, a high Q value requires intensity peak levels and shapes in the reconstructed and reference volumes to be matched. We show that accurate velocity fields rely only on the peak locations in the volumes and not on intensity peak levels and shapes. In synthetic aperture (SA) PIV reconstructions, the intensity peak shapes and heights vary with the number of cameras and due to spatial/temporal particle intensity variation respectively. This lowers Q but not the accuracy of the derived velocity field. We introduce a new velocity vector correlation factor Qv as a metric to assess the accuracy of 3D PIV techniques, which provides a better indication of algorithm accuracy. For SAPIV, the number of cameras required for a high Qv are lower than that for a high Q. We discuss Qv in the context of 3D PIV and also present a preliminary comparison of the performance of TomoPIV and SAPIV based on Qv.

  14. Investigation of the Accuracy of Google Earth Elevation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ashmawy, Khalid L. A.

    2016-09-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) comprise valuable source of elevation data required for many engineering applications. Contour lines, slope - aspect maps are part of their many uses. Moreover, DEMs are used often in geographic information systems (GIS), and are the most common basis for digitally-produced relief maps. This paper proposes a method of generating DEM by using Google Earth elevation data which is easier and free. The case study consisted of three different small regions in the northern beach in Egypt. The accuracy of the Google earth derived elevation data are reported using root mean square error (RMSE), mean error (ME) and maximum absolute error (MAE). All these accuracy statistics were computed using the ground coordinates of 200 reference points for each region of the case study. The reference data was collected with total station survey. The results showed that the accuracies for the prepared DEMs are suitable for some certain engineering applications but inadequate to meet the standard required for fine/small scale DEM for very precise engineering study. The obtained accuracies for terrain with small height difference can be used for preparing large area cadastral, city planning, or land classification maps. In general, Google Earth elevation data can be used only for investigation and preliminary studies with low cost. It is strongly concluded that the users of Google Earth have to test the accuracy of elevation data by comparing with reference data before using it.

  15. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  16. High accuracy broadband infrared spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan

    Mueller matrix spectroscopy or Spectropolarimetry combines conventional spectroscopy with polarimetry, providing more information than can be gleaned from spectroscopy alone. Experimental studies on infrared polarization properties of materials covering a broad spectral range have been scarce due to the lack of available instrumentation. This dissertation aims to fill the gap by the design, development, calibration and testing of a broadband Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectropolarimeter. The instrument operates over the 3-12 mum waveband and offers better overall accuracy compared to the previous generation instruments. Accurate calibration of a broadband spectropolarimeter is a non-trivial task due to the inherent complexity of the measurement process. An improved calibration technique is proposed for the spectropolarimeter and numerical simulations are conducted to study the effectiveness of the proposed technique. Insights into the geometrical structure of the polarimetric measurement matrix is provided to aid further research towards global optimization of Mueller matrix polarimeters. A high performance infrared wire-grid polarizer is characterized using the spectropolarimeter. Mueller matrix spectrum measurements on Penicillin and pine pollen are also presented.

  17. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  18. [Accuracy of HDL cholesterol measurements].

    PubMed

    Niedmann, P D; Luthe, H; Wieland, H; Schaper, G; Seidel, D

    1983-02-01

    The widespread use of different methods for the determination of HDL-cholesterol (in Europe: sodium phosphotungstic acid/MgCl2) in connection with enzymatic procedures (in the USA: heparin/MnCl2 followed by the Liebermann-Burchard method) but common reference values makes it necessary to evaluate not only accuracy, specificity, and precision of the precipitation step but also of the subsequent cholesterol determination. A high ratio of serum vs. concentrated precipitation reagent (10:1 V/V) leads to the formation of variable amounts of delta-3.5-cholestadiene. This substance is not recognized by cholesterol oxidase but leads to an 1.6 times overestimation by the Liebermann-Burchard method. Therefore, errors in HDL-cholesterol determination should be considered and differences up to 30% may occur between HDL-cholesterol values determined by the different techniques (heparin/MnCl2 - Liebermann-Burchard and NaPW/MgCl2-CHOD-PAP).

  19. Ground Truth Sampling and LANDSAT Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. W.; Gunther, F. J.; Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that the key factor in any accuracy assessment of remote sensing data is the method used for determining the ground truth, independent of the remote sensing data itself. The sampling and accuracy procedures developed for nuclear power plant siting study are described. The purpose of the sampling procedure was to provide data for developing supervised classifications for two study sites and for assessing the accuracy of that and the other procedures used. The purpose of the accuracy assessment was to allow the comparison of the cost and accuracy of various classification procedures as applied to various data types.

  20. Measurements of dimensional accuracy using linear and scanning profile techniques.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A; Huggett, R; Zissis, A

    1992-01-01

    Various measurement methods have been described for the determination of dimensional accuracy and stability of denture base materials. This investigation introduces a computerised coordinate measuring machine (CCMM) and compares it with two methods routinely used for assessment of the accuracy of fit of denture base materials. The results demonstrate that the three methods (digital calipers, optical comparator, and CCMM) are acceptable for linear measurement. The CCMM was also used in its scanning mode to define and to quantify the contour changes of the resin bases. The advantages of the CCMM become apparent when two-dimensional changes require assessment.

  1. Using judgement to improve accuracy in decision-making.

    PubMed

    Dowding, Dawn; Thompson, Carl

    Nursing judgements are complex, often involving the need to process a large number of information cues. Key issues include how accurate they are and how we can improve levels of accuracy. Traditional approaches to the study of nursing judgement, characterised by qualitative and descriptive research, have provided valuable insights into the nature of expert nursing practice and the complexity of practice. However, they have largely failed to provide the data needed to address judgement accuracy. Social judgement analysis approaches are one way of overcoming these limitations. This paper argues that as nurses take on more roles requiring accurate judgement, it is time to increase our knowledge of judgement and ways to improve it.

  2. Landsat Thematic Mapper geodetic accuracy - Implications for geocoded map compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.; Walker, R. E.; Gokhmann, B.

    1985-01-01

    The geodetic accuracy and geometric fidelity of corrected thematic mapper (TM) imagery are evaluated. The positional accuracy requirements for the TM are for a single band to within 0.5 pixels of true earth-surface locations at any point over 90 percent of the image and for interband registration to within 0.3 pixel tolerance over 90 percent of the data. Landsat 4 and 5 TM data are analyzed to investigate: (1) single band geometric integrity, (2) 30 m resolution interband registration; (3) image to image conformity; (4) image to ground conformity; and (5) image projective geometry conformity to a mapped earth geometry. The procedures used to study these characteristics are described. The data reveal that Landsat TM digital data met or exceed map accuracy standards for horizontal control.

  3. Effects of accuracy motivation and anchoring on metacomprehension judgment and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin

    2012-01-01

    The current research investigates how accuracy motivation impacts anchoring and adjustment in metacomprehension judgment and how accuracy motivation and anchoring affect metacomprehension accuracy. Participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions produced by the between-subjects factorial design involving accuracy motivation (incentive or no) and peer performance anchor (95%, 55%, or no). Two studies showed that accuracy motivation did not impact anchoring bias, but the adjustment-from-anchor process occurred. Accuracy incentive increased anchor-judgment gap for the 95% anchor but not for the 55% anchor, which induced less certainty about the direction of adjustment. The findings offer support to the integrative theory of anchoring. Additionally, the two studies revealed a "power struggle" between accuracy motivation and anchoring in influencing metacomprehension accuracy. Accuracy motivation could improve metacomprehension accuracy in spite of anchoring effect, but if anchoring effect is too strong, it could overpower the motivation effect. The implications of the findings were discussed.

  4. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.; Baker, D.

    1994-10-01

    This document presents a compilation of the attitude accuracy attained by a number of satellites that have been supported by the Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It starts with a general description of the factors that influence spacecraft attitude accuracy. After brief descriptions of the missions supported, it presents the attitude accuracy results for currently active and older missions, including both three-axis stabilized and spin-stabilized spacecraft. The attitude accuracy results are grouped by the sensor pair used to determine the attitudes. A supplementary section is also included, containing the results of theoretical computations of the effects of variation of sensor accuracy on overall attitude accuracy.

  5. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.; Baker, D.

    1994-01-01

    This document presents a compilation of the attitude accuracy attained by a number of satellites that have been supported by the Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It starts with a general description of the factors that influence spacecraft attitude accuracy. After brief descriptions of the missions supported, it presents the attitude accuracy results for currently active and older missions, including both three-axis stabilized and spin-stabilized spacecraft. The attitude accuracy results are grouped by the sensor pair used to determine the attitudes. A supplementary section is also included, containing the results of theoretical computations of the effects of variation of sensor accuracy on overall attitude accuracy.

  6. Cost and accuracy of advanced breeding trial designs in apple

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, Julia M; Evans, Kate M; Hardner, Craig M

    2016-01-01

    Trialing advanced candidates in tree fruit crops is expensive due to the long-term nature of the planting and labor-intensive evaluations required to make selection decisions. How closely the trait evaluations approximate the true trait value needs balancing with the cost of the program. Designs of field trials of advanced apple candidates in which reduced number of locations, the number of years and the number of harvests per year were modeled to investigate the effect on the cost and accuracy in an operational breeding program. The aim was to find designs that would allow evaluation of the most additional candidates while sacrificing the least accuracy. Critical percentage difference, response to selection, and correlated response were used to examine changes in accuracy of trait evaluations. For the quality traits evaluated, accuracy and response to selection were not substantially reduced for most trial designs. Risk management influences the decision to change trial design, and some designs had greater risk associated with them. Balancing cost and accuracy with risk yields valuable insight into advanced breeding trial design. The methods outlined in this analysis would be well suited to other horticultural crop breeding programs. PMID:27019717

  7. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-jiao; Xiong, Yu-xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial “line-laser” scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a “stereophotography” (3dMD) and a “structured light” facial scanner (FaceScan) separately. Registration based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm was executed to overlap the test models to reference models, and “3D error” as a new measurement indicator calculated by reverse engineering software (Geomagic Studio) was used to evaluate the 3D global and partial (upper, middle, and lower parts of face) PA of each facial scanner. The respective 3D accuracy of stereophotography and structured light facial scanners obtained for facial deformities was 0.58±0.11 mm and 0.57±0.07 mm. The 3D accuracy of different facial partitions was inconsistent; the middle face had the best performance. Although the PA of two facial scanners was lower than their nominal accuracy (NA), they all met the requirement for oral clinic use. PMID:28056044

  8. Accuracy testing of steel and electric groundwater-level measuring tapes: Test method and in-service tape accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Clayton, Christopher S.

    2015-10-09

    The calibration device and proposed method were used to calibrate a sample of in-service USGS steel and electric groundwater tapes. The sample of in-service groundwater steel tapes were in relatively good condition. All steel tapes, except one, were accurate to ±0.01 ft per 100 ft over their entire length. One steel tape, which had obvious damage in the first hundred feet, was marginally outside the accuracy of ±0.01 ft per 100 ft by 0.001 ft. The sample of in-service groundwater-level electric tapes were in a range of conditions—from like new, with cosmetic damage, to nonfunctional. The in-service electric tapes did not meet the USGS accuracy recommendation of ±0.01 ft. In-service electric tapes, except for the nonfunctional tape, were accurate to about ±0.03 ft per 100 ft. A comparison of new with in-service electric tapes found that steel-core electric tapes maintained their length and accuracy better than electric tapes without a steel core. The in-service steel tapes could be used as is and achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurements. The in-service electric tapes require tape corrections to achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurement.

  9. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Xiong, Yu-Xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial "line-laser" scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a "stereophotography" (3dMD) and a "structured light" facial scanner (FaceScan) separately. Registration based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm was executed to overlap the test models to reference models, and "3D error" as a new measurement indicator calculated by reverse engineering software (Geomagic Studio) was used to evaluate the 3D global and partial (upper, middle, and lower parts of face) PA of each facial scanner. The respective 3D accuracy of stereophotography and structured light facial scanners obtained for facial deformities was 0.58±0.11 mm and 0.57±0.07 mm. The 3D accuracy of different facial partitions was inconsistent; the middle face had the best performance. Although the PA of two facial scanners was lower than their nominal accuracy (NA), they all met the requirement for oral clinic use.

  10. Theoferometer for High Accuracy Optical Alignment and Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald; Leviton, Doug; Koterba, Seth

    2004-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the orientation of optical parts and systems is a pressing problem for upcoming space missions, such as stellar interferometers, requiring the knowledge and maintenance of positions to the sub-arcsecond level. Theodolites, the devices commonly used to make these measurements, cannot provide the needed level of accuracy. This paper describes the design, construction, and testing of an interferometer system to fill the widening gap between future requirements and current capabilities. A Twyman-Green interferometer mounted on a 2 degree of freedom rotation stage is able to obtain sub-arcsecond, gravity-referenced tilt measurements of a sample alignment cube. Dubbed a 'theoferometer,' this device offers greater ease-of-use, accuracy, and repeatability than conventional methods, making it a suitable 21st-century replacement for the theodolite.

  11. Stereotype Accuracy: Toward Appreciating Group Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yueh-Ting, Ed.; And Others

    The preponderance of scholarly theory and research on stereotypes assumes that they are bad and inaccurate, but understanding stereotype accuracy and inaccuracy is more interesting and complicated than simpleminded accusations of racism or sexism would seem to imply. The selections in this collection explore issues of the accuracy of stereotypes…

  12. [Upon scientific accuracy scheme at clinical specialties].

    PubMed

    Ortega Calvo, M

    2006-11-01

    Will be medical specialties like sciences in the future? Yes, progressively they will. Accuracy in clinical specialties will be dissimilar in the future because formal-logic mathematics, quantum physics advances and relativity theory utilities. Evidence based medicine is now helping to clinical specialties on scientific accuracy by the way of decision theory.

  13. Sound source localization identification accuracy: bandwidth dependencies.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    Sound source localization accuracy using a sound source identification task was measured in the front, right quarter of the azimuth plane as rms (root-mean-square) error (degrees) for stimulus conditions in which the bandwidth (1/20 to 2 octaves wide) and center frequency (250, 2000, 4000 Hz) of 200-ms noise bursts were varied. Tones of different frequencies (250, 2000, 4000 Hz) were also used. As stimulus bandwidth increases, there is an increase in sound source localization identification accuracy (i.e., rms error decreases). Wideband stimuli (>1 octave wide) produce best sound source localization accuracy (~6°-7° rms error), and localization accuracy for these wideband noise stimuli does not depend on center frequency. For narrow bandwidths (<1 octave) and tonal stimuli, accuracy does depend on center frequency such that highest accuracy is obtained for low-frequency stimuli (centered on 250 Hz), worse accuracy for mid-frequency stimuli (centered on 2000 Hz), and intermediate accuracy for high-frequency stimuli (centered on 4000 Hz).

  14. Accuracy of Parent Identification of Stuttering Occurrence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsdottir, Johanna; Ingham, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Background: Clinicians rely on parents to provide information regarding the onset and development of stuttering in their own children. The accuracy and reliability of their judgments of stuttering is therefore important and is not well researched. Aim: To investigate the accuracy of parent judgements of stuttering in their own children's speech…

  15. Increasing Deception Detection Accuracy with Strategic Questioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Timothy R.; Shaw, Allison; Shulman, Hillary C.

    2010-01-01

    One explanation for the finding of slightly above-chance accuracy in detecting deception experiments is limited variance in sender transparency. The current study sought to increase accuracy by increasing variance in sender transparency with strategic interrogative questioning. Participants (total N = 128) observed cheaters and noncheaters who…

  16. The Accuracy of Gender Stereotypes Regarding Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Sylvia; Finnegan, Andrea

    Given the salience of biological sex, it is not surprising that gender stereotypes are pervasive. To explore the prevalence of such stereotypes, the accuracy of gender stereotyping regarding occupations is presented in this paper. The paper opens with an overview of gender stereotype measures that use self-perceptions as benchmarks of accuracy,…

  17. Evaluating the accuracy of selenodesic reference grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koptev, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Estimates were made of the accuracy of reference point grids using the technique of calculating the errors from theoretical analysis. Factors taken into consideration were: telescope accuracy, number of photographs, and libration amplitude. To solve the problem, formulas were used for the relationship between the coordinates of lunar surface points and their images on the photograph.

  18. Characterizing geometric accuracy and precision in image guided gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Stephen Edward

    Gated radiotherapy combined with intensity modulated or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for tumors in the thorax and abdomen can deliver dose distributions which conform closely to tumor shapes allowing increased tumor dose while sparing healthy tissues. These conformal fields require more accurate and precise placement than traditional fields or tumors may receive suboptimal dose thereby reducing tumor control probability. Image guidance based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) provides a means to improve accuracy and precision in radiotherapy. The ability of 4DCT to accurately reproduce patient geometry and the ability of image guided gating equipment to position tumors and place fields around them must be characterized in order to determine treatment parameters such as tumor margins. Fiducial based methods of characterizing accuracy and precision of equipment for 4DCT planning and image guided gated radiotherapy (IGGRT) are presented with results for specific equipment. Fiducial markers of known geometric orientation are used to characterize 4DCT image reconstruction accuracy. Accuracy is determined under different acquisition protocols, reconstruction phases, and phantom trajectories. Targeting accuracy of fiducial based image guided gating is assessed by measuring in-phantom field positions for different motions, gating levels and target rotations. Synchronization parameters for gating equipment are also determined. Finally, end-to-end testing is performed to assess overall accuracy and precision of the equipment under controlled conditions. 4DCT limits fiducial geometric distance errors to 2 mm for repeatable target trajectories and to 5 mm for a pseudo-random trajectory. Largest offsets were in the longitudinal direction. If correctly calibrated and synchronized, the IGGRT system tested here can target reproducibly moving tumors with accuracy better than 1.2 mm. Gating level can affect accuracy if target motion is asymmetric about the

  19. 40 CFR 92.127 - Emission measurement accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... procedure: (i) Span the full analyzer range using a top range calibration gas meeting the calibration gas... applicable requirements of §§ 92.118 through 92.122. (iii) Select a calibration gas (a span gas may be used... increments. This gas must be “named” to an accuracy of ±1.0 percent (±2.0 percent for CO2 span gas) of...

  20. 10 CFR 61.9a - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 61.9a Section 61.9a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE General Provisions § 61.9a Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  1. 10 CFR 61.9a - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 61.9a Section 61.9a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE General Provisions § 61.9a Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  2. 10 CFR 61.9a - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 61.9a Section 61.9a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE General Provisions § 61.9a Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  3. 10 CFR 61.9a - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 61.9a Section 61.9a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE General Provisions § 61.9a Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  4. 10 CFR 61.9a - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 61.9a Section 61.9a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE General Provisions § 61.9a Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  5. The Social Accuracy Model of Interpersonal Perception: Assessing Individual Differences in Perceptive and Expressive Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesanz, Jeremy C.

    2010-01-01

    The social accuracy model of interpersonal perception (SAM) is a componential model that estimates perceiver and target effects of different components of accuracy across traits simultaneously. For instance, Jane may be generally accurate in her perceptions of others and thus high in "perceptive accuracy"--the extent to which a particular…

  6. Determination of elemental composition of volatile organic compounds from Chinese rose oil by spectral accuracy and mass accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Yaheng; Xu, Hongliang; Gu, Ming

    2011-10-30

    Elemental composition determination of volatile organic compounds through high mass accuracy and isotope pattern matching could not be routinely achieved with a unit-mass resolution mass spectrometer until the recent development of the comprehensive instrument line-shape calibration technology. Through this unique technology, both m/z values and mass spectral peak shapes are calibrated simultaneously. Of fundamental importance is that calibrated mass spectra have symmetric and mathematically known peak shapes, which makes it possible to deconvolute overlapped monoisotopes and their (13)C-isotope peaks and achieve accurate mass measurements. The key experimental requirements for the measurements are to acquire true raw data in a profile or continuum mode with the acquisition threshold set to zero. A total of 13 ions from Chinese rose oil were analyzed with internal calibration. Most of the ions produced high mass accuracy of better than 5 mDa and high spectral accuracy of better than 99%. These results allow five tested ions to be identified with unique elemental compositions and the other eight ions to be determined as a top match from multiple candidates based on spectral accuracy. One of them, a coeluted component (Nerol) with m/z 154, could not be identified by conventional GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) and library search. Such effective determination for elemental compositions of the volatile organic compounds with a unit-mass resolution quadrupole system is obviously attributed to the significant improvement of mass accuracy. More importantly, high spectral accuracy available through the instrument line-shape calibration enables highly accurate isotope pattern recognition for unknown identification.

  7. Accuracy of Small Base Metal Dental Castings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-10

    aCCURACY OF SMALL BASE METAL DENTAL CASTINGS,(U) M JUL 80 E A HUBET, S 6 VERMILYEA, M .J KUFFLER UNCLASSIFIED NE7 hhhhh *EN UN~CLASSIFIED SECURITY...TPCCSI70NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S .CATALOG NUMBER I _% dSutte 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Accuracy of Small Base Metal Dental Castings Manuscript S...base metal- alloys is countered by their inadequate casting accuracy . Until this problem can be overcome, the acceptance of such alloys for routine use

  8. Discrimination in measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Was, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge monitoring predicts academic outcomes in many contexts. However, measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy are often incomplete. In the current study, a measure of students’ ability to discriminate known from unknown information as a component of knowledge monitoring was considered. Undergraduate students’ knowledge monitoring accuracy was assessed and used to predict final exam scores in a specific course. It was found that gamma, a measure commonly used as the measure of knowledge monitoring accuracy, accounted for a small, but significant amount of variance in academic performance whereas the discrimination and bias indexes combined to account for a greater amount of variance in academic performance. PMID:25339979

  9. Relevance of intracellular polarity to accuracy of eukaryotic chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Nagamatsu, Akihiro; Akuzawa, Naohiro; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2014-10-01

    Eukaryotic chemotaxis is usually mediated by intracellular signals that tend to localize at the front or back of the cell. Such intracellular polarities frequently require no extracellular guidance cues, indicating that spontaneous polarization occurs in the signal network. Spontaneous polarization activity is considered relevant to the persistent motions in random cell migrations and chemotaxis. In this study, we propose a theoretical model that connects spontaneous intracellular polarity and motile ability in a chemoattractant solution. We demonstrate that the intracellular polarity can enhance the accuracy of chemotaxis. Chemotactic accuracy should also depend on chemoattractant concentration through the concentration-dependent correlation time in the polarity direction. Both the polarity correlation time and the chemotactic accuracy depend on the degree of responsiveness to the chemical gradient. We show that optimally accurate chemotaxis occurs at an intermediate responsiveness of intracellular polarity. Experimentally, we find that the persistence time of randomly migrating Dictyostelium cells depends on the chemoattractant concentration, as predicted by our theory. At the optimum responsiveness, this ameboid cell can enhance its chemotactic accuracy tenfold.

  10. Solving the stability-accuracy-diversity dilemma of recommender systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Liu, Kecheng; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Runtong

    2017-02-01

    Recommender systems are of great significance in predicting the potential interesting items based on the target user's historical selections. However, the recommendation list for a specific user has been found changing vastly when the system changes, due to the unstable quantification of item similarities, which is defined as the recommendation stability problem. To improve the similarity stability and recommendation stability is crucial for the user experience enhancement and the better understanding of user interests. While the stability as well as accuracy of recommendation could be guaranteed by recommending only popular items, studies have been addressing the necessity of diversity which requires the system to recommend unpopular items. By ranking the similarities in terms of stability and considering only the most stable ones, we present a top- n-stability method based on the Heat Conduction algorithm (denoted as TNS-HC henceforth) for solving the stability-accuracy-diversity dilemma. Experiments on four benchmark data sets indicate that the TNS-HC algorithm could significantly improve the recommendation stability and accuracy simultaneously and still retain the high-diversity nature of the Heat Conduction algorithm. Furthermore, we compare the performance of the TNS-HC algorithm with a number of benchmark recommendation algorithms. The result suggests that the TNS-HC algorithm is more efficient in solving the stability-accuracy-diversity triple dilemma of recommender systems.

  11. Relevance of intracellular polarity to accuracy of eukaryotic chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Nagamatsu, Akihiro; Akuzawa, Naohiro; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2014-08-14

    Eukaryotic chemotaxis is usually mediated by intracellular signals that tend to localize at the front or back of the cell. Such intracellular polarities frequently require no extracellular guidance cues, indicating that spontaneous polarization occurs in the signal network. Spontaneous polarization activity is considered relevant to the persistent motions in random cell migrations and chemotaxis. In this study, we propose a theoretical model that connects spontaneous intracellular polarity and motile ability in a chemoattractant solution. We demonstrate that the intracellular polarity can enhance the accuracy of chemotaxis. Chemotactic accuracy should also depend on chemoattractant concentration through the concentration-dependent correlation time in the polarity direction. Both the polarity correlation time and the chemotactic accuracy depend on the degree of responsiveness to the chemical gradient. We show that optimally accurate chemotaxis occurs at an intermediate responsiveness of intracellular polarity. Experimentally, we find that the persistence time of randomly migrating Dictyostelium cells depends on the chemoattractant concentration, as predicted by our theory. At the optimum responsiveness, this ameboid cell can enhance its chemotactic accuracy tenfold.

  12. Spatial accuracy of a rapid defense behavior in caterpillars.

    PubMed

    van Griethuijsen, Linnea I; Banks, Kelly M; Trimmer, Barry A

    2013-02-01

    Aimed movements require that an animal accurately locates the target and correctly reaches that location. One such behavior is the defensive strike seen in Manduca sexta larva. These caterpillars respond to noxious mechanical stimuli applied to their abdomen with a strike of the mandibles towards the location of the stimulus. The accuracy with which the first strike movement reaches the stimulus site depends on the location of the stimulus. Reponses to dorsal stimuli are less accurate than those to ventral stimuli and the mandibles generally land ventral to the stimulus site. Responses to stimuli applied to anterior abdominal segments are less accurate than responses to stimuli applied to more posterior segments and the mandibles generally land posterior to the stimulus site. A trade-off between duration of the strike and radial accuracy is only seen in the anterior stimulus location (body segment A4). The lower accuracy of the responses to anterior and dorsal stimuli can be explained by the morphology of the animal; to reach these areas the caterpillar needs to move its body into a tight curve. Nevertheless, the accuracy is not exact in locations that the animal has shown it can reach, which suggests that consistently aiming more ventral and posterior of the stimulation site might be a defense strategy.

  13. Sun-pointing programs and their accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.C.

    1981-05-01

    Several sun-pointing programs and their accuracy are described. FORTRAN program listings are given. Program descriptions are given for both Hewlett-Packard (HP-67) and Texas Instruments (TI-59) hand-held calculators.

  14. Critical thinking and accuracy of nurses' diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Margaret

    2003-01-01

    Interpretations of patient data are complex and diverse, contributing to a risk of low accuracy nursing diagnoses. This risk is confirmed in research findings that accuracy of nurses' diagnoses varied widely from high to low. Highly accurate diagnoses are essential, however, to guide nursing interventions for the achievement of positive health outcomes. Development of critical thinking abilities is likely to improve accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. New views of critical thinking serve as a basis for critical thinking in nursing. Seven cognitive skills and ten habits of mind are identified as dimensions of critical thinking for use in the diagnostic process. Application of the cognitive skills of critical thinking illustrates the importance of using critical thinking for accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. Ten strategies are proposed for self-development of critical thinking abilities.

  15. USDA registration and rectification requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the requirements of the United States Department of Agriculture for accuracy of aerospace acquired data, and specifically, requirements for registration and rectification of remotely sensed data are discussed. Particular attention is given to foreign and domestic crop estimation and forecasting, forestry information applications, and rangeland condition evaluations.

  16. Accuracy, resolution, and cost comparisons between small format and mapping cameras for environmental mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, R. H.; Scherz, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Successful aerial photography depends on aerial cameras providing acceptable photographs within cost restrictions of the job. For topographic mapping where ultimate accuracy is required only large format mapping cameras will suffice. For mapping environmental patterns of vegetation, soils, or water pollution, 9-inch cameras often exceed accuracy and cost requirements, and small formats may be better. In choosing the best camera for environmental mapping, relative capabilities and costs must be understood. This study compares resolution, photo interpretation potential, metric accuracy, and cost of 9-inch, 70mm, and 35mm cameras for obtaining simultaneous color and color infrared photography for environmental mapping purposes.

  17. The energy-speed-accuracy tradeoff in sensory adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Ganhui; Sartori, Pablo; Neumann, Silke; Sourjik, Victor; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation is the essential process by which an organism becomes better suited to its environment. The benefits of adaptation are well documented, but the cost it incurs remains poorly understood. Here, by analysing a stochastic model of a minimum feedback network underlying many sensory adaptation systems, we show that adaptive processes are necessarily dissipative, and continuous energy consumption is required to stabilize the adapted state. Our study reveals a general relation among energy dissipation rate, adaptation speed and the maximum adaptation accuracy. This energy-speed-accuracy relation is tested in the Escherichia coli chemosensory system, which exhibits near-perfect chemoreceptor adaptation. We identify key requirements for the underlying biochemical network to achieve accurate adaptation with a given energy budget. Moreover, direct measurements confirm the prediction that adaptation slows down as cells gradually de-energize in a nutrient-poor medium without compromising adaptation accuracy. Our work provides a general framework to study cost-performance tradeoffs for cellular regulatory functions and information processing. PMID:22737175

  18. Morphological Awareness and Children's Writing: Accuracy, Error, and Invention.

    PubMed

    McCutchen, Deborah; Stull, Sara

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between children's morphological awareness and their ability to produce accurate morphological derivations in writing. Fifth-grade U.S. students (n = 175) completed two writing tasks that invited or required morphological manipulation of words. We examined both accuracy and error, specifically errors in spelling and errors of the sort we termed morphological inventions, which entailed inappropriate, novel pairings of stems and suffixes. Regressions were used to determine the relationship between morphological awareness, morphological accuracy, and spelling accuracy, as well as between morphological awareness and morphological inventions. Linear regressions revealed that morphological awareness uniquely predicted children's generation of accurate morphological derivations, regardless of whether or not accurate spelling was required. A logistic regression indicated that morphological awareness was also uniquely predictive of morphological invention, with higher morphological awareness increasing the probability of morphological invention. These findings suggest that morphological knowledge may not only assist children with spelling during writing, but may also assist with word production via generative experimentation with morphological rules during sentence generation. Implications are discussed for the development of children's morphological knowledge and relationships with writing.

  19. Evaluation of registration accuracy between Sentinel-2 and Landsat 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Cuca, Branka; Previtali, Mattia

    2016-08-01

    Starting from June 2015, Sentinel-2A is delivering high resolution optical images (ground resolution up to 10 meters) to provide a global coverage of the Earth's land surface every 10 days. The planned launch of Sentinel-2B along with the integration of Landsat images will provide time series with an unprecedented revisit time indispensable for numerous monitoring applications, in which high resolution multi-temporal information is required. They include agriculture, water bodies, natural hazards to name a few. However, the combined use of multi-temporal images requires an accurate geometric registration, i.e. pixel-to-pixel correspondence for terrain-corrected products. This paper presents an analysis of spatial co-registration accuracy for several datasets of Sentinel-2 and Landsat 8 images distributed all around the world. Images were compared with digital correlation techniques for image matching, obtaining an evaluation of registration accuracy with an affine transformation as geometrical model. Results demonstrate that sub-pixel accuracy was achieved between 10 m resolution Sentinel-2 bands (band 3) and 15 m resolution panchromatic Landsat images (band 8).

  20. Analysis of deformable image registration accuracy using computational modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Hualiang; Kim, Jinkoo; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2010-03-15

    Computer aided modeling of anatomic deformation, allowing various techniques and protocols in radiation therapy to be systematically verified and studied, has become increasingly attractive. In this study the potential issues in deformable image registration (DIR) were analyzed based on two numerical phantoms: One, a synthesized, low intensity gradient prostate image, and the other a lung patient's CT image data set. Each phantom was modeled with region-specific material parameters with its deformation solved using a finite element method. The resultant displacements were used to construct a benchmark to quantify the displacement errors of the Demons and B-Spline-based registrations. The results show that the accuracy of these registration algorithms depends on the chosen parameters, the selection of which is closely associated with the intensity gradients of the underlying images. For the Demons algorithm, both single resolution (SR) and multiresolution (MR) registrations required approximately 300 iterations to reach an accuracy of 1.4 mm mean error in the lung patient's CT image (and 0.7 mm mean error averaged in the lung only). For the low gradient prostate phantom, these algorithms (both SR and MR) required at least 1600 iterations to reduce their mean errors to 2 mm. For the B-Spline algorithms, best performance (mean errors of 1.9 mm for SR and 1.6 mm for MR, respectively) on the low gradient prostate was achieved using five grid nodes in each direction. Adding more grid nodes resulted in larger errors. For the lung patient's CT data set, the B-Spline registrations required ten grid nodes in each direction for highest accuracy (1.4 mm for SR and 1.5 mm for MR). The numbers of iterations or grid nodes required for optimal registrations depended on the intensity gradients of the underlying images. In summary, the performance of the Demons and B-Spline registrations have been quantitatively evaluated using numerical phantoms. The results show that parameter

  1. Increasing Accuracy in Computed Inviscid Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A technique has been devised to increase the accuracy of computational simulations of flows of inviscid fluids by increasing the accuracy with which surface boundary conditions are represented. This technique is expected to be especially beneficial for computational aeroacoustics, wherein it enables proper accounting, not only for acoustic waves, but also for vorticity and entropy waves, at surfaces. Heretofore, inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions have been limited to third-order accuracy in time for stationary surfaces and to first-order accuracy in time for moving surfaces. For steady-state calculations, it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is needed for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady flow phenomena. The present technique is the first surface treatment that provides the needed high accuracy through proper accounting of higher-order time derivatives. The present technique is founded on a method known in art as the Hermitian modified solution approximation (MESA) scheme. This is because high time accuracy at a surface depends upon, among other things, correction of the spatial cross-derivatives of flow variables, and many of these cross-derivatives are included explicitly on the computational grid in the MESA scheme. (Alternatively, a related method other than the MESA scheme could be used, as long as the method involves consistent application of the effects of the cross-derivatives.) While the mathematical derivation of the present technique is too lengthy and complex to fit within the space available for this article, the technique itself can be characterized in relatively simple terms: The technique involves correction of surface-normal spatial pressure derivatives at a boundary surface to satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions and thereby achieve arbitrarily high orders of time accuracy in special cases. The boundary conditions can now include a potentially infinite number

  2. Accuracy of multi-look geo-coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidaw, E. M.; Roth, M. W.; Brown, M. Z.; Scheck, A. E.

    2010-04-01

    Very accurate geo-location (geo-coding) of imagery taken at long range is a very large challenge. Whereas GPS can supply a very accurate sensor position, the hardware for the required precision pointing can have a very large cost. Roth, et al (2005) showed that because of the accuracy of lidar range-data, a tri-lateration method (called Multi-Look Lidar or Multi-Look Geo-Coding) can achieve very accurate geocoding at very long ranges and very low cost by using data-driven processing. This paper presents extensive flight-testing results using commercial airborne lidar. Because the tri-lateration method produces a large number of control points, the resulting accuracy of the geo-coded lidar data is somewhat better than that predicted for a single control point due to control-point averaging.

  3. Towards Experimental Accuracy from the First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, O. L.; Lodi, L.; Tennyson, J.; Zobov, N. F.

    2013-06-01

    Producing ab initio ro-vibrational energy levels of small, gas-phase molecules with an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} would constitute a significant step forward in theoretical spectroscopy and would place calculated line positions considerably closer to typical experimental accuracy. Such an accuracy has been recently achieved for the H_3^+ molecular ion for line positions up to 17 000 cm ^{-1}. However, since H_3^+ is a two-electron system, the electronic structure methods used in this study are not applicable to larger molecules. A major breakthrough was reported in ref., where an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} was achieved ab initio for seven water isotopologues. Calculated vibrational and rotational energy levels up to 15 000 cm^{-1} and J=25 resulted in a standard deviation of 0.08 cm^{-1} with respect to accurate reference data. As far as line intensities are concerned, we have already achieved for water a typical accuracy of 1% which supersedes average experimental accuracy. Our results are being actively extended along two major directions. First, there are clear indications that our results for water can be improved to an accuracy of the order of 0.01 cm^{-1} by further, detailed ab initio studies. Such level of accuracy would already be competitive with experimental results in some situations. A second, major, direction of study is the extension of such a 0.1 cm^{-1} accuracy to molecules containg more electrons or more than one non-hydrogen atom, or both. As examples of such developments we will present new results for CO, HCN and H_2S, as well as preliminary results for NH_3 and CH_4. O.L. Polyansky, A. Alijah, N.F. Zobov, I.I. Mizus, R. Ovsyannikov, J. Tennyson, L. Lodi, T. Szidarovszky and A.G. Csaszar, Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. London A, {370}, 5014-5027 (2012). O.L. Polyansky, R.I. Ovsyannikov, A.A. Kyuberis, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and N.F. Zobov, J. Phys. Chem. A, (in press). L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and O.L. Polyansky, J. Chem. Phys. {135}, 034113 (2011).

  4. Activity monitor accuracy in persons using canes.

    PubMed

    Wendland, Deborah Michael; Sprigle, Stephen H

    2012-01-01

    The StepWatch activity monitor has not been validated on multiple indoor and outdoor surfaces in a population using ambulation aids. The aims of this technical report are to report on strategies to configure the StepWatch activity monitor on subjects using a cane and to report the accuracy of both leg-mounted and cane-mounted StepWatch devices on people ambulating over different surfaces while using a cane. Sixteen subjects aged 67 to 85 yr (mean 75.6) who regularly use a cane for ambulation participated. StepWatch calibration was performed by adjusting sensitivity and cadence. Following calibration optimization, accuracy was tested on both the leg-mounted and cane-mounted devices on different surfaces, including linoleum, sidewalk, grass, ramp, and stairs. The leg-mounted device had an accuracy of 93.4% across all surfaces, while the cane-mounted device had an aggregate accuracy of 84.7% across all surfaces. Accuracy of the StepWatch on the stairs was significantly less accurate (p < 0.001) when comparing surfaces using repeated measures analysis of variance. When monitoring community mobility, placement of a StepWatch on a person and his/her ambulation aid can accurately document both activity and device use.

  5. Accuracy metrics for judging time scale algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Jacques, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time scales have been constructed in different ways to meet the many demands placed upon them for time accuracy, frequency accuracy, long-term stability, and robustness. Usually, no single time scale is optimum for all purposes. In the context of the impending availability of high-accuracy intermittently-operated cesium fountains, we reconsider the question of evaluating the accuracy of time scales which use an algorithm to span interruptions of the primary standard. We consider a broad class of calibration algorithms that can be evaluated and compared quantitatively for their accuracy in the presence of frequency drift and a full noise model (a mixture of white PM, flicker PM, white FM, flicker FM, and random walk FM noise). We present the analytic techniques for computing the standard uncertainty for the full noise model and this class of calibration algorithms. The simplest algorithm is evaluated to find the average-frequency uncertainty arising from the noise of the cesium fountain's local oscillator and from the noise of a hydrogen maser transfer-standard. This algorithm and known noise sources are shown to permit interlaboratory frequency transfer with a standard uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15) for periods of 30-100 days.

  6. Measurement accuracies in band-limited extrapolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritikos, H. N.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of numerical instability associated with extrapolation algorithms is addressed. An attempt is made to estimate the bounds for the acceptable errors and to place a ceiling on the measurement accuracy and computational accuracy needed for the extrapolation. It is shown that in band limited (or visible angle limited) extrapolation the larger effective aperture L' that can be realized from a finite aperture L by over sampling is a function of the accuracy of measurements. It is shown that for sampling in the interval L/b absolute value of xL, b1 the signal must be known within an error e sub N given by e sub N squared approximately = 1/4(2kL') cubed (e/8b L/L')(2kL') where L is the physical aperture, L' is the extrapolated aperture, and k = 2pi lambda.

  7. The measurement accuracy of passive radon instruments.

    PubMed

    Beck, T R; Foerster, E; Buchröder, H; Schmidt, V; Döring, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the data having been gathered from interlaboratory comparisons of passive radon instruments over 10 y with respect to the measurement accuracy. The measurement accuracy is discussed in terms of the systematic and the random measurement error. The analysis shows that the systematic measurement error of the most instruments issued by professional laboratory services can be within a range of ±10 % from the true value. A single radon measurement has an additional random measurement error, which is in the range of up to ±15 % for high exposures to radon (>2000 kBq h m(-3)). The random measurement error increases for lower exposures. The analysis especially applies to instruments with solid-state nuclear track detectors and results in proposing criteria for testing the measurement accuracy. Instruments with electrets and charcoal have also been considered, but the low stock of data enables only a qualitative discussion.

  8. Why do delayed summaries improve metacomprehension accuracy?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mary C M; Thiede, Keith W

    2008-05-01

    We showed that metacomprehension accuracy improved when participants (N=87 college students) wrote summaries of texts prior to judging their comprehension; however, accuracy only improved when summaries were written after a delay, not when written immediately after reading. We evaluated two hypotheses proposed to account for this delayed-summarization effect (the accessibility hypothesis and the situation model hypothesis). The data suggest that participants based metacomprehension judgments more on the gist of texts when they generated summaries after a delay; whereas, they based judgments more on details when they generated summaries immediately after reading. Focusing on information relevant to the situation model of a text (the gist of a text) produced higher levels of metacomprehension accuracy, which is consistent with situation model hypothesis.

  9. Increasing Accuracy and Increasing Tension in Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Wendy L.

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Constant, Ho, provides a measure of the current expansion rate of the universe. In recent decades, there has been a huge increase in the accuracy with which extragalactic distances, and hence Ho, can be measured. While the historical factor-of-two uncertainty in Ho has been resolved, a new discrepancy has arisen between the values of Ho measured in the local universe, and that estimated from cosmic microwave background measurements, assuming a Lambda cold dark matter model. I will review the advances that have led to the increase in accuracy in measurements of Ho, as well as describe exciting future prospects with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Gaia, which will make it feasible to measure extragalactic distances at percent-level accuracy in the next decade.

  10. The accuracy of Halley's cometary orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. W.

    The accuracy of a scientific computation depends in the main on the data fed in and the analysis method used. This statement is certainly true of Edmond Halley's cometary orbit work. Considering the 420 comets that had been seen before Halley's era of orbital calculation (1695 - 1702) only 24, according to him, had been observed well enough for their orbits to be calculated. Two questions are considered in this paper. Do all the orbits listed by Halley have the same accuracy? and, secondly, how accurate was Halley's method of calculation?

  11. Size-Dependent Accuracy of Nanoscale Thermometers.

    PubMed

    Alicki, Robert; Leitner, David M

    2015-07-23

    The accuracy of two classes of nanoscale thermometers is estimated in terms of size and system-dependent properties using the spin-boson model. We consider solid state thermometers, where the energy splitting is tuned by thermal properties of the material, and fluorescent organic thermometers, in which the fluorescence intensity depends on the thermal population of conformational states of the thermometer. The results of the theoretical model compare well with the accuracy reported for several nanothermometers that have been used to measure local temperature inside living cells.

  12. Estimation and Accuracy after Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Efron, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Classical statistical theory ignores model selection in assessing estimation accuracy. Here we consider bootstrap methods for computing standard errors and confidence intervals that take model selection into account. The methodology involves bagging, also known as bootstrap smoothing, to tame the erratic discontinuities of selection-based estimators. A useful new formula for the accuracy of bagging then provides standard errors for the smoothed estimators. Two examples, nonparametric and parametric, are carried through in detail: a regression model where the choice of degree (linear, quadratic, cubic, …) is determined by the Cp criterion, and a Lasso-based estimation problem. PMID:25346558

  13. Predictive accuracy in the neuroprediction of rearrest

    PubMed Central

    Aharoni, Eyal; Mallett, Joshua; Vincent, Gina M.; Harenski, Carla L.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter; Gazzaniga, Michael S.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    A recently published study by the present authors (Aharoni et al., 2013) reported evidence that functional changes in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) within a sample of 96 criminal offenders who were engaged in a Go/No-Go impulse control task significantly predicted their rearrest following release from prison. In an extended analysis, we use discrimination and calibration techniques to test the accuracy of these predictions relative to more traditional models and their ability to generalize to new observations in both full and reduced models. Modest to strong discrimination and calibration accuracy were found, providing additional support for the utility of neurobiological measures in predicting rearrest. PMID:24720689

  14. Final Technical Report: Increasing Prediction Accuracy.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Hansen, Clifford; Stein, Joshua

    2015-12-01

    PV performance models are used to quantify the value of PV plants in a given location. They combine the performance characteristics of the system, the measured or predicted irradiance and weather at a site, and the system configuration and design into a prediction of the amount of energy that will be produced by a PV system. These predictions must be as accurate as possible in order for finance charges to be minimized. Higher accuracy equals lower project risk. The Increasing Prediction Accuracy project at Sandia focuses on quantifying and reducing uncertainties in PV system performance models.

  15. Development and evaluation of a Kalman-filter algorithm for terminal area navigation using sensors of moderate accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanning, G.; Cicolani, L. S.; Schmidt, S. F.

    1983-01-01

    Translational state estimation in terminal area operations, using a set of commonly available position, air data, and acceleration sensors, is described. Kalman filtering is applied to obtain maximum estimation accuracy from the sensors but feasibility in real-time computations requires a variety of approximations and devices aimed at minimizing the required computation time with only negligible loss of accuracy. Accuracy behavior throughout the terminal area, its relation to sensor accuracy, its effect on trajectory tracking errors and control activity in an automatic flight control system, and its adequacy in terms of existing criteria for various terminal area operations are examined. The principal investigative tool is a simulation of the system.

  16. On precision and accuracy (bias) statements for measurement procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, L.A.; Hume, M.W.; Delvin, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    Measurement procedures are often required to contain precision and accuracy of precision and bias statements. This paper contains a glossary that explains various terms that often appear in these statements as well as an example illustrating such statements for a specific set of data. Precision and bias statements are shown to vary according to the conditions under which the data were collected. This paper emphasizes that the error model (an algebraic expression that describes how the various sources of variation affect the measurement) is an important consideration in the formation of precision and bias statements.

  17. On the geolocation accuracy of COSMO-SkyMed products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitti, Davide O.; Nutricato, Raffaele; Lorusso, Rino; Lombardi, Nunzia; Bovenga, Fabio; Bruno, Maria F.; Chiaradia, Maria T.; Milillo, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Accurate geolocation of SAR data is nowadays strongly required because of the increasing number of high resolution SAR sensors available as for instance from TerraSAR-X / TanDEM-X and COSMO-SkyMed space-borne missions. Both stripmap and spotlight acquisition modes provide from metric to sub metric spatial resolution which demands the ability to ensure a geolocation accuracy of the same order of magnitude. Geocoding quality depends on several factors and in particular on the knowledge of the actual values of the satellite position along the orbit, and the delay introduced by the additional path induced by changes in the refractivity index due to the presence of the atmosphere (the so called Atmospheric Path Delay or APD). No definitive results are reported yet in the scientific literature, concerning the best performances achievable by the COSMO-SkyMed constellation in terms of geolocation accuracy. Preliminary studies have shown that sub-pixel geolocation accuracies are hardly achievable with COSMO-SkyMed data. The present work aims at inspecting the origin of the geolocation error sources in COSMO-SkyMed Single-look Complex Slant (SCS) products, and to investigate possible strategies for their compensation or mitigation. Five different test sites have been selected in Italy and Argentina, where up to 30 corner reflectors are installed, pointing towards ascending or descending passes. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  18. Diagnostic Accuracy Comparison of Artificial Immune Algorithms for Primary Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Ufuk; Yurtay, Nilüfer; Koç, Emine Rabia; Tepe, Nermin; Güllüoğlu, Halil; Ertaş, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of immune system algorithms with the aim of classifying the primary types of headache that are not related to any organic etiology. They are divided into four types: migraine, tension, cluster, and other primary headaches. After we took this main objective into consideration, three different neurologists were required to fill in the medical records of 850 patients into our web-based expert system hosted on our project web site. In the evaluation process, Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) were used as the classification algorithms. The AIS are classification algorithms that are inspired by the biological immune system mechanism that involves significant and distinct capabilities. These algorithms simulate the specialties of the immune system such as discrimination, learning, and the memorizing process in order to be used for classification, optimization, or pattern recognition. According to the results, the accuracy level of the classifier used in this study reached a success continuum ranging from 95% to 99%, except for the inconvenient one that yielded 71% accuracy. PMID:26075014

  19. Standardized accuracy assessment of the calypso wireless transponder tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, A. M.; Schmitt, D.; Seitel, A.; Chatrasingh, M.; Echner, G.; Oelfke, U.; Nill, S.; Birkfellner, W.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2014-11-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) tracking allows localization of small EM sensors in a magnetic field of known geometry without line-of-sight. However, this technique requires a cable connection to the tracked object. A wireless alternative based on magnetic fields, referred to as transponder tracking, has been proposed by several authors. Although most of the transponder tracking systems are still in an early stage of development and not ready for clinical use yet, Varian Medical Systems Inc. (Palo Alto, California, USA) presented the Calypso system for tumor tracking in radiation therapy which includes transponder technology. But it has not been used for computer-assisted interventions (CAI) in general or been assessed for accuracy in a standardized manner, so far. In this study, we apply a standardized assessment protocol presented by Hummel et al (2005 Med. Phys. 32 2371-9) to the Calypso system for the first time. The results show that transponder tracking with the Calypso system provides a precision and accuracy below 1 mm in ideal clinical environments, which is comparable with other EM tracking systems. Similar to other systems the tracking accuracy was affected by metallic distortion, which led to errors of up to 3.2 mm. The potential of the wireless transponder tracking technology for use in many future CAI applications can be regarded as extremely high.

  20. Evaluating diagnostic accuracy in the face of multiple reference standards.

    PubMed

    Naaktgeboren, Christiana A; de Groot, Joris A H; van Smeden, Maarten; Moons, Karel G M; Reitsma, Johannes B

    2013-08-06

    A universal challenge in studies that quantify the accuracy of diagnostic tests is establishing whether each participant has the disease of interest. Ideally, the same preferred reference standard would be used for all participants; however, for practical or ethical reasons, alternative reference standards that are often less accurate are frequently used instead. The use of different reference standards across participants in a single study is known as differential verification.Differential verification can cause severely biased accuracy estimates of the test or model being studied. Many variations of differential verification exist, but not all introduce the same risk of bias. A risk-of-bias assessment requires detailed information about which participants receive which reference standards and an estimate of the accuracy of the alternative reference standard. This article classifies types of differential verification and explores how they can lead to bias. It also provides guidance on how to report results and assess the risk of bias when differential verification occurs and highlights potential ways to correct for the bias.

  1. Accuracy assessment of fluoroscopy-transesophageal echocardiography registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Seslija, Petar; Bainbridge, Daniel; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Doug L.; Chu, Michael W.; Holdsworth, David W.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    This study assesses the accuracy of a new transesophageal (TEE) ultrasound (US) fluoroscopy registration technique designed to guide percutaneous aortic valve replacement. In this minimally invasive procedure, a valve is inserted into the aortic annulus via a catheter. Navigation and positioning of the valve is guided primarily by intra-operative fluoroscopy. Poor anatomical visualization of the aortic root region can result in incorrect positioning, leading to heart valve embolization, obstruction of the coronary ostia and acute kidney injury. The use of TEE US images to augment intra-operative fluoroscopy provides significant improvements to image-guidance. Registration is achieved using an image-based TEE probe tracking technique and US calibration. TEE probe tracking is accomplished using a single-perspective pose estimation algorithm. Pose estimation from a single image allows registration to be achieved using only images collected in standard OR workflow. Accuracy of this registration technique is assessed using three models: a point target phantom, a cadaveric porcine heart with implanted fiducials, and in-vivo porcine images. Results demonstrate that registration can be achieved with an RMS error of less than 1.5mm, which is within the clinical accuracy requirements of 5mm. US-fluoroscopy registration based on single-perspective pose estimation demonstrates promise as a method for providing guidance to percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. Future work will focus on real-time implementation and a visualization system that can be used in the operating room.

  2. Survey methods for assessing land cover map accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nusser, S.M.; Klaas, E.E.

    2003-01-01

    The increasing availability of digital photographic materials has fueled efforts by agencies and organizations to generate land cover maps for states, regions, and the United States as a whole. Regardless of the information sources and classification methods used, land cover maps are subject to numerous sources of error. In order to understand the quality of the information contained in these maps, it is desirable to generate statistically valid estimates of accuracy rates describing misclassification errors. We explored a full sample survey framework for creating accuracy assessment study designs that balance statistical and operational considerations in relation to study objectives for a regional assessment of GAP land cover maps. We focused not only on appropriate sample designs and estimation approaches, but on aspects of the data collection process, such as gaining cooperation of land owners and using pixel clusters as an observation unit. The approach was tested in a pilot study to assess the accuracy of Iowa GAP land cover maps. A stratified two-stage cluster sampling design addressed sample size requirements for land covers and the need for geographic spread while minimizing operational effort. Recruitment methods used for private land owners yielded high response rates, minimizing a source of nonresponse error. Collecting data for a 9-pixel cluster centered on the sampled pixel was simple to implement, and provided better information on rarer vegetation classes as well as substantial gains in precision relative to observing data at a single-pixel.

  3. Speed-Accuracy Response Models: Scoring Rules Based on Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; van der Maas, Han

    2012-01-01

    Starting from an explicit scoring rule for time limit tasks incorporating both response time and accuracy, and a definite trade-off between speed and accuracy, a response model is derived. Since the scoring rule is interpreted as a sufficient statistic, the model belongs to the exponential family. The various marginal and conditional distributions…

  4. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  5. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  6. Adult Metacomprehension: Judgment Processes and Accuracy Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Qin; Linderholm, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review and synthesize two interrelated topics in the adult metacomprehension literature: the bases of metacomprehension judgment and the constraints on metacomprehension accuracy. Our review shows that adult readers base their metacomprehension judgments on different types of information, including experiences…

  7. Task Speed and Accuracy Decrease When Multitasking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin; Cockerham, Deborah; Chang, Zhengsi; Natividad, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    As new technologies increase the opportunities for multitasking, the need to understand human capacities for multitasking continues to grow stronger. Is multitasking helping us to be more efficient? This study investigated the multitasking abilities of 168 participants, ages 6-72, by measuring their task accuracy and completion time when they…

  8. Accuracy Assessment for AG500, Electromagnetic Articulograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Green, Jordan R.; Mefferd, Antje

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the AG500 (Carstens Medizinelectronik, Lenglern, Germany), an electromagnetic device developed recently to register articulatory movements in three dimensions. This technology seems to have unprecedented capabilities to provide rich information about time-varying…

  9. Least squares polynomial fits and their accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Equations are presented which attempt to fit least squares polynomials to tables of date. It is concluded that much data are needed to reduce the measurement error standard deviation by a significant amount, however at certain points great accuracy is attained.

  10. A microwave position sensor with submillimeter accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, A.; Diskus, C. G.; Lubke, K.; Thim, H. W.

    1999-12-01

    Design and characteristics of a prototype distance sensor are presented in this paper. The radar front-end operates at 35 GHz and applies six-port technology and direct frequency measurement. The sensor makes use of both frequency-modulated continuous wave and interferometer principles and is capable of measuring distance with a very high accuracy of ±0.1 mm.

  11. Vowel Space Characteristics and Vowel Identification Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relation between vowel production characteristics and intelligibility. Method: Acoustic characteristics of 10 vowels produced by 45 men and 48 women from the J. M. Hillenbrand, L. A. Getty, M. J. Clark, and K. Wheeler (1995) study were examined and compared with identification accuracy. Global (mean f0, F1, and F2;…

  12. Statistical Parameters for Describing Model Accuracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-20

    mean and the standard deviation, approximately characterizes the accuracy of the model, since the width of the confidence interval whose center is at...Using a modified version of Chebyshev’s inequality, a similar result is obtained for the upper bound of the confidence interval width for any

  13. Direct Behavior Rating: Considerations for Rater Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sayward E.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct behavior rating (DBR) offers users a flexible, feasible method for the collection of behavioral data. Previous research has supported the validity of using DBR to rate three target behaviors: academic engagement, disruptive behavior, and compliance. However, the effect of the base rate of behavior on rater accuracy has not been established.…

  14. Accuracy of Depth to Water Measurements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Accuracy of depth to water measurements is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers as they attempt to determine directions of ground-water flow, areas of recharge or discharge, the hydraulic characteristics of...

  15. Bullet trajectory reconstruction - Methods, accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Mattijssen, Erwin J A T; Kerkhoff, Wim

    2016-05-01

    Based on the spatial relation between a primary and secondary bullet defect or on the shape and dimensions of the primary bullet defect, a bullet's trajectory prior to impact can be estimated for a shooting scene reconstruction. The accuracy and precision of the estimated trajectories will vary depending on variables such as, the applied method of reconstruction, the (true) angle of incidence, the properties of the target material and the properties of the bullet upon impact. This study focused on the accuracy and precision of estimated bullet trajectories when different variants of the probing method, ellipse method, and lead-in method are applied on bullet defects resulting from shots at various angles of incidence on drywall, MDF and sheet metal. The results show that in most situations the best performance (accuracy and precision) is seen when the probing method is applied. Only for the lowest angles of incidence the performance was better when either the ellipse or lead-in method was applied. The data provided in this paper can be used to select the appropriate method(s) for reconstruction and to correct for systematic errors (accuracy) and to provide a value of the precision, by means of a confidence interval of the specific measurement.

  16. Bayesian Methods for Medical Test Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Broemeling, Lyle D.

    2011-01-01

    Bayesian methods for medical test accuracy are presented, beginning with the basic measures for tests with binary scores: true positive fraction, false positive fraction, positive predictive values, and negative predictive value. The Bayesian approach is taken because of its efficient use of prior information, and the analysis is executed with a Bayesian software package WinBUGS®. The ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve gives the intrinsic accuracy of medical tests that have ordinal or continuous scores, and the Bayesian approach is illustrated with many examples from cancer and other diseases. Medical tests include X-ray, mammography, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine and tests based on biomarkers, such as blood glucose values for diabetes. The presentation continues with more specialized methods suitable for measuring the accuracies of clinical studies that have verification bias, and medical tests without a gold standard. Lastly, the review is concluded with Bayesian methods for measuring the accuracy of the combination of two or more tests. PMID:26859485

  17. 47 CFR 65.306 - Calculation accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation accuracy. 65.306 Section 65.306 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Exchange Carriers § 65.306 Calculation...

  18. Accuracy of References in Five Entomology Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristof, Cynthia

    ln this paper, the bibliographical references in five core entomology journals are examined for citation accuracy in order to determine if the error rates are similar. Every reference printed in each journal's first issue of 1992 was examined, and these were compared to the original (cited) publications, if possible, in order to determine the…

  19. Method for measuring centroid algorithm accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, S.; Liewer, K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will describe such a method for measuring the accuracy of centroid algorithms using a relatively inexpensive setup consisting of a white light source, lenses, a CCD camea, an electro-strictive actuator, and a DAC (Digital-to-Analog Converter), and employing embedded PowerPC, VxWorks, and Solaris based software.

  20. High accuracy gaseous x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.

    1983-11-01

    An outline is given of the design and operation of high accuracy position-sensitive x-ray detectors suitable for experiments using synchrotron radiation. They are based on the gas proportional detector, with position readout using a delay line; a detailed examination is made of factors which limit spatial resolution. Individual wire readout may be used for extremely high counting rates.

  1. Observed Consultation: Confidence and Accuracy of Assessors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweed, Mike; Ingham, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Judgments made by the assessors observing consultations are widely used in the assessment of medical students. The aim of this research was to study judgment accuracy and confidence and the relationship between these. Assessors watched recordings of consultations, scoring the students on: a checklist of items; attributes of consultation; a…

  2. Analyzing thematic maps and mapping for accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two problems which exist while attempting to test the accuracy of thematic maps and mapping are: (1) evaluating the accuracy of thematic content, and (2) evaluating the effects of the variables on thematic mapping. Statistical analysis techniques are applicable to both these problems and include techniques for sampling the data and determining their accuracy. In addition, techniques for hypothesis testing, or inferential statistics, are used when comparing the effects of variables. A comprehensive and valid accuracy test of a classification project, such as thematic mapping from remotely sensed data, includes the following components of statistical analysis: (1) sample design, including the sample distribution, sample size, size of the sample unit, and sampling procedure; and (2) accuracy estimation, including estimation of the variance and confidence limits. Careful consideration must be given to the minimum sample size necessary to validate the accuracy of a given. classification category. The results of an accuracy test are presented in a contingency table sometimes called a classification error matrix. Usually the rows represent the interpretation, and the columns represent the verification. The diagonal elements represent the correct classifications. The remaining elements of the rows represent errors by commission, and the remaining elements of the columns represent the errors of omission. For tests of hypothesis that compare variables, the general practice has been to use only the diagonal elements from several related classification error matrices. These data are arranged in the form of another contingency table. The columns of the table represent the different variables being compared, such as different scales of mapping. The rows represent the blocking characteristics, such as the various categories of classification. The values in the cells of the tables might be the counts of correct classification or the binomial proportions of these counts divided by

  3. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Femoral Tunnel Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Laurie A.; Kerslake, Sarah; Lafave, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a procedure aimed to reestablish the checkrein to lateral patellar translation in patients with symptomatic patellofemoral instability. Correct femoral tunnel position is thought to be crucial to successful MPFL reconstruction, but the accuracy of this statement in terms of patient outcomes has not been tested. Purpose: To assess the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement in an MPFL reconstruction cohort and to determine the correlation between tunnel accuracy and a validated disease-specific, patient-reported quality-of-life outcome measure. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Between June 2008 and February 2014, a total of 206 subjects underwent an MPFL reconstruction. Lateral radiographs were measured to determine the accuracy of the femoral tunnel by measuring the distance from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point. Banff Patella Instability Instrument (BPII) scores were collected a mean 24 months postoperatively. Results: A total of 155 (79.5%) subjects had adequate postoperative lateral radiographs and complete BPII scores. The mean duration of follow-up (±SD) was 24.4 ± 8.2 months (range, 12-74 months). Measurement from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point resulted in 143 (92.3%) tunnels being categorized as “good” or “ideal.” There were 8 failures in the cohort, none of which occurred in malpositioned tunnels. The mean distance from the center of the MPFL tunnel to the center of the Schöttle point was 5.9 ± 4.2 mm (range, 0.5-25.9 mm). The mean postoperative BPII score was 65.2 ± 22.5 (range, 9.2-100). Pearson r correlation demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between accuracy of femoral tunnel position and BPII score (r = –0.08; 95% CI, –0.24 to 0.08). Conclusion: There was no evidence of a correlation between the accuracy of MPFL reconstruction femoral tunnel in relation to the Schöttle point and

  4. Accuracy of genotype imputation in sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Hayes, B J; Bowman, P J; Daetwyler, H D; Kijas, J W; van der Werf, J H J

    2012-02-01

    Although genomic selection offers the prospect of improving the rate of genetic gain in meat, wool and dairy sheep breeding programs, the key constraint is likely to be the cost of genotyping. Potentially, this constraint can be overcome by genotyping selection candidates for a low density (low cost) panel of SNPs with sparse genotype coverage, imputing a much higher density of SNP genotypes using a densely genotyped reference population. These imputed genotypes would then be used with a prediction equation to produce genomic estimated breeding values. In the future, it may also be desirable to impute very dense marker genotypes or even whole genome re-sequence data from moderate density SNP panels. Such a strategy could lead to an accurate prediction of genomic estimated breeding values across breeds, for example. We used genotypes from 48 640 (50K) SNPs genotyped in four sheep breeds to investigate both the accuracy of imputation of the 50K SNPs from low density SNP panels, as well as prospects for imputing very dense or whole genome re-sequence data from the 50K SNPs (by leaving out a small number of the 50K SNPs at random). Accuracy of imputation was low if the sparse panel had less than 5000 (5K) markers. Across breeds, it was clear that the accuracy of imputing from sparse marker panels to 50K was higher if the genetic diversity within a breed was lower, such that relationships among animals in that breed were higher. The accuracy of imputation from sparse genotypes to 50K genotypes was higher when the imputation was performed within breed rather than when pooling all the data, despite the fact that the pooled reference set was much larger. For Border Leicesters, Poll Dorsets and White Suffolks, 5K sparse genotypes were sufficient to impute 50K with 80% accuracy. For Merinos, the accuracy of imputing 50K from 5K was lower at 71%, despite a large number of animals with full genotypes (2215) being used as a reference. For all breeds, the relationship of

  5. Factors Affecting Accuracy of Data Abstracted from Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Zozus, Meredith N.; Pieper, Carl; Johnson, Constance M.; Johnson, Todd R.; Franklin, Amy; Smith, Jack; Zhang, Jiajie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medical record abstraction (MRA) is often cited as a significant source of error in research data, yet MRA methodology has rarely been the subject of investigation. Lack of a common framework has hindered application of the extant literature in practice, and, until now, there were no evidence-based guidelines for ensuring data quality in MRA. We aimed to identify the factors affecting the accuracy of data abstracted from medical records and to generate a framework for data quality assurance and control in MRA. Methods Candidate factors were identified from published reports of MRA. Content validity of the top candidate factors was assessed via a four-round two-group Delphi process with expert abstractors with experience in clinical research, registries, and quality improvement. The resulting coded factors were categorized into a control theory-based framework of MRA. Coverage of the framework was evaluated using the recent published literature. Results Analysis of the identified articles yielded 292 unique factors that affect the accuracy of abstracted data. Delphi processes overall refuted three of the top factors identified from the literature based on importance and five based on reliability (six total factors refuted). Four new factors were identified by the Delphi. The generated framework demonstrated comprehensive coverage. Significant underreporting of MRA methodology in recent studies was discovered. Conclusion The framework generated from this research provides a guide for planning data quality assurance and control for studies using MRA. The large number and variability of factors indicate that while prospective quality assurance likely increases the accuracy of abstracted data, monitoring the accuracy during the abstraction process is also required. Recent studies reporting research results based on MRA rarely reported data quality assurance or control measures, and even less frequently reported data quality metrics with research results. Given

  6. Accuracy in clinical chemistry - who will kiss Sleeping Beauty awake?

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Linda M

    2008-01-01

    Triggered by recent criticism from parties outside the clinical chemistry community on poor analytical accuracy of measurement procedures used for evaluating the calcium-parathyroid hormone-vitamin D axis, I argue, in this opinion paper, strongly in favor of prioritizing the establishment of accuracy. I make a proposal on how the clinical chemistry profession could tackle the challenges focused at the conceptual, technical, and organizational level. The profession should "rehearse" the basic concepts of measurement, because they need to be understood before one can look for pragmatic solutions when a purist's approach cannot be realized in a foreseeable time. This is illustrated for the measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). To solve problems encountered at the technical level of establishing reference measurement systems, in particular when this is not possible according to the point of view of purism, the profession should have the courage to agree on pragmatic solutions, without neglecting, however, the technical progress. This is exemplified by way of a solution for measurement of FT4 in serum water and TSH. Because the technical question is also inseparably connected to the specification of the analytical quality required for measurements, I propose that the profession sets realistic specifications for calibration tolerance, limits for batch acceptance, linearity, etc. Last but not least, I call upon organizing and implementing the accuracy process with utmost care, i.e., in a concerted action with all parties involved in patient care. The driving force towards accuracy should come from the test developers, while the lead should be taken by the clinical chemistry community, itself being guided by the clinical professions.

  7. System Accuracy Evaluation of the GlucoRx Nexus Voice TD-4280 Blood Glucose Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Franklin

    2014-01-01

    Use of blood glucose (BG) meters in the self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) significantly lowers the risk of diabetic complications. With several BG meters now commercially available, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) ensures that each BG meter conforms to a set degree of accuracy. Although adherence to ISO guidelines is a prerequisite for commercialization in Europe, several BG meters claim to meet the ISO guidelines yet fail to do so on internal validation. We conducted a study to determine whether the accuracy of the GlucoRx Nexus TD-4280 meter, utilized by our department for its cost-effectiveness, complied with ISO guidelines. 105 patients requiring laboratory blood glucose analysis were randomly selected and reference measurements were determined by the UniCel DxC 800 clinical system. Overall the BG meter failed to adhere to the ≥95% accuracy criterion required by both the 15197:2003 (overall accuracy 92.4%) and 15197:2013 protocol (overall accuracy 86.7%). Inaccurate meters have an inherent risk of over- and/or underestimating the true BG concentration, thereby risking patients to incorrect therapeutic interventions. Our study demonstrates the importance of internally validating the accuracy of BG meters to ensure that its accuracy is accepted by standardized guidelines. PMID:25374434

  8. High-accuracy global time and frequency transfer with a space-borne hydrogen maser clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decher, R.; Allan, D. W.; Alley, C. O.; Baugher, C.; Duncan, B. J.; Vessot, R. F. C.; Winkler, G. M. R.

    1983-01-01

    A proposed system for high-accuracy global time and frequency transfer using a hydrogen maser clock in a space vehicle is discussed. Direct frequency transfer with a accuracy of 10 to the minus 14th power and time transfer with an estimated accuracy of 1 nsec are provided by a 3-link microwave system. A short pulse laser system is included for subnanosecond time transfer and system calibration. The results of studies including operational aspects, error sources, data flow, system configuration, and implementation requirements for an initial demonstration experiment using the Space Shuttle are discussed.

  9. Speed-accuracy strategy regulations in prefrontal tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Fabio; Skrap, Miran; Vallesi, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    The ability to flexibly switch between fast and accurate decisions is crucial in everyday life. Recent neuroimaging evidence suggested that left lateral prefrontal cortex plays a role in switching from a quick response strategy to an accurate one. However, the causal role of the left prefrontal cortex in this particular, non-verbal, strategy switch has never been demonstrated. To fill this gap, we administered a perceptual decision-making task to neuro-oncological prefrontal patients, in which the requirement to be quick or accurate changed randomly on a trial-by-trial basis. To directly assess hemispheric asymmetries in speed-accuracy regulation, patients were tested a few days before and a few days after surgical excision of a brain tumor involving either the left (N=13) or the right (N=12) lateral frontal brain region. A group of age- and education-matched healthy controls was also recruited. To gain more insight on the component processes implied in the task, performance data (accuracy and speed) were not only analyzed separately but also submitted to a diffusion model analysis. The main findings indicated that the left prefrontal patients were impaired in appropriately adopting stricter response criteria in speed-to-accuracy switching trials with respect to healthy controls and right prefrontal patients, who were not impaired in this condition. This study demonstrates that the prefrontal cortex in the left hemisphere is necessary for flexible behavioral regulations, in particular when setting stricter response criteria is required in order to successfully switch from a speedy strategy to an accurate one. PMID:26772144

  10. An accuracy measurement method for star trackers based on direct astronomic observation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; Wang, Xiaochu; You, Zheng; Chu, Daping

    2016-01-01

    Star tracker is one of the most promising optical attitude measurement devices and it is widely used in spacecraft for its high accuracy. However, how to realize and verify such an accuracy remains a crucial but unsolved issue until now. The authenticity of the accuracy measurement method of a star tracker will eventually determine the satellite performance. A new and robust accuracy measurement method for a star tracker based on the direct astronomical observation is proposed here. In comparison with the conventional method with simulated stars, this method utilizes real navigation stars as observation targets which makes the measurement results more authoritative and authentic. Transformations between different coordinate systems are conducted on the account of the precision movements of the Earth, and the error curves of directional vectors are obtained along the three axes. Based on error analysis and accuracy definitions, a three-axis accuracy evaluation criterion has been proposed in this paper, which could determine pointing and rolling accuracy of a star tracker directly. Experimental measurements confirm that this method is effective and convenient to implement. Such a measurement environment is close to the in-orbit conditions and it can satisfy the stringent requirement for high-accuracy star trackers. PMID:26948412

  11. Evaluation of novel approach to deflectometry for high accuracy optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Giorgia; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Tayabaly, Kashmira; Pareschi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    A deflectometrical facility was developed at Italian National Institute for Astrophysics-OAB to characterize free-form optics with shape errors within few microns rms. Deflectometry is an interesting technique because it allows the fast characterization of free-form optics. The capabilities of deflectometry in measuring medium-high frequencies are well known, but the low frequencies error characterization is more challenging. Our facility design foresees an innovative approach based on the acquisition of multiple direct images to enhance the performance on the challenging low frequencies range. This contribution presents the error-budget analysis of the measuring method and a study of the configuration tolerances required to allow the use of deflectometry in the realization of optical components suitable for astronomical projects with a requirement of high accuracy for the optics. As test examples we took into account mirrors for the E-ELT telescope.

  12. Accuracy assessment of EPA protocol gases purchased in 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Coppedge, E.A.; Logan, T.J.; Midgett, M.R.; Shores, R.C.; Messner, M.J.

    1992-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established quality assurance procedures for air pollution measurement systems that are intended to reduce the uncertainty in environmental measurements. The compressed gas standards of the program are used for calibration and audits of continuous emission monitoring systems. EPA's regulations require that the certified values for these standards be traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Materials or to NIST/EPA-approved Certified Reference Materials via either of two traceability protocols. The manufacturer assessment was conducted to: (1) document the accuracy of the compressed gas standards' certified concentrations; and (2) ensure that the compressed gas standards' written certification reports met the documentation requirements of the protocol. All available sources were contacted and the following gas mixtures were acquired: (1) 300-ppm SO2 and 400-ppm NO in N2; and (2) 1500-ppm SO2 and 900-ppm NO in N2.

  13. Accuracy of CO2 sensors in commercial buildings: a pilotstudy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2006-10-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors are often deployed in commercial buildings to obtain CO{sub 2} data that are used to automatically modulate rates of outdoor air supply. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above code requirements, but to also to save energy by avoiding over ventilation relative to code requirements. However, there have been many anecdotal reports of poor CO{sub 2} sensor performance in actual commercial building applications. This study evaluated the accuracy of 44 CO{sub 2} sensors located in nine commercial buildings to determine if CO{sub 2} sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. CO{sub 2} measurement errors varied widely and were sometimes hundreds of parts per million. Despite its small size, this study provides a strong indication that the accuracy of CO{sub 2} sensors used in commercial buildings is frequently less than is needed to measure peak indoor-outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration differences with less than a 20% error. Thus, we conclude that there is a need for more accurate CO{sub 2} sensors and/or better sensor maintenance or calibration procedures.

  14. Matter power spectrum and the challenge of percent accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Aurel; Teyssier, Romain; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Onions, Julian; Reed, Darren S.; Smith, Robert E.; Springel, Volker; Pearce, Frazer R.; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Future galaxy surveys require one percent precision in the theoretical knowledge of the power spectrum over a large range including very nonlinear scales. While this level of accuracy is easily obtained in the linear regime with perturbation theory, it represents a serious challenge for small scales where numerical simulations are required. In this paper we quantify the precision of present-day N-body methods, identifying main potential error sources from the set-up of initial conditions to the measurement of the final power spectrum. We directly compare three widely used N-body codes, Ramses, Pkdgrav3, and Gadget3 which represent three main discretisation techniques: the particle-mesh method, the tree method, and a hybrid combination of the two. For standard run parameters, the codes agree to within one percent at k<=1 h Mpc-1 and to within three percent at k<=10 h Mpc-1. We also consider the bispectrum and show that the reduced bispectra agree at the sub-percent level for k<= 2 h Mpc-1. In a second step, we quantify potential errors due to initial conditions, box size, and resolution using an extended suite of simulations performed with our fastest code Pkdgrav3. We demonstrate that the simulation box size should not be smaller than L=0.5 h-1Gpc to avoid systematic finite-volume effects (while much larger boxes are required to beat down the statistical sample variance). Furthermore, a maximum particle mass of Mp=109 h-1Msolar is required to conservatively obtain one percent precision of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, numerical simulations covering large survey volumes of upcoming missions such as DES, LSST, and Euclid will need more than a trillion particles to reproduce clustering properties at the targeted accuracy.

  15. Improvement in Rayleigh Scattering Measurement Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous velocity, density, and temperature measurements. The Fabry-Perot interferometer or etalon is a commonly employed instrument for resolving the spectrum of molecular Rayleigh scattered light for the purpose of evaluating these flow properties. This paper investigates the use of an acousto-optic frequency shifting device to improve measurement accuracy in Rayleigh scattering experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The frequency shifting device is used as a means of shifting the incident or reference laser frequency by 1100 MHz to avoid overlap of the Rayleigh and reference signal peaks in the interference pattern used to obtain the velocity, density, and temperature measurements, and also to calibrate the free spectral range of the Fabry-Perot etalon. The measurement accuracy improvement is evaluated by comparison of Rayleigh scattering measurements acquired with and without shifting of the reference signal frequency in a 10 mm diameter subsonic nozzle flow.

  16. Response time accuracy in Apple Macintosh computers.

    PubMed

    Neath, Ian; Earle, Avery; Hallett, Darcy; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-06-01

    The accuracy and variability of response times (RTs) collected on stock Apple Macintosh computers using USB keyboards was assessed. A photodiode detected a change in the screen's luminosity and triggered a solenoid that pressed a key on the keyboard. The RTs collected in this way were reliable, but could be as much as 100 ms too long. The standard deviation of the measured RTs varied between 2.5 and 10 ms, and the distributions approximated a normal distribution. Surprisingly, two recent Apple-branded USB keyboards differed in their accuracy by as much as 20 ms. The most accurate RTs were collected when an external CRT was used to display the stimuli and Psychtoolbox was able to synchronize presentation with the screen refresh. We conclude that RTs collected on stock iMacs can detect a difference as small as 5-10 ms under realistic conditions, and this dictates which types of research should or should not use these systems.

  17. Accuracy control in Monte Carlo radiative calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almazan, P. Planas

    1993-01-01

    The general accuracy law that rules the Monte Carlo, ray-tracing algorithms used commonly for the calculation of the radiative entities in the thermal analysis of spacecraft are presented. These entities involve transfer of radiative energy either from a single source to a target (e.g., the configuration factors). or from several sources to a target (e.g., the absorbed heat fluxes). In fact, the former is just a particular case of the latter. The accuracy model is later applied to the calculation of some specific radiative entities. Furthermore, some issues related to the implementation of such a model in a software tool are discussed. Although only the relative error is considered through the discussion, similar results can be derived for the absolute error.

  18. Accuracy of forecasts in strategic intelligence.

    PubMed

    Mandel, David R; Barnes, Alan

    2014-07-29

    The accuracy of 1,514 strategic intelligence forecasts abstracted from intelligence reports was assessed. The results show that both discrimination and calibration of forecasts was very good. Discrimination was better for senior (versus junior) analysts and for easier (versus harder) forecasts. Miscalibration was mainly due to underconfidence such that analysts assigned more uncertainty than needed given their high level of discrimination. Underconfidence was more pronounced for harder (versus easier) forecasts and for forecasts deemed more (versus less) important for policy decision making. Despite the observed underconfidence, there was a paucity of forecasts in the least informative 0.4-0.6 probability range. Recalibrating the forecasts substantially reduced underconfidence. The findings offer cause for tempered optimism about the accuracy of strategic intelligence forecasts and indicate that intelligence producers aim to promote informativeness while avoiding overstatement.

  19. Positional Accuracy Assessment of Googleearth in Riyadh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Ashraf; Algarni, Dafer

    2014-06-01

    Google Earth is a virtual globe, map and geographical information program that is controlled by Google corporation. It maps the Earth by the superimposition of images obtained from satellite imagery, aerial photography and GIS 3D globe. With millions of users all around the globe, GoogleEarth® has become the ultimate source of spatial data and information for private and public decision-support systems besides many types and forms of social interactions. Many users mostly in developing countries are also using it for surveying applications, the matter that raises questions about the positional accuracy of the Google Earth program. This research presents a small-scale assessment study of the positional accuracy of GoogleEarth® Imagery in Riyadh; capital of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The results show that the RMSE of the GoogleEarth imagery is 2.18 m and 1.51 m for the horizontal and height coordinates respectively.

  20. Accuracy estimation for supervised learning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, C.W.; Oblow, E.M.; Rao, N.S.V.

    1997-04-01

    This paper illustrates the relative merits of three methods - k-fold Cross Validation, Error Bounds, and Incremental Halting Test - to estimate the accuracy of a supervised learning algorithm. For each of the three methods we point out the problem they address, some of the important assumptions that are based on, and illustrate them through an example. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  1. Boresighting Issues for High Accuracy TSPI Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 412 RANS/ENRT Edwards Air Force Base, CA...navigation sensor to accurately report the heading, roll, and pitch of an aircraft, the angular offset between the sensor inertial coordinate system and...the aircraft coordinate system, the “boresight”, must be measured . Errors in the boresight measurements directly affect the accuracy of the navigation

  2. Measurement Accuracy Limitation Analysis on Synchrophasors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiecheng; Zhan, Lingwei; Liu, Yilu; Qi, Hairong; Gracia, Jose R; Ewing, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the theoretical accuracy limitation of synchrophasors measurements on phase angle and frequency of the power grid. Factors that cause the measurement error are analyzed, including error sources in the instruments and in the power grid signal. Different scenarios of these factors are evaluated according to the normal operation status of power grid measurement. Based on the evaluation and simulation, the errors of phase angle and frequency caused by each factor are calculated and discussed.

  3. Secure Fingerprint Identification of High Accuracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    work on secure face recognition ([12], [29] and others), DNA matching ([35], [6], and others), iris code comparisons ([9], [7]), fingerprint ...1 Secure Fingerprint Identification of High Accuracy Marina Blanton and Siddharth Saraph Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of...In this work, we treat the problem of privacy- preserving matching of two fingerprints , which can be used for secure fingerprint authentication and

  4. Accuracy of Stokes integration for geoid computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Zahra; Jamet, Olivier; Altamimi, Zuheir

    2014-05-01

    Geoid determination by remove-compute-restore (RCR) technique involves the application of Stokes's integral on reduced gravity anomalies. Reduced gravity anomalies are obtained through interpolation after removing low degree gravity signal from space spherical harmonic model and high frequency from topographical effects and cover a spectre ranging from degree 150-200. Stokes's integral is truncated to a limited region around the computation point producing an error that will be reducing by a modification of Stokes's kernel. We study Stokes integral accuracy on synthetic signal of various frequency ranges, produced with EGM2008 spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 2000. We analyse the integration error according to the frequency range of signal, the resolution of gravity anomaly grid and the radius of Stokes integration. The study shows that the behaviour of the relative errors is frequency independent. The standard Stokes kernel is though insufficient to produce 1cm geoid accuracy without a removal of the major part of the gravity signal up to degree 600. The Integration over an area of radius greater than 3 degree does not improve accuracy improvement. The results are compared to a similar experiment using the modified Stokes kernel formula (Ellmann2004, Sjöberg2003). References: Ellmann, A. (2004) The geoid for the Baltic countries determined by least-squares modification of Stokes formula. Sjöberg, LE (2003). A general model of modifying Stokes formula and its least-squares solution Journal of Geodesy, 77. 459-464.

  5. Speed versus accuracy in collective decision making.

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Nigel R; Dornhaus, Anna; Fitzsimmons, Jon P; Stevens, Martin

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a speed versus accuracy trade-off in collective decision making. House-hunting ant colonies choose a new nest more quickly in harsh conditions than in benign ones and are less discriminating. The errors that occur in a harsh environment are errors of judgement not errors of omission because the colonies have discovered all of the alternative nests before they initiate an emigration. Leptothorax albipennis ants use quorum sensing in their house hunting. They only accept a nest, and begin rapidly recruiting members of their colony, when they find within it a sufficient number of their nest-mates. Here we show that these ants can lower their quorum thresholds between benign and harsh conditions to adjust their speed-accuracy trade-off. Indeed, in harsh conditions these ants rely much more on individual decision making than collective decision making. Our findings show that these ants actively choose to take their time over judgements and employ collective decision making in benign conditions when accuracy is more important than speed. PMID:14667335

  6. Solving Nonlinear Euler Equations with Arbitrary Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program that efficiently solves the time-dependent, nonlinear Euler equations in two dimensions to an arbitrarily high order of accuracy has been developed. The program implements a modified form of a prior arbitrary- accuracy simulation algorithm that is a member of the class of algorithms known in the art as modified expansion solution approximation (MESA) schemes. Whereas millions of lines of code were needed to implement the prior MESA algorithm, it is possible to implement the present MESA algorithm by use of one or a few pages of Fortran code, the exact amount depending on the specific application. The ability to solve the Euler equations to arbitrarily high accuracy is especially beneficial in simulations of aeroacoustic effects in settings in which fully nonlinear behavior is expected - for example, at stagnation points of fan blades, where linearizing assumptions break down. At these locations, it is necessary to solve the full nonlinear Euler equations, and inasmuch as the acoustical energy is of the order of 4 to 5 orders of magnitude below that of the mean flow, it is necessary to achieve an overall fractional error of less than 10-6 in order to faithfully simulate entropy, vortical, and acoustical waves.

  7. On the Accuracy of Genomic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Rabier, Charles-Elie; Barre, Philippe; Asp, Torben; Charmet, Gilles; Mangin, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Genomic selection is focused on prediction of breeding values of selection candidates by means of high density of markers. It relies on the assumption that all quantitative trait loci (QTLs) tend to be in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with at least one marker. In this context, we present theoretical results regarding the accuracy of genomic selection, i.e., the correlation between predicted and true breeding values. Typically, for individuals (so-called test individuals), breeding values are predicted by means of markers, using marker effects estimated by fitting a ridge regression model to a set of training individuals. We present a theoretical expression for the accuracy; this expression is suitable for any configurations of LD between QTLs and markers. We also introduce a new accuracy proxy that is free of the QTL parameters and easily computable; it outperforms the proxies suggested in the literature, in particular, those based on an estimated effective number of independent loci (Me). The theoretical formula, the new proxy, and existing proxies were compared for simulated data, and the results point to the validity of our approach. The calculations were also illustrated on a new perennial ryegrass set (367 individuals) genotyped for 24,957 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In this case, most of the proxies studied yielded similar results because of the lack of markers for coverage of the entire genome (2.7 Gb). PMID:27322178

  8. Ultra-wideband ranging precision and accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGougan, Glenn; O'Keefe, Kyle; Klukas, Richard

    2009-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of ultra-wideband (UWB) in the context of ranging applications and assesses the precision and accuracy of UWB ranging from both a theoretical perspective and a practical perspective using real data. The paper begins with a brief history of UWB technology and the most current definition of what constitutes an UWB signal. The potential precision of UWB ranging is assessed using Cramer-Rao lower bound analysis. UWB ranging methods are described and potential error sources are discussed. Two types of commercially available UWB ranging radios are introduced which are used in testing. Actual ranging accuracy is assessed from line-of-sight testing under benign signal conditions by comparison to high-accuracy electronic distance measurements and to ranges derived from GPS real-time kinematic positioning. Range measurements obtained in outdoor testing with line-of-sight obstructions and strong reflection sources are compared to ranges derived from classically surveyed positions. The paper concludes with a discussion of the potential applications for UWB ranging.

  9. Wind measurement accuracy for the NASA scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David G.; Oliphant, Travis

    1997-09-01

    The NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) is designed to make measurements of the normalized radar backscatter coefficient ((sigma) o) of the ocean's surface. The measured (sigma) o is a function of the viewing geometry and the surface roughness due to wind-generated waves. By making multiple measurements of the same location from different azimuth angles it is possible to retrieve the near-surface wind speed and direction with the aid of a Geophysical Model Function (GMF) which relates wind and (sigma) o. The wind is estimated from the noisy (sigma) o measurements using maximum likelihood techniques. The probability density of the measured (sigma) o is assumed to be Gaussian with a variance that depends on the true (sigma) o and therefore the wind through the GMF and the measurements from different azimuth angles are assumed independent in estimating the wind. In order to estimate the accuracy of the retrieved wind, we derive the Cramer-Reo (CR) bound for wind estimation from scatterometer measurements. We show that the CR bound can be used as an error bar on the estimated wind. The role of geophysical modeling error in the GMF is considered and shown to play a significant role in the wind accuracy. Estimates of the accuracy of NSCAT measurements are given along with other scatterometer geometries and types.

  10. Determination of GPS orbits to submeter accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, W. I.; Lichten, S. M.; Katsigris, E. C.

    1988-01-01

    Orbits for satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS) were determined with submeter accuracy. Tests used to assess orbital accuracy include orbit comparisons from independent data sets, orbit prediction, ground baseline determination, and formal errors. One satellite tracked 8 hours each day shows rms error below 1 m even when predicted more than 3 days outside of a 1-week data arc. Differential tracking of the GPS satellites in high Earth orbit provides a powerful relative positioning capability, even when a relatively small continental U.S. fiducial tracking network is used with less than one-third of the full GPS constellation. To demonstrate this capability, baselines of up to 2000 km in North America were also determined with the GPS orbits. The 2000 km baselines show rms daily repeatability of 0.3 to 2 parts in 10 to the 8th power and agree with very long base interferometry (VLBI) solutions at the level of 1.5 parts in 10 to the 8th power. This GPS demonstration provides an opportunity to test different techniques for high-accuracy orbit determination for high Earth orbiters. The best GPS orbit strategies included data arcs of at least 1 week, process noise models for tropospheric fluctuations, estimation of GPS solar pressure coefficients, and combine processing of GPS carrier phase and pseudorange data. For data arc of 2 weeks, constrained process noise models for GPS dynamic parameters significantly improved the situation.

  11. 47 CFR 400.8 - Non-compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.8 Non... its certification related to the diversion of E-911 charges, the State shall be required to return...

  12. 47 CFR 400.8 - Non-compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.8 Non... its certification related to the diversion of E-911 charges, the State shall be required to return...

  13. 47 CFR 400.8 - Non-compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.8 Non... its certification related to the diversion of E-911 charges, the State shall be required to return...

  14. 47 CFR 400.8 - Non-compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.8 Non... its certification related to the diversion of E-911 charges, the State shall be required to return...

  15. 47 CFR 400.8 - Non-compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.8 Non... its certification related to the diversion of E-911 charges, the State shall be required to return...

  16. Parametric Characterization of SGP4 Theory and TLE Positional Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltrogge, D.; Ramrath, J.

    2014-09-01

    Two-Line Elements, or TLEs, contain mean element state vectors compatible with General Perturbations (GP) singly-averaged semi-analytic orbit theory. This theory, embodied in the SGP4 orbit propagator, provides sufficient accuracy for some (but perhaps not all) orbit operations and SSA tasks. For more demanding tasks, higher accuracy orbit and force model approaches (i.e. Special Perturbations numerical integration or SP) may be required. In recent times, the suitability of TLEs or GP theory for any SSA analysis has been increasingly questioned. Meanwhile, SP is touted as being of high quality and well-suited for most, if not all, SSA applications. Yet the lack of truth or well-known reference orbits that haven't already been adopted for radar and optical sensor network calibration has typically prevented a truly unbiased assessment of such assertions. To gain better insight into the practical limits of applicability for TLEs, SGP4 and the underlying GP theory, the native SGP4 accuracy is parametrically examined for the statistically-significant range of RSO orbit inclinations experienced as a function of all orbit altitudes from LEO through GEO disposal altitude. For each orbit altitude, reference or truth orbits were generated using full force modeling, time-varying space weather, and AGIs HPOP numerical integration orbit propagator. Then, TLEs were optimally fit to these truth orbits. The resulting TLEs were then propagated and positionally differenced with the truth orbits to determine how well the GP theory was able to fit the truth orbits. Resultant statistics characterizing these empirically-derived accuracies are provided. This TLE fit process of truth orbits was intentionally designed to be similar to the JSpOC process operationally used to generate Enhanced GP TLEs for debris objects. This allows us to draw additional conclusions of the expected accuracies of EGP TLEs. In the real world, Orbit Determination (OD) programs aren't provided with dense optical

  17. An automated method for the evaluation of the pointing accuracy of Sun-tracking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Pötzi, Werner; Freislich, Heinrich; Strutzmann, Heinz; Veronig, Astrid M.; Rieder, Harald E.

    2017-03-01

    The accuracy of solar radiation measurements, for direct (DIR) and diffuse (DIF) radiation, depends significantly on the precision of the operational Sun-tracking device. Thus, rigid targets for instrument performance and operation have been specified for international monitoring networks, e.g., the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Sun-tracking devices that fulfill these accuracy requirements are available from various instrument manufacturers; however, none of the commercially available systems comprise an automatic accuracy control system allowing platform operators to independently validate the pointing accuracy of Sun-tracking sensors during operation. Here we present KSO-STREAMS (KSO-SunTRackEr Accuracy Monitoring System), a fully automated, system-independent, and cost-effective system for evaluating the pointing accuracy of Sun-tracking devices. We detail the monitoring system setup, its design and specifications, and the results from its application to the Sun-tracking system operated at the Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO) Austrian radiation monitoring network (ARAD) site. The results from an evaluation campaign from March to June 2015 show that the tracking accuracy of the device operated at KSO lies within BSRN specifications (i.e., 0.1° tracking accuracy) for the vast majority of observations (99.8 %). The evaluation of manufacturer-specified active-tracking accuracies (0.02°), during periods with direct solar radiation exceeding 300 W m-2, shows that these are satisfied in 72.9 % of observations. Tracking accuracies are highest during clear-sky conditions and on days where prevailing clear-sky conditions are interrupted by frontal movement; in these cases, we obtain the complete fulfillment of BSRN requirements and 76.4 % of observations within manufacturer-specified active-tracking accuracies. Limitations to tracking surveillance arise during overcast conditions and

  18. 100% Classification Accuracy Considered Harmful: The Normalized Information Transfer Factor Explains the Accuracy Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Valverde-Albacete, Francisco J.; Peláez-Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The most widely spread measure of performance, accuracy, suffers from a paradox: predictive models with a given level of accuracy may have greater predictive power than models with higher accuracy. Despite optimizing classification error rate, high accuracy models may fail to capture crucial information transfer in the classification task. We present evidence of this behavior by means of a combinatorial analysis where every possible contingency matrix of 2, 3 and 4 classes classifiers are depicted on the entropy triangle, a more reliable information-theoretic tool for classification assessment. Motivated by this, we develop from first principles a measure of classification performance that takes into consideration the information learned by classifiers. We are then able to obtain the entropy-modulated accuracy (EMA), a pessimistic estimate of the expected accuracy with the influence of the input distribution factored out, and the normalized information transfer factor (NIT), a measure of how efficient is the transmission of information from the input to the output set of classes. The EMA is a more natural measure of classification performance than accuracy when the heuristic to maximize is the transfer of information through the classifier instead of classification error count. The NIT factor measures the effectiveness of the learning process in classifiers and also makes it harder for them to “cheat” using techniques like specialization, while also promoting the interpretability of results. Their use is demonstrated in a mind reading task competition that aims at decoding the identity of a video stimulus based on magnetoencephalography recordings. We show how the EMA and the NIT factor reject rankings based in accuracy, choosing more meaningful and interpretable classifiers. PMID:24427282

  19. 100% classification accuracy considered harmful: the normalized information transfer factor explains the accuracy paradox.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Albacete, Francisco J; Peláez-Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The most widely spread measure of performance, accuracy, suffers from a paradox: predictive models with a given level of accuracy may have greater predictive power than models with higher accuracy. Despite optimizing classification error rate, high accuracy models may fail to capture crucial information transfer in the classification task. We present evidence of this behavior by means of a combinatorial analysis where every possible contingency matrix of 2, 3 and 4 classes classifiers are depicted on the entropy triangle, a more reliable information-theoretic tool for classification assessment. Motivated by this, we develop from first principles a measure of classification performance that takes into consideration the information learned by classifiers. We are then able to obtain the entropy-modulated accuracy (EMA), a pessimistic estimate of the expected accuracy with the influence of the input distribution factored out, and the normalized information transfer factor (NIT), a measure of how efficient is the transmission of information from the input to the output set of classes. The EMA is a more natural measure of classification performance than accuracy when the heuristic to maximize is the transfer of information through the classifier instead of classification error count. The NIT factor measures the effectiveness of the learning process in classifiers and also makes it harder for them to "cheat" using techniques like specialization, while also promoting the interpretability of results. Their use is demonstrated in a mind reading task competition that aims at decoding the identity of a video stimulus based on magnetoencephalography recordings. We show how the EMA and the NIT factor reject rankings based in accuracy, choosing more meaningful and interpretable classifiers.

  20. Age-Related Reduction of the Confidence-Accuracy Relationship in Episodic Memory: Effects of Recollection Quality and Retrieval Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jessica T.; Cramer, Stefanie J.; Gallo, David A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated age-related reductions in episodic metamemory accuracy. Participants studied pictures and words in different colors, and then took forced-choice recollection tests. These tests required recollection of the earlier presentation color, holding familiarity of the response options constant. Metamemory accuracy was assessed for each participant by comparing recollection test accuracy to corresponding confidence judgments. We found that recollection test accuracy was greater in younger than older adults, and also for pictures than font color. Metamemory accuracy tracked each of these recollection differences, as well as individual differences in recollection test accuracy within each age group, suggesting that recollection ability affects metamemory accuracy. Critically, the age-related impairment in metamemory accuracy persisted even when the groups were matched on recollection test accuracy, suggesting that metamemory declines were not entirely due to differences in recollection frequency or quantity, but that differences in recollection quality and/or monitoring also played a role. We also found that age-related impairments in recollection and metamemory accuracy were equivalent for pictures and font colors. This result contrasted with previous false recognition findings, which predicted that older adults would be differentially impaired when monitoring memory for less distinctive memories. These and other results suggest that age-related reductions in metamemory accuracy are not entirely attributable to false recognition effects, but also depend heavily on deficient recollection and/or monitoring of specific details associated with studied stimuli. PMID:22449027

  1. Accuracy of Consonant-Vowel Syllables in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Hearing Children in the Single-Word Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D.; Davis, Barbara L.; MacNeilage, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Attaining speech accuracy requires that children perceive and attach meanings to vocal output on the basis of production system capacities. Because auditory perception underlies speech accuracy, profiles for children with hearing loss (HL) differ from those of children with normal hearing (NH). Method: To understand the impact of auditory…

  2. Improvement of focus accuracy on processed wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashibata, Satomi; Komine, Nobuhiro; Fukuhara, Kazuya; Koike, Takashi; Kato, Yoshimitsu; Hashimoto, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    As feature size shrinkage in semiconductor device progress, process fluctuation, especially focus strongly affects device performance. Because focus control is an ongoing challenge in optical lithography, various studies have sought for improving focus monitoring and control. Focus errors are due to wafers, exposure tools, reticles, QCs, and so on. Few studies are performed to minimize the measurement errors of auto focus (AF) sensors of exposure tool, especially when processed wafers are exposed. With current focus measurement techniques, the phase shift grating (PSG) focus monitor 1) has been already proposed and its basic principle is that the intensity of the diffraction light of the mask pattern is made asymmetric by arranging a π/2 phase shift area on a reticle. The resist pattern exposed at the defocus position is shifted on the wafer and shifted pattern can be easily measured using an overlay inspection tool. However, it is difficult to measure shifted pattern for the pattern on the processed wafer because of interruptions caused by other patterns in the underlayer. In this paper, we therefore propose "SEM-PSG" technique, where the shift of the PSG resist mark is measured by employing critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) to measure the focus error on the processed wafer. First, we evaluate the accuracy of SEM-PSG technique. Second, by applying the SEM-PSG technique and feeding the results back to the exposure, we evaluate the focus accuracy on processed wafers. By applying SEM-PSG feedback, the focus accuracy on the processed wafer was improved from 40 to 29 nm in 3σ.

  3. On the Accuracy of IGS Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Ray, J.

    2007-12-01

    In order to explore the reliability of IGS internal orbit accuracy estimates, we have compared the geocentric satellite positions at the midnight epoch between consecutive days for the period since November 5, 2006, when the IGS changed its method of antenna calibration. For each pair of orbits, day "A" has been fitted to the extended CODE orbit model (three position and three velocity parameters plus nine nuisance solar radiation parameters), using the IGS05 Final orbits as psuedo-observations, and extrapolated to epoch 24:00 to compare with the 00:00 epoch from the IGS05 Final orbits of day "B". This yields a time series of orbit repeatability measures, analogous to the classical geodetic test for position determinations. To assess the error introduced by the fitting and extrapolation process, the same procedure has been applied to several days dropping the 23:45 epoch, fitting up to 23:30, extrapolating to 23:45, and comparing with reported positions for 23:45. The test differences range between 0 and 10 mm (mean = 3 mm) per geocentric component with 3D differences of 3 to 10 mm (mean = 6 mm). So, the effect of the orbit fitting-extrapolation process nearly always adds insignificant noise to the day- boundary orbit comparisons. If we compare our average 1D position differences to the official IGS accuracy codes (derived from the internal agreement among combined orbit solutions), root-sum-squared for each pair of days, the actual discontinuities are not well correlated with the expected performance values. If instead the IGS RMS values from the Final combination long-arc analyses (which also use the extended CODE model) are taken as the measure of IGS accuracy, the actual orbit discontinuties are much better represented. This is despite the fact that our day- boundary offsets apply to a single epoch each day and the long-arc analyses consider variations over a day (compared to the satellite dynamics determined over the full week). Our method is not well suited

  4. Precision cosmology, Accuracy cosmology and Statistical cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde, Licia

    2014-05-01

    The avalanche of data over the past 10-20 years has propelled cosmology into the ``precision era''. The next challenge cosmology has to meet is to enter the era of accuracy. Because of the intrinsic nature of studying the Cosmos and the sheer amount of data available now and coming soon, the only way to meet this challenge is by developing suitable and specific statistical techniques. The road from precision Cosmology to accurate Cosmology goes through statistical Cosmology. I will outline some open challenges and discuss some specific examples.

  5. Guidance accuracy considerations for realtime GPS interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braasch, Michael S.; Van Graas, Frank

    1991-01-01

    During April and May of 1991, the Avionics Engineering Center at Ohio University completed the first set of realtime flight tests of a GPS interferometric attitude and heading determination system. This technique has myriad applications for aircraft and spacecraft guidance and control. However, before these applications can be further developed, a number of guidance accuracy issues must be considered. Among these are: signal derogation due to multipath and shadowing, effects of structural flexures, and system robustness during loss of phase lock. This paper addresses these issues with special emphasis on the information content of the GPS signal, and characterization and mitigation of multipath encountered while in flight.

  6. Accuracy and Precision of an IGRT Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Gareth J. Rowbottom, Carl G.; Mackay, Ranald I.

    2009-07-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) can potentially improve the accuracy of delivery of radiotherapy treatments by providing high-quality images of patient anatomy in the treatment position that can be incorporated into the treatment setup. The achievable accuracy and precision of delivery of highly complex head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with an IGRT technique using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) was investigated. Four head-and-neck IMRT plans were delivered to a semi-anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom and the dose distribution was measured simultaneously by up to 20 microMOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transmitter) detectors. A volumetric kilovoltage (kV) x-ray image was then acquired in the treatment position, fused with the phantom scan within the TPS using Syntegra software, and used to recalculate the dose with the precise delivery isocenter at the actual position of each detector within the phantom. Three repeat measurements were made over a period of 2 months to reduce the effect of random errors in measurement or delivery. To ensure that the noise remained below 1.5% (1 SD), minimum doses of 85 cGy were delivered to each detector. The average measured dose was systematically 1.4% lower than predicted and was consistent between repeats. Over the 4 delivered plans, 10/76 measurements showed a systematic error > 3% (3/76 > 5%), for which several potential sources of error were investigated. The error was ultimately attributable to measurements made in beam penumbrae, where submillimeter positional errors result in large discrepancies in dose. The implementation of an image-guided technique improves the accuracy of dose verification, particularly within high-dose gradients. The achievable accuracy of complex IMRT dose delivery incorporating image-guidance is within {+-} 3% in dose over the range of sample points. For some points in high-dose gradients

  7. Feasibility, Accuracy, and Repeatability of Suprathreshold Saccadic Vector Optokinetic Perimetry

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Ian C.; Cameron, Lorraine A.; McTrusty, Alice D.; Perperidis, Antonios; Brash, Harry M.; Fleck, Brian W.; Minns, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate feasibility, accuracy, and repeatability of suprathreshold Saccadic Vector Optokinetic Perimetry (SVOP) by comparison with Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) perimetry. Methods The subjects included children with suspected field defects (n = 10, age 5–15 years), adults with field defects (n = 33, age 39–78 years), healthy children (n = 12, age 6–14 years), and healthy adults (n = 30, age 16–61 years). The test protocol comprised repeat suprathreshold SVOP and HFA testing with the C-40 test pattern. Feasibility was assessed by protocol completeness. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of SVOP was established by comparison with reliable HFA tests in two ways: (1) visual field pattern results (normal/abnormal), and (2) individual test point outcomes (seen/unseen). Repeatability of each test type was assessed using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Results Of subjects, 82% completed a full protocol. Poor reliability of HFA testing in child patients limited the robustness of comparisons in this group. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy across all groups when analyzing the visual field pattern results was 90.9%, 88.5%, and 89.0%, respectively, and was 69.1%, 96.9%, and 95.0%, respectively, when analyzing the individual test points. Cohen's kappa coefficient for repeatability of SVOP and HFA was excellent (0.87 and 0.88, respectively) when assessing visual field pattern results, and substantial (0.62 and 0.74, respectively) when assessing test point outcomes. Conclusions SVOP was accurate in this group of adults. Further studies are required to assess SVOP in child patient groups. Translational Relevance SVOP technology is still in its infancy but is used in a number of centers. It will undergo iterative improvements and this study provides a benchmark for future iterations. PMID:27617181

  8. High-accuracy three-dimensional reconstruction of vibration based on stereo vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Peng; Deng, Huaxia; Wang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The traditional vibration measurement method usually uses contact sensors, which induce unwanted mass and have limits for moving parts. Currently, using stereo vision for vibration measurement is developing fast because of noncontact and full field. However, for stereo vision, the high-accuracy reconstruction for the vibration motion is a significant challenge and the factors that affect the construction accuracy have not been thoroughly studied. The accuracy analysis of sinusoidal motion reconstruction is important because it can provide guidance for the reconstruction of other vibration motions. The high accuracy reconstruction for sinusoidal motion and the factors that affect the accuracy of the reconstruction are presented. First, the error model of reconstruction using stereo vision considering the delay time, frequency, amplitude, and disparity is established. The accuracy of sinusoidal motion reconstruction in the whole period is analyzed theoretically and experimentally considering subpixel interpolation. Peak identification is essential for the sinusoidal motion reconstruction and has the highest resolution requirement for the reconstruction resolution. This requirement is systematically investigated for the sinusoidal motions with different frequencies and amplitudes. The relationships between the reconstruction resolution and parameters of cameras are analyzed.

  9. Direct Georeferencing : a New Standard in Photogrammetry for High Accuracy Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizaldy, A.; Firdaus, W.

    2012-07-01

    Direct georeferencing is a new method in photogrammetry, especially in the digital camera era. Theoretically, this method does not require ground control points (GCP) and the Aerial Triangulation (AT), to process aerial photography into ground coordinates. Compared with the old method, this method has three main advantages: faster data processing, simple workflow and less expensive project, at the same accuracy. Direct georeferencing using two devices, GPS and IMU. GPS recording the camera coordinates (X, Y, Z), and IMU recording the camera orientation (omega, phi, kappa). Both parameters merged into Exterior Orientation (EO) parameter. This parameters required for next steps in the photogrammetric projects, such as stereocompilation, DSM generation, orthorectification and mosaic. Accuracy of this method was tested on topographic map project in Medan, Indonesia. Large-format digital camera Ultracam X from Vexcel is used, while the GPS / IMU is IGI AeroControl. 19 Independent Check Point (ICP) were used to determine the accuracy. Horizontal accuracy is 0.356 meters and vertical accuracy is 0.483 meters. Data with this accuracy can be used for 1:2.500 map scale project.

  10. A review on the processing accuracy of two-photon polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hou, Yihong; Lin, Jieqiong

    2015-03-15

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) is a powerful and potential technology to fabricate true three-dimensional (3D) micro/nanostructures of various materials with subdiffraction-limit resolution. And it has been applied to microoptics, electronics, communications, biomedicine, microfluidic devices, MEMS and metamaterials. These applications, such as microoptics and photon crystals, put forward rigorous requirements on the processing accuracy of TPP, including the dimensional accuracy, shape accuracy and surface roughness and the processing accuracy influences their performance, even invalidate them. In order to fabricate precise 3D micro/nanostructures, the factors influencing the processing accuracy need to be considered comprehensively and systematically. In this paper, we review the basis of TPP micro/nanofabrication, including mechanism of TPP, experimental set-up for TPP and scaling laws of resolution of TPP. Then, we discuss the factors influencing the processing accuracy. Finally, we summarize the methods reported lately to improve the processing accuracy from improving the resolution and changing spatial arrangement of voxels.

  11. Consideration for high accuracy radiation efficiency measurements for the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) subarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozakoff, D. J.; Schuchardt, J. M.; Ryan, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The transmit beam and radiation efficiency for 10 metersquare subarray panels were quantified. Measurement performance potential of far field elevated and ground reflection ranges and near field technique were evaluated. The state-of-the-art of critical components and/or unique facilities required was identified. Relative cost, complexity and performance tradeoffs were performed for techniques capable of achieving accuracy objectives. It is considered that because of the large electrical size of the SPS subarray panels and the requirement for high accuracy measurements, specialized measurement facilities are required. Most critical measurement error sources have been identified for both conventional far field and near field techniques. Although the adopted error budget requires advances in state-of-the-art of microwave instrumentation, the requirements appear feasible based on extrapolation from today's technology. Additional performance and cost tradeoffs need to be completed before the choice of the preferred measurement technique is finalized.

  12. Doppler estimation accuracy of linear FM waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, F. E.

    The single-pulse Doppler estimation accuracy of an unweighted linear FM waveform is analyzed in detail. Simple formulas are derived that predict that one-sigma Doppler estimation error for realistic radar applications. The effects of multiple target interference and nonlinearlities in the radar measurements are considered. In addition, a practical method to estimate Doppler frequency is presented. This technique uses the phase data after pulse compression, and it limits the effect of multiple target interference. In contrast, the available literature is based on the Cramer-Rao bound for Doppler accuracy, which ignores the effects of nonlinearities, multiple target interference and the question of practical implementation. A simple formula is derived that predicts the region of validity for the Cramer-Rao bound. This formula provides a criterion for minimum signal-to-noise ratio in terms of time-bandwidth product. Finally, an important concept that is demonstrated in this paper is that: the bulk of the Doppler information in a linear FM pulse is encoded in the range sidelobes after pulse compression.

  13. High accuracy electronic material level sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11

    The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: (1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, (2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, (3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or ``ghost`` reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%. 4 figs.

  14. High accuracy electronic material level sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: 1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, 2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, 3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or "ghost" reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%.

  15. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  16. Millimeter accuracy satellites for two color ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1993-01-01

    The principal technical challenge in designing a millimeter accuracy satellite to support two color observations at high altitudes is to provide high optical cross-section simultaneously with minimal pulse spreading. In order to address this issue, we provide, a brief review of some fundamental properties of optical retroreflectors when used in spacecraft target arrays, develop a simple model for a spherical geodetic satellite, and use the model to determine some basic design criteria for a new generation of geodetic satellites capable of supporting millimeter accuracy two color laser ranging. We find that increasing the satellite diameter provides: a larger surface area for additional cube mounting thereby leading to higher cross-sections; and makes the satellite surface a better match for the incoming planar phasefront of the laser beam. Restricting the retroreflector field of view (e.g. by recessing it in its holder) limits the target response to the fraction of the satellite surface which best matches the optical phasefront thereby controlling the amount of pulse spreading. In surveying the arrays carried by existing satellites, we find that European STARLETTE and ERS-1 satellites appear to be the best candidates for supporting near term two color experiments in space.

  17. Dust trajectory sensor: accuracy and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, J; Sternovsky, Z; Grün, E; Auer, S; Duncan, N; Drake, K; Le, H; Horanyi, M; Srama, R

    2011-10-01

    The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Grün, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008)] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Grün, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010)]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1° in direction.

  18. Dust trajectory sensor: Accuracy and data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, J.; Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Gruen, E.; Duncan, N.; Drake, K.; Le, H.; Auer, S.; Srama, R.

    2011-10-15

    The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Gruen, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008)] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Gruen, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010)]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1 deg. in direction.

  19. Is Empathic Accuracy Enough to Facilitate Responsive Behavior in Dyadic Interaction? Distinguishing Ability From Motivation.

    PubMed

    Winczewski, Lauren A; Bowen, Jeffrey D; Collins, Nancy L

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that interpersonal responsiveness-feeling understood, validated, and cared for by other people-plays a key role in shaping the quality of one's social interactions and relationships. But what enables people to be interpersonally responsive to others? In the current study, we argued that responsiveness requires not only accurate understanding but also compassionate motivation. Specifically, we hypothesized that understanding another person's thoughts and feelings (empathic accuracy) would foster responsive behavior only when paired with benevolent motivation (empathic concern). To test this idea, we asked couples (N = 91) to discuss a personal or relationship stressor; we then assessed empathic accuracy, empathic concern, and responsive behavior. As predicted, when listeners' empathic concern was high, empathic accuracy facilitated responsiveness; but when empathic concern was low, empathic accuracy was unhelpful (and possibly harmful) for responsiveness. These findings provide the first evidence that cognitive and affective forms of empathy work together to facilitate responsive behavior.

  20. Assessing the Accuracy of Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul D; Pollock, David D; Blackburne, Benjamin P; Goldstein, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic inference of ancestral protein sequences is a powerful technique for the study of molecular evolution, but any conclusions drawn from such studies are only as good as the accuracy of the reconstruction method. Every inference method leads to errors in the ancestral protein sequence, resulting in potentially misleading estimates of the ancestral protein's properties. To assess the accuracy of ancestral protein reconstruction methods, we performed computational population evolution simulations featuring near-neutral evolution under purifying selection, speciation, and divergence using an off-lattice protein model where fitness depends on the ability to be stable in a specified target structure. We were thus able to compare the thermodynamic properties of the true ancestral sequences with the properties of “ancestral sequences” inferred by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods. Surprisingly, we found that methods such as maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood that reconstruct a “best guess” amino acid at each position overestimate thermostability, while a Bayesian method that sometimes chooses less-probable residues from the posterior probability distribution does not. Maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony apparently tend to eliminate variants at a position that are slightly detrimental to structural stability simply because such detrimental variants are less frequent. Other properties of ancestral proteins might be similarly overestimated. This suggests that ancestral reconstruction studies require greater care to come to credible conclusions regarding functional evolution. Inferred functional patterns that mimic reconstruction bias should be reevaluated. PMID:16789817

  1. Prospective memory mediated by interoceptive accuracy: a psychophysiological approach

    PubMed Central

    Tochizawa, Saiko; Shibata, Midori; Terasawa, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on prospective memory (PM), defined as memory for future intentions, suggest that psychological stress enhances successful PM retrieval. However, the mechanisms underlying this notion remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that PM retrieval is achieved through interaction with autonomic nervous activity, which is mediated by the individual accuracy of interoceptive awareness, as measured by the heartbeat detection task. In this study, the relationship between cardiac reactivity and retrieval of delayed intentions was evaluated using the event-based PM task. Participants were required to detect PM target letters while engaged in an ongoing 2-back working memory task. The results demonstrated that individuals with higher PM task performance had a greater increase in heart rate on PM target presentation. Also, higher interoceptive perceivers showed better PM task performance. This pattern was not observed for working memory task performance. These findings suggest that cardiac afferent signals enhance PM retrieval, which is mediated by individual levels of interoceptive accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interoception beyond homeostasis: affect, cognition and mental health’. PMID:28080964

  2. Accuracy of the PAR corneal topography system with spatial misalignment.

    PubMed

    Belin, M W; Zloty, P

    1993-01-01

    The PAR Corneal Topography System is a computerized corneal imaging system which uses close-range raster photogrammetry to measure and produce a topographic map of the corneal surface. Raster photogrammetry is a standard method of extracting object information by projecting a known pattern onto an object and recording the distortion when viewed from an oblique angle. Unlike placido disc based videokeratoscopes, the PAR system requires neither a smooth reflective surface nor precise spatial alignment for accurate imaging. We studied both the accuracy of the system with purposeful misalignment (defocusing) of the test object and determined the ability to image freshly deepithelialized, keratectomized, and photoablated corneas. The PAR system was both accurate and reproducible in imaging calibrated spheres within a defined zone in space. Whole cadaver eyes were imaged both before and immediately after removal of the epithelium, lamellar keratectomy, and laser photoablation. The system demonstrated the ability to image irregular, deepithelialized, and keratectomized corneas. The ability to maintain accuracy without precise alignment and the facility to image freshly deepithelialized and keratectomized corneas may make the system suitable for intraoperative refractive monitoring.

  3. Generalized and Heuristic-Free Feature Construction for Improved Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Zhong, Erheng; Peng, Jing; Verscheure, Olivier; Zhang, Kun; Ren, Jiangtao; Yan, Rong; Yang, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    State-of-the-art learning algorithms accept data in feature vector format as input. Examples belonging to different classes may not always be easy to separate in the original feature space. One may ask: can transformation of existing features into new space reveal significant discriminative information not obvious in the original space? Since there can be infinite number of ways to extend features, it is impractical to first enumerate and then perform feature selection. Second, evaluation of discriminative power on the complete dataset is not always optimal. This is because features highly discriminative on subset of examples may not necessarily be significant when evaluated on the entire dataset. Third, feature construction ought to be automated and general, such that, it doesn't require domain knowledge and its improved accuracy maintains over a large number of classification algorithms. In this paper, we propose a framework to address these problems through the following steps: (1) divide-conquer to avoid exhaustive enumeration; (2) local feature construction and evaluation within subspaces of examples where local error is still high and constructed features thus far still do not predict well; (3) weighting rules based search that is domain knowledge free and has provable performance guarantee. Empirical studies indicate that significant improvement (as much as 9% in accuracy and 28% in AUC) is achieved using the newly constructed features over a variety of inductive learners evaluated against a number of balanced, skewed and high-dimensional datasets. Software and datasets are available from the authors. PMID:21544257

  4. Accuracy of diagnostic testing in primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Claire L.; Behan, Laura; Goggin, Patricia M.; Adam, Elizabeth C.; Coles, Janice L.; Evans, Hazel J.; Harris, Amanda; Lackie, Peter; Packham, Samantha; Page, Anton; Thompson, James; Walker, Woolf T.; Kuehni, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) lacks a “gold standard” test and is therefore based on combinations of tests including nasal nitric oxide (nNO), high-speed video microscopy analysis (HSVMA), genotyping and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). There are few published data on the accuracy of this approach. Using prospectively collected data from 654 consecutive patients referred for PCD diagnostics we calculated sensitivity and specificity for individual and combination testing strategies. Not all patients underwent all tests. HSVMA had excellent sensitivity and specificity (100% and 93%, respectively). TEM was 100% specific, but 21% of PCD patients had normal ultrastructure. nNO (30 nL·min−1 cut-off) had good sensitivity and specificity (91% and 96%, respectively). Simultaneous testing using HSVMA and TEM was 100% sensitive and 92% specific. In conclusion, combination testing was found to be a highly accurate approach for diagnosing PCD. HSVMA alone has excellent accuracy, but requires significant expertise, and repeated sampling or cell culture is often needed. TEM alone is specific but misses 21% of cases. nNO (≤30 nL·min−1) contributes well to the diagnostic process. In isolation nNO screening at this cut-off would miss ∼10% of cases, but in combination with HSVMA could reduce unnecessary further testing. Standardisation of testing between centres is a future priority. PMID:26647444

  5. Evaluating the Accuracy of Hessian Approximations for Direct Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yu; Siebert, Matthew R; Hase, William L; Kay, Kenneth G; Ceotto, Michele

    2013-01-08

    Direct dynamics simulations are a very useful and general approach for studying the atomistic properties of complex chemical systems, since an electronic structure theory representation of a system's potential energy surface is possible without the need for fitting an analytic potential energy function. In this paper, recently introduced compact finite difference (CFD) schemes for approximating the Hessian [J. Chem. Phys.2010, 133, 074101] are tested by employing the monodromy matrix equations of motion. Several systems, including carbon dioxide and benzene, are simulated, using both analytic potential energy surfaces and on-the-fly direct dynamics. The results show, depending on the molecular system, that electronic structure theory Hessian direct dynamics can be accelerated up to 2 orders of magnitude. The CFD approximation is found to be robust enough to deal with chaotic motion, concomitant with floppy and stiff mode dynamics, Fermi resonances, and other kinds of molecular couplings. Finally, the CFD approximations allow parametrical tuning of different CFD parameters to attain the best possible accuracy for different molecular systems. Thus, a direct dynamics simulation requiring the Hessian at every integration step may be replaced with an approximate Hessian updating by tuning the appropriate accuracy.

  6. Assessing expected accuracy of probe vehicle travel time reports

    SciTech Connect

    Hellinga, B.; Fu, L.

    1999-12-01

    The use of probe vehicles to provide estimates of link travel times has been suggested as a means of obtaining travel times within signalized networks for use in advanced travel information systems. Past research in the literature has proved contradictory conclusions regarding the expected accuracy of these probe-based estimates, and consequently has estimated different levels of market penetration of probe vehicles required to sustain accurate data within an advanced traveler information system. This paper examines the effect of sampling bias on the accuracy of the probe estimates. An analytical expression is derived on the basis of queuing theory to prove that bias in arrival time distributions and/or in the proportion of probes associated with each link departure turning movement will lead to a systematic bias in the sample estimate of the mean delay. Subsequently, the potential for and impact of sampling bias on a signalized link is examined by simulating an arterial corridor. The analytical derivation and the simulation analysis show that the reliability of probe-based average link travel times is highly affected by sampling bias. Furthermore, this analysis shows that the contradictory conclusions of previous research are directly related to the presence of absence of sample bias.

  7. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    PubMed

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions.

  8. Balancing accuracy, delay and battery autonomy for pervasive seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Karapatis, Athanasios; Seepers, Robert M; van Dongen, Marijn; Serdijn, Wouter A; Strydis, Christos

    2016-08-01

    A promising alternative for treating absence seizures has emerged through closed-loop neurostimulation, which utilizes a wearable or implantable device to detect and subsequently suppress epileptic seizures. Such devices should detect seizures fast and with high accuracy, while respecting the strict energy budget on which they operate. Previous work has overlooked one or more of these requirements, resulting in solutions which are not suitable for continuous closed-loop stimulation. In this paper, we perform an in-depth design space exploration of a novel seizure-detection algorithm, which uses a complex Morlet wavelet filter and a static thresholding mechanism to detect absence seizures. We consider both the accuracy and speed of our detection algorithm, as well as various trade-offs with device autonomy when executed on a low-power processor. For example, we demonstrate that a minimal decrease in average detection rate of only 1.83% (from 92.72% to 90.89%) allows for a substantial increase in device autonomy (of 3.7x) while also facilitating faster detection (from 710 ms to 540 ms).

  9. The generalized radon transform: Sampling, accuracy and memoryconsiderations

    SciTech Connect

    Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; van Ginkel, Michael; Verbeek, Piet W.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2004-09-23

    The generalized Radon (or Hough) transform is a well-known tool for detecting parameterized shapes in an image. The Radon transform is a mapping between the image space and a parameter space. The coordinates of a point in the latter correspond to the parameters of a shape in the image. The amplitude at that point corresponds to the amount of evidence for that shape. In this paper we discuss three important aspects of the Radon transform. The first aspect is discretization. Using concepts from sampling theory we derive a set of sampling criteria for the generalized Radon transform. The second aspect is accuracy. For the specific case of the Radon transform for spheres, we examine how well the location of the maxima matches the true parameters. We derive a correction term to reduce the bias in the estimated radii. The third aspect concerns a projection-based algorithm to reduce memory requirements.

  10. The Accuracy of Radio Interferometric Measurements of Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Spieth, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of very long base interferometry earth rotation (UT1) measurements is examined by intercomparing TEMPO and POLARIS data for 1982 and the first half of 1983. None of these data are simultaneous, and so a proper intercomparison requires accounting for the scatter introduced by the rapid, unpredictable, UT1 variations driven by exchanges of angular momentum with the atmosphere. A statistical model of these variations, based on meteorological estimates of the Atmospheric Angular Momentum is derived, and the optimal linear (Kalman) smoother for this model is constructed. The scatter between smoothed and independent raw data is consistent with the residual formal errors, which do not depend upon the actual scatter of the UT1 data. This represents the first time that an accurate prediction of the scatter between UT1 data sets were possible.

  11. Remote sensing and the Mississippi high accuracy reference network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mick, Mark; Alexander, Timothy M.; Woolley, Stan

    1994-01-01

    Since 1986, NASA's Commercial Remote Sensing Program (CRSP) at Stennis Space Center has supported commercial remote sensing partnerships with industry. CRSP's mission is to maximize U.S. market exploitation of remote sensing and related space-based technologies and to develop advanced technical solutions for spatial information requirements. Observation, geolocation, and communications technologies are converging and their integration is critical to realize the economic potential for spatial informational needs. Global positioning system (GPS) technology enables a virtual revolution in geopositionally accurate remote sensing of the earth. A majority of states are creating GPS-based reference networks, or high accuracy reference networks (HARN). A HARN can be defined for a variety of local applications and tied to aerial or satellite observations to provide an important contribution to geographic information systems (GIS). This paper details CRSP's experience in the design and implementation of a HARN in Mississippi and the design and support of future applications of integrated earth observations, geolocation, and communications technology.

  12. Hydrodynamic modeling of Singapore's coastal waters: Nesting and model accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, G. M. Jahid; van Maren, Dirk Sebastiaan; Ooi, Seng Keat

    2016-01-01

    The tidal variation in Singapore's coastal waters is influenced by large-scale, complex tidal dynamics (by interaction of the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea) as well as monsoon-driven low frequency variations, requiring a model with large spatial coverage. Close to the shores, the complex topography, influenced by headlands and small islands, requires a high resolution model to simulate tidal dynamics. This can be achieved through direct nesting or multi-scale nesting, involving multiple model grids. In this paper, we investigate the effect of grid resolution and multi-scale nesting on the tidal dynamics in Singapore's coastal waters, by comparing model results with observations using different statistical techniques. The results reveal that the intermediate-scale model is generally sufficiently accurate (equal to or better than the most refined model), but also that the most refined model is only more accurate when nested in the intermediate scale model (requiring multi-scale nesting). This latter is the result of the complex tidal dynamics around Singapore, where the dominantly diurnal tidal currents are decoupled from the semi-diurnal water level variations. Furthermore, different techniques to quantify model accuracy (harmonic analysis, basic statistics and more complex statistics) are inconsistent in determining which model is more accurate.

  13. IRCM spectral signature measurements instrumentation featuring enhanced radiometric accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantagne, Stéphane; Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Roy, Claude; Willers, Cornelius J.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral Infrared (IR) signature measurements are performed in military applications including aircraft- and -naval vessel stealth characterization, detection/lock-on ranges, and flares efficiency characterization. Numerous military applications require high precision measurement of infrared signature characterization. For instance, Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) systems and Infrared Counter-Countermeasure (IRCCM) system are continuously evolving. Infrared flares defeated IR guided seekers, IR flares became defeated by intelligent IR guided seekers and Jammers defeated the intelligent IR guided seekers [7]. A precise knowledge of the target infrared signature phenomenology is crucial for the development and improvement of countermeasure and counter-countermeasure systems and so precise quantification of the infrared energy emitted from the targets requires accurate spectral signature measurements. Errors in infrared characterization measurements can lead to weakness in the safety of the countermeasure system and errors in the determination of detection/lock-on range of an aircraft. The infrared signatures are analyzed, modeled, and simulated to provide a good understanding of the signature phenomenology to improve the IRCM and IRCCM technologies efficiency [7,8,9]. There is a growing need for infrared spectral signature measurement technology in order to further improve and validate infrared-based models and simulations. The addition of imagery to Spectroradiometers is improving the measurement capability of complex targets and scenes because all elements in the scene can now be measured simultaneously. However, the limited dynamic range of the Focal Plane Array (FPA) sensors used in these instruments confines the ranges of measurable radiance intensities. This ultimately affects the radiometric accuracy of these complex signatures. We will describe and demonstrate how the ABB hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer features enhanced the radiometric accuracy

  14. How Patients Can Improve the Accuracy of their Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Dullabh, Prashila M.; Sondheimer, Norman K.; Katsh, Ethan; Evans, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    , pharmacists responded positively to 68 percent of patient requests for medication list changes. (3) Processing patient feedback will requires both software algorithms and human interpretation. For the 107 forms subsample, pharmacists accepted patient input in 51 percent of cases where they could not contact the patient. Where the patient was contacted, they accepted feedback from 68 percent. This suggests there may be opportunities to automate feedback filtering and processing for more efficient (and larger scale) medication-list optimization. (4) A supportive overall e-health environment makes acceptance of an online patient feedback system more likely. Review of Geisinger usage data showed patients who completed the medication feedback form had previously accessed MyGeisinger 2.3 times as often as the average patient and initiated secure messages with a clinician 1.35 times as often as patients not involved in the pilot. Conclusions: Patient feedback, placed in a useful workflow, can improve medical record accuracy. Electronic health record (EHR) vendors and developers need to build appropriate capabilities into applications. Continued research and development is needed for enabling health care organizations to elicit and process patient information most effectively. PMID:25848614

  15. Researches on High Accuracy Prediction Methods of Earth Orientation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    The Earth rotation reflects the coupling process among the solid Earth, atmosphere, oceans, mantle, and core of the Earth on multiple spatial and temporal scales. The Earth rotation can be described by the Earth's orientation parameters, which are abbreviated as EOP (mainly including two polar motion components PM_X and PM_Y, and variation in the length of day ΔLOD). The EOP is crucial in the transformation between the terrestrial and celestial reference systems, and has important applications in many areas such as the deep space exploration, satellite precise orbit determination, and astrogeodynamics. However, the EOP products obtained by the space geodetic technologies generally delay by several days to two weeks. The growing demands for modern space navigation make high-accuracy EOP prediction be a worthy topic. This thesis is composed of the following three aspects, for the purpose of improving the EOP forecast accuracy. (1) We analyze the relation between the length of the basic data series and the EOP forecast accuracy, and compare the EOP prediction accuracy for the linear autoregressive (AR) model and the nonlinear artificial neural network (ANN) method by performing the least squares (LS) extrapolations. The results show that the high precision forecast of EOP can be realized by appropriate selection of the basic data series length according to the required time span of EOP prediction: for short-term prediction, the basic data series should be shorter, while for the long-term prediction, the series should be longer. The analysis also showed that the LS+AR model is more suitable for the short-term forecasts, while the LS+ANN model shows the advantages in the medium- and long-term forecasts. (2) We develop for the first time a new method which combines the autoregressive model and Kalman filter (AR+Kalman) in short-term EOP prediction. The equations of observation and state are established using the EOP series and the autoregressive coefficients

  16. Accuracy of an earpiece face-bow.

    PubMed

    Palik, J F; Nelson, D R; White, J T

    1985-06-01

    The validity of the Hanau ear-bow to transfer an arbitrary hinge axis to a Hanau articulator was clinically compared with a Hanau kinematic face-bow. The study was conducted with 18 randomly selected patients. This investigation demonstrated a significant statistical difference between the arbitrary axis located with an ear-bow and the terminal hinge axis. This discrepancy was significant in the anteroposterior direction but not in the superior-inferior direction. Only 50% of the arbitrary hinge axes were within a 5 mm radius of the terminal hinge axis, while 89% were within a 6 mm radius. Furthermore, the ear-bow method was not repeatable statistically. Additional study is needed to determine the practical value of the arbitrary face-bow and to pursue modifications to improve its accuracy.

  17. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  18. Statistical fitting accuracy in photon correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaumeyer, J. N.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Continuing our experimental investigation of the fitting accuracy associated with photon correlation spectroscopy, we collect 150 correlograms of light scattered at 90 deg from a thermostated sample of 91-nm-diameter, polystyrene latex spheres in water. The correlograms are taken with two correlators: one with linearly spaced channels and one with geometrically spaced channels. Decay rates are extracted from the single-exponential correlograms with both nonlinear least-squares fits and second-order cumulant fits. We make several statistical comparisons between the two fitting techniques and verify an earlier result that there is no sample-time dependence in the decay rate errors. We find, however, that the two fitting techniques give decay rates that differ by 1 percent.

  19. Accuracy Estimation in Force Spectroscopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankl, Christian; Kienberger, Ferry; Gruber, Hermann; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Force spectroscopy is a useful tool for the investigation of molecular interactions. We here present a detailed analysis of parameter estimation in force spectroscopy experiments. It provides the values of the statistical errors of the kinetic off-rate constant koff and the energy length scale xβ to be considered using the single barrier model. As a biologically relevant experimental system we used the interaction between human rhinovirus serotype 2 and a recombinant derivative of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor. The interaction forces of single virus-receptor pairs were measured at different loading rates and analysed according to the single barrier model. Accuracy estimates of koff and xβ were obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and bootstrapping. For this model of virus-receptor attachment, force spectroscopy experiments yielded xβ=(0.38± 0.07) nm and \\ln koff=(-2.3± 1.0)\\ln s-1.

  20. Quantitative code accuracy evaluation of ISP33

    SciTech Connect

    Kalli, H.; Miwrrin, A.; Purhonen, H.

    1995-09-01

    Aiming at quantifying code accuracy, a methodology based on the Fast Fourier Transform has been developed at the University of Pisa, Italy. The paper deals with a short presentation of the methodology and its application to pre-test and post-test calculations submitted to the International Standard Problem ISP33. This was a double-blind natural circulation exercise with a stepwise reduced primary coolant inventory, performed in PACTEL facility in Finland. PACTEL is a 1/305 volumetrically scaled, full-height simulator of the Russian type VVER-440 pressurized water reactor, with horizontal steam generators and loop seals in both cold and hot legs. Fifteen foreign organizations participated in ISP33, with 21 blind calculations and 20 post-test calculations, altogether 10 different thermal hydraulic codes and code versions were used. The results of the application of the methodology to nine selected measured quantities are summarized.

  1. Accuracy of lineaments mapping from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Nicholas M.

    1989-01-01

    The use of Landsat and other space imaging systems for lineaments detection is analyzed in terms of their effectiveness in recognizing and mapping fractures and faults, and the results of several studies providing a quantitative assessment of lineaments mapping accuracies are discussed. The cases under investigation include a Landsat image of the surface overlying a part of the Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma, the Landsat images and selected radar imagery of major lineaments systems distributed over much of Canadian Shield, and space imagery covering a part of the East African Rift in Kenya. It is demonstrated that space imagery can detect a significant portion of a region's fracture pattern, however, significant fractions of faults and fractures recorded on a field-produced geological map are missing from the imagery as it is evident in the Kenya case.

  2. Stereotype accuracy of ballet and modern dancers.

    PubMed

    Clabaugh, Alison; Morling, Beth

    2004-02-01

    The authors recorded preprofessional ballet and modern dancers' perceptions of the personality traits of each type of dancer and self-reports of their own standing, to test the accuracy of the group stereotypes. Participants accurately stereotyped ballet dancers as scoring higher than modern dancers on Fear of Negative Evaluation and Personal Need for Structure and accurately viewed the groups as equal on Fitness Esteem. Participants inaccurately stereotyped ballet dancers as lower on Body Esteem; the groups actually scored the same. Sensitivity correlations across traits indicated that dancers were accurate about the relative magnitudes of trait differences in the two types of dancers. A group of nondancers reported stereotypes that were usually in the right direction although of inaccurate magnitude, and nondancers were sensitive to the relative sizes of group differences across traits.

  3. The empirical accuracy of uncertain inference models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, David S.; Yadrick, Robert M.; Perrin, Bruce M.; Wise, Ben P.

    1987-01-01

    Uncertainty is a pervasive feature of the domains in which expert systems are designed to function. Research design to test uncertain inference methods for accuracy and robustness, in accordance with standard engineering practice is reviewed. Several studies were conducted to assess how well various methods perform on problems constructed so that correct answers are known, and to find out what underlying features of a problem cause strong or weak performance. For each method studied, situations were identified in which performance deteriorates dramatically. Over a broad range of problems, some well known methods do only about as well as a simple linear regression model, and often much worse than a simple independence probability model. The results indicate that some commercially available expert system shells should be used with caution, because the uncertain inference models that they implement can yield rather inaccurate results.

  4. Positioning accuracy of the neurotron 1000

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.S.; Murphy, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Neuotron 1000 is a novel treatment machine under development for frameless stereotaxic radiosurgery that consists of a compact X-band accelerator mounted on a robotic arm. The therapy beam is guided to the lesion by an imaging system, which included two diagnostic x-ray cameras that view the patient during treatment. Patient position and motion are measured by the imaging system and appropriate corrections are communicated in real time to the robotic arm for beam targeting and motion tracking. The three tests reported here measured the pointing accuracy of the therapy beam and the present capability of the imaging guidance system. The positioning and pointing test measured the ability of the robotic arm to direct the beam through a test isocenter from arbitrary arm positions. The test isocenter was marked by a small light-sensitive crystal and the beam axis was simulated by a laser.

  5. Moyamoya disease: diagnostic accuracy of MRI.

    PubMed

    Yamada, I; Suzuki, S; Matsushima, Y

    1995-07-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in moyamoya disease. We studied 30 patients with this disease, comparing MRI and angiographic findings. The diagnostic value of MRI was evaluated for occlusive lesions, collateral vessels, and parenchymal lesions. In all patients bilateral occlusion or stenosis of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery and proximal anterior and middle cerebral arteries was clearly shown by MRI, and staging of the extent of occlusion agreed with angiographic staging in 44 (73%) of 60 arteries. MRI, particularly coronal images, clearly showed basal cerebral moyamoya vessels in 54 hemispheres, and 45 of a total of 71 large leptomeningeal and transdural collateral vessels were identified. MRI also showed parenchymal lesions in 48 (80%) hemispheres, and the extent of occlusion in the anterior and posterior circulations respectively correlated with white matter and cortical and/or subcortical infarcts.

  6. Accuracy of maxillary positioning in bimaxillary surgery.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, W B; Zoder, W; Baciut, G; Bacuit, Mihaela; Wangerin, K

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the accuracy of a modified pin system for the vertical control of maxillary repositioning in bimaxillary osteotomies. The preoperative cephalograms of 239 consecutive patients who were to have bimaxillary osteotomies were superimposed on the postoperative films. Planned and observed vertical and horizontal movements of the upper incisor were analysed statistically. The mean deviations of -0.07 mm (95% confidence intervals (CIs) -0.17 to 0.04 mm) for the vertical movement and 0.12 mm (95% CI -0.06 to 0.30 mm) for the horizontal movement did not differ significantly from zero. Comparison of the two variances between intrusion and extrusion of the maxilla did not differ significantly either (p=0.51). These results suggest that the modified pin system for vertical control combined with interocclusal splints provides accurate vertical positioning of the anterior maxilla in orthognathic surgery.

  7. Quantum mechanical calculations to chemical accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of current molecular-structure calculations is illustrated with examples of quantum mechanical solutions for chemical problems. Two approaches are considered: (1) the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with a perturbational estimate of the contribution of connected triple excitations, or CCDS(T); and (2) the multireference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approach to the correlation problem. The MRCI approach gains greater applicability by means of size-extensive modifications such as the averaged-coupled pair functional approach. The examples of solutions to chemical problems include those for C-H bond energies, the vibrational frequencies of O3, identifying the ground state of Al2 and Si2, and the Lewis-Rayleigh afterglow and the Hermann IR system of N2. Accurate molecular-wave functions can be derived from a combination of basis-set saturation studies and full configuration-interaction calculations.

  8. Accuracy of the Cloud Integrating Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Hermann E.

    2004-01-01

    Potential error sources for measurements with the Cloud Integrating Nephelometer (CIN) are discussed and analyzed, including systematic errors of the measurement approach, flow and particle-trajectory deviations at flight velocity, ice-crystal breakup on probe surfaces, and errors in calibration and developing scaling constants. It is concluded that errors are minimal, and that the accuracy of the CIN should be close to the systematic behavior of the CIN derived in Gerber et al (2000). Absolute calibration of the CIN with a transmissometer operating co-located in a mountain-top cloud shows that the earlier scaling constant for the optical extinction coefficient obtained by other means is within 5% of the absolute calibration value, and that the CIN measurements on the Citation aircraft flights during the CRYSTAL-FACE study are accurate.

  9. Innovative fast technique for overlay accuracy estimation using archer self calibration (ASC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Simon C. C.; Chen, Charlie; Yu, Chun Chi; Pai, Yuan Chi; Amit, Eran; Yap, Lipkong; Itzkovich, Tal; Tien, David; Huang, Eros; Kuo, Kelly T. L.; Amir, Nuriel

    2014-04-01

    As overlay margins shrink for advanced process nodes, a key overlay metrology challenge is finding the measurement conditions which optimize the yield for every device and layer. Ideally, this setup should be found in-line during the lithography measurements step. Moreover, the overlay measurement must have excellent correlation to the device electrical behavior. This requirement makes the measurement conditions selection even more challenging since it requires information about the response of both the metrology target and device to different process variations. In this work a comprehensive solution for overlay metrology accuracy, used by UMC, is described. This solution ranks the different measurement setups by their accuracy, using Qmerit, as reported by the Archer 500. This ranking was verified to match device overlay using electrical tests. Moreover, the use of Archer Self Calibration (ASC) allows further improvement of overlay measurement accuracy.

  10. Research on how to improve the accuracy of the SLM metallic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacurar, Razvan; Balc, Nicolae; Prem, Florica

    2011-05-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is one of the most important technologies used when complex metallic parts need to be rapidly manufactured. There are some requirements related to the quality of the manufactured part or the accuracy of the process control, in order to turn SLM process into a production technique. This paper presents a case study undertaken at the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca (TUCN) in cooperation with an industrial company from Romania, focusing on the accuracy issues. Finite element analysis (FEA) and Design Expert software were jointly used in order to determine the optimum process parameters required to improve the accuracy of the SLM metallic parts. Experimental results are also presented in the paper.

  11. Dosimetric accuracy of a staged radiosurgery treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernica, George; de Boer, Steven F.; Diaz, Aidnag; Fenstermaker, Robert A.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2005-05-01

    For large cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), the efficacy of radiosurgery is limited since the large doses necessary to produce obliteration may increase the risk of radiation necrosis to unacceptable levels. An alternative is to stage the radiosurgery procedure over multiple stages (usually two), effectively irradiating a smaller volume of the AVM nidus with a therapeutic dose during each session. The difference between coordinate systems defined by sequential stereotactic frame placements can be represented by a translation and a rotation. A unique transformation can be determined based on the coordinates of several fiducial markers fixed to the skull and imaged in each stereotactic coordinate system. Using this transformation matrix, isocentre coordinates from the first stage can be displayed in the coordinate system of subsequent stages allowing computation of a combined dose distribution covering the entire AVM. The accuracy of this approach was tested on an anthropomorphic head phantom and was verified dosimetrically. Subtle defects in the phantom were used as control points, and 2 mm diameter steel balls attached to the surface were used as fiducial markers and reference points. CT images (2 mm thick) were acquired. Using a transformation matrix developed with two frame placements, the predicted locations of control and reference points had an average error of 0.6 mm near the fiducial markers and 1.0 mm near the control points. Dose distributions in a staged treatment approach were accurately calculated using the transformation matrix. This approach is simple, fast and accurate. Errors were small and clinically acceptable for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Accuracy can be improved by reducing the CT slice thickness.

  12. Combining Multiple Gyroscope Outputs for Increased Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    2003-01-01

    A proposed method of processing the outputs of multiple gyroscopes to increase the accuracy of rate (that is, angular-velocity) readings has been developed theoretically and demonstrated by computer simulation. Although the method is applicable, in principle, to any gyroscopes, it is intended especially for application to gyroscopes that are parts of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The method is based on the concept that the collective performance of multiple, relatively inexpensive, nominally identical devices can be better than that of one of the devices considered by itself. The method would make it possible to synthesize the readings of a single, more accurate gyroscope (a virtual gyroscope) from the outputs of a large number of microscopic gyroscopes fabricated together on a single MEMS chip. The big advantage would be that the combination of the MEMS gyroscope array and the processing circuitry needed to implement the method would be smaller, lighter in weight, and less power-hungry, relative to a conventional gyroscope of equal accuracy. The method (see figure) is one of combining and filtering the digitized outputs of multiple gyroscopes to obtain minimum-variance estimates of rate. In the combining-and-filtering operations, measurement data from the gyroscopes would be weighted and smoothed with respect to each other according to the gain matrix of a minimum- variance filter. According to Kalman-filter theory, the gain matrix of the minimum-variance filter is uniquely specified by the filter covariance, which propagates according to a matrix Riccati equation. The present method incorporates an exact analytical solution of this equation.

  13. Methodology for high accuracy contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Kalantarian, A; David, R; Neumann, A W

    2009-12-15

    A new version of axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) called ADSA-NA (ADSA-no apex) was developed for measuring interfacial properties for drop configurations without an apex. ADSA-NA facilitates contact angle measurements on drops with a capillary protruding into the drop. Thus a much simpler experimental setup, not involving formation of a complete drop from below through a hole in the test surface, may be used. The contact angles of long-chained alkanes on a commercial fluoropolymer, Teflon AF 1600, were measured using the new method. A new numerical scheme was incorporated into the image processing to improve the location of the contact points of the liquid meniscus with the solid substrate to subpixel resolution. The images acquired in the experiments were also analyzed by a different drop shape technique called theoretical image fitting analysis-axisymmetric interfaces (TIFA-AI). The results were compared with literature values obtained by means of the standard ADSA for sessile drops with the apex. Comparison of the results from ADSA-NA with those from TIFA-AI and ADSA reveals that, with different numerical strategies and experimental setups, contact angles can be measured with an accuracy of less than 0.2 degrees. Contact angles and surface tensions measured from drops with no apex, i.e., by means of ADSA-NA and TIFA-AI, were considerably less scattered than those from complete drops with apex. ADSA-NA was also used to explore sources of improvement in contact angle resolution. It was found that using an accurate value of surface tension as an input enhances the accuracy of contact angle measurements.

  14. Improving the accuracy of death certification

    PubMed Central

    Myers, K A; Farquhar, D R

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population-based mortality statistics are derived from the information recorded on death certificates. This information is used for many important purposes, such as the development of public health programs and the allocation of health care resources. Although most physicians are confronted with the task of completing death certificates, many do not receive adequate training in this skill. Resulting inaccuracies in information undermine the quality of the data derived from death certificates. METHODS: An educational intervention was designed and implemented to improve internal medicine residents' accuracy in death certificate completion. A total of 229 death certificates (146 completed before and 83 completed after the intervention) were audited for major and minor errors, and the rates of errors before and after the intervention were compared. RESULTS: Major errors were identified on 32.9% of the death certificates completed before the intervention, a rate comparable to previously reported rates for internal medicine services in teaching hospitals. Following the intervention the major error rate decreased to 15.7% (p = 0.01). The reduction in the major error rate was accounted for by significant reductions in the rate of listing of mechanism of death without a legitimate underlying cause of death (15.8% v. 4.8%) (p = 0.01) and the rate of improper sequencing of death certificate information (15.8% v. 6.0%) (p = 0.03). INTERPRETATION: Errors are common in the completion of death certificates in the inpatient teaching hospital setting. The accuracy of death certification can be improved with the implementation of a simple educational intervention. PMID:9614825

  15. Matters of Accuracy and Conventionality: Prior Accuracy Guides Children's Evaluations of Others' Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scofield, Jason; Gilpin, Ansley Tullos; Pierucci, Jillian; Morgan, Reed

    2013-01-01

    Studies show that children trust previously reliable sources over previously unreliable ones (e.g., Koenig, Clement, & Harris, 2004). However, it is unclear from these studies whether children rely on accuracy or conventionality to determine the reliability and, ultimately, the trustworthiness of a particular source. In the current study, 3- and…

  16. Considerations for high accuracy radiation efficiency measurements for the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) subarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozakoff, D. J.; Schuchardt, J. M.; Ryan, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The relatively large apertures to be used in SPS, small half-power beamwidths, and the desire to accurately quantify antenna performance dictate the requirement for specialized measurements techniques. Objectives include the following: (1) For 10-meter square subarray panels, quantify considerations for measuring power in the transmit beam and radiation efficiency to + or - 1 percent (+ or - 0.04 dB) accuracy. (2) Evaluate measurement performance potential of far-field elevated and ground reflection ranges and near-field techniques. (3) Identify the state-of-the-art of critical components and/or unique facilities required. (4) Perform relative cost, complexity and performance tradeoffs for techniques capable of achieving accuracy objectives. the precision required by the techniques discussed below are not obtained by current methods which are capable of + or - 10 percent (+ or - dB) performance. In virtually every area associated with these planned measurements, advances in state-of-the-art are required.

  17. Understanding vs. Competency: The Case of Accuracy Checking Dispensed Medicines in Pharmacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, K. Lynette; Davies, J. Graham; Kinchin, Ian; Patel, Jignesh P.; Whittlesea, Cate

    2010-01-01

    Ensuring the competence of healthcare professionals' is core to undergraduate and post-graduate education. Undergraduate pharmacy students and pre-registration graduates are required to demonstrate competence at dispensing and accuracy checking medicines. However, competence differs from understanding. This study determined the competence and…

  18. Morphological Awareness and Children's Writing: Accuracy, Error, and Invention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutchen, Deborah; Stull, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between children's morphological awareness and their ability to produce accurate morphological derivations in writing. Fifth-grade US students (n = 175) completed two writing tasks that invited or required morphological manipulation of words. We examined both accuracy and error, specifically errors in…

  19. 12 CFR 620.3 - Accuracy of reports and assessment of internal control over financial reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in accordance with all applicable statutory or regulatory requirements, and (3) The information is true, accurate, and complete to the best of signatories' knowledge and belief. (d) Management... CREDIT SYSTEM DISCLOSURE TO SHAREHOLDERS General § 620.3 Accuracy of reports and assessment of...

  20. Screening Accuracy of Level 2 Autism Spectrum Disorder Rating Scales: A Review of Selected Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Megan; Lecavalier, Luc

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review was to examine the state of Level 2, caregiver-completed rating scales for the screening of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) in individuals above the age of three years. We focused on screening accuracy and paid particular attention to comparison groups. Inclusion criteria required that scales be developed post ICD-10, be…

  1. Teaching High-Accuracy Global Positioning System to Undergraduates Using Online Processing Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guoquan

    2013-01-01

    High-accuracy Global Positioning System (GPS) has become an important geoscientific tool used to measure ground motions associated with plate movements, glacial movements, volcanoes, active faults, landslides, subsidence, slow earthquake events, as well as large earthquakes. Complex calculations are required in order to achieve high-precision…

  2. On the Effects of Error Correction Strategies on the Grammatical Accuracy of the Iranian English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Toni, Arman

    2009-01-01

    Writing, as a productive skill, requires an accurate in-depth knowledge of the grammar system, language form and sentence structure. The emphasis on accuracy is justified in the sense that it can lead to the production of structurally correct instances of second language, and to prevent inaccuracy that may result in the production of structurally…

  3. Geographic stacking: Decision fusion to increase global land cover map accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, Nicholas; Yu, Le; Gong, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Techniques to combine multiple classifier outputs is an established sub-discipline in data mining, referred to as "stacking," "ensemble classification," or "meta-learning." Here we describe how stacking of geographically allocated classifications can create a map composite of higher accuracy than any of the individual classifiers. We used both voting algorithms and trainable classifiers with a set of validation data to combine individual land cover maps. We describe the generality of this setup in terms of existing algorithms and accuracy assessment procedures. This method has the advantage of not requiring posterior probabilities or level of support for predicted class labels. We demonstrate the technique using Landsat based, 30-meter land cover maps, the highest resolution, globally available product of this kind. We used globally distributed validation samples to composite the maps and compute accuracy. We show that geographic stacking can improve individual map accuracy by up to 6.6%. The voting methods can also achieve higher accuracy than the best of the input classifications. Accuracies from different classifiers, input data, and output type are compared. The results are illustrated on a Landsat scene in California, USA. The compositing technique described here has broad applicability in remote sensing based map production and geographic classification.

  4. Joint helmet-mounted cueing system accuracy testing using celestial references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marticello, Daniel N., Jr.; Spillman, Mark S.

    1999-07-01

    The Joint Helmet-Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) incorporates a man-mounted, ejection-compatible helmet-mounted display system, with the capability to cue and verify cueing of high off-axis sensors and weapons, on U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy single-seat and two-seat fighter aircraft. Program requirements call for the JHMCS to meet a certain level of pointing accuracy. Pointing accuracy is defined as how close the JHMCS computed line of sight (LOS) is to the actual LOS of the pilot. In order to test the pointing accuracy of JHMCS throughout the pilot's range of motion, truth data had to be established sat various azimuths and elevations. Surveyed ground locations do not provide the ability to test at different helmet elevations. Airborne targets do not provide the measurement precision needed to validate system accuracy. Therefore, celestial bodies (stars), whose locations are precisely known for a given time and date at a specific location, will serve as truth data for LOS accuracy testing. This paper addresses the theory, planning, and status of JHMCS accuracy testing utilizing celestial bodies as reference points.

  5. 40 CFR 86.1338-2007 - Emission measurement accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission measurement accuracy. 86.1338... Procedures § 86.1338-2007 Emission measurement accuracy. (a) Minimum limit. (1) The minimum limit of an... measurement must be made to ensure the accuracy of the calibration curve to within ±2 percent of...

  6. 40 CFR 86.1338-2007 - Emission measurement accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission measurement accuracy. 86.1338... Procedures § 86.1338-2007 Emission measurement accuracy. (a) Minimum limit. (1) The minimum limit of an... measurement must be made to ensure the accuracy of the calibration curve to within ±2 percent of...

  7. Accuracy of GFR Estimation in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Sens, Florence; Nguyen-Tu, Marie-Sophie; Juillard, Laurent; Dubourg, Laurence; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Adequate estimation of renal function in obese patients is essential for the classification of patients in CKD category as well as the dose adjustment of drugs. However, the body size descriptor for GFR indexation is still debatable, and formulas are not validated in patients with extreme variations of weight. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study included 209 stages 1–5 CKD obese patients referred to the Department of Renal Function Study at the University Hospital in Lyon between 2010 and 2013 because of suspected renal dysfunction. GFR was estimated with the Chronic Kidney Disease and Epidemiology equation (CKD-EPI) and measured with a gold standard method (inulin or iohexol) not indexed (mGFR) or indexed to body surface area determined by the Dubois and Dubois formula with either real (mGFRr) or ideal (mGFRi) body weight. Mean bias (eGFR−mGFR), precision, and accuracy of mGFR were compared with the results obtained for nonobese participants (body mass index between 18.5 and 24.9) who had a GFR measurement during the same period of time. Results Mean mGFRr (51.6±24.2 ml/min per 1.73 m2) was significantly lower than mGFR, mGFRi, and eGFRCKD-EPI. eGFRCKD-EPI had less bias with mGFR (0.29; −1.7 to 2.3) and mGFRi (−1.62; −3.1 to 0.45) compared with mGFRr (8.7; 7 to 10). This result was confirmed with better accuracy for the whole cohort (78% for mGFR, 84% for mGFRi, and 72% for mGFRr) and participants with CKD stages 3–5. Moreover, the Bland Altman plot showed better agreement between mGFR and eGFRCKD-EPI. The bias between eGFRCKD-EPI and mGFRr was greater in obese than nonobese participants (8.7 versus 0.58, P<0.001). Conclusions This study shows that, in obese CKD patients, the performance of eGFRCKD-EPI is good for GFR≤60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Indexation of mGFR with body surface area using ideal body weight gives less bias than mGFR scaled with body surface area using real body weight. PMID:24482068

  8. Required Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janko, Edmund

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the author insists that those seeking public office prove their literary mettle. As an English teacher, he does have a litmus test for all public officials, judges and senators included--a reading litmus test. He would require that all candidates and nominees have read and reflected on a nucleus of works whose ideas and insights…

  9. Software Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Real-Time Systems Specifications 11 Convenient Auto Rental System Marea82 12 Systems Architecture Marca , D. A., and C. L. McGowan. "Static and...Requirements Marca88 Structured Analysis. Orr’s work is worthy of study Marca , D. A., and C. L. McGowan. SADT: Struc- by the instructor, since it enjoys

  10. Time and position accuracy using codeless GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. E.; Jefferson, D. C.; Lichten, S. M.; Thomas, J. B.; Vigue, Y.; Young, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System has allowed scientists and engineers to make measurements having accuracy far beyond the original 15 meter goal of the system. Using global networks of P-Code capable receivers and extensive post-processing, geodesists have achieved baseline precision of a few parts per billion, and clock offsets have been measured at the nanosecond level over intercontinental distances. A cloud hangs over this picture, however. The Department of Defense plans to encrypt the P-Code (called Anti-Spoofing, or AS) in the fall of 1993. After this event, geodetic and time measurements will have to be made using codeless GPS receivers. However, there appears to be a silver lining to the cloud. In response to the anticipated encryption of the P-Code, the geodetic and GPS receiver community has developed some remarkably effective means of coping with AS without classified information. We will discuss various codeless techniques currently available and the data noise resulting from each. We will review some geodetic results obtained using only codeless data, and discuss the implications for time measurements. Finally, we will present the status of GPS research at JPL in relation to codeless clock measurements.

  11. Accuracy and robustness evaluation in stereo matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc M.; Hanca, Jan; Lu, Shao-Ping; Schelkens, Peter; Munteanu, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Stereo matching has received a lot of attention from the computer vision community, thanks to its wide range of applications. Despite of the large variety of algorithms that have been proposed so far, it is not trivial to select suitable algorithms for the construction of practical systems. One of the main problems is that many algorithms lack sufficient robustness when employed in various operational conditions. This problem is due to the fact that most of the proposed methods in the literature are usually tested and tuned to perform well on one specific dataset. To alleviate this problem, an extensive evaluation in terms of accuracy and robustness of state-of-the-art stereo matching algorithms is presented. Three datasets (Middlebury, KITTI, and MPEG FTV) representing different operational conditions are employed. Based on the analysis, improvements over existing algorithms have been proposed. The experimental results show that our improved versions of cross-based and cost volume filtering algorithms outperform the original versions with large margins on Middlebury and KITTI datasets. In addition, the latter of the two proposed algorithms ranks itself among the best local stereo matching approaches on the KITTI benchmark. Under evaluations using specific settings for depth-image-based-rendering applications, our improved belief propagation algorithm is less complex than MPEG's FTV depth estimation reference software (DERS), while yielding similar depth estimation performance. Finally, several conclusions on stereo matching algorithms are also presented.

  12. [Accuracy of a pulse oximeter during hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, C; Fukada, T; Hasegawa, R; Satoh, K; Furuya, Y; Ohe, Y

    1996-04-01

    The accuracy of the pulse oximeter was examined in hypoxic patients. We studied 11 cyanotic congenital heart disease patients during surgery, and compared the arterial oxygen saturation determined by both the simultaneous blood gas analysis (CIBA-CORNING 288 BLOOD GAS SYSTEM, SaO2) and by the pulse oximeter (DATEX SATELITE, with finger probe, SpO2). Ninty sets of data on SpO2 and SaO2 were obtained. The bias (SpO2-SaO2) was 1.7 +/- 6.9 (mean +/- SD) %. In cyanotic congenital heart disease patients, SpO2 values were significantly higher than SaO2. Although the reason is unknown, in constantly hypoxic patients, SpO2 values are possibly over-estimated. In particular, pulse oximetry at low levels of saturation (SaO2 below 80%) was not as accurate as at a higher saturation level (SaO2 over 80%). There was a positive correlation between SpO2 and SaO2 (linear regression analysis yields the equation y = 0.68x + 26.0, r = 0.93). In conclusion, the pulse oximeter is useful to monitor oxygen saturation in constantly hypoxic patients, but the values thus obtained should be compared with the values measured directly when hypoxemia is severe.

  13. Accuracy Improvement for Predicting Parkinson's Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Nilashi, Mehrbakhsh; Ibrahim, Othman; Ahani, Ali

    2016-09-30

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a member of a larger group of neuromotor diseases marked by the progressive death of dopamineproducing cells in the brain. Providing computational tools for Parkinson disease using a set of data that contains medical information is very desirable for alleviating the symptoms that can help the amount of people who want to discover the risk of disease at an early stage. This paper proposes a new hybrid intelligent system for the prediction of PD progression using noise removal, clustering and prediction methods. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Expectation Maximization (EM) are respectively employed to address the multi-collinearity problems in the experimental datasets and clustering the data. We then apply Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Support Vector Regression (SVR) for prediction of PD progression. Experimental results on public Parkinson's datasets show that the proposed method remarkably improves the accuracy of prediction of PD progression. The hybrid intelligent system can assist medical practitioners in the healthcare practice for early detection of Parkinson disease.

  14. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Stuart; Morgan, Mamdouh

    2002-01-01

    A prospective study of 238 patients was performed in a district general hospital to assess current diagnostic accuracy rates and to ascertain the use and the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning in reducing the number of negative arthroscopies. The pre-operative diagnosis of patients listed for knee arthroscopy was medial meniscus tear 94 (40%) and osteoarthritis 59 (25%). MRI scans were requested in 57 patients (24%) with medial meniscus tear representing 65% (37 patients). The correlation study was done between pre-operative diagnosis, MRI and arthroscopic diagnosis. Clinical diagnosis was as accurate as the MRI with 79% agreement between the preoperative diagnosis and arthroscopy compared to 77% agreement between MRI scan and arthroscopy. There was no evidence, in this study, that MRI scan can reduce the number of negative arthroscopies. Four normal MRI scans had positive arthroscopic diagnosis (two torn medial meniscus, one torn lateral meniscus and one chondromalacia patella). Out of 240 arthroscopies, there were only 10 normal knees (negative arthroscopy) representing 4% of the total number of knee arthroscopies; one patient of those 10 cases had MRI scan with ACL rupture diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12215031

  15. Firing temperature accuracy of four dental furnaces.

    PubMed

    Haag, Per; Ciber, Edina; Dérand, Tore

    2011-01-01

    In spite of using recommended firing and displayed temperatures, low-fired dental porcelain more often demonstrates unsatisfactory results after firing than porcelain fired at higher temperatures. It could therefore be anticipated that temperatures shown on the display are incorrect, implying that the furnace does not render correct firing programs for low-fired porcelain. The purpose of this study is to investigate deviations from the real temperature during the firing process and also to illustrate the service and maintenance discipline of furnaces at dental laboratories. Totally 20 units of four different types of dental furnaces were selected for testing of temperature accuracy with usage of a digital temperature measurement apparatus, Therma 1. In addition,the staffs at 68 dental laboratories in Sweden were contacted for a telephone interview on furnace brand and on service and maintenance program performed at their laboratories. None of the 20 different dental furnaces in the study could generate the firing temperatures shown on the display, indicating that the hypothesis was correct. Multimat MCII had the least deviation of temperature compared with displayfigures. 62 out of 68 invited dental laboratories chose to participate in the interviews and the result was that very few laboratories had a service and maintenance program living up to quality standards. There is room for improving the precision of dental porcelain furnaces as there are deviations between displayed and read temperatures during the different steps of the firing process.

  16. Classification accuracy of actuarial risk assessment instruments.

    PubMed

    Neller, Daniel J; Frederick, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    Users of commonly employed actuarial risk assessment instruments (ARAIs) hope to generate numerical probability statements about risk; however, ARAI manuals often do not explicitly report data that are essential for understanding the classification accuracy of the instruments. In addition, ARAI manuals often contain data that have the potential for misinterpretation. The authors of the present article address the accurate generation of probability statements. First, they illustrate how the reporting of numerical probability statements based on proportions rather than predictive values can mislead users of ARAIs. Next, they report essential test characteristics that, to date, have gone largely unreported in ARAI manuals. Then they discuss a graphing method that can enhance the practice of clinicians who communicate risk via numerical probability statements. After the authors review several strategies for selecting optimal cut-off scores, they show how the graphing method can be used to estimate positive predictive values for each cut-off score of commonly used ARAIs, across all possible base rates. They also show how the graphing method can be used to estimate base rates of violent recidivism in local samples.

  17. Analysis of initial orbit determination accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vananti, Alessandro; Schildknecht, Thomas

    The Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) is conducting several search campaigns for orbital debris. The debris objects are discovered during systematic survey observations. In general only a short observation arc, or tracklet, is available for most of these objects. From this discovery tracklet a first orbit determination is computed in order to be able to find the object again in subsequent follow-up observations. The additional observations are used in the orbit improvement process to obtain accurate orbits to be included in a catalogue. In this paper, the accuracy of the initial orbit determination is analyzed. This depends on a number of factors: tracklet length, number of observations, type of orbit, astrometric error, and observation geometry. The latter is characterized by both the position of the object along its orbit and the location of the observing station. Different positions involve different distances from the target object and a different observing angle with respect to its orbital plane and trajectory. The present analysis aims at optimizing the geometry of the discovery observations depending on the considered orbit.

  18. Fragmentation functions beyond fixed order accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderle, Daniele P.; Kaufmann, Tom; Stratmann, Marco; Ringer, Felix

    2017-03-01

    We give a detailed account of the phenomenology of all-order resummations of logarithmically enhanced contributions at small momentum fraction of the observed hadron in semi-inclusive electron-positron annihilation and the timelike scale evolution of parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions. The formalism to perform resummations in Mellin moment space is briefly reviewed, and all relevant expressions up to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order are derived, including their explicit dependence on the factorization and renormalization scales. We discuss the details pertinent to a proper numerical implementation of the resummed results comprising an iterative solution to the timelike evolution equations, the matching to known fixed-order expressions, and the choice of the contour in the Mellin inverse transformation. First extractions of parton-to-pion fragmentation functions from semi-inclusive annihilation data are performed at different logarithmic orders of the resummations in order to estimate their phenomenological relevance. To this end, we compare our results to corresponding fits up to fixed, next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy and study the residual dependence on the factorization scale in each case.

  19. High accuracy in situ radiometric mapping.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Andrew N

    2004-01-01

    In situ and airborne gamma ray spectrometry have been shown to provide rapid and spatially representative estimates of environmental radioactivity across a range of landscapes. However, one of the principal limitations of this technique has been the influence of changes in the vertical distribution of the source (e.g. 137Cs) on the observed photon fluence resulting in a significant reduction in the accuracy of the in situ activity measurement. A flexible approach for single gamma photon emitting radionuclides is presented, which relies on the quantification of forward scattering (or valley region between the full energy peak and Compton edge) within the gamma ray spectrum to compensate for changes in the 137Cs vertical activity distribution. This novel in situ method lends itself to the mapping of activity concentrations in environments that exhibit systematic changes in the vertical activity distribution. The robustness of this approach has been demonstrated in a salt marsh environment on the Solway coast, SW Scotland, with both a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) detector and a 35% n-type HPGe detector. Application to ploughed field environments has also been demonstrated using HPGe detector, including its application to the estimation of field moist bulk density and soil erosion measurement. Ongoing research work is also outlined.

  20. [History, accuracy and precision of SMBG devices].

    PubMed

    Dufaitre-Patouraux, L; Vague, P; Lassmann-Vague, V

    2003-04-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose started only fifty years ago. Until then metabolic control was evaluated by means of qualitative urinary blood measure often of poor reliability. Reagent strips were the first semi quantitative tests to monitor blood glucose, and in the late seventies meters were launched on the market. Initially the use of such devices was intended for medical staff, but thanks to handiness improvement they became more and more adequate to patients and are now a necessary tool for self-blood glucose monitoring. The advanced technologies allow to develop photometric measurements but also more recently electrochemical one. In the nineties, improvements were made mainly in meters' miniaturisation, reduction of reaction time and reading, simplification of blood sampling and capillary blood laying. Although accuracy and precision concern was in the heart of considerations at the beginning of self-blood glucose monitoring, the recommendations of societies of diabetology came up in the late eighties. Now, the French drug agency: AFSSAPS asks for a control of meter before any launching on the market. According to recent publications very few meters meet reliability criteria set up by societies of diabetology in the late nineties. Finally because devices may be handled by numerous persons in hospitals, meters use as possible source of nosocomial infections have been recently questioned and is subject to very strict guidelines published by AFSSAPS.

  1. Accuracy of 3-D reconstruction with occlusions.

    PubMed

    Begon, Mickaël; Lacouture, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    A marker has to be seen by at least two cameras for its three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction, and the accuracy can be improved with more cameras. However, a change in the set of cameras used in the reconstruction can alter the kinematics. The purpose of this study was to quantify the harmful effect of occlusions on two-dimensional (2-D) images and to make recommendations about the signal processing. A reference kinematics data set was collected for a three degree-of-freedom linkage with three cameras of a commercial motion analysis system without any occlusion on the 2-D images. In the 2-D images, some occlusions were artificially created based on trials of real cyclic motions. An interpolation of 2-D trajectories before the 3-D reconstruction and two filters (Savitsky-Golay and Butterworth filters) after reconstruction were successively applied to minimize the effect of the 2-D occlusions. The filter parameters were optimized by minimizing the root mean square error between the reference and the filtered data. The optimal parameters of the filters were marker dependent, whereas no filter was necessary after a 2-D interpolation. As the occlusions cause systematic error in the 3-D reconstruction, the interpolation of the 2-D trajectories is more appropriate than filtering the 3-D trajectories.

  2. The accuracy of dynamic attitude propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvie, E.; Chu, D.; Woodard, M.

    1990-01-01

    Propagating attitude by integrating Euler's equation for rigid body motion has long been suggested for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) but until now has not been implemented. Because of limited Sun visibility, propagation is necessary for yaw determination. With the deterioration of the gyros, dynamic propagation has become more attractive. Angular rates are derived from integrating Euler's equation with a stepsize of 1 second, using torques computed from telemetered control system data. The environmental torque model was quite basic. It included gravity gradient and unshadowed aerodynamic torques. Knowledge of control torques is critical to the accuracy of dynamic modeling. Due to their coarseness and sparsity, control actuator telemetry were smoothed before integration. The dynamic model was incorporated into existing ERBS attitude determination software. Modeled rates were then used for attitude propagation in the standard ERBS fine-attitude algorithm. In spite of the simplicity of the approach, the dynamically propagated attitude matched the attitude propagated with good gyros well for roll and yaw but diverged up to 3 degrees for pitch because of the very low resolution in pitch momentum wheel telemetry. When control anomalies significantly perturb the nominal attitude, the effect of telemetry granularity is reduced and the dynamically propagated attitudes are accurate on all three axes.

  3. Dimensional accuracy of thermoformed polymethyl methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Jagger, R G

    1996-12-01

    Thermoforming of polymethyl methacrylate sheet is used to produce a number of different types of dental appliances. The purpose of this study was to determine the dimensional accuracy of thermoformed polymethyl methacrylate specimens. Five blanks of the acrylic resin were thermoformed on stone casts prepared from a silicone mold of a brass master die. The distances between index marks were measured both on the cast and on the thermoformed blanks with an optical comparator. Measurements on the blanks were made again 24 hours after processing and then 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after immersion in water. Linear shrinkage of less than 1% (range 0.37% to 0.52%) was observed 24 hours after removal of the blanks from the cast. Immersion of the thermoformed specimens in water resulted in an increase in measured dimensions, but after 3 months' immersion these increases were still less than those of the cast (range 0.07% to 0.18%). It was concluded that it is possible to thermoform Perspex polymethyl methacrylate accurately.

  4. Effect of data latency upon missile accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, L. J.

    1983-12-01

    This study examined the effect of data latency upon air-to-air guided missile accuracy. This research was done by modeling a digital guided missile, inserting the model into a computer simulation and generating miss distance statistics. The digital guided missile was modeled after the DIS microcomputer architecture. The DIS (Digital Integrating Subsystem) approach involves a number of loosely coupled microprocessors which communicate over a serial multiplex bus. It was developed at the Air Force Armament Lab., Eglin AFB, FL. The missile simulation, Tactics IV, involves three degrees of freedom and is written in FORTRAN IV. It was developed by Science Applications, Inc. in conjunction with AFWAL/FIMB, Wright Patterson AFB, OH. The results of this study indicate that typical data latency values generate only small increases in miss distance. The maximum delays tested were .01 seconds and the average increase in miss distance was 2.12 feet. Additionally, it was discovered that the transmission rate of the DIS microcomputers greatly affected miss distance. Microcomputers transmitting at 10 HZ generated large miss distances, even without data latency present. The identical missile engagements using transmission rates of 100 HZ resulted in much smaller miss distances.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of three-dimensional facial scanners measurement accuracy for facial deformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi-jiao; Xiong, Yu-xue; Sun, Yu-chun; Yang, Hui-fang; Lyu, Pei-jun; Wang, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To evaluate the measurement accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) facial scanners for facial deformity patients from oral clinic. Methods: 10 patients in different types of facial deformity from oral clinical were included. Three 3D digital face models for each patient were obtained by three facial scanners separately (line laser scanner from Faro for reference, stereophotography scanner from 3dMD and structured light scanner from FaceScan for test). For each patient, registration based on Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm was executed to align two test models (3dMD data & Facescan data) to the reference models (Faro data in high accuracy) respectively. The same boundaries on each pair models (one test and one reference models) were obtained by projection function in Geomagic Stuido 2012 software for trimming overlapping region, then 3D average measurement errors (3D errors) were calculated for each pair models also by the software. Paired t-test analysis was adopted to compare the 3D errors of two test facial scanners (10 data for each group). 3D profile measurement accuracy (3D accuracy) that is integrated embodied by average value and standard deviation of 10 patients' 3D errors were obtained by surveying analysis for each test scanner finally. Results: 3D accuracies of 2 test facial scanners in this study for facial deformity were 0.44+/-0.08 mm and 0.43+/-0.05 mm. The result of structured light scanner was slightly better than stereophotography scanner. No statistical difference between them. Conclusions: Both test facial scanners could meet the accuracy requirement (0.5mm) of 3D facial data acquisition for oral clinic facial deformity patients in this study. Their practical measurement accuracies were all slightly lower than their nominal accuracies.

  6. Precipitation measurements for earth-space communications: Accuracy requirements and ground-truth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J.; Kaul, R.

    1981-01-01

    Rainfall which is regarded as one of the more important observations for the measurements of this most variable parameter was made continuously, across large areas and over the sea. Ships could not provide the needed resolution nor could available radars provide the needed breadth of coverage. Microwave observations from the Nimbus-5 satellite offered some hope. Another possibility was suggested by the results of many comparisons between rainfall and the clouds seen in satellite pictures. Sequences of pictures from the first geostationary satellites were employed and a general correspondence between rain and the convective clouds visible in satellite pictures was found. It was demonstrated that the agreement was best for growing clouds. The development methods to infer GATE rainfall from geostationary satellite images are examined.

  7. The Aviation Supply Office Continues to have Problems with the Accuracy of Its Requirements Determinations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-22

    computations. Tn addition, asset data on items in the Closed Loon Aero- naut cal Manaoement Procram (CLAMP), a seoarately manaaed crouram for about...11S1 stock control officil sadta poeu=swud t~-Iih-? ;herb"the livis- ions control crouo would mo2nitor overriue actions and obtiin iustification for Iela

  8. Recommended documentation of evapotranspiration measurements and associated weather data and a review of requirements for accuracy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More and more evapotranspiration (ET) models, ET crop coefficients, and associated measurements of ET are reported in the literature. These measurements base from a range of measurement systems including lysimeters, eddy covariance, Bowen ratio, water balance (gravimetric, neutron meter, other soil ...

  9. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Hhhhhhh... - Calibration and Accuracy Requirements for Continuous Parameter Monitoring Systems

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CPMS for physical and operational integrity and all electrical connections for oxidation and galvanic... for integrity, oxidation and galvanic corrosion if CPMS is not equipped with a redundant...

  10. 75 FR 2549 - Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters; Public Meeting; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ...: The public meeting will be held at the Hilton Hotel in Gaithersburg, MD, 620 Perry Pkwy., Gaithersburg... contact the hotel at 301-977-8900 at least 7 days prior to the meeting. Directions to the hotel and other... include presentations from physicians, laboratories, government and industry representatives, and...

  11. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Hhhhhhh... - Calibration and Accuracy Requirements for Continuous Parameter Monitoring Systems

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... measurement location where swirling flow or abnormal velocity distributions due to upstream and downstream disturbances at the point of measurement do not exist. 4. Gas flow rate ±5 percent of the flow rate or 10 cubic... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION...

  12. Forecasting method in multilateration accuracy based on laser tracker measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, Sergio; Santolaria, Jorge; Samper, David; José Aguilar, Juan

    2017-02-01

    Multilateration based on a laser tracker (LT) requires the measurement of a set of points from three or more positions. Although the LTs’ angular information is not used, multilateration produces a volume of measurement uncertainty. This paper presents two new coefficients from which to determine whether the measurement of a set of points, before performing the necessary measurements, will improve or worsen the accuracy of the multilateration results, avoiding unnecessary measurement, and reducing the time and economic cost required. The first specific coefficient measurement coefficient (MCLT) is unique for each laser tracker. It determines the relationship between the radial and angular laser tracker measurement noise. Similarly, the second coefficient is related with specific conditions of measurement β. It is related with the spatial angle between the laser tracker positions α and its effect on error reduction. Both parameters MCLT and β are linked in error reduction limits. Beside these, a new methodology to determine the multilateration reduction limit according to the multilateration technique of an ideal laser tracker distribution and a random one are presented. It provides general rules and advice from synthetic tests that are validated through a real test carried out in a coordinate measurement machine.

  13. Monitoring techniques for high accuracy interference fit assembly processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuti, A.; Vedugo, F. Rodriguez; Paone, N.; Ungaro, C.

    2016-06-01

    In the automotive industry, there are many assembly processes that require a high geometric accuracy, in the micrometer range; generally open-loop controllers cannot meet these requirements. This results in an increased defect rate and high production costs. This paper presents an experimental study of interference fit process, aimed to evaluate the aspects which have the most impact on the uncertainty in the final positioning. The press-fitting process considered, consists in a press machine operating with a piezoelectric actuator to press a plug into a sleeve. Plug and sleeve are designed and machined to obtain a known interference fit. Differential displacement and velocity measurements of the plug with respect to the sleeve are measured by a fiber optic differential laser Doppler vibrometer. Different driving signals of the piezo actuator allow to have an insight into the differences between a linear and a pulsating press action. The paper highlights how the press-fit assembly process is characterized by two main phases: the first is an elastic deformation of the plug and sleeve, which produces a reversible displacement, the second is a sliding of the plug with respect to the sleeve, which results in an irreversible displacement and finally realizes the assembly. The simultaneous measurements of the displacement and the force have permitted to define characteristic features in the signal useful to identify the start of the irreversible movement. These indicators could be used to develop a control logic in a press assembly process.

  14. High Accuracy Dual Lens Transmittance Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    measurement of lens transmission,” Metrologia 37, 603–605 (2000). 3. B. Munro, “Quantum information processing with light and its requirement for detectors...5. N. P. Fox, “Trap detectors and their properties,” Metrologia 28, 197–202 (1991). 5402 APPLIED OPTICS Vol. 46, No. 22 1 August 2007 6. S. L

  15. Tetroon evaluation program. [volume accuracies under superpressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beemer, J. D.; Markhardt, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    The actual volume of a constant volume superpressured tetrahedron shaped balloon changes as the amount of superpressure is changed. The experimental methods used to measure these changes in volume are described and results are presented. The basic equations used to determine the amount of inflation gas required for a tetroon to float at a predetermined flight level are presented and inflation techniques discussed.

  16. Accuracy of schemes with nonuniform meshes for compressible fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of the space discretization for time-dependent problems when a nonuniform mesh is used is considered. Many schemes reduce to first-order accuracy while a popular finite volume scheme is even inconsistent for general grids. This accuracy is based on physical variables. However, when accuracy is measured in computational variables then second-order accuracy can be obtained. This is meaningful only if the mesh accurately reflects the properties of the solution. In addition, the stability properties of some improved accurate schemes are analyzed and it can be shown that they also allow for larger time steps when Runge-Kutta type methods are used to advance in time.

  17. Wind Prediction Accuracy for Air Traffic Management Decision Support Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Rod; Green, Steve; Jardin, Matt; Schwartz, Barry; Benjamin, Stan

    2000-01-01

    The performance of Air Traffic Management and flight deck decision support tools depends in large part on the accuracy of the supporting 4D trajectory predictions. This is particularly relevant to conflict prediction and active advisories for the resolution of conflicts and the conformance with of traffic-flow management flow-rate constraints (e.g., arrival metering / required time of arrival). Flight test results have indicated that wind prediction errors may represent the largest source of trajectory prediction error. The tests also discovered relatively large errors (e.g., greater than 20 knots), existing in pockets of space and time critical to ATM DST performance (one or more sectors, greater than 20 minutes), are inadequately represented by the classic RMS aggregate prediction-accuracy studies of the past. To facilitate the identification and reduction of DST-critical wind-prediction errors, NASA has lead a collaborative research and development activity with MIT Lincoln Laboratories and the Forecast Systems Lab of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This activity, begun in 1996, has focussed on the development of key metrics for ATM DST performance, assessment of wind-prediction skill for state of the art systems, and development/validation of system enhancements to improve skill. A 13 month study was conducted for the Denver Center airspace in 1997. Two complementary wind-prediction systems were analyzed and compared to the forecast performance of the then standard 60 km Rapid Update Cycle - version 1 (RUC-1). One system, developed by NOAA, was the prototype 40-km RUC-2 that became operational at NCEP in 1999. RUC-2 introduced a faster cycle (1 hr vs. 3 hr) and improved mesoscale physics. The second system, Augmented Winds (AW), is a prototype en route wind application developed by MITLL based on the Integrated Terminal Wind System (ITWS). AW is run at a local facility (Center) level, and updates RUC predictions based on an

  18. Accuracy evaluation of an X-ray microtomography system.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Jaquiel S; Appoloni, Carlos R; Fernandes, Celso P

    2016-06-01

    Microstructural parameter evaluation of reservoir rocks is of great importance to petroleum production companies. In this connection, X-ray computed microtomography (μ-CT) has proven to be a quite useful method for the assessment of rocks, as it provides important microstructural parameters, such as porosity, permeability, pore size distribution and porous phase of the sample. X-ray computed microtomography is a non-destructive technique that enables the reuse of samples already measured and also yields 2-D cross-sectional images of the sample as well as volume rendering. This technique offers an additional advantage, as it does not require sample preparation, of reducing the measurement time, which is approximately one to three hours, depending on the spatial resolution used. Although this technique is extensively used, accuracy verification of measurements is hard to obtain because the existing calibrated samples (phantoms) have large volumes and are assessed in medical CT scanners with millimeter spatial resolution. Accordingly, this study aims to determine the accuracy of an X-ray computed microtomography system using a Skyscan 1172 X-ray microtomograph. To accomplish this investigation, it was used a nylon thread set with known appropriate diameter inserted into a glass tube. The results for porosity size and phase distribution by X-ray microtomography were very close to the geometrically calculated values. The geometrically calculated porosity and the porosity determined by the methodology using the μ-CT was 33.4±3.4% and 31.0±0.3%, respectively. The outcome of this investigation was excellent. It was also observed a small variability in the results along all 401 sections of the analyzed image. Minimum and maximum porosity values between the cross sections were 30.9% and 31.1%, respectively. A 3-D image representing the actual structure of the sample was also rendered from the 2-D images.

  19. Accuracy and limitations of localized Green's function methods for materials science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Johnson, D. D.

    2001-12-01

    We compare screened real-space and reciprocal-space implementations of Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker electronic-structure method for their applicability to largescale problems requiring various levels of accuracy. We show that real-space calculations in metals can become impractical to describe energies. We suggest a combined r- and k-space scheme as the most efficient and flexible strategy for accurate energy calculations. Our hybrid code is suitable for (parallel) large-scale calculations involving complex, multicomponent systems. We also discuss how details of numerical procedures can affect accuracy of such calculations.

  20. Accuracy analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor profile measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estler, W. Tyler

    1989-01-01

    The Profile Measuring Device (PMD) was developed at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center following the loss of the Space Shuttle Challenger. It is a rotating gauge used to measure the absolute diameters of mating features of redesigned Solid Rocket Motor field joints. Diameter tolerance of these features are typically + or - 0.005 inches and it is required that the PMD absolute measurement uncertainty be within this tolerance. In this analysis, the absolute accuracy of these measurements were found to be + or - 0.00375 inches, worst case, with a potential accuracy of + or - 0.0021 inches achievable by improved temperature control.

  1. Effect of atmospherics on beamforming accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Richard M.

    1990-01-01

    Two mathematical representations of noise due to atmospheric turbulence are presented. These representations are derived and used in computer simulations of the Bartlett Estimate implementation of beamforming. Beamforming is an array processing technique employing an array of acoustic sensors used to determine the bearing of an acoustic source. Atmospheric wind conditions introduce noise into the beamformer output. Consequently, the accuracy of the process is degraded and the bearing of the acoustic source is falsely indicated or impossible to determine. The two representations of noise presented here are intended to quantify the effects of mean wind passing over the array of sensors and to correct for these effects. The first noise model is an idealized case. The effect of the mean wind is incorporated as a change in the propagation velocity of the acoustic wave. This yields an effective phase shift applied to each term of the spatial correlation matrix in the Bartlett Estimate. The resultant error caused by this model can be corrected in closed form in the beamforming algorithm. The second noise model acts to change the true direction of propagation at the beginning of the beamforming process. A closed form correction for this model is not available. Efforts to derive effective means to reduce the contributions of the noise have not been successful. In either case, the maximum error introduced by the wind is a beam shift of approximately three degrees. That is, the bearing of the acoustic source is indicated at a point a few degrees from the true bearing location. These effects are not quite as pronounced as those seen in experimental results. Sidelobes are false indications of acoustic sources in the beamformer output away from the true bearing angle. The sidelobes that are observed in experimental results are not caused by these noise models. The effects of mean wind passing over the sensor array as modeled here do not alter the beamformer output as

  2. Enhancing the Classification Accuracy of IP Geolocation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    in cloud infrastructure services. For example, a Dropbox user may require their data to be hosted on servers in San Francisco, but the data’s true...location may actually be in Tennessee (see Fig. 1). Users of cloud computing deploy Virtual Machines (VM) on a cloud providers infrastructure without...datacenters, as specified by a Service Level Agreement (SLA). Cloud users can use IP geolocation to independently verify data confidentiality by

  3. Validation of dosimetric field matching accuracy from proton therapy using a robotic patient positioning system.

    PubMed

    Farr, Jonathan B; O'Ryan-Blair, Avril; Jesseph, Frederick; Hsi, Wen-Chien; Allgower, Chris E; Mascia, Anthony E; Thornton, Allan F; Schreuder, Andreas N

    2010-04-12

    Large area, shallow fields are well suited to proton therapy. However, due to beam production limitations, such volumes typically require multiple matched fields. This is problematic due to the relatively narrow beam penumbra at shallow depths compared to electron and photon beams. Therefore, highly accurate dose planning and delivery is required. As the dose delivery includes shifting the patient for matched fields, accuracy at the 1-2 millimeter level in patient positioning is also required. This study investigates the dosimetric accuracy of such proton field matching by an innovative robotic patient positioner system (RPPS). The dosimetric comparisons were made between treatment planning system calculations, radiographic film and ionization chamber measurements. The results indicated good agreement amongst the methods and suggest that proton field matching by a RPPS is accurate and efficient.

  4. Accuracy of quantitative visual soil assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; Heuvelink, Gerard; Stoorvogel, Jetse; Wallinga, Jakob; de Boer, Imke; van Dam, Jos; van Essen, Everhard; Moolenaar, Simon; Verhoeven, Frank; Stoof, Cathelijne

    2016-04-01

    Visual soil assessment (VSA) is a method to assess soil quality visually, when standing in the field. VSA is increasingly used by farmers, farm organisations and companies, because it is rapid and cost-effective, and because looking at soil provides understanding about soil functioning. Often VSA is regarded as subjective, so there is a need to verify VSA. Also, many VSAs have not been fine-tuned for contrasting soil types. This could lead to wrong interpretation of soil quality and soil functioning when contrasting sites are compared to each other. We wanted to assess accuracy of VSA, while taking into account soil type. The first objective was to test whether quantitative visual field observations, which form the basis in many VSAs, could be validated with standardized field or laboratory measurements. The second objective was to assess whether quantitative visual field observations are reproducible, when used by observers with contrasting backgrounds. For the validation study, we made quantitative visual observations at 26 cattle farms. Farms were located at sand, clay and peat soils in the North Friesian Woodlands, the Netherlands. Quantitative visual observations evaluated were grass cover, number of biopores, number of roots, soil colour, soil structure, number of earthworms, number of gley mottles and soil compaction. Linear regression analysis showed that four out of eight quantitative visual observations could be well validated with standardized field or laboratory measurements. The following quantitative visual observations correlated well with standardized field or laboratory measurements: grass cover with classified images of surface cover; number of roots with root dry weight; amount of large structure elements with mean weight diameter; and soil colour with soil organic matter content. Correlation coefficients were greater than 0.3, from which half of the correlations were significant. For the reproducibility study, a group of 9 soil scientists and 7

  5. Resist development modeling for OPC accuracy improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yongfa; Zavyalova, Lena; Zhang, Yunqiang; Zhang, Charlie; Lucas, Kevin; Falch, Brad; Croffie, Ebo; Li, Jianliang; Melvin, Lawrence; Ward, Brian

    2009-03-01

    in the same way that current model calibration is done. The method is validated with a rigorous lithography process simulation tool which is based on physical models to simulate and predict effects during the resist PEB and development process. Furthermore, an experimental lithographic process was modeled using this new methodology, showing significant improvement in modeling accuracy in compassion to a traditional model. Layout correction test has shown that the new model form is equivalent to traditional model forms in terms of correction convergence and speed.

  6. Multisensor Arrays for Greater Reliability and Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Eckhoff, Anthony; Lane, John; Perotti, Jose; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman; Ree, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Arrays of multiple, nominally identical sensors with sensor-output-processing electronic hardware and software are being developed in order to obtain accuracy, reliability, and lifetime greater than those of single sensors. The conceptual basis of this development lies in the statistical behavior of multiple sensors and a multisensor-array (MSA) algorithm that exploits that behavior. In addition, advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and integrated circuits are exploited. A typical sensor unit according to this concept includes multiple MEMS sensors and sensor-readout circuitry fabricated together on a single chip and packaged compactly with a microprocessor that performs several functions, including execution of the MSA algorithm. In the MSA algorithm, the readings from all the sensors in an array at a given instant of time are compared and the reliability of each sensor is quantified. This comparison of readings and quantification of reliabilities involves the calculation of the ratio between every sensor reading and every other sensor reading, plus calculation of the sum of all such ratios. Then one output reading for the given instant of time is computed as a weighted average of the readings of all the sensors. In this computation, the weight for each sensor is the aforementioned value used to quantify its reliability. In an optional variant of the MSA algorithm that can be implemented easily, a running sum of the reliability value for each sensor at previous time steps as well as at the present time step is used as the weight of the sensor in calculating the weighted average at the present time step. In this variant, the weight of a sensor that continually fails gradually decreases, so that eventually, its influence over the output reading becomes minimal: In effect, the sensor system "learns" which sensors to trust and which not to trust. The MSA algorithm incorporates a criterion for deciding whether there remain enough sensor readings that

  7. Height Accuracy Based on Different Rtk GPS Method for Ultralight Aircraft Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahar, K. N.

    2015-08-01

    Height accuracy is one of the important elements in surveying work especially for control point's establishment which requires an accurate measurement. There are many methods can be used to acquire height value such as tacheometry, leveling and Global Positioning System (GPS). This study has investigated the effect on height accuracy based on different observations which are single based and network based GPS methods. The GPS network is acquired from the local network namely Iskandar network. This network has been setup to provide real-time correction data to rover GPS station while the single network is based on the known GPS station. Nine ground control points were established evenly at the study area. Each ground control points were observed about two and ten minutes. It was found that, the height accuracy give the different result for each observation.

  8. Accuracy and Resolution of Kinect Depth Data for Indoor Mapping Applications

    PubMed Central

    Khoshelham, Kourosh; Elberink, Sander Oude

    2012-01-01

    Consumer-grade range cameras such as the Kinect sensor have the potential to be used in mapping applications where accuracy requirements are less strict. To realize this potential insight into the geometric quality of the data acquired by the sensor is essential. In this paper we discuss the calibration of the Kinect sensor, and provide an analysis of the accuracy and resolution of its depth data. Based on a mathematical model of depth measurement from disparity a theoretical error analysis is presented, which provides an insight into the factors influencing the accuracy of the data. Experimental results show that the random error of depth measurement increases with increasing distance to the sensor, and ranges from a few millimeters up to about 4 cm at the maximum range of the sensor. The quality of the data is also found to be influenced by the low resolution of the depth measurements. PMID:22438718

  9. Effect of the rail unevenness on the pointing accuracy of large radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Wu, Jiang; Duan, Bao-Yan; Wang, Cong-Si

    2017-03-01

    Considering the stringent requirement of the pointing accuracy up to 2.5″ of the World largest full steerable telescope, this paper presents a coarse-fine mixed model to describe the azimuth rail unevenness. First, the coarse-fine mixed model is proposed. In the model, the trigonometric function is utilized to describe the error with long wavelength whilst the fractal function is used for the short wavelength errors, separately. Then the mathematic model of the pointing accuracy is developed mathematically. Finally, the coarse-fine model and point accuracy model are applied to Green Bank Telescope with valuable result. This paved the way for predicting point error of Qi Tai Telescope.

  10. New integration techniques for chemical kinetic rate equations. 2: Accuracy comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of the accuracy of several techniques recently developed for solving stiff differential equations is presented. The techniques examined include two general purpose codes EEPISODE and LSODE developed for an arbitrary system of ordinary differential equations, and three specialized codes CHEMEQ, CREKID, and GCKP84 developed specifically to solve chemical kinetic rate equations. The accuracy comparisons are made by applying these solution procedures to two practical combustion kinetics problems. Both problems describe adiabatic, homogeneous, gas phase chemical reactions at constant pressure, and include all three combustion regimes: induction, heat release, and equilibration. The comparisons show that LSODE is the most efficient code - in the sense that it requires the least computational work to attain a specified accuracy level. An important finding is that an iterative solution of the algebraic enthalpy conservation equation for the temperature can be more accurate and efficient than computing the temperature by integrating its time derivative.

  11. New integration techniques for chemical kinetic rate equations. II - Accuracy comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the accuracy of several techniques recently developed for solving stiff differential equations is presented. The techniques examined include two general purpose codes EEPISODE and LSODE developed for an arbitrary system of ordinary differential equations, and three specialized codes CHEMEQ, CREKID, and GCKP84 developed specifically to solve chemical kinetic rate equations. The accuracy comparisons are made by applying these solution procedures to two practical combustion kinetics problems. Both problems describe adiabatic, homogeneous, gas phase chemical reactions at constant pressure, and include all three combustion regimes: induction heat release, and equilibration. The comparisons show that LSODE is the most efficient code - in the sense that it requires the least computational work to attain a specified accuracy level. An important finding is that an iterative solution of the algebraic enthalpy conservation equation for the temperature can be more accurate and efficient than computing the temperature by integrating its time derivative.

  12. Accuracy analysis of TDRSS demand forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Daniel C.; Levine, Allen J.; Pitt, Karl J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews Space Network (SN) demand forecasting experience over the past 16 years and describes methods used in the forecasts. The paper focuses on the Single Access (SA) service, the most sought-after resource in the Space Network. Of the ten years of actual demand data available, only the last five years (1989 to 1993) were considered predictive due to the extensive impact of the Challenger accident of 1986. NASA's Space Network provides tracking and communications services to user spacecraft such as the Shuttle and the Hubble Space Telescope. Forecasting the customer requirements is essential to planning network resources and to establishing service commitments to future customers. The lead time to procure Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS's) requires demand forecasts ten years in the future a planning horizon beyond the funding commitments for missions to be supported. The long range forecasts are shown to have had a bias toward underestimation in the 1991 -1992 period. The trend of underestimation can be expected to be replaced by overestimation for a number of years starting with 1998. At that time demand from new missions slated for launch will be larger than the demand from ongoing missions, making the potential for delay the dominant factor. If the new missions appear as scheduled, the forecasts are likely to be moderately underestimated. The SN commitment to meet the negotiated customer's requirements calls for conservatism in the forecasting. Modification of the forecasting procedure to account for a delay bias is, therefore, not advised. Fine tuning the mission model to more accurately reflect the current actual demand is recommended as it may marginally improve the first year forecasting.

  13. Improving the accuracy of walking piezo motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Heijer, M.; Fokkema, V.; Saedi, A.; Schakel, P.; Rost, M. J.

    2014-05-01

    Many application areas require ultraprecise, stiff, and compact actuator systems with a high positioning resolution in combination with a large range as well as a high holding and pushing force. One promising solution to meet these conflicting requirements is a walking piezo motor that works with two pairs of piezo elements such that the movement is taken over by one pair, once the other pair reaches its maximum travel distance. A resolution in the pm-range can be achieved, if operating the motor within the travel range of one piezo pair. However, applying the typical walking drive signals, we measure jumps in the displacement up to 2.4 μm, when the movement is given over from one piezo pair to the other. We analyze the reason for these large jumps and propose improved drive signals. The implementation of our new drive signals reduces the jumps to less than 42 nm and makes the motor ideally suitable to operate as a coarse approach motor in an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope. The rigidity of the motor is reflected in its high pushing force of 6.4 N.

  14. Accuracy Studies of a Magnetometer-Only Attitude-and-Rate-Determination System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challa, M. (Editor); Wheeler, C. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    A personal computer based system was recently prototyped that uses measurements from a three axis magnetometer (TAM) to estimate the attitude and rates of a spacecraft using no a priori knowledge of the spacecraft's state. Past studies using in-flight data from the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particles Explorer focused on the robustness of the system and demonstrated that attitude and rate estimates could be obtained accurately to 1.5 degrees (deg) and 0.01 deg per second (deg/sec), respectively, despite limitations in the data and in the accuracies of te truth models. This paper studies the accuracy of the Kalman filter in the system using several orbits of in-flight Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) data and attitude and rate truth models obtained from high precision sensors to demonstrate the practical capabilities. This paper shows the following: Using telemetered TAM data, attitude accuracies of 0.2 to 0.4 deg and rate accuracies of 0.002 to 0.005 deg/sec (within ERBS attitude control requirements of 1 deg and 0.0005 deg/sec) can be obtained with minimal tuning of the filter; Replacing the TAM data in the telemetry with simulated TAM data yields corresponding accuracies of 0.1 to 0.2 deg and 0.002 to 0.005 deg/sec, thus demonstrating that the filter's accuracy can be significantly enhanced by further calibrating the TAM. Factors affecting the fillter's accuracy and techniques for tuning the system's Kalman filter are also presented.

  15. STARD-BLCM: Standards for the Reporting of Diagnostic accuracy studies that use Bayesian Latent Class Models.

    PubMed

    Kostoulas, Polychronis; Nielsen, Søren S; Branscum, Adam J; Johnson, Wesley O; Dendukuri, Nandini; Dhand, Navneet K; Toft, Nils; Gardner, Ian A

    2017-03-01

    The Standards for the Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) statement, which was recently updated to the STARD2015 statement, was developed to encourage complete and transparent reporting of test accuracy studies. Although STARD principles apply broadly, the checklist is limited to studies designed to evaluate the accuracy of tests when the disease status is determined from a perfect reference procedure or an imperfect one with known measures of test accuracy. However, a reference standard does not always exist, especially in the case of infectious diseases with a long latent period. In such cases, a valid alternative to classical test evaluation involves the use of latent class models that do not require a priori knowledge of disease status. Latent class models have been successfully implemented in a Bayesian framework for over 20 years. The objective of this work was to identify the STARD items that require modification and develop a modified version of STARD for studies that use Bayesian latent class analysis to estimate diagnostic test accuracy in the absence of a reference standard. Examples and elaborations for each of the modified items are provided. The new guidelines, termed STARD-BLCM (Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic accuracy studies that use Bayesian Latent Class Models), will facilitate improved quality of reporting on the design, conduct and results of diagnostic accuracy studies that use Bayesian latent class models.

  16. Accuracy Assessment of Underwater Photogrammetric Three Dimensional Modelling for Coral Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, T.; Capra, A.; Troyer, M.; Gruen, A.; Brooks, A. J.; Hench, J. L.; Schmitt, R. J.; Holbrook, S. J.; Dubbini, M.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in automation of photogrammetric 3D modelling software packages have stimulated interest in reconstructing highly accurate 3D object geometry in unconventional environments such as underwater utilizing simple and low-cost camera systems. The accuracy of underwater 3D modelling is affected by more parameters than in single media cases. This study is part of a larger project on 3D measurements of temporal change of coral cover in tropical waters. It compares the accuracies of 3D point clouds generated by using images acquired from a system camera mounted in an underwater housing and the popular GoPro cameras respectively. A precisely measured calibration frame was placed in the target scene in order to provide accurate control information and also quantify the errors of the modelling procedure. In addition, several objects (cinder blocks) with various shapes were arranged in the air and underwater and 3D point clouds were generated by automated image matching. These were further used to examine the relative accuracy of the point cloud generation by comparing the point clouds of the individual objects with the objects measured by the system camera in air (the best possible values). Given a working distance of about 1.5 m, the GoPro camera can achieve a relative accuracy of 1.3 mm in air and 2.0 mm in water. The system camera achieved an accuracy of 1.8 mm in water, which meets our requirements for coral measurement in this system.

  17. Laser damage properties of films with different surface accuracy of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jinman; Su, Junhong

    2014-09-01

    The analysis of laser damage properties of films is the focus of most concern in recent years. Many properties of the film have been studied, but the surface accuracy of the substrates shouldn't be ignored. TiO2 films are prepared on K9 glass substrates with different surface accuracy by ion beam assistant deposition technique. The films' surface morphology, microstructure and thickness are been analyzed. It shows that the substrates with different surface accuracy have some impact on thin film growth and make different micro-structures of thin film. According to the international standard requirements of the damage threshold, the films' damage threshold is measured on the films' laser-induced damage threshold test platform composed with 1064 nm Nd: YAG laser. The results indicate that the laser damage threshold of the film deposited on the substrate with the better surface accuracy is higher, and the substrate with high accuracy can improve the laser damage resistance of the film.

  18. Nationwide forestry applications program. Analysis of forest classification accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congalton, R. G.; Mead, R. A.; Oderwald, R. G.; Heinen, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The development of LANDSAT classification accuracy assessment techniques, and of a computerized system for assessing wildlife habitat from land cover maps are considered. A literature review on accuracy assessment techniques and an explanation for the techniques development under both projects are included along with listings of the computer programs. The presentations and discussions at the National Working Conference on LANDSAT Classification Accuracy are summarized. Two symposium papers which were published on the results of this project are appended.

  19. Airborne Topographic Mapper Calibration Procedures and Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Chreston F.; Krabill, William B.; Manizade, Serdar S.; Russell, Rob L.; Sonntag, John G.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Description of NASA Airborn Topographic Mapper (ATM) lidar calibration procedures including analysis of the accuracy and consistancy of various ATM instrument parameters and the resulting influence on topographic elevation measurements. The ATM elevations measurements from a nominal operating altitude 500 to 750 m above the ice surface was found to be: Horizontal Accuracy 74 cm, Horizontal Precision 14 cm, Vertical Accuracy 6.6 cm, Vertical Precision 3 cm.

  20. A high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor for finite element applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Taylor, B. K.

    1984-01-01

    Optical linear processors are computationally efficient computers for solving matrix-matrix and matrix-vector oriented problems. Optical system errors limit their dynamic range to 30-40 dB, which limits their accuray to 9-12 bits. Large problems, such as the finite element problem in structural mechanics (with tens or hundreds of thousands of variables) which can exploit the speed of optical processors, require the 32 bit accuracy obtainable from digital machines. To obtain this required 32 bit accuracy with an optical processor, the data can be digitally encoded, thereby reducing the dynamic range requirements of the optical system (i.e., decreasing the effect of optical errors on the data) while providing increased accuracy. This report describes a new digitally encoded optical linear algebra processor architecture for solving finite element and banded matrix-vector problems. A linear static plate bending case study is described which quantities the processor requirements. Multiplication by digital convolution is explained, and the digitally encoded optical processor architecture is advanced.

  1. A fast RCS accuracy assessment method for passive radar calibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yongsheng; Li, Chuanrong; Tang, Lingli; Ma, Lingling; Liu, QI

    2016-10-01

    In microwave radar radiometric calibration, the corner reflector acts as the standard reference target but its structure is usually deformed during the transportation and installation, or deformed by wind and gravity while permanently installed outdoor, which will decrease the RCS accuracy and therefore the radiometric calibration accuracy. A fast RCS accuracy measurement method based on 3-D measuring instrument and RCS simulation was proposed in this paper for tracking the characteristic variation of the corner reflector. In the first step, RCS simulation algorithm was selected and its simulation accuracy was assessed. In the second step, the 3-D measuring instrument was selected and its measuring accuracy was evaluated. Once the accuracy of the selected RCS simulation algorithm and 3-D measuring instrument was satisfied for the RCS accuracy assessment, the 3-D structure of the corner reflector would be obtained by the 3-D measuring instrument, and then the RCSs of the obtained 3-D structure and corresponding ideal structure would be calculated respectively based on the selected RCS simulation algorithm. The final RCS accuracy was the absolute difference of the two RCS calculation results. The advantage of the proposed method was that it could be applied outdoor easily, avoiding the correlation among the plate edge length error, plate orthogonality error, plate curvature error. The accuracy of this method is higher than the method using distortion equation. In the end of the paper, a measurement example was presented in order to show the performance of the proposed method.

  2. Accuracy assessment of NLCD 2006 land cover and impervious surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickham, James D.; Stehman, Stephen V.; Gass, Leila; Dewitz, Jon; Fry, Joyce A.; Wade, Timothy G.

    2013-01-01

    Release of NLCD 2006 provides the first wall-to-wall land-cover change database for the conterminous United States from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data. Accuracy assessment of NLCD 2006 focused on four primary products: 2001 land cover, 2006 land cover, land-cover change between 2001 and 2006, and impervious surface change between 2001 and 2006. The accuracy assessment was conducted by selecting a stratified random sample of pixels with the reference classification interpreted from multi-temporal high resolution digital imagery. The NLCD Level II (16 classes) overall accuracies for the 2001 and 2006 land cover were 79% and 78%, respectively, with Level II user's accuracies exceeding 80% for water, high density urban, all upland forest classes, shrubland, and cropland for both dates. Level I (8 classes) accuracies were 85% for NLCD 2001 and 84% for NLCD 2006. The high overall and user's accuracies for the individual dates translated into high user's accuracies for the 2001–2006 change reporting themes water gain and loss, forest loss, urban gain, and the no-change reporting themes for water, urban, forest, and agriculture. The main factor limiting higher accuracies for the change reporting themes appeared to be difficulty in distinguishing the context of grass. We discuss the need for more research on land-cover change accuracy assessment.

  3. Thematic Accuracy Assessment of the 2011 National Land ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Accuracy assessment is a standard protocol of National Land Cover Database (NLCD) mapping. Here we report agreement statistics between map and reference labels for NLCD 2011, which includes land cover for ca. 2001, ca. 2006, and ca. 2011. The two main objectives were assessment of agreement between map and reference labels for the three, single-date NLCD land cover products at Level II and Level I of the classification hierarchy, and agreement for 17 land cover change reporting themes based on Level I classes (e.g., forest loss; forest gain; forest, no change) for three change periods (2001–2006, 2006–2011, and 2001–2011). The single-date overall accuracies were 82%, 83%, and 83% at Level II and 88%, 89%, and 89% at Level I for 2011, 2006, and 2001, respectively. Many class-specific user's accuracies met or exceeded a previously established nominal accuracy benchmark of 85%. Overall accuracies for 2006 and 2001 land cover components of NLCD 2011 were approximately 4% higher (at Level II and Level I) than the overall accuracies for the same components of NLCD 2006. The high Level I overall, user's, and producer's accuracies for the single-date eras in NLCD 2011 did not translate into high class-specific user's and producer's accuracies for many of the 17 change reporting themes. User's accuracies were high for the no change reporting themes, commonly exceeding 85%, but were typically much lower for the reporting themes that represented change. Only forest l

  4. Sound source localization identification accuracy: Level and duration dependencies.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A

    2016-07-01

    Sound source localization accuracy for noises was measured for sources in the front azimuthal open field mainly as a function of overall noise level and duration. An identification procedure was used in which listeners identify which loudspeakers presented a sound. Noises were filtered and differed in bandwidth and center frequency. Sound source localization accuracy depended on the bandwidth of the stimuli, and for the narrow bandwidths, accuracy depended on the filter's center frequency. Sound source localization accuracy did not depend on overall level or duration.

  5. Assessment of the Thematic Accuracy of Land Cover Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhle, J.

    2015-08-01

    Several land cover maps are generated from aerial imagery and assessed by different approaches. The test site is an urban area in Europe for which six classes (`building', `hedge and bush', `grass', `road and parking lot', `tree', `wall and car port') had to be derived. Two classification methods were applied (`Decision Tree' and `Support Vector Machine') using only two attributes (height above ground and normalized difference vegetation index) which both are derived from the images. The assessment of the thematic accuracy applied a stratified design and was based on accuracy measures such as user's and producer's accuracy, and kappa coefficient. In addition, confidence intervals were computed for several accuracy measures. The achieved accuracies and confidence intervals are thoroughly analysed and recommendations are derived from the gained experiences. Reliable reference values are obtained using stereovision, false-colour image pairs, and positioning to the checkpoints with 3D coordinates. The influence of the training areas on the results is studied. Cross validation has been tested with a few reference points in order to derive approximate accuracy measures. The two classification methods perform equally for five classes. Trees are classified with a much better accuracy and a smaller confidence interval by means of the decision tree method. Buildings are classified by both methods with an accuracy of 99% (95% CI: 95%-100%) using independent 3D checkpoints. The average width of the confidence interval of six classes was 14% of the user's accuracy.

  6. Thermocouple Calibration and Accuracy in a Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Nathal, M. V.; Keller, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    A consolidation of information has been provided that can be used to define procedures for enhancing and maintaining accuracy in temperature measurements in materials testing laboratories. These studies were restricted to type R and K thermocouples (TCs) tested in air. Thermocouple accuracies, as influenced by calibration methods, thermocouple stability, and manufacturer's tolerances were all quantified in terms of statistical confidence intervals. By calibrating specific TCs the benefits in accuracy can be as great as 6 C or 5X better compared to relying on manufacturer's tolerances. The results emphasize strict reliance on the defined testing protocol and on the need to establish recalibration frequencies in order to maintain these levels of accuracy.

  7. Analysis and Improvement of Geo-Referencing Accuracy in Long Term Global AVHRR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlopenkov, K.; Minnis, P.

    2011-12-01

    Precise geolocation is one of the fundamental requirements for generating high-quality Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Satellite Climate Data Record (SCDR) at 1-km spatial resolution for climate applications. The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS) identified the requirement for the accuracy of geolocation of satellite data for climate applications as 1/3 field-of-view (FOV). This requirement for AVHRR series on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) platforms cannot be met without implementing the ground control point (GCP) correction, especially for historical data, because of the limited accuracy of orbit models and uncertainty in the satellite attitude angles. This work presents a new analysis of the geo-referencing accuracy of global AVHRR data, that uses an automated image matching at pre-selected GCP locations. As a reference image, we have been using the clear-sky monthly composite imagery derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MOD09 dataset at 250-m resolution. The image matching technique is applicable to processing not only the daytime observations from optical solar bands, but also the nighttime imagery by using the long wave thermal channels. The method includes the ortho-rectification to correct for surface elevation and achieves the sub-pixel accuracy in both along-scan and along-track directions. The produced image displacement map is then used to derive a correction to satellite clock error and the attitude angles. The statistics and pattern of these corrections have been analyzed for different NOAA Polar-orbiting satellites by using the HRPT, LAC, and GAC data sets. The application of the developed processing system showed that the algorithm achieved better than 1/3 FOV geolocation accuracy for most of AVHRR 1-km scenes. It has a high efficiency rate (over 97%) for global AVHRR data from NOAA-6 through NOAA-19.

  8. Pedicle screw placement accuracy of bone-mounted miniature robot system.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tzou, Rong-Dar; Su, Yu-Feng; Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2017-01-01

    This article describes factors affecting the accuracy of transpedicle screw placements performed with the Renaissance robot-guided system and reviews the relevant literature. Between January 2013 and January 2015, Renaissance robot-guided spinal surgery was performed in 125 patients at Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The surgeries included 662 transpedicle screw implants and 49 Kirschner wire (K-wire) reimplants performed by intraoperative repositioning. The lead author evaluated the accuracy of all K-wire insertions and classified their accuracy into 3 categories relative to the preoperative plan for transpedicle screw placement. For cases in which screws required repositioning after the registration step, factors affecting pedicle screw placement were determined according to the consensus of 3 experienced spinal surgeons. According to the scheme developed by Kuo et al (PLoS One 2016;11:e0153235), the K-wire placement accuracies before and after repositioning were respectively classified as follows: 76.1% and 77.6% in type I; 12.2% and 17.7% in type IIa; 4.3% and 4.5% in type IIb; 6.4% and 0% in type IIIa; and 1% and 1% in type IIIb. The percentage of screws requiring repositioning due to drilling error was 85.7% (42/49). Comparisons of preoperative and postoperative function showed significantly improved accuracy. This study showed that inaccurate pedicle screw placement mainly results from errors in preoperative planning, mounting, registration, drilling, and robot assembly. Pedicle screw placement using a bone-mounted miniature robot system requires meticulous preoperative planning to minimize these errors.

  9. Pedicle screw placement accuracy of bone-mounted miniature robot system

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tzou, Rong-Dar; Su, Yu-Feng; Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This article describes factors affecting the accuracy of transpedicle screw placements performed with the Renaissance robot-guided system and reviews the relevant literature. Between January 2013 and January 2015, Renaissance robot-guided spinal surgery was performed in 125 patients at Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The surgeries included 662 transpedicle screw implants and 49 Kirschner wire (K-wire) reimplants performed by intraoperative repositioning. The lead author evaluated the accuracy of all K-wire insertions and classified their accuracy into 3 categories relative to the preoperative plan for transpedicle screw placement. For cases in which screws required repositioning after the registration step, factors affecting pedicle screw placement were determined according to the consensus of 3 experienced spinal surgeons. According to the scheme developed by Kuo et al (PLoS One 2016;11:e0153235), the K-wire placement accuracies before and after repositioning were respectively classified as follows: 76.1% and 77.6% in type I; 12.2% and 17.7% in type IIa; 4.3% and 4.5% in type IIb; 6.4% and 0% in type IIIa; and 1% and 1% in type IIIb. The percentage of screws requiring repositioning due to drilling error was 85.7% (42/49). Comparisons of preoperative and postoperative function showed significantly improved accuracy. This study showed that inaccurate pedicle screw placement mainly results from errors in preoperative planning, mounting, registration, drilling, and robot assembly. Pedicle screw placement using a bone-mounted miniature robot system requires meticulous preoperative planning to minimize these errors. PMID:28099339

  10. Uniformity requirements in CMS hadron calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1996-02-01

    Practical considerations of calorimeter systems require a specification of the allowed manufacturing tolerances. The tightness of these requirements directly makes an impact on the assembly costs of the calorimeter. For that reason, a precise and well defined set of criteria is mandatory. In addition, the intrinsic limitations of hadron calorimetry define the level of accuracy needed in the manufacture of such devices. Therefore, considerations of the limitations on energy measurement accuracy due to Physics should define the needed level of effort to produce a uniform calorimetric device.

  11. Geolocation and Pointing Accuracy Analysis for the WindSat Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.; Purdy, William E.; Gaiser, Peter W.; Poe, Gene; Uliana, Enzo A.

    2006-01-01

    Geolocation and pointing accuracy analyses of the WindSat flight data are presented. The two topics were intertwined in the flight data analysis and will be addressed together. WindSat has no unusual geolocation requirements relative to other sensors, but its beam pointing knowledge accuracy is especially critical to support accurate polarimetric radiometry. Pointing accuracy was improved and verified using geolocation analysis in conjunction with scan bias analysis. nvo methods were needed to properly identify and differentiate between data time tagging and pointing knowledge errors. Matchups comparing coastlines indicated in imagery data with their known geographic locations were used to identify geolocation errors. These coastline matchups showed possible pointing errors with ambiguities as to the true source of the errors. Scan bias analysis of U, the third Stokes parameter, and of vertical and horizontal polarizations provided measurement of pointing offsets resolving ambiguities in the coastline matchup analysis. Several geolocation and pointing bias sources were incfementally eliminated resulting in pointing knowledge and geolocation accuracy that met all design requirements.

  12. Accuracy of a stormwater monitoring program for urban landuses.

    PubMed

    Madarang, Krish; Kang, Joo-Hyon

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the accuracy of an urban stormwater monitoring program in estimating the annual discharge load (L(T)) and the annual reduction rate by a stormwater treatment device (R(T)) for total suspended solids. A calibrated stormwater management model was used to generate the entire stormwater runoff events in one year and was used to estimate L(T) and R(T) under different monitoring strategies having limited numbers of runoff events, including random, wet season, antecedent dry days (ADD)-based, monthly, and seasonally weighted. For random monitoring, 12 storms were required to estimate the values of L(T) and R(T) with mean relative errors of 13.98 and 0.24%, respectively. Monthly monitoring had slightly greater mean relative errors compared to random monitoring. Wet season and ADD-based monitoring under- or overestimated both L(T) and R(T). Monitoring with equal numbers of storms from the wet and dry seasons best estimated L(T) and R(T).

  13. Modeling versus accuracy in EEG and MEG data

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Huang, M.; Leahy, R.M.; Spencer, M.E.

    1997-07-30

    The widespread availability of high-resolution anatomical information has placed a greater emphasis on accurate electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography (collectively, E/MEG) modeling. A more accurate representation of the cortex, inner skull surface, outer skull surface, and scalp should lead to a more accurate forward model and hence improve inverse modeling efforts. The authors examine a few topics in this paper that highlight some of the problems of forward modeling, then discuss the impacts these results have on the inverse problem. The authors begin by assuming a perfect head model, that of the sphere, then show the lower bounds on localization accuracy of dipoles within this perfect forward model. For more realistic anatomy, the boundary element method (BEM) is a common numerical technique for solving the boundary integral equations. For a three-layer BEM, the computational requirements can be too intensive for many inverse techniques, so they examine a few simplifications. They quantify errors in generating this forward model by defining a regularized percentage error metric. The authors then apply this metric to a single layer boundary element solution, a multiple sphere approach, and the common single sphere model. They conclude with an MEG localization demonstration on a novel experimental human phantom, using both BEM and multiple spheres.

  14. The role of sensors in the accuracy of machine tools

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, E.R.

    1988-07-26

    Accuracy of machine tools is impossible without the assistance of sensors. The original manufacturers employed human senses, especially touch and sight, to enable the human brain to control manufacturing processes. Gradually, manufacturers found artificial means to overcome the limitations of human senses. More recently, manufacturers began to employ artificial means to overcome the limitations of the human brain to effect control of manufacturing processes. The resultant array of sensors and computers, coupled with artificial means to overcome the limitations of human skeletons and muscles is embodied in modern machine tools. The evolution continues, resulting in increasing human capacity to create and replicate products. Machine tools are used to make products, are assembled with products and are products themselves. Consequently, sensors play a role in both the manufacture and the use of machine tools. In order to fully manage the design, manufacture and operation of precise and accurate machine tools, engineers must examine and understand the nature of sources of errors and imperfections. Many errors are not directly measurable, e.g., thermal effects. Consequently, control of such errors requires that engineers base the selection and use of sensors on an understanding of the underlying cause and effect relationship. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Improving accuracy through density correction in guided wave tomography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The accurate quantification of wall loss caused by corrosion is critical to the reliable life estimation of pipes and pressure vessels. Traditional thickness gauging by scanning a probe is slow and requires access to all points on the surface; this is impractical in many cases as corrosion often occurs where access is restricted, such as beneath supports where water collects. Guided wave tomography presents a solution to this; by transmitting guided waves through the region of interest and exploiting their dispersive nature, it is possible to build up a map of thickness. While the best results have been seen when using the fundamental modes A0 and S0 at low frequency, the complex scattering of the waves causes errors within the reconstruction. It is demonstrated that these lead to an underestimate in wall loss for A0 but an overestimate for S0. Further analysis showed that this error was related to density variation, which was proportional to thickness. It was demonstrated how this could be corrected for in the reconstructions, in many cases resulting in the near-elimination of the error across a range of defects, and greatly improving the accuracy of life estimates from guided wave tomography. PMID:27118904

  16. Accuracy of selected techniques for estimating ice-affected streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, John F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of selected techniques for estimating streamflow during ice-affected periods. The techniques are classified into two categories - subjective and analytical - depending on the degree of judgment required. Discharge measurements have been made at three streamflow-gauging sites in Iowa during the 1987-88 winter and used to established a baseline streamflow record for each site. Using data based on a simulated six-week field-tip schedule, selected techniques are used to estimate discharge during the ice-affected periods. For the subjective techniques, three hydrographers have independently compiled each record. Three measures of performance are used to compare the estimated streamflow records with the baseline streamflow records: the average discharge for the ice-affected period, and the mean and standard deviation of the daily errors. Based on average ranks for three performance measures and the three sites, the analytical and subjective techniques are essentially comparable. For two of the three sites, Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance detects significant differences among the three hydrographers for the subjective methods, indicating that the subjective techniques are less consistent than the analytical techniques. The results suggest analytical techniques may be viable tools for estimating discharge during periods of ice effect, and should be developed further and evaluated for sites across the United States.

  17. Accuracy and reproducibility of cholesterol assay in the western Cape.

    PubMed

    Berger, G M; Christopher, K; Juritz, J M; Liesegang, F

    1988-11-19

    The accuracy and precision of cholesterol assay in the western Cape region is reported. The survey was carried out over 15 weeks utilising three human EDTA plasma pools with normal, borderline high and high cholesterol levels respectively. All 11 laboratories in the region providing a service to academic, provincial or military hospitals or to the private medical sector were included in the study. Ten of the 11 laboratories utilised automated enzymatic methods of cholesterol assay whereas 1 used a manual procedure based on the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. Methods were standardised by means of a variety of commercial calibrator material in all except 1 laboratory which used reference sera from the Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta. The performance of the 4 best laboratories met the standard of precision recommended for cholesterol assay, viz. total coefficient of variation of less than or equal to 2.5%. However, only 2 of the 11 laboratories achieved the optimum objective of an overall bias of less than 2.0% together with precision of less than or equal to 2.5%. Rational use of cholesterol assay for diagnosis and management will therefore require standardisation of cholesterol assay on a common reference material and greater attention to analytical factors influencing the reproducibility of results. Intrinsic biological variation also contributes uncertainty to the interpretation of a single value. Thus important clinical decisions must be based on two or more assays carried out using appropriate methodology.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of nodular gastritis for H. pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Flores, Juan L; Fernandez-Rivero, Justo A; Marroquín-Fabian, Erika; Téllez-Ávila, Félix I; Sánchez-Jiménez, Beatriz A; Juárez-Hernández, Eva; Uribe, Misael; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C

    2017-01-01

    Background The term nodular is not included in the Sydney classification and there is no widely accepted histopathological definition. It has been proposed that the presence of antral nodularity could predict Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of nodular gastritis (NG) for H. pylori infection after a rigorous standardization process, and to describe the associated histopathological characteristics. Materials and methods Endoscopic images of patients submitted to endoscopy with biopsy sampling were included. Endoscopic images were distributed among six endoscopists. The analysis was performed sequentially in three rounds: the first round assessed the interobserver variability, the second evaluated the intraobserver variability, and the third calculated the interobserver variability after training. A correlation analysis between endoscopic and histopathological findings was performed. Results A total of 917 studies were included. In the first analysis of interobserver variability, a poor kappa value (0.078) was obtained. The second evaluation yielded good intraobserver variability, with kappa values of 0.62–0.86. The evaluation of interobserver variability after training revealed an improvement in the kappa value of 0.42. A correlation was found between endoscopic images and histopathological reports. Conclusion There was a strong correlation between NG and H. pylori, but only after rigorous evaluation. The use of the term NG requires extensive standardization before it can be used clinically. PMID:28031716

  19. Improving Localization Accuracy: Successive Measurements Error Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Abu Ali, Najah; Abu-Elkheir, Mervat

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle self-localization is an essential requirement for many of the safety applications envisioned for vehicular networks. The mathematical models used in current vehicular localization schemes focus on modeling the localization error itself, and overlook the potential correlation between successive localization measurement errors. In this paper, we first investigate the existence of correlation between successive positioning measurements, and then incorporate this correlation into the modeling positioning error. We use the Yule Walker equations to determine the degree of correlation between a vehicle’s future position and its past positions, and then propose a p-order Gauss–Markov model to predict the future position of a vehicle from its past p positions. We investigate the existence of correlation for two datasets representing the mobility traces of two vehicles over a period of time. We prove the existence of correlation between successive measurements in the two datasets, and show that the time correlation between measurements can have a value up to four minutes. Through simulations, we validate the robustness of our model and show that it is possible to use the first-order Gauss–Markov model, which has the least complexity, and still maintain an accurate estimation of a vehicle’s future location over time using only its current position. Our model can assist in providing better modeling of positioning errors and can be used as a prediction tool to improve the performance of classical localization algorithms such as the Kalman filter. PMID:26140345

  20. On the Accuracy of Double Scattering Approximation for Atmospheric Polarization Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkin, Sergey V.; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Marshak, Alexander L.

    2011-01-01

    Interpretation of multi-angle spectro-polarimetric data in remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols require fast and accurate methods of solving the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The single and double scattering approximations could provide an analytical framework for the inversion algorithms and are relatively fast, however accuracy assessments of these approximations for the aerosol atmospheres in the atmospheric window channels have been missing. This paper provides such analysis for a vertically homogeneous aerosol atmosphere with weak and strong asymmetry of scattering. In both cases, the double scattering approximation gives a high accuracy result (relative error approximately 0.2%) only for the low optical path - 10(sup -2) As the error rapidly grows with optical thickness, a full VRTE solution is required for the practical remote sensing analysis. It is shown that the scattering anisotropy is not important at low optical thicknesses neither for reflected nor for transmitted polarization components of radiation.

  1. 10 CFR 52.6 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 52.6 Section 52.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.6 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  2. 10 CFR 52.6 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 52.6 Section 52.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.6 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  3. 10 CFR 52.6 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 52.6 Section 52.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.6 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  4. 10 CFR 52.6 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 52.6 Section 52.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.6 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  5. 10 CFR 52.6 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 52.6 Section 52.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.6 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  6. Reliability and Accuracy of Surgical Resident Peer Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutsky, Larry A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reliability and accuracy of peer ratings by 32, 28, 33 general surgery residents over 3 years were examined. Peer ratings were found highly reliable, with high level of test-retest reliability replicated across three years. Halo effects appear to pose greatest threat to rater accuracy, though chief residents tended to exhibit less halo effect than…

  7. 10 CFR 55.9 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 55.9 Section 55.9 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.9 Completeness and accuracy of information. Information provided to the Commission by an applicant for a...

  8. 40 CFR 92.127 - Emission measurement accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission measurement accuracy. 92.127 Section 92.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Emission measurement accuracy. (a) Good engineering practice dictates that exhaust emission sample...

  9. Concept Mapping Improves Metacomprehension Accuracy among 7th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redford, Joshua S.; Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments explored concept map construction as a useful intervention to improve metacomprehension accuracy among 7th grade students. In the first experiment, metacomprehension was marginally better for a concept mapping group than for a rereading group. In the second experiment, metacomprehension accuracy was significantly greater for a…

  10. Understanding the Delayed-Keyword Effect on Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiede, Keith W.; Dunlosky, John; Griffin, Thomas D.; Wiley, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    The typical finding from research on metacomprehension is that accuracy is quite low. However, recent studies have shown robust accuracy improvements when judgments follow certain generation tasks (summarizing or keyword listing) but only when these tasks are performed at a delay rather than immediately after reading (K. W. Thiede & M. C. M.…

  11. Alaska national hydrography dataset positional accuracy assessment study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arundel, Samantha; Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Constance, Eric; Mantey, Kim; Vinyard-Houx, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Initial visual assessments Wide range in the quality of fit between features in NHD and these new image sources. No statistical analysis has been performed to actually quantify accuracy Determining absolute accuracy is cost prohibitive (must collect independent, well defined test points) Quantitative analysis of relative positional error is feasible.

  12. Task-Based Variability in Children's Singing Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Bryan E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore task-based variability in children's singing accuracy performance. The research questions were: Does children's singing accuracy vary based on the nature of the singing assessment employed? Is there a hierarchy of difficulty and discrimination ability among singing assessment tasks? What is the…

  13. Exploring a Three-Level Model of Calibration Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraw, Gregory; Kuch, Fred; Gutierrez, Antonio P.; Richmond, Aaron S.

    2014-01-01

    We compared 5 different statistics (i.e., G index, gamma, "d'", sensitivity, specificity) used in the social sciences and medical diagnosis literatures to assess calibration accuracy in order to examine the relationship among them and to explore whether one statistic provided a best fitting general measure of accuracy. College…

  14. 40 CFR 92.127 - Emission measurement accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission measurement accuracy. 92.127 Section 92.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Emission measurement accuracy. (a) Good engineering practice dictates that exhaust emission sample...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1338-84 - Emission measurement accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission measurement accuracy. 86.1338... Procedures § 86.1338-84 Emission measurement accuracy. (a) Measurement accuracy—Bag sampling. (1) Good... using the calibration data obtained with both calibration gases. (b) Measurement...

  16. 12 CFR 740.2 - Accuracy of advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Accuracy of advertising. 740.2 Section 740.2... ADVERTISING AND NOTICE OF INSURED STATUS § 740.2 Accuracy of advertising. No insured credit union may use any advertising (which includes print, electronic, or broadcast media, displays and signs, stationery, and...

  17. 12 CFR 740.2 - Accuracy of advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Accuracy of advertising. 740.2 Section 740.2... ADVERTISING AND NOTICE OF INSURED STATUS § 740.2 Accuracy of advertising. No insured credit union may use any advertising (which includes print, electronic, or broadcast media, displays and signs, stationery, and...

  18. 12 CFR 740.2 - Accuracy of advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accuracy of advertising. 740.2 Section 740.2... ADVERTISING AND NOTICE OF INSURED STATUS § 740.2 Accuracy of advertising. No insured credit union may use any advertising (which includes print, electronic, or broadcast media, displays and signs, stationery, and...

  19. 12 CFR 740.2 - Accuracy of advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Accuracy of advertising. 740.2 Section 740.2... ADVERTISING AND NOTICE OF INSURED STATUS § 740.2 Accuracy of advertising. No insured credit union may use any advertising (which includes print, electronic, or broadcast media, displays and signs, stationery, and...

  20. 12 CFR 740.2 - Accuracy of advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accuracy of advertising. 740.2 Section 740.2... ADVERTISING AND NOTICE OF INSURED STATUS § 740.2 Accuracy of advertising. No insured credit union may use any advertising (which includes print, electronic, or broadcast media, displays and signs, stationery, and...

  1. 40 CFR 1502.24 - Methodology and scientific accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methodology and scientific accuracy... STATEMENT § 1502.24 Methodology and scientific accuracy. Agencies shall insure the professional integrity... shall identify any methodologies used and shall make explicit reference by footnote to the...

  2. Estimating Consistency and Accuracy Indices for Multiple Classifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Won-Chan; Hanson, Bradley A.; Brennan, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes procedures for estimating various indices of classification consistency and accuracy for multiple category classifications using data from a single test administration. The estimates of the classification consistency and accuracy indices are compared under three different psychometric models: the two-parameter beta binomial,…

  3. EFFECTS OF LANDSCAPE CHARACTERISTICS ON LAND-COVER CLASS ACCURACY

    EPA Science Inventory



    Utilizing land-cover data gathered as part of the National Land-Cover Data (NLCD) set accuracy assessment, several logistic regression models were formulated to analyze the effects of patch size and land-cover heterogeneity on classification accuracy. Specific land-cover ...

  4. An overview of systematic reviews of diagnostic tests accuracy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration says that the Cochrane handbook for diagnostic test accuracy reviews (DTAR) is currently in development as per the Cochrane Collaboration. This implies that the methodology of systematic reviews (SR) of diagnostic test accuracy is still a matter of debate. At this point, comparison of methodologies for SR in case of interventions as against diagnostics would be helpful to understand DTAR.

  5. Investigating the Accuracy of Teachers' Word Frequency Intuitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrostie, James

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has found that native English speakers can judge, with a relatively high degree of accuracy, the frequency of words in the English language. However, there has been little investigation of the ability to judge the frequency of high and middle frequency words. Similarly, the accuracy of EFL teachers' frequency judgements remains…

  6. Assessment Of Accuracies Of Remote-Sensing Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Don H.; Strong, Laurence L.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of accuracies of classifications of picture elements in map derived by digital processing of Landsat-multispectral-scanner imagery of coastal plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Accuracies of portions of map analyzed with help of statistical sampling procedure called "stratified plurality sampling", in which all picture elements in given cluster classified in stratum to which plurality of them belong.

  7. 10 CFR 76.9 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 76.9 Section 76.9 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS General Provisions § 76.9 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a) Information provided to the Commission...

  8. 10 CFR 76.9 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 76.9 Section 76.9 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS General Provisions § 76.9 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a) Information provided to the Commission...

  9. 10 CFR 76.9 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 76.9 Section 76.9 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS General Provisions § 76.9 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a) Information provided to the Commission...

  10. 10 CFR 76.9 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 76.9 Section 76.9 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS General Provisions § 76.9 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a) Information provided to the Commission...

  11. 10 CFR 76.9 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 76.9 Section 76.9 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS General Provisions § 76.9 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a) Information provided to the Commission...

  12. Accuracy of thick-target micro-PIXE analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Teesdale, W. J.; Wang, J.-X.

    1990-04-01

    The accuracy attainable in micro-PIXE analysis is assessed in terms of the X-ray production model and its assumptions, physical realities of the specimen, the necessary data base, and techniques of standardization. NTIS reference materials are analyzed to provide the experimental tests of accuracy.

  13. 10 CFR 55.9 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 55.9 Section 55.9 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.9 Completeness and accuracy of information. Information provided to the Commission by an applicant for a...

  14. Effects of Prolonged Work on Data Entry Speed and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy,Alice F.; Kole,James A.; Buck-Gengle,Carolyn J.; Bourne,Lyle E.

    2004-01-01

    In 2 experiments, participants used a keyboard to enter 4-digit numbers presented on a computer monitor under conditions promoting fatigue. In Experiment 1, accuracy of data entry declined but response times improved over time, reflecting an increasing speed-accuracy trade-off. In Experiment 2, the (largely cognitive) time to enter the initial…

  15. Dissociating Appraisals of Accuracy and Recollection in Autobiographical Remembering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoboria, Alan; Pascal, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of metamemory appraisals implicated in autobiographical remembering have established distinct roles for judgments of occurrence, recollection, and accuracy for past events. In studies involving everyday remembering, measures of recollection and accuracy correlate highly (>.85). Thus although their measures are structurally…

  16. Camera Calibration Accuracy at Different Uav Flying Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, A. R.; Ariff, M. F. M.; Idris, K. M.; Majid, Z.; Chong, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can be used to acquire highly accurate data in deformation survey, whereby low-cost digital cameras are commonly used in the UAV mapping. Thus, camera calibration is considered important in obtaining high-accuracy UAV mapping using low-cost digital cameras. The main focus of this study was to calibrate the UAV camera at different camera distances and check the measurement accuracy. The scope of this study included camera calibration in the laboratory and on the field, and the UAV image mapping accuracy assessment used calibration parameters of different camera distances. The camera distances used for the image calibration acquisition and mapping accuracy assessment were 1.5 metres in the laboratory, and 15 and 25 metres on the field using a Sony NEX6 digital camera. A large calibration field and a portable calibration frame were used as the tools for the camera calibration and for checking the accuracy of the measurement at different camera distances. Bundle adjustment concept was applied in Australis software to perform the camera calibration and accuracy assessment. The results showed that the camera distance at 25 metres is the optimum object distance as this is the best accuracy obtained from the laboratory as well as outdoor mapping. In conclusion, the camera calibration at several camera distances should be applied to acquire better accuracy in mapping and the best camera parameter for the UAV image mapping should be selected for highly accurate mapping measurement.

  17. Students' Accuracy of Measurement Estimation: Context, Units, and Logical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Gardner, Grant E.; Taylor, Amy R.; Forrester, Jennifer H.; Andre, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study examined students' accuracy of measurement estimation for linear distances, different units of measure, task context, and the relationship between accuracy estimation and logical thinking. Middle school students completed a series of tasks that included estimating the length of various objects in different contexts and completed a test…

  18. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources.

  19. A consensus on protein structure accuracy in NMR?

    PubMed

    Billeter, Martin

    2015-02-03

    The precision of an NMR structure may be manipulated by calculation parameters such as calibration factors. Its accuracy is, however, a different issue. In this issue of Structure, Buchner and Güntert present "consensus structure bundles," where precision analysis allows estimation of accuracy.

  20. 10 CFR 60.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 60.10 Section 60.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.10 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  1. 10 CFR 60.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 60.10 Section 60.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.10 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  2. 10 CFR 60.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 60.10 Section 60.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.10 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  3. 10 CFR 63.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 63.10 Section 63.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA General Provisions § 63.10 Completeness and accuracy...

  4. 10 CFR 63.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 63.10 Section 63.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA General Provisions § 63.10 Completeness and accuracy...

  5. 10 CFR 63.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 63.10 Section 63.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA General Provisions § 63.10 Completeness and accuracy...

  6. 10 CFR 63.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 63.10 Section 63.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA General Provisions § 63.10 Completeness and accuracy...

  7. 10 CFR 63.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 63.10 Section 63.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA General Provisions § 63.10 Completeness and accuracy...

  8. 10 CFR 60.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 60.10 Section 60.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.10 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  9. 10 CFR 60.10 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 60.10 Section 60.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.10 Completeness and accuracy of information. (a)...

  10. Developing a Weighted Measure of Speech Sound Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jonathan L.; Ramsdell, Heather L.; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Edwards, Mary Louise; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a system for numerically quantifying a speaker's phonetic accuracy through transcription-based measures. With a focus on normal and disordered speech in children, the authors describe a system for differentially weighting speech sound errors on the basis of various levels of phonetic accuracy using a Weighted Speech Sound…

  11. A Probability Model of Accuracy in Deception Detection Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hee Sun; Levine, Timothy R.

    2001-01-01

    Extends the recent work on the veracity effect in deception detection. Explains the probabilistic nature of a receiver's accuracy in detecting deception and analyzes a receiver's detection of deception in terms of set theory and conditional probability. Finds that accuracy is shown to be a function of the relevant conditional probability and the…

  12. Accuracy of References in Ten Library Science Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Nancy N.

    1992-01-01

    A study of 100 article citations from 11 library science journals showed only 45 article citations that were completely free of errors, while 11 had major errors--i.e., errors preventing or hindering location of the reference--and the remaining 44 had minor errors. Citation accuracy in library science journals appears similar to accuracy in other…

  13. Quantifying Numerical Model Accuracy and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, L. H.; Lynett, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku tsunami event has changed the logic on how to evaluate tsunami hazard on coastal communities. Numerical models are a key component for methodologies used to estimate tsunami risk. Model predictions are essential for the development of Tsunami Hazard Assessments (THA). By better understanding model bias and uncertainties and if possible minimizing them, a more accurate and reliable THA will result. In this study we compare runup height, inundation lines and flow velocity field measurements between GeoClaw and the Method Of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) predictions in the Sendai plain. Runup elevation and average inundation distance was in general overpredicted by the models. However, both models agree relatively well with each other when predicting maximum sea surface elevation and maximum flow velocities. Furthermore, to explore the variability and uncertainties in numerical models, MOST is used to compare predictions from 4 different grid resolutions (30m, 20m, 15m and 12m). Our work shows that predictions of particular products (runup and inundation lines) do not require the use of high resolution (less than 30m) Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs). When predicting runup heights and inundation lines, numerical convergence was achieved using the 30m resolution grid. On the contrary, poor convergence was found in the flow velocity predictions, particularly the 1 meter depth maximum flow velocities. Also, runup height measurements and elevations from the DEM were used to estimate model bias. The results provided in this presentation will help understand the uncertainties in model predictions and locate possible sources of errors within a model.

  14. Evaluation of a High-Accuracy MacCormack-Type Scheme Using Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.

    1997-01-01

    Due to their inherent dissipation and stability, the MacCormack scheme and its variants have been widely used in the computation of unsteady flow and acoustic problems. However, these schemes require many points per wavelength in order to propagate waves with a reasonable amount of accuracy. In this work, the linear wave propagation characteristics of MacCormack-type schemes are shown by solving several of the CAA Benchmark Problems.

  15. Dimensional accuracy of small gold alloy castings. Part 4. The casting ring and ring liners.

    PubMed

    Morey, E F

    1992-04-01

    The role of the casting ring and its asbestos liner is discussed. Asbestos as a liner has now largely been replaced by two alternative materials, one based on cellulose and the other on ceramic fibres. The limited literature on the effect of these newer materials on casting accuracy is also reviewed as their introduction may require significant changes in the traditional technology of dental casting.

  16. High accuracy autonomous navigation using the global positioning system (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Son H.; Hart, Roger C.; Shoan, Wendy C.; Wood, Terri; Long, Anne C.; Oza, Dipak H.; Lee, Taesul

    1997-01-01

    The application of global positioning system (GPS) technology to the improvement of the accuracy and economy of spacecraft navigation, is reported. High-accuracy autonomous navigation algorithms are currently being qualified in conjunction with the GPS attitude determination flyer (GADFLY) experiment for the small satellite technology initiative Lewis spacecraft. Preflight performance assessments indicated that these algorithms are able to provide a real time total position accuracy of better than 10 m and a velocity accuracy of better than 0.01 m/s, with selective availability at typical levels. It is expected that the position accuracy will be increased to 2 m if corrections are provided by the GPS wide area augmentation system.

  17. Improving metacomprehension accuracy in an undergraduate course context.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D; Jaeger, Allison J; Jarosz, Andrew F; Cushen, Patrick J; Thiede, Keith W

    2016-12-01

    Students tend to have poor metacomprehension when learning from text, meaning they are not able to distinguish between what they have understood well and what they have not. Although there are a good number of studies that have explored comprehension monitoring accuracy in laboratory experiments, fewer studies have explored this in authentic course contexts. This study investigated the effect of an instructional condition that encouraged comprehension-test-expectancy and self-explanation during study on metacomprehension accuracy in the context of an undergraduate course in research methods. Results indicated that when students received this instructional condition, relative metacomprehension accuracy was better than in a comparison condition. In addition, differences were also seen in absolute metacomprehension accuracy measures, strategic study behaviors, and learning outcomes. The results of the current study demonstrate that a condition that has improved relative metacomprehension accuracy in laboratory contexts may have value in real classroom contexts as well. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Feasibility and accuracy of medication checks via Internet video.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Natalie; Armfield, Nigel R; Young, Jeanine; Smith, Anthony C

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of using Internet-based videoconferencing for double-checking medications. Ten participants checked 30 different medications using a desktop PC and a webcam. The accuracy of the video-based checks was compared with 'face-to-vial' checks. The checks included the drug name, dosage and expiry dates of ampoules, vials and tablets, as well as graduations on syringes. There was 100% accuracy for drug name, dosage, and graduations on syringes greater than 1 unit. The expiry dates proved more difficult to read, and accuracy was only 63%. The mean overall accuracy was 91% for all items. Internet video-based medication double-checks may have a useful role to play in processes to ensure the safe use of medications in home care.

  19. Measuring the spatial accuracy of the spatial scan statistic.

    PubMed

    Read, Simon; Bath, Peter; Willett, Peter; Maheswaran, Ravi

    2011-06-01

    The spatial scan statistic is well established in spatial epidemiology. However, studies of its spatial accuracy are infrequent and vary in approach, often using multiple measures which complicate the objective ranking of different implementations of the statistic. We address this with three novel contributions. Firstly, a modular framework into which different definitions of spatial accuracy can be compared and hybridised. Secondly, we derive a new single measure, Ω, which takes account of all true and detected clusters, without the need for arbitrary weightings and irrespective of any chosen significance threshold. Thirdly, we demonstrate the new measure, alongside existing ones, in a study of the six output filter options provided by SaTScan™. The study suggests filtering overlapping detected clusters tends to reduce spatial accuracy, and visualising overlapping clusters may be better than filtering them out. Although we only address spatial accuracy, the framework and Ω may be extendible to spatio-temporal accuracy.

  20. Accuracy testing of electric groundwater-level measurement tapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jelinski, Jim; Clayton, Christopher S.; Fulford, Janice M.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy tests demonstrated that none of the electric-tape models tested consistently met the suggested USGS accuracy of ±0.01 ft. The test data show that the tape models in the study should give a water-level measurement that is accurate to roughly ±0.05 ft per 100 ft without additional calibration. To meet USGS accuracy guidelines, the electric-tape models tested will need to be individually calibrated. Specific conductance also plays a part in tape accuracy. The probes will not work in water with specific conductance values near zero, and the accuracy of one probe was unreliable in very high conductivity water (10,000 microsiemens per centimeter).

  1. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for diagnosing ulcerative early gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyungkil; Bang, Byongwook; Kwon, Kyesook; Shin, Youngwoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the first-choice imaging modality for predicting the invasion depth of early gastric cancer (EGC), the prediction accuracy of EUS is significantly decreased when EGC is combined with ulceration. The aim of present study was to compare the accuracy of EUS and conventional endoscopy (CE) for determining the depth of EGC. In addition, the various clinic-pathologic factors affecting the diagnostic accuracy of EUS, with a particular focus on endoscopic ulcer shapes, were evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed data from 236 consecutive patients with ulcerative EGC. All patients underwent EUS for estimating tumor invasion depth, followed by either curative surgery or endoscopic treatment. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS and CE was evaluated by comparing the final histologic result of resected specimen. The correlation between accuracy of EUS and characteristics of EGC (tumor size, histology, location in stomach, tumor invasion depth, and endoscopic ulcer shapes) was analyzed. Endoscopic ulcer shapes were classified into 3 groups: definite ulcer, superficial ulcer, and ill-defined ulcer. The overall accuracy of EUS and CE for predicting the invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was 68.6% and 55.5%, respectively. Of the 236 patients, 36 patients were classified as definite ulcers, 98 were superficial ulcers, and 102 were ill-defined ulcers, In univariate analysis, EUS accuracy was associated with invasion depth (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.034), and endoscopic ulcer shapes (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, there is a significant association between superficial ulcer in CE and EUS accuracy (odds ratio: 2.977; 95% confidence interval: 1.255–7.064; P = 0.013). The accuracy of EUS for determining tumor invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was superior to that of CE. In addition, ulcer shape was an important factor that affected EUS accuracy. PMID:27472672

  2. The effect of different Global Navigation Satellite System methods on positioning accuracy in elite alpine skiing.

    PubMed

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Limpach, Philippe; Geiger, Alain; Müller, Erich

    2014-10-03

    In sport science, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are frequently applied to capture athletes' position, velocity and acceleration. Application of GNSS includes a large range of different GNSS technologies and methods. To date no study has comprehensively compared the different GNSS methods applied. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of differential and non-differential solutions, different satellite systems and different GNSS signal frequencies on position accuracy. Twelve alpine ski racers were equipped with high-end GNSS devices while performing runs on a giant slalom course. The skiers' GNSS antenna positions were calculated in three satellite signal obstruction conditions using five different GNSS methods. The GNSS antenna positions were compared to a video-based photogrammetric reference system over one turn and against the most valid GNSS method over the entire run. Furthermore, the time for acquisitioning differential GNSS solutions was assessed for four differential methods. The only GNSS method that consistently yielded sub-decimetre position accuracy in typical alpine skiing conditions was a differential method using American (GPS) and Russian (GLONASS) satellite systems and the satellite signal frequencies L1 and L2. Under conditions of minimal satellite signal obstruction, valid results were also achieved when either the satellite system GLONASS or the frequency L2 was dropped from the best configuration. All other methods failed to fulfill the accuracy requirements needed to detect relevant differences in the kinematics of alpine skiers, even in conditions favorable for GNSS measurements. The methods with good positioning accuracy had also the shortest times to compute differential solutions. This paper highlights the importance to choose appropriate methods to meet the accuracy requirements for sport applications.

  3. The Effect of Different Global Navigation Satellite System Methods on Positioning Accuracy in Elite Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Limpach, Philippe; Geiger, Alain; Müller, Erich

    2014-01-01

    In sport science, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are frequently applied to capture athletes' position, velocity and acceleration. Application of GNSS includes a large range of different GNSS technologies and methods. To date no study has comprehensively compared the different GNSS methods applied. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of differential and non-differential solutions, different satellite systems and different GNSS signal frequencies on position accuracy. Twelve alpine ski racers were equipped with high-end GNSS devices while performing runs on a giant slalom course. The skiers' GNSS antenna positions were calculated in three satellite signal obstruction conditions using five different GNSS methods. The GNSS antenna positions were compared to a video-based photogrammetric reference system over one turn and against the most valid GNSS method over the entire run. Furthermore, the time for acquisitioning differential GNSS solutions was assessed for four differential methods. The only GNSS method that consistently yielded sub-decimetre position accuracy in typical alpine skiing conditions was a differential method using American (GPS) and Russian (GLONASS) satellite systems and the satellite signal frequencies L1 and L2. Under conditions of minimal satellite signal obstruction, valid results were also achieved when either the satellite system GLONASS or the frequency L2 was dropped from the best configuration. All other methods failed to fulfill the accuracy requirements needed to detect relevant differences in the kinematics of alpine skiers, even in conditions favorable for GNSS measurements. The methods with good positioning accuracy had also the shortest times to compute differential solutions. This paper highlights the importance to choose appropriate methods to meet the accuracy requirements for sport applications. PMID:25285461

  4. 40 CFR 53.53 - Test for flow rate accuracy, regulation, measurement accuracy, and cut-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... measurement accuracy, coefficient of variability measurement accuracy, and the flow rate cut-off function. The... flow measurements are made at intervals not to exceed 5 minutes. The flow rate cut-off test, conducted... definitions. (1) Sample flow rate means the quantitative volumetric flow rate of the air stream caused by...

  5. 40 CFR 53.53 - Test for flow rate accuracy, regulation, measurement accuracy, and cut-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... measurement accuracy, coefficient of variability measurement accuracy, and the flow rate cut-off function. The... flow measurements are made at intervals not to exceed 5 minutes. The flow rate cut-off test, conducted... definitions. (1) Sample flow rate means the quantitative volumetric flow rate of the air stream caused by...

  6. 40 CFR 53.53 - Test for flow rate accuracy, regulation, measurement accuracy, and cut-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... measurement accuracy, coefficient of variability measurement accuracy, and the flow rate cut-off function. The... flow measurements are made at intervals not to exceed 5 minutes. The flow rate cut-off test, conducted... definitions. (1) Sample flow rate means the quantitative volumetric flow rate of the air stream caused by...

  7. 40 CFR 53.53 - Test for flow rate accuracy, regulation, measurement accuracy, and cut-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... measurement accuracy, coefficient of variability measurement accuracy, and the flow rate cut-off function. The... flow measurements are made at intervals not to exceed 5 minutes. The flow rate cut-off test, conducted... definitions. (1) Sample flow rate means the quantitative volumetric flow rate of the air stream caused by...

  8. 40 CFR 53.53 - Test for flow rate accuracy, regulation, measurement accuracy, and cut-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... measurement accuracy, coefficient of variability measurement accuracy, and the flow rate cut-off function. The... flow measurements are made at intervals not to exceed 5 minutes. The flow rate cut-off test, conducted... definitions. (1) Sample flow rate means the quantitative volumetric flow rate of the air stream caused by...

  9. Accuracy tests of the tessellated SLBM model

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A L; Myers, S C

    2007-07-20

    renderings of the P velocity distribution within the specified layer for UM and SLBM models. The bottom right frame shows the difference in P velocity between UM and SLBM renderings. Black denotes zero thickness in both the UM and SLBM models. When the layer thickness is zero for one model and non-zero for the other model, then the velocity difference equals the velocity in the model with non-zero layer thickness. The figures suggest that most differences between the UM and SLBM models are small. The depth and velocity patterns in the figures are very similar. We can see some model differences at the edges of tectonic features. These are likely caused by the bilinear interpolation required to produce the tessellated model. Differences are accentuated North of 75 degrees latitude. These are probably due to the different resolution of the UM and SLBM models near the poles; the UM model is defined at a higher resolution close to the poles whereas the SLBM model is defined at an approximately constant resolution throughout the globe. In summary, our tests suggest that the SLBM model stored in memory for travel time calculation is sufficiently accurate for project needs.

  10. Radial lens distortion correction with sub-pixel accuracy for X-ray micro-tomography.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nghia T; Atwood, Robert C; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-12-14

    Distortion correction or camera calibration for an imaging system which is highly configurable and requires frequent disassembly for maintenance or replacement of parts needs a speedy method for recalibration. Here we present direct techniques for calculating distortion parameters of a non-linear model based on the correct determination of the center of distortion. These techniques are fast, very easy to implement, and accurate at sub-pixel level. The implementation at the X-ray tomography system of the I12 beamline, Diamond Light Source, which strictly requires sub-pixel accuracy, shows excellent performance in the calibration image and in the reconstructed images.

  11. Dissociating appraisals of accuracy and recollection in autobiographical remembering.

    PubMed

    Scoboria, Alan; Pascal, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies of metamemory appraisals implicated in autobiographical remembering have established distinct roles for judgments of occurrence, recollection, and accuracy for past events. In studies involving everyday remembering, measures of recollection and accuracy correlate highly (>.85). Thus although their measures are structurally distinct, such high correspondence might suggest conceptual redundancy. This article examines whether recollection and accuracy dissociate when studying different types of autobiographical event representations. In Study 1, 278 participants described a believed memory, a nonbelieved memory, and a believed-not-remembered event and rated each on occurrence, recollection, accuracy, and related covariates. In Study 2, 876 individuals described and rated 1 of these events, as well as an event about which they were uncertain about their memory. Confirmatory structural equation modeling indicated that the measurement dissociation between occurrence, recollection and accuracy held across all types of events examined. Relative to believed memories, the relationship between recollection and belief in accuracy was meaningfully lower for the other event types. These findings support the claim that recollection and accuracy arise from distinct underlying mechanisms. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Aiming for benchmark accuracy with the many-body expansion.

    PubMed

    Richard, Ryan M; Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus The past 15 years have witnessed an explosion of activity in the field of fragment-based quantum chemistry, whereby ab initio electronic structure calculations are performed on very large systems by decomposing them into a large number of relatively small subsystem calculations and then reassembling the subsystem data in order to approximate supersystem properties. Most of these methods are based, at some level, on the so-called many-body (or "n-body") expansion, which ultimately requires calculations on monomers, dimers, ..., n-mers of fragments. To the extent that a low-order n-body expansion can reproduce supersystem properties, such methods replace an intractable supersystem calculation with a large number of easily distributable subsystem calculations. This holds great promise for performing, for example, "gold standard" CCSD(T) calculations on large molecules, clusters, and condensed-phase systems. The literature is awash in a litany of fragment-based methods, each with their own working equations and terminology, which presents a formidable language barrier to the uninitiated reader. We have sought to unify these methods under a common formalism, by means of a generalized many-body expansion that provides a universal energy formula encompassing not only traditional n-body cluster expansions but also methods designed for macromolecules, in which the supersystem is decomposed into overlapping fragments. This formalism allows various fragment-based methods to be systematically classified, primarily according to how the fragments are constructed and how higher-order n-body interactions are approximated. This classification furthermore suggests systematic ways to improve the accuracy. Whereas n-body approaches have been thoroughly tested at low levels of theory in small noncovalent clusters, we have begun to explore the efficacy of these methods for large systems, with the goal of reproducing benchmark-quality calculations, ideally meaning complete

  13. 17 CFR 38.401 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General requirements. 38.401 Section 38.401 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DESIGNATED CONTRACT...'s Web site within the time prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Accuracy...

  14. Large format focal plane array integration with precision alignment, metrology and accuracy capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Jay; Parlato, Russell; Tracy, Gregory; Randolph, Max

    2015-09-01

    Focal plane alignment for large format arrays and faster optical systems require enhanced precision methodology and stability over temperature. The increase in focal plane array size continues to drive the alignment capability. Depending on the optical system, the focal plane flatness of less than 25μm (.001") is required over transition temperatures from ambient to cooled operating temperatures. The focal plane flatness requirement must also be maintained in airborne or launch vibration environments. This paper addresses the challenge of the detector integration into the focal plane module and housing assemblies, the methodology to reduce error terms during integration and the evaluation of thermal effects. The driving factors influencing the alignment accuracy include: datum transfers, material effects over temperature, alignment stability over test, adjustment precision and traceability to NIST standard. The FPA module design and alignment methodology reduces the error terms by minimizing the measurement transfers to the housing. In the design, the proper material selection requires matched coefficient of expansion materials minimizes both the physical shift over temperature as well as lowering the stress induced into the detector. When required, the co-registration of focal planes and filters can achieve submicron relative positioning by applying precision equipment, interferometry and piezoelectric positioning stages. All measurements and characterizations maintain traceability to NIST standards. The metrology characterizes the equipment's accuracy, repeatability and precision of the measurements.

  15. High-Accuracy Potentials for Van Der Waals Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Brown, James; Carrington, Tucker; , Jr.

    2012-06-01

    Recent experimental studies of vdWs systems including those by Moazzen-Ahmadi and McKellar,1,2 as well as microwave studies by Minei and Novick3,4 have observed previously unknown stable polar isomers for systems such as (NNO)2 and (OCS)2. The multi-welled floppy nature of the PESs and the small barriers between minima place stringent requirements on the PES for a successful theoretical description of these states. An automated method of generating accurate PESs for vdW systems has been developed and is demonstrated here.5,6 A limited number of ab initio data at the explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b level are interpolated into analytic PESs with negligible fitting error. High-accuracy PESs were developed for a number of systems including (NNO)2, (OCS)2, (CO)2, CO2:CS2 and (NH3)2. Using the PESs, the rovibrational Schrödinger equation is solved with a symmetry-adapted Lanczos algorithm and an uncoupled product basis set. All inter-monomer coordinates are included in the calculations. Calculated transition frequencies are in very close agreement with experiment. References (1) M. Dehghani, M. Afshari, Z. Abusara, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, A. R. W. McKellar, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 164310 (2007). (2) M. Dehghani, M. Afshari, Z. Abusara, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, A. R. W. McKellar, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 071102 (2007). (3) N. R. Walker, R. Nicholas, A. J. Minei, S. E. Novick, A. C. Legon, J. Mol. Spec. 251, 153 (2008). (4) A. J. Minei and S. E. Novick, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 101101 (2007). (5) R. Dawes, X.-G. Wang, A. W. Jasper, T. Carrington Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134304 (2010). (6) X.-G. Wang, T. Carrington Jr., R. Dawes and A. W. Jasper, J. Mol. Spec. 268, 53 (2011).

  16. Accuracy of pitch matching significantly improved by live voice model.

    PubMed

    Granot, Roni Y; Israel-Kolatt, Rona; Gilboa, Avi; Kolatt, Tsafrir

    2013-05-01

    Singing is, undoubtedly, the most fundamental expression of our musical capacity, yet an estimated 10-15% of Western population sings "out-of-tune (OOT)." Previous research in children and adults suggests, albeit inconsistently, that imitating a human voice can improve pitch matching. In the present study, we focus on the potentially beneficial effects of the human voice and especially the live human voice. Eighteen participants varying in their singing abilities were required to imitate in singing a set of nine ascending and descending intervals presented to them in five different randomized blocked conditions: live piano, recorded piano, live voice using optimal voice production, recorded voice using optimal voice production, and recorded voice using artificial forced voice production. Pitch and interval matching in singing were much more accurate when participants repeated sung intervals as compared with intervals played to them on the piano. The advantage of the vocal over the piano stimuli was robust and emerged clearly regardless of whether piano tones were played live and in full view or were presented via recording. Live vocal stimuli elicited higher accuracy than recorded vocal stimuli, especially when the recorded vocal stimuli were produced in a forced vocal production. Remarkably, even those who would be considered OOT singers on the basis of their performance when repeating piano tones were able to pitch match live vocal sounds, with deviations well within the range of what is considered accurate singing (M=46.0, standard deviation=39.2 cents). In fact, those participants who were most OOT gained the most from the live voice model. Results are discussed in light of the dual auditory-motor encoding of pitch analogous to that found in speech.

  17. Accuracy of Sea Surface Topography with GPS Scattered Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuffada, C.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Lowe, S.

    2001-12-01

    The concept of using GPS reflected signals for ocean and land remote sensing is based on the use of one airborne (or space-based) GPS receiver working simultaneously with a constellation of several signal-transmitting GPS satellites. This would offer an advantage in terms of spatial coverage compared to a conventional monostatic radar system and possibly allow new scientific applications to be pursued. However, the limited power of GPS transmitters and a relatively low surface cross section would require either large receiving antennas or longer integration times to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio. Analogously to the case of a conventional radar altimeter, the reflected GPS signal acquired by the receiver is the average power versus time (a range measurement) and generally represents the contributions from surfaces which scatter incoherently. This waveform is derived as a function of viewing geometry, system parameters, surface roughness and dielectric properties of underlying covers. This work investigates the spatial-temporal coherence properties and statistics of the measured reflected GPS signal that describes variability from one sample to another. This information is needed to choose an optimal strategy for a successful signal processing. We examine the above-mentioned properties of the modeled received power as a function of surface state and scattering geometry. Its impact on the accuracy of sea surface topography, both from airborne and orbital platforms is addressed. A characterization of error and expected spatial resolution in relation to existing instruments is discussed. Furthermore, in examining the coherence time, we analyze the spectral behavior of the reflected signal versus sea state parameters, such as wind vector. In addition, we compare the predictions with data available from recent airplane measurements taken in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California obtaining preliminary validations of our models.

  18. Relationship between Leg Mass, Leg Composition and Foot Velocity on Kicking Accuracy in Australian Football

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Nicolas H.; Nimphius, Sophia; Spiteri, Tania; Cochrane, Jodie L.; Newton, Robert U.

    2016-01-01

    Kicking a ball accurately over a desired distance to an intended target is arguably the most important skill to acquire in Australian Football. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms which underpin kicking accuracy is warranted. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leg mass, leg composition and foot velocity on kicking accuracy in Australian Football. Thirty-one Australian Footballers (n = 31; age: 22.1 ± 2.8 years; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m; weight: 85.1 ± 13.0 kg; BMI: 25.9 ± 3.2) each performed ten drop punt kicks over twenty metres to a player target. Athletes were separated into accurate (n = 15) and inaccurate (n = 16) kicking groups. Leg mass characteristics were assessed using whole body DXA scans. Foot velocity was determined using a ten-camera optoelectronic, three-dimensional motion capture system. Interactions between leg mass and foot velocity evident within accurate kickers only (r = -0.670 to -0.701). Relative lean mass was positively correlated with kicking accuracy (r = 0.631), while no relationship between foot velocity and kicking accuracy was evident in isolation (r = -0.047 to -0.083). Given the evident importance of lean mass, and its interaction with foot velocity for accurate kickers; future research should explore speed-accuracy, impulse-variability, limb co-ordination and foot-ball interaction constructs in kicking using controlled with-in subject studies to examine the effects of resistance training and skill acquisition programs on the development of kicking accuracy. Key points Accurate kickers expressed a very strong inverse relationship between leg mass and foot velocity. Inaccurate kickers were unable to replicate this, with greater volatility in their performance, indicating an ability of accurate kickers to mediate foot velocity to compensate for leg mass in order to deliver the ball over the required distance. Accurate kickers exhibited larger quantities of relative lean mass and lower

  19. Relationship between Leg Mass, Leg Composition and Foot Velocity on Kicking Accuracy in Australian Football.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nicolas H; Nimphius, Sophia; Spiteri, Tania; Cochrane, Jodie L; Newton, Robert U

    2016-06-01

    Kicking a ball accurately over a desired distance to an intended target is arguably the most important skill to acquire in Australian Football. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms which underpin kicking accuracy is warranted. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leg mass, leg composition and foot velocity on kicking accuracy in Australian Football. Thirty-one Australian Footballers (n = 31; age: 22.1 ± 2.8 years; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m; weight: 85.1 ± 13.0 kg; BMI: 25.9 ± 3.2) each performed ten drop punt kicks over twenty metres to a player target. Athletes were separated into accurate (n = 15) and inaccurate (n = 16) kicking groups. Leg mass characteristics were assessed using whole body DXA scans. Foot velocity was determined using a ten-camera optoelectronic, three-dimensional motion capture system. Interactions between leg mass and foot velocity evident within accurate kickers only (r = -0.670 to -0.701). Relative lean mass was positively correlated with kicking accuracy (r = 0.631), while no relationship between foot velocity and kicking accuracy was evident in isolation (r = -0.047 to -0.083). Given the evident importance of lean mass, and its interaction with foot velocity for accurate kickers; future research should explore speed-accuracy, impulse-variability, limb co-ordination and foot-ball interaction constructs in kicking using controlled with-in subject studies to examine the effects of resistance training and skill acquisition programs on the development of kicking accuracy. Key pointsAccurate kickers expressed a very strong inverse relationship between leg mass and foot velocity. Inaccurate kickers were unable to replicate this, with greater volatility in their performance, indicating an ability of accurate kickers to mediate foot velocity to compensate for leg mass in order to deliver the ball over the required distance.Accurate kickers exhibited larger quantities of relative lean mass and lower quantities

  20. Evaluating model accuracy for model-based reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Roden, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Described here is an approach to automatically assessing the accuracy of various components of a model. In this approach, actual data from the operation of a target system is used to drive statistical measures to evaluate the prediction accuracy of various portions of the model. We describe how these statistical measures of model accuracy can be used in model-based reasoning for monitoring and design. We then describe the application of these techniques to the monitoring and design of the water recovery system of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) of Space Station Freedom.