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Sample records for accuracy response time

  1. Speed-Accuracy Response Models: Scoring Rules Based on Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; van der Maas, Han

    2012-01-01

    Starting from an explicit scoring rule for time limit tasks incorporating both response time and accuracy, and a definite trade-off between speed and accuracy, a response model is derived. Since the scoring rule is interpreted as a sufficient statistic, the model belongs to the exponential family. The various marginal and conditional distributions…

  2. Distinguishing Fast and Slow Processes in Accuracy - Response Time Data.

    PubMed

    Coomans, Frederik; Hofman, Abe; Brinkhuis, Matthieu; van der Maas, Han L J; Maris, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relation between speed and accuracy within problem solving in its simplest non-trivial form. We consider tests with only two items and code the item responses in two binary variables: one indicating the response accuracy, and one indicating the response speed. Despite being a very basic setup, it enables us to study item pairs stemming from a broad range of domains such as basic arithmetic, first language learning, intelligence-related problems, and chess, with large numbers of observations for every pair of problems under consideration. We carry out a survey over a large number of such item pairs and compare three types of psychometric accuracy-response time models present in the literature: two 'one-process' models, the first of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally independent and the second of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally dependent, and a 'two-process' model which models accuracy contingent on response time. We find that the data clearly violates the restrictions imposed by both one-process models and requires additional complexity which is parsimoniously provided by the two-process model. We supplement our survey with an analysis of the erroneous responses for an example item pair and demonstrate that there are very significant differences between the types of errors in fast and slow responses. PMID:27167518

  3. Modeling Individual Differences in Response Time and Accuracy in Numeracy

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, Roger; Thompson, Clarissa A.; McKoon, Gail

    2015-01-01

    In the study of numeracy, some hypotheses have been based on response time (RT) as a dependent variable and some on accuracy, and considerable controversy has arisen about the presence or absence of correlations between RT and accuracy, between RT or accuracy and individual differences like IQ and math ability, and between various numeracy tasks. In this article, we show that an integration of the two dependent variables is required, which we accomplish with a theory-based model of decision making. We report data from four tasks: numerosity discrimination, number discrimination, memory for two-digit numbers, and memory for three-digit numbers. Accuracy correlated across tasks, as did RTs. However, the negative correlations that might be expected between RT and accuracy were not obtained; if a subject was accurate, it did not mean that they were fast (and vice versa). When the diffusion decision-making model was applied to the data (Ratcliff, 1978), we found significant correlations across the tasks between the quality of the numeracy information (drift rate) driving the decision process and between the speed/ accuracy criterion settings, suggesting that similar numeracy skills and similar speed-accuracy settings are involved in the four tasks. In the model, accuracy is related to drift rate and RT is related to speed-accuracy criteria, but drift rate and criteria are not related to each other across subjects. This provides a theoretical basis for understanding why negative correlations were not obtained between accuracy and RT. We also manipulated criteria by instructing subjects to maximize either speed or accuracy, but still found correlations between the criteria settings between and within tasks, suggesting that the settings may represent an individual trait that can be modulated but not equated across subjects. Our results demonstrate that a decision-making model may provide a way to reconcile inconsistent and sometimes contradictory results in numeracy

  4. A mixture hierarchical model for response times and response accuracy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun; Xu, Gongjun

    2015-11-01

    In real testing, examinees may manifest different types of test-taking behaviours. In this paper we focus on two types that appear to be among the more frequently occurring behaviours – solution behaviour and rapid guessing behaviour. Rapid guessing usually happens in high-stakes tests when there is insufficient time, and in low-stakes tests when there is lack of effort. These two qualitatively different test-taking behaviours, if ignored, will lead to violation of the local independence assumption and, as a result, yield biased item/person parameter estimation. We propose a mixture hierarchical model to account for differences among item responses and response time patterns arising from these two behaviours. The model is also able to identify the specific behaviour an examinee engages in when answering an item. A Monte Carlo expectation maximization algorithm is proposed for model calibration. A simulation study shows that the new model yields more accurate item and person parameter estimates than a non-mixture model when the data indeed come from two types of behaviour. The model also fits real, high-stakes test data better than a non-mixture model, and therefore the new model can better identify the underlying test-taking behaviour an examinee engages in on a certain item. PMID:25873487

  5. Posterior Predictive Checks for Conditional Independence between Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolsinova, Maria; Tijmstra, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Conditional independence (CI) between response time and response accuracy is a fundamental assumption of many joint models for time and accuracy used in educational measurement. In this study, posterior predictive checks (PPCs) are proposed for testing this assumption. These PPCs are based on three discrepancy measures reflecting different…

  6. A Systematic Investigation of Accuracy and Response Time Based Measures Used to Index ANS Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Julia Felicitas; Huber, Stefan; Klein, Elise; Willmes, Klaus; Pixner, Silvia; Moeller, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    The approximate number system (ANS) was proposed to be a building block for later mathematical abilities. Several measures have been used interchangeably to assess ANS acuity. Some of these measures were based on accuracy data, whereas others relied on response time (RT) data or combined accuracy and RT data. Previous studies challenged the view that all these measures can be used interchangeably, because low correlations between some of the measures had been observed. These low correlations might be due to poor reliability of some of the measures, since the majority of these measures are mathematically related. Here we systematically investigated the relationship between common ANS measures while avoiding the potential confound of poor reliability. Our first experiment revealed high correlations between all accuracy based measures supporting the assumption that all of them can be used interchangeably. In contrast, not all RT based measures were highly correlated. Additionally, our results revealed a speed-accuracy trade-off. Thus, accuracy and RT based measures provided conflicting conclusions regarding ANS acuity. Therefore, we investigated in two further experiments which type of measure (accuracy or RT) is more informative about the underlying ANS acuity, depending on participants’ preferences for accuracy or speed. To this end, we manipulated participants’ preferences for accuracy or speed both explicitly using different task instructions and implicitly varying presentation duration. Accuracy based measures were more informative about the underlying ANS acuity than RT based measures. Moreover, the influence of the underlying representations on accuracy data was more pronounced when participants preferred accuracy over speed after the accuracy instruction as well as for long or unlimited presentation durations. Implications regarding the diffusion model as a theoretical framework of dot comparison as well as regarding the relationship between ANS acuity and

  7. A Systematic Investigation of Accuracy and Response Time Based Measures Used to Index ANS Acuity.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Julia Felicitas; Huber, Stefan; Klein, Elise; Willmes, Klaus; Pixner, Silvia; Moeller, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    The approximate number system (ANS) was proposed to be a building block for later mathematical abilities. Several measures have been used interchangeably to assess ANS acuity. Some of these measures were based on accuracy data, whereas others relied on response time (RT) data or combined accuracy and RT data. Previous studies challenged the view that all these measures can be used interchangeably, because low correlations between some of the measures had been observed. These low correlations might be due to poor reliability of some of the measures, since the majority of these measures are mathematically related. Here we systematically investigated the relationship between common ANS measures while avoiding the potential confound of poor reliability. Our first experiment revealed high correlations between all accuracy based measures supporting the assumption that all of them can be used interchangeably. In contrast, not all RT based measures were highly correlated. Additionally, our results revealed a speed-accuracy trade-off. Thus, accuracy and RT based measures provided conflicting conclusions regarding ANS acuity. Therefore, we investigated in two further experiments which type of measure (accuracy or RT) is more informative about the underlying ANS acuity, depending on participants' preferences for accuracy or speed. To this end, we manipulated participants' preferences for accuracy or speed both explicitly using different task instructions and implicitly varying presentation duration. Accuracy based measures were more informative about the underlying ANS acuity than RT based measures. Moreover, the influence of the underlying representations on accuracy data was more pronounced when participants preferred accuracy over speed after the accuracy instruction as well as for long or unlimited presentation durations. Implications regarding the diffusion model as a theoretical framework of dot comparison as well as regarding the relationship between ANS acuity and

  8. The Effect of Intervention on Accuracy of Students' Responses and Reaction Times to Geometry Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babai, Reuven; Zilber, Hanna; Stavy, Ruth; Tirosh, Dina

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect on student performance in drawing their attention to relevant task variables, focusing on accuracy of responses and reaction times. We chose this methodology in order to better understand how such interventions affect the reasoning process. The study employs a geometry task in which the irrelevant salient…

  9. Presentation and response timing accuracy in Adobe Flash and HTML5/JavaScript Web experiments.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Web-based research is becoming ubiquitous in the behavioral sciences, facilitated by convenient, readily available participant pools and relatively straightforward ways of running experiments: most recently, through the development of the HTML5 standard. Although in most studies participants give untimed responses, there is a growing interest in being able to record response times online. Existing data on the accuracy and cross-machine variability of online timing measures are limited, and generally they have compared behavioral data gathered on the Web with similar data gathered in the lab. For this article, we took a more direct approach, examining two ways of running experiments online-Adobe Flash and HTML5 with CSS3 and JavaScript-across 19 different computer systems. We used specialist hardware to measure stimulus display durations and to generate precise response times to visual stimuli in order to assess measurement accuracy, examining effects of duration, browser, and system-to-system variability (such as across different Windows versions), as well as effects of processing power and graphics capability. We found that (a) Flash and JavaScript's presentation and response time measurement accuracy are similar; (b) within-system variability is generally small, even in low-powered machines under high load; (c) the variability of measured response times across systems is somewhat larger; and (d) browser type and system hardware appear to have relatively small effects on measured response times. Modeling of the effects of this technical variability suggests that for most within- and between-subjects experiments, Flash and JavaScript can both be used to accurately detect differences in response times across conditions. Concerns are, however, noted about using some correlational or longitudinal designs online.

  10. Presentation and response timing accuracy in Adobe Flash and HTML5/JavaScript Web experiments.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Web-based research is becoming ubiquitous in the behavioral sciences, facilitated by convenient, readily available participant pools and relatively straightforward ways of running experiments: most recently, through the development of the HTML5 standard. Although in most studies participants give untimed responses, there is a growing interest in being able to record response times online. Existing data on the accuracy and cross-machine variability of online timing measures are limited, and generally they have compared behavioral data gathered on the Web with similar data gathered in the lab. For this article, we took a more direct approach, examining two ways of running experiments online-Adobe Flash and HTML5 with CSS3 and JavaScript-across 19 different computer systems. We used specialist hardware to measure stimulus display durations and to generate precise response times to visual stimuli in order to assess measurement accuracy, examining effects of duration, browser, and system-to-system variability (such as across different Windows versions), as well as effects of processing power and graphics capability. We found that (a) Flash and JavaScript's presentation and response time measurement accuracy are similar; (b) within-system variability is generally small, even in low-powered machines under high load; (c) the variability of measured response times across systems is somewhat larger; and (d) browser type and system hardware appear to have relatively small effects on measured response times. Modeling of the effects of this technical variability suggests that for most within- and between-subjects experiments, Flash and JavaScript can both be used to accurately detect differences in response times across conditions. Concerns are, however, noted about using some correlational or longitudinal designs online. PMID:24903687

  11. A phase transition model for the speed-accuracy trade-off in response time experiments.

    PubMed

    Dutilh, Gilles; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Visser, Ingmar; van der Maas, Han L J

    2011-03-01

    Most models of response time (RT) in elementary cognitive tasks implicitly assume that the speed-accuracy trade-off is continuous: When payoffs or instructions gradually increase the level of speed stress, people are assumed to gradually sacrifice response accuracy in exchange for gradual increases in response speed. This trade-off presumably operates over the entire range from accurate but slow responding to fast but chance-level responding (i.e., guessing). In this article, we challenge the assumption of continuity and propose a phase transition model for RTs and accuracy. Analogous to the fast guess model (Ollman, 1966), our model postulates two modes of processing: a guess mode and a stimulus-controlled mode. From catastrophe theory, we derive two important predictions that allow us to test our model against the fast guess model and against the popular class of sequential sampling models. The first prediction--hysteresis in the transitions between guessing and stimulus-controlled behavior--was confirmed in an experiment that gradually changed the reward for speed versus accuracy. The second prediction--bimodal RT distributions--was confirmed in an experiment that required participants to respond in a way that is intermediate between guessing and accurate responding.

  12. A PC parallel port button box provides millisecond response time accuracy under Linux.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Neil

    2006-02-01

    For psychologists, it is sometimes necessary to measure people's reaction times to the nearest millisecond. This article describes how to use the PC parallel port to receive signals from a button box to achieve millisecond response time accuracy. The workings of the parallel port, the corresponding port addresses, and a simple Linux program for controlling the port are described. A test of the speed and reliability of button box signal detection is reported. If the reader is moderately familiar with Linux, this article should provide sufficient instruction for him or her to build and test his or her own parallel port button box. This article also describes how the parallel port could be used to control an external apparatus.

  13. The Effects of Spatial Stimulus-Response Compatibility on Choice Time Production Accuracy and Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakitin, Brian C.

    2005-01-01

    Five experiments examined the relations between timing and attention using a choice time production task in which the latency of a spatial choice response is matched to a target interval (3 or 5 s). Experiments 1 and 2 indicated that spatial stimulus-response incompatibility increased nonscalar timing variability without affecting timing accuracy…

  14. An Accuracy--Response Time Capacity Assessment Function that Measures Performance against Standard Parallel Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, James T.; Altieri, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Measures of human efficiency under increases in mental workload or attentional limitations are vital in studying human perception, cognition, and action. Assays of efficiency as workload changes have typically been confined to either reaction times (RTs) or accuracy alone. Within the realm of RTs, a nonparametric measure called the "workload…

  15. Beyond Test Accuracy: Benefits of Measuring Response Time in Computerised Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gvozdenko, Eugene; Chambers, Dianne

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates how monitoring the time spent on a question in a test of basic mathematics skills can provide insights into learning processes, the quality of test takers' knowledge, and cognitive demands and performance of test items that otherwise would remain undiscovered if the usual test outcome of accuracy only format…

  16. A Semiparametric Model for Jointly Analyzing Response Times and Accuracy in Computerized Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Fan, Zhewen; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The item response times (RTs) collected from computerized testing represent an underutilized type of information about items and examinees. In addition to knowing the examinees' responses to each item, we can investigate the amount of time examinees spend on each item. Current models for RTs mainly focus on parametric models, which have the…

  17. Accuracy and response time of a portable pulse oximeter. The Pulsox-7 with a finger probe.

    PubMed

    Modica, R; Rizzo, A

    1991-01-01

    We studied the performance of a portable pulse oximeter in 123 consecutive adult patients by spot-checking with a finger probe and by spectrophotometry of oxygen saturation on a simultaneous arterial blood sample. 88 patients were overtly hypoxemic (HbO2 less than 90%) and 26 showed severe hypoxemia (HbO2 36-70%). The differences between the two methods showed a skewed distribution with a positive tail due to the over-estimation of lower saturation values by the pulse oximeter. Overall, the 95% confidence interval for the median difference ranged from -0.6 to +0.5%. The limits of agreement (distribution-free 95% confidence interval for the sample) were -5.8 to +11.6%. Pulse oximetry can be recommended as a first assessment of the respiratory balance only if a cut-off value of HbO2 equal to 90% in nonsmoking, air-breathing subjects is acceptable. The finger probe implies a response delay of approximately 30 s, making the instrument rather insensitive to short hypoxemic transients. With a predictive value around 90%, the pulse oximeter may be a useful portable screening tool. PMID:1745847

  18. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  19. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-05-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  20. Brief report: accuracy and response time for the recognition of facial emotions in a large sample of children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Fink, Elian; de Rosnay, Marc; Wierda, Marlies; Koot, Hans M; Begeer, Sander

    2014-09-01

    The empirical literature has presented inconsistent evidence for deficits in the recognition of basic emotion expressions in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which may be due to the focus on research with relatively small sample sizes. Additionally, it is proposed that although children with ASD may correctly identify emotion expression they rely on more deliberate, more time-consuming strategies in order to accurately recognize emotion expressions when compared to typically developing children. In the current study, we examine both emotion recognition accuracy and response time in a large sample of children, and explore the moderating influence of verbal ability on these findings. The sample consisted of 86 children with ASD (M age = 10.65) and 114 typically developing children (M age = 10.32) between 7 and 13 years of age. All children completed a pre-test (emotion word-word matching), and test phase consisting of basic emotion recognition, whereby they were required to match a target emotion expression to the correct emotion word; accuracy and response time were recorded. Verbal IQ was controlled for in the analyses. We found no evidence of a systematic deficit in emotion recognition accuracy or response time for children with ASD, controlling for verbal ability. However, when controlling for children's accuracy in word-word matching, children with ASD had significantly lower emotion recognition accuracy when compared to typically developing children. The findings suggest that the social impairments observed in children with ASD are not the result of marked deficits in basic emotion recognition accuracy or longer response times. However, children with ASD may be relying on other perceptual skills (such as advanced word-word matching) to complete emotion recognition tasks at a similar level as typically developing children.

  1. Effects of Age and Task Load on Drivers’ Response Accuracy and Reaction Time When Responding to Traffic Lights

    PubMed Central

    Salvia, Emilie; Petit, Claire; Champely, Stéphane; Chomette, René; Di Rienzo, Franck; Collet, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Due to population aging, elderly drivers represent an increasing proportion of car drivers. Yet, how aging alters sensorimotor functions and impacts driving safety remains poorly understood. This paper aimed at assessing to which extent elderly drivers are sensitive to various task loads and how this affects the reaction time (RT) in a driving context. Old and middle-aged people completed RT tasks which reproduced cognitive demands encountered while driving. Participants had to detect and respond to traffic lights or traffic light arrows as quickly as possible, under three experimental conditions of incremental difficulty. In both groups, we hypothesized that decision-making would be impacted by the number of cues to be processed. The first test was a simple measure of RT. The second and third tests were choice RT tasks requiring the processing of 3 and 5 cues, respectively. Responses were collected within a 2 s time-window. Otherwise, the trial was considered a no-response. In both groups, the data revealed that RT, error rate (incorrect answers), and no-response rate increased along with task difficulty. However, the middle-aged group outperformed the elderly group. The RT difference between the two groups increased drastically along with task difficulty. In the third test, the rate of no-response suggested that elderly drivers needed more than 2 s to process complex information and respond accurately. Both prolonged RT and increased no-response rate, especially for difficult tasks, might attest an impairment of cognitive abilities in relation to aging. Accordingly, casual driving conditions for young drivers may be particularly complex and stressful for elderly people who should thus be informed about the effects of normal aging upon driving. PMID:27462266

  2. Time and position accuracy using codeless GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. E.; Jefferson, D. C.; Lichten, S. M.; Thomas, J. B.; Vigue, Y.; Young, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System has allowed scientists and engineers to make measurements having accuracy far beyond the original 15 meter goal of the system. Using global networks of P-Code capable receivers and extensive post-processing, geodesists have achieved baseline precision of a few parts per billion, and clock offsets have been measured at the nanosecond level over intercontinental distances. A cloud hangs over this picture, however. The Department of Defense plans to encrypt the P-Code (called Anti-Spoofing, or AS) in the fall of 1993. After this event, geodetic and time measurements will have to be made using codeless GPS receivers. However, there appears to be a silver lining to the cloud. In response to the anticipated encryption of the P-Code, the geodetic and GPS receiver community has developed some remarkably effective means of coping with AS without classified information. We will discuss various codeless techniques currently available and the data noise resulting from each. We will review some geodetic results obtained using only codeless data, and discuss the implications for time measurements. Finally, we will present the status of GPS research at JPL in relation to codeless clock measurements.

  3. Accuracy metrics for judging time scale algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Jacques, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time scales have been constructed in different ways to meet the many demands placed upon them for time accuracy, frequency accuracy, long-term stability, and robustness. Usually, no single time scale is optimum for all purposes. In the context of the impending availability of high-accuracy intermittently-operated cesium fountains, we reconsider the question of evaluating the accuracy of time scales which use an algorithm to span interruptions of the primary standard. We consider a broad class of calibration algorithms that can be evaluated and compared quantitatively for their accuracy in the presence of frequency drift and a full noise model (a mixture of white PM, flicker PM, white FM, flicker FM, and random walk FM noise). We present the analytic techniques for computing the standard uncertainty for the full noise model and this class of calibration algorithms. The simplest algorithm is evaluated to find the average-frequency uncertainty arising from the noise of the cesium fountain's local oscillator and from the noise of a hydrogen maser transfer-standard. This algorithm and known noise sources are shown to permit interlaboratory frequency transfer with a standard uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15) for periods of 30-100 days.

  4. Accuracy, precision and response time of consumer fork, remote digital probe and disposable indicator thermometers for cooked ground beef patties and chicken breasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine different commercially available instant-read consumer thermometers (forks, remotes, digital probe and disposable color change indicators) were tested for accuracy and precision compared to a calibrated thermocouple in 80 percent and 90 percent lean ground beef patties, and boneless and bone-in...

  5. Lexical and Sub-Lexical Effects on Accuracy, Reaction Time and Response Duration: Impaired and Typical Word and Pseudoword Reading in a Transparent Orthography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Robert; Rodriguez-Ferreiro, Javier; Suarez, Paz; Cuetos, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    In an opaque orthography like English, phonological coding errors are a prominent feature of dyslexia. In a transparent orthography like Spanish, reading difficulties are characterized by slower reading speed rather than reduced accuracy. In previous research, the reading speed deficit was revealed by asking children to read lists of words.…

  6. Speed accuracy trade-off under response deadlines

    PubMed Central

    Karşılar, Hakan; Simen, Patrick; Papadakis, Samantha; Balcı, Fuat

    2014-01-01

    Perceptual decision making has been successfully modeled as a process of evidence accumulation up to a threshold. In order to maximize the rewards earned for correct responses in tasks with response deadlines, participants should collapse decision thresholds dynamically during each trial so that a decision is reached before the deadline. This strategy ensures on-time responding, though at the cost of reduced accuracy, since slower decisions are based on lower thresholds and less net evidence later in a trial (compared to a constant threshold). Frazier and Yu (2008) showed that the normative rate of threshold reduction depends on deadline delays and on participants' uncertainty about these delays. Participants should start collapsing decision thresholds earlier when making decisions under shorter deadlines (for a given level of timing uncertainty) or when timing uncertainty is higher (for a given deadline). We tested these predictions using human participants in a random dot motion discrimination task. Each participant was tested in free-response, short deadline (800 ms), and long deadline conditions (1000 ms). Contrary to optimal-performance predictions, the resulting empirical function relating accuracy to response time (RT) in deadline conditions did not decline to chance level near the deadline; nor did the slight decline we typically observed relate to measures of endogenous timing uncertainty. Further, although this function did decline slightly with increasing RT, the decline was explainable by the best-fitting parameterization of Ratcliff's diffusion model (Ratcliff, 1978), whose parameters are constant within trials. Our findings suggest that at the very least, typical decision durations are too short for participants to adapt decision parameters within trials. PMID:25177265

  7. Acoustic environmental accuracy requirements for response determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettitt, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    A general purpose computer program was developed for the prediction of vehicle interior noise. This program, named VIN, has both modal and statistical energy analysis capabilities for structural/acoustic interaction analysis. The analytic models and their computer implementation were verified through simple test cases with well-defined experimental results. The model was also applied in a space shuttle payload bay launch acoustics prediction study. The computer program processes large and small problems with equal efficiency because all arrays are dynamically sized by program input variables at run time. A data base is built and easily accessed for design studies. The data base significantly reduces the computational costs of such studies by allowing the reuse of the still-valid calculated parameters of previous iterations.

  8. COMPASS time synchronization and dissemination—Toward centimetre positioning accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZhengBo; Zhao, Lu; Wang, ShiGuang; Zhang, JianWei; Wang, Bo; Wang, LiJun

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we investigate methods to achieve highly accurate time synchronization among the satellites of the COMPASS global navigation satellite system (GNSS). Owing to the special design of COMPASS which implements several geo-stationary satellites (GEO), time synchronization can be highly accurate via microwave links between ground stations to the GEO satellites. Serving as space-borne relay stations, the GEO satellites can further disseminate time and frequency signals to other satellites such as the inclined geo-synchronous (IGSO) and mid-earth orbit (MEO) satellites within the system. It is shown that, because of the accuracy in clock synchronization, the theoretical accuracy of COMPASS positioning and navigation will surpass that of the GPS. In addition, the COMPASS system can function with its entire positioning, navigation, and time-dissemination services even without the ground link, thus making it much more robust and secure. We further show that time dissemination using the COMPASS-GEO satellites to earth-fixed stations can achieve very high accuracy, to reach 100 ps in time dissemination and 3 cm in positioning accuracy, respectively. In this paper, we also analyze two feasible synchronization plans. All special and general relativistic effects related to COMPASS clocks frequency and time shifts are given. We conclude that COMPASS can reach centimeter-level positioning accuracy and discuss potential applications.

  9. The movement speed-accuracy relation in space-time.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Liu, Yeou-Teh; Mayer-Kress, Gottfried; Newell, Karl M

    2013-02-01

    Two experiments investigated a new approach to decomposing the contributions of spatial and temporal constraints to an integrated single space-time performance score in the movement speed-accuracy relation of a line drawing task. The mean and variability of the space-time performance error score were lowest when the task space and time constraint contributions to the performance score were comparable (i.e., middle range of velocities). As the contribution of either space or time to the performance score became increasingly asymmetrical at lower and higher average velocities, the mean performance error score and its variability increased with a greater trade-off between spatial and temporal movement properties. The findings revealed a new U-shaped space-time speed-accuracy function for performance outcome in tasks that have both spatial and temporal demands. The traditional speed-accuracy functions for spatial error and temporal error considered independently map to this integrated space-time movement speed-accuracy function.

  10. Accuracy of Pedometer Steps and Time for Youth with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Combs, Cindy; Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Morgan, Melinda; Bryan, Rebecca R.; Foley, John T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the accuracy of pedometer steps and activity time (Walk4Life, WL) for youth with developmental disabilities. Eighteen youth (11 girls, 7 boys) 4-14 years completed six 80-meter self-paced walking trials while wearing a pedometer at five waist locations (front right, front left, back right, back left, middle…

  11. Timing of spacecraft date: Time accuracy requirements and timing facilities of the European Space Agency (ESA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworak, H. P.

    1985-04-01

    The time accuracy requirements for various European Space Agency (ESA) missions are analyzed; the requirements are grouped by the type of mission. The evolution of satellite timing techniques since 1968 is shown, and the requirements for future ESA missions (until the late 1980's) are assessed. Timing systems and their configuration at various ESA ground stations and the operations control centers are described. Two studies on future techniques in the field of time dissemination and time synchronization conclude this paper: The LASSO mission (Laser Synchronization from Stationary Orbit) and a low-cost time dissemination technique using METEOSAT, the European meteorological satellites, are briefly outlined.

  12. Effects of Accuracy Feedback on Fractal Characteristics of Time Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Wallot, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The current experiment investigated the effect of visual accuracy feedback on the structure of variability of time interval estimates in the continuation tapping paradigm. Participants were asked to repeatedly estimate a 1-s interval for a prolonged period of time by tapping their index finger. In some conditions, participants received accuracy feedback after every estimate, whereas in other conditions, no feedback was given. Also, the likelihood of receiving visual feedback was manipulated by adjusting the tolerance band around the 1-s target interval so that feedback was displayed only if the temporal estimate deviated from the target interval by more than 50, 100, or 200 ms respectively. We analyzed the structure of variability of the inter-tap intervals with fractal and multifractal methods that allow for a quantification of complex long-range correlation patterns in the timing performance. Our results indicate that feedback changes the long-range correlation structure of time estimates: Increased amounts of feedback lead to a decrease in fractal long-range correlations, as well to a decrease in the magnitude of local fluctuations in the performance. The multifractal characteristics of the time estimates were not impacted by the presence of accuracy feedback. Nevertheless, most of the data sets show significant multifractal signatures. We interpret these findings as showing that feedback acts to constrain and possibly reorganize timing performance. Implications for mechanistic and complex systems-based theories of timing behavior are discussed. PMID:22046149

  13. Improved time-domain accuracy standards for model gravitational waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, Lee; Baker, John G.

    2010-10-15

    Model gravitational waveforms must be accurate enough to be useful for detection of signals and measurement of their parameters, so appropriate accuracy standards are needed. Yet these standards should not be unnecessarily restrictive, making them impractical for the numerical and analytical modelers to meet. The work of Lindblom, Owen, and Brown [Phys. Rev. D 78, 124020 (2008)] is extended by deriving new waveform accuracy standards which are significantly less restrictive while still ensuring the quality needed for gravitational-wave data analysis. These new standards are formulated as bounds on certain norms of the time-domain waveform errors, which makes it possible to enforce them in situations where frequency-domain errors may be difficult or impossible to estimate reliably. These standards are less restrictive by about a factor of 20 than the previously published time-domain standards for detection, and up to a factor of 60 for measurement. These new standards should therefore be much easier to use effectively.

  14. A Measurement Model for Likert Responses that Incorporates Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a model for response times that is proposed as a supplement to the usual factor-analytic model for responses to graded or more continuous typical-response items. The use of the proposed model together with the factor model provides additional information about the respondent and can potentially increase the accuracy of the…

  15. Operating a real time high accuracy positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Hanley, J.; Russell, D.; Vooght, A.

    2003-04-01

    The paper shall review the history and development of real time DGPS services prior to then describing the design of a high accuracy GPS commercial augmentation system and service currently delivering over a wide area to users of precise positioning products. The infrastructure and system shall be explained in relation to the need for high accuracy and high integrity of positioning for users. A comparison of the different techniques for the delivery of data shall be provided to outline the technical approach taken. Examples of the performance of the real time system shall be shown in various regions and modes to outline the current achievable accuracies. Having described and established the current GPS based situation, a review of the potential of the Galileo system shall be presented. Following brief contextual information relating to the Galileo project, core system and services, the paper will identify possible key applications and the main user communities for sub decimetre level precise positioning. The paper will address the Galileo and modernised GPS signals in space that are relevant to commercial precise positioning for the future and will discuss the implications for precise positioning performance. An outline of the proposed architecture shall be described and associated with pointers towards a successful implementation. Central to this discussion will be an assessment of the likely evolution of system infrastructure and user equipment implementation, prospects for new applications and their effect upon the business case for precise positioning services.

  16. Accuracy Assessment in rainfall upscaling in multiple time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Wang, C.; Lin, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Long-term hydrologic parameters, e.g. annual precipitations, are usually used to represent the general hydrologic characteristics in a region. Recently, the analysis of the impact of climate change to hydrological patterns primarily relies on the measurement and/or the estimations in long time scales, e.g. year. Under the general condition of the prevalence of short-term measurements, therefore, it is important to understand the accuracy of upscaling for the long-term estimations of hydrologic parameters. This study applies spatiotemporal geostatistical method to analyze and discuss the accuracy of precipitation upscaling in Taiwan under the different time scales, and also quantifies the uncertainty in the upscaled long-term precipitations. In this study, two space-time upscaling approaches developed by Bayesian Maximum Entropy method (BME) are presented 1) UM1: data aggregation followed by BME estimation and 2) UM2: BME estimation followed by aggregation. The investigation and comparison are also implemented to assess the performance of the rainfall estimations in multiple time scales in Taiwan by the two upscaling. Keywords: upscaling, geostatistics, BME, uncertainty analysis

  17. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  18. Accuracy of real time radiography burning rate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaniyi, Bisola

    The design of a solid propellant rocket motor requires the determination of a propellant's burning-rate and its dependency upon environmental parameters. The requirement that the burning-rate be physically measured, establishes the need for methods and equipment to obtain such data. A literature review reveals that no measurement has provided the desired burning rate accuracy. In the current study, flash x-ray modeling and digitized film-density data were employed to predict motor-port area to length ratio. The pre-fired port-areas and base burning rate were within 2.5% and 1.2% of their known values, respectively. To verify the accuracy of the method, a continuous x-ray and a solid propellant rocket motor model (Plexiglas cylinder) were used. The solid propellant motor model was translated laterally through a real-time radiography system at different speeds simulating different burning rates. X-ray images were captured and the burning-rate was then determined. The measured burning rate was within 1.65% of the known values.

  19. Time-resolved spectral imaging: better photon economy, higher accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Reitsma, Keimpe; Blab, Gerhard A.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2015-03-01

    Lifetime and spectral imaging are complementary techniques that offer a non-invasive solution for monitoring metabolic processes, identifying biochemical compounds, and characterizing their interactions in biological tissues, among other tasks. Newly developed instruments that perform time-resolved spectral imaging can provide even more information and reach higher sensitivity than either modality alone. Here we report a multispectral lifetime imaging system based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), capable of operating at high photon count rates (12 MHz) per spectral detection channel, and with time resolution of 200 ps. We performed error analyses to investigate the effect of gate width and spectral-channel width on the accuracy of estimated lifetimes and spectral widths. Temporal and spectral phasors were used for analysis of recorded data, and we demonstrated blind un-mixing of the fluorescent components using information from both modalities. Fractional intensities, spectra, and decay curves of components were extracted without need for prior information. We further tested this approach with fluorescently doubly-labeled DNA, and demonstrated its suitability for accurately estimating FRET efficiency in the presence of either non-interacting or interacting donor molecules.

  20. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions – Changes in Accuracy over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interest in 3D inertial motion tracking devices (AHRS) has been growing rapidly among the biomechanical community. Although the convenience of such tracking devices seems to open a whole new world of possibilities for evaluation in clinical biomechanics, its limitations haven’t been extensively documented. The objectives of this study are: 1) to assess the change in absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of 3 commercially available AHRS over time; and 2) to identify different sources of errors affecting AHRS accuracy and to document how they may affect the measurements over time. Methods This study used an instrumented Gimbal table on which AHRS modules were carefully attached and put through a series of velocity-controlled sustained motions including 2 minutes motion trials (2MT) and 12 minutes multiple dynamic phases motion trials (12MDP). Absolute accuracy was assessed by comparison of the AHRS orientation measurements to those of an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was evaluated using the variation in relative orientation between modules during the trials. Findings Both absolute and relative accuracy decreased over time during 2MT. 12MDP trials showed a significant decrease in accuracy over multiple phases, but accuracy could be enhanced significantly by resetting the reference point and/or compensating for initial Inertial frame estimation reference for each phase. Interpretation The variation in AHRS accuracy observed between the different systems and with time can be attributed in part to the dynamic estimation error, but also and foremost, to the ability of AHRS units to locate the same Inertial frame. Conclusions Mean accuracies obtained under the Gimbal table sustained conditions of motion suggest that AHRS are promising tools for clinical mobility assessment under constrained conditions of use. However, improvement in magnetic compensation and alignment between AHRS modules are desirable in order for AHRS to reach their

  1. Modeling Reaction Time and Accuracy of Multiple-Alternative Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fábio P.; Ratcliff, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Several sequential sampling models using racing diffusion processes for multiple-alternative decisions were evaluated using data from two perceptual discrimination experiments. The structures of the models differed on a number of dimensions, including whether there was lateral inhibition between accumulators, whether there was decay in evidence, whether evidence could be negative, and whether there was variability in starting points. Data were collected from a letter discrimination task in which stimulus difficulty and probability of the response alternatives were varied along with number of response alternatives. Model fitting results ruled out a large number of model classes in favor of a smaller number of specific models, most of which showed a moderate to high degree of mimicking. The best-fitting models had zero to moderate values of decay, no inhibition, and assumed that the addition of alternatives either affected the subprocesses contributing to the nondecisional time, the degree of caution, or the quality of evidence extracted from stimuli. PMID:20045893

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of the bronchodilator response in children

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Sze Man; Gold, Diane R.; Sordillo, Joanne E.; Hoffman, Elaine B.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Weiss, Scott T.; Litonjua, Augusto A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The bronchodilator response (BDR) reflects the reversibility of airflow obstruction and is recommended as an adjunctive test to diagnose asthma. The validity of the commonly used definition of BDR, a 12% or greater change in FEV1 from baseline, has been questioned in childhood. Objectives We sought to examine the diagnostic accuracy of the BDR test by using 3 large pediatric cohorts. Methods Cases include 1041 children with mild-to-moderate asthma from the Childhood Asthma Management Program. Control subjects (nonasthmatic and nonwheezing) were chosen from Project Viva and Home Allergens, 2 population-based pediatric cohorts. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed, and areas under the curve were calculated for different BDR cutoffs. Results A total of 1041 cases (59.7% male; mean age, 8.9 ± 2.1 years) and 250 control subjects (46.8% male; mean age, 8.7 ± 1.7 years) were analyzed, with mean BDRs of 10.7% ± 10.2% and 2.7% ± 8.4%, respectively. The BDR test differentiated asthmatic patients from nonasthmatic patients with a moderate accuracy (area under the curve, 73.3%). Despite good specificity, a cutoff of 12% was associated with poor sensitivity (35.6%). A cutoff of less than 8% performed significantly better than a cutoff of 12% (P = .03, 8% vs 12%). Conclusions Our findings highlight the poor sensitivity associated with the commonly used 12% cutoff for BDR. Although our data show that a threshold of less than 8% performs better than 12%, given the variability of this test in children, we conclude that it might be not be appropriate to choose a specific BDR cutoff as a criterion for the diagnosis of asthma. PMID:23683464

  3. Accuracy vs. computational time: translating aortic simulations to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alistair G; Shi, Yubing; Marzo, Alberto; Staicu, Cristina; Valverde, Isra; Beerbaum, Philipp; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney

    2012-02-01

    State of the art simulations of aortic haemodynamics feature full fluid-structure interaction (FSI) and coupled 0D boundary conditions. Such analyses require not only significant computational resource but also weeks to months of run time, which compromises the effectiveness of their translation to a clinical workflow. This article employs three computational fluid methodologies, of varying levels of complexity with coupled 0D boundary conditions, to simulate the haemodynamics within a patient-specific aorta. The most comprehensive model is a full FSI simulation. The simplest is a rigid walled incompressible fluid simulation while an alternative middle-ground approach employs a compressible fluid, tuned to elicit a response analogous to the compliance of the aortic wall. The results demonstrate that, in the context of certain clinical questions, the simpler analysis methods may capture the important characteristics of the flow field.

  4. Accuracy Assessment of Response Surface Approximations for Supersonic Turbine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papila, Nilay; Papila, Melih; Shyy, Wei; Haftka, Raphael T.; FitzCoy, Norman

    2001-01-01

    There is a growing trend to employ CFD tools to supply the necessary information for design optimization of fluid dynamics components/systems. Such results are prone to uncertainties due to reasons including discretization. errors, incomplete convergence of computational procedures, and errors associated with physical models such as turbulence closures. Based on this type of information, gradient-based optimization algorithms often suffer from the noisy calculations, which can seriously compromise the outcome. Similar problems arise from the experimental measurements. Global optimization techniques, such as those based on the response surface (RS) concept are becoming popular in part because they can overcome some of these barriers. However, there are also fundamental issues related to such global optimization technique such as RS. For example, in high dimensional design spaces, typically only a small number of function evaluations are available due to computational and experimental costs. On the other hand, complex features of the design variables do not allow one to model the global characteristics of the design space with simple quadratic polynomials. Consequently a main challenge is to reduce the size of the region where we fit the RS, or make it more accurate in the regions where the optimum is likely to reside. Response Surface techniques using either polynomials or and Neural Network (NN) methods offer designers alternatives to conduct design optimization. The RS technique employs statistical and numerical techniques to establish the relationship between design variables and objective/constraint functions, typically using polynomials. In this study, we aim at addressing issues related to the following questions: (1) How to identify outliers associated with a given RS representation and improve the RS model via appropriate treatments? (2) How to focus on selected design data so that RS can give better performance in regions critical to design optimization? (3

  5. Response times to conceptual questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Watkins, Jessica; Mazur, Eric; Ibrahim, Ahmed

    2013-09-01

    We measured the time taken by students to respond to individual Force Concept Inventory (FCI) questions. We examine response time differences between correct and incorrect answers, both before and after instruction. We also determine the relation between response time and expressed confidence. Our data reveal three results of interest. First, response times are longer for incorrect answers than for correct ones, indicating that distractors are not automatic choices. Second, response times increase after instruction for both correct and incorrect answers, supporting the notion that instruction changes students' approach to conceptual questions. Third, response times are inversely related to students' expressed confidence; the lower their confidence, the longer it takes to respond.

  6. Advantages of improved timing accuracy in PET cameras using LSOscintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2002-12-02

    PET scanners based on LSO have the potential forsignificantly better coincidence timing resolution than the 6 ns fwhmtypically achieved with BGO. This study analyzes the performanceenhancements made possible by improved timing as a function of thecoincidence time resolution. If 500 ps fwhm coincidence timing resolutioncan be achieved in a complete PET camera, the following four benefits canbe realized for whole-body FDG imaging: 1) The random event rate can bereduced by using a narrower coincidence timing window, increasing thepeak NECR by~;50 percent. 2) Using time-of-flight in the reconstructionalgorithm will reduce the noise variance by a factor of 5. 3) Emissionand transmission data can be acquired simultaneously, reducing the totalscan time. 4) Axial blurring can be reduced by using time-of-flight todetermine the correct axial plane that each event originated from. Whiletime-of-flight was extensively studied in the 1980's, practical factorslimited its effectiveness at that time and little attention has been paidto timing in PET since then. As these potential improvements aresubstantial and the advent of LSO PET cameras gives us the means toobtain them without other sacrifices, efforts to improve PET timingshould resume after their long dormancy.

  7. Effects of Interviewer Behavior on Accuracy of Children's Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparling, Jessica; Wilder, David A.; Kondash, Jennifer; Boyle, Megan; Compton, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that certain interviewer behaviors can evoke inaccurate answers by children. In the current study, we examined the effects of approving and disapproving statements on the accuracy of 3 children's answers to questions in an interview (Experiment 1). We then evaluated 3 questioning techniques that may be used by…

  8. An Evaluation of Item Response Theory Classification Accuracy and Consistency Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Hao, Shiqi

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces two new classification consistency indices that can be used when item response theory (IRT) models have been applied. The new indices are shown to be related to Rudner's classification accuracy index and Guo's classification accuracy index. The Rudner- and Guo-based classification accuracy and consistency indices are…

  9. Accuracy in Recalling Interest Inventory Information at Three Time Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Jane L.; Gore, Paul A., Jr.; Leuwerke, Wade; D'Achiardi, Catalina; Edwards, Jorie Hitch; Edwards, Jared

    2006-01-01

    Rates of accurate recall of the Strong Interest Inventory (SII; L. W. Harmon, J. C. Hansen, F. H. Borgen, & A. L. Hammer, 1994) profile information varied with the amount of time elapsed since the interpretation, the type of SII scale, and whether immediate recall was elicited, but rates did not vary with the strategy used to provide the…

  10. Is Empathic Accuracy Enough to Facilitate Responsive Behavior in Dyadic Interaction? Distinguishing Ability From Motivation.

    PubMed

    Winczewski, Lauren A; Bowen, Jeffrey D; Collins, Nancy L

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that interpersonal responsiveness-feeling understood, validated, and cared for by other people-plays a key role in shaping the quality of one's social interactions and relationships. But what enables people to be interpersonally responsive to others? In the current study, we argued that responsiveness requires not only accurate understanding but also compassionate motivation. Specifically, we hypothesized that understanding another person's thoughts and feelings (empathic accuracy) would foster responsive behavior only when paired with benevolent motivation (empathic concern). To test this idea, we asked couples (N = 91) to discuss a personal or relationship stressor; we then assessed empathic accuracy, empathic concern, and responsive behavior. As predicted, when listeners' empathic concern was high, empathic accuracy facilitated responsiveness; but when empathic concern was low, empathic accuracy was unhelpful (and possibly harmful) for responsiveness. These findings provide the first evidence that cognitive and affective forms of empathy work together to facilitate responsive behavior. PMID:26847609

  11. Real-time lens distortion correction: speed, accuracy and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Michael R.; Shahidi, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Optical lens systems suffer from nonlinear geometrical distortion. Optical imaging applications such as image-enhanced endoscopy and image-based bronchoscope tracking require correction of this distortion for accurate localization, tracking, registration, and measurement of image features. Real-time capability is desirable for interactive systems and live video. The use of a texture-mapping graphics accelerator, which is standard hardware on current motherboard chipsets and add-in video graphics cards, to perform distortion correction is proposed. Mesh generation for image tessellation, an error analysis, and performance results are presented. It is shown that distortion correction using commodity graphics hardware is substantially faster than using the main processor and can be performed at video frame rates (faster than 30 frames per second), and that the polar-based method of mesh generation proposed here is more accurate than a conventional grid-based approach. Using graphics hardware to perform distortion correction is not only fast and accurate but also efficient as it frees the main processor for other tasks, which is an important issue in some real-time applications.

  12. The accuracy of telling time via oscillatory signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Michele; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter

    2016-06-01

    Circadian clocks are the central timekeepers of life, allowing cells to anticipate changes between day and night. Experiments in recent years have revealed that circadian clocks can be highly stable, raising the question how reliably they can be read out. Here, we combine mathematical modeling with information theory to address the question how accurately a cell can infer the time from an ensemble of protein oscillations, which are driven by a circadian clock. We show that the precision increases with the number of oscillations and their amplitude relative to their noise. Our analysis also reveals that their exists an optimal phase relation that minimizes the error in the estimate of time, which depends on the relative noise levels of the protein oscillations. Lastly, our work shows that cross-correlations in the noise of the protein oscillations can enhance the mutual information, which suggests that cross-regulatory interactions between the proteins that read out the clock can be beneficial for temporal information transmission.

  13. A Joint Modeling Approach for Reaction Time and Accuracy in Psycholinguistic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeys, T.; Rosseel, Y.; Baten, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the psycholinguistic literature, reaction times and accuracy can be analyzed separately using mixed (logistic) effects models with crossed random effects for item and subject. Given the potential correlation between these two outcomes, a joint model for the reaction time and accuracy may provide further insight. In this paper, a Bayesian…

  14. Verification of concentration time formulae accuracy in Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas Ferreira, Pedro; Allasia, Daniel; Herbstrith Froemming, Gabriel; Ribeiro Fontoura, Jessica; Tassi, Rutineia

    2016-04-01

    The time of concentration (TC) of an urban catchment is a fundamental watershed parameter used to compute the peak discharge and/or in the hydrological simulation of sewer systems. In the lack of hydrological data for its estimative, several empirical formulae are used, however, almost none of them have been verified in Brazil leading to large uncertainties in the correct value. In this light, were tested several formulae such as the proposed by Kirpich (and a modifications of this equation proposed by the National Transport Bureau of Brazil (DNIT)), U.S. Corps. Of Engineers, Pasini, Dooge , Johnstone , Ventura and Ven T Chow as they are used in Brazil. The verification was accomplished against measured data in 5 sub-basins situated in the Dilúvio basin, a semi urbanized watershed that contains the most developed area of the city of Porto Alegre. All the rainfall stations were active in the period from late 1970's until early 1980's due to the existence of Projeto Dilúvio but today, however, only two of them are still in operation. Porto Alegre is the capital and largest city in the Brazilian southernmost state of Rio Grande do Sul with a population of approximately 1.6 million inhabitants, the tenth most populous city in the country and the centre of Brazil's fourth largest metropolitan area, with almost 4,5 million inhabitants (IBGE, 2010). The city is situated in a humid subtropical climate with high and regular precipitation throughout the year. Most summer rainfall occurs during thunderstorms and an occasional tropical storm, hurricane or cyclone. The results showed an error of around 70% for half of the formulas, with a tendency to underestimate TC values. Among the tested methods, Johnstone had the best overall result, with an average error of 25%, well far from the second, Dooge, with 43% of average error. The best results were obtained in only one basin, Dilúvio, the largest one, with an area of 25km², with an error of just 3% for Modified Kirpich, and

  15. Effects of interviewer behavior on accuracy of children's responses.

    PubMed

    Sparling, Jessica; Wilder, David A; Kondash, Jennifer; Boyle, Megan; Compton, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that certain interviewer behaviors can evoke inaccurate answers by children. In the current study, we examined the effects of approving and disapproving statements on the accuracy of 3 children's answers to questions in an interview (Experiment 1). We then evaluated 3 questioning techniques that may be used by interviewers during a forensic interview in which a child provides eyewitness testimony (Experiment 2). All participants responded with more inaccurate answers when approving statements followed inaccurate information and disapproving statements followed accurate information in Experiment 1. During Experiment 2, 1 participant responded most inaccurately when she was requestioned after providing an initial answer, whereas the remaining 2 participants responded most inaccurately when the interviewer provided cowitness information and suggestive questions. PMID:21941387

  16. EFFECTS OF INTERVIEWER BEHAVIOR ON ACCURACY OF CHILDREN'S RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Sparling, Jessica; Wilder, David A; Kondash, Jennifer; Boyle, Megan; Compton, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that certain interviewer behaviors can evoke inaccurate answers by children. In the current study, we examined the effects of approving and disapproving statements on the accuracy of 3 children's answers to questions in an interview (Experiment 1). We then evaluated 3 questioning techniques that may be used by interviewers during a forensic interview in which a child provides eyewitness testimony (Experiment 2). All participants responded with more inaccurate answers when approving statements followed inaccurate information and disapproving statements followed accurate information in Experiment 1. During Experiment 2, 1 participant responded most inaccurately when she was requestioned after providing an initial answer, whereas the remaining 2 participants responded most inaccurately when the interviewer provided cowitness information and suggestive questions. PMID:21941387

  17. Estimation Accuracy on Execution Time of Run-Time Tasks in a Heterogeneous Distributed Environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Weidong; Jin, Dandan; Shen, Jian; Fu, Zhangjie; Liu, Xiaodong; Linge, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Computing has achieved tremendous development since cloud computing was proposed in 2006, and played a vital role promoting rapid growth of data collecting and analysis models, e.g., Internet of things, Cyber-Physical Systems, Big Data Analytics, etc. Hadoop has become a data convergence platform for sensor networks. As one of the core components, MapReduce facilitates allocating, processing and mining of collected large-scale data, where speculative execution strategies help solve straggler problems. However, there is still no efficient solution for accurate estimation on execution time of run-time tasks, which can affect task allocation and distribution in MapReduce. In this paper, task execution data have been collected and employed for the estimation. A two-phase regression (TPR) method is proposed to predict the finishing time of each task accurately. Detailed data of each task have drawn interests with detailed analysis report being made. According to the results, the prediction accuracy of concurrent tasks' execution time can be improved, in particular for some regular jobs. PMID:27589753

  18. Estimation Accuracy on Execution Time of Run-Time Tasks in a Heterogeneous Distributed Environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Weidong; Jin, Dandan; Shen, Jian; Fu, Zhangjie; Liu, Xiaodong; Linge, Nigel

    2016-08-30

    Distributed Computing has achieved tremendous development since cloud computing was proposed in 2006, and played a vital role promoting rapid growth of data collecting and analysis models, e.g., Internet of things, Cyber-Physical Systems, Big Data Analytics, etc. Hadoop has become a data convergence platform for sensor networks. As one of the core components, MapReduce facilitates allocating, processing and mining of collected large-scale data, where speculative execution strategies help solve straggler problems. However, there is still no efficient solution for accurate estimation on execution time of run-time tasks, which can affect task allocation and distribution in MapReduce. In this paper, task execution data have been collected and employed for the estimation. A two-phase regression (TPR) method is proposed to predict the finishing time of each task accurately. Detailed data of each task have drawn interests with detailed analysis report being made. According to the results, the prediction accuracy of concurrent tasks' execution time can be improved, in particular for some regular jobs.

  19. Estimation Accuracy on Execution Time of Run-Time Tasks in a Heterogeneous Distributed Environment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Weidong; Jin, Dandan; Shen, Jian; Fu, Zhangjie; Liu, Xiaodong; Linge, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Computing has achieved tremendous development since cloud computing was proposed in 2006, and played a vital role promoting rapid growth of data collecting and analysis models, e.g., Internet of things, Cyber-Physical Systems, Big Data Analytics, etc. Hadoop has become a data convergence platform for sensor networks. As one of the core components, MapReduce facilitates allocating, processing and mining of collected large-scale data, where speculative execution strategies help solve straggler problems. However, there is still no efficient solution for accurate estimation on execution time of run-time tasks, which can affect task allocation and distribution in MapReduce. In this paper, task execution data have been collected and employed for the estimation. A two-phase regression (TPR) method is proposed to predict the finishing time of each task accurately. Detailed data of each task have drawn interests with detailed analysis report being made. According to the results, the prediction accuracy of concurrent tasks’ execution time can be improved, in particular for some regular jobs. PMID:27589753

  20. Cued Speech Transliteration: Effects of Speaking Rate and Lag Time on Production Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Jean C; Tessler, Morgan P

    2016-10-01

    Many deaf and hard-of-hearing children rely on interpreters to access classroom communication. Although the exact level of access provided by interpreters in these settings is unknown, it is likely to depend heavily on interpreter accuracy (portion of message correctly produced by the interpreter) and the factors that govern interpreter accuracy. In this study, the accuracy of 12 Cued Speech (CS) transliterators with varying degrees of experience was examined at three different speaking rates (slow, normal, fast). Accuracy was measured with a high-resolution, objective metric in order to facilitate quantitative analyses of the effect of each factor on accuracy. Results showed that speaking rate had a large negative effect on accuracy, caused primarily by an increase in omitted cues, whereas the effect of lag time on accuracy, also negative, was quite small and explained just 3% of the variance. Increased experience level was generally associated with increased accuracy; however, high levels of experience did not guarantee high levels of accuracy. Finally, the overall accuracy of the 12 transliterators, 54% on average across all three factors, was low enough to raise serious concerns about the quality of CS transliteration services that (at least some) children receive in educational settings. PMID:27221370

  1. Accuracy, security, and processing time comparisons of biometric fingerprint recognition system using digital and optical enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharif, Salim; El-Saba, Aed; Jagapathi, Rajendarreddy

    2011-06-01

    Fingerprint recognition is one of the most commonly used forms of biometrics and has been widely used in daily life due to its feasibility, distinctiveness, permanence, accuracy, reliability, and acceptability. Besides cost, issues related to accuracy, security, and processing time in practical biometric recognition systems represent the most critical factors that makes these systems widely acceptable. Accurate and secure biometric systems often require sophisticated enhancement and encoding techniques that burdens the overall processing time of the system. In this paper we present a comparison between common digital and optical enhancementencoding techniques with respect to their accuracy, security and processing time, when applied to biometric fingerprint systems.

  2. Response accuracy of hazard identification in migrant farm workers.

    PubMed

    Burau, Keith D; Shipp, Eva M; Cooper, Sharon P; Frankowski, Ralph; McKinnon, Sarah; Walker, Kristina M

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed potential biases introduced by using maternal proxies for reporting work hazards, illness symptoms, and acute agricultural injuries in studies of migrant farmworker families. A convenience sample of 79 mother/spouse and mother/oldest child pairs was obtained from a two-year cohort study of migrant farmworker families from Starr County, Texas. Pairs completed an interviewer-administered survey including 27 close-ended items describing work history, illness symptoms, and acute injuries during the 2001 migration season. Data analysis included prevalence, sensitivity, and specificity measures. Maternal proxy reports of subjective symptoms of a spouse or child were approximately 50% lower than spouse or child self-reports. Sensitivity and specificity of mothers' responses regarding hazard items were higher for spouses than for children. For items measuring illness symptoms, sensitivity of mothers' responses for spouses and oldest child pairs was generally less than 30%; however, specificity was generally above 90%. For acute agricultural injury, the mother/spouse sensitivity was 75%, the mother/child 40%, and specificities were 100% and 97%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for mother/ spouse pairs was generally higher than mother/child pairs for work hazards, illness symptoms and acute injuries. While mothers may be acceptable proxies for spouses in this population, efforts should be made to collect data directly from adolescent children in studies of agricultural injuries. PMID:16893834

  3. Measures of spatio-temporal accuracy for time series land cover data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumida, Narumasa; Comber, Alexis J.

    2015-09-01

    Remote sensing is a useful tool for monitoring changes in land cover over time. The accuracy of such time-series analyses has hitherto only been assessed using confusion matrices. The matrix allows global measures of user, producer and overall accuracies to be generated, but lacks consideration of any spatial aspects of accuracy. It is well known that land cover errors are typically spatially auto-correlated and can have a distinct spatial distribution. As yet little work has considered the temporal dimension and investigated the persistence or errors in both geographic and temporal dimensions. Spatio-temporal errors can have a profound impact on both change detection and on environmental monitoring and modelling activities using land cover data. This study investigated methods for describing the spatio-temporal characteristics of classification accuracy. Annual thematic maps were created using a random forest classification of MODIS data over the Jakarta metropolitan areas for the period of 2001-2013. A logistic geographically weighted model was used to estimate annual spatial measures of user, producer and overall accuracies. A principal component analysis was then used to extract summaries of the multi-temporal accuracy. The results showed how the spatial distribution of user and producer accuracy varied over space and time, and overall spatial variance was confirmed by the principal component analysis. The results indicated that areas of homogeneous land cover were mapped with relatively high accuracy and low variability, and areas of mixed land cover with the opposite characteristics. A multi-temporal spatial approach to accuracy is shown to provide more informative measures of accuracy, allowing map producers and users to evaluate time series thematic maps more comprehensively than a standard confusion matrix approach. The need to identify suitable properties for a temporal kernel are discussed.

  4. Improved Motor-Timing: Effects of Synchronized Metro-Nome Training on Golf Shot Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Marius; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on motor timing and how this training might affect golf shot accuracy. Twenty-six experienced male golfers participated (mean age 27 years; mean golf handicap 12.6) in this study. Pre- and post-test investigations of golf shots made by three different clubs were conducted by use of a golf simulator. The golfers were randomized into two groups: a SMT group and a Control group. After the pre-test, the golfers in the SMT group completed a 4-week SMT program designed to improve their motor timing, the golfers in the Control group were merely training their golf-swings during the same time period. No differences between the two groups were found from the pre-test outcomes, either for motor timing scores or for golf shot accuracy. However, the post-test results after the 4-weeks SMT showed evident motor timing improvements. Additionally, significant improvements for golf shot accuracy were found for the SMT group and with less variability in their performance. No such improvements were found for the golfers in the Control group. As with previous studies that used a SMT program, this study’s results provide further evidence that motor timing can be improved by SMT and that such timing improvement also improves golf accuracy. Key points This study investigates the effect of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on motor timing and how this training might affect golf shot accuracy. A randomized control group design was used. The 4 week SMT intervention showed significant improvements in motor timing, golf shot accuracy, and lead to less variability. We conclude that this study’s results provide further evidence that motor timing can be improved by SMT training and that such timing improvement also improves golf accuracy. PMID:24149608

  5. Recognition accuracy and reaction time of vocal expressions of emotion by African-American and Euro-American college women.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Monica D; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Lever, Teresa; O'Brien, Patrick; Campbell, Stacy; Rastatter, Michael

    2004-10-01

    This study examined the relationship of racial group membership and vocal expressions of emotion. Recognition accuracy and reaction time were examined using the Diagnostic Assessment of Nonverbal Accuracy 2 Receptive Paralanguage subtests with 18 young Euro-American and African-American women. Participants listened to Euro-American children and adults speaking a neutral sentence, and identified the emotion as happy, sad, angry, or fearful. Analysis identified a significant effect for race on reaction time. Euro-American participants had faster mean RT than the African-American women for the recognition of vocal expression of emotion portrayed by Euro-Americans. However, no significant differences were found in mean accurate identification between the two groups. The finding of a significant difference in recognition RT but not in accuracy between the stimuli spoken by an adult and a child was unexpected. Both racial groups had faster mean RT in response to vocal expression of emotion by children. PMID:15560358

  6. Deconvolution improves the accuracy and depth sensitivity of time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Mamadou; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved (TR) techniques have the potential to distinguish early- from late-arriving photons. Since light travelling through superficial tissue is detected earlier than photons that penetrate the deeper layers, time-windowing can in principle be used to improve the depth sensitivity of TR measurements. However, TR measurements also contain instrument contributions - referred to as the instrument-response-function (IRF) - which cause temporal broadening of the measured temporal-point-spread-function (TPSF). In this report, we investigate the influence of the IRF on pathlength-resolved absorption changes (Δμa) retrieved from TR measurements using the microscopic Beer-Lambert law (MBLL). TPSFs were acquired on homogeneous and two-layer tissue-mimicking phantoms with varying optical properties. The measured IRF and TPSFs were deconvolved to recover the distribution of time-of-flights (DTOFs) of the detected photons. The microscopic Beer-Lambert law was applied to early and late time-windows of the TPSFs and DTOFs to access the effects of the IRF on pathlength-resolved Δμa. The analysis showed that the late part of the TPSFs contains substantial contributions from early-arriving photons, due to the smearing effects of the IRF, which reduced its sensitivity to absorption changes occurring in deep layers. We also demonstrated that the effects of the IRF can be efficiently eliminated by applying a robust deconvolution technique, thereby improving the accuracy and sensitivity of TR measurements to deep-tissue absorption changes.

  7. Accuracy and computational efficiency of real-time subspace propagation schemes for the time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russakoff, Arthur; Li, Yonghui; He, Shenglai; Varga, Kalman

    2016-05-01

    Time-dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) has become successful for its balance of economy and accuracy. However, the application of TDDFT to large systems or long time scales remains computationally prohibitively expensive. In this paper, we investigate the numerical stability and accuracy of two subspace propagation methods to solve the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations with finite and periodic boundary conditions. The bases considered are the Lánczos basis and the adiabatic eigenbasis. The results are compared to a benchmark fourth-order Taylor expansion of the time propagator. Our results show that it is possible to use larger time steps with the subspace methods, leading to computational speedups by a factor of 2-3 over Taylor propagation. Accuracy is found to be maintained for certain energy regimes and small time scales.

  8. Effects of Language of Instruction on Response Accuracy and Challenging Behavior in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Russell; Rispoli, Mandy; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Andrews, Alonzo; Ortega, Lilia

    2011-01-01

    Discrete trial training was delivered using English and Spanish languages to a student with autism from a Spanish-speaking family. An alternating treatments design was used to examine the effects of language of instruction on the child's response accuracy and challenging behavior. More correct responses and fewer challenging behaviors occurred…

  9. Student accuracy and evaluation of a computer-based audience response system.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Robert G; Blalock, John S; Parker, Merle H; Haywood, Van B

    2006-12-01

    We have incorporated an audience response system into our curriculum to increase student interaction in the teaching process. Classroom Performance System (CPS) is a computer-based audience response system that allows students to answer questions posed to the entire class by entering responses on a keypad. The responses are tallied and displayed on the classroom screen for all students to see. The purpose of our study was to determine student accuracy using the system with three different methods of administering questions. A secondary purpose was to assess students' perceptions about using the system. Our hypothesis for the study was that there should be no difference in volunteer accuracy or questionnaire responses to the three methods of gathering responses. Sixty-two dental students volunteered to participate. Using three methods (projected on a screen, verbal, and written), volunteers were given "responses" to enter into the system using CPS wireless remote answering devices. In the projected and verbal formats, the teacher managed the assessment by controlling the pace of input. In the written format, students were given responses on paper to input into the system at their own pace. At the end of the sessions, volunteers completed an anonymous questionnaire regarding their experiences with the system. The accuracy of responses was similar in the teacher-managed assessments (projected and verbal format). There was a statistical difference in the accuracy of responses in the student-managed assessment (p=<0.000001). Questionnaire responses also showed that students preferred teacher-managed assessments. The hypothesis was disproved. The overall response to this audience response system and its methods of gathering information was very positive.

  10. An effective timing characterization method for an accuracy-proved VLSI standard cell library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianhua, Jiang; Man, Liang; Lei, Wang; Yumei, Zhou

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a method of tailoring the characterization and modeling timing of a VLSI standard cell library. The paper also presents a method to validate the reasonability of the value through accuracy analysis. In the process of designing a standard cell library, this method is applied to characterize the cell library. In addition, the error calculations of some simple circuit path delays are compared between using the characterization file and an Hspice simulation. The comparison results demonstrate the accuracy of the generated timing library file.

  11. Uncertainty versus computer response time

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, W.D. |

    1994-12-31

    Interactive on-line presentation of risk analysis results with immediate ``what if`` capability is now possible with available microcomputer technology. This can provide an effective means off presenting the risk results, the decision possibilities, and the underlying assumptions to decision makers, stakeholders, and the public. However, the limitation of computer calculational power on microcomputers requires a trade-off between the precision of the analysis and the computing and display response time. Fortunately, the uncertainties in the risk analysis are usually so large that extreme precision is often unwarranted. Therefore, risk analyses used for this purpose must include trade-offs between precision and processing time, and uncertainties introduced must be put into perspective.

  12. Studies of the accuracy of time integration methods for reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropp, David L.; Shadid, John N.; Ober, Curtis C.

    2004-03-01

    In this study we present numerical experiments of time integration methods applied to systems of reaction-diffusion equations. Our main interest is in evaluating the relative accuracy and asymptotic order of accuracy of the methods on problems which exhibit an approximate balance between the competing component time scales. Nearly balanced systems can produce a significant coupling of the physical mechanisms and introduce a slow dynamical time scale of interest. These problems provide a challenging test for this evaluation and tend to reveal subtle differences between the various methods. The methods we consider include first- and second-order semi-implicit, fully implicit, and operator-splitting techniques. The test problems include a prototype propagating nonlinear reaction-diffusion wave, a non-equilibrium radiation-diffusion system, a Brusselator chemical dynamics system and a blow-up example. In this evaluation we demonstrate a "split personality" for the operator-splitting methods that we consider. While operator-splitting methods often obtain very good accuracy, they can also manifest a serious degradation in accuracy due to stability problems.

  13. 28 CFR 20.37 - Responsibility for accuracy, completeness, currency, and integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibility for accuracy, completeness, currency, and integrity. 20.37 Section 20.37 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.37...

  14. Two Approaches to Estimation of Classification Accuracy Rate under Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Quinn N.; Cheng, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of item response theory (IRT), there are two recent lines of work on the estimation of classification accuracy (CA) rate. One approach estimates CA when decisions are made based on total sum scores, the other based on latent trait estimates. The former is referred to as the Lee approach, and the latter, the Rudner approach,…

  15. Determining Stroke Onset Time Using Quantitative MRI: High Accuracy, Sensitivity and Specificity Obtained from Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Times

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, Bryony L.; Rogers, Harriet J.; Knight, Michael J.; Jokivarsi, Kimmo T.; Gröhn, Olli H.J.; Kauppinen, Risto A.

    2016-01-01

    Many ischaemic stroke patients are ineligible for thrombolytic therapy due to unknown onset time. Quantitative MRI (qMRI) is a potential surrogate for stroke timing. Rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and qMRI parameters including hemispheric differences in apparent diffusion coefficient, T2-weighted signal intensities, T1 and T2 relaxation times (qT1, qT2) and f1, f2 and Voverlap were measured at hourly intervals at 4.7 or 9.4 T. Accuracy and sensitivity for identifying strokes scanned within and beyond 3 h of onset was determined. Accuracy for Voverlap, f2 and qT2 (>90%) was significantly higher than other parameters. At a specificity of 1, sensitivity was highest for Voverlap (0.90) and f2 (0.80), indicating promise of these qMRI indices in the clinical assessment of stroke onset time.

  16. A space system for high-accuracy global time and frequency comparison of clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decher, R.; Allan, D. W.; Alley, C. O.; Vessot, R. F. C.; Winkler, G. M. R.

    1981-01-01

    A Space Shuttle experiment in which a hydrogen maser clock on board the Space Shuttle will be compared with clocks on the ground using two-way microwave and short pulse laser signals is described. The accuracy goal for the experiment is 1 nsec or better for the time transfer and 10 to the minus 14th power for the frequency comparison. A direct frequency comparison of primary standards at the 10 to the minus 14th power accuracy level is a unique feature of the proposed system. Both time and frequency transfer will be accomplished by microwave transmission, while the laser signals provide calibration of the system as well as subnanosecond time transfer.

  17. An effective approach to improving low-cost GPS positioning accuracy in real-time navigation.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Rashedul; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    Positioning accuracy is a challenging issue for location-based applications using a low-cost global positioning system (GPS). This paper presents an effective approach to improving the positioning accuracy of a low-cost GPS receiver for real-time navigation. The proposed method precisely estimates position by combining vehicle movement direction, velocity averaging, and distance between waypoints using coordinate data (latitude, longitude, time, and velocity) of the GPS receiver. The previously estimated precious reference point, coordinate translation, and invalid data check also improve accuracy. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we conducted an experiment using a GARMIN GPS 19xHVS receiver attached to a car and used Google Maps to plot the processed data. The proposed method achieved improvement of 4-10 meters in several experiments. In addition, we compared the proposed approach with two other state-of-the-art methods: recursive averaging and ARMA interpolation. The experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of positioning accuracy.

  18. Advanced video extensometer for non-contact, real-time, high-accuracy strain measurement.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Tian, Long

    2016-08-22

    We developed an advanced video extensometer for non-contact, real-time, high-accuracy strain measurement in material testing. In the established video extensometer, a "near perfect and ultra-stable" imaging system, combining the idea of active imaging with a high-quality bilateral telecentric lens, is constructed to acquire high-fidelity video images of the test sample surface, which is invariant to ambient lighting changes and small out-of-plane motions occurred between the object surface and image plane. In addition, an efficient and accurate inverse compositional Gauss-Newton algorithm incorporating a temporal initial guess transfer scheme and a high-accuracy interpolation method is employed to achieve real-time, high-accuracy displacement tracking with negligible bias error. Tensile tests of an aluminum sample and a carbon fiber filament sample were performed to demonstrate the efficiency, repeatability and accuracy of the developed advanced video extensometer. The results indicate that longitudinal and transversal strains can be estimated and plotted at a rate of 117 fps and with a maximum strain error less than 30 microstrains. PMID:27557188

  19. An Effective Approach to Improving Low-Cost GPS Positioning Accuracy in Real-Time Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Rashedul; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    Positioning accuracy is a challenging issue for location-based applications using a low-cost global positioning system (GPS). This paper presents an effective approach to improving the positioning accuracy of a low-cost GPS receiver for real-time navigation. The proposed method precisely estimates position by combining vehicle movement direction, velocity averaging, and distance between waypoints using coordinate data (latitude, longitude, time, and velocity) of the GPS receiver. The previously estimated precious reference point, coordinate translation, and invalid data check also improve accuracy. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we conducted an experiment using a GARMIN GPS 19xHVS receiver attached to a car and used Google Maps to plot the processed data. The proposed method achieved improvement of 4–10 meters in several experiments. In addition, we compared the proposed approach with two other state-of-the-art methods: recursive averaging and ARMA interpolation. The experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of positioning accuracy. PMID:25136679

  20. Climatic associations of British species distributions show good transferability in time but low predictive accuracy for range change.

    PubMed

    Rapacciuolo, Giovanni; Roy, David B; Gillings, Simon; Fox, Richard; Walker, Kevin; Purvis, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Conservation planners often wish to predict how species distributions will change in response to environmental changes. Species distribution models (SDMs) are the primary tool for making such predictions. Many methods are widely used; however, they all make simplifying assumptions, and predictions can therefore be subject to high uncertainty. With global change well underway, field records of observed range shifts are increasingly being used for testing SDM transferability. We used an unprecedented distribution dataset documenting recent range changes of British vascular plants, birds, and butterflies to test whether correlative SDMs based on climate change provide useful approximations of potential distribution shifts. We modelled past species distributions from climate using nine single techniques and a consensus approach, and projected the geographical extent of these models to a more recent time period based on climate change; we then compared model predictions with recent observed distributions in order to estimate the temporal transferability and prediction accuracy of our models. We also evaluated the relative effect of methodological and taxonomic variation on the performance of SDMs. Models showed good transferability in time when assessed using widespread metrics of accuracy. However, models had low accuracy to predict where occupancy status changed between time periods, especially for declining species. Model performance varied greatly among species within major taxa, but there was also considerable variation among modelling frameworks. Past climatic associations of British species distributions retain a high explanatory power when transferred to recent time--due to their accuracy to predict large areas retained by species--but fail to capture relevant predictors of change. We strongly emphasize the need for caution when using SDMs to predict shifts in species distributions: high explanatory power on temporally-independent records--as assessed using

  1. Accuracy of Pedometer Steps and Time for Youth with Intellectual Disabilities during Dynamic Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Beets, Michael W.; Flaming, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Pedometer accuracy for steps and activity time during dynamic movement for youth with intellectual disabilities (ID) were examined. Twenty-four youth with ID (13 girls, 13.1 [plus or minus] 3.2 yrs; 11 boys, 14.7 [plus or minus] 2.7 yrs) were videotaped during adapted physical education class while wearing a Walk4Life 2505 pedometer in five…

  2. Interpersonal variability in timing strategy and temporal accuracy in rapid interception task with variable time-to-contact.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, Tetsuya; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    In rapid interceptive actions such as hitting a baseball, cricket ball or tennis ball, ball speed varies between trials, and players have to compensate the time lag by controlling the moment of movement onset and movement duration. Previous studies have found that these two variables can flexibly co-vary and are robustly influenced by target speed (i.e. velocity-coupling effect: faster movement for faster target). However, some studies reported an interpersonal variability in the timing control strategy and the relationship between the strategy and temporal accuracy in rapid interception is unclear. We used a baseball-simulated rapid interceptive task to assess this issue. Under relatively easy time constraints, there was a large interpersonal variability, and participants were distinctively divided into two groups: those who mainly modulated their movement duration and those who mainly controlled their movement onset. When the time constraint became severe, the second strategy shifted to the first strategy in most of the second group participants. In the both cases, being able to mainly control movement onset resulted in higher temporal accuracy. These results suggest that minimising the velocity-coupling effect is an important factor to achieve high temporal accuracy in rapid interception. PMID:25277080

  3. Interpersonal variability in timing strategy and temporal accuracy in rapid interception task with variable time-to-contact.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, Tetsuya; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    In rapid interceptive actions such as hitting a baseball, cricket ball or tennis ball, ball speed varies between trials, and players have to compensate the time lag by controlling the moment of movement onset and movement duration. Previous studies have found that these two variables can flexibly co-vary and are robustly influenced by target speed (i.e. velocity-coupling effect: faster movement for faster target). However, some studies reported an interpersonal variability in the timing control strategy and the relationship between the strategy and temporal accuracy in rapid interception is unclear. We used a baseball-simulated rapid interceptive task to assess this issue. Under relatively easy time constraints, there was a large interpersonal variability, and participants were distinctively divided into two groups: those who mainly modulated their movement duration and those who mainly controlled their movement onset. When the time constraint became severe, the second strategy shifted to the first strategy in most of the second group participants. In the both cases, being able to mainly control movement onset resulted in higher temporal accuracy. These results suggest that minimising the velocity-coupling effect is an important factor to achieve high temporal accuracy in rapid interception.

  4. Travel-time source-specific station correction improves location accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, Alessandra; Materni, Valerio; Chiappini, Stefano; Carluccio, Roberto; Console, Rodolfo; Chiappini, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Accurate earthquake locations are crucial for investigating seismogenic processes, as well as for applications like verifying compliance to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Earthquake location accuracy is related to the degree of knowledge about the 3-D structure of seismic wave velocity in the Earth. It is well known that modeling errors of calculated travel times may have the effect of shifting the computed epicenters far from the real locations by a distance even larger than the size of the statistical error ellipses, regardless of the accuracy in picking seismic phase arrivals. The consequences of large mislocations of seismic events in the context of the CTBT verification is particularly critical in order to trigger a possible On Site Inspection (OSI). In fact, the Treaty establishes that an OSI area cannot be larger than 1000 km2, and its larger linear dimension cannot be larger than 50 km. Moreover, depth accuracy is crucial for the application of the depth event screening criterion. In the present study, we develop a method of source-specific travel times corrections based on a set of well located events recorded by dense national seismic networks in seismically active regions. The applications concern seismic sequences recorded in Japan, Iran and Italy. We show that mislocations of the order of 10-20 km affecting the epicenters, as well as larger mislocations in hypocentral depths, calculated from a global seismic network and using the standard IASPEI91 travel times can be effectively removed by applying source-specific station corrections.

  5. Accuracy and time requirements of a bar-code inventory system for medical supplies.

    PubMed

    Hanson, L B; Weinswig, M H; De Muth, J E

    1988-02-01

    The effects of implementing a bar-code system for issuing medical supplies to nursing units at a university teaching hospital were evaluated. Data on the time required to issue medical supplies to three nursing units at a 480-bed, tertiary-care teaching hospital were collected (1) before the bar-code system was implemented (i.e., when the manual system was in use), (2) one month after implementation, and (3) four months after implementation. At the same times, the accuracy of the central supply perpetual inventory was monitored using 15 selected items. One-way analysis of variance tests were done to determine any significant differences between the bar-code and manual systems. Using the bar-code system took longer than using the manual system because of a significant difference in the time required for order entry into the computer. Multiple-use requirements of the central supply computer system made entering bar-code data a much slower process. There was, however, a significant improvement in the accuracy of the perpetual inventory. Using the bar-code system for issuing medical supplies to the nursing units takes longer than using the manual system. However, the accuracy of the perpetual inventory was significantly improved with the implementation of the bar-code system.

  6. Entropy of space-time outcome in a movement speed-accuracy task.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Pacheco, Matheus Maia; Newell, Karl M

    2015-12-01

    The experiment reported was set-up to investigate the space-time entropy of movement outcome as a function of a range of spatial (10, 20 and 30 cm) and temporal (250-2500 ms) criteria in a discrete aiming task. The variability and information entropy of the movement spatial and temporal errors considered separately increased and decreased on the respective dimension as a function of an increment of movement velocity. However, the joint space-time entropy was lowest when the relative contribution of spatial and temporal task criteria was comparable (i.e., mid-range of space-time constraints), and it increased with a greater trade-off between spatial or temporal task demands, revealing a U-shaped function across space-time task criteria. The traditional speed-accuracy functions of spatial error and temporal error considered independently mapped to this joint space-time U-shaped entropy function. The trade-off in movement tasks with joint space-time criteria is between spatial error and timing error, rather than movement speed and accuracy.

  7. Accuracy and responses of genomic selection on key traits in apple breeding

    PubMed Central

    Muranty, Hélène; Troggio, Michela; Sadok, Inès Ben; Rifaï, Mehdi Al; Auwerkerken, Annemarie; Banchi, Elisa; Velasco, Riccardo; Stevanato, Piergiorgio; van de Weg, W Eric; Di Guardo, Mario; Kumar, Satish; Laurens, François; Bink, Marco C A M

    2015-01-01

    The application of genomic selection in fruit tree crops is expected to enhance breeding efficiency by increasing prediction accuracy, increasing selection intensity and decreasing generation interval. The objectives of this study were to assess the accuracy of prediction and selection response in commercial apple breeding programmes for key traits. The training population comprised 977 individuals derived from 20 pedigreed full-sib families. Historic phenotypic data were available on 10 traits related to productivity and fruit external appearance and genotypic data for 7829 SNPs obtained with an Illumina 20K SNP array. From these data, a genome-wide prediction model was built and subsequently used to calculate genomic breeding values of five application full-sib families. The application families had genotypes at 364 SNPs from a dedicated 512 SNP array, and these genotypic data were extended to the high-density level by imputation. These five families were phenotyped for 1 year and their phenotypes were compared to the predicted breeding values. Accuracy of genomic prediction across the 10 traits reached a maximum value of 0.5 and had a median value of 0.19. The accuracies were strongly affected by the phenotypic distribution and heritability of traits. In the largest family, significant selection response was observed for traits with high heritability and symmetric phenotypic distribution. Traits that showed non-significant response often had reduced and skewed phenotypic variation or low heritability. Among the five application families the accuracies were uncorrelated to the degree of relatedness to the training population. The results underline the potential of genomic prediction to accelerate breeding progress in outbred fruit tree crops that still need to overcome long generation intervals and extensive phenotyping costs. PMID:26744627

  8. High accuracy position response calibration method for a micro-channel plate ion detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, R.; Leredde, A.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Fléchard, X.; García, A.; Müller, P.; Knecht, A.; Liénard, E.; Kossin, M.; Sternberg, M. G.; Swanson, H. E.; Zumwalt, D. W.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a position response calibration method for a micro-channel plate (MCP) detector with a delay-line anode position readout scheme. Using an in situ calibration mask, an accuracy of 8 μm and a resolution of 85 μm (FWHM) have been achieved for MeV-scale α particles and ions with energies of ∼10 keV. At this level of accuracy, the difference between the MCP position responses to high-energy α particles and low-energy ions is significant. The improved performance of the MCP detector can find applications in many fields of AMO and nuclear physics. In our case, it helps reducing systematic uncertainties in a high-precision nuclear β-decay experiment.

  9. Trading Speed and Accuracy by Coding Time: A Coupled-circuit Cortical Model

    PubMed Central

    Standage, Dominic; You, Hongzhi; Wang, Da-Hui; Dorris, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Our actions take place in space and time, but despite the role of time in decision theory and the growing acknowledgement that the encoding of time is crucial to behaviour, few studies have considered the interactions between neural codes for objects in space and for elapsed time during perceptual decisions. The speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) provides a window into spatiotemporal interactions. Our hypothesis is that temporal coding determines the rate at which spatial evidence is integrated, controlling the SAT by gain modulation. Here, we propose that local cortical circuits are inherently suited to the relevant spatial and temporal coding. In simulations of an interval estimation task, we use a generic local-circuit model to encode time by ‘climbing’ activity, seen in cortex during tasks with a timing requirement. The model is a network of simulated pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons, connected by conductance synapses. A simple learning rule enables the network to quickly produce new interval estimates, which show signature characteristics of estimates by experimental subjects. Analysis of network dynamics formally characterizes this generic, local-circuit timing mechanism. In simulations of a perceptual decision task, we couple two such networks. Network function is determined only by spatial selectivity and NMDA receptor conductance strength; all other parameters are identical. To trade speed and accuracy, the timing network simply learns longer or shorter intervals, driving the rate of downstream decision processing by spatially non-selective input, an established form of gain modulation. Like the timing network's interval estimates, decision times show signature characteristics of those by experimental subjects. Overall, we propose, demonstrate and analyse a generic mechanism for timing, a generic mechanism for modulation of decision processing by temporal codes, and we make predictions for experimental verification. PMID:23592967

  10. Equivalent Effects of Grouping by Time, Voice, and Location on Response Timing in Verbal Serial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Maybery, Murray T.

    2008-01-01

    The grouping of list items is known to improve serial memory accuracy and constrain the nature of temporal errors. A recent study (M. T. Maybery, F. B. R. Parmentier, & D. M. Jones, 2002) showed that grouping results in a temporal organization of the participants' responses that mimics the list structure but not the timing of its presentation.…

  11. Accuracy of System Step Response Roll Magnitude Estimation from Central and Peripheral Visual Displays and Simulator Cockpit Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosman, R. J. A. W.; Vandervaart, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment to investigate visual roll attitude and roll rate perception is described. The experiment was also designed to assess the improvements of perception due to cockpit motion. After the onset of the motion, subjects were to make accurate and quick estimates of the final magnitude of the roll angle step response by pressing the appropriate button of a keyboard device. The differing time-histories of roll angle, roll rate and roll acceleration caused by a step response stimulate the different perception processes related the central visual field, peripheral visual field and vestibular organs in different, yet exactly known ways. Experiments with either of the visual displays or cockpit motion and some combinations of these were run to asses the roles of the different perception processes. Results show that the differences in response time are much more pronounced than the differences in perception accuracy.

  12. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18... REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal is... later than the third calendar day after filing. If the time period for response to a Request or...

  13. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18... REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal is... later than the third calendar day after filing. If the time period for response to a Request or...

  14. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18... REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal is... later than the third calendar day after filing. If the time period for response to a Request or...

  15. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18... REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal is... later than the third calendar day after filing. If the time period for response to a Request or...

  16. A simple method for improving the time-stepping accuracy in atmosphere and ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    In contemporary numerical simulations of the atmosphere and ocean, evidence suggests that time-stepping errors may be a significant component of total model error, on both weather and climate time-scales. This presentation will review the available evidence, and will then suggest a simple but effective method for substantially improving the time-stepping numerics at no extra computational expense. A common time-stepping method in atmosphere and ocean models is the leapfrog scheme combined with the Robert-Asselin (RA) filter. This method is used in the following models (and many more): ECHAM, MAECHAM, MM5, CAM, MESO-NH, HIRLAM, KMCM, LIMA, SPEEDY, IGCM, PUMA, COSMO, FSU-GSM, FSU-NRSM, NCEP-GFS, NCEP-RSM, NSEAM, NOGAPS, RAMS, and CCSR/NIES-AGCM. Although the RA filter controls the time-splitting instability, it also introduces non-physical damping and reduces the accuracy. This presentation proposes a simple modification to the RA filter, which has become known as the RAW filter (Williams 2009, 2011). When used in conjunction with the leapfrog scheme, the RAW filter eliminates the non-physical damping and increases the amplitude accuracy by two orders, yielding third-order accuracy. (The phase accuracy remains second-order.) The RAW filter can easily be incorporated into existing models, typically via the insertion of just a single line of code. Better simulations are obtained at no extra computational expense. Results will be shown from recent implementations of the RAW filter in various models, including SPEEDY and COSMO. For example, in SPEEDY, the skill of weather forecasts is found to be significantly improved. In particular, in tropical surface pressure predictions, five-day forecasts made using the RAW filter have approximately the same skill as four-day forecasts made using the RA filter (Amezcua, Kalnay & Williams 2011). These improvements are encouraging for the use of the RAW filter in other atmosphere and ocean models. References PD Williams (2009) A

  17. Mayer waves reduce the accuracy of estimated hemodynamic response functions in functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino; Boas, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of cerebral hemodynamics reveals a wide spectrum of oscillations ranging from 0.0095 to 2 Hz. While most of these oscillations can be filtered out during analysis of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals when estimating stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses, oscillations around 0.1 Hz are an exception. This is due to the fact that they share a common spectral range with typical stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses from the brain. Here we investigate the effect of hemodynamic oscillations around 0.1 Hz on the estimation of hemodynamic response functions from fNIRS data. Our results show that for an expected response of ~1 µM in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO), Mayer wave oscillations with an amplitude > ~1 µM at 0.1 Hz reduce the accuracy of the estimated response as quantified by a 3 fold increase in the mean squared error and decrease in correlation (R2 below 0.78) when compared to the true HRF. These results indicate that the amplitude of oscillations at 0.1 Hz can serve as an objective metric of the expected HRF estimation accuracy. In addition, we investigated the effect of short separation regression on the recovered HRF, and found that this improves the recovered HRF when large amplitude 0.1 Hz oscillations are present in fNIRS data. We suspect that the development of other filtering strategies may provide even further improvement. PMID:27570699

  18. Mayer waves reduce the accuracy of estimated hemodynamic response functions in functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Meryem A; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M; Lin, Pei-Yi; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino; Boas, David A

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of cerebral hemodynamics reveals a wide spectrum of oscillations ranging from 0.0095 to 2 Hz. While most of these oscillations can be filtered out during analysis of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals when estimating stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses, oscillations around 0.1 Hz are an exception. This is due to the fact that they share a common spectral range with typical stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses from the brain. Here we investigate the effect of hemodynamic oscillations around 0.1 Hz on the estimation of hemodynamic response functions from fNIRS data. Our results show that for an expected response of ~1 µM in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO), Mayer wave oscillations with an amplitude > ~1 µM at 0.1 Hz reduce the accuracy of the estimated response as quantified by a 3 fold increase in the mean squared error and decrease in correlation (R(2) below 0.78) when compared to the true HRF. These results indicate that the amplitude of oscillations at 0.1 Hz can serve as an objective metric of the expected HRF estimation accuracy. In addition, we investigated the effect of short separation regression on the recovered HRF, and found that this improves the recovered HRF when large amplitude 0.1 Hz oscillations are present in fNIRS data. We suspect that the development of other filtering strategies may provide even further improvement. PMID:27570699

  19. Accuracy of the Timed Up and Go test for predicting sarcopenia in elderly hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Bruno Prata; Gomes, Isabela Barboza; de Oliveira, Carolina Santana; Ramos, Isis Resende; Rocha, Mônica Diniz Marques; Júnior, Luiz Alberto Forgiarini; Camelier, Fernanda Warken Rosa; Camelier, Aquiles Assunção

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The ability of the Timed Up and Go test to predict sarcopenia has not been evaluated previously. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Timed Up and Go test for predicting sarcopenia in elderly hospitalized patients. METHODS: This cross-sectional study analyzed 68 elderly patients (≥60 years of age) in a private hospital in the city of Salvador-BA, Brazil, between the 1st and 5th day of hospitalization. The predictive variable was the Timed Up and Go test score, and the outcome of interest was the presence of sarcopenia (reduced muscle mass associated with a reduction in handgrip strength and/or weak physical performance in a 6-m gait-speed test). After the descriptive data analyses, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of a test using the predictive variable to predict the presence of sarcopenia were calculated. RESULTS: In total, 68 elderly individuals, with a mean age 70.4±7.7 years, were evaluated. The subjects had a Charlson Comorbidity Index score of 5.35±1.97. Most (64.7%) of the subjects had a clinical admission profile; the main reasons for hospitalization were cardiovascular disorders (22.1%), pneumonia (19.1%) and abdominal disorders (10.2%). The frequency of sarcopenia in the sample was 22.1%, and the mean length of time spent performing the Timed Up and Go test was 10.02±5.38 s. A time longer than or equal to a cutoff of 10.85 s on the Timed Up and Go test predicted sarcopenia with a sensitivity of 67% and a specificity of 88.7%. The accuracy of this cutoff for the Timed Up and Go test was good (0.80; IC=0.66-0.94; p=0.002). CONCLUSION: The Timed Up and Go test was shown to be a predictor of sarcopenia in elderly hospitalized patients. PMID:26039955

  20. Evaluating Cognitive Theory: A Joint Modeling Approach Using Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein Entink, Rinke H.; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias; Hornke, Lutz F.; Fox, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    In current psychological research, the analysis of data from computer-based assessments or experiments is often confined to accuracy scores. Response times, although being an important source of additional information, are either neglected or analyzed separately. In this article, a new model is developed that allows the simultaneous analysis of…

  1. Classification Accuracy of Mixed Format Tests: A Bi-Factor Item Response Theory Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Drasgow, Fritz; Liu, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Mixed format tests (e.g., a test consisting of multiple-choice [MC] items and constructed response [CR] items) have become increasingly popular. However, the latent structure of item pools consisting of the two formats is still equivocal. Moreover, the implications of this latent structure are unclear: For example, do constructed response items tap reasoning skills that cannot be assessed with multiple choice items? This study explored the dimensionality of mixed format tests by applying bi-factor models to 10 tests of various subjects from the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Program and compared the accuracy of scores based on the bi-factor analysis with scores derived from a unidimensional analysis. More importantly, this study focused on a practical and important question—classification accuracy of the overall grade on a mixed format test. Our findings revealed that the degree of multidimensionality resulting from the mixed item format varied from subject to subject, depending on the disattenuated correlation between scores from MC and CR subtests. Moreover, remarkably small decrements in classification accuracy were found for the unidimensional analysis when the disattenuated correlations exceeded 0.90. PMID:26973568

  2. Accuracy of gantry rotation time of less than 300 ms for modern MDCT systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Matsubara, Kosuke; Miyati, Tosiaki

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of gantry rotation times of less than 300 ms has been assessed for two "state-of-the art" MDCT systems. The rotation time was measured at selected nominal rotation times (275 and 280 ms) with a solid-state detector; Unfors Xi probe. The detector was positioned on the inner bottom of the gantry bore. Because a pair of two successive radiation peaks is necessary for determination of the rotation time, the radiation detection was performed with the helical scan mode of operation. Upon completion of the data acquisition, we determined the peak times with the Unfors Xi View software program to obtain the rotation time. The means and standard deviations of the measured rotation times were 275.3 ± 0.5 and 285.1 ± 0.4 ms, respectively. The inaccuracy of the rotation time was approximately 5 ms at most, which was comparable to that previously reported for slower rotation times.

  3. Improved time efficiency and accuracy in diffusion tensor microimaging with multiple-echo acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulani, Vikas; Weber, Thomas; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2005-12-01

    In high-field NMR microscopy rapid single-shot imaging methods, for example, echo planar imaging, cannot be used for determination of the apparent diffusion tensor (ADT) due to large magnetic susceptibility effects. We propose a pulse sequence in which a diffusion-weighted spin-echo is followed by multiple gradient-echoes with additional diffusion weighting. These additional echoes can be used to calculate the ADT and T2∗ maps. We show here that this results in modest but consistent improvements in the accuracy of ADT determination within a given total data acquisition time. The method is tested on excised, chemically fixed rat spinal cords.

  4. Sex differences in accuracy and precision when judging time to arrival: data from two Internet studies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff; Sinclair, Kamila

    2011-12-01

    We report two Internet studies that investigated sex differences in the accuracy and precision of judging time to arrival. We used accuracy to mean the ability to match the actual time to arrival and precision to mean the consistency with which each participant made their judgments. Our task was presented as a computer game in which a toy UFO moved obliquely towards the participant through a virtual three-dimensional space on route to a docking station. The UFO disappeared before docking and participants pressed their space bar at the precise moment they thought the UFO would have docked. Study 1 showed it was possible to conduct quantitative studies of spatiotemporal judgments in virtual reality via the Internet and confirmed reports that men are more accurate because women underestimate, but found no difference in precision measured as intra-participant variation. Study 2 repeated Study 1 with five additional presentations of one condition to provide a better measure of precision. Again, men were more accurate than women but there were no sex differences in precision. However, within the coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) literature, of those studies that report sex differences, a majority found that males are both more accurate and more precise than females. Noting that many CAT studies report no sex differences, we discuss appropriate interpretations of such null findings. While acknowledging that CAT performance may be influenced by experience we suggest that the sex difference may have originated among our ancestors with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting and women for gathering.

  5. Comprehensive Numerical Analysis of Finite Difference Time Domain Methods for Improving Optical Waveguide Sensor Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Samak, M. Mosleh E. Abu; Bakar, A. Ashrif A.; Kashif, Muhammad; Zan, Mohd Saiful Dzulkifly

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses numerical analysis methods for different geometrical features that have limited interval values for typically used sensor wavelengths. Compared with existing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods, the alternating direction implicit (ADI)-FDTD method reduces the number of sub-steps by a factor of two to three, which represents a 33% time savings in each single run. The local one-dimensional (LOD)-FDTD method has similar numerical equation properties, which should be calculated as in the previous method. Generally, a small number of arithmetic processes, which result in a shorter simulation time, are desired. The alternating direction implicit technique can be considered a significant step forward for improving the efficiency of unconditionally stable FDTD schemes. This comparative study shows that the local one-dimensional method had minimum relative error ranges of less than 40% for analytical frequencies above 42.85 GHz, and the same accuracy was generated by both methods.

  6. Eye exercises enhance accuracy and letter recognition, but not reaction time, in a modified rapid serial visual presentation task.

    PubMed

    Di Noto, Paula; Uta, Sorin; DeSouza, Joseph F X

    2013-01-01

    Eye exercises have been prescribed to resolve a multitude of eye-related problems. However, studies on the efficacy of eye exercises are lacking, mainly due to the absence of simple assessment tools in the clinic. Because similar regions of the brain are responsible for eye movements and visual attention, we used a modified rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) to assess any measurable effect of short-term eye exercise in improvements within these domains. In the present study, twenty subjects were equally divided into control and experimental groups, each of which performed a pre-training RSVP assessment where target letters, to which subjects were asked to respond to by pressing a spacebar, were serially and rapidly presented. Response time to target letters, accuracy of correctly responding to target letters, and correct identification of target letters in each of 12 sessions was measured. The experimental group then performed active eye exercises, while the control group performed a task that minimized eye movements for 18.5 minutes. A final post-training RSVP assessment was performed by both groups and response time, accuracy, and letter identification were compared between and within subject groups both pre- and post-training. Subjects who performed eye exercises were more accurate in responding to target letters separated by one distractor and in letter identification in the post-training RSVP assessment, while latency of responses were unchanged between and within groups. This suggests that eye exercises may prove useful in enhancing cognitive performance on tasks related to attention and memory over a very brief course of training, and RSVP may be a useful measure of this efficacy. Further research is needed on eye exercises to determine whether they are an effective treatment for patients with cognitive and eye-related disorders.

  7. Effects of training and simulated combat stress on leg tourniquet application accuracy, time, and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Schreckengaust, Richard; Littlejohn, Lanny; Zarow, Gregory J

    2014-02-01

    The lower extremity tourniquet failure rate remains significantly higher in combat than in preclinical testing, so we hypothesized that tourniquet placement accuracy, speed, and effectiveness would improve during training and decline during simulated combat. Navy Hospital Corpsman (N = 89), enrolled in a Tactical Combat Casualty Care training course in preparation for deployment, applied Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) and the Special Operations Forces Tactical Tourniquet (SOFT-T) on day 1 and day 4 of classroom training, then under simulated combat, wherein participants ran an obstacle course to apply a tourniquet while wearing full body armor and avoiding simulated small arms fire (paint balls). Application time and pulse elimination effectiveness improved day 1 to day 4 (p < 0.005). Under simulated combat, application time slowed significantly (p < 0.001), whereas accuracy and effectiveness declined slightly. Pulse elimination was poor for CAT (25% failure) and SOFT-T (60% failure) even in classroom conditions following training. CAT was more quickly applied (p < 0.005) and more effective (p < 0.002) than SOFT-T. Training fostered fast and effective application of leg tourniquets while performance declined under simulated combat. The inherent efficacy of tourniquet products contributes to high failure rates under combat conditions, pointing to the need for superior tourniquets and for rigorous deployment preparation training in simulated combat scenarios.

  8. Effects of machining accuracy on frequency response properties of thick-screen frequency selective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chunyi; Gao, Jinsong; Xin, Chen

    2012-10-01

    Electromagnetic theory shows that a thick-screen frequency selective surface (FSS) has many advantages in its frequency response characteristics. In addition, it can be used to make a stealth radome. Therefore, we research in detail how machining accuracy affects the frequency response properties of the FSS in the gigahertz range. Specifically, by using the least squares method applied to machining data, the effects of different machining precision in the samples can be calculated thus obtaining frequency response curves which were verified by testing in the near-field in a microwave dark room. The results show that decreasing roughness and flatness variation leads to an increase in the bandwidth and that an increase in spacing error leads to the center frequency drifting lower. Finally, an increase in aperture error leads to an increase in bandwidth. Therefore, the conclusion is that machining accuracy should be controlled and that a spatial error less than 0.05 mm is required in order to avoid unwanted center frequency drift and a transmittance decrease.

  9. Accuracy and reproducibility of bending stiffness measurements by mechanical response tissue analysis in artificial human ulnas.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Patricia A; Ellerbrock, Emily R; Bowman, Lyn; Loucks, Anne B

    2014-11-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by reduced bone strength, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone strength. Bone strength is strongly associated with bone stiffness, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone stiffness either. Mechanical Response Tissue Analysis (MRTA) is a non-significant risk, non-invasive, radiation-free, vibration analysis technique for making immediate, direct functional measurements of the bending stiffness of long bones in humans in vivo. MRTA has been used for research purposes for more than 20 years, but little has been published about its accuracy. To begin to investigate its accuracy, we compared MRTA measurements of bending stiffness in 39 artificial human ulna bones to measurements made by Quasistatic Mechanical Testing (QMT). In the process, we also quantified the reproducibility (i.e., precision and repeatability) of both methods. MRTA precision (1.0±1.0%) and repeatability (3.1 ± 3.1%) were not as high as those of QMT (0.2 ± 0.2% and 1.3+1.7%, respectively; both p<10(-4)). The relationship between MRTA and QMT measurements of ulna bending stiffness was indistinguishable from the identity line (p=0.44) and paired measurements by the two methods agreed within a 95% confidence interval of ± 5%. If such accuracy can be achieved on real human ulnas in situ, and if the ulna is representative of the appendicular skeleton, MRTA may prove clinically useful.

  10. Accuracy and reproducibility of bending stiffness measurements by mechanical response tissue analysis in artificial human ulnas.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Patricia A; Ellerbrock, Emily R; Bowman, Lyn; Loucks, Anne B

    2014-11-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by reduced bone strength, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone strength. Bone strength is strongly associated with bone stiffness, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone stiffness either. Mechanical Response Tissue Analysis (MRTA) is a non-significant risk, non-invasive, radiation-free, vibration analysis technique for making immediate, direct functional measurements of the bending stiffness of long bones in humans in vivo. MRTA has been used for research purposes for more than 20 years, but little has been published about its accuracy. To begin to investigate its accuracy, we compared MRTA measurements of bending stiffness in 39 artificial human ulna bones to measurements made by Quasistatic Mechanical Testing (QMT). In the process, we also quantified the reproducibility (i.e., precision and repeatability) of both methods. MRTA precision (1.0±1.0%) and repeatability (3.1 ± 3.1%) were not as high as those of QMT (0.2 ± 0.2% and 1.3+1.7%, respectively; both p<10(-4)). The relationship between MRTA and QMT measurements of ulna bending stiffness was indistinguishable from the identity line (p=0.44) and paired measurements by the two methods agreed within a 95% confidence interval of ± 5%. If such accuracy can be achieved on real human ulnas in situ, and if the ulna is representative of the appendicular skeleton, MRTA may prove clinically useful. PMID:25261885

  11. Predicted accuracy of and response to genomic selection for new traits in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Calus, M P L; de Haas, Y; Pszczola, M; Veerkamp, R F

    2013-02-01

    Genomic selection relaxes the requirement of traditional selection tools to have phenotypic measurements on close relatives of all selection candidates. This opens up possibilities to select for traits that are difficult or expensive to measure. The objectives of this paper were to predict accuracy of and response to genomic selection for a new trait, considering that only a cow reference population of moderate size was available for the new trait, and that selection simultaneously targeted an index and this new trait. Accuracy for and response to selection were deterministically evaluated for three different breeding goals. Single trait selection for the new trait based only on a limited cow reference population of up to 10 000 cows, showed that maximum genetic responses of 0.20 and 0.28 genetic standard deviation (s.d.) per year can be achieved for traits with a heritability of 0.05 and 0.30, respectively. Adding information from the index based on a reference population of 5000 bulls, and assuming a genetic correlation of 0.5, increased genetic response for both heritability levels by up to 0.14 genetic s.d. per year. The scenario with simultaneous selection for the new trait and the index, yielded a substantially lower response for the new trait, especially when the genetic correlation with the index was negative. Despite the lower response for the index, whenever the new trait had considerable economic value, including the cow reference population considerably improved the genetic response for the new trait. For scenarios with a zero or negative genetic correlation with the index and equal economic value for the index and the new trait, a reference population of 2000 cows increased genetic response for the new trait with at least 0.10 and 0.20 genetic s.d. per year, for heritability levels of 0.05 and 0.30, respectively. We conclude that for new traits with a very small or positive genetic correlation with the index, and a high positive economic value

  12. Accuracy of prospective space-time surveillance in detecting tuberculosis transmission.

    PubMed

    Verma, Aman; Schwartzman, Kevin; Behr, Marcel A; Zwerling, Alice; Allard, Robert; Rochefort, Christian M; Buckeridge, David L

    2014-04-01

    To improve detection of tuberculosis transmission, public health can supplement contact tracing with space-time surveillance. However, investigation of space-time clusters not due to transmission (false alarms), may lead to costly, unnecessary interventions. We measured the accuracy of prospective space-time surveillance in detecting tuberculosis transmission, assessing the number of clusters containing transmission and the false alarm rate. We simulated monthly prospective applications of a scan statistic using the home addresses and diagnosis dates of all 1566 culture-positive TB cases reported in Montreal during 1996-2007. We verified transmission within the space-time clusters by analyzing the TB genotype. Over 11.5 years, at 1.3 false alarms per month, we detected 89 transmission chains; at 0.05 false alarms per month we detected 5 transmission chains. We found evidence that prospective space-time surveillance for TB leads to a high false alarm rate, limiting its practical utility in settings with TB epidemiology similar to Montreal.

  13. Accuracy validation of T2L2 time transfer in co-location.

    PubMed

    Laas-Bourez, Myrtille; Courde, Clément; Samain, Etienne; Exertier, Pierre; Guillemot, Philippe; Torre, Jean-Marie; Martin, Nicolas; Foussard, Claude

    2015-02-01

    The Time Transfer by Laser Link (T2L2) experiment has been developed in close collaboration between Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales and Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur. The aim is to synchronize remote ultra-stable clocks over large-scale distances using two laser ranging stations. This ground to space time transfer has been derived from laser telemetry technology with dedicated space equipment designed to record arrival time of laser pulses on board the satellite. For 3 years, specific campaigns have been organized to prove T2L2 performance. In April 2012, we performed a 2-week campaign with our two laser ranging stations, Métrologie Optique and French Transportable Laser Ranging Station, to demonstrate the T2L2 time transfer accuracy in co-location. We have compared three independent time transfer techniques: T2L2, GPS, and direct measurement, with both an event timer and an interval counter. The most important result obtained in this campaign was a mean agreement between T2L2 and a direct comparison better than 200 ps. This is the first major step to validate the uncertainty budget of the entire T2L2 experiment. This paper focuses on this campaign setup and the obtained results. PMID:25643076

  14. Accuracy validation of T2L2 time transfer in co-location.

    PubMed

    Laas-Bourez, Myrtille; Courde, Clément; Samain, Etienne; Exertier, Pierre; Guillemot, Philippe; Torre, Jean-Marie; Martin, Nicolas; Foussard, Claude

    2015-02-01

    The Time Transfer by Laser Link (T2L2) experiment has been developed in close collaboration between Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales and Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur. The aim is to synchronize remote ultra-stable clocks over large-scale distances using two laser ranging stations. This ground to space time transfer has been derived from laser telemetry technology with dedicated space equipment designed to record arrival time of laser pulses on board the satellite. For 3 years, specific campaigns have been organized to prove T2L2 performance. In April 2012, we performed a 2-week campaign with our two laser ranging stations, Métrologie Optique and French Transportable Laser Ranging Station, to demonstrate the T2L2 time transfer accuracy in co-location. We have compared three independent time transfer techniques: T2L2, GPS, and direct measurement, with both an event timer and an interval counter. The most important result obtained in this campaign was a mean agreement between T2L2 and a direct comparison better than 200 ps. This is the first major step to validate the uncertainty budget of the entire T2L2 experiment. This paper focuses on this campaign setup and the obtained results.

  15. More than accuracy: Nonverbal dialects modulate the time course of vocal emotion recognition across cultures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoming; Paulmann, Silke; Robin, Jessica; Pell, Marc D

    2015-06-01

    Using a gating paradigm, this study investigated the nature of the in-group advantage in vocal emotion recognition by comparing 2 distinct cultures. Pseudoutterances conveying 4 basic emotions, expressed in English and Hindi, were presented to English and Hindi listeners. In addition to hearing full utterances, each stimulus was gated from its onset to construct 5 processing intervals to pinpoint when the in-group advantage emerges, and whether this differs when listening to a foreign language (English participants judging Hindi) or a second language (Hindi participants judging English). An index of the mean emotion identification point for each group and unbiased measures of accuracy at each time point was calculated. Results showed that in each language condition, native listeners were faster and more accurate than non-native listeners to recognize emotions. The in-group advantage emerged in both conditions after processing 400 ms to 500 ms of acoustic information. In the bilingual Hindi group, greater oral proficiency in English predicted faster and more accurate recognition of English emotional expressions. Consistent with dialect theory, our findings provide new evidence that nonverbal dialects impede both the accuracy and the efficiency of vocal emotion processing in cross-cultural settings, even when individuals are highly proficient in the out-group target language.

  16. Intracranial aneurysms: Diagnostics accuracy of three-dimensional, fourier transform, time-of-flight MR angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Korogi, Yukunori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Mabuchi, Nobuhisa; Miki, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Satoru; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Nakagawa, Toshio; O`Uchi, Toshihiro; Watabe, Tsuneya; Shiga, Hayao

    1994-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of three-dimensional, Fourier transform, time-of-flight magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in the identification of intracranial aneurysms. MR angiograms of 126 patients (59 male and 67 female patients, aged 12-77 years) with various intracranial vascular lesions were evaluated. Seventy-eight aneurysms, including 60 less than 5 mm in diameter, in 61 patients were depicted at conventional angiography. Eight projection images, as well as one axial collapsed MR angiogram obtained with a maximum-intensity projection algorithm, were used for evaluation. Sensitivity for the five observers ranged from 58% to 68% (mean, 63%). Higher sensitivity was achieved for anterior communicating and middle cerebral artery aneurysms, while that for internal carotid artery aneurysms was poor. Sensitivities for small and medium aneurysms ranged from 50% to 60% (mean, 56%) and from 77% to 94% (mean, 85%), respectively. MR angiography can depict intracranial aneurysms 5 mm or larger with good accuracy but is less useful for the identification of smaller aneurysms. 12 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Sex differences in accuracy and precision when judging time to arrival: data from two Internet studies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff; Sinclair, Kamila

    2011-12-01

    We report two Internet studies that investigated sex differences in the accuracy and precision of judging time to arrival. We used accuracy to mean the ability to match the actual time to arrival and precision to mean the consistency with which each participant made their judgments. Our task was presented as a computer game in which a toy UFO moved obliquely towards the participant through a virtual three-dimensional space on route to a docking station. The UFO disappeared before docking and participants pressed their space bar at the precise moment they thought the UFO would have docked. Study 1 showed it was possible to conduct quantitative studies of spatiotemporal judgments in virtual reality via the Internet and confirmed reports that men are more accurate because women underestimate, but found no difference in precision measured as intra-participant variation. Study 2 repeated Study 1 with five additional presentations of one condition to provide a better measure of precision. Again, men were more accurate than women but there were no sex differences in precision. However, within the coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) literature, of those studies that report sex differences, a majority found that males are both more accurate and more precise than females. Noting that many CAT studies report no sex differences, we discuss appropriate interpretations of such null findings. While acknowledging that CAT performance may be influenced by experience we suggest that the sex difference may have originated among our ancestors with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting and women for gathering. PMID:21125324

  18. Prismatic displacement effect of progressive multifocal glasses on reaction time and accuracy in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Ashton C; Campbell, A John; Robertson, M Clare; Sanderson, Gordon F

    2014-01-01

    Background Multifocal glasses (bifocals, trifocals, and progressives) increase the risk of falling in elderly people, but how they do so is unclear. To explain why glasses with progressive addition lenses increase the risk of falls and whether this can be attributed to false projection, this study aimed to 1) map the prismatic displacement of a progressive lens, and 2) test whether this displacement impaired reaction time and accuracy. Methods The reaction times of healthy ≥75-year-olds (31 participants) were measured when grasping for a bar and touching a black line. Participants performed each test twice, wearing their progressives and new, matched single vision (distance) glasses in random order. The line and bar targets were positioned according to the maximum and minimum prismatic displacement effect through the progressive lens, mapped using a focimeter. Results Progressive spectacle lenses have large areas of prismatic displacement in the central visual axis and edges. Reaction time was faster for progressives compared with single vision glasses with a centrally-placed horizontal grab bar (mean difference 101 ms, P=0.011 [repeated measures analysis]) and a horizontal black line placed 300 mm below center (mean difference 80 ms, P=0.007). There was no difference in accuracy between the two types of glasses. Conclusion Older people appear to adapt to the false projection of progressives in the central visual axis. This adaptation means that swapping to new glasses or a large change in prescription may lead to a fall. Frequently updating glasses may be more beneficial. PMID:24872674

  19. Validity and accuracy of electric response audiometry using the auditory steady-state response: evaluation in an empirical design.

    PubMed

    Kaf, Wafaa A; Durrant, John D; Sabo, Diane L; Robert Boston, J; Taubman, Lisa B; Kovacyk, Kristie

    2006-04-01

    The validity and accuracy of the application of the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) to electric response audiometry (ERA) was tested further in a study permitting subjects to be their own controls for hearing loss. Simulated sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) of complex configuration and varying degrees was effected using filtered masking noise. Thresholds estimated via ASSR-ERA were compared to those measured via conventional pure-tone audiometry. Further, the slow vertex potential N1-P2 was recorded to permit a comparison with an evoked-response test of common content validity and known accuracy. Results in a homogeneous subject sample demonstrated strong interest correlation and agreement within 10 dB at 1000 to 4000 Hz (on average), but not at 500 Hz. The configurations determined by ASSR-ERA followed behavioral audiometric patterns well, except for the mildest degree of SSHL tested. Consequently, limitations of ERA remain, although ASSR-ERA appears to be quite valid overall and promises (justifiably) broad clinical applicability. PMID:16684702

  20. Effect of Variations in IRU Integration Time Interval On Accuracy of Aqua Attitude Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natanson, G. A.; Tracewell, Dave

    2003-01-01

    During Aqua launch support, attitude analysts noticed several anomalies in Onboard Computer (OBC) rates and in rates computed by the ground Attitude Determination System (ADS). These included: 1) periodic jumps in the OBC pitch rate every 2 minutes; 2) spikes in ADS pitch rate every 4 minutes; 3) close agreement between pitch rates computed by ADS and those derived from telemetered OBC quaternions (in contrast to the step-wise pattern observed for telemetered OBC rates); 4) spikes of +/- 10 milliseconds in telemetered IRU integration time every 4 minutes (despite the fact that telemetered time tags of any two sequential IRU measurements were always 1 second apart from each other). An analysis presented in the paper explains this anomalous behavior by a small average offset of about 0.5 +/- 0.05 microsec in the time interval between two sequential accumulated angle measurements. It is shown that errors in the estimated pitch angle due to neglecting the aforementioned variations in the integration time interval by the OBC is within +/- 2 arcseconds. Ground attitude solutions are found to be accurate enough to see the effect of the variations on the accuracy of the estimated pitch angle.

  1. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal...

  2. Improving Accuracy in Arrhenius Models of Cell Death: Adding a Temperature-Dependent Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A

    2015-12-01

    The Arrhenius formulation for single-step irreversible unimolecular reactions has been used for many decades to describe the thermal damage and cell death processes. Arrhenius predictions are acceptably accurate for structural proteins, for some cell death assays, and for cell death at higher temperatures in most cell lines, above about 55 °C. However, in many cases--and particularly at hyperthermic temperatures, between about 43 and 55 °C--the particular intrinsic cell death or damage process under study exhibits a significant "shoulder" region that constant-rate Arrhenius models are unable to represent with acceptable accuracy. The primary limitation is that Arrhenius calculations always overestimate the cell death fraction, which leads to severely overoptimistic predictions of heating effectiveness in tumor treatment. Several more sophisticated mathematical model approaches have been suggested and show much-improved performance. But simpler models that have adequate accuracy would provide useful and practical alternatives to intricate biochemical analyses. Typical transient intrinsic cell death processes at hyperthermic temperatures consist of a slowly developing shoulder region followed by an essentially constant-rate region. The shoulder regions have been demonstrated to arise chiefly from complex functional protein signaling cascades that generate delays in the onset of the constant-rate region, but may involve heat shock protein activity as well. This paper shows that acceptably accurate and much-improved predictions in the simpler Arrhenius models can be obtained by adding a temperature-dependent time delay. Kinetic coefficients and the appropriate time delay are obtained from the constant-rate regions of the measured survival curves. The resulting predictions are seen to provide acceptably accurate results while not overestimating cell death. The method can be relatively easily incorporated into numerical models. Additionally, evidence is presented

  3. Improving Accuracy in Arrhenius Models of Cell Death: Adding a Temperature-Dependent Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A

    2015-12-01

    The Arrhenius formulation for single-step irreversible unimolecular reactions has been used for many decades to describe the thermal damage and cell death processes. Arrhenius predictions are acceptably accurate for structural proteins, for some cell death assays, and for cell death at higher temperatures in most cell lines, above about 55 °C. However, in many cases--and particularly at hyperthermic temperatures, between about 43 and 55 °C--the particular intrinsic cell death or damage process under study exhibits a significant "shoulder" region that constant-rate Arrhenius models are unable to represent with acceptable accuracy. The primary limitation is that Arrhenius calculations always overestimate the cell death fraction, which leads to severely overoptimistic predictions of heating effectiveness in tumor treatment. Several more sophisticated mathematical model approaches have been suggested and show much-improved performance. But simpler models that have adequate accuracy would provide useful and practical alternatives to intricate biochemical analyses. Typical transient intrinsic cell death processes at hyperthermic temperatures consist of a slowly developing shoulder region followed by an essentially constant-rate region. The shoulder regions have been demonstrated to arise chiefly from complex functional protein signaling cascades that generate delays in the onset of the constant-rate region, but may involve heat shock protein activity as well. This paper shows that acceptably accurate and much-improved predictions in the simpler Arrhenius models can be obtained by adding a temperature-dependent time delay. Kinetic coefficients and the appropriate time delay are obtained from the constant-rate regions of the measured survival curves. The resulting predictions are seen to provide acceptably accurate results while not overestimating cell death. The method can be relatively easily incorporated into numerical models. Additionally, evidence is presented

  4. Accuracy of spirometric and flow-volume indices obtained by digitizing volume-time tracings.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, C R; Sneddon, S L; Schenker, M; Garshick, E; Speizer, F E; Mead, J

    1987-07-01

    We tested the accuracy of a new system for deriving standard spirometric indices, maximal expiratory flow rates, and slope ratios from volume-time tracings. A computer-based technique employing a hand-operated cursor was used to put discrete values of volume and time into a memory array. Spirometric values obtained on 102 subjects using the computer system were compared with the corresponding "hand-read" values. The difference between the 2 measuring techniques were not significant for the FVC, the FEV75, and the FEF25-75; however, the average FEV1 differed by 6.7 ml (SD, 20.3 ml), which was significant. In addition, 10 subjects performed FVC maneuvers through a spirometer and flowmeter connected in series. Flows and slope ratios obtained from the volume-time tracings were compared with those obtained directly from the flowmeter. There was a high degree of correlation between the 2 types of flow measurements (r = 0.989), whereas slope ratios were less well correlated (r = 0.589). Configurational detail such as the presence of "bumps" on slope ratio versus volume plots were recovered with the computer technique. Using this new system, it is possible for 1 operator to process 10 to 12 sets of spirometry tracings per hour. PMID:3605826

  5. High-accuracy time- and space-resolved Stark shift measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.E.; Adams, R.; Carlson, A.L.; Ching, C.H.; Filuk, A.B.; Lake, P.

    1996-07-01

    Stark-shift measurements using emission spectroscopy are a powerful tool for advancing understanding in many plasma physics experiments. The authors use simultaneous 2-D-spatial and time-resolved spectra to study the electric field evolution in the 20 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II ion diode acceleration gap. Fiber optic arrays transport light from the gap to remote streaked spectrographs operated in a multiplexed mode that enables recording time-resolved spectra from eight spatial locations on a single instrument. Design optimization and characterization measurements of the multiplexed spectrograph properties include the astigmatism, resolution, dispersion variation, and sensitivity. A semi-automated line-fitting procedure determines the Stark shift and the related uncertainties. Fields up to 10 MV/cm are measured with an accuracy {+-}2--4%. Detailed tests of the fitting procedure confirm that the wavelength shift uncertainties are accurate to better than {+-}20%. Development of an active spectroscopy probe technique that uses laser-induced fluorescence from an injected atomic beam to obtain 3-D space- and time-resolved measurements of the electric and magnetic fields is in progress.

  6. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms. PMID:27686111

  7. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms.

  8. Time-dependent classification accuracy curve under marker-dependent sampling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaoyin; Wang, Xiaofei; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Kosinski, Andrzej S; George, Stephen L

    2016-07-01

    Evaluating the classification accuracy of a candidate biomarker signaling the onset of disease or disease status is essential for medical decision making. A good biomarker would accurately identify the patients who are likely to progress or die at a particular time in the future or who are in urgent need for active treatments. To assess the performance of a candidate biomarker, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) are commonly used. In many cases, the standard simple random sampling (SRS) design used for biomarker validation studies is costly and inefficient. In order to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of biomarker validation, marker-dependent sampling (MDS) may be used. In a MDS design, the selection of patients to assess true survival time is dependent on the result of a biomarker assay. In this article, we introduce a nonparametric estimator for time-dependent AUC under a MDS design. The consistency and the asymptotic normality of the proposed estimator is established. Simulation shows the unbiasedness of the proposed estimator and a significant efficiency gain of the MDS design over the SRS design. PMID:27119599

  9. Estimating subsurface water volumes and transit times in Hokkaido river catchments, Japan, using high-accuracy tritium analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusyev, Maksym; Yamazaki, Yusuke; Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike; Kashiwaya, Kazuhisa; Hirai, Yasuyuki; Kuribayashi, Daisuke; Sawano, Hisaya

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study is to estimate subsurface water transit times and volumes in headwater catchments of Hokkaido, Japan, using the New Zealand high-accuracy tritium analysis technique. Transit time provides insights into the subsurface water storage and therefore provides a robust and quick approach to quantifying the subsurface groundwater volume. Our method is based on tritium measurements in river water. Tritium is a component of meteoric water, decays with a half-life of 12.32 years, and is inert in the subsurface after the water enters the groundwater system. Therefore, tritium is ideally suited for characterization of the catchment's responses and can provide information on mean water transit times up to 200 years. Only in recent years has it become possible to use tritium for dating of stream and river water, due to the fading impact of the bomb-tritium from thermo-nuclear weapons testing, and due to improved measurement accuracy for the extremely low natural tritium concentrations. Transit time of the water discharge is one of the most crucial parameters for understanding the response of catchments and estimating subsurface water volume. While many tritium transit time studies have been conducted in New Zealand, only a limited number of tritium studies have been conducted in Japan. In addition, the meteorological, orographic and geological conditions of Hokkaido Island are similar to those in parts of New Zealand, allowing for comparison between these regions. In 2014, three field trips were conducted in Hokkaido in June, July and October to sample river water at river gauging stations operated by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). These stations have altitudes between 36 m and 860 m MSL and drainage areas between 45 and 377 km2. Each sampled point is located upstream of MLIT dams, with hourly measurements of precipitation and river water levels enabling us to distinguish between the snow melt and baseflow contributions

  10. A Method for Evaluating Timeliness and Accuracy of Volitional Motor Responses to Vibrotactile Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Leineweber, Matthew J; Shi, Sam; Andrysek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Artificial sensory feedback (ASF) systems can be used to compensate for lost proprioception in individuals with lower-limb impairments. Effective design of these ASF systems requires an in-depth understanding of how the parameters of specific feedback mechanism affect user perception and reaction to stimuli. This article presents a method for applying vibrotactile stimuli to human participants and measuring their response. Rotating mass vibratory motors are placed at pre-defined locations on the participant's thigh, and controlled through custom hardware and software. The speed and accuracy of participants' volitional responses to vibrotactile stimuli are measured for researcher-specified combinations of motor placement and vibration frequency. While the protocol described here uses push-buttons to collect a simple binary response to the vibrotactile stimuli, the technique can be extended to other response mechanisms using inertial measurement units or pressure sensors to measure joint angle and weight bearing ratios, respectively. Similarly, the application of vibrotactile stimuli can be explored for body segments other than the thigh. PMID:27585366

  11. Vehicle Position Estimation Based on Magnetic Markers: Enhanced Accuracy by Compensation of Time Delays

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Yeun-Sub; Jeong, Rag-Gyo; Kang, Seok-Won

    2015-01-01

    The real-time recognition of absolute (or relative) position and orientation on a network of roads is a core technology for fully automated or driving-assisted vehicles. This paper presents an empirical investigation of the design, implementation, and evaluation of a self-positioning system based on a magnetic marker reference sensing method for an autonomous vehicle. Specifically, the estimation accuracy of the magnetic sensing ruler (MSR) in the up-to-date estimation of the actual position was successfully enhanced by compensating for time delays in signal processing when detecting the vertical magnetic field (VMF) in an array of signals. In this study, the signal processing scheme was developed to minimize the effects of the distortion of measured signals when estimating the relative positional information based on magnetic signals obtained using the MSR. In other words, the center point in a 2D magnetic field contour plot corresponding to the actual position of magnetic markers was estimated by tracking the errors between pre-defined reference models and measured magnetic signals. The algorithm proposed in this study was validated by experimental measurements using a test vehicle on a pilot network of roads. From the results, the positioning error was found to be less than 0.04 m on average in an operational test. PMID:26580622

  12. The accuracy of current methods in determining the timing of epiphysiodesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, S C; Shim, J S; Seo, S W; Lim, K S; Ko, K R

    2013-07-01

    We compared the accuracy of the growth remaining method of assessing leg-length discrepancy (LLD) with the straight-line graph method, the multiplier method and their variants. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 44 patients treated by percutaneous epiphysiodesis for LLD. All were followed up until maturity. We used the modified Green-Anderson growth-remaining method (Method 1) to plan the timing of epiphysiodesis. Then we presumed that the other four methods described below were used pre-operatively for calculating the timing of epiphysiodesis. We then assumed that these four methods were used pre-operatively. Method 2 was the original Green-Anderson growth-remaining method; Method 3, Paley's multiplier method using bone age; Method 4, Paley's multiplier method using chronological age; and Method 5, Moseley's straight-line graph method. We compared 'Expected LLD at maturity with surgery' with 'Final LLD at maturity with surgery' for each method. Statistical analysis revealed that 'Expected LLD at maturity with surgery' was significantly different from 'Final LLD at maturity with surgery'. Method 2 was the most accurate. There was a significant correlation between 'Expected LLD at maturity with surgery' and 'Final LLD at maturity with surgery', the greatest correlation being with Method 2. Generally all the methods generated an overcorrected value. No method generates the precise 'Expected LLD at maturity with surgery'. It is essential that an analysis of the pattern of growth is taken into account when predicting final LLD. As many additional data as possible are required.

  13. Vehicle Position Estimation Based on Magnetic Markers: Enhanced Accuracy by Compensation of Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Byun, Yeun-Sub; Jeong, Rag-Gyo; Kang, Seok-Won

    2015-01-01

    The real-time recognition of absolute (or relative) position and orientation on a network of roads is a core technology for fully automated or driving-assisted vehicles. This paper presents an empirical investigation of the design, implementation, and evaluation of a self-positioning system based on a magnetic marker reference sensing method for an autonomous vehicle. Specifically, the estimation accuracy of the magnetic sensing ruler (MSR) in the up-to-date estimation of the actual position was successfully enhanced by compensating for time delays in signal processing when detecting the vertical magnetic field (VMF) in an array of signals. In this study, the signal processing scheme was developed to minimize the effects of the distortion of measured signals when estimating the relative positional information based on magnetic signals obtained using the MSR. In other words, the center point in a 2D magnetic field contour plot corresponding to the actual position of magnetic markers was estimated by tracking the errors between pre-defined reference models and measured magnetic signals. The algorithm proposed in this study was validated by experimental measurements using a test vehicle on a pilot network of roads. From the results, the positioning error was found to be less than 0.04 m on average in an operational test. PMID:26580622

  14. Silicon Timing Response to Particles and Light

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is observed growing interest to fast timing detectors in high energy physics, related, for example, with collider luminosity increase (LHC) [1]. The options of CMS [2] calorimeter upgrade based on silicon detectors renewed interest to the timing study of this type of detectors. The article is devoted to study of silicon timing response to particles and light.

  15. Cognitive Reflection, Decision Biases, and Response Times

    PubMed Central

    Alós-Ferrer, Carlos; Garagnani, Michele; Hügelschäfer, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    We present novel evidence on response times and personality traits in standard questions from the decision-making literature where responses are relatively slow (medians around half a minute or above). To this end, we measured response times in a number of incentivized, framed items (decisions from description) including the Cognitive Reflection Test, two additional questions following the same logic, and a number of classic questions used to study decision biases in probability judgments (base-rate neglect, the conjunction fallacy, and the ratio bias). All questions create a conflict between an intuitive process and more deliberative thinking. For each item, we then created a non-conflict version by either making the intuitive impulse correct (resulting in an alignment question), shutting it down (creating a neutral question), or making it dominant (creating a heuristic question). For CRT questions, the differences in response times are as predicted by dual-process theories, with alignment and heuristic variants leading to faster responses and neutral questions to slower responses than the original, conflict questions. For decision biases (where responses are slower), evidence is mixed. To explore the possible influence of personality factors on both choices and response times, we used standard personality scales including the Rational-Experiential Inventory and the Big Five, and used them as controls in regression analysis. PMID:27713710

  16. Validating the Accuracy of Reaction Time Assessment on Computer-Based Tablet Devices.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Philip; Ybarra, Vincent; Leitner, Donald

    2015-08-01

    Computer-based assessment has evolved to tablet-based devices. Despite the availability of tablets and "apps," there is limited research validating their use. We documented timing delays between stimulus presentation and (simulated) touch response on iOS devices (3rd- and 4th-generation Apple iPads) and Android devices (Kindle Fire, Google Nexus, Samsung Galaxy) at response intervals of 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 milliseconds (ms). Results showed significantly greater timing error on Google Nexus and Samsung tablets (81-97 ms), than Kindle Fire and Apple iPads (27-33 ms). Within Apple devices, iOS 7 obtained significantly lower timing error than iOS 6. Simple reaction time (RT) trials (250 ms) on tablet devices represent 12% to 40% error (30-100 ms), depending on the device, which decreases considerably for choice RT trials (3-5% error at 1,000 ms). Results raise implications for using the same device for serial clinical assessment of RT using tablets, as well as the need for calibration of software and hardware. PMID:25612627

  17. Validating the Accuracy of Reaction Time Assessment on Computer-Based Tablet Devices.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Philip; Ybarra, Vincent; Leitner, Donald

    2015-08-01

    Computer-based assessment has evolved to tablet-based devices. Despite the availability of tablets and "apps," there is limited research validating their use. We documented timing delays between stimulus presentation and (simulated) touch response on iOS devices (3rd- and 4th-generation Apple iPads) and Android devices (Kindle Fire, Google Nexus, Samsung Galaxy) at response intervals of 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 milliseconds (ms). Results showed significantly greater timing error on Google Nexus and Samsung tablets (81-97 ms), than Kindle Fire and Apple iPads (27-33 ms). Within Apple devices, iOS 7 obtained significantly lower timing error than iOS 6. Simple reaction time (RT) trials (250 ms) on tablet devices represent 12% to 40% error (30-100 ms), depending on the device, which decreases considerably for choice RT trials (3-5% error at 1,000 ms). Results raise implications for using the same device for serial clinical assessment of RT using tablets, as well as the need for calibration of software and hardware.

  18. Response time for multilayered platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Response time constants for several multilayered temperature transducers were determined numerically by using Martin Marietta's MITAS software package which is available at NASA Langley Research Center. Present results were found in close agreement with the solutions reported in the literature, thus, the capability of MITAS was justified. On the basis of experiences gained, the MITAS is recommended for use in predicting the response time constants of sensors by an in-situ technique.

  19. The Value of Response Times in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    A new and very interesting approach to the analysis of responses and response times is proposed by Goldhammer (this issue). In his approach, differences in the speed-ability compromise within respondents are considered to confound the differences in ability between respondents. These confounding effects of speed on the inferences about ability can…

  20. A high accuracy broadband measurement system for time resolved complex bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S; Malhotra, A; Ardelt, G; Ryschka, M

    2014-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements are useful tools in biomedical engineering and life science. Bioimpedance is the electrical impedance of living tissue and can be used in the analysis of various physiological parameters. Bioimpedance is commonly measured by injecting a small well known alternating current via surface electrodes into an object under test and measuring the resultant surface voltages. It is non-invasive, painless and has no known hazards. This work presents a field programmable gate array based high accuracy broadband bioimpedance measurement system for time resolved bioimpedance measurements. The system is able to measure magnitude and phase of complex impedances under test in a frequency range of about 10-500 kHz with excitation currents from 10 µA to 5 mA. The overall measurement uncertainties stay below 1% for the impedance magnitude and below 0.5° for the phase in most measurement ranges. Furthermore, the described system has a sample rate of up to 3840 impedance spectra per second. The performance of the bioimpedance measurement system is demonstrated with a resistor based system calibration and with measurements on biological samples.

  1. Curbside radiology consults: how does the time allotted for review, level of training, and subspecialization affect interpretation accuracy?

    PubMed

    Jordanov, Martin; Bregman, Jana; Montgomery, Kathleen; Heidel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation accuracy of resident and attending radiologists was assessed based on time allotted for study review, level of training, and subspecialization. Twelve cases were presented in a time-constrained and a time-unconstrained fashion to eight residents and six attendings. Overall, timed and untimed diagnostic accuracy was similar for all groups tested. Attendings sometimes performed worse than residents and in-field attendings when reviewing out-of-field studies. Residents often had greater specialty-specific accuracy than out-of-field attendings. Residents are capable of providing accurate "curbside" consultations to referring clinicians even under time-constrained conditions. Highly subspecialized attending radiologists should be cognizant of their out-of-field limitations. PMID:25725945

  2. Accuracy of Perceived Estimated Travel Time by EMS to a Trauma Center in San Bernardino County, California

    PubMed Central

    Neeki, Michael M.; MacNeil, Colin; Toy, Jake; Dong, Fanglong; Vara, Richard; Powell, Joe; Pennington, Troy; Kwong, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mobilization of trauma resources has the potential to cause ripple effects throughout hospital operations. One major factor affecting efficient utilization of trauma resources is a discrepancy between the prehospital estimated time of arrival (ETA) as communicated by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and their actual time of arrival (TOA). The current study aimed to assess the accuracy of the perceived prehospital estimated arrival time by EMS personnel in comparison to their actual arrival time at a Level II trauma center in San Bernardino County, California. Methods This retrospective study included traumas classified as alerts or activations that were transported to Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in 2013. We obtained estimated arrival time and actual arrival time for each transport from the Surgery Department Trauma Registry. The difference between the median of ETA and actual TOA by EMS crews to the trauma center was calculated for these transports. Additional variables assessed included time of day and month during which the transport took place. Results A total of 2,454 patients classified as traumas were identified in the Surgery Department Trauma Registry. After exclusion of trauma consults, walk-ins, handoffs between agencies, downgraded traumas, traumas missing information, and traumas transported by agencies other than American Medical Response, Ontario Fire, Rialto Fire or San Bernardino County Fire, we included a final sample size of 555 alert and activation classified traumas in the final analysis. When combining all transports by the included EMS agencies, the median of the ETA was 10 minutes and the median of the actual TOA was 22 minutes (median of difference=9 minutes, p<0.0001). Furthermore, when comparing the difference between trauma alerts and activations, trauma activations demonstrated an equal or larger difference in the median of the estimated and actual time of arrival (p<0.0001). We also found month and time of

  3. Parsing the phonological loop: activation timing in the dorsal speech stream determines accuracy in speech reproduction.

    PubMed

    Herman, Alexander B; Houde, John F; Vinogradov, Sophia; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2013-03-27

    Despite significant research and important clinical correlates, direct neural evidence for a phonological loop linking speech perception, short-term memory and production remains elusive. To investigate these processes, we acquired whole-head magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings from human subjects performing a variable-length syllable sequence reproduction task. The MEG sensor data were source localized using a time-frequency optimized spatially adaptive filter, and we examined the time courses of cortical oscillatory power and the correlations of oscillatory power with behavior between onset of the audio stimulus and the overt speech response. We found dissociations between time courses of behaviorally relevant activations in a network of regions falling primarily within the dorsal speech stream. In particular, verbal working memory load modulated high gamma power in both Sylvian-parietal-temporal and Broca's areas. The time courses of the correlations between high gamma power and subject performance clearly alternated between these two regions throughout the task. Our results provide the first evidence of a reverberating input-output buffer system in the dorsal stream underlying speech sensorimotor integration, consistent with recent phonological loop, competitive queuing, and speech-motor control models. These findings also shed new light on potential sources of speech dysfunction in aphasia and neuropsychiatric disorders, identifying anatomically and behaviorally dissociable activation time windows critical for successful speech reproduction. PMID:23536060

  4. Accuracy and speed of response to different voice types in a cockpit voice warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, J.; Rumbaugh, W. A.

    1983-09-01

    Voice warning systems (VWS) in aircraft cockpits provide a valuable means of warning identification. Improvements in technology have made the VWS a viable addition to aircraft warning systems. This thesis was an experiment to determine the best voice type (male, female, or neutral machine) for use in a VWS for military aircraft. Different levels of engine background noise, signal to noise ratio of the warning message, and precursor delivery formats were used. The experiment had ten subjects performing a primary tracking task; at random intervals a voice warning was interjected, requiring that the subjects respond by pushing the correct button. The results of this experiment contradict some previous beliefs and findings. The male voice was associated with more accurate responses for voice warning systems in the military aircraft environment. For speed of response the results were more complicated; the male voice was generally more closely associated with faster response times for accurate responses.

  5. Factors Affecting Accuracy and Time Requirements of a Glucose Oxidase-Peroxidase Assay for Determination of Glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate and rapid assays for glucose are desirable for analysis of glucose and starch in food and feedstuffs. An established colorimetric glucose oxidase-peroxidase method for glucose was modified to reduce analysis time, and evaluated for factors that affected accuracy. Time required to perform t...

  6. Influence of alginate impression materials and storage time on surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo D; Moreti, Ana F F; Martinelli, Julia; Berger, Sandrine B; Meneghel, Luciana L; Caixeta, Rodrigo V; Sinhoreti, Mário A C

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models obtained from molds prepared using different alginate impression materials (Cavex ColorChange, Hydrogum 5, or Jeltrate Plus) and with different storage times (1, 3, and 5 days) to models from molds that were filled immediately with no storage time. The molds were prepared over a matrix containing 50-μm line, (ISO 1563 standard) under pressure with a perforated metal tray. The molds were removed 2 minutes after loss of sticky consistency and either filled immediately or stored in closed jars at 100% relative humidity and 37°C for 1, 3, or 5 days. The molds were filled with dental plaster (Durone IV). Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy were evaluated using optical microscopy on the 50-μm wide line, which was 25 mm in length, according to ISO 1563 standard. The dimensional accuracy results (%) were subjected to analysis of variance. The 50-μm wide line (ISO 1563 standard) was completely reproduced by all alginate impression materials regardless of the storage time. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean dimensional accuracy values of stone models made from molds composed of different alginate impression materials and with different storage times (p = 0.989). In conclusion, storing the mold for five days prior to filling did not change the surface detail reproduction or dimensional accuracy of the alginates examined in this study.

  7. High-accuracy real-time automatic thresholding for centroid tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Yanjie

    2006-01-01

    Many of the video image trackers today use the centroid as the tracking point. In engineering, a target's centroid is computed from a binary image to reduce the processing time. Hence thresholding of gray level image to binary image is a decisive step in centroid tracking. How to choose the feat thresholds in clutter is still an intractability problem unsolved today. This paper introduces a high-accuracy real-time automatic thresholding method for centroid tracker. It works well for variety types of target tracking in clutter. The core of this method is to get the entire information contained in the histogram, such as the number of the peaks, their height, position and other properties in the histogram. Combine with this histogram analysis; we can get several key pairs of peaks which can include the target and the background around it and use the method of Otsu to get intensity thresholds from them. According to the thresholds, we can gain the binary image and get the centroid from it. To track the target, the paper also suggests subjoining an eyeshot-window, just like our eyes focus on a target, we will not miss it unless it is out of our eyeshot, the impression will help us to extract the target in clutter and track it and we will wait its emergence since it has been covered. To obtain the impression, the paper offers a idea comes from the method of Snakes; it give a great help for us to get a glancing size, so that we can compare the size of the object in the current frame with the former. If the change is little, we consider the object has been tracked well. Otherwise, if the change is bigger than usual, we should analyze the inflection in the histogram to find out what happened to the object. In general, what we have to do is turning the analysis into codes for the tracker to determine a feat threshold. The paper will show the steps in detail. The paper also discusses the hardware architecture which can meet the speed requirement.

  8. The functional independence of response latency and accuracy: implications for the concept of conceptual tempo.

    PubMed

    Williams, M; Lahey, B B

    1977-12-01

    Kagan (1965a) developed the concepts of impulsive and reflective cognitive styles (conceptual tempo) to add a new dimension to the understanding and assessment of human intelligence. Although latency (the principal component of conceptual tempo) is negatively correlated with academic performance, it may not be necessary to modify latency in order to modify accuracy.. With 40 disadvantaged preschool children, it was found that reinforcing long latencies in choice tasks did not increase accuracy and vice versa, and that reinforcing both long latencies and accuracy was no more effective than reinforcing accuracy alone. These data were used to question the usefulness of the construct of conceptual tempo.

  9. Speed-accuracy tradeoffs and false alarms in bee responses to cryptic predators.

    PubMed

    Ings, Thomas C; Chittka, Lars

    2008-10-14

    Learning plays a crucial role in predator avoidance [1-3], but little is known about how the type of experience with predators molds future prey behavior. Specifically, is predator-avoidance learning and memory retention disrupted by cryptic coloration of predators, such as crab spiders [4, 5]? How does experience with different predators affect foraging decisions? We evaluated these questions by exposing foraging bumblebees to controlled predation risk from predators (robotic crab spiders) that were either cryptic or highly contrasting, as assessed by a quantitative model of bee color perception [6]. Our results from 3D tracking software reveal a speed-accuracy tradeoff [7]: Bees slow their inspection flights after learning that there is a risk from cryptic spiders. The adjustment of inspection effort results in accurate predator detection, leveling out predation risk at the expense of foraging time. Overnight-retention tests reveal no decline in performance, but bees that had experienced cryptic predators are more prone to "false alarms" (rejection of foraging opportunities on safe flowers) than those that had experienced conspicuous predators. Therefore, bees in the cryptic-spider treatment made a functional decision to trade off reduced foraging efficiency via increased inspection times and false-alarm rates against higher potential fitness loss from being injured or eaten.

  10. Assessment of fine motor skill in musicians and nonmusicians: differences in timing versus sequence accuracy in a bimanual fingering task.

    PubMed

    Kincaid, Anthony E; Duncan, Scott; Scott, Samuel A

    2002-08-01

    While professional musicians are generally considered to possess better control of finger movements than nonmusicians, relatively few reports have experimentally addressed the nature of this discrepancy in fine motor skills. For example, it is unknown whether musicians perform with greater skill than control subjects in all aspects of different types of fine motor activities. More specifically, it is not known whether musicians perform better than control subjects on a fine motor task that is similar, but not identical, to the playing of their primary instrument. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of finger placement and accuracy of timing in professional musicians and nonmusicians using a simple, rhythmical, bilateral fingering pattern and the technology that allowed separate assessment of these two parameters. Professional musicians (other than pianists) and nonmusicians were given identical, detailed and explicit instructions but not allowed physically to practice the finger pattern. After verbally repeating the correct pattern for the investigator, subjects performed the task on an electric keyboard with both hands simultaneously. Each subject's performance was then converted to a numerical score. While musicians clearly demonstrated better accuracy in timing, no significant difference was found between the groups in their finger placement scores. These findings were not correlated with subjects' age, sex, limb dominance, or primary instrument (for the professional musicians). This study indicates that professional musicians perform better in timing accuracy but not spatial accuracy while executing a simple, novel, bimanual motor sequence. PMID:12365261

  11. Real-time diagnosis of H. pylori infection during endoscopy: Accuracy of an innovative tool (EndoFaster)

    PubMed Central

    Costamagna, Guido; Zullo, Angelo; Bizzotto, Alessandra; Hassan, Cesare; Riccioni, Maria Elena; Marmo, Clelia; Strangio, Giuseppe; Di Rienzo, Teresa Antonella; Cammarota, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background EndoFaster is novel device able to perform real-time ammonium measurement in gastric juice allowing H. pylori diagnosis during endoscopy. This large study aimed to validate the accuracy of EndoFaster for real-time H. pylori detection. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent upper endoscopy in two centres were prospectively enrolled. During endoscopy, 4 ml of gastric juice were aspirated to perform automatic analysis by EndoFaster within 90 seconds, and H. pylori was considered present (>62 ppm/ml) or absent (≤62 ppm/ml). Accuracy was measured by using histology as gold standard, and 13C-urea breath test (UBT) in discordant cases. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Results Overall, 189 patients were enrolled, but in seven (3.4%) the aspirated gastric juice amount was insufficient to perform the test. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 87.4%, 90.3%, 85.5%, 80.2%, 93.1%, respectively, and 92.6%, 97.1%, 89.7%, 85.9%, 98.0%, respectively, when H. pylori status was reclassified according to the UBT result in discordant cases. Conclusions This study found a high accuracy/feasibility of EndoFaster for real-time H. pylori diagnosis. Use of EndoFaster may allow selecting those patients in whom routine gastric biopsies could be avoided. PMID:27403299

  12. A Ballistic Model of Choice Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott; Heathcote, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Almost all models of response time (RT) use a stochastic accumulation process. To account for the benchmark RT phenomena, researchers have found it necessary to include between-trial variability in the starting point and/or the rate of accumulation, both in linear (R. Ratcliff & J. N. Rouder, 1998) and nonlinear (M. Usher & J. L. McClelland, 2001)…

  13. Structural health monitoring ultrasonic thickness measurement accuracy and reliability of various time-of-flight calculation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, Thomas J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lozev, Mark G.

    2016-02-01

    The accuracy, precision, and reliability of ultrasonic thickness structural health monitoring systems are discussed in-cluding the influence of systematic and environmental factors. To quantify some of these factors, a compression wave ultrasonic thickness structural health monitoring experiment is conducted on a flat calibration block at ambient temperature with forty four thin-film sol-gel transducers and various time-of-flight thickness calculation methods. As an initial calibration, the voltage response signals from each sensor are used to determine the common material velocity as well as the signal offset unique to each calculation method. Next, the measurement precision of the thickness error of each method is determined with a proposed weighted censored relative maximum likelihood analysis technique incorporating the propagation of asymmetric measurement uncertainty. The results are presented as upper and lower confidence limits analogous to the a90/95 terminology used in industry recognized Probability-of-Detection assessments. Future work is proposed to apply the statistical analysis technique to quantify measurement precision of various thickness calculation methods under different environmental conditions such as high temperature, rough back-wall surface, and system degradation with an intended application to monitor naphthenic acid corrosion in oil refineries.

  14. Patterns of Response Times and Response Choices to Science Questions: The Influence of Relative Processing Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Scaife, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on five experiments investigating response choices and response times to simple science questions that evoke student "misconceptions," and we construct a simple model to explain the patterns of response choices. Physics students were asked to compare a physical quantity represented by the slope, such as speed, on simple physics…

  15. A quantitative method for evaluating numerical simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation with its applications to selecting appropriate element size and time step.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Tse, Peter W; Tan, Haihui

    2016-01-01

    Lamb wave technique has been widely used in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). However, due to the multi-mode characteristics and dispersive nature, Lamb wave propagation behavior is much more complex than that of bulk waves. Numerous numerical simulations on Lamb wave propagation have been conducted to study its physical principles. However, few quantitative studies on evaluating the accuracy of these numerical simulations were reported. In this paper, a method based on cross correlation analysis for quantitatively evaluating the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb waves propagation is proposed. Two kinds of error, affecting the position and shape accuracies are firstly identified. Consequently, two quantitative indices, i.e., the GVE (group velocity error) and MACCC (maximum absolute value of cross correlation coefficient) derived from cross correlation analysis between a simulated signal and a reference waveform, are proposed to assess the position and shape errors of the simulated signal. In this way, the simulation accuracy on the position and shape is quantitatively evaluated. In order to apply this proposed method to select appropriate element size and time step, a specialized 2D-FEM program combined with the proposed method is developed. Then, the proper element size considering different element types and time step considering different time integration schemes are selected. These results proved that the proposed method is feasible and effective, and can be used as an efficient tool for quantitatively evaluating and verifying the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation. PMID:26315506

  16. Note: electronic circuit for two-way time transfer via a single coaxial cable with picosecond accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Panek, Petr

    2012-11-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested the overall performance of the electronic circuit for the two-way time transfer between two timing devices over modest distances with sub-picosecond precision and a systematic error of a few picoseconds. The concept of the electronic circuit enables to carry out time tagging of pulses of interest in parallel to the comparison of the time scales of these timing devices. The key timing parameters of the circuit are: temperature change of the delay is below 100 fs/K, timing stability time deviation better than 8 fs for averaging time from minutes to hours, sub-picosecond time transfer precision, and a few picoseconds time transfer accuracy.

  17. Tracking Accuracy of a Real-Time Fiducial Tracking System for Patient Positioning and Monitoring in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shchory, Tal; Schifter, Dan; Lichtman, Rinat; Neustadter, David; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy there is a need to accurately know the location of the target in real time. A novel radioactive tracking technology has been developed to answer this need. The technology consists of a radioactive implanted fiducial marker designed to minimize migration and a linac mounted tracking device. This study measured the static and dynamic accuracy of the new tracking technology in a clinical radiation therapy environment. Methods and Materials: The tracking device was installed on the linac gantry. The radioactive marker was located in a tissue equivalent phantom. Marker location was measured simultaneously by the radioactive tracking system and by a Microscribe G2 coordinate measuring machine (certified spatial accuracy of 0.38 mm). Localization consistency throughout a volume and absolute accuracy in the Fixed coordinate system were measured at multiple gantry angles over volumes of at least 10 cm in diameter centered at isocenter. Dynamic accuracy was measured with the marker located inside a breathing phantom. Results: The mean consistency for the static source was 0.58 mm throughout the tested region at all measured gantry angles. The mean absolute position error in the Fixed coordinate system for all gantry angles was 0.97 mm. The mean real-time tracking error for the dynamic source within the breathing phantom was less than 1 mm. Conclusions: This novel radioactive tracking technology has the potential to be useful in accurate target localization and real-time monitoring for radiation therapy.

  18. Evaluation of the accuracy of BOTDA systems based on the phase spectral response.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gil, Alexia; Soto, Marcelo A; Angulo-Vinuesa, Xabier; Dominguez-Lopez, Alejandro; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Thévenaz, Luc; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel

    2016-07-25

    We evaluate the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) determination error when utilizing the Brillouin phase spectrum (BPS) instead of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) in BOTDA systems. Systems based on the BPS perform the determination of the BFS through a linear fit around the zero de-phase frequency region. An analytical expression of the error obtained in the BFS determination as a function of the different experimental parameters is provided and experimentally validated. The experimental results show a good agreement with the theoretical predictions as a function of the number of sampling points, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Brillouin spectral linewidth. For an equal SNR and linewidth, the phase response only provides a better BFS estimation than the gain response when the fit is performed over a restricted frequency range around the center of the spectral profile. This may reduce the measurement time of specific BOTDA systems requiring a narrow frequency scanning. When the frequency scan covers most of the Brillouin spectral profile, gain and phase responses give very similar estimations of the BFS and the BPS offers no crucial benefit.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring response time

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; August, C.

    1983-08-11

    A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring response time

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; August, Charles

    1985-01-01

    A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

  1. Binocular summation and peripheral visual response time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliland, K.; Haines, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Six males were administered a peripheral visual response time test to the onset of brief small stimuli imaged in 10-deg arc separation intervals across the dark adapted horizontal retinal meridian under both binocular and monocular viewing conditions. This was done in an attempt to verify the existence of peripheral binocular summation using a response time measure. The results indicated that from 50-deg arc right to 50-deg arc left of the line of sight binocular summation is a reasonable explanation for the significantly faster binocular data. The stimulus position by viewing eye interaction was also significant. A discussion of these and other analyses is presented along with a review of related literature.

  2. Response time correlations for platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    The 'plunge method' recommended by ASTM has been used to determine the time constant of 100-ohm platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) considered for use in the National Transonic Facility. It is shown that the response time of ventilated PRT can be correlated with the reciprocal of the heat transfer coefficient in a given field. Universal correlations are established for the 100- and 1000-ohm PRT with uncertainties of 20 and 30 percent, respectively. The correlations are found to be consistent with the uncertainty involved in heat transfer correlations available in the literature and are recommended for use in flowing liquids and gases.

  3. Functional wave time-lag focusing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer: improved mass accuracy.

    PubMed

    Whittal, R M; Russon, L M; Weinberger, S R; Li, L

    1997-06-01

    A strength of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is its ability to analyze mixtures without separation. MALDI mass spectrometers capable of providing a linear mass calibration over a broad mass range should find wide use in these applications. This work addresses issues pertinent to mass measurement accuracy of a time-lag focusing MALDI time-of-flight instrument and presents a new approach to improving mass accuracy by using a functional wave extraction pulse, instead of a square wave, for time-lag focusing. A model is described of an ideal extraction pulse shape that provides constant total kinetic energy for all ions. If total kinetic energy is constant, then there is an exact linear correlation between ion mass and flight time raised to the second power. Using a descending wave extraction pulse, it is demonstrated that mass accuracy of better than 30 ppm using two internal calibrants and better than 70 ppm using external calibrants can be obtained over a 25 ku mass range. The practical aspects of an instrument needed to obtain consistent mass accuracy is discussed. It is found that ion flight time shows a small dependence upon laser flux; flight times increase slightly as the flux increases. But this dependence is much smaller than is observed in continuous-extraction MALDI.

  4. A note on state individual differences in accuracy of response imagery: aftereffects and reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Kohl, R M; Fisicaro, S A; Roenker, D L; Turner, M K

    1998-12-01

    In two sessions, separated by 7 days, subjects imagined themselves performing a tracking task under a massed practice schedule. After conditions of interpolated rest and no-rest, which were counterbalanced across sessions, subjects actually performed the tracking task. During imagery practice, subjects verbally reported the temporal component of the task. The temporal accuracy of verbal reports varied widely across subjects, but not within subjects. Furthermore, a performance gain was demonstrated as a function of interpolated rest versus no-rest (reminiscence effect). Finally, the accuracy of verbal reports predicted imagery aftereffects, but not reminiscence effects.

  5. The accuracy of simulated indoor time trials utilizing a CompuTrainer and GPS data.

    PubMed

    Peveler, Willard W

    2013-10-01

    The CompuTrainer is commonly used to measure cycling time trial performance in a laboratory setting. Previous research has demonstrated that the CompuTrainer tends toward underestimating power at higher workloads but provides reliable measures. The extent to which the CompuTrainer is capable of simulating outdoor time trials in a laboratory setting has yet to be examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of replicating an outdoor time trial course indoors by comparing completion times between the actual time trial course and the replicated outdoor time trial course on the CompuTrainer. A global positioning system was used to collect data points along a local outdoor time trial course. Data were then downloaded and converted into a time trial course for the CompuTrainer. Eleven recreational to highly trained cyclists participated in this study. To participate in this study, subjects had to have completed a minimum of 2 of the local Cleves time trial races. Subjects completed 2 simulated indoor time trials on the CompuTrainer. Mean finishing times for the mean indoor performance trial (34.58 ± 8.63 minutes) were significantly slower in relation to the mean outdoor performance time (26.24 ± 3.23 minutes). Cyclists' finish times increased (performance decreased) by 24% on the indoor time trials in relation to the mean outdoor times. There were no significant differences between CompuTrainer trial 1 (34.77 ± 8.54 minutes) and CompuTrainer trial 1 (34.37 ± 8.76 minutes). Because of the significant differences in times between the indoor and outdoor time trials, meaningful comparisons of performance times cannot be made between the two. However, there were no significant differences found between the 2 CompuTrainer trials, and therefore the CompuTrainer can still be recommended for laboratory testing between trials.

  6. Unstructured grids in 3D and 4D for a time-dependent interface in front tracking with improved accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J. W.; Li, X. L.; Li, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Front tracking traces the dynamic evolution of an interface separating differnt materials or fluid components. In this paper, they describe three types of the grid generation methods used in the front tracking method. One is the unstructured surface grid. The second is a structured grid-based reconstruction method. The third is a time-space grid, also grid based, for a conservative tracking algorithm with improved accuracy.

  7. Accuracy Study of the Space-Time CE/SE Method for Computational Aeroacoustics Problems Involving Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    1999-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element(CE/SE) method is used to study the sound-shock interaction problem. The order of accuracy of numerical schemes is investigated. The linear model problem.govemed by the 1-D scalar convection equation, sound-shock interaction problem governed by the 1-D Euler equations, and the 1-D shock-tube problem which involves moving shock waves and contact surfaces are solved to investigate the order of accuracy of numerical schemes. It is concluded that the accuracy of the CE/SE numerical scheme with designed 2nd-order accuracy becomes 1st order when a moving shock wave exists. However, the absolute error in the CE/SE solution downstream of the shock wave is on the same order as that obtained using a fourth-order accurate essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) scheme. No special techniques are used for either high-frequency low-amplitude waves or shock waves.

  8. Accuracy of a Mitral Valve Segmentation Method Using J-Splines for Real-Time 3D Echocardiography Data

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Andrew W.; Icenogle, David A.; Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Rossignac, Jarek; Lerakis, Stamatios; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-specific models of the heart’s mitral valve (MV) exhibit potential for surgical planning. While advances in 3D echocardiography (3DE) have provided adequate resolution to extract MV leaflet geometry, no study has quantitatively assessed the accuracy of their modeled leaflets versus a ground-truth standard for temporal frames beyond systolic closure or for differing valvular dysfunctions. The accuracy of a 3DE-based segmentation methodology based on J-splines was assessed for porcine MVs with known 4D leaflet coordinates within a pulsatile simulator during closure, peak closure, and opening for a control, prolapsed, and billowing MV model. For all time points, the mean distance error between the segmented models and ground-truth data were 0.40±0.32 mm, 0.52±0.51 mm, and 0.74±0.69 mm for the control, flail, and billowing models. For all models and temporal frames, 95% of the distance errors were below 1.64 mm. When applied to a patient data set, segmentation was able to confirm a regurgitant orifice and post-operative improvements in coaptation. This study provides an experimental platform for assessing the accuracy of an MV segmentation methodology at phases beyond systolic closure and for differing MV dysfunctions. Results demonstrate the accuracy of a MV segmentation methodology for the development of future surgical planning tools. PMID:23460042

  9. Patterns of response times and response choices to science questions: the influence of relative processing time.

    PubMed

    Heckler, Andrew F; Scaife, Thomas M

    2015-04-01

    We report on five experiments investigating response choices and response times to simple science questions that evoke student "misconceptions," and we construct a simple model to explain the patterns of response choices. Physics students were asked to compare a physical quantity represented by the slope, such as speed, on simple physics graphs. We found that response times of incorrect answers, resulting from comparing heights, were faster than response times of correct answers comparing slopes. This result alone might be explained by the fact that height was typically processed faster than slope for this kind of task, which we confirmed in a separate experiment. However, we hypothesize that the difference in response time is an indicator of the cause (rather than the result) of the response choice. To support this, we found that imposing a 3-s delay in responding increased the number of students comparing slopes (answering correctly) on the task. Additionally a significant proportion of students recognized the correct written rule (compare slope), but on the graph task they incorrectly compared heights. Finally, training either with repetitive examples or providing a general rule both improved scores, but only repetitive examples had a large effect on response times, thus providing evidence of dual paths or processes to a solution. Considering models of heuristics, information accumulation models, and models relevant to the Stroop effect, we construct a simple relative processing time model that could be viewed as a kind of fluency heuristic. The results suggest that misconception-like patterns of answers to some science questions commonly found on tests may be explained in part by automatic processes that involve the relative processing time of considered dimensions and a priority to answer quickly. PMID:25230833

  10. Residential Real-time Price Response Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Chassin, David P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2011-10-10

    The electric industry is gaining experience with innovative price responsive demand pilots and limited roll-outs to customers. One of these pilots is investigating real-time pricing signals to engage end-use systems and local distributed generation and storage in a distributed optimization process. Attractive aspects about the approach include strong scalability characteristics, simplified interfaces between automation devices, and the adaptability to integrate a wide variety of devices and systems. Experience in this nascent field is revealing a rich array of for engineering decisions and the application of complexity theory. To test the decisions, computer simulations are used to reveal insights about design, demand elasticity, and the limits of response (including consumer fatigue). Agent-based approaches lend themselves well in the simulation to modeling the participation and interaction of each piece of equipment on a distribution feeder. This paper discusses rate design and simulation experiences at the distribution feeder level where consumers and their HVAC systems and water heaters on a feeder receive real-time pricing signals.

  11. Effect of Time Lapse on the Diagnostic Accuracy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Detection of Vertical Root Fractures.

    PubMed

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Asl, Amin Mahdavi; Jalalzadeh, Mohsen; Tayari, Maryam; Hosseinipanah, Mohammad; Fardmal, Javad; Shokri, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and early diagnosis of vertical root fractures (VRFs) is imperative to prevent extensive bone loss and unnecessary endodontic and prosthodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for VRFs in endodontically treated dog's teeth. Forty-eight incisors and premolars of three adult male dogs underwent root canal therapy. The teeth were assigned to two groups: VRFs were artificially induced in the first group (n=24) while the teeth in the second group remained intact (n=24). The CBCT scans were obtained by NewTom 3G unit immediately after inducing VRFs and after one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks. Three oral and maxillofacial radiologists blinded to the date of radiographs assessed the presence/absence of VRFs on CBCT scans. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values were calculated and data were analyzed using SPSS v.16 software and ANOVA. The total accuracy of detection of VRFs immediately after surgery, one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks was 67.3%, 68.7%, 66.6%, 64.6%, 64.5%, 69.4%, 68.7%, 68% respectively. The effect of time lapse on detection of VRFs was not significant (p>0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CBCT for detection of VRFs were 74.3%, 62.2%, 67.2% respectively. Cone beam computed tomography is a valuable tool for detection of VRFs. Time lapse (four months) had no effect on detection of VRFs on CBCT scans. PMID:27007339

  12. Effect of Time Lapse on the Diagnostic Accuracy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Detection of Vertical Root Fractures.

    PubMed

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Asl, Amin Mahdavi; Jalalzadeh, Mohsen; Tayari, Maryam; Hosseinipanah, Mohammad; Fardmal, Javad; Shokri, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and early diagnosis of vertical root fractures (VRFs) is imperative to prevent extensive bone loss and unnecessary endodontic and prosthodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for VRFs in endodontically treated dog's teeth. Forty-eight incisors and premolars of three adult male dogs underwent root canal therapy. The teeth were assigned to two groups: VRFs were artificially induced in the first group (n=24) while the teeth in the second group remained intact (n=24). The CBCT scans were obtained by NewTom 3G unit immediately after inducing VRFs and after one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks. Three oral and maxillofacial radiologists blinded to the date of radiographs assessed the presence/absence of VRFs on CBCT scans. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values were calculated and data were analyzed using SPSS v.16 software and ANOVA. The total accuracy of detection of VRFs immediately after surgery, one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks was 67.3%, 68.7%, 66.6%, 64.6%, 64.5%, 69.4%, 68.7%, 68% respectively. The effect of time lapse on detection of VRFs was not significant (p>0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CBCT for detection of VRFs were 74.3%, 62.2%, 67.2% respectively. Cone beam computed tomography is a valuable tool for detection of VRFs. Time lapse (four months) had no effect on detection of VRFs on CBCT scans.

  13. Precise and Continuous Time and Frequency Synchronisation at the 5×10-19 Accuracy Level

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B.; Gao, C.; Chen, W. L.; Miao, J.; Zhu, X.; Bai, Y.; Zhang, J. W.; Feng, Y. Y.; Li, T. C.; Wang, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    The synchronisation of time and frequency between remote locations is crucial for many important applications. Conventional time and frequency dissemination often makes use of satellite links. Recently, the communication fibre network has become an attractive option for long-distance time and frequency dissemination. Here, we demonstrate accurate frequency transfer and time synchronisation via an 80 km fibre link between Tsinghua University (THU) and the National Institute of Metrology of China (NIM). Using a 9.1 GHz microwave modulation and a timing signal carried by two continuous-wave lasers and transferred across the same 80 km urban fibre link, frequency transfer stability at the level of 5×10−19/day was achieved. Time synchronisation at the 50 ps precision level was also demonstrated. The system is reliable and has operated continuously for several months. We further discuss the feasibility of using such frequency and time transfer over 1000 km and its applications to long-baseline radio astronomy. PMID:22870385

  14. Association Between Time Spent Interpreting, Level of Confidence and Accuracy of Screening Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Patricia A.; Bogart, Andy; Geller, Berta M.; Haneuse, Sebastian; Kerlikowske, Karla; Buist, Diana SM; Smith, Robert; Rosenberg, Robert; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Onega, Tracy; Miglioretti, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of time spent viewing images and level of confidence on a screening mammography test set on interpretive performance. Materials and Methods Radiologists from six mammography registries participated in the study and were randomized to interpret one of four test sets and complete 12 survey questions. Each test set had 109 cases of digitized four-view screening film-screen mammograms with prior comparison screening views. Viewing time for each case was defined as the cumulative time spent viewing all mammographic images before recording which visible feature, if any, was the “most significant finding”. Log-linear regression fit via GEE was used to test the effect of viewing time and level of confidence in the interpretation on test set sensitivity and false-positive rate. Results 119 radiologists completed a test set and contributed data on 11,484 interpretations. Radiologists spent more time viewing cases that had significant findings or for which they had less confidence in interpretation. Each additional minute of viewing time increased the probability of a true positive interpretation among cancer cases by 1.12 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.19, p<0.001), regardless of confidence in the assessment. Among radiologists who were ‘very confident’ in their assessment, each additional minute of viewing time increased the adjusted risk of a false positive interpretation among non-cancer cases by 1.42 (95% CI 1.21, 1.68), and this viewing-time effect diminished with decreasing confidence. Conclusions Longer interpretation times and higher levels of confidence in the interpretation are both associated with higher sensitivity and false positive rates in mammography screening. PMID:22451568

  15. Accuracy study of time delay estimation techniques in laser pulse ranger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinliang; Wang, Xingshu; Gao, Yang

    2013-12-01

    Time-of-flight measurement by using laser pulses is an alternative method in laser range finding and laser scanning, the echo pulses originating from backscattering of the emitted laser pulse on targets is detected by optical receiver. The distance of target can be obtained by measuring the round-trip time. Time-of-arrival estimation may be based on schemes such as constant-fraction discriminator (CFD) in analog electronics. In contrast, as sampled signals are available, time delay estimation may be based on schemes like direct cross-correlation function (CCF) and average square difference function (ASDF) in digital electronics. By the way, constant-fraction discriminator can also be used in digital electronics. All this three methods are analyzed and compared with each other. It is shown that estimators based on CCF and ASDF are more precise than conventional CFD based estimator.

  16. Two- and three-dimensional accuracy of dental impression materials: effects of storage time and moisture contamination.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Deepa T; Jagger, Daryll C; Jagger, Robert G; Barbour, Michele E

    2010-01-01

    Dental impression materials are used to create an inverse replica of the dental hard and soft tissues, and are used in processes such as the fabrication of crowns and bridges. The accuracy and dimensional stability of impression materials are of paramount importance to the accuracy of fit of the resultant prosthesis. Conventional methods for assessing the dimensional stability of impression materials are two-dimensional (2D), and assess shrinkage or expansion between selected fixed points on the impression. In this study, dimensional changes in four impression materials were assessed using an established 2D and an experimental three-dimensional (3D) technique. The former involved measurement of the distance between reference points on the impression; the latter a contact scanning method for producing a computer map of the impression surface showing localised expansion, contraction and warpage. Dimensional changes were assessed as a function of storage times and moisture contamination comparable to that found in clinical situations. It was evident that dimensional changes observed using the 3D technique were not always apparent using the 2D technique, and that the former offers certain advantages in terms of assessing dimensional accuracy and predictability of impression methods. There are, however, drawbacks associated with 3D techniques such as the more time-consuming nature of the data acquisition and difficulty in statistically analysing the data.

  17. Movement imagery for speech in healthy women: influences on articulation accuracy and fluidity, imagery times, and expectations of success.

    PubMed

    Mantie-Kozlowski, Alana; Netsell, Ronald; Daniel, Todd

    2012-12-01

    The use of movement imagery in speech performance has received less attention than it has in many other professional disciplines. 30 healthy monolingual native English speakers participated in this within-subjects study. Participants' speech accuracy and fluidity was compared when they used movement imagery and when they did not. The timing of imagery and articulation were compared using a chronometric paradigm. Participants' expectations of improvement when using movement imagery for speech were compared to their actual performance. The results from this study support the use of movement imagery for speech with a single imaging event for the purpose of improving speech fluidity, but not for improving articulation accuracy. The chronometric system as a tool for monitoring adherence to the movement imagery protocol for speech proved valuable. Finally, while estimation inflation has been reported by some using movement imagery techniques, this was not the case for the participants of this study.

  18. A novel mask proximity correction software combining accuracy and reduced writing time for the manufacturing of advanced photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, Patrick; Martin, Luc; Browning, Clyde; Farys, Vincent; Sundermann, Frank; Narukawa, Shogo; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya

    2012-06-01

    The new generations of photomasks are seen to bring more and more challenges to the mask manufacturer. Maskshops face two conflicting requirements, namely improving pattern fidelity and reducing or at least maintaining acceptable writing time. These requirements are getting more and more challenging since pattern size continuously shrinks and data volumes continuously grows. Although the classical dose modulation Proximity Effect Correction is able to provide sufficient process control to the mainstream products, an increased number of published and wafer data show that the mask process is becoming a nonnegligible contributor to the 28nm technology yield. We will show in this paper that a novel approach of mask proximity effect correction is able to meet the dual challenge of the new generation of masks. Unlike the classical approach, the technique presented in this paper is based on a concurrent optimization of the dose and geometry of the fractured shots. Adding one more parameter allows providing the best possible compromise between accuracy and writing time since energy latitude can be taken into account as well. This solution is implemented in the Inscale software package from Aselta Nanographics. We have assessed the capability of this technology on several levels of a 28nm technology. On this set, the writing time has been reduced up to 25% without sacrificing the accuracy which at the same time has been improved significantly compared to the existing process. The experiments presented in the paper confirm that a versatile proximity effect correction strategy, combining dose and geometry modulation helps the users to tradeoff between resolution/accuracy and e-beam write time.

  19. Reduced temporal sampling effect on accuracy of time-domain fluorescence lifetime Förster resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Travis; Zhao, Lingling; Intes, Xavier; Hahn, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) aims at quantifying the exponential decay rate of fluorophores to yield lifetime maps over the imaged sample. When combined with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), the technique can be used to indirectly sense interactions at the nanoscale such as protein–protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions, and protein conformational changes. In the case of FLIM-FRET, the fluorescence intensity decays are fitted to a biexponential model in order to estimate the lifetime and fractional amplitude coefficients of each component of the population of the donor fluorophore (quenched and nonquenched). Numerous time data points, also called temporal or time gates, are typically employed for accurately estimating the model parameters, leading to lengthy acquisition times and significant computational demands. This work investigates the effect of the number and location of time gates on model parameter estimation accuracy. A detailed model of a FLIM-FRET imaging system is used for the investigation, and the simulation outcomes are validated with in vitro and in vivo experimental data. In all cases investigated, it is found that 10 equally spaced time gates allow robust estimation of model-based parameters with accuracy similar to that of full temporal datasets (90 gates). PMID:25166472

  20. Accuracy of patient's turnover time prediction using RFID technology in an academic ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Marchand-Maillet, Florence; Debes, Claire; Garnier, Fanny; Dufeu, Nicolas; Sciard, Didier; Beaussier, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Patients flow in outpatient surgical unit is a major issue with regards to resource utilization, overall case load and patient satisfaction. An electronic Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) was used to document the overall time spent by the patients between their admission and discharge from the unit. The objective of this study was to evaluate how a RFID-based data collection system could provide an accurate prediction of the actual time for the patient to be discharged from the ambulatory surgical unit after surgery. This is an observational prospective evaluation carried out in an academic ambulatory surgery center (ASC). Data on length of stay at each step of the patient care, from admission to discharge, were recorded by a RFID device and analyzed according to the type of surgical procedure, the surgeon and the anesthetic technique. Based on these initial data (n = 1520), patients were scheduled in a sequential manner according to the expected duration of the previous case. The primary endpoint was the difference between actual and predicted time of discharge from the unit. A total of 414 consecutive patients were prospectively evaluated. One hundred seventy four patients (42%) were discharged at the predicted time ± 30 min. Only 24% were discharged behind predicted schedule. Using an automatic record of patient's length of stay would allow an accurate prediction of the discharge time according to the type of surgery, the surgeon and the anesthetic procedure.

  1. Accuracy of an UWB-based position tracking system used for time-motion analyses in game sports.

    PubMed

    Leser, Roland; Schleindlhuber, Armin; Lyons, Keith; Baca, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the ultra-wideband (UWB)-based positioning system Ubisense, which is used for time-motion analysis in sports. Furthermore, some alternatives for positioning the system's transponders on the atheletes, as well as the accuracy depending on the location of measurement, were tested. Therefore, in a pre-study, some basic issues were examined (measurement assumptions and consistency and location of the system's transponder used for position detection), and position measurements at the borders and in the centre of a basketball field were performed. In the main study, 13 male basketball players (15.8 years ± 0.6; 187.9 height ± 3.4; 77.5 weight ± 3.7), equipped with a Ubisense transponder mounted on top of their heads, handled a trundle wheel during simulated match play. The players with the trundle wheel participated passively in the match by following one of the ten competing players. The distance measurements of the trundle wheel were used as reference values and compared to the Ubisense distance estimations. Best results were found with the measurements of a single mounted transponder on top of the athlete's heads. No differences were detectable in the accuracy between measurements in the centre and at the borders of the basketball field. The (Ubisense) system's difference to the (trundle wheel) reference was 3.45 ± 1.99%, resulting in 95% limits of agreement of -0.46-7.35%. The study indicates the examined system's sufficient accuracy for time-motion analysis in basketball. PMID:24512176

  2. Accuracy of an UWB-based position tracking system used for time-motion analyses in game sports.

    PubMed

    Leser, Roland; Schleindlhuber, Armin; Lyons, Keith; Baca, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the ultra-wideband (UWB)-based positioning system Ubisense, which is used for time-motion analysis in sports. Furthermore, some alternatives for positioning the system's transponders on the atheletes, as well as the accuracy depending on the location of measurement, were tested. Therefore, in a pre-study, some basic issues were examined (measurement assumptions and consistency and location of the system's transponder used for position detection), and position measurements at the borders and in the centre of a basketball field were performed. In the main study, 13 male basketball players (15.8 years ± 0.6; 187.9 height ± 3.4; 77.5 weight ± 3.7), equipped with a Ubisense transponder mounted on top of their heads, handled a trundle wheel during simulated match play. The players with the trundle wheel participated passively in the match by following one of the ten competing players. The distance measurements of the trundle wheel were used as reference values and compared to the Ubisense distance estimations. Best results were found with the measurements of a single mounted transponder on top of the athlete's heads. No differences were detectable in the accuracy between measurements in the centre and at the borders of the basketball field. The (Ubisense) system's difference to the (trundle wheel) reference was 3.45 ± 1.99%, resulting in 95% limits of agreement of -0.46-7.35%. The study indicates the examined system's sufficient accuracy for time-motion analysis in basketball.

  3. Method and computer product to increase accuracy of time-based software verification for sensor networks

    DOEpatents

    Foo Kune, Denis; Mahadevan, Karthikeyan

    2011-01-25

    A recursive verification protocol to reduce the time variance due to delays in the network by putting the subject node at most one hop from the verifier node provides for an efficient manner to test wireless sensor nodes. Since the software signatures are time based, recursive testing will give a much cleaner signal for positive verification of the software running on any one node in the sensor network. In this protocol, the main verifier checks its neighbor, who in turn checks its neighbor, and continuing this process until all nodes have been verified. This ensures minimum time delays for the software verification. Should a node fail the test, the software verification downstream is halted until an alternative path (one not including the failed node) is found. Utilizing techniques well known in the art, having a node tested twice, or not at all, can be avoided.

  4. Boosting the accuracy and speed of quantum Monte Carlo: Size consistency and time step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Andrea; Sorella, Sandro; Gillan, Michael J.; Michaelides, Angelos; Alfè, Dario

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations for fermions are becoming the standard for providing high-quality reference data in systems that are too large to be investigated via quantum chemical approaches. DMC with the fixed-node approximation relies on modifications of the Green's function to avoid singularities near the nodal surface of the trial wave function. Here we show that these modifications affect the DMC energies in a way that is not size consistent, resulting in large time-step errors. Building on the modifications of Umrigar et al. and DePasquale et al. we propose a simple Green's function modification that restores size consistency to large values of the time step, which substantially reduces time-step errors. This algorithm also yields remarkable speedups of up to two orders of magnitude in the calculation of molecule-molecule binding energies and crystal cohesive energies, thus extending the horizons of what is possible with DMC.

  5. Monitoring Rater Performance over Time: A Framework for Detecting Differential Accuracy and Differential Scale Category Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myford, Carol M.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we describe a framework for monitoring rater performance over time. We present several statistical indices to identify raters whose standards drift and explain how to use those indices operationally. To illustrate the use of the framework, we analyzed rating data from the 2002 Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition…

  6. State-Based Metacognition: How Time of Day Affects the Accuracy of Metamemory

    PubMed Central

    Hourihan, Kathleen L.; Benjamin, Aaron S.

    2013-01-01

    Though there is an abundance of research on how stimulus characteristics and encoding conditions affect metamemory, and how those effects either successfully do or do not mirror effects on memory, there is little research on whether and how characteristics of participants’ states—like mood, fatigue, or hunger—affect metamemory. The present study examined whether metamemory ability fluctuates with time of day. Specifically, we evaluated whether learners can successfully account for the effects of time of day on their memory, and whether metacognitive monitoring is more accurate at an individual’s optimal time of day. Young adults studied and recalled lists of words in both the morning and the afternoon, providing various metamemory judgments during each test session. We replicated the finding that young participants recalled more words in the afternoon than in the morning. Prior to study, participants did not predict superior recall in the afternoon, but they did after they had an opportunity to study the list (but before the test on that material). We also found that item-by-item predictions were more accurate in the afternoon, suggesting that self-regulated learning may benefit from being scheduled during times of day that accord with individuals’ peak arousal. PMID:23742008

  7. There Is Time for Calculation in Speed Chess, and Calculation Accuracy Increases With Expertise.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Hsuan A; Lane, David M

    2016-01-01

    The recognition-action theory of chess skill holds that expertise in chess is due primarily to the ability to recognize familiar patterns of pieces. Despite its widespread acclaim, empirical evidence for this theory is indirect. One source of indirect evidence is that there is a high correlation between speed chess and standard chess. Assuming that there is little or no time for calculation in speed chess, this high correlation implies that calculation is not the primary factor in standard chess. Two studies were conducted analyzing 100 games of speed chess. In Study 1, we examined the distributions of move times, and the key finding was that players often spent considerable time on a few moves. Moreover, stronger players were more likely than weaker players to do so. Study 2 examined skill differences in calculation by examining poor moves. The stronger players made proportionally fewer blunders (moves that a 2-ply search would have revealed to be errors). Overall, the poor moves made by the weaker players would have required a less extensive search to be revealed as poor moves than the poor moves made by the stronger players. Apparently, the stronger players are searching deeper and more accurately. These results are difficult to reconcile with the view that speed chess does not allow players time to calculate extensively and call into question the assertion that the high correlation between speed chess and standard chess supports recognition-action theory. PMID:27029102

  8. Response time correlations for platinum resistance thermometers in flowing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal response of two types of Platinum Resistance Thermometers (PRT's), which are being considered for use in the National Transonic Wind Tunnel Facility, were studied. Response time correlations for each PRT, in flowing water, oil and air, were established separately. A universal correlation, tau WOA = 2.0 + 1264, 9/h, for a Hy-Cal Sensor (with a reference resistance of 100 ohm) within an error of 20% was established while the universal correlation for the Rosemount Sensor (with a reference resistance of 1000 ohm), tau OA = 0.122 + 1105.6/h, was found with a maximum percentage error of 30%. The correlation for the Rosemount Sensor was based on air and oil data only which is certainly not sufficient to make a correlation applicable to every condition. Therefore, the correlation needs more data to be gathered in different fluids. Also, it is necessary to state that the calculation of the parameter, h, was based on the available heat transfer correlations, whose accuracies are already reported in literature uncertain within 20-30%. Therefore, the universal response constant correlations established here for the Hy-Cal and Rosemount sensors are consistent with the uncertainty in the input data and are recommended for future use in flowing liquids and gases.

  9. Design and analysis of ALE schemes with provable second-order time-accuracy for inviscid and viscous flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geuzaine, Philippe; Grandmont, Céline; Farhat, Charbel

    2003-10-01

    We consider the solution of inviscid as well as viscous unsteady flow problems with moving boundaries by the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. We present two computational approaches for achieving formal second-order time-accuracy on moving grids. The first approach is based on flux time-averaging, and the second one on mesh configuration time-averaging. In both cases, we prove that formally second-order time-accurate ALE schemes can be designed. We illustrate our theoretical findings and highlight their impact on practice with the solution of inviscid as well as viscous, unsteady, nonlinear flow problems associated with the AGARD Wing 445.6 and a complete F-16 configuration.

  10. Joint Modeling of Ability and Differential Speed Using Responses and Response Times.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jean-Paul; Marianti, Sukaesi

    2016-01-01

    With computerized testing, it is possible to record both the responses of test takers to test questions (i.e., items) and the amount of time spent by a test taker in responding to each question. Various models have been proposed that take into account both test-taker ability and working speed, with the many models assuming a constant working speed throughout the test. The constant working speed assumption may be inappropriate for various reasons. For example, a test taker may need to adjust the pace due to time mismanagement, or a test taker who started out working too fast may reduce the working speed to improve accuracy. A model is proposed here that allows for variable working speed. An illustration of the model using the Amsterdam Chess Test data is provided. PMID:27269482

  11. Comparison of Clinician Judgments and Measurements of Swallow Response Time: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnell, Michael P.; Rogus, Nicole M.

    2005-01-01

    Practicing clinicians frequently offer judgments about aspects of swallowing physiology rather than performing actual measurements. Little is known about the accuracy of those judgments. The purpose of this preliminary study was to explore agreement of clinicians' judgments of pharyngeal swallow response time (PSRT) with temporal measurements of…

  12. Accuracy and optimal timing of activity measurements in estimating the absorbed dose of radioiodine in the treatment of Graves' disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, S.; Horowitz, J.; Traino, A. C.; Chipkin, S. R.; Hollot, C. V.; Chait, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Calculation of the therapeutic activity of radioiodine 131I for individualized dosimetry in the treatment of Graves' disease requires an accurate estimate of the thyroid absorbed radiation dose based on a tracer activity administration of 131I. Common approaches (Marinelli-Quimby formula, MIRD algorithm) use, respectively, the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid and the time-integrated activity. Many physicians perform one, two, or at most three tracer dose activity measurements at various times and calculate the required therapeutic activity by ad hoc methods. In this paper, we study the accuracy of estimates of four 'target variables': time-integrated activity coefficient, time of maximum activity, maximum activity, and effective half-life in the gland. Clinical data from 41 patients who underwent 131I therapy for Graves' disease at the University Hospital in Pisa, Italy, are used for analysis. The radioiodine kinetics are described using a nonlinear mixed-effects model. The distributions of the target variables in the patient population are characterized. Using minimum root mean squared error as the criterion, optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules are determined for estimation of the target variables, and probabilistic bounds are given for the errors under the optimal times. An algorithm is developed for computing the optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules for the target variables. This algorithm is implemented in a freely available software tool. Taking into consideration 131I effective half-life in the thyroid and measurement noise, the optimal 1-point time for time-integrated activity coefficient is a measurement 1 week following the tracer dose. Additional measurements give only a slight improvement in accuracy.

  13. "Right Time, Right Place" Health Communication on Twitter: Value and Accuracy of Location Information

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Scott H; Tanner, Kesler W; West, Joshua H; Barnes, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Background Twitter provides various types of location data, including exact Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates, which could be used for infoveillance and infodemiology (ie, the study and monitoring of online health information), health communication, and interventions. Despite its potential, Twitter location information is not well understood or well documented, limiting its public health utility. Objective The objective of this study was to document and describe the various types of location information available in Twitter. The different types of location data that can be ascertained from Twitter users are described. This information is key to informing future research on the availability, usability, and limitations of such location data. Methods Location data was gathered directly from Twitter using its application programming interface (API). The maximum tweets allowed by Twitter were gathered (1% of the total tweets) over 2 separate weeks in October and November 2011. The final dataset consisted of 23.8 million tweets from 9.5 million unique users. Frequencies for each of the location options were calculated to determine the prevalence of the various location data options by region of the world, time zone, and state within the United States. Data from the US Census Bureau were also compiled to determine population proportions in each state, and Pearson correlation coefficients were used to compare each state’s population with the number of Twitter users who enable the GPS location option. Results The GPS location data could be ascertained for 2.02% of tweets and 2.70% of unique users. Using a simple text-matching approach, 17.13% of user profiles in the 4 continental US time zones were able to be used to determine the user’s city and state. Agreement between GPS data and data from the text-matching approach was high (87.69%). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the number of Twitter users per state and the 2010 US Census state

  14. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  15. Bottom-Up Mechanisms Are Involved in the Relation between Accuracy in Timing Tasks and Intelligence--Further Evidence Using Manipulations of State Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullen, Fredrik; Soderlund, Therese; Kaaria, Lenita; Madison, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Intelligence correlates with accuracy in various timing tasks. Such correlations could be due to both bottom-up mechanisms, e.g. neural properties that influence both temporal accuracy and cognitive processing, and differences in top-down control. We have investigated the timing-intelligence relation using a simple temporal motor task, isochronous…

  16. Improving the accuracy and efficiency of time-resolved electronic spectra calculations: Cellular dephasing representation with a prefactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zambrano, Eduardo; Šulc, Miroslav; Vaníček, Jiří

    2013-08-07

    Time-resolved electronic spectra can be obtained as the Fourier transform of a special type of time correlation function known as fidelity amplitude, which, in turn, can be evaluated approximately and efficiently with the dephasing representation. Here we improve both the accuracy of this approximation—with an amplitude correction derived from the phase-space propagator—and its efficiency—with an improved cellular scheme employing inverse Weierstrass transform and optimal scaling of the cell size. We demonstrate the advantages of the new methodology by computing dispersed time-resolved stimulated emission spectra in the harmonic potential, pyrazine, and the NCO molecule. In contrast, we show that in strongly chaotic systems such as the quartic oscillator the original dephasing representation is more appropriate than either the cellular or prefactor-corrected methods.

  17. A Flexible Latent Trait Model for Response Times in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Latent trait models for response times in tests have become popular recently. One challenge for response time modeling is the fact that the distribution of response times can differ considerably even in similar tests. In order to reduce the need for tailor-made models, a model is proposed that unifies two popular approaches to response time…

  18. Impact of time-variable vegetation on accuracy of rapid hydrologic predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stec, Magdalena; Niedzielski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    It is crucial to identify the processes that impact errors of hydrologic forecasts. Since existence of vegetation and its ability to store precipitation is an important element of water distribution in the catchment, especially at the beginning of a rainfall event, it may be considered as one of the processes influencing skills of hydrological forecasts. The main objective of the study is to verify the hypothesis that water level predictions are controlled by vegetation dynamics in the contributing mountainous basins. The analysis is conducted for the upper Nysa Klodzka catchment with the outlet in Bardo (SW Poland). The basin includes a mid-mountain abasement covered with crops, while surrounding medium-altitude mountain ranges are mainly covered with forests. We focus on the entire year, from autumn 2013 to summer 2014. Herein, we analyze prediction errors and efficiency measures of hydrologic forecasts provided by two stochastic models - uni- and multivariate autoregressive models as well as their two-model ensemble prediction. In addition, we use the satellite-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI) images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Hydrological prognoses are derived by the HydroProg real-time rapid forecasting system, built at the University of Wroclaw (Poland) in frame of the research project 2011/01/D/ST10/04171 of the National Science Centre of Poland. Correlation analysis between the plant maximum water storage capacity and prediction error/skill statistics (mean absolute error, root mean square error, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency , index of agreement) is conducted. To cope with small sample size, the bootstrap simulation is performed. We conclude that there is a strong negative association between mean or median prediction errors and vegetation state for all meteorological seasons of a year. This result implies that basins with higher interception potential are more vulnerable to forecast inaccuracy than those with sparse natural

  19. A Long Distance Phase-Sensitive Optical Time Domain Reflectometer with Simple Structure and High Locating Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Feng, Hao; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2015-01-01

    A phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer (Φ-OTDR) can be used for pipeline security. However, the sensing distance (less than 20 km) of traditional Φ-OTDR is too short for the needs of typical oil and gas pipeline monitoring applications (30–50 km). A simple structure Φ-OTDR system utilizing long pulse, balanced amplified detector and heterodyne detection is proposed in this paper and the sensing range is thereby increased to 60 km. Through analyzing the sensing principle of Φ-OTDR, a novel locating strategy is proposed to maintain the locating accuracy at a few meters when a long pulse (5 µs) is used. The increased pulse width deteriorates the time series of each sensing point seriously. In order to eliminate the deterioration, a data processing technique combining wavelet and empirical mode decomposition is applied in this system. The experiment results show that the sensing distance can be increased to 60 km and the locating accuracy is maintained at 6.8 m. PMID:26340628

  20. A Long Distance Phase-Sensitive Optical Time Domain Reflectometer with Simple Structure and High Locating Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Feng, Hao; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2015-09-02

    A phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer (Φ-OTDR) can be used for pipeline security. However, the sensing distance (less than 20 km) of traditional Φ-OTDR is too short for the needs of typical oil and gas pipeline monitoring applications (30-50 km). A simple structure Φ-OTDR system utilizing long pulse, balanced amplified detector and heterodyne detection is proposed in this paper and the sensing range is thereby increased to 60 km. Through analyzing the sensing principle of Φ-OTDR, a novel locating strategy is proposed to maintain the locating accuracy at a few meters when a long pulse (5 µs) is used. The increased pulse width deteriorates the time series of each sensing point seriously. In order to eliminate the deterioration, a data processing technique combining wavelet and empirical mode decomposition is applied in this system. The experiment results show that the sensing distance can be increased to 60 km and the locating accuracy is maintained at 6.8 m.

  1. 28 CFR 20.37 - Responsibility for accuracy, completeness, currency, and integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., currency, and integrity. 20.37 Section 20.37 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.37 Responsibility... justice agency contributing data to the III System and the FIRS to assure that information on...

  2. 28 CFR 20.37 - Responsibility for accuracy, completeness, currency, and integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., currency, and integrity. 20.37 Section 20.37 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.37 Responsibility... justice agency contributing data to the III System and the FIRS to assure that information on...

  3. 28 CFR 20.37 - Responsibility for accuracy, completeness, currency, and integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., currency, and integrity. 20.37 Section 20.37 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.37 Responsibility... justice agency contributing data to the III System and the FIRS to assure that information on...

  4. 28 CFR 20.37 - Responsibility for accuracy, completeness, currency, and integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., currency, and integrity. 20.37 Section 20.37 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.37 Responsibility... justice agency contributing data to the III System and the FIRS to assure that information on...

  5. A reminder on millisecond timing accuracy and potential replication failure in computer-based psychology experiments: An open letter.

    PubMed

    Plant, Richard R

    2016-03-01

    There is an ongoing 'replication crisis' across the field of psychology in which researchers, funders, and members of the public are questioning the results of some scientific studies and the validity of the data they are based upon. However, few have considered that a growing proportion of research in modern psychology is conducted using a computer. Could it simply be that the hardware and software, or experiment generator, being used to run the experiment itself be a cause of millisecond timing error and subsequent replication failure? This article serves as a reminder that millisecond timing accuracy in psychology studies remains an important issue and that care needs to be taken to ensure that studies can be replicated on current computer hardware and software. PMID:25761394

  6. Improvement of orbit determination accuracy for Beidou Navigation Satellite System with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chengpan; Hu, Xiaogong; Zhou, Shanshi; Guo, Rui; He, Feng; Liu, Li; Zhu, Lingfeng; Li, Xiaojie; Wu, Shan; Zhao, Gang; Yu, Yang; Cao, Yueling

    2016-10-01

    The Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) manages to estimate simultaneously the orbits and clock offsets of navigation satellites, using code and carrier phase measurements of a regional network within China. The satellite clock offsets are also directly measured with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT). Satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals and comparisons with the precise ephemeris indicate that the radial error of GEO satellites is much larger than that of IGSO and MEO satellites and that the BDS orbit accuracy is worse than GPS. In order to improve the orbit determination accuracy for BDS, a new orbit determination strategy is proposed, in which the satellite clock measurements from TWSTFT are fixed as known values, and only the orbits of the satellites are solved. However, a constant systematic error at the nanosecond level can be found in the clock measurements, which is obtained and then corrected by differencing the clock measurements and the clock estimates from orbit determination. The effectiveness of the new strategy is verified by a GPS regional network orbit determination experiment. With the IGS final clock products fixed, the orbit determination and prediction accuracy for GPS satellites improve by more than 50% and the 12-h prediction User Range Error (URE) is better than 0.12 m. By processing a 25-day of measurement from the BDS regional network, an optimal strategy for the satellite-clock-fixed orbit determination is identified. User Equivalent Ranging Error is reduced by 27.6% for GEO satellites, but no apparent reduction is found for IGSO/MEO satellites. The SLR residuals exhibit reductions by 59% and 32% for IGSO satellites but no reductions for GEO and MEO satellites.

  7. 39 CFR 3004.45 - Extension of response time limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACT § 3004.45 Extension of response time limit. (a) The Commission may extend the time limit for a response at the request stage and at the appeal stage up to 10 working days due to unusual circumstances...

  8. 39 CFR 3004.45 - Extension of response time limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACT § 3004.45 Extension of response time limit. (a) The Commission may extend the time limit for a response at the request stage and at the appeal stage up to 10 working days due to unusual circumstances...

  9. 40 CFR 1066.245 - Response time verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dynamometer's automated process to verify response time. Perform this test at two different inertia settings... observed settling response time must be less than 100 milliseconds for each inertia setting. ER15SE11.085...

  10. Analyzing Response Times in Tests with Rank Correlation Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2013-01-01

    It is common practice to log-transform response times before analyzing them with standard factor analytical methods. However, sometimes the log-transformation is not capable of linearizing the relation between the response times and the latent traits. Therefore, a more general approach to response time analysis is proposed in the current…

  11. 48 CFR 205.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Publicizing and response time. 205.203 Section 205.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Contract Actions 205.203 Publicizing and response time. (b) Allow at least 45 days response time...

  12. 48 CFR 205.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Publicizing and response time. 205.203 Section 205.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Contract Actions 205.203 Publicizing and response time. (b) Allow at least 45 days response time...

  13. System measures response time of photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, M. R.

    1968-01-01

    Calibration system enables precise determination of rise time of photosensitive detectors. To perform a calibration, the time-voltage curve of the excitation voltage for a light source is compared with the time-voltage curve of the voltage output from a photosensitive detector which is responding to the light.

  14. Eyewitness identification accuracy and response latency: the unruly 10-12-second rule.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nathan; Brewer, Neil; Wells, Gary L; Semmler, Carolyn; Keast, Amber

    2004-09-01

    Data are reported from 3,213 research eyewitnesses confirming that accurate eyewitness identifications from lineups are made faster than are inaccurate identifications. However, consistent with predictions from the recognition and search literatures, the authors did not find support for the "10-12-s rule" in which lineup identifications faster than 10-12 s maximally discriminate between accurate and inaccurate identifications (D. Dunning & S. Perretta, 2002). Instead, the time frame that proved most discriminating was highly variable across experiments, ranging from 5 s to 29 s, and the maximally discriminating time was often unimpressive in its ability to sort accurate from inaccurate identifications. The authors suggest several factors that are likely to moderate the 10-12-s rule. PMID:15462616

  15. Accuracy of sign interpreting and real-time captioning of science videos for the delivery of instruction to deaf students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Karen L.

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively examine the impact of third-party support service providers on the quality of science information available to deaf students in regular science classrooms. Three different videotapes that were developed by NASA for high school science classrooms were selected for the study, allowing for different concepts and vocabulary to be examined. The focus was on the accuracy of translation as measured by the number of key science words included in the transcripts (captions) or videos (interpreted). Data were collected via transcripts completed by CART (computer assisted real-time captionists) or through videos of sign language interpreters. All participants were required to listen to and translate these NASA educational videos with no prior experience with this information so as not to influence their delivery. CART personnel using captions were found to be significantly more accurate in the delivery of science words as compared to the sign language interpreters in this study.

  16. A method to improve the stability and accuracy of ANN- and SVM-based time series models for long-term groundwater level predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Heesung; Hyun, Yunjung; Ha, Kyoochul; Lee, Kang-Kun; Kim, Gyoo-Bum

    2016-05-01

    The prediction of long-term groundwater level fluctuations is necessary to effectively manage groundwater resources and to assess the effects of changes in rainfall patterns on groundwater resources. In the present study, a weighted error function approach was utilised to improve the performance of artificial neural network (ANN)- and support vector machine (SVM)-based recursive prediction models for the long-term prediction of groundwater levels in response to rainfall. The developed time series models were applied to groundwater level data from 5 groundwater-monitoring stations in South Korea. The results demonstrated that the weighted error function approach can improve the stability and accuracy of recursive prediction models, especially for ANN models. The comparison of the model performance showed that the recursive prediction performance of the SVM was superior to the performance of the ANN in this case study.

  17. Design of responsive polymer surfaces with ultrafast response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzer, Jan; Ozcam, Evren; Willoughby, Julie

    2009-03-01

    Responsive surfaces with tailorable surface-reconstruction kinetics and switching hysteresis were prepared from poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) (PVMS) networks modified with thiol alkanes to provide hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface properties. The cooperative effects of polymer mobility, arising from the high flexibility of the siloxane backbone, and the enthalpic interactions between the contacting medium and the PVMS functionalized surface control the degree of responsiveness. Exposing the modified-elastomer surfaces to water resulted in rearrangement of the hydrophilic alkanes at the surface. The kinetics of reconstruction and reversibility were established by measuring the surface wettability via dynamic contact angle. By controlling the formation of semi-crystalline regions in our substrates we demonstrate either ``sluggish'' kinetics and eventual surface ``freezing'' and stability or stimuli-responsive substrates with a magnitude of change and repeated reversibility unparallel to most polymeric surfaces.

  18. Dispersion of Response Times Reveals Cognitive Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, John G.; Van Orden, Guy C.; Turvey, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Trial-to-trial variation in word-pronunciation times exhibits 1/f scaling. One explanation is that human performances are consequent on multiplicative interactions among interdependent processes-interaction dominant dynamics. This article describes simulated distributions of pronunciation times in a further test for multiplicative interactions and…

  19. OSLD energy response performance and dose accuracy at 24 - 1250 keV: Comparison with TLD-100H and TLD-100

    SciTech Connect

    Kadir, A. B. A.; Priharti, W.; Samat, S. B.; Dolah, M. T.

    2013-11-27

    OSLD was evaluated in terms of energy response and accuracy of the measured dose in comparison with TLD-100H and TLD-100. The OSLD showed a better energy response performance for H{sub p}(10) whereas for H{sub p}(0.07), TLD-100H is superior than the others. The OSLD dose accuracy is comparable with the other two dosimeters since it fulfilled the requirement of the ICRP trumpet graph analysis.

  20. Effect of storage time and framework design on the accuracy of maxillary cobalt-chromium cast removable partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Viswambaran, M.; Sundaram, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Inaccuracies in the fit of palatal major connectors may be related to distortion of the wax pattern due to prolonged storage time and faulty major connector design. Purpose: This in vitro study was carried out to find out the effect of storage time and major connector design on the accuracy of cobalt-chromium cast removable partial dentures (RPDs). Materials and Methods: A brass metal die with a Kennedy Class III, modification 1, the partially edentulous arch was used as a master die. Thirty-six refractory casts were fabricated from the master die. The refractory casts were divided into three groups (Group I: Anterior-posterior palatal bar, Group II: Palatal strap and Group III: Palatal plate) based on the design of maxillary major connector and subdivided into four groups (sub Group A: 01 h, sub Group B: 03 h, Sub Group C: 06 h, and sub Group D: 24 h) based on the storage time. For each group, 12 frameworks were fabricated. The influence of wax pattern storage time and the accuracy of the fit palatal major connector designs on the master die were compared. Casting defects (nodules/incompleteness) of the frameworks were also evaluated before finishing and polishing. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. Results: The gap discrepancy was least in sub Group A (01 h) followed by sub Group B (03 h) and C (06 h) and most in sub Group D (24 h). Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05 in all locations L1–L5) in the fit of the framework were related to the design of the major connector. The gap discrepancy was least in Group I (anterior-posterior palatal bar) followed by Group II (palatal strap) and most in Group II (palatal plate). Conclusions: It is recommended that the wax patterns for RPD to be invested immediately on completion of the wax procedure. The selection of a major connector design is crucial for an accurate fit of RPD. PMID:26681850

  1. Real-time GPS Strategies for Rapid Response Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanson, I. A.; Dreger, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    High-rate, low-latency GPS data can make valuable contribution to both Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) and Rapid Response (RR) applications. While GPS will make is largest contribution to EEW in high magnitude earthquakes, it can provide valuable information to RR products for many more events, from moderate to high magnitude. In particular, static offsets from GPS provide information on the fault plane orientation and total slip in a finite slip inversion, which is used to produce Shakemap. Shakemap is a product that shows the estimated intensity of shaking around the epicentral area and is used by first responders to evaluate where damage is likely to have occurred. In this project, we investigate strategies for using GPS data for moderate earthquakes in California to produce estimates of static offsets and estimate a slip plane within minutes following an event. The 2007 M5.6 Alum Rock and 2004 M6.0 Parkfield earthquakes are used as test cases and the data is processed using Track and TrackRT. Multiple methods for measuring the static offsets from the displacement waveforms are tested, including differencing the pre- and post- earthquake median positions and a method involving pre- and post- earthquake line fitting. We also look into the effects of different types of starting geometry on the speed and accuracy of the non-linear fault plane determination process. We find that rapid post-processing with Track allows more robust static offset determination from these smaller earthquakes than real-time processing (as it exists today). Rapid post-processing can be finished and displacement waveforms made available within a couple minutes, well within the time threshold for other rapid products and providing essentially no delay to the final products. Nonetheless, this strategy still requires real-time transmission of data from the field to the lab so that it is available on demand following an event.

  2. Accuracy of a Real-Time, Computerized, Binocular, Three-Dimensional Trajectory-Tracking Device for Recording Functional Mandibular Movements

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tian; Yang, Huifang; Sui, Huaxin; Salvi, Satyajeet Sudhir; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Developments in digital technology have permitted researchers to study mandibular movements. Here, the accuracy of a real-time, computerized, binocular, three-dimensional (3D) trajectory-tracking device for recording functional mandibular movements was evaluated. Methods An occlusal splint without the occlusal region was created based on a plaster cast of the lower dentition. The splint was rigidly connected with a target on its labial side and seated on the cast. The cast was then rigidly attached to the stage of a high-precision triaxial electronic translator, which was used to move the target-cast-stage complex. Half-circular movements (5.00-mm radius) in three planes (XOY, XOZ, YOZ) and linear movements along the x-axis were performed at 5.00 mm/s. All trajectory points were recorded with the binocular 3D trajectory-tracking device and fitted to arcs or lines, respectively, with the Imageware software. To analyze the accuracy of the trajectory-tracking device, the mean distances between the trajectory points and the fitted arcs or lines were measured, and the mean differences between the lengths of the fitted arcs’ radii and a set value (5.00 mm) were then calculated. A one-way analysis of variance was used to evaluate the spatial consistency of the recording accuracy in three different planes. Results The mean distances between the trajectory points and fitted arcs or lines were 0.076 ± 0.033 mm or 0.089 ± 0.014 mm. The mean difference between the lengths of the fitted arcs’ radii and the set value (5.00 mm) was 0.025 ± 0.071 mm. A one-way ANOVA showed that the recording errors in three different planes were not statistically significant. Conclusion These results suggest that the device can record certain movements at 5.00 mm/s, which is similar to the speed of functional mandibular movements. In addition, the recordings had an error of <0.1 mm and good spatial consistency. Thus, the device meets some of the requirements necessary for

  3. Acute Response in vivo of a Fiber-Optic Sensor for Continuous Glucose Monitoring from Canine Studies on Point Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuo-Chih; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Chiu, Cheng-Yang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute response of Sencil™, a fiber-optic sensor, in point accuracy for glucose monitoring in vivo on healthy dogs under anesthesia. A total of four dogs with clinically normal glycemia were implanted with one sensor each in the chest region to measure the interstitial glucose concentration during the ovariohysterectomy procedure. The data was acquired every 10 seconds after initiation, and was compared to the concentration of venous plasma glucose sampled during the surgery procedures for accuracy of agreement analysis. In the four trials with a range of 71–297 mg/dL plasma glucose, the collected 21 pairs of ISF readings from the Sencil™ and the plasma reference showed superior dispersion of residue values than the conventional system, and a linear correlation (the Pearson correlation coefficient is 0.9288 and the y-intercept is 14.22 mg/dL). The MAD (17.6 mg/dL) and RMAD (16.16%) of Sencil™ measurements were in the comparable range of the conventional system. The Clarke error grid analysis indicated that 100% of the paired points were in the clinically acceptable zone A (61.9%) and B (38.1%). PMID:22163627

  4. Acute response in vivo of a fiber-optic sensor for continuous glucose monitoring from canine studies on point accuracy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Chih; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Chiu, Cheng-Yang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute response of Sencil(™), a fiber-optic sensor, in point accuracy for glucose monitoring in vivo on healthy dogs under anesthesia. A total of four dogs with clinically normal glycemia were implanted with one sensor each in the chest region to measure the interstitial glucose concentration during the ovariohysterectomy procedure. The data was acquired every 10 seconds after initiation, and was compared to the concentration of venous plasma glucose sampled during the surgery procedures for accuracy of agreement analysis. In the four trials with a range of 71-297 mg/dL plasma glucose, the collected 21 pairs of ISF readings from the Sencil™ and the plasma reference showed superior dispersion of residue values than the conventional system, and a linear correlation (the Pearson correlation coefficient is 0.9288 and the y-intercept is 14.22 mg/dL). The MAD (17.6 mg/dL) and RMAD (16.16%) of Sencil™ measurements were in the comparable range of the conventional system. The Clarke error grid analysis indicated that 100% of the paired points were in the clinically acceptable zone A (61.9%) and B (38.1%). PMID:22163627

  5. Using Lunar Observations to Validate Pointing Accuracy and Geolocation, Detector Sensitivity Stability and Static Point Response of the CERES Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Janet L.; Smith, G. Louis; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Validation of in-orbit instrument performance is a function of stability in both instrument and calibration source. This paper describes a method using lunar observations scanning near full moon by the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. The Moon offers an external source whose signal variance is predictable and non-degrading. From 2006 to present, these in-orbit observations have become standardized and compiled for the Flight Models -1 and -2 aboard the Terra satellite, for Flight Models-3 and -4 aboard the Aqua satellite, and beginning 2012, for Flight Model-5 aboard Suomi-NPP. Instrument performance measurements studied are detector sensitivity stability, pointing accuracy and static detector point response function. This validation method also shows trends per CERES data channel of 0.8% per decade or less for Flight Models 1-4. Using instrument gimbal data and computed lunar position, the pointing error of each detector telescope, the accuracy and consistency of the alignment between the detectors can be determined. The maximum pointing error was 0.2 Deg. in azimuth and 0.17 Deg. in elevation which corresponds to an error in geolocation near nadir of 2.09 km. With the exception of one detector, all instruments were found to have consistent detector alignment from 2006 to present. All alignment error was within 0.1o with most detector telescopes showing a consistent alignment offset of less than 0.02 Deg.

  6. Accuracy of sea level predictions with lead time of one week: a comparison between Prognocean and MyOcean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swierczynska, Malgorzata; Mizinski, Bartlomiej; Niedzielski, Tomasz

    2015-04-01

    There exist several systems which produce sea level forecasts in real time, with lead times ranging from hours to two weeks in the future. One of the recently developed solutions is Prognocean, the system that has been built and implemented at the University of Wroclaw, Poland. Its main feature is that it uses simple time series models to predict sea level anomaly maps, and does it for lead times ranging from 1 to 14 days with daily update. The empirical data-based models are fitted in real time both to individual grids (polynomial-harmonic model, polynomial-harmonic model combined with autoregressive model, polynomial-harmonic model combined with threshold autoregressive model) and to numerous grids forming a spatial latitude x longitude window of 3˚ x 5˚ (polynomial-harmonic model combined with multivariate autoregressive model). Although their simplicity, the approaches have already been shown to produce sea level anomaly predictions of reasonable accuracy. However, none of the analyses targeted at the comparative study which would present the skills of the Prognocean system against a background of the performance of other systems that use physically-based models. This study aims to fill this gap by comparing Prognocean-based predictions for one week into the future with the corresponding prognoses calculated by MyOcean. The reader is provided with the objectively-calculated set of statistics, presented as maps, which describes prediction errors (mean absolute error, root mean square error, index of agreement) and prediction skills (prediction efficiency, coefficient of determination) of the two systems. The exercise enables to compare the skills of the approaches, and the gridwise comparison allows one to identify areas of superior performance of each system.

  7. Response modalities and time-sharing performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidulich, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment performed to investigate the role of resource competition and asymmetric transfer in dual-task performance is described. It is shown that there is an advantage to mixed manual/speech response modality configurations that cannot be accounted for by asymmetric transfer. The present results support the multiple resources approach to the application of speech technology. Once speech recognition achieves an acceptable level of operational reliability, speech controls can be used to reduce resource competition and improve performance in multitask environments.

  8. Temperate grass response to timing of grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grazing management has a significant impact on pasture growth. We determined how timing of grazing influences grass productivity, yield distribution, and persistence. Meadow fescue [Schedonorus pratensis (Huds.) P. Beauv.], orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), quackgrass [Elymus repens (L.) Gould...

  9. Accuracy of travel time distribution (TTD) models as affected by TTD complexity, observation errors, and model and tracer selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Christopher T.; Zhang, Yong; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Landon, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Analytical models of the travel time distribution (TTD) from a source area to a sample location are often used to estimate groundwater ages and solute concentration trends. The accuracies of these models are not well known for geologically complex aquifers. In this study, synthetic datasets were used to quantify the accuracy of four analytical TTD models as affected by TTD complexity, observation errors, model selection, and tracer selection. Synthetic TTDs and tracer data were generated from existing numerical models with complex hydrofacies distributions for one public-supply well and 14 monitoring wells in the Central Valley, California. Analytical TTD models were calibrated to synthetic tracer data, and prediction errors were determined for estimates of TTDs and conservative tracer (NO3−) concentrations. Analytical models included a new, scale-dependent dispersivity model (SDM) for two-dimensional transport from the watertable to a well, and three other established analytical models. The relative influence of the error sources (TTD complexity, observation error, model selection, and tracer selection) depended on the type of prediction. Geological complexity gave rise to complex TTDs in monitoring wells that strongly affected errors of the estimated TTDs. However, prediction errors for NO3− and median age depended more on tracer concentration errors. The SDM tended to give the most accurate estimates of the vertical velocity and other predictions, although TTD model selection had minor effects overall. Adding tracers improved predictions if the new tracers had different input histories. Studies using TTD models should focus on the factors that most strongly affect the desired predictions.

  10. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  11. Efficiency and accuracy of the perturbation response coefficient generation method for whole core comet calculations in BWR and CANDU configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    The coarse mesh transport method (COMET) is a highly accurate and efficient computational tool which predicts whole-core neutronics behaviors for heterogeneous reactor cores via a pre-computed eigenvalue-dependent response coefficient (function) library. Recently, a high order perturbation method was developed to significantly improve the efficiency of the library generation method. In that work, the method's accuracy and efficiency was tested in a small PWR benchmark problem. This paper extends the application of the perturbation method to include problems typical of the other water reactor cores such as BWR and CANDU bundles. It is found that the response coefficients predicted by the perturbation method for typical BWR bundles agree very well with those directly computed by the Monte Carlo method. The average and maximum relative errors in the surface-to-surface response coefficients are 0.02%-0.05% and 0.06%-0.25%, respectively. For CANDU bundles, the corresponding quantities are 0.01%-0.05% and 0.04% -0.15%. It is concluded that the perturbation method is highly accurate and efficient with a wide range of applicability. (authors)

  12. A Study of Bayesian Estimation and Comparison of Response Time Models in Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Hongwook

    2010-01-01

    Response time has been regarded as an important source for investigating the relationship between human performance and response speed. It is important to examine the relationship between response time and item characteristics, especially in the perspective of the relationship between response time and various factors that affect examinee's…

  13. A Lognormal Model for Response Times on Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    A lognormal model for the response times of a person on a set of test items is investigated. The model has a parameter structure analogous to the two-parameter logistic response models in item response theory, with a parameter for the speed of each person as well as parameters for the time intensity and discriminating power of each item. It is…

  14. Using Response Times for Item Selection in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a second-level model for the distribution of the…

  15. The effect of pain on task switching: pain reduces accuracy and increases reaction times across multiple switching paradigms.

    PubMed

    Attridge, Nina; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Pain disrupts attention, which may have negative consequences for daily life for people with acute or chronic pain. It has been suggested that switching between tasks may leave us particularly susceptible to pain-related attentional disruption, because we need to disengage our attention from one task before shifting it onto another. Switching tasks typically elicit lower accuracies and/or longer reaction times when participants switch to a new task compared with repeating the same task, and pain may exacerbate this effect. We present 3 studies to test this hypothesis. In study 1, participants completed 2 versions of an alternating runs switching task under pain-free and thermal pain-induction conditions. Pain did not affect performance on either task. In studies 2 and 3, we examined 7 versions of the switching task using large general population samples, experiencing a variety of naturally occurring pain conditions, recruited and tested on the internet. On all tasks, participants with pain had longer reaction times on both switch and repeat trials compared with participants without pain, but pain did not increase switch costs. In studies 2 and 3, we also investigated the effects of type of pain, duration of pain, and analgesics on task performance. We conclude that pain has a small dampening effect on performance overall on switching tasks. This suggests that pain interrupts attention even when participants are engaged in a trial, not only when attention has been disengaged for shifting to a new task set.

  16. Response time characterization of fast responding pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2010-11-01

    Response time characterization of a fast responding pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is important information in measuring an unsteady flow field. PSP is an optical pressure sensor. The luminescent image from the PSP is related to a pressure map. In the previous works, a time delay from a step change of pressure is generally used to characterize the response time. The thickness of the PSP as well as the PSP binding material greatly influences the response time. Because the temperature influences the diffusion or permeation of a PSP binder, it is also an important parameter to influence the response time. We build a shock tube to create a step change of pressure for response time characterization. This can control the temperature of the PSP. We discuss the PSP response times related to the temperature of the binder as well as the binding materials.

  17. On the response time of plasmonic terahertz detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravev, V. M.; Solov'ev, V. V.; Fortunatov, A. A.; Tsydynzhapov, G. E.; Kukushkin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The response time of a plasmonic terahertz detector is investigated using two independent experimental techniques relying on time-resolved and heterodyne measurements, respectively. Both methods demonstrate that the detector response time does not exceed 110 ps. The results obtained suggest that the designed terahertz detector can be used as a component of high-speed telecommunication systems of a new generation.

  18. Effect of Storage Time of Extended-Pour and Conventional Alginate Impressions on Dimensional Accuracy of Casts

    PubMed Central

    Rohanian, Ahmad; Ommati Shabestari, Ghasem; Zeighami, Somayeh; Samadi, Mohammad Javad; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Some manufacturers claim to have produced new irreversible hydro-colloids that are able to maintain their dimensional stability during storage. The present study evaluated the effect of storage time on dimensional stability of three alginates: Hydrogum 5, Tropicalgin and Alginoplast. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in-vitro trial, a total of 90 alginate impressions were made from a Dentoform model using Hydrogum 5, Tropicalgin and Alginoplast alginates. The impressions were stored in a sealed plastic bag without a damp paper towel for 0, 24, 48, 72 and 120 hours and then poured with type III dental stone. Cross-arch (facial of 6 to facial of 6 on the opposite side) and antero-posterior (distal of right first molar to the ipsilateral central incisor) measurements were made with a digital caliper on the casts. Data were analyzed by two-way and one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test (P<0.05). Results: Alginate type and the pouring time significantly affected the dimensional stability of alginate impressions (both Ps<0.001). Pouring of Hydrogum 5 impressions can be delayed for up to 120 hours without significant dimensional changes. Alginoplast impressions may be poured after 72 hours, but Tropicalgin should be poured immediately and the storage time should not be more than 24 hours. Conclusion: Immediate pouring of alginate impressions provides the highest accuracy in reproducing the teeth and adjacent tissues; however, this study demonstrated that pouring may be delayed for up to five days using extended-pour (Hydrogum 5) alginates. PMID:25628695

  19. Latent Response Times and Cognitive Processing on the FMCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonham, Scott

    2008-10-01

    Latent response time analysis of students on an electronic version of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE) provides information on student reading patterns and the role of mental models in student reasoning. Regression analysis looked at the dependence of response times on characteristics of questions, such as amount of text and inclusion of graphs. Results indicate that students generally read through the question text and instructions when first presented, but do not systematically read through answer choices and graphs. Comparison of average response times between pre- and post-instructional assessment found a drop in response times when students used Newtonian ideas but no change for responses using the main alternative concept. The average response time for students who answered using a mix of Newtonian and alternative concepts was not different from those using primarily one or the other; questions rarely activated both concepts at the same time.

  20. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  1. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  2. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  3. High Mass Measurement Accuracy Determination for Proteomics using Multivariate Regression Fitting: Application to Electrospray Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, Eric F.; Rodriguez, Nestor; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-02-01

    Important factors that limit the mass measurement accuracy from a mass spectrometer are related to (1) the type of mass analyzer used and (2) the data processing/calibration methods used to obtain mass values from the raw data. Here, two data processing methods are presented that correct for systematic deviations when measuring the mass of ions using a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The first fitting method is one where m/z values are obtained from fitting peak distributions using double Gaussian functions. A second calibration method takes into account the slight non-linear response of the time-of-flight analyzer in addition to the drift in the calibration over time. Using multivariate regression, both of these two effects can be corrected for using a single calibration formula. Achievable performance was evaluated with a trypsin digestion of serum albumin and proteins from the organism D. radiodurans that were analyzed using gradient reverse-phase liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. The root mean square deviation between the theoretical and experimental m/z for serum albumin was found to be 8 ppm using the double Gaussian-multivariate method compared to 29 ppm determined using linear calibration and normal peak centroiding. An advantage of the methods presented here is that no calibrant compounds need to be added to the mobile phase, thereby avoiding interference effects and signal suppression of analytes.

  4. Time-dependent onshore tsunami response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apotsos, Alex; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    While bulk measures of the onshore impact of a tsunami, including the maximum run-up elevation and inundation distance, are important for hazard planning, the temporal evolution of the onshore flow dynamics likely controls the extent of the onshore destruction and the erosion and deposition of sediment that occurs. However, the time-varying dynamics of actual tsunamis are even more difficult to measure in situ than the bulk parameters. Here, a numerical model based on the non-linear shallow water equations is used to examine the effects variations in the wave characteristics, bed slope, and bottom roughness have on the temporal evolution of the onshore flow. Model results indicate that the onshore flow dynamics vary significantly over the parameter space examined. For example, the flow dynamics over steep, smooth morphologies tend to be temporally symmetric, with similar magnitude velocities generated during the run-up and run-down phases of inundation. Conversely, on shallow, rough onshore topographies the flow dynamics tend to be temporally skewed toward the run-down phase of inundation, with the magnitude of the flow velocities during run-up and run-down being significantly different. Furthermore, for near-breaking tsunami waves inundating over steep topography, the flow velocity tends to accelerate almost instantaneously to a maximum and then decrease monotonically. Conversely, when very long waves inundate over shallow topography, the flow accelerates more slowly and can remain steady for a period of time before beginning to decelerate. These results indicate that a single set of assumptions concerning the onshore flow dynamics cannot be applied to all tsunamis, and site specific analyses may be required.

  5. Accuracy of PARTwear Inertial Sensor and Optojump Optical Measurement System for Measuring Ground Contact Time During Running.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Rahel; Taube, Wolfgang; Wyss, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Ammann, R, Taube, W, and Wyss, T. Accuracy of PARTwear inertial sensor and Optojump optical measurement system for measuring ground contact time during running. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2057-2063, 2016-The aim of this study was to validate the detection of ground contact time (GCT) during running in 2 differently working systems: a small inertial measurement sensor, PARTwear (PW), worn on the shoe laces, and the optical measurement system, Optojump (OJ), placed on the track. Twelve well-trained subjects performed 12 runs each on an indoor track at speeds ranging from 3.0 to 9.0 m·s. GCT of one step per run (total 144) was simultaneously obtained by the PW, the OJ, and a high-speed video camera (HSC), whereby the latter served as reference system. The sampling rate was 1,000 Hz for all methods. Compared with the HSC, the PW and the OJ systems underestimated GCT by -1.3 ± 6.1% and -16.5 ± 6.7% (p-values ≤ 0.05), respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients between PW and HSC and between OJ and HSC were 0.984 and 0.853 (p-values < 0.001), respectively. Despite the constant systematic underestimation of GCT, analyses indicated that PW successfully recorded GCT over a wide range of speeds. However, results showed only moderate validity for the OJ system, with increasing errors when speed decreased. In conclusion, the PW proved to be a highly useful and valid application, and its use can be recommended not only for laboratory settings but also for field applications. In contrast, data on GCT obtained by OJ during running must be treated with caution, specifically when running speed changes or when comparisons are made with GCT data collected by other measurement systems.

  6. A Comparison of Response Rate, Response Time, and Costs of Mail and Electronic Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, David M.; Bradshaw, Carol C.

    2002-01-01

    Compared response rates, response time, and costs of mail and electronic surveys using a sample of 377 college faculty members. Mail surveys yielded a higher response rate and a lower rate of undeliverable surveys, but response time was longer and costs were higher than for electronic surveys. (SLD)

  7. Effect of time discretization of the imaging process on the accuracy of trajectory estimation in fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yau; Chao, Jerry; Lin, Zhiping; Ober, Raimund J

    2014-08-25

    In fluorescence microscopy, high-speed imaging is often necessary for the proper visualization and analysis of fast subcellular dynamics. Here, we examine how the speed of image acquisition affects the accuracy with which parameters such as the starting position and speed of a microscopic non-stationary fluorescent object can be estimated from the resulting image sequence. Specifically, we use a Fisher information-based performance bound to investigate the detector-dependent effect of frame rate on the accuracy of parameter estimation. We demonstrate that when a charge-coupled device detector is used, the estimation accuracy deteriorates as the frame rate increases beyond a point where the detector's readout noise begins to overwhelm the low number of photons detected in each frame. In contrast, we show that when an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) detector is used, the estimation accuracy improves with increasing frame rate. In fact, at high frame rates where the low number of photons detected in each frame renders the fluorescent object difficult to detect visually, imaging with an EMCCD detector represents a natural implementation of the Ultrahigh Accuracy Imaging Modality, and enables estimation with an accuracy approaching that which is attainable only when a hypothetical noiseless detector is used. PMID:25321248

  8. Increasing the accuracy and temporal resolution of two-filter radon-222 measurements by correcting for the instrument response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Alan D.; Chambers, Scott D.; Williams, Alastair G.; Werczynski, Sylvester

    2016-06-01

    Dual-flow-loop two-filter radon detectors have a slow time response, which can affect the interpretation of their output when making continuous observations of near-surface atmospheric radon concentrations. While concentrations are routinely reported hourly, a calibrated model of detector performance shows that ˜ 40 % of the signal arrives more than an hour after a radon pulse is delivered. After investigating several possible ways to correct for the detector's slow time response, we show that a Bayesian approach using a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler is an effective method. After deconvolution, the detector's output is redistributed into the appropriate counting interval and a 10 min temporal resolution can be achieved under test conditions when the radon concentration is controlled. In the case of existing archived observations, collected under less ideal conditions, the data can be retrospectively reprocessed at 30 min resolution. In one case study, we demonstrate that a deconvolved radon time series was consistent with the following: measurements from a fast-response carbon dioxide monitor; grab samples from an aircraft; and a simple mixing height model. In another case study, during a period of stable nights and days with well-developed convective boundary layers, a bias of 18 % in the mean daily minimum radon concentration was eliminated by correcting for the instrument response.

  9. Hierarchical Diffusion Models for Two-Choice Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandekerckhove, Joachim; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Lee, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two-choice response times are a common type of data, and much research has been devoted to the development of process models for such data. However, the practical application of these models is notoriously complicated, and flexible methods are largely nonexistent. We combine a popular model for choice response times--the Wiener diffusion…

  10. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of...

  11. 40 CFR 1601.24 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1601... Disclosing Records § 1601.24 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general. The CSB ordinarily shall... an imminent threat to the life or physical safety of an individual; (ii) An urgency to inform...

  12. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of...

  13. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of...

  14. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of...

  15. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of...

  16. Testing for Aberrant Behavior in Response Time Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marianti, Sukaesi; Fox, Jean-Paul; Avetisyan, Marianna; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Tijmstra, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Many standardized tests are now administered via computer rather than paper-and-pencil format. In a computer-based testing environment, it is possible to record not only the test taker's response to each question (item) but also the amount of time spent by the test taker in considering and answering each item. Response times (RTs) provide…

  17. 48 CFR 5.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GPE (see 5.201). All publicizing and response times are calculated based on the date of publication. The publication date is the date the notice appears on the GPE. The notice must be published at least... day response time from the date of publication of a proper notice of intent to contract for...

  18. 48 CFR 5.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GPE (see 5.201). All publicizing and response times are calculated based on the date of publication. The publication date is the date the notice appears on the GPE. The notice must be published at least... day response time from the date of publication of a proper notice of intent to contract for...

  19. 6 CFR 5.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 5.5 Section 5.5 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 5.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general....

  20. Response Time Variations in an Online Search System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael D.

    1983-01-01

    Explores response time variations in National Library of Medicine's ELHILL bibliographic search system and analyzes statistical significance of response time in terms of its variations by day of week, hour of day, particular bibliographic file being searched, command issued by user, number of users logged onto system. Ten references are cited.…

  1. 48 CFR 1505.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Publicizing and response time. 1505.203 Section 1505.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Proposed Contract Actions 1505.203 Publicizing and response time. (a) The...

  2. Detecting lies about consumer attitudes using the timed antagonistic response alethiometer.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Aiden P; Mahadevan, Nikhila; Edwards, Sonja E; Klymowsky, James

    2014-09-01

    The Timed Antagonistic Response Alethiometer (TARA) is a true-false statement classification task that diagnoses lying on the basis of slower average response speeds. Previous research (Gregg in Applied Cognitive Psychology, 21, 621-647, 2007) showed that a computer-based TARA was about 80 % accurate when its statements conveyed demographic facts or religious views. Here, we tested the TARA's diagnostic potential when its statements conveyed attitudes-here, toward both branded and generic consumer products-across different versions of the TARA (Exps. 1a, 1b, and 1c), as well as across consecutive administrations (Exp. 2). The results generalized well across versions, and maximal accuracy rates exceeding 80 % were obtained, although accuracy declined somewhat upon readministration. Overall, the TARA shows promise as a comparatively cheap, convenient, and diagnostic index of lying about attitudes. PMID:24166022

  3. An efficient finite-difference method with high-order accuracy in both time and space domains for modelling scalar-wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sirui; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-05-01

    For modelling large-scale 3-D scalar-wave propagation, the finite-difference (FD) method with high-order accuracy in space but second-order accuracy in time is widely used because of its relatively low requirements of computer memory. We develop a novel staggered-grid (SG) FD method with high-order accuracy not only in space, but also in time, for solving 2- and 3-D scalar-wave equations. We determine the coefficients of the FD operator in the joint time-space domain to achieve high-order accuracy in time while preserving high-order accuracy in space. Our new FD scheme is based on a stencil that contains a few more grid points than the standard stencil. It is 2M-th-order accurate in space and fourth-order accurate in time when using 2M grid points along each axis and wavefields at one time step as the standard SGFD method. We validate the accuracy and efficiency of our new FD scheme using dispersion analysis and numerical modelling of scalar-wave propagation in 2- and 3-D complex models with a wide range of velocity contrasts. For media with a velocity contrast up to five, our new FD scheme is approximately two times more computationally efficient than the standard SGFD scheme with almost the same computer-memory requirement as the latter. Further numerical experiments demonstrate that our new FD scheme loses its advantages over the standard SGFD scheme if the velocity contrast is 10. However, for most large-scale geophysical applications, the velocity contrasts often range approximately from 1 to 3. Our new method is thus particularly useful for large-scale 3-D scalar-wave modelling and full-waveform inversion.

  4. Improving the Average Response Time in Collective I/O

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Chen; Sehrish, Saba; Liao, Wei-keng; Choudhary, Alok; Schuchardt, Karen L.

    2011-09-21

    In collective I/O, MPI processes exchange requests so that the rearranged requests can result in the shortest file system access time. Scheduling the exchange sequence determines the response time of participating processes. Existing implementations that simply follow the increasing order of file ofsets do not necessary produce the best performance. To minimize the average response time, we propose three scheduling algorithms that consider the number of processes per file stripe and the number of accesses per process. Our experimental results demonstrate improvements of up to 50% in the average response time using two synthetic benchmarks and a high-resolution climate application.

  5. Passenger comfort response times as a function of aircraft motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinalducci, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between a passenger's response time of changes in level of comfort experienced as a function of aircraft motion was examined. The aircraft used in this investigation was capable of providing a wide range of vertical and transverse accelerations by means of direct lift flap control surfaces and side force generator surfaces in addition to normal control surfaces. Response times to changes in comfort were recorded along with the passenger's rating of comfort on a five point scale. In addition, a number of aircraft motion variables including vertical and transverse accelerations were also recorded. Results indicate some relationship between human comfort response times to reaction time data.

  6. Accuracy sensitivity to carboxyhemoglobin, and speed of response of the Hewlett-Packard 47201A ear oximeter.

    PubMed

    Douglas, N J; Brash, H M; Wraith, P K; Calverley, P M; Leggett, R J; McElderry, L; Flenley, D C

    1979-02-01

    We have shown that the Hewlett-Packard 47201A ear oximeter measures arterial O2 saturation within 95 per cent confidence limits of +/- 4 per cent when arterial blood saturation is more than 65 per cent, but at lower saturations the oximeter consistently provides a reading that is too low. The oximeter is sensitive to carboxyhemoglobin, progressively overestimating arterial saturation as carboxyhemoglobin concentration increases from 0 to 18 per cent. The time response is exponential, with a normal time constant of 3 sec, but this is halved in the fast mode or operation.

  7. Computer Response Time Measurements of Mood, Fatigue and Symptom Scale Items: Implications for Scale Response Time Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryman, David H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes study conducted with U.S. Marine Corps enlisted personnel to measure response time to computer-administered questionnaire items, and to evaluate how measurement of response time might be useful in various research areas. Topics addressed include mood states; the occurrence of straight lining; and experimental effects of sleep loss and…

  8. An Item Response Theory Model for Incorporating Response Time Data in Binary Personality Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a general item response theory model for personality items that allows the information provided by the item response times to be used to estimate the individual trait levels. The submodel describing the item response times is a modification of Thissen's log-linear model and is based on the distance-difficulty hypothesis in…

  9. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response…

  10. Neural Basis of Adaptive Response Time Adjustment during Saccade Countermanding

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Pierre; Logan, Gordon D.; Palmeri, Thomas J.; Boucher, Leanne; Paré, Martin; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Humans and macaque monkeys adjust their response time adaptively in stop signal (countermanding) tasks, responding slower after stop-signal trials than after control trials with no stop signal. We investigated the neural mechanism underlying this adaptive response time adjustment in macaque monkeys performing a saccade countermanding task. Earlier research showed that movements are initiated when the random accumulation of presaccadic movement-related activity reaches a fixed threshold. We found that a systematic delay in response time after stop signal trials was accomplished not through a change of threshold, baseline, or accumulation rate, but instead through a change in the time when activity first began to accumulate. The neurons underlying movement initiation have been identified with mathematical accumulator models of response time performance. Therefore, this new result provides surprising new insights into the neural instantiation of stochastic accumulator models and the mechanisms through which executive control can be exerted. PMID:21880921

  11. The Episodic Engram Transformed: Time Reduces Retrieval-Related Brain Activity but Correlates It with Memory Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Orit; Mendelsohn, Avi; Dudai, Yadin

    2012-01-01

    We took snapshots of human brain activity with fMRI during retrieval of realistic episodic memory over several months. Three groups of participants were scanned during a memory test either hours, weeks, or months after viewing a documentary movie. High recognition accuracy after hours decreased after weeks and remained at similar levels after…

  12. Improved design provides faster response time in photomultiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Dynamic Crossed-Field Electron Multiplying /DCFEM/ light demodulator avoids the normal response time limitations inherent in static field devices by using time varying crossed electric and static magnetic fields. This eliminates the transit time spread that affects electrons as they proceed along the secondary emission stages of the tube.

  13. Diminished Response of Arctic Plants to Warming over Time

    PubMed Central

    Kremers, Kelseyann S.; Hollister, Robert D.; Oberbauer, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to determine if the response of arctic plants to warming is consistent across species, locations and time. This study examined the impact of experimental warming and natural temperature variation on plants at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska beginning in 1994. We considered observations of plant performance collected from 1994–2000 “short-term” and those from 2007–2012 “long-term”. The plant traits reported are the number of inflorescences, inflorescence height, leaf length, and day of flower emergence. These traits can inform us about larger scale processes such as plant reproductive effort, plant growth, and plant phenology, and therefore provide valuable insight into community dynamics, carbon uptake, and trophic interactions. We categorized traits of all species monitored at each site into temperature response types. We then compared response types across traits, plant growth forms, sites, and over time to analyze the consistency of plant response to warming. Graminoids were the most responsive to warming and showed a positive response to temperature, while shrubs were generally the least responsive. Almost half (49%) of response types (across all traits, species, and sites combined) changed from short-term to long-term. The percent of plants responsive to warming decreased from 57% (short-term) to 46% (long-term). These results indicate that the response of plants to warming varies over time and has diminished overall in recent years. PMID:25767881

  14. Grade of Membership Response Time Model for Detecting Guessing Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokropek, Artur

    2016-01-01

    A response model that is able to detect guessing behaviors and produce unbiased estimates in low-stake conditions using timing information is proposed. The model is a special case of the grade of membership model in which responses are modeled as partial members of a class that is affected by motivation and a class that responds only according to…

  15. A Mixture Rasch Model with Item Response Time Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    An examinee faced with a test item will engage in solution behavior or rapid-guessing behavior. These qualitatively different test-taking behaviors bias parameter estimates for item response models that do not control for such behavior. A mixture Rasch model with item response time components was proposed and evaluated through application to real…

  16. A Mechanism for Error Detection in Speeded Response Time Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Clay B.; Yeung, Nick; Coles, Michael G. H.; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of error detection plays a central role in theories of executive control. In this article, the authors present a mechanism that can rapidly detect errors in speeded response time tasks. This error monitor assigns values to the output of cognitive processes involved in stimulus categorization and response generation and detects errors…

  17. The Impact of Strategy Instruction and Timing of Estimates on Low and High Working-Memory Capacity Readers' Absolute Monitoring Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linderholm, Tracy; Zhao, Qin

    2008-01-01

    Working-memory capacity, strategy instruction, and timing of estimates were investigated for their effects on absolute monitoring accuracy, which is the difference between estimated and actual reading comprehension test performance. Participants read two expository texts under one of two randomly assigned reading strategy instruction conditions…

  18. Response time to colored stimuli in the full visual field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.; Dawson, L. M.; Galvan, T.; Reid, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Peripheral visual response time was measured in seven dark adapted subjects to the onset of small (45' arc diam), brief (50 msec), colored (blue, yellow, green, red) and white stimuli imaged at 72 locations within their binocular field of view. The blue, yellow, and green stimuli were matched for brightness at about 2.6 sub log 10 units above their absolute light threshold, and they appeared at an unexpected time and location. These data were obtained to provide response time and no-response data for use in various design disciplines involving instrument panel layout. The results indicated that the retina possesses relatively concentric regions within each of which mean response time can be expected to be of approximately the same duration. These regions are centered near the fovea and extend farther horizontally than vertically. Mean foveal response time was fastest for yellow and slowest for blue. Three and one-half percent of the total 56,410 trials presented resulted in no-responses. Regardless of stimulus color, the lowest percentage of no-responses occurred within 30 deg arc from the fovea and the highest within 40 deg to 80 deg arc below the fovea.

  19. The Screening Accuracy of the Parent and Teacher-Reported Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS): Comparison with the 3Di and ADOS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvekot, Jorieke; van der Ende, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

    2015-01-01

    The screening accuracy of the parent and teacher-reported Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) was compared with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) classification according to (1) the Developmental, Dimensional, and Diagnostic Interview (3Di), (2) the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), (3) both the 3Di and ADOS, in 186 children referred to…

  20. Peripheral visual response time and visual display layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a group of 42 subjects in a study of their peripheral visual response time to visual signals under positive acceleration, during prolonged bedrest, at passive 70 deg headup body lift, under exposures to high air temperatures and high luminance levels, and under normal stress-free laboratory conditions. Diagrams are plotted for mean response times to white, red, yellow, green, and blue stimuli under different conditions.

  1. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, J. S. Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2014-11-15

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  2. Prospective evaluation of the VITEK MS for the routine identification of bacteria and yeast in the clinical microbiology laboratory: assessment of accuracy of identification and turnaround time.

    PubMed

    Charnot-Katsikas, Angella; Tesic, Vera; Boonlayangoor, Sue; Bethel, Cindy; Frank, Karen M

    2014-02-01

    This study assessed the accuracy of bacterial and yeast identification using the VITEK MS, and the time to reporting of isolates before and after its implementation in routine clinical practice. Three hundred and sixty-two isolates of bacteria and yeast, consisting of a variety of clinical isolates and American Type Culture Collection strains, were tested. Results were compared with reference identifications from the VITEK 2 system and with 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The VITEK MS provided an acceptable identification to species level for 283 (78 %) isolates. Considering organisms for which genus-level identification is acceptable for routine clinical care, 315 isolates (87 %) had an acceptable identification. Six isolates (2 %) were identified incorrectly, five of which were Shigella species. Finally, the time for reporting the identifications was decreased significantly after implementation of the VITEK MS for a total mean reduction in time of 10.52 h (P<0.0001). Overall, accuracy of the VITEK MS was comparable or superior to that from the VITEK 2. The findings were also comparable to other studies examining the accuracy of the VITEK MS, although differences exist, depending on the diversity of species represented as well as on the versions of the databases used. The VITEK MS can be incorporated effectively into routine use in a clinical microbiology laboratory and future expansion of the database should provide improved accuracy for the identification of micro-organisms.

  3. 40 CFR 89.310 - Analyzer accuracy and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.310 Analyzer accuracy and specifications. (a) Measurement accuracy... is defined as 2.5 times the standard deviation(s) of 10 repetitive responses to a given calibration or span gas. (3) Noise. The analyzer peak-to-peak response to zero and calibration or span gases...

  4. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... requester who is not a full-time member of the news media must establish that he or she is a person...

  5. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... requester who is not a full-time member of the news media must establish that he or she is a person...

  6. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... requester who is not a full-time member of the news media must establish that he or she is a person...

  7. Conceptual Question Response Times in Peer Instruction Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to…

  8. Verification of the accuracy of GEM-L2 in response to criticism by Lambeck and Coleman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the accuracy of the Goddard Earth Model (GEM)-L2 and its improvement in estimating Lageos orbits in order to provide better baselines for plate tectonics, improved polar motion and Earth rotation. Analyses and comparisons with other models are made to verify accuracy in contrast to the Lambeck and Coleman result which denied the authors' accuracy estimates. The analysis presented completely verifies the accuracy of the GEM-L2 model and disproves the statistical methods of Lambeck and Coleman rejecting the accuracy of GEM-L2 as published in their report. The baselines derived from Lageos with GEM-L2 were estimated to have a 2 cm uncertainty due to the errors in the GEM-L2 gravity model which is supported by the results given. The calibration tests indicate that the errors in GEM-L2 should be reduced by about 30 percent which is in the opposite direction to the result obtained by Lambeck and Coleman.

  9. An Extra Dimension to Decision-Making in Animals: The Three-way Trade-off between Speed, Effort per-Unit-Time and Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    de Froment, Adrian J.; Rubenstein, Daniel I.; Levin, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    The standard view in biology is that all animals, from bumblebees to human beings, face a trade-off between speed and accuracy as they search for resources and mates, and attempt to avoid predators. For example, the more time a forager spends out of cover gathering information about potential food sources the more likely it is to make accurate decisions about which sources are most rewarding. However, when the cost of time spent out of cover rises (e.g. in the presence of a predator) the optimal strategy is for the forager to spend less time gathering information and to accept a corresponding decline in the accuracy of its decisions. We suggest that this familiar picture is missing a crucial dimension: the amount of effort an animal expends on gathering information in each unit of time. This is important because an animal that can respond to changing time costs by modulating its level of effort per-unit-time does not have to accept the same decrease in accuracy that an animal limited to a simple speed-accuracy trade-off must bear in the same situation. Instead, it can direct additional effort towards (i) reducing the frequency of perceptual errors in the samples it gathers or (ii) increasing the number of samples it gathers per-unit-time. Both of these have the effect of allowing it to gather more accurate information within a given period of time. We use a modified version of a canonical model of decision-making (the sequential probability ratio test) to show that this ability to substitute effort for time confers a fitness advantage in the face of changing time costs. We predict that the ability to modulate effort levels will therefore be widespread in nature, and we lay out testable predictions that could be used to detect adaptive modulation of effort levels in laboratory and field studies. Our understanding of decision-making in all species, including our own, will be improved by this more ecologically-complete picture of the three-way tradeoff between time

  10. An extra dimension to decision-making in animals: the three-way trade-off between speed, effort per-unit-time and accuracy.

    PubMed

    de Froment, Adrian J; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Levin, Simon A

    2014-12-01

    The standard view in biology is that all animals, from bumblebees to human beings, face a trade-off between speed and accuracy as they search for resources and mates, and attempt to avoid predators. For example, the more time a forager spends out of cover gathering information about potential food sources the more likely it is to make accurate decisions about which sources are most rewarding. However, when the cost of time spent out of cover rises (e.g. in the presence of a predator) the optimal strategy is for the forager to spend less time gathering information and to accept a corresponding decline in the accuracy of its decisions. We suggest that this familiar picture is missing a crucial dimension: the amount of effort an animal expends on gathering information in each unit of time. This is important because an animal that can respond to changing time costs by modulating its level of effort per-unit-time does not have to accept the same decrease in accuracy that an animal limited to a simple speed-accuracy trade-off must bear in the same situation. Instead, it can direct additional effort towards (i) reducing the frequency of perceptual errors in the samples it gathers or (ii) increasing the number of samples it gathers per-unit-time. Both of these have the effect of allowing it to gather more accurate information within a given period of time. We use a modified version of a canonical model of decision-making (the sequential probability ratio test) to show that this ability to substitute effort for time confers a fitness advantage in the face of changing time costs. We predict that the ability to modulate effort levels will therefore be widespread in nature, and we lay out testable predictions that could be used to detect adaptive modulation of effort levels in laboratory and field studies. Our understanding of decision-making in all species, including our own, will be improved by this more ecologically-complete picture of the three-way tradeoff between time

  11. [Real-time sonography of cholangiolithiasis. Dependence of the diagnostic accuracy on the competence of the operator].

    PubMed

    Schafroth, E; Saltzman, J; Probst, P

    1987-09-01

    The reliability of sonography for demonstrating bile duct stones depends on technical factors and on the experience of the operator. The pick up rate of an experienced operator has been compared with that of three other doctors who had performed sonography only briefly and intermittently. This was based on the results of surgery in 142 patients. The sensitivity of the experienced operator was 72.4% and almost twice that of the other doctors, who showed an accuracy of 37.5 and 44%. The competence of the operator depends not only on adequate training, but also on continuous practice.

  12. A Conditional Joint Modeling Approach for Locally Dependent Item Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Xiang-Bin; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The assumption of conditional independence between the responses and the response times (RTs) for a given person is common in RT modeling. However, when the speed of a test taker is not constant, this assumption will be violated. In this article we propose a conditional joint model for item responses and RTs, which incorporates a covariance…

  13. Monitoring the immune response using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Stordeur, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Induction of an immune response to a particular antigen is the basis of vaccination. This has been done for years to prevent infectious diseases, and has the potential for the treatment of cancer. The immune response is nowadays more precisely modulated rather than simply induced, like in case of immunotherapy of allergic diseases. Likewise, autoimmune diseases are associated with an inappropriate immune response, and many efforts are made for specifically inhibiting this unwanted response. A possible line of attack is the induction of an antigen-specific immune tolerance, which also has a use in the field of transplantation, where allogeneic responses are deleterious for the graft. In all of these fields of fundamental and clinical medicine, the modulation of immune response requires the assistance of laboratory tests, among which real-time PCR appears more and more helpful. This chapter describes a protocol to quantify immune-related mRNAs using reverse transcription-real-time PCR. The transcripts can be quantified in cultured cells or in cultured whole blood, after an incubation period in the presence of the antigen to which the immune response is analyzed. This is the typical approach to evaluate the efficacy of a vaccine. The transcripts can also be quantified directly in the biological sample, giving information about the in vivo immune status of the individual. The techniques to achieve these different methods are described, and are illustrated by the analysis of the response against the toxoid tetanus antigen.

  14. Conceptual question response times in Peer Instruction classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to in-class, conceptual questions [ConcepTests (CTs)] in two introductory physics courses taught using Peer Instruction and use item response theory to determine the difficulty of the CTs. We examine response time differences between correct and incorrect answers both before and after the peer discussion for CTs of varying difficulty. We also determine the relationship between response time and student performance on a standardized test of incoming physics knowledge, precourse self-efficacy, and gender. Our data reveal three results of interest. First, response time for correct answers is significantly faster than for incorrect answers, both before and after peer discussion, especially for easy CTs. Second, students with greater incoming physics knowledge and higher self-efficacy respond faster in both rounds. Third, there is no gender difference in response rate after controlling for incoming physics knowledge scores, although males register significantly more attempts before committing to a final answer than do female students. These results provide insight into effective CT pacing during Peer Instruction. In particular, in order to maintain a pace that keeps everyone engaged, students should not be given too much time to respond. When around 80% of the answers are in, the ratio of correct to incorrect responses rapidly approaches levels indicating random guessing and instructors should close the poll.

  15. Maternal Accuracy and Behavior in Anticipating Children’s Responses to Novelty: Relations to Fearful Temperament and Implications for Anxiety Development

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that mothers’ behaviors may serve as a mechanism in the development from toddler fearful temperament to childhood anxiety. The current study examined the maternal characteristic of accuracy in predicting toddlers’ distress reactions to novelty in relation to temperament, parenting, and anxiety development. Ninety-three two-year-old toddlers and their mothers participated in the study. Maternal accuracy moderated the relation between fearful temperament and protective behavior, suggesting this bidirectional link may be more likely to occur when mothers are particularly attuned to their children’s fear responses. An exploratory moderated mediation analysis supported the mechanistic role of protective parenting in the relation between early fearful temperament and later anxiety. Mediation only occurred, however, when mothers displayed high accuracy. Results are discussed within the broader literature of parental influence on fearful children’s development. PMID:20436795

  16. Maternal Accuracy and Behavior in Anticipating Children's Responses to Novelty: Relations to Fearful Temperament and Implications for Anxiety Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that mothers' behaviors may serve as a mechanism in the development from toddler fearful temperament to childhood anxiety. The current study examined the maternal characteristic of accuracy in predicting toddlers' distress reactions to novelty in relation to temperament, parenting, and anxiety development.…

  17. Peripheral visual response time and retinal luminance-area relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to elucidate the stimulus luminance-retinal area relationship that underlies response time (RT) behavior. Mean RT was significantly faster to stimuli imaged beyond about 70 deg of arc from the fovea when their luminance was increased by an amount equal to the foveal stimulus luminance multiplied by the cosine of the angle between the peripheral stimuli and the line of sight. This and additional data are discussed in relation to previous psychophysical data and to possible response mechanisms.

  18. Time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Porteus, Cosima; Hedrick, Michael S; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias; Milsom, William K

    2011-04-01

    Over a decade has passed since Powell et al. (Respir Physiol 112:123-134, 1998) described and defined the time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in adult mammals. These time domains, however, have yet to receive much attention in other vertebrate groups. The initial, acute HVR of fish, amphibians and reptiles serves to minimize the imbalance between oxygen supply and demand. If the hypoxia is sustained, a suite of secondary adjustments occur giving rise to a more long-term balance (acclimatization) that allows the behaviors of normal life. These secondary responses can change over time as a function of the nature of the stimulus (the pattern and intensity of the hypoxic exposure). To add to the complexity of this process, hypoxia can also lead to metabolic suppression (the hypoxic metabolic response) and the magnitude of this is also time dependent. Unlike the original review of Powell et al. (Respir Physiol 112:123-134, 1998) that only considered the HVR in adult animals, we also consider relevant developmental time points where information is available. Finally, in amphibians and reptiles with incompletely divided hearts the magnitude of the ventilatory response will be modulated by hypoxia-induced changes in intra-cardiac shunting that also improve the match between O(2) supply and demand, and these too change in a time-dependent fashion. While the current literature on this topic is reviewed here, it is noted that this area has received little attention. We attempt to redefine time domains in a more 'holistic' fashion that better accommodates research on ectotherms. If we are to distinguish between the genetic, developmental and environmental influences underlying the various ventilatory responses to hypoxia, however, we must design future experiments with time domains in mind. PMID:21312038

  19. Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Hermann, Christian; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior-posterior direction, with systematic ( N-Ary-Summation ) and random ({sigma}) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%{+-}19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to N-Ary-Summation =0.01 mm and {sigma} = 0.55 mm in the anterior-posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%{+-}4.6% and 99.7%{+-}0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a {gamma} index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

  20. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals.

    PubMed

    Zuehlsdorff, T J; Hine, N D M; Payne, M C; Haynes, P D

    2015-11-28

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment. PMID:26627950

  1. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuehlsdorff, T. J.; Hine, N. D. M.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.

    2015-11-01

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment.

  2. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlsdorff, T. J. Payne, M. C.; Hine, N. D. M.; Haynes, P. D.

    2015-11-28

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment.

  3. Investigation of the trade-off between time window length, classifier update rate and classification accuracy for restorative brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Sam; Ridding, Michael C; Abbott, Derek; Baumert, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the application of restorative brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) has received significant interest in many BCI labs. However, there are a number of challenges, that need to be tackled to achieve efficient performance of such systems. For instance, any restorative BCI needs an optimum trade-off between time window length, classification accuracy and classifier update rate. In this study, we have investigated possible solutions to these problems by using a dataset provided by the University of Graz, Austria. We have used a continuous wavelet transform and the Student t-test for feature extraction and a support vector machine (SVM) for classification. We find that improved results, for restorative BCIs for rehabilitation, may be achieved by using a 750 milliseconds time window with an average classification accuracy of 67% that updates every 32 milliseconds.

  4. X-ray Streak Camera Cathode Development and Timing Accuracy of the 4w UV Fiducial System at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Opachich, Y P; Palmer, N; Homoelle, D; Hatch, B W; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Kalantar, D; Browning, D; Landen, O

    2012-05-02

    The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4-{omega} (263nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, Titanium, Gold and Silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data was analyzed to determine the centroiding a statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps respectively.

  5. Assessing recognition memory using confidence ratings and response times

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Classification of stimuli into categories (such as ‘old’ and ‘new’ in tests of recognition memory or ‘present’ versus ‘absent’ in signal detection tasks) requires the mapping of internal signals to discrete responses. Introspective judgements about a given choice response are regularly employed in research, legal and clinical settings in an effort to measure the signal that is thought to be the basis of the classification decision. Correlations between introspective judgements and task performance suggest that such ratings often do convey information about internal states that are relevant for a given task, but well-known limitations of introspection call the fidelity of this information into question. We investigated to what extent response times can reveal information usually assessed with explicit confidence ratings. We quantitatively compared response times to confidence ratings in their ability to qualify recognition memory decisions and found convergent results suggesting that much of the information from confidence ratings can be obtained from response times. PMID:27152209

  6. Malignant glioma - timing of response to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, L.E.; Fisher, B.J.; MacDonald, D.R.; Cairncross, J.G. London Regional Cancer Centre, Ontario ); LeBer, D.V. ); Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr. )

    1993-04-02

    The response of malignant gliomas to radiation was examined retrospectively in 71 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial malignant gliomas. Questions asked included frequency, timing and clinical significance of response. After surgery, all were treated with whole brain plus boost radiotherapy followed 8 weeks later by chemotherapy. The rate, degree, and timing of response to radiation were determined by comparing postoperative, end of radiation, and prechemotherapy CT scans on each patient. Postoperative residual tumor was evident on 63/71 postoperative scans. Twenty-two of 63 tumors (35%) had a partial or complete response to radiation. Twenty (32%) had responded by the end of radiation; 17 maximally. Six to 8 weeks later, three responding tumors had responded further and two previously stable ones had begun to respond. Only three tumors (5%) responded completely. A greater proportion of anaplastic gliomas than glioblastomas responded to radiation (52% vs. 26%). Protracted or delayed responses were only observed in patients with anaplastic glioma. Patients who responded to radiation did not live significantly longer than non-responders. However, tumor progression prior to chemotherapy was associated with significantly shorter survival. This CT scan-based analysis demonstrates that malignant gliomas are only moderately radioresponsive tumors and also demonstrates that response to radiation, if it is going to occur, is usually evident by the end of treatment. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. A mechanism for error detection in speeded response time tasks.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Clay B; Yeung, Nick; Coles, Michael G H; Cohen, Jonathan D

    2005-05-01

    The concept of error detection plays a central role in theories of executive control. In this article, the authors present a mechanism that can rapidly detect errors in speeded response time tasks. This error monitor assigns values to the output of cognitive processes involved in stimulus categorization and response generation and detects errors by identifying states of the system associated with negative value. The mechanism is formalized in a computational model based on a recent theoretical framework for understanding error processing in humans (C. B. Holroyd & M. G. H. Coles, 2002). The model is used to simulate behavioral and event-related brain potential data in a speeded response time task, and the results of the simulation are compared with empirical data.

  8. Climate response times: dependence on climate sensitivity and ocean mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.; Russell, G.; Lacis, A.; Fung, I.; Rind, D.; Stone, P.

    1985-08-30

    The factors that determine climate response times were investigated with simple models and scaling statements. The response times are particularly sensitive to (1) the amount that the climate response is amplified by feedbacks and (2) the representation of ocean mixing. If equilibrium climate sensitivity is 3/sup 0/C or greater for a doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration, then most of the expected warming attributable to trace gases added to the atmosphere by man probably has not yet occurred. This yet to be realized warming calls into question a policy of wait and see regarding the issue of how to deal with increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide and other trace gases. 17 references, 2 figures.

  9. Separability of Item and Person Parameters in Response Time Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses two forms of separability of item and person parameters in the context of response time models. The first is "separate sufficiency," and the second is "ranking independence." For each form a theorem stating sufficient conditions is proved. The two forms are shown to include several cases of models from psychometric and biometric…

  10. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  11. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  12. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  13. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  14. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  15. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... news media must establish that he or she is a person whose main professional activity or occupation...

  16. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... news media must establish that he or she is a person whose main professional activity or occupation...

  17. 18 CFR 1301.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Timing of responses to requests. 1301.5 Section 1301.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY... is most efficient in each case. (1) Track 1. Requests that can be answered with readily...

  18. 18 CFR 1301.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1301.5 Section 1301.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY... is most efficient in each case. (1) Track 1. Requests that can be answered with readily...

  19. 18 CFR 1301.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1301.5 Section 1301.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY... is most efficient in each case. (1) Track 1. Requests that can be answered with readily...

  20. 18 CFR 1301.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1301.5 Section 1301.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY... is most efficient in each case. (1) Track 1. Requests that can be answered with readily...

  1. 18 CFR 1301.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1301.5 Section 1301.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY... is most efficient in each case. (1) Track 1. Requests that can be answered with readily...

  2. Distinct Response Time Distributions in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Querne, Laurent; Berquin, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To address the issue of response time (RT) profiles in hyperactive-impulsive (ADHD-HI), inattentive (ADHD-IA), and combined (ADHD-C) subtypes of ADHD. We hypothesized that children with ADHD-HI should respond more rapidly than children without ADHD and children with ADHD-IA and ADHD-C should respond more slowly than children without…

  3. Processing Time Shifts Affects the Execution of Motor Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, Andrea J.; Kaschak, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    We explore whether time shifts in text comprehension are represented spatially. Participants read sentences involving past or future events and made sensibility judgment responses in one of two ways: (1) moving toward or away from their body and (2) pressing the toward or away buttons without moving. Previous work suggests that spatial…

  4. 40 CFR 1066.245 - Response time verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... automated process to verify response time. You may perform this test either at two different inertia... base inertia and two acceleration rates that cover the range of acceleration rates experienced during... less than 100 milliseconds for each inertia setting. ER28AP14.066...

  5. 36 CFR 1600.4 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1600.4 Section 1600.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property MORRIS K. UDALL SCHOLARSHIP AND EXCELLENCE IN NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY FOUNDATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF DOCUMENTS AND RECORDS Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the...

  6. Modeling Information Accumulation in Psychological Tests Using Item Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a latent trait model is proposed for the response times in psychological tests. The latent trait model is based on the linear transformation model and subsumes popular models from survival analysis, like the proportional hazards model and the proportional odds model. Core of the model is the assumption that an unspecified monotone…

  7. From Zero to Sixty: Calibrating Real-Time Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koulis, Theodoro; Ramsay, James O.; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in data recording technology have given researchers new ways of collecting on-line and continuous data for analyzing input-output systems. For example, continuous response digital interfaces are increasingly used in psychophysics. The statistical problem related to these input-output systems reduces to linking time-varying…

  8. 36 CFR 1600.4 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1600.4 Section 1600.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property MORRIS K. UDALL SCHOLARSHIP AND EXCELLENCE IN NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY FOUNDATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF DOCUMENTS AND...

  9. Monitoring Ambulation of Patients in Geriatric Rehabilitation Wards: The Accuracy of Clinicians' Prediction of Patients' Walking Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Vivian H. Y.; Salih, Salih A.; Crouch, Alisa; Karunanithi, Mohanraj K.; Gray, Len

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether clinicians' estimates of patients' walking time agree with those determined by accelerometer devices. The walking time was measured using a waist-mounted accelerometer device everyday during the patients' waking hours. At each weekly meeting, clinicians estimated the patients' average daily walking…

  10. Timing and Causality in the Generation of Learned Eyelid Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum-red nucleus-facial motoneuron (Mn) pathway has been reported as being involved in the proper timing of classically conditioned eyelid responses. This special type of associative learning serves as a model of event timing for studying the role of the cerebellum in dynamic motor control. Here, we have re-analyzed the firing activities of cerebellar posterior interpositus (IP) neurons and orbicularis oculi (OO) Mns in alert behaving cats during classical eyeblink conditioning, using a delay paradigm. The aim was to revisit the hypothesis that the IP neurons (IPns) can be considered a neuronal phase-modulating device supporting OO Mns firing with an emergent timing mechanism and an explicit correlation code during learned eyelid movements. Optimized experimental and computational tools allowed us to determine the different causal relationships (temporal order and correlation code) during and between trials. These intra- and inter-trial timing strategies expanding from sub-second range (millisecond timing) to longer-lasting ranges (interval timing) expanded the functional domain of cerebellar timing beyond motor control. Interestingly, the results supported the above-mentioned hypothesis. The causal inferences were influenced by the precise motor and pre-motor spike timing in the cause-effect interval, and, in addition, the timing of the learned responses depended on cerebellar–Mn network causality. Furthermore, the timing of CRs depended upon the probability of simulated causal conditions in the cause-effect interval and not the mere duration of the inter-stimulus interval. In this work, the close relation between timing and causality was verified. It could thus be concluded that the firing activities of IPns may be related more to the proper performance of ongoing CRs (i.e., the proper timing as a consequence of the pertinent causality) than to their generation and/or initiation. PMID:21941469

  11. Timing of anticipatory muscle tensing control: responses before and after expected impact.

    PubMed

    Vishton, Peter M; Reardon, Kristin M; Stevens, Jennifer A

    2010-05-01

    It is widely accepted that human motor control is anticipatory in nature. Previous studies have used electromyography (EMG) to examine muscle responses to falling objects and identified anticipatory muscle tensing (AMT) as a spike in activation that occurs prior to object impact. Some studies have suggested that humans use an internal model of gravity to mediate precisely timed AMT responses. The present study further examines predictive motor control through the analysis of AMT during an object catching task. For some trials, participants watched an object falling toward the hand; for other trials, their eyes were closed. For some trials, the object fell downward and impacted the hand; for other randomly selected trials, the object abruptly stopped 12 cm above the hand, enabling an assessment of the effect of impact anticipation independent of the reflexive tactile response associated with an actual impact. In Experiment 1, AMT did not shift for approximately 113 ms after the abrupt stop of the ball. In Experiment 2, we randomly varied the start height of the object and found well-timed AMT with a 129-ms lag time. A control system based on simple memory for fall time duration cannot explain these findings. We argue that an AMT control system with a lag time of approximately 121 ms could not perform with human levels of accuracy without accounting for the acceleration of downward moving objects. PMID:20135099

  12. Timing of anticipatory muscle tensing control: responses before and after expected impact.

    PubMed

    Vishton, Peter M; Reardon, Kristin M; Stevens, Jennifer A

    2010-05-01

    It is widely accepted that human motor control is anticipatory in nature. Previous studies have used electromyography (EMG) to examine muscle responses to falling objects and identified anticipatory muscle tensing (AMT) as a spike in activation that occurs prior to object impact. Some studies have suggested that humans use an internal model of gravity to mediate precisely timed AMT responses. The present study further examines predictive motor control through the analysis of AMT during an object catching task. For some trials, participants watched an object falling toward the hand; for other trials, their eyes were closed. For some trials, the object fell downward and impacted the hand; for other randomly selected trials, the object abruptly stopped 12 cm above the hand, enabling an assessment of the effect of impact anticipation independent of the reflexive tactile response associated with an actual impact. In Experiment 1, AMT did not shift for approximately 113 ms after the abrupt stop of the ball. In Experiment 2, we randomly varied the start height of the object and found well-timed AMT with a 129-ms lag time. A control system based on simple memory for fall time duration cannot explain these findings. We argue that an AMT control system with a lag time of approximately 121 ms could not perform with human levels of accuracy without accounting for the acceleration of downward moving objects.

  13. Aircraft Fault Detection Using Real-Time Frequency Response Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.

    2016-01-01

    A real-time method for estimating time-varying aircraft frequency responses from input and output measurements was demonstrated. The Bat-4 subscale airplane was used with NASA Langley Research Center's AirSTAR unmanned aerial flight test facility to conduct flight tests and collect data for dynamic modeling. Orthogonal phase-optimized multisine inputs, summed with pilot stick and pedal inputs, were used to excite the responses. The aircraft was tested in its normal configuration and with emulated failures, which included a stuck left ruddervator and an increased command path latency. No prior knowledge of a dynamic model was used or available for the estimation. The longitudinal short period dynamics were investigated in this work. Time-varying frequency responses and stability margins were tracked well using a 20 second sliding window of data, as compared to a post-flight analysis using output error parameter estimation and a low-order equivalent system model. This method could be used in a real-time fault detection system, or for other applications of dynamic modeling such as real-time verification of stability margins during envelope expansion tests.

  14. Effects of cognitive load and prosthetic liner on volitional response times to vibrotactile feedback.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Leineweber, Matthew J; Andrysek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Artificial tactile feedback systems can improve prosthetic function for people with amputation by substituting for lost proprioception in the missing limb. However, limited data exists to guide the design and application of these systems for mobility and balance scenarios. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a noninvasive artificial sensory feedback (ASF) system on lower-limb function in the presence of a cognitive load and a liner interface. Reaction times (RTs) and accuracy of leg-movement responses to vibratory stimuli at the thigh were recorded for 12 nondisabled individuals and 3 participants with transfemoral amputation using a custom-built testing apparatus. The results indicate that the addition of a cognitive load increases response times relative to the baseline condition by 0.26 to 0.33 s. The prosthetic liner produced a less pronounced increase in RT of 0.06 to 0.11 s. Participants were able to correctly identify the stimulus location with nearly 100% accuracy. These increased RTs are nontrivial and must be considered in designing ASF systems. PMID:27532493

  15. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  16. The Time Course Effect of Moderate Intensity Exercise on Response Execution and Response Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Jennifer; Graydon, Jan; McMorris, Terry; Davranche, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the time course effect of a moderate steady-state exercise session on response execution and response inhibition using a stop-task paradigm. Ten participants performed a stop-signal task whilst cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity (40% of maximal aerobic power), immediately following exercise and…

  17. An Implicit Measure of Associations with Mental Illness versus Physical Illness: Response Latency Decomposition and Stimuli Differential Functioning in Relation to IAT Order of Associative Conditions and Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Mannarini, Stefania; Boffo, Marilisa

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at the definition of a latent measurement dimension underlying an implicit measure of automatic associations between the concept of mental illness and the psychosocial and biogenetic causal explanatory attributes. To this end, an Implicit Association Test (IAT) assessing the association between the Mental Illness and Physical Illness target categories to the Psychological and Biologic attribute categories, representative of the causal explanation domains, was developed. The IAT presented 22 stimuli (words and pictures) to be categorized into the four categories. After 360 university students completed the IAT, a Many-Facet Rasch Measurement (MFRM) modelling approach was applied. The model specified a person latency parameter and a stimulus latency parameter. Two additional parameters were introduced to denote the order of presentation of the task associative conditions and the general response accuracy. Beyond the overall definition of the latent measurement dimension, the MFRM was also applied to disentangle the effect of the task block order and the general response accuracy on the stimuli response latency. Further, the MFRM allowed detecting any differential functioning of each stimulus in relation to both block ordering and accuracy. The results evidenced: a) the existence of a latency measurement dimension underlying the Mental Illness versus Physical Illness - Implicit Association Test; b) significant effects of block order and accuracy on the overall latency; c) a differential functioning of specific stimuli. The results of the present study can contribute to a better understanding of the functioning of an implicit measure of semantic associations with mental illness and give a first blueprint for the examination of relevant issues in the development of an IAT. PMID:25000406

  18. Time to smell: a cascade model of human olfactory perception based on response-time (RT) measurement.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Jonas K

    2014-01-01

    The timing of olfactory behavioral decisions may provide an important source of information about how the human olfactory-perceptual system is organized. This review integrates results from olfactory response-time (RT) measurements from a perspective of mental chronometry. Based on these findings, a new cascade model of human olfaction is presented. Results show that main perceptual decisions are executed with high accuracy within about 1~s of sniff onset. The cascade model proposes the existence of distinct processing stages within this brief time-window. According to the cascade model, different perceptual features become accessible to the perceiver at different time-points, and the output of earlier processing stages provides the input for later processing stages. The olfactory cascade starts with detecting the odor, which is followed by establishing an odor object. The odor object, in turn, triggers systems for determining odor valence and edibility. Evidence for the cascade model comes from studies showing that RTs for odor valence and edibility assessment are predicted by the shorter RTs needed to establish the odor object. Challenges for future research include innovative task designs for olfactory RT experiments and the integration of the behavioral processing sequence into the underlying cortical processes using complementary RT measures and neuroimaging methods.

  19. Classification accuracy improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Improvements made in processing system designed for MIDAS (prototype multivariate interactive digital analysis system) effects higher accuracy in classification of pixels, resulting in significantly-reduced processing time. Improved system realizes cost reduction factor of 20 or more.

  20. Time dependency of craving and response inhibition during nicotine abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Tsaur, Stephen; Strasser, Andrew A.; Souprountchouk, Valentina; Evans, Gretchen C.; Ashare, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nicotine withdrawal produces increased craving for cigarettes and deficits in response inhibition, and these withdrawal symptoms are predictive of relapse. Although it is well-established that these symptoms emerge early during abstinence, there is mixed evidence regarding whether they occur simultaneously. Given the importance of the early withdrawal period, this study examined craving and response inhibition at 24h and 72h abstinence. Methods Twenty-one non-treatment seeking adult smokers were evaluated at baseline, 24h, and 72h abstinence for craving (Questionnaire on Smoking Urges – Brief) and response inhibition (Stop Signal Task, Stroop Task, Continuous Performance Task). Generalized linear regression models were used for primary outcomes, and Pearson correlations for examining the association between craving and response inhibition. Results Factor 2 craving (anticipated relief of negative affect) increased from baseline to 24h abstinent (p=0.004), which subsided by 72h (p=0.08). Deficits in response inhibition measured by the Stop Signal Task were observed at 72h (p=0.046), but not 24h (p=0.318). No correlation was found between response inhibition and craving at any time point (p-values>0.19), except between the Stroop Task and factor 1 craving at baseline (p=0.025). Conclusions Factor 2 craving peaked at 24h, whereas deficits in response inhibition did not emerge until 72h, indicating that need to target craving and cognitive function during early abstinence may not occur simultaneously. Further characterizing the time course of withdrawal symptoms may guide development of targeted treatments for smoking cessation. PMID:26052265

  1. Modeling in Real Time During the Ebola Response.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Martin I; Santibanez, Scott; Fischer, Leah S; Merlin, Toby L; Adhikari, Bishwa B; Atkins, Charisma Y; Campbell, Caresse; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai; Gambhir, Manoj; Gift, Thomas; Greening, Bradford; Gu, Weidong; Jacobson, Evin U; Kahn, Emily B; Carias, Cristina; Nerlander, Lina; Rainisch, Gabriel; Shankar, Manjunath; Wong, Karen; Washington, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    To aid decision-making during CDC's response to the 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, CDC activated a Modeling Task Force to generate estimates on various topics related to the response in West Africa and the risk for importation of cases into the United States. Analysis of eight Ebola response modeling projects conducted during August 2014-July 2015 provided insight into the types of questions addressed by modeling, the impact of the estimates generated, and the difficulties encountered during the modeling. This time frame was selected to cover the three phases of the West African epidemic curve. Questions posed to the Modeling Task Force changed as the epidemic progressed. Initially, the task force was asked to estimate the number of cases that might occur if no interventions were implemented compared with cases that might occur if interventions were implemented; however, at the peak of the epidemic, the focus shifted to estimating resource needs for Ebola treatment units. Then, as the epidemic decelerated, requests for modeling changed to generating estimates of the potential number of sexually transmitted Ebola cases. Modeling to provide information for decision-making during the CDC Ebola response involved limited data, a short turnaround time, and difficulty communicating the modeling process, including assumptions and interpretation of results. Despite these challenges, modeling yielded estimates and projections that public health officials used to make key decisions regarding response strategy and resources required. The impact of modeling during the Ebola response demonstrates the usefulness of modeling in future responses, particularly in the early stages and when data are scarce. Future modeling can be enhanced by planning ahead for data needs and data sharing, and by open communication among modelers, scientists, and others to ensure that modeling and its limitations are more clearly understood. The activities summarized in

  2. Evaluation of the accuracy of articular cartilage thickness measurement by B-mode ultrasonography with conventional imaging and real-time spatial compound ultrasonography imaging.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Satoru; Ohnishi, Isao; Matsumoto, Takuya; Bessho, Masahiko; Matsuyama, Juntaro; Tobita, Kenji; Kaneko, Masako; Nakamura, Kozo

    2012-02-01

    The present study aimed to quantify the thickness of articular cartilage (Tc) in vitro using both conventional and real-time spatial compound B-mode ultrasonography (US) with a clinically used transducer and to evaluate the accuracy of measurement by comparing the results with values obtained microscopically. Femoral condyle samples were obtained from a 6-month-old pig and a 3-year-old pig. B-mode US images with conventional imaging and real-time spatial compound imaging (RTSCI) of osteochondral blocks were acquired. Tc determined using US (Tc-US) was measured from line data parallel to US beam direction acquired from B-mode images with an objective method for determining cartilage surface and bone-cartilage interfaces at the peak brightness values. Tc was also determined under microscopy (Tc-optical) using the corresponding points from US measurement. Tc-US was compared with Tc-optical to assess accuracy. Tc-US correlated significantly with Tc in both conventional imaging and RTSCI (r = 0.961, 0.976, respectively). Bland-Altman plots showed mean differences between Tc-optical and Tc-US were -0.0073 mm and 0.0139 mm with standard deviations of 0.171 mm and 0.131 mm for conventional imaging and RTSCI, respectively. Our results show that Tc-US measurement using B-mode US allows accurate measurement of Tc. Considering correlation coefficients between Tc-US and Tc-optical, RTSCI US may offer higher accuracy for measuring Tc than conventional methods when an objective tissue border determination algorithm is used, even though both showed good accuracy in our study.

  3. Ampoule failure sensor time response testing: Experiments 2 and 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. L.; Watring, D. A.

    1994-06-01

    The response time of an ampoule failure sensor exposed to a liquid or vapor gallium-arsenide (GaAs) and the corresponding breach time of the containing cartridge is investigated. The experiments were conducted in niobium-hafnium (WC-103) cartridges with an exterior silicide coating. These cartridges were built to flight specifications that were used in NASA's Crystal Growth Furnace during the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) mission. The ampoule failure sensor is a chemical fuse made from a metal with which the semiconductor material reacts more rapidly than it does with the containing cartridge. In these experiments a platinum metal was used for the manufacture of the sensors. This technical report discusses the response time of two different sensor designs. The first design utilizes a helical wrapped wire and the second uses a single bare wire element. Experimental results indicate that both sensors are adequate in sensing the presence of molten or vapor GaAs with the latter having a 2-minute longer response time. In both experiments, the containing cartridge was breached within 185 minutes after ampoule rupture.

  4. Ampoule failure sensor time response testing: Experiments 2 and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. L.; Watring, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The response time of an ampoule failure sensor exposed to a liquid or vapor gallium-arsenide (GaAs) and the corresponding breach time of the containing cartridge is investigated. The experiments were conducted in niobium-hafnium (WC-103) cartridges with an exterior silicide coating. These cartridges were built to flight specifications that were used in NASA's Crystal Growth Furnace during the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) mission. The ampoule failure sensor is a chemical fuse made from a metal with which the semiconductor material reacts more rapidly than it does with the containing cartridge. In these experiments a platinum metal was used for the manufacture of the sensors. This technical report discusses the response time of two different sensor designs. The first design utilizes a helical wrapped wire and the second uses a single bare wire element. Experimental results indicate that both sensors are adequate in sensing the presence of molten or vapor GaAs with the latter having a 2-minute longer response time. In both experiments, the containing cartridge was breached within 185 minutes after ampoule rupture.

  5. Ultimate response time of high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Rudin, Sergey; Rupper, Greg; Shur, Michael

    2015-05-07

    We present theoretical studies of the response time of the two-dimensional gated electron gas to femtosecond pulses. Our hydrodynamic simulations show that the device response to a short pulse or a step-function signal is either smooth or oscillating time-decay at low and high mobility, μ, values, respectively. At small gate voltage swings, U{sub 0} = U{sub g} − U{sub th}, where U{sub g} is the gate voltage and U{sub th} is the threshold voltage, such that μU{sub 0}/L < v{sub s}, where L is the channel length and v{sub s} is the effective electron saturation velocity, the decay time in the low mobility samples is on the order of L{sup 2}/(μU{sub 0}), in agreement with the analytical drift model. However, the decay is preceded by a delay time on the order of L/s, where s is the plasma wave velocity. This delay is the ballistic transport signature in collision-dominated devices, which becomes important during very short time periods. In the high mobility devices, the period of the decaying oscillations is on the order of the plasma wave velocity transit time. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors, mixers, delay lines, and phase shifters in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  6. Time-dependent response of filamentary composite spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel is modeled as a pseudoisotropic (or transversely isotropic) composite shell, with the effects of the liner and fill tubes omitted. Equations of elasticity, macromechanical and micromechanical formulations, and laminate properties are derived for the application of an internally pressured spherical composite vessel. Viscoelastic properties for the composite matrix are used to characterize time-dependent behavior. Using the maximum strain theory of failure, burst pressure and critical strain equations are formulated, solved in the Laplace domain with an associated elastic solution, and inverted back into the time domain using the method of collocation. Viscoelastic properties of HBFR-55 resin are experimentally determined and a Kevlar/HBFR-55 system is evaluated with a FORTRAN program. The computed reduction in burst pressure with respect to time indicates that the analysis employed may be used to predict the time-dependent response of a filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel.

  7. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Color-Coded Images: Towards a Reduction in Reading Time While Keeping a Similar Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Campos Kitamura, Felipe; de Medeiros Alves, Srhael; Antônio Tobaru Tibana, Luis; Abdala, Nitamar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a diagnostic tool capable of providing diffusion and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map information in a single color-coded image and to assess the performance of color-coded images compared with their corresponding diffusion and ADC map. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, which sequentially enrolled 36 head MRI scans. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and ADC maps were compared to their corresponding color-coded images. Four raters had their interobserver agreement measured for both conventional (DWI) and color-coded images. Differences between conventional and color-coded images were also estimated for each of the 4 raters. Cohen's kappa and percent agreement were used. Also, paired-samples t-test was used to compare reading time for rater 1. Conventional and color-coded images had substantial or almost perfect agreement for all raters. Mean reading time of rater 1 was 47.4 seconds for DWI and 27.9 seconds for color-coded images (P = .00007). These findings are important because they support the role of color-coded images as being equivalent to that of the conventional DWI in terms of diagnostic capability. Reduction in reading time (which makes the reading easier) is also demonstrated for one rater in this study.

  8. Exact response functions within the time-dependent Gutzwiller approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünemann, J.; Wasner, S.; Oelsen, E. v.; Seibold, G.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the applicability of the two existing versions of a time-dependent Gutzwiller approach (TDGA) beyond the frequently used limit of infinite spatial dimensions. To this end, we study the two-particle response functions of a two-site Hubbard model where we can compare the exact results and those derived from the TDGA. It turns out that only the more recently introduced version of the TDGA can be combined with a diagrammatic approach which allows for the evaluation of Gutzwiller wave functions in finite dimensions. For this TDGA method, we derive the time-dependent Lagrangian for general single-band Hubbard models.

  9. Noncausal time response in frustrated total internal reflection?

    PubMed

    Carey; Zawadzka; Jaroszynski; Wynne

    2000-02-14

    Tunneling of photons in frustrated total internal reflection has been studied in the time domain with single-cycle femtosecond pulses. It is seen that both the phase and energy of the pulse travel faster than the speed of light in vacuum. Theoretical analysis of the experiments shows that the time-response function for electromagnetic waves propagating in the air gap is noncausal. However, it is found that superluminal signal propagation is not possible in this case because of the inevitable diffractive spreading of the signal beam.

  10. The Screening Accuracy of the Parent and Teacher-Reported Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS): Comparison with the 3Di and ADOS.

    PubMed

    Duvekot, Jorieke; van der Ende, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

    2015-06-01

    The screening accuracy of the parent and teacher-reported Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) was compared with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) classification according to (1) the Developmental, Dimensional, and Diagnostic Interview (3 Di), (2) the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), (3) both the 3 Di and ADOS, in 186 children referred to six mental health centers. The parent report showed excellent correspondence to an ASD classification according to the 3 Di and both the 3 Di and ADOS. The teacher report added significantly to the screening accuracy over and above the parent report when compared with the ADOS classification. Findings support the screening utility of the parent-reported SRS among clinically referred children and indicate that different informants may provide unique information relevant for ASD assessment. PMID:25428292

  11. Collecting response times using Amazon Mechanical Turk and Adobe Flash.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Travis; Fiez, Julie A

    2014-03-01

    Crowdsourcing systems like Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) allow data to be collected from a large sample of people in a short amount of time. This use has garnered considerable interest from behavioral scientists. So far, most experiments conducted on AMT have focused on survey-type instruments because of difficulties inherent in running many experimental paradigms over the Internet. This study investigated the viability of presenting stimuli and collecting response times using Adobe Flash to run ActionScript 3 code in conjunction with AMT. First, the timing properties of Adobe Flash were investigated using a phototransistor and two desktop computers running under several conditions mimicking those that may be present in research using AMT. This experiment revealed some strengths and weaknesses of the timing capabilities of this method. Next, a flanker task and a lexical decision task implemented in Adobe Flash were administered to participants recruited with AMT. The expected effects in these tasks were replicated. Power analyses were conducted to describe the number of participants needed to replicate these effects. A questionnaire was used to investigate previously undescribed computer use habits of 100 participants on AMT. We conclude that a Flash program in conjunction with AMT can be successfully used for running many experimental paradigms that rely on response times, although experimenters must understand the limitations of the method.

  12. High frequency dielectrophoretic response of microalgae over time

    PubMed Central

    Hadady, Hanieh; Wong, Johnson J.; Hiibel, Sage R.; Redelman, Doug; Geiger, Emil J.

    2015-01-01

    The high frequency dielectrophoresis (>20 MHz) response of microalgae cells with different lipid content was monitored over time. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was cultured in regular medium and under nitrogen-depleted conditions in order to produce populations of cells with low and high lipid content, respectively. The electrical conductivity (EC) of the culture media was also monitored over the same time. The upper crossover frequency (UCOF) decreased for high-lipid cells over time. The single-shell model predicts that the upper crossover frequency is dictated primarily by the dielectric properties of the cytoplasm. The high frequency DEP response of the high-lipid cells’ cytoplasm was changed by lipid accumulation. DEP response of the low-lipid cells also varied with the conductivity of the culture media due to nutrient consumption. Relative lipid content was estimated with BODIPY 505/515 dye by calculating the area-weighted intensity average of fluorescent images. Finally, microalgae cells were successfully separated based on lipid content at 41 MHz and DEP media conductivity 106 ± 1 µS/cm. PMID:25229637

  13. Prospects for high accuracy time dissemination and synchronization using coded radar pulses from a low-earth orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detoma, Edoardo V.; Dionisio, C.

    1995-01-01

    The radar (an acronym for radio detection and ranging) is an instrument developed just before the WW-II to precisely measure the position of an object (target) in space. This is done by emitting a narrow pulse of electromagnetic energy in the RF spectrum, receiving the return echo and measuring the time of flight in the two-way path from the emitter to the target. The propagation delay provides a measure of the range to the target, which is not in itself sufficient to uniquely locate the position of the same in space. However, if a directional antenna is used, the direction of the echo can be assessed by the antenna pointing angles. In this way the position of the target can be uniquely determined in space. How well this can be done is a function of the resolution of the measurements performed (range and direction, i.e.: angles); in turn, the resolution will dictate the time and frequency requirements of the reference oscillator.

  14. Effectiveness of slow motion video compared to real time video in improving the accuracy and consistency of subjective gait analysis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lane, D.M.; Hill, S.A.; Huntingford, J.L.; Lafuente, P.; Wall, R.; Jones, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective measures of canine gait quality via force plates, pressure mats or kinematic analysis are considered superior to subjective gait assessment (SGA). Despite research demonstrating that SGA does not accurately detect subtle lameness, it remains the most commonly performed diagnostic test for detecting lameness in dogs. This is largely because the financial, temporal and spatial requirements for existing objective gait analysis equipment makes this technology impractical for use in general practice. The utility of slow motion video as a potential tool to augment SGA is currently untested. To evaluate a more accessible way to overcome the limitations of SGA, a slow motion video study was undertaken. Three experienced veterinarians reviewed video footage of 30 dogs, 15 with a diagnosis of primary limb lameness based on history and physical examination, and 15 with no indication of limb lameness based on history and physical examination. Four different videos were made for each dog, demonstrating each dog walking and trotting in real time, and then again walking and trotting in 50% slow motion. For each video, the veterinary raters assessed both the degree of lameness, and which limb(s) they felt represented the source of the lameness. Spearman’s rho, Cramer’s V, and t-tests were performed to determine if slow motion video increased either the accuracy or consistency of raters’ SGA relative to real time video. Raters demonstrated no significant increase in consistency or accuracy in their SGA of slow motion video relative to real time video. Based on these findings, slow motion video does not increase the consistency or accuracy of SGA values. Further research is required to determine if slow motion video will benefit SGA in other ways. PMID:26623383

  15. Real-time performance modelling of a Sustained Attention to Response Task.

    PubMed

    Larue, Grégoire S; Rakotonirainy, Andry; Pettitt, Anthony N

    2010-10-01

    Vigilance declines when exposed to highly predictable and uneventful tasks. Monotonous tasks provide little cognitive and motor stimulation and contribute to human errors. This paper aims to model and detect vigilance decline in real time through participants' reaction times during a monotonous task. A laboratory-based experiment adapting the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) is conducted to quantify the effect of monotony on overall performance. Relevant parameters are then used to build a model detecting hypovigilance throughout the experiment. The accuracy of different mathematical models is compared to detect in real time - minute by minute - the lapses in vigilance during the task. It is shown that monotonous tasks can lead to an average decline in performance of 45%. Furthermore, vigilance modelling enables the detection of vigilance decline through reaction times with an accuracy of 72% and a 29% false alarm rate. Bayesian models are identified as a better model to detect lapses in vigilance as compared with neural networks and generalised linear mixed models. This modelling could be used as a framework to detect vigilance decline of any human performing monotonous tasks. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Existing research on monotony is largely entangled with endogenous factors such as sleep deprivation, fatigue and circadian rhythm. This paper uses a Bayesian model to assess the effects of a monotonous task on vigilance in real time. It is shown that the negative effects of monotony on the ability to sustain attention can be mathematically modelled and predicted in real time using surrogate measures, such as reaction times. This allows the modelling of vigilance fluctuations.

  16. Real-time performance modelling of a Sustained Attention to Response Task.

    PubMed

    Larue, Grégoire S; Rakotonirainy, Andry; Pettitt, Anthony N

    2010-10-01

    Vigilance declines when exposed to highly predictable and uneventful tasks. Monotonous tasks provide little cognitive and motor stimulation and contribute to human errors. This paper aims to model and detect vigilance decline in real time through participants' reaction times during a monotonous task. A laboratory-based experiment adapting the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) is conducted to quantify the effect of monotony on overall performance. Relevant parameters are then used to build a model detecting hypovigilance throughout the experiment. The accuracy of different mathematical models is compared to detect in real time - minute by minute - the lapses in vigilance during the task. It is shown that monotonous tasks can lead to an average decline in performance of 45%. Furthermore, vigilance modelling enables the detection of vigilance decline through reaction times with an accuracy of 72% and a 29% false alarm rate. Bayesian models are identified as a better model to detect lapses in vigilance as compared with neural networks and generalised linear mixed models. This modelling could be used as a framework to detect vigilance decline of any human performing monotonous tasks. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Existing research on monotony is largely entangled with endogenous factors such as sleep deprivation, fatigue and circadian rhythm. This paper uses a Bayesian model to assess the effects of a monotonous task on vigilance in real time. It is shown that the negative effects of monotony on the ability to sustain attention can be mathematically modelled and predicted in real time using surrogate measures, such as reaction times. This allows the modelling of vigilance fluctuations. PMID:20865604

  17. Programming time in serial tapping responses as a function of pathway constraint.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, B; Schoenfelder-Zohdi, B; Moore, B

    1990-01-01

    This study varied the accuracy demand within a linear series of targets to investigate the effect of movement-pathway constraints on response-programming time. Sidaway, Christina, and Shea (1988) have suggested that constraints placed upon movement initiation by the demand for response precision may play an important role in determining the length of the programming process. By varying the subtended angles of a series of three targets, this experiment tested the specific prediction of Sidaway et al. that programming time may be a function of the target, within a line of targets, that subtends the smallest angle at the start position. It is this target that demands the greatest precision in the movement pathway. Subjects participated in a series of conditions in which the size and placement of the target that imposed the maximal constraint was varied. In each condition the subjects were required to strike a series of three targets with a stylus in a simple reaction-time paradigm. Analysis of the reaction-time results revealed a significant effect of size of constraint, but no effect of position of constraint. Analysis of the movement-time data dispelled movement-duration and movement-velocity interpretations of the results and intimated a possible online trajectory-correction process.

  18. Progress integrating ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology with accessory mineral geochemistry: towards better accuracy and higher precision time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoene, B.; Samperton, K. M.; Crowley, J. L.; Cottle, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly common that hand samples of plutonic and volcanic rocks contain zircon with dates that span between zero and >100 ka. This recognition comes from the increased application of U-series geochronology on young volcanic rocks and the increased precision to better than 0.1% on single zircons by the U-Pb ID-TIMS method. It has thus become more difficult to interpret such complicated datasets in terms of ashbed eruption or magma emplacement, which are critical constraints for geochronologic applications ranging from biotic evolution and the stratigraphic record to magmatic and metamorphic processes in orogenic belts. It is important, therefore, to develop methods that aid in interpreting which minerals, if any, date the targeted process. One promising tactic is to better integrate accessory mineral geochemistry with high-precision ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology. These dual constraints can 1) identify cogenetic populations of minerals, and 2) record magmatic or metamorphic fluid evolution through time. Goal (1) has been widely sought with in situ geochronology and geochemical analysis but is limited by low-precision dates. Recent work has attempted to bridge this gap by retrieving the typically discarded elution from ion exchange chemistry that precedes ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology and analyzing it by ICP-MS (U-Pb TIMS-TEA). The result integrates geochemistry and high-precision geochronology from the exact same volume of material. The limitation of this method is the relatively coarse spatial resolution compared to in situ techniques, and thus averages potentially complicated trace element profiles through single minerals or mineral fragments. In continued work, we test the effect of this on zircon by beginning with CL imaging to reveal internal zonation and growth histories. This is followed by in situ LA-ICPMS trace element transects of imaged grains to reveal internal geochemical zonation. The same grains are then removed from grain-mount, fragmented, and

  19. Clock accuracy and precision evolve as a consequence of selection for adult emergence in a narrow window of time in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Nisha N; Vaze, Koustubh M; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2012-10-15

    Although circadian clocks are believed to have evolved under the action of periodic selection pressures (selection on phasing) present in the geophysical environment, there is very little rigorous and systematic empirical evidence to support this. In the present study, we examined the effect of selection for adult emergence in a narrow window of time on the circadian rhythms of fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. Selection was imposed in every generation by choosing flies that emerged during a 1 h window of time close to the emergence peak of baseline/control flies under 12 h:12 h light:dark cycles. To study the effect of selection on circadian clocks we estimated several quantifiable features that reflect inter- and intra-individual variance in adult emergence and locomotor activity rhythms. The results showed that with increasing generations, incidence of adult emergence and activity of adult flies during the 1 h selection window increased gradually in the selected populations. Flies from the selected populations were more homogenous in their clock period, were more coherent in their phase of entrainment, and displayed enhanced accuracy and precision in their emergence and activity rhythms compared with controls. These results thus suggest that circadian clocks in D. melanogaster evolve enhanced accuracy and precision when subjected to selection for emergence in a narrow window of time.

  20. Camera-based three-dimensional real-time particle tracking at kHz rates and Ångström accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Joo, Sihwa; Otto, Oliver; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Seidel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Optical and magnetic tweezers are widely employed to probe the mechanics and activity of individual biomolecular complexes. They rely on micrometer-sized particles to detect molecular conformational changes from the particle position. Real-time particle tracking with Ångström accuracy has so far been only achieved using laser detection through photodiodes. Here we demonstrate that camera-based imaging can provide a similar performance for all three dimensions. Particle imaging at kHz rates is combined with real-time data processing being accelerated by a graphics processing unit. For particles that are fixed in the sample cell we can detect 3 Å sized steps that are introduced by cell translations at rates of 10 Hz, while for DNA-tethered particles 5 Å steps at 1 Hz can be resolved. Moreover, 20 particles can be tracked in parallel with comparable accuracy. Our approach provides a simple and robust way for high-resolution tweezers experiments using multiple particles at a time. PMID:25565216

  1. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Real-Time Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in Differentiation Malignant From Benign Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wuguo; Hao, Shuai; Gao, Bo; Jiang, Yan; Zhang, Shu; Guo, Lingji; Gu, Lingji; Luo, Donglin

    2015-12-01

    Thyroid nodules are relatively more prevalent in iodine-deficiency area, and the incidence increased sharply in the past decade in these areas. Workup of malignant from benign nodules in clinic was the main problem for managing thyroid nodules.An overall search for the articles about the diagnostic performance of real-time elastography (RTE) and shear wave elastography (SWE) before April 2015 in the databases of PubMed, Embase, and Google scholar. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve were obtained from individual studies with a random-effects model. Subgroup and meta-regression analysis were also performed.Fifty-six studies involved in 2621 malignant nodules and 7380 benign nodules were contained in our meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of RTE was 83.0% and 81.2%, which is higher than SWE (sensitivity: 78.7%, specificity: 80.5%). The areas under the SROC curve of RTE and SWE were 0.885 and 0.842 respectively. RTE had higher diagnostic value for Caucasians than Asians. Stran ratio (SR) assessment had higher diagnostic performance than elasticity score (ES) system. Similarly, it had higher diagnostic value when malignant nodules were more than 50.In summary, the results revealed that RTE had higher diagnostic performance than SWE in differentiating malignant from benign nodules. However, future international multicenter studies in the region of thyroid risk need to further assess the diagnostic performance of RTE. PMID:26717367

  2. Modeling in Real Time During the Ebola Response.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Martin I; Santibanez, Scott; Fischer, Leah S; Merlin, Toby L; Adhikari, Bishwa B; Atkins, Charisma Y; Campbell, Caresse; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai; Gambhir, Manoj; Gift, Thomas; Greening, Bradford; Gu, Weidong; Jacobson, Evin U; Kahn, Emily B; Carias, Cristina; Nerlander, Lina; Rainisch, Gabriel; Shankar, Manjunath; Wong, Karen; Washington, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    To aid decision-making during CDC's response to the 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, CDC activated a Modeling Task Force to generate estimates on various topics related to the response in West Africa and the risk for importation of cases into the United States. Analysis of eight Ebola response modeling projects conducted during August 2014-July 2015 provided insight into the types of questions addressed by modeling, the impact of the estimates generated, and the difficulties encountered during the modeling. This time frame was selected to cover the three phases of the West African epidemic curve. Questions posed to the Modeling Task Force changed as the epidemic progressed. Initially, the task force was asked to estimate the number of cases that might occur if no interventions were implemented compared with cases that might occur if interventions were implemented; however, at the peak of the epidemic, the focus shifted to estimating resource needs for Ebola treatment units. Then, as the epidemic decelerated, requests for modeling changed to generating estimates of the potential number of sexually transmitted Ebola cases. Modeling to provide information for decision-making during the CDC Ebola response involved limited data, a short turnaround time, and difficulty communicating the modeling process, including assumptions and interpretation of results. Despite these challenges, modeling yielded estimates and projections that public health officials used to make key decisions regarding response strategy and resources required. The impact of modeling during the Ebola response demonstrates the usefulness of modeling in future responses, particularly in the early stages and when data are scarce. Future modeling can be enhanced by planning ahead for data needs and data sharing, and by open communication among modelers, scientists, and others to ensure that modeling and its limitations are more clearly understood. The activities summarized in

  3. Free cortisol awakening responses are influenced by awakening time.

    PubMed

    Federenko, Ilona; Wüst, Stefan; Hellhammer, Dirk H; Dechoux, Ralph; Kumsta, Robert; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2004-02-01

    Psychobiological investigations on the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis depend on markers that adequately describe the activity of this system. There is evidence that the free cortisol response to awakening, proposed as a marker for the HPA axis, can be influenced by time of awakening. To further investigate this possible confounder, 24 shift working nurses and 31 female students on a regular sleep-wake cycle collected saliva samples 0, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after awakening. Nurses were investigated on the first and second day of their early (awakening: 04:00-05:30 h), late (awakening: 06:00-09:00 h), and night shift (awakening: 11:00-14:00 h), respectively. Students were studied after taking a short nap on two consecutive weekdays (awakening: 18:45-20:30 h). Mean cortisol levels after awakening increased significantly under all three shift conditions (p<0.01), but decreased in the student sample (p<.05). Within the three shift conditions, cortisol responses following waking in the early shift were more pronounced than in late (p<.01) and night shift (p<.05). The present study shows that in a sample with a large range of awakening times, an impact of this variable on the cortisol awakening response can be observed. The data furthermore strongly suggest that waking up per se is insufficient for adrenocortical stimulation. PMID:14604599

  4. Accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for identification of clinical pathogenic fungi: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Huazhi; Yuan, Zhijie; Shen, Jilu; Wang, Zhongxin; Xu, Yuanhong

    2014-07-01

    Fungal infections in the clinic have become increasingly serious. In many cases, the identification of clinically relevant fungi remains time-consuming and may also be unreliable. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS) is a newly developed diagnostic tool that is increasingly being employed to rapidly and accurately identify clinical pathogenic microorganisms. The present meta-analysis aimed to systematically evaluate the accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of clinical pathogenic fungi. After a rigorous selection process, 33 articles, involving 38 trials and a total of 9,977 fungal isolates, were included in the meta-analysis. The random-effects pooled identification accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS increased from 0.955 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.939 to 0.969) at the species level to 0.977 (95% CI, 0.955 to 0.993) at the genus level (P < 0.001; χ(2) = 15.452). Subgroup analyses were performed at the species level for several categories, including strain, source of strain, system, system database, and modified outcomes, to calculate the accuracy and to investigate heterogeneity. These analyses revealed significant differences between the overall meta-analysis and some of the subanalyses. In parallel, significant differences in heterogeneity among different systems and among different methods for calculating the identification ratios were found by multivariate metaregression, but none of the factors, except for the moderator of outcome, was significantly associated with heterogeneity by univariate metaregression. In summary, the MALDI-TOF MS method is highly accurate for the identification of clinically pathogenic fungi; future studies should analyze the comprehensive capability of this technology for clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  5. Effects of Differential Reinforcement of Short Latencies on Response Latency, Task Completion, and Accuracy of an Adolescent with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Melanie M.; Casey, Laura Baylot; Bicard, David F.; Bicard, Sara E.

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are faced with many challenging behaviors that could impede their learning. One commonly reported problem behavior is noncompliance, which is often defined as a delay in response (latency), decrease in rate of responding (fluency), or failure to complete a task. This failure to comply in an appropriate…

  6. SU-E-T-248: Near Real-Time Analysis of Radiation Delivery and Imaging, Accuracy to Ensure Patient Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesooriya, K; Seitter, K; Desai, V; Read, P; Larner, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and optimize an effective software method for comparing planned to delivered control point machine parameters for all VARIAN TrueBeam treatments so as to permit (1) assessment of a large patient pool throughout their treatment course to quantify treatment technique specific systematic and random uncertainty of observables, (2) quantify the site specific daily imaging shifts required for target alignment, and (3) define tolerance levels for mechanical parameters and imaging parameters based on statistical analysis data gathered, and the dosimetric impact of variations. Methods: Treatment and imaging log files were directly compared to plan parameters for Eclipse and Pinnacle planned treatments via 3D, IMRT, control point, RapidArc, and electrons. Each control point from all beams/arcs (7984) for all fractions (1940) of all patients treated over six months were analyzed. At each control point gantry angle, collimator angle, couch angle, jaw positions, MLC positions, MU were compared. Additionally per-treatment isocenter shifts were calculated. Results were analyzed as a whole in treatment type subsets: IMRT, 3D, RapidArc; and in treatment site subsets: brain, chest/mediastinum, esophagus, H and N, lung, pelvis, prostate. Results: Daily imaging isocenter shifts from initial external tattoo alignment were dependent on the treatment site with < 0.5 cm translational shifts for H and N, Brain, and lung SBRT, while pelvis, esophagus shifts were ∼1 cm. Mechanical delivery parameters were within tolerance levels for all sub-beams. The largest variations were for RapidArc plans: gantry angle 0.11±0.12,collimator angle 0.00±0.00, jaw positions 0.48±0.26, MLC leaf positions 0.66±0.08, MU 0.14±0.34. Conclusion: Per-control point validation reveals deviations between planned and delivered parameters. If used in a near real-time error checking system, patient safety can be improved by equipping the treatment delivery system with additional forcing

  7. Rasch analysis for the evaluation of rank of student response time in multiple choice examinations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James J; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W

    2013-01-01

    The availability of computerized testing has broadened the scope of person assessment beyond the usual accuracy-ability domain to include response time analyses. Because there are contexts in which speed is important, e.g. medical practice, it is important to develop tools by which individuals can be evaluated for speed. In this paper, the ability of Rasch measurement to convert ordinal nonparametric rankings of speed to measures is examined and compared to similar measures derived from parametric analysis of response times (pace) and semi-parametric logarithmic time-scaling procedures. Assuming that similar spans of the measures were used, non-parametric methods of raw ranking or percentile-ranking of persons by questions gave statistically acceptable person estimates of speed virtually identical to the parametric or semi-parametric methods. Because no assumptions were made about the underlying time distributions with ranking, generality of conclusions was enhanced. The main drawbacks of the non-parametric ranking procedures were the lack of information on question duration and the overall assignment by the model of variance to the person by question interaction.

  8. Rasch analysis for the evaluation of rank of student response time in multiple choice examinations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James J; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W

    2013-01-01

    The availability of computerized testing has broadened the scope of person assessment beyond the usual accuracy-ability domain to include response time analyses. Because there are contexts in which speed is important, e.g. medical practice, it is important to develop tools by which individuals can be evaluated for speed. In this paper, the ability of Rasch measurement to convert ordinal nonparametric rankings of speed to measures is examined and compared to similar measures derived from parametric analysis of response times (pace) and semi-parametric logarithmic time-scaling procedures. Assuming that similar spans of the measures were used, non-parametric methods of raw ranking or percentile-ranking of persons by questions gave statistically acceptable person estimates of speed virtually identical to the parametric or semi-parametric methods. Because no assumptions were made about the underlying time distributions with ranking, generality of conclusions was enhanced. The main drawbacks of the non-parametric ranking procedures were the lack of information on question duration and the overall assignment by the model of variance to the person by question interaction. PMID:24064578

  9. Time-dependent response of dissipative electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Krause, Pascal; Klamroth, Tillmann; Saalfrank, Peter

    2010-06-15

    We present a systematic study of the influence of energy and phase relaxation on dynamic polarizability simulations in the linear response regime. The nonperturbative approach is based on explicit electron dynamics using short laser pulses of low intensities. To include environmental effects on the property calculation, we use the time-dependent configuration-interaction method in its reduced density matrix formulation. Both energy dissipation and nonlocal pure dephasing are included. The explicit treatment of time-resolved electron dynamics gives access to the phase shift between the electric field and the induced dipole moment, which can be used to define a useful uncertainty measure for the dynamic polarizability. The nonperturbative treatment is compared to perturbation theory expressions, as applied to a simple model system, the rigid H{sub 2} molecule. It is shown that both approaches are equivalent for low field intensities, but the time-dependent treatment provides complementary information on the phase of the induced dipole moment, which allows for the definition of an uncertainty associated with the computation of the dynamic polarizability in the linear response regime.

  10. A general strategy for performing temperature-programming in high performance liquid chromatography--further improvements in the accuracy of retention time predictions of segmented temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Steffen; Teutenberg, Thorsten; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2012-01-27

    In the present work it is shown that the linear elution strength (LES) model which was adapted from temperature-programming gas chromatography (GC) can also be employed for systematic method development in high-temperature liquid chromatography (HT-HPLC). The ability to predict isothermal retention times based on temperature-gradient as well as isothermal input data was investigated. For a small temperature interval of ΔT=40°C, both approaches result in very similar predictions. Average relative errors of predicted retention times of 2.7% and 1.9% were observed for simulations based on isothermal and temperature-gradient measurements, respectively. Concurrently, it was investigated whether the accuracy of retention time predictions of segmented temperature gradients can be further improved by temperature dependent calculation of the parameter S(T) of the LES relationship. It was found that the accuracy of retention time predictions of multi-step temperature gradients can be improved to around 1.5%, if S(T) was also calculated temperature dependent. The adjusted experimental design making use of four temperature-gradient measurements was applied for systematic method development of selected food additives by high-temperature liquid chromatography. Method development was performed within a temperature interval from 40°C to 180°C using water as mobile phase. Two separation methods were established where selected food additives were baseline separated. In addition, a good agreement between simulation and experiment was observed, because an average relative error of predicted retention times of complex segmented temperature gradients less than 5% was observed. Finally, a schedule of recommendations to assist the practitioner during systematic method development in high-temperature liquid chromatography was established.

  11. Effect of processing variables (different compression packing processes and investment material types) and time on the dimensional accuracy of polymethyl methacrylate denture bases.

    PubMed

    Baydas, Seyfettin; Bayindir, Funda; Akyil, M Samil

    2003-06-01

    In this study we determined the effect of different compression packing processes, investment materials (a hemihydrate and dental stone) and time on the dimensional accuracy of polymethyl metacrylate denture bases. Square stainless steel plates (15 mm x 15 mm x 5 mm) were prepared to make an acrylic resin specimen. The linear dimensional changes of acrylic resin were determined by measuring the distances of fix points. Measurements were made at 24 hours, 48 hours, 12 days and 30 days after setting with a digital compass. Dimensional changes of test specimens that were obtained with three different flasks and two press techniques were compared by univariate analysis. Measurements of the linear dimensions of specimens cured by different compression packing techniques suggested that differences existed. The time interval differences were not significant. According to the results; flask and investment material types affect the dimensional accuracy of test specimens (p < 0.05). The least dimensional change observed in the specimens was obtained with Type 1 flask-dental stone-manual press combinations.

  12. A simple algorithm improves mass accuracy to 50-100 ppm for delayed extraction linear matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hack, Christopher A; Benner, W Henry

    2002-01-01

    A simple mathematical technique for improving mass calibration accuracy of linear delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOFMS) spectra is presented. The method involves fitting a parabola to a plot of Delta(m) vs. mass data where Delta(m) is the difference between the theoretical mass of calibrants and the mass obtained from a linear relationship between the square root of m/z and ion time of flight. The quadratic equation that describes the parabola is then used to correct the mass of unknowns by subtracting the deviation predicted by the quadratic equation from measured data. By subtracting the value of the parabola at each mass from the calibrated data, the accuracy of mass data points can be improved by factors of 10 or more. This method produces highly similar results whether or not initial ion velocity is accounted for in the calibration equation; consequently, there is no need to depend on that uncertain parameter when using the quadratic correction. This method can be used to correct the internally calibrated masses of protein digest peaks. The effect of nitrocellulose as a matrix additive is also briefly discussed, and it is shown that using nitrocellulose as an additive to the alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (alphaCHCA) matrix does not significantly change initial ion velocity but does change the average position of ions relative to the sample electrode at the instant the extraction voltage is applied.

  13. The effect of window size and lead time on pre-impact fall detection accuracy using support vector machine analysis of waist mounted inertial sensor data.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Omar; Russell, Colin M; Park, Edward J; Robinovitch, Stephen N

    2014-01-01

    Falls are a major cause of death and morbidity in older adults. In recent years many researchers have examined the role of wearable inertial sensors (accelerometers and/or gyroscopes) to automatically detect falls. The primary goal of such fall monitors is to alert care providers of the fall event, who can then commence earlier treatment. Although such fall detection systems may reduce time until the arrival of medical assistance, they cannot help to prevent or reduce the severity of traumatic injury caused by the fall. In the current study, we extend the application of wearable inertial sensors beyond post-impact fall detection, by developing and evaluating the accuracy of a sensor system for detecting falls prior to the fall impact. We used support vector machine (SVM) analysis to classify 7 fall and 8 non-fall events. In particular, we focused on the effect of data window size and lead time on the accuracy of our pre-impact fall detection system using signals from a single waist sensor. We found that our system was able to detect fall events at between 0.0625-0.1875 s prior to the impact with at least 95% sensitivity and at least 90% specificity for window sizes between 0.125-1 s.

  14. Dual-frequency liquid crystal gels with submillisecond response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yun-Hsing; Ren, Hongwen; Liang, Xiao; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2004-09-01

    Two types of gels using dual-frequency liquid crystal are demonstrated. The one using a homogeneous cell shows anisotropic scattering behavior while the other prepared using a cell without polyimide alignment layers exhibits isotropic scattering properties. Both liquid crystal gels are highly transparent in the voltage-off state. Light scattering occurs when a high frequency voltage is applied. The isotropic gel exhibits a high contrast ratio and submillisecond response time. Potential applications of these gels for switchable polarizer, telecom optical switch, and reflective displays are emphasized.

  15. Further improvements in deconvolution of pass-through paleomagnetic measurement data: Accuracy of positioning and sensor response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, H.; Xuan, C.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Pass-through superconducting rock magnetometer (SRM) is one of the most important tools for modern paleomagnetism research. It offers rapid and continuous measurements of weak remanent magnetization preserved in various geological archives. However, pass-through SRM measurements are inevitably smoothed and even distorted due to the convolution effect of the SRM sensor response, and deconvolution is necessary to restore high-resolution signal from pass-through measurements. Reliable deconvolution relies on accurate estimate of the SRM sensor response and our understanding of errors associated with sample measurements. In this presentation, we introduce new practical tool and procedure to facilitate rapid and accurate measurements of SRM sensor response with demonstration using an SRM at the Kochi Core Center, Japan. We also report accurate measurements of SRM tray positions measured using laser interferometry. The measured positions with an actual u-channel sample on the tray show vibrations with peak amplitudes of ~50μm following each stop of the tray. The vibrations diminish towards background level in ~0.4 sec. Comparison with the positions expected from the stepping motor counts show random discrepancies with standard deviations of 0.1~0.2 mm. Measurements with u-channel show higher standard deviations including significant stepwise changes of up to ~0.5mm.

  16. Time domain response of electrical ceramics -- Micro to megaseconds

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    The electrical properties of ceramics can be measured in either the time domain or in the frequency domain. But for electrically nonlinear ceramics such as varistors, time-domain measurements provide insights that are different and more relevant to material performance as well as being more physically incisive. This article focuses specifically on the electrical properties of ZnO varistors, but much of it is of relevance for other materials, in particular those materials with grain-boundary barriers and disordered ceramics or glasses. The interpretation of electrical measurements in the time domain is profoundly influenced by such practical matters as source impedance and waveform characteristics. Experimental results are presented for both high and low source impedance relative to that of a test varistor, and the different in experimental difficulty and ease of interpretation is described. Time-domain measurements of capacitance and of the inductive response of varistors to large, fast electrical pulses are presented and their implications for varistor theory are given. Experimental evidence is given of short- and long-term memory in varistors. These memory phenomena are ascribed respectively to the life time of holes that become trapped in barriers and to polarization currents originating from deep electron traps. Polarization current measurements are presented for a wide range of time and temperature. The power-law time dependence and universal behavior of these currents is discussed. The exponent that describes the power law behavior is seen to change with temperature, and the change is interpreted as a double transition from diffusive to dispersive transport that originates with current from two different electron traps.

  17. Time domain responses of a prestressed beam and prestress identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, S. S.; Lu, Z. R.

    2005-12-01

    The time-domain response of a prestressed Euler-Bernoulli beam under external excitation is studied based on modal superposition. The prestress force is then identified in the time domain by a system identification approach and Tikhonov regularization technique is used to provide bounds to the ill-conditioned results in the identified problem. Both measured displacements and strains are used. The noise effect is improved using the orthogonal polynomial function, and cases with either sinusoidal or impulsive excitations are illustrated to give very good results from the lower three measured modes and data obtained from three measurement points. Work in this paper demonstrates the feasibility of indirectly identifying the prestress force in a beam.

  18. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  19. Time-dependent mechanical response of HDPE geomembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Merry, S.M.; Bray, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    Geomembranes are used extensively in the construction of base liners and cover systems for both hazardous and municipal waste-containment facilities. Characterization of the long-term mechanical response of geomembranes used in waste-containment facilities is crucial to designing base liner and over systems that perform satisfactorily. To investigate the long-term mechanical response, strain-controlled multiaxial tension testing was performed over a fourfold variation of strain rate using a newly developed multiaxial tension-test apparatus capable of performing constant strain rate and constant stress creep tests. This device subjects a geomembrane specimen to multiaxial stress states and allows for the development of strain conditions that vary from plane strain at the clamped edges to balanced biaxial at the center. Results from testing high-density polyethylene (HDPE) specimens indicate that the secant modulus and strength decreases considerably at strain rates appropriate for long-term field applications. The strength of HDPE measured at a typical laboratory strain rate of 1% per minute can be more than twice the strength predicted at a strain rate of 1E-6% per minute, which may be representative of field performance for a typical 30-year design life. A hyperbolic model and the Singh-Mitchell creep model (which was originally formulated for soils) are shown to capture the time-dependent mechanical response of HDPE well.

  20. Time domain responses of hydraulic bushing with two flow passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Tan; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Hydraulic bushings are commonly employed in vehicle suspension and body sub-frame systems to control motion, vibration, and structure-borne noise. Since literature on this topic is sparse, a controlled bushing prototype which accommodates a combination of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements is first designed, constructed and instrumented. Step-up and step-down responses of several typical fluid-filled bushing configurations are measured along with steady harmonic time histories of transmitted force and internal pressures. To analyze the experimental results and gain physical insights into the hydraulic bushing system, lumped system models of bushings with different design features are developed, and analytical expressions of transmitted force and internal pressure responses are derived by using the convolution method. Parametric studies are also conducted to examine the effect of hydraulic element parameters. System parameters are successfully estimated for both harmonic and step responses using theory and measurements, and the dynamic force measurements are analyzed using analytical predictions. Finally, some nonlinearities of the system are also observed, and the fluid resistance of flow passage is found to be the most nonlinear element.

  1. Rapid detection of health-care-associated bloodstream infection in critical care using multipathogen real-time polymerase chain reaction technology: a diagnostic accuracy study and systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Warhurst, Geoffrey; Dunn, Graham; Chadwick, Paul; Blackwood, Bronagh; McAuley, Daniel; Perkins, Gavin D; McMullan, Ronan; Gates, Simon; Bentley, Andrew; Young, Duncan; Carlson, Gordon L; Dark, Paul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is growing interest in the potential utility of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in diagnosing bloodstream infection by detecting pathogen deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in blood samples within a few hours. SeptiFast (Roche Diagnostics GmBH, Mannheim, Germany) is a multipathogen probe-based system targeting ribosomal DNA sequences of bacteria and fungi. It detects and identifies the commonest pathogens causing bloodstream infection. As background to this study, we report a systematic review of Phase III diagnostic accuracy studies of SeptiFast, which reveals uncertainty about its likely clinical utility based on widespread evidence of deficiencies in study design and reporting with a high risk of bias. OBJECTIVE Determine the accuracy of SeptiFast real-time PCR for the detection of health-care-associated bloodstream infection, against standard microbiological culture. DESIGN Prospective multicentre Phase III clinical diagnostic accuracy study using the standards for the reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies criteria. SETTING Critical care departments within NHS hospitals in the north-west of England. PARTICIPANTS Adult patients requiring blood culture (BC) when developing new signs of systemic inflammation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES SeptiFast real-time PCR results at species/genus level compared with microbiological culture in association with independent adjudication of infection. Metrics of diagnostic accuracy were derived including sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values, with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Latent class analysis was used to explore the diagnostic performance of culture as a reference standard. RESULTS Of 1006 new patient episodes of systemic inflammation in 853 patients, 922 (92%) met the inclusion criteria and provided sufficient information for analysis. Index test assay failure occurred on 69 (7%) occasions. Adult patients had been exposed to a median of 8 days (interquartile range 4

  2. Ampoule failure sensor time response testing: Experiment 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. L.; Watring, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The response time of an ampoule failure sensor exposed to a liquid or vapor gallium-arsenide (GaAs) is investigated. The experimental configuration represents the sample/ampoule cartridge assembly used in NASA's Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF). The sensor is a chemical fuse made from a metal with which the semiconductor material reacts more rapidly than it does with the containing cartridge. For the III-IV compound of GaAs, a platinum metal was chosen based on the reaction of platinum and arsenic at elevated temperatures which forms a low melting eutectic. Ampoule failure is indicated by a step change in resistance of the failure sensor on the order of megohms. The sensors will increase the safety of crystal growth experiments by providing an indication that an ampoule has failed. Experimental results indicate that the response times (after a known ampoule failure) for the 0.003 and 0.010 inch ampoule failure sensors are 2.4 and 3.6 minutes, respectively. This ampoule failure sensor will be utilized in the CGF during the second United States Microgravity Laboratory Mission (USML-2) and is the subject of a NASA patent application.

  3. Accuracy of Chronic Aquatic Toxicity Estimates Determined from Acute Toxicity Data and Two Time–Response Models.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditionally, chronic toxicity in aquatic organisms and wildlife has been determined from either toxicity test data, acute to chronic ratios, or application of safety factors. A more recent alternative approach has been to estimate chronic toxicity by modeling the time course of...

  4. Assessment of visual quality and spatial accuracy of fast anisotropic diffusion and scan conversion algorithms for real-time three-dimensional spherical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qi; Angelini, Elsa D.; Laine, Andrew

    2004-04-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound machines based on matrix phased-array transducers are gaining predominance for real-time dynamic screening in cardiac and obstetric practice. These transducers array acquire three-dimensional data in spherical coordinates along lines tiled in azimuth and elevation angles at incremental depth. This study aims at evaluating fast filtering and scan conversion algorithms applied in the spherical domain prior to visualization into Cartesian coordinates for visual quality and spatial measurement accuracy. Fast 3d scan conversion algorithms were implemented and with different order interpolation kernels. Downsizing and smoothing of sampling artifacts were integrated in the scan conversion process. In addition, a denoising scheme for spherical coordinate data with 3d anisotropic diffusion was implemented and applied prior to scan conversion to improve image quality. Reconstruction results under different parameter settings, such as different interpolation kernels, scaling factor, smoothing options, and denoising, are reported. Image quality was evaluated on several data sets via visual inspections and measurements of cylinder objects dimensions. Error measurements of the cylinder's radius, reported in this paper, show that the proposed fast scan conversion algorithm can correctly reconstruct three-dimensional ultrasound in Cartesian coordinates under tuned parameter settings. Denoising via three-dimensional anisotropic diffusion was able to greatly improve the quality of resampled data without affecting the accuracy of spatial information after the modification of the introduction of a variable gradient threshold parameter.

  5. SU-E-T-346: Validation of Beam Accuracy of a Gated Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy System with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking at Hokkaido University

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T; Matsuura, T; Toramatsu, C; Takao, S; Nihongi, H; Miyamoto, N; Shimizu, S; Shirato, H; Takayanagi, T; Umezawa, M; Matsuda, K; Umegaki, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: At Hokkaido University, we have developed a gated spot scanning proton beam therapy system with real-time tumor-tracking under collaborative work with Hitachi Ltd. This system has the ability to gate proton beams from the synchrotron, turning the beam on only when the actual positions of inserted fiducial markers monitored by two fluoroscopic X-ray systems are within the planned positions [Shirato, 2012]. In this research, we validated the accuracy of the proton beams while utilizing external gating signals. Methods: The accuracy of spot positions, spot dose, absolute dose at the center of the SOBP, and range were measured while utilizing external gating signals. The following external gating signals were generated by an arbitrary waveform generator: (1) ON at all times (without gating), (2) an OFF period of 4 s followed by an ON period of 1 s, (3) two ON periods of 0.5 s with a 0.15 s OFF interval, (4) signals recorded during the treatment of real-time tumor-tracking X-ray therapy in Hokkaido University. The spot positions and spot dose were measured by beam monitors in the nozzle. The ranges were measured with a multi-layer ion chamber made by Hitachi Ltd. The absolute dose was measured with a Farmer ionization chamber and a RFA300 water phantom system. Results: The maximum error of the beam position in the isocenter plane was 0.8 mm without the gating signal and 1.0 mm with the gating signal. The maximum error of the spot dose was 0.0029 MU, below the criterion of 0.0032 MU. The maximum error of the absolute dose was 0.4% and the maximum variation of the range was 0.1 mm. Conclusion: It was confirmed with measurements of the beam that the accuracy of the proton beam met the criteria with external gating signals. This research was supported by the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R and D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program

  6. Role of Estrogen Response Element in the Human Prolactin Gene: Transcriptional Response and Timing

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Anne V.; Adamson, Antony D.; Dunham, Lee S. S.; Semprini, Sabrina; Spiller, David G.; McNeilly, Alan S.; Mullins, John J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) reporter constructs in molecular physiology enables the inclusion of large sections of flanking DNA, likely to contain regulatory elements and enhancers regions that contribute to the transcriptional output of a gene. Using BAC recombineering, we have manipulated a 160-kb human prolactin luciferase (hPRL-Luc) BAC construct and mutated the previously defined proximal estrogen response element (ERE) located −1189 bp relative to the transcription start site, to assess its involvement in the estrogen responsiveness of the entire hPRL locus. We found that GH3 cell lines stably expressing Luc under control of the ERE-mutated hPRL promoter (ERE-Mut) displayed a dramatically reduced transcriptional response to 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment compared with cells expressing Luc from the wild-type (WT) ERE hPRL-Luc promoter (ERE-WT). The −1189 ERE controls not only the response to E2 treatment but also the acute transcriptional response to TNFα, which was abolished in ERE-Mut cells. ERE-WT cells displayed a biphasic transcriptional response after TNFα treatment, the acute phase of which was blocked after treatment with the estrogen receptor antagonist 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen. Unexpectedly, we show the oscillatory characteristics of hPRL promoter activity in individual living cells were unaffected by disruption of this crucial response element, real-time bioluminescence imaging showed that transcription cycles were maintained, with similar cycle lengths, in ERE-WT and ERE-Mut cells. These data suggest the −1189 ERE is the dominant response element involved in the hPRL transcriptional response to both E2 and TNFα and, crucially, that cycles of hPRL promoter activity are independent of estrogen receptor binding. PMID:26691151

  7. Characteristics and control response of the TOPAZ II Reactor System Real-time Dynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.

    1993-11-12

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulation program has been tested and it is able to handle a step decrease of $8 worth of reactivity. It also provides simulations of fuel, emitter, collector, stainless steel, and ZrH moderator failures. Presented in this paper are the models used in the calculations, a sample simulation session, and a discussion of the performance and limitations of the simulator. The simulator has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system under both normal and casualty conditions.

  8. Driving time modulates accommodative response and intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jesús; Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Jiménez, Raimundo; Morales, José M; Catena, Andrés; Cardenas, David; Di Stasi, Leandro L

    2016-10-01

    Driving is a task mainly reliant on the visual system. Most of the time, while driving, our eyes are constantly focusing and refocusing between the road and the dashboard or near and far traffic. Thus, prolonged driving time should produce visual fatigue. Here, for the first time, we investigated the effects of driving time, a common inducer of driver fatigue, on two ocular parameters: the accommodative response (AR) and the intraocular pressure (IOP). A pre/post-test design has been used to assess the impact of driving time on both indices. Twelve participants (out of 17 recruited) completed the study (5 women, 24.42±2.84years old). The participants were healthy and active drivers with no visual impairment or pathology. They drove for 2h in a virtual driving environment. We assessed AR and IOP before and after the driving session, and also collected subjective measures of arousal and fatigue. We found that IOP and AR decreased (i.e., the accommodative lag increased) after the driving session (p=0.03 and p<0.001, respectively). Moreover, the nearest distances tested (20cm, 25cm, and 33cm) induced the highest decreases in AR (corrected p-values<0.05). Consistent with these findings, the subjective levels of arousal decreased and levels of fatigue increased after the driving session (all p-values<0.001). These results represent an innovative step towards an objective, valid, and reliable assessment of fatigue-impaired driving based on visual fatigue signs. PMID:27235337

  9. Designing for time-dependent material response in spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Oleksuk, Lynda L. S.; Bowles, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    To study the influence on overall deformations of the time-dependent constitutive properties of fiber-reinforced polymeric matrix composite materials being considered for use in orbiting precision segmented reflectors, simple sandwich beam models are developed. The beam models include layers representing the face sheets, the core, and the adhesive bonding of the face sheets to the core. A three-layer model lumps the adhesive layers with the face sheets or core, while a five-layer model considers the adhesive layers explicitly. The deformation response of the three-layer and five-layer sandwich beam models to a midspan point load is studied. This elementary loading leads to a simple analysis, and it is easy to create this loading in the laboratory. Using the correspondence principle of viscoelasticity, the models representing the elastic behavior of the two beams are transformed into time-dependent models. Representative cases of time-dependent material behavior for the facesheet material, the core material, and the adhesive are used to evaluate the influence of these constituents being time-dependent on the deformations of the beam. As an example of the results presented, if it assumed that, as a worst case, the polymer-dominated shear properties of the core behave as a Maxwell fluid such that under constant shear stress the shear strain increases by a factor of 10 in 20 years, then it is shown that the beam deflection increases by a factor of 1.4 during that time. In addition to quantitative conclusions, several assumptions are discussed which simplify the analyses for use with more complicated material models. Finally, it is shown that the simpler three-layer model suffices in many situations.

  10. [Accuracy of a real-time polymerase-chain-reaction assay for a quantitative estimation of genetically modified sources in food products].

    PubMed

    Abramov, D D; Trofimov, D Iu; Rebrikov, D V

    2006-01-01

    The accuracy of a real-time polymerase-chain-reaction assay for genetically modified sources in food products was determined using two official test systems (kits) of primers and samples. These kits were recommended by the Federal Center of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance (Russian Ministry of Health) and the European Commission. We used the following three models of thermocyclers: iCycler iQ (BioRad, United States), Rotor-Gene 3000 (Corbett Research, Australia), and DT-322 (DNA-Technology, Russia). Studies of samples that contained 1% genetically modified sources showed that the error of a quantitative assay for genetically modified sources in food products corresponds to 20-30% and does not depend on the kit type and the thermocycler model used.

  11. Field response and switching times in biaxial nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardi, Roberto; Muccioli, Luca; Zannoni, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We study by means of virtual molecular dynamics computer experiments the response of a bulk biaxial nematic to an applied external field and, in particular, the relative speed of reorientation of the principal director axis and of the secondary one, typical of these new materials, upon a π /2 field switch. We perform the simulations setting up and integrating the equations of motion for biaxial Gay-Berne particles using quaternions and a suitable time reversible symplectic integrator. We find that switching of the secondary axis is up to an order of magnitude faster than that of the principal axis, and that under fields above a certain strength a reorganization of local domains, temporarily disrupting the nematic and biaxial ordering, rather than a collective concerted reorientation occurs.

  12. Viewer response to time-varying video quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Don E.

    1998-07-01

    Over the past several years we have investigated viewer response to temporal fluctuations in the quality of digital television pictures, which occur when video is coded into relatively low bit rates. Three phenomena of interest have been identified: (1) a forgiveness effect, (2) a recency effect, and (3) a negative-peak (duration-neglect); these are described and discussed in the paper. In collaboration with our partners in European projects MOSAIC and TAPESTRIES, we have developed a three-stage method of measuring time-variant quality, which has been accepted by the ITU-R. The first stage is a Single Stimulus Continuous Quality Evaluation (SSCQE) of instantaneous quality; the second a calibration stage to link SSCQE with conventional DSCQS, and the third stage a numerical procedure for relating continuous and overall quality. Some of the factors we have identified as being important in producing good overall quality judgements have relevance to the design of optimal coding strategies for digital television.

  13. Word Association in L1 and L2: An Exploratory Study of Response Types, Response Times, and Interlingual Mediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Tess; Izura, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Word association responses in first-language (L1) Spanish and second-language (L2) English were investigated by means of response latencies and types of associative response produced. The primary aims were to establish whether (a) some response types are produced more often or faster than others, (b) participants' L2 response time profiles mirror…

  14. Accuracy of erythrogram and serum ferritin for the maternal anemia diagnosis (AMA): a phase 3 diagnostic study on prediction of the therapeutic responsiveness to oral iron in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pregnancy anemia remains as a public health problem, since the official reports in the 70’s. To guide the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy, the haemoglobin concentration is the most used test in spite of its low accuracy, and serum ferritin is the most reliable test, although its cutoff point remains an issue. Methods/design The aim of this protocol is to verify the accuracy of erythrocyte indices and serum ferritin (studied tests) for the diagnosis of functional iron-deficiency in pregnancy using the iron-therapy responsiveness as the gold-standard. This is an ongoing phase III accuracy study initiated in August 2011 and to be concluded in April 2013. The subjects are anemic pregnant women (haemoglobin concentration < 11.0 g/dL) attended at a low-risk prenatal care center in the Northeast of Brazil. The sample size (n 278) was calculated to estimate sensitivity of 90% and 80% of specificity with relative error of 10% and power of 95%. This study has a prospective design with a before-after intervention of 80 mg of daily oral iron during 90 days and will be analyzed as a delayed-type cross-sectional study. Women at the second trimester of pregnancy are being evaluated with clinical and laboratorial examinations at the enrollment and monthly. The ‘responsiveness to therapeutic test with oral iron’ (gold-standard) was defined to an increase of at least 0.55 Z-score in haemoglobin after 4 weeks of treatment and a total dose of 1200 mg of iron. At the study conclusion, sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, likelihood ratios and areas under the ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curves of serum ferritin and erythrocyte indices (red blood cell count, haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, red blood cell distribution width, reticulocyte count) will be tested. The compliance and adverse effects are considered

  15. Heat-Treatment-Responsive Proteins in Different Developmental Stages of Tomato Pollen Detected by Targeted Mass Accuracy Precursor Alignment (tMAPA).

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Palak; Doerfler, Hannes; Jegadeesan, Sridharan; Ghatak, Arindam; Pressman, Etan; Castillejo, Maria Angeles; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Egelhofer, Volker; Firon, Nurit; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2015-11-01

    Recently, we have developed a quantitative shotgun proteomics strategy called mass accuracy precursor alignment (MAPA). The MAPA algorithm uses high mass accuracy to bin mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios of precursor ions from LC-MS analyses, determines their intensities, and extracts a quantitative sample versus m/z ratio data alignment matrix from a multitude of samples. Here, we introduce a novel feature of this algorithm that allows the extraction and alignment of proteotypic peptide precursor ions or any other target peptide from complex shotgun proteomics data for accurate quantification of unique proteins. This strategy circumvents the problem of confusing the quantification of proteins due to indistinguishable protein isoforms by a typical shotgun proteomics approach. We applied this strategy to a comparison of control and heat-treated tomato pollen grains at two developmental stages, post-meiotic and mature. Pollen is a temperature-sensitive tissue involved in the reproductive cycle of plants and plays a major role in fruit setting and yield. By LC-MS-based shotgun proteomics, we identified more than 2000 proteins in total for all different tissues. By applying the targeted MAPA data-processing strategy, 51 unique proteins were identified as heat-treatment-responsive protein candidates. The potential function of the identified candidates in a specific developmental stage is discussed.

  16. On the time course of rapid and repeatable response induction.

    PubMed

    Jarmolowicz, David P; Hudnall, Jennifer L; Darden, Alexandria C; Lemley, Shea M; Sofis, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    As reinforcers are delivered for a particular response, that response increases. Other similar responses also increase, with the extent to which this increase is seen being positively related to the similarity between the responses. This process, called induction, is pronounced during initial response acquisition, and dissipates as the target response is established. The present experiment examined this process in a paradigm wherein responses to one of five nose poke receptacles results in reinforcement for six sessions in each condition and the target location changes between conditions. Consistent patterns of induction were seen across conditions, with patterns of induction dissipating within each condition.

  17. Computerized assessment of pedophilic sexual interest through self-report and viewing time: reliability, validity, and classification accuracy of the affinity program.

    PubMed

    Mokros, Andreas; Gebhard, Michael; Heinz, Volker; Marschall, Roland W; Nitschke, Joachim; Glasgow, David V; Gress, Carmen L Z; Laws, D Richard

    2013-06-01

    Affinity is a computerized assessment tool that combines viewing time and self-report measures of sexual interest. The present study was designed to assess the diagnostic properties of Affinity with respect to sexual interest in prepubescent children. Reliability of both self-report and viewing time components was estimated to be high. The group profile of a sample of pedophilic adult male child molesters (n = 42, all of whom admitted their offenses) differed from the group profiles of male community controls (n = 95) and male nonsexual offenders (n = 27), respectively. More specifically, both ratings and viewing times for images showing small children or prejuvenile children were significantly higher within the child molester sample than in either of the other two groups, attesting to the validity of the measures. Overall classification accuracy, however, was mediocre: A multivariate classification routine yielded 50% sensitivity for child molester status at the cost of 13% false positives. The implications for forensic use of Affinity are discussed. PMID:22878565

  18. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  19. Comparable performance of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and healthy controls for verbal and nonverbal memory accuracy and confidence: time to forget the forgetfulness hypothesis of OCD?

    PubMed

    Moritz, Steffen; Kloss, Martin; von Eckstaedt, Francesca Vitzthum; Jelinek, Lena

    2009-04-30

    The memory deficit or forgetfulness hypothesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has received considerable attention and empirical effort over the past decades. The present study aimed to provide a fair test of its various formulations: (1) memory dysfunction in OCD is ubiquitous, that is, manifests irrespective of modality and material; (2) memory dysfunction is found for nonverbal but not verbal material, (3) memory dysfunction is secondary to executive impairment; and (4) memory dysfunction affects meta-memory rather than memory accuracy. Participants comprised 43 OCD patients and 46 healthy controls who were tested on the Picture Word Memory Test (PWMT), which provides several unconfounded parameters for nonverbal and verbal memory accuracy and confidence measures across different time-points. In addition, the Trail-Making Test B was administered to test assumption number 3. Replicating earlier work of our group, samples displayed similar performance on all indices. None of the different formulations of the memory deficit hypothesis were supported. In view of waning evidence for a global memory deficit in OCD, neuropsychological research on OCD should more thoroughly investigate moderators and triggers of occasional instances of impaired performance, particularly cognitive biases such as perfectionism and an inflated sense of responsibility. PMID:19285350

  20. Time-resolved diagnostics for concrete target response

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, D.W.; Kuklo, R.M.; Reaugh, J.E.; Simonson, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    In order to facilitate the design of advanced penetrating weapons for defeating land targets, the interaction of concrete with high-velocity penetrators needs to be better characterized. To aid in this effort, three new types of time-resolved diagnostics are being developed and have been used in two experiments and one demonstration: fiber optic arrays to localize penetrators in space and time, Fabry-Perot velocimetry to record the concrete particle velocity, which is related to the pressure, at specific locations within concrete targets, and micropower impulse radar to provide a non-intrusive measure of the penetrator position-time history in a target. The two experiments used the fiber optic array and the Fabry-Perot velocimeter to diagnose the response of concrete to penetration by a Viper shaped charge jet. The results were analyzed using the CALE continuum mechanics simulation program, for which a preliminary model of the material properties of concrete was developed. The fiber optic arrays recorded the bow shock at locations 6.4 and 16.9 cm from the front surfaces. The Fabry-Perot velocimeter measured a free-surface velocity of 0.13 km/s at a distance of 3 cm and obliquity 70{degree} from the jet, which was moving at an interface velocity of 4.0 km/s at a depth of 29 cm. These values imply a pressure of about 6.6 kbar at that location. The demonstration used micropower impulse radar with a pulse repetition frequency of 0.25 MHz and a cell size of 30 ps to detect and record the motion of a metal penetrator simulant moving inside a cylindrical concrete target.

  1. Development of X-Y Servo Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Hybrid Actuators for Position Control with High Response, Large Stroke and Nanometer Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to develop a X-Y dual-axial intelligent servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuator for position control with high response, large stroke (250 mm, 200 mm) and nanometer accuracy (20 nm). In each axis, the rodless pneumatic actuator serves to position in coarse stroke and the piezoelectric actuator compensates in fine stroke. Thus, the overall control systems of the single axis become a dual-input single-output (DISO) system. Although the rodless pneumatic actuator has relatively larger friction force, it has the advantage of mechanism for multi-axial development. Thus, the X-Y dual-axial positioning system is developed based on the servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuator. In addition, the decoupling self-organizing fuzzy sliding mode control is developed as the intelligent control strategies. Finally, the proposed novel intelligent X-Y dual-axial servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuators are implemented and verified experimentally. PMID:22319266

  2. Children's Processing and Comprehension of Complex Sentences Containing Temporal Connectives: The Influence of Memory on the Time Course of Accurate Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blything, Liam P.; Cain, Kate

    2016-01-01

    In a touch-screen paradigm, we recorded 3- to 7-year-olds' (N = 108) accuracy and response times (RTs) to assess their comprehension of 2-clause sentences containing "before" and "after". Children were influenced by order: performance was most accurate when the presentation order of the 2 clauses matched the chronological order…

  3. The impact of aging on the spatial accuracy of quick corrective arm movements in response to sudden target displacement during reaching

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Daisuke; Kadota, Koji; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Age-related declines in visuomotor processing speed can have a large impact on motor performance in elderly individuals. Contrary to previous findings, however, recent studies revealed that elderly individuals are able to quickly react to displacement of a visual target during reaching. Here, we investigated the influence of aging on quick, corrective responses to perturbations during reaching in the terms of their functional contribution to accuracy. Elderly and young adults performed reaching movements to a visual target that could be displaced during reaching, and they were requested to move their hand to reach the final target location as quickly as possible. Results showed that, for the younger group, the variance in the directional error of the corrective response correlated with the variance in the reaching trajectory at the halfway point of the reach, but the correlation decreased at the end of the reaching. On the other hand, such correlations were not significant in elderly participants, although the variance of the directional error did not show a significant difference between age groups. Thus, the quick, corrective response seems to play an important role in decreasing variability, especially before the end of reaching, and aging can impair this process. PMID:26441641

  4. Interpreting response time effects in functional imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J.S.H.; Rastle, Kathleen; Davis, Matthew H.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that differential neural activity in imaging studies is most informative if it is independent of response time (RT) differences. However, others view RT as a behavioural index of key cognitive processes, which is likely linked to underlying neural activity. Here, we reconcile these views using the effort and engagement framework developed by Taylor, Rastle, and Davis (2013) and data from the domain of reading aloud. We propose that differences in neural engagement should be independent of RT, whereas, differences in neural effort should co-vary with RT. We illustrate these different mechanisms using data from an fMRI study of neural activity during reading aloud of regular words, irregular words, and pseudowords. In line with our proposals, activation revealed by contrasts designed to tap differences in neural engagement (e.g., words are meaningful and therefore engage semantic representations more than pseudowords) survived correction for RT, whereas activation for contrasts designed to tap differences in neural effort (e.g., it is more difficult to generate the pronunciation of pseudowords than words) correlated with RT. However, even for contrasts designed to tap neural effort, activity remained after factoring out the RT–BOLD response correlation. This may reveal unpredicted differences in neural engagement (e.g., learning phonological forms for pseudowords > words) that could further the development of cognitive models of reading aloud. Our framework provides a theoretically well-grounded and easily implemented method for analysing and interpreting RT effects in neuroimaging studies of cognitive processes. PMID:24904992

  5. Reaction Time and Accuracy in Erroneous vs Correct Responses among Dyslexic and Regular Readers: From Letters to Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; Breznitz, Zvia

    2011-01-01

    Speed of processing (SOP) is a crucial factor in fluent reading and is measured using reading rate. This measure is commonly used to examine correct reading patterns, yet in the present study it is employed to determine whether differences in SOP exist for correct and incorrect reading. One of the characteristics of dyslexia is slow and inaccurate…

  6. The clinical diagnostic accuracy of rapid detection of healthcare-associated bloodstream infection in intensive care using multipathogen real-time PCR technology

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Graham; Chadwick, Paul; Young, Duncan; Bentley, Andrew; Carlson, Gordon; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the potential utility of real-time PCR in diagnosing bloodstream infection by detecting pathogen DNA in blood samples within a few hours. SeptiFast is a multipathogen probe-based real-time PCR system targeting ribosomal DNA sequences of bacteria and fungi. It detects and identifies the commonest pathogens causing bloodstream infection and has European regulatory approval. The SeptiFast pathogen panel is suited to identifying healthcare-associated bloodstream infection acquired during complex healthcare, and the authors report here the protocol for the first detailed health-technology assessment of multiplex real-time PCR in this setting. Methods/design A Phase III multicentre double-blinded diagnostic study will determine the clinical validity of SeptiFast for the rapid detection of healthcare-associated bloodstream infection, against the current service standard of microbiological culture, in an adequately sized population of critically ill adult patients. Results from SeptiFast and standard microbiological culture procedures in each patient will be compared at study conclusion and the metrics of clinical diagnostic accuracy of SeptiFast determined in this population setting. In addition, this study aims to assess further the preliminary evidence that the detection of pathogen DNA in the bloodstream using SeptiFast may have value in identifying the presence of infection elsewhere in the body. Furthermore, differences in circulating immune-inflammatory markers in patient groups differentiated by the presence/absence of culturable pathogens and pathogen DNA will help elucidate further the patho-physiology of infection developing in the critically ill. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been granted by the North West 6 Research Ethics Committee (09/H1003/109). Based on the results of this first non-commercial study, independent recommendations will be made to The Department of Health (open-access health technology

  7. K+-selective nanospheres: maximising response range and minimising response time.

    PubMed

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2006-12-01

    Cross-linked K(+) ion-selective copolymer nanospheres have been prepared by free-radical photo-initiated polymerization of n-butyl acrylate (nBA) with hexanedioldiacrylate (HDDA). Nanospheres (<200 nm) containing H(+)-chromoionophore (ETH 5294) and lipophilic salt (KTClPB) for H(+)-sensors, or ETH 5294, a K(+)-selective ionophore (valinomycin) and anionic sites for K(+)-sensors were compared, and the effect of varying the normalised concentrations for beta (R(T)(-)/L(T)) and gamma (C(m)(T)/L(T)) was studied. Experimental data were fitted to theoretical curves for the dynamic response range, based on the effect of changes in the concentration of these lipophilic sensing components incorporated into the spheres, and conditions identified for maximising the response range. A complex valinomycin-K(+) formation constant, log K(IL) = 13.13 +/- 2.22, was obtained in the nBA matrix, and from the calibration curves the apparent acid-dissociation equilibrium constant (pK(a) = 12.92 +/- 0.03) was extracted for the H(+)-sensing system, and the equilibrium exchange constant (pK(exch) = 6.16 +/- 0.03, at pH 7) calculated for the K(+)-sensing nanospheres. A basis for establishing optimum performance was identified, whereby response range and response time were balanced with maximum fluorescence yield. Parameters for achieving nanospheres with a response time <5 minutes, covering 2-3 orders of magnitude change in activity were identified, demanding nanospheres with radius <300 nm and beta(crit) approximately 0.6. An RSD(%) approximately 3% was obtained in a study of the reproducibility of the response of the proposed nanospheres, and selectivity was also evaluated for a K(+)-selective nanosensor using several cations as interfering agents. In most cases, the fluorescent emission spectra showed no response to the cations tested, confirming the selectivity of nanospheres to potassium ion. The nanosensors were satisfactorily applied to the determination of K(+) in samples mimicking

  8. K+-selective nanospheres: maximising response range and minimising response time.

    PubMed

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2006-12-01

    Cross-linked K(+) ion-selective copolymer nanospheres have been prepared by free-radical photo-initiated polymerization of n-butyl acrylate (nBA) with hexanedioldiacrylate (HDDA). Nanospheres (<200 nm) containing H(+)-chromoionophore (ETH 5294) and lipophilic salt (KTClPB) for H(+)-sensors, or ETH 5294, a K(+)-selective ionophore (valinomycin) and anionic sites for K(+)-sensors were compared, and the effect of varying the normalised concentrations for beta (R(T)(-)/L(T)) and gamma (C(m)(T)/L(T)) was studied. Experimental data were fitted to theoretical curves for the dynamic response range, based on the effect of changes in the concentration of these lipophilic sensing components incorporated into the spheres, and conditions identified for maximising the response range. A complex valinomycin-K(+) formation constant, log K(IL) = 13.13 +/- 2.22, was obtained in the nBA matrix, and from the calibration curves the apparent acid-dissociation equilibrium constant (pK(a) = 12.92 +/- 0.03) was extracted for the H(+)-sensing system, and the equilibrium exchange constant (pK(exch) = 6.16 +/- 0.03, at pH 7) calculated for the K(+)-sensing nanospheres. A basis for establishing optimum performance was identified, whereby response range and response time were balanced with maximum fluorescence yield. Parameters for achieving nanospheres with a response time <5 minutes, covering 2-3 orders of magnitude change in activity were identified, demanding nanospheres with radius <300 nm and beta(crit) approximately 0.6. An RSD(%) approximately 3% was obtained in a study of the reproducibility of the response of the proposed nanospheres, and selectivity was also evaluated for a K(+)-selective nanosensor using several cations as interfering agents. In most cases, the fluorescent emission spectra showed no response to the cations tested, confirming the selectivity of nanospheres to potassium ion. The nanosensors were satisfactorily applied to the determination of K(+) in samples mimicking

  9. DT-MRI measurement of myolaminar structure: accuracy and sensitivity to time post-fixation, b-value and number of directions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stephen H; Smaill, Bruce H; Walton, Richard D; Trew, Mark L; Bernus, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    DT-MRI has been widely used to quantify myocardial fiber and laminar orientations. These structural orientations influence both the spread of excitation and the reorganization of the myocardium during contraction and are altered in disease states. Studies have sought to validate DT-MRI but questions remain about the accuracy of the method and its sensitivity to the time post-fixation and imaging parameters, including b-value, number of diffusion directions and image voxel size. The advent of high-spatial resolution ex vivo MRI and structure tensor (ST) analysis provides a means of direct validation of DT-MRI and assessment of sensitivity to the b-value, the number of diffusion directions and the image voxel size. We find that, with the fixation method we used, structure does not change with time (up to 72 hours). We show that DT-MRI and ST/HR-MRI are markedly similar measures of fiber orientation but DT-MRI and ST are much less similar measures of laminar orientation. DT-MRI performance is not sensitive to the number of directions, with similar structural orientations measured with 6 or 12 directions. Likewise, DT-MRI performance is generally insensitive to b-value, but laminar measurement is moderately more accurate at b = 500 than for higher b-values.

  10. Revealing Real-Time Emotional Responses: a Personalized Assessment based on Heartbeat Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Emotion recognition through computational modeling and analysis of physiological signals has been widely investigated in the last decade. Most of the proposed emotion recognition systems require relatively long-time series of multivariate records and do not provide accurate real-time characterizations using short-time series. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel personalized probabilistic framework able to characterize the emotional state of a subject through the analysis of heartbeat dynamics exclusively. The study includes thirty subjects presented with a set of standardized images gathered from the international affective picture system, alternating levels of arousal and valence. Due to the intrinsic nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the RR interval series, a specific point-process model was devised for instantaneous identification considering autoregressive nonlinearities up to the third-order according to the Wiener-Volterra representation, thus tracking very fast stimulus-response changes. Features from the instantaneous spectrum and bispectrum, as well as the dominant Lyapunov exponent, were extracted and considered as input features to a support vector machine for classification. Results, estimating emotions each 10 seconds, achieve an overall accuracy in recognizing four emotional states based on the circumplex model of affect of 79.29%, with 79.15% on the valence axis, and 83.55% on the arousal axis.

  11. Revealing Real-Time Emotional Responses: a Personalized Assessment based on Heartbeat Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Emotion recognition through computational modeling and analysis of physiological signals has been widely investigated in the last decade. Most of the proposed emotion recognition systems require relatively long-time series of multivariate records and do not provide accurate real-time characterizations using short-time series. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel personalized probabilistic framework able to characterize the emotional state of a subject through the analysis of heartbeat dynamics exclusively. The study includes thirty subjects presented with a set of standardized images gathered from the international affective picture system, alternating levels of arousal and valence. Due to the intrinsic nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the RR interval series, a specific point-process model was devised for instantaneous identification considering autoregressive nonlinearities up to the third-order according to the Wiener-Volterra representation, thus tracking very fast stimulus-response changes. Features from the instantaneous spectrum and bispectrum, as well as the dominant Lyapunov exponent, were extracted and considered as input features to a support vector machine for classification. Results, estimating emotions each 10 seconds, achieve an overall accuracy in recognizing four emotional states based on the circumplex model of affect of 79.29%, with 79.15% on the valence axis, and 83.55% on the arousal axis. PMID:24845973

  12. SEPARABLE RESPONSES TO ERROR, AMBIGUITY, AND REACTION TIME IN CINGULO-OPERCULAR TASK CONTROL REGIONS

    PubMed Central

    Neta, Maital; Schlaggar, Bradley L.; Petersen, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    The dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC), along with the closely affiliated anterior insula/frontal operculum have been demonstrated to show three types of task control signals across a wide variety of tasks. One of these signals, a transient signal that is thought to represent performance feedback, shows greater activity to error than correct trials. Other work has found similar effects for uncertainty/ambiguity or conflict, though some argue that dACC activity is, instead, modulated primarily by other processes more reflected in reaction time. Here, we demonstrate that, rather than a single explanation, multiple information processing operations are crucial to characterizing the function of these brain regions, by comparing operations within a single paradigm. Participants performed two tasks in an fMRI experimental session: (1) deciding whether or not visually presented word pairs rhyme, and (2) rating auditorily presented single words as abstract or concrete. A pilot was used to identify ambiguous stimuli for both tasks (e.g., word pair: BASS/GRACE; single word: CHANGE). We found greater cingulo-opercular activity for errors and ambiguous trials than clear/correct trials, with a robust effect of reaction time. The effects of error and ambiguity remained when reaction time was regressed out, although the differences decreased. Further stepwise regression of response consensus (agreement across participants for each stimulus; a proxy for ambiguity) decreased differences between ambiguous and clear trials, but left error-related differences almost completely intact. These observations suggest that trial-wise responses in cinguloopercular regions monitor multiple performance indices, including accuracy, ambiguity, and reaction time. PMID:24887509

  13. Timing of plant immune responses by a central circadian regulator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Barnaby, Jinyoung Yang; Tada, Yasuomi; Li, Hairi; Tör, Mahmut; Caldelari, Daniela; Lee, Dae-un; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Dong, Xinnian

    2011-02-01

    The principal immune mechanism against biotrophic pathogens in plants is the resistance (R)-gene-mediated defence. It was proposed to share components with the broad-spectrum basal defence machinery. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we report the identification of novel genes involved in R-gene-mediated resistance against downy mildew in Arabidopsis and their regulatory control by the circadian regulator, CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1). Numerical clustering based on phenotypes of these gene mutants revealed that programmed cell death (PCD) is the major contributor to resistance. Mutants compromised in the R-gene-mediated PCD were also defective in basal resistance, establishing an interconnection between these two distinct defence mechanisms. Surprisingly, we found that these new defence genes are under circadian control by CCA1, allowing plants to 'anticipate' infection at dawn when the pathogen normally disperses the spores and time immune responses according to the perception of different pathogenic signals upon infection. Temporal control of the defence genes by CCA1 differentiates their involvement in basal and R-gene-mediated defence. Our study has revealed a key functional link between the circadian clock and plant immunity.

  14. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    PubMed

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained.

  15. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    PubMed

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained. PMID:26481207

  16. Improving OCD time to solution using Signal Response Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Pandev, Stilian; Sanko, Dimitry; Ramanathan, Vidya; Venkataraman, Kartik; Haupt, Ronny

    2016-03-01

    In recent technology nodes, advanced process and novel integration scheme have challenged the precision limits of conventional metrology; with critical dimensions (CD) of device reduce to sub-nanometer region. Optical metrology has proved its capability to precisely detect intricate details on the complex structures, however, conventional RCWA-based (rigorous coupled wave analysis) scatterometry has the limitations of long time-to-results and lack of flexibility to adapt to wide process variations. Signal Response Metrology (SRM) is a new metrology technique targeted to alleviate the consumption of engineering and computation resources by eliminating geometric/dispersion modeling and spectral simulation from the workflow. This is achieved by directly correlating the spectra acquired from a set of wafers with known process variations encoded. In SPIE 2015, we presented the results of SRM application in lithography metrology and control [1], accomplished the mission of setting up a new measurement recipe of focus/dose monitoring in hours. This work will demonstrate our recent field exploration of SRM implementation in 20nm technology and beyond, including focus metrology for scanner control; post etch geometric profile measurement, and actual device profile metrology.

  17. Structural Equation Model Approach to the Use of Response Times for Improving Estimation in Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Rohini

    2012-01-01

    In the last five decades, research on the uses of response time has extended into the field of psychometrics (Schnikpe & Scrams, 1999; van der Linden, 2006; van der Linden, 2007), where interest has centered around the usefulness of response time information in item calibration and person measurement within an item response theory. framework.…

  18. Prognostic accuracy of cerebral blood flow measurement by perfusion computed tomography, at the time of emergency room admission, in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Max; Reichhart, Marc; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Maeder, Philippe; Chalaron, Marc; Schnyder, Pierre; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Meuli, Reto

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic accuracy of perfusion computed tomography (CT), performed at the time of emergency room admission, in acute stroke patients. Accuracy was determined by comparison of perfusion CT with delayed magnetic resonance (MR) and by monitoring the evolution of each patient's clinical condition. Twenty-two acute stroke patients underwent perfusion CT covering four contiguous 10mm slices on admission, as well as delayed MR, performed after a median interval of 3 days after emergency room admission. Eight were treated with thrombolytic agents. Infarct size on the admission perfusion CT was compared with that on the delayed diffusion-weighted (DWI)-MR, chosen as the gold standard. Delayed magnetic resonance angiography and perfusion-weighted MR were used to detect recanalization. A potential recuperation ratio, defined as PRR = penumbra size/(penumbra size + infarct size) on the admission perfusion CT, was compared with the evolution in each patient's clinical condition, defined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). In the 8 cases with arterial recanalization, the size of the cerebral infarct on the delayed DWI-MR was larger than or equal to that of the infarct on the admission perfusion CT, but smaller than or equal to that of the ischemic lesion on the admission perfusion CT; and the observed improvement in the NIHSS correlated with the PRR (correlation coefficient = 0.833). In the 14 cases with persistent arterial occlusion, infarct size on the delayed DWI-MR correlated with ischemic lesion size on the admission perfusion CT (r = 0.958). In all 22 patients, the admission NIHSS correlated with the size of the ischemic area on the admission perfusion CT (r = 0.627). Based on these findings, we conclude that perfusion CT allows the accurate prediction of the final infarct size and the evaluation of clinical prognosis for acute stroke patients at the time of emergency evaluation. It may also provide

  19. Bayesian Procedures for Identifying Aberrant Response-Time Patterns in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Guo, Fanmin

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify aberrant response-time patterns on educational and psychological tests, it is important to be able to separate the speed at which the test taker operates from the time the items require. A lognormal model for response times with this feature was used to derive a Bayesian procedure for detecting aberrant response times.…

  20. Time Evolution of Climate Response to Supervolcano Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchikov, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    A supervolcano could inject into the stratosphere enormous amount of SO2, in comparison with the recent historic eruptions, and therefore it is expected to produce strong reduction of the surface air temperature globally. However the climate response to stratospheric super-injections of sulfur-containing gases might not scale linearly with respect to the effects of moderate eruptions of the historic period. Here we find that, counter-intuitively, very large volcanic eruptions might cause climate warming, at least for a prolonged initial period after an eruption. Supervolcano eruptions like the Toba eruption 75,000 years ago have injected into the atmosphere hundreds of times more SO2 than the largest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century. The huge mass of sulfur from a Toba-size eruption could potentially produce a sulfate aerosol layer with optical depth of more than 40. However, the gas-to-particle conversion process might be effectively slowed down because SO2 and an initially formed relatively thin aerosol layer will absorb and reflect UV radiation, reducing actinic fluxes and OH production to almost zero within and below the SO2 layer. Therefore SO2 would not be quickly converted to sulfate aerosols, but would stay in the stratosphere for years. Because SO2, like ozone, is a strong greenhouse gas it would cause significant IR warming for an extended period until it will be converted to sulfate aerosols or removed. We have simulated Toba eruption using the NASA GISS ModelE, and find that coupled climate model results and available proxy data support this hypothesis.

  1. Modulation of Response Timing in ADHD, Effects of Reinforcement Valence and Magnitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luman, Marjolein; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Sergeant, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of reinforcement valence and magnitude on response timing in children with ADHD. Children were required to estimate a 1-s interval, and both the median response time (response tendency) and the intrasubject-variability (response stability) were investigated. In addition, heart rate and skin conductance…

  2. The Influence of Different Response Consequences on Children's Preference for Time-Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willoughby, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    Time-out from positive reinforcement was found to have a suppressive effect when the response alternative was reinforced with the same frequency as the punished response. When the response alternative was a response for which positive reinforcement had been withdrawn, time-out was significantly preferred. (MH)

  3. Anticipating by Pigeons Depends on Local Statistical Information in a Serial Response Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Alyson L.; Herbranson, Walter T.; Loper, Julia D.; Wood, David M.; Shimp, Charles P.

    2004-01-01

    Pigeons responded in a serial response time task patterned after that of M. J. Nissen and P. Bullemer (1987) with humans. Experiment 1 produced global facilitation: Response times in repeating lists of locations were faster than when locations were random. Response time to a spatial location was also a function of both that location's 1st- and…

  4. A frequency response analysis approach for quantitative assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tong; Chen, Cheng; Xu, WeiJie; Sanchez, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Real-time hybrid simulation is a viable and economical technique that allows researchers to observe the behavior of critical elements at full scale when an entire structure is subjected to dynamic loading. To ensure reliable experimental results, it is necessary to evaluate the actuator tracking after the test, even when sophisticated compensation methods are used to negate the detrimental effect of servo-hydraulic dynamics. Existing methods for assessment of actuator tracking are often based on time-domain analysis. This paper proposes a frequency-domain-based approach to the assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulations. To ensure the accuracy of the proposed frequency response approach, the effects of spectrum leakage are investigated as well as the length and sampling frequency requirements of the signals. Two signal pre-processing techniques (data segmentation and window transform) are also discussed and compared to improve the accuracy of the proposed approach. Finally the effectiveness of the proposed frequency-domain-based approach is demonstrated through both computational analyses and laboratory tests, including real-time tests with predefined displacement and real-time hybrid simulation.

  5. Considering Time in Orthophotography Production: from a General Workflow to a Shortened Workflow for a Faster Disaster Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, G.

    2015-08-01

    This article overall deals with production time with orthophoto imagery with medium size digital frame camera. The workflow examination follows two main parts: data acquisition and post-processing. The objectives of the research are fourfold: 1/ gathering time references for the most important steps of orthophoto production (it turned out that literature is missing on this topic); these figures are used later for total production time estimation; 2/ identifying levers for reducing orthophoto production time; 3/ building a simplified production workflow for emergency response: less exigent with accuracy and faster; and compare it to a classical workflow; 4/ providing methodical elements for the estimation of production time with a custom project. In the data acquisition part a comprehensive review lists and describes all the factors that may affect the acquisition efficiency. Using a simulation with different variables (average line length, time of the turns, flight speed) their effect on acquisition efficiency is quantitatively examined. Regarding post-processing, the time references figures were collected from the processing of a 1000 frames case study with 15 cm GSD covering a rectangular area of 447 km2; the time required to achieve each step during the production is written down. When several technical options are possible, each one is tested and time documented so as all alternatives are available. Based on a technical choice with the workflow and using the compiled time reference of the elementary steps, a total time is calculated for the post-processing of the 1000 frames. Two scenarios are compared as regards to time and accuracy. The first one follows the "normal" practices, comprising triangulation, orthorectification and advanced mosaicking methods (feature detection, seam line editing and seam applicator); the second is simplified and make compromise over positional accuracy (using direct geo-referencing) and seamlines preparation in order to achieve

  6. Limited information estimation of the diffusion-based item response theory model for responses and response times.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias; Szardenings, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Psychological tests are usually analysed with item response models. Recently, some alternative measurement models have been proposed that were derived from cognitive process models developed in experimental psychology. These models consider the responses but also the response times of the test takers. Two such models are the Q-diffusion model and the D-diffusion model. Both models can be calibrated with the diffIRT package of the R statistical environment via marginal maximum likelihood (MML) estimation. In this manuscript, an alternative approach to model calibration is proposed. The approach is based on weighted least squares estimation and parallels the standard estimation approach in structural equation modelling. Estimates are determined by minimizing the discrepancy between the observed and the implied covariance matrix. The estimator is simple to implement, consistent, and asymptotically normally distributed. Least squares estimation also provides a test of model fit by comparing the observed and implied covariance matrix. The estimator and the test of model fit are evaluated in a simulation study. Although parameter recovery is good, the estimator is less efficient than the MML estimator.

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Spatial Accuracy of a Fusion Imaging Technique Combining Previously Acquired Computed Tomography and Real-Time Ultrasound for Imaging of Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hakime, Antoine Deschamps, Frederic; Garcia Marques de Carvalho, Enio; Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; De Baere, Thierry

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the spatial accuracy of matching volumetric computed tomography (CT) data of hepatic metastases with real-time ultrasound (US) using a fusion imaging system (VNav) according to different clinical settings. Methods: Twenty-four patients with one hepatic tumor identified on enhanced CT and US were prospectively enrolled. A set of three landmarks markers was chosen on CT and US for image registration. US and CT images were then superimposed using the fusion imaging display mode. The difference in spatial location between the tumor visible on the CT and the US on the overlay images (reviewer no. 1, comment no. 2) was measured in the lateral, anterior-posterior, and vertical axis. The maximum difference (Dmax) was evaluated for different predictive factors.CT performed 1-30 days before registration versus immediately before. Use of general anesthesia for CT and US versus no anesthesia.Anatomic landmarks versus landmarks that include at least one nonanatomic structure, such as a cyst or a calcificationResultsOverall, Dmax was 11.53 {+-} 8.38 mm. Dmax was 6.55 {+-} 7.31 mm with CT performed immediately before VNav versus 17.4 {+-} 5.18 with CT performed 1-30 days before (p < 0.0001). Dmax was 7.05 {+-} 6.95 under general anesthesia and 16.81 {+-} 6.77 without anesthesia (p < 0.0015). Landmarks including at least one nonanatomic structure increase Dmax of 5.2 mm (p < 0.0001). The lowest Dmax (1.9 {+-} 1.4 mm) was obtained when CT and VNav were performed under general anesthesia, one immediately after the other. Conclusions: VNav is accurate when adequate clinical setup is carefully selected. Only under these conditions (reviewer no. 2), liver tumors not identified on US can be accurately targeted for biopsy or radiofrequency ablation using fusion imaging.

  8. Evaluation of real-time PCR assays and standard curve optimisation for enhanced accuracy in quantification of Campylobacter environmental water isolates.

    PubMed

    Gosselin-Théberge, Maxime; Taboada, Eduardo; Guy, Rebecca A

    2016-10-01

    Campylobacter is a major public health and economic burden in developed and developing countries. This study evaluated published real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for detection of Campylobacter to enable selection of the best assays for quantification of C. spp. and C. jejuni in environmental water samples. A total of 9 assays were compared: three for thermotolerant C. spp. targeting the 16S rRNA and six for C. jejuni targeting different genes. These assays were tested in the wet-lab for specificity and sensitivity against a collection of 60, genetically diverse, Campylobacter isolates from environmental water. All three qPCR assays targeting C. spp. were positive when tested against the 60 isolates, whereas, assays targeting C. jejuni differed among each other in terms of specificity and sensitivity. Three C. jejuni-specific assays that demonstrated good specificity and sensitivity when tested in the wet-lab showed concordant results with in silico-predicted results obtained against a set of 211 C. jejuni and C. coli genome sequences. Two of the assays targeting C. spp. and C. jejuni were selected to compare DNA concentration estimation, using spectrophotometry and digital PCR (dPCR), in order to calibrate standard curves (SC) for greater accuracy of qPCR-based quantification. Average differences of 0.56±0.12 and 0.51±0.11 log fold copies were observed between the spectrophotometry-based SC preparation and the dPCR preparation for C. spp. and C. jejuni, respectively, demonstrating an over-estimation of Campylobacter concentration when spectrophotometry was used to calibrate the DNA SCs. Our work showed differences in quantification of aquatic environmental isolates of Campylobacter between qPCR assays and method-specific bias in SC preparation. This study provided an objective analysis of qPCR assays targeting Campylobacter in the literature and provides a framework for evaluating novel assays. PMID:27485709

  9. MCP PMT with high time response and linear output current for neutron time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolotov, A. S.; Konovalov, P. I.; Nurtdinov, R. I.

    2016-09-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a subnanosecond time response and a high linear output current has been developed. PMT is designed for detection of weak pulses of radiation in UV-, visible and nearer-IR ranges and can be used in neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors in experiments on laser compression of thermonuclear fuel. The results of measurements of MCP PMT main parameters are presented: photocathode spectral sensitivity, gain, maximum linear output current, and time response.

  10. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in man. 1: Effect of stimulus rise-fall time and duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Squires, N.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Short latency (under 10 msec) responses elicited by bursts of white noise were recorded from the scalps of human subjects. Response alterations produced by changes in the noise burst duration (on-time), inter-burst interval (off-time), and onset and offset shapes were analyzed. The latency of the most prominent response component, wave V, was markedly delayed with increases in stimulus rise time but was unaffected by changes in fall time. Increases in stimulus duration, and therefore in loudness, resulted in a systematic increase in latency. This was probably due to response recovery processes, since the effect was eliminated with increases in stimulus off-time. The amplitude of wave V was insensitive to changes in signal rise and fall times, while increasing signal on-time produced smaller amplitude responses only for sufficiently short off-times. It was concluded that wave V of the human auditory brainstem evoked response is solely an onset response.

  11. Speed and accuracy of visual image discrimination by rats.

    PubMed

    Reinagel, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    The trade-off between speed and accuracy of sensory discrimination has most often been studied using sensory stimuli that evolve over time, such as random dot motion discrimination tasks. We previously reported that when rats perform motion discrimination, correct trials have longer reaction times than errors, accuracy increases with reaction time, and reaction time increases with stimulus ambiguity. In such experiments, new sensory information is continually presented, which could partly explain interactions between reaction time and accuracy. The present study shows that a changing physical stimulus is not essential to those findings. Freely behaving rats were trained to discriminate between two static visual images in a self-paced, two-alternative forced-choice reaction time task. Each trial was initiated by the rat, and the two images were presented simultaneously and persisted until the rat responded, with no time limit. Reaction times were longer in correct trials than in error trials, and accuracy increased with reaction time, comparable to results previously reported for rats performing motion discrimination. In the motion task, coherence has been used to vary discrimination difficulty. Here morphs between the previously learned images were used to parametrically vary the image similarity. In randomly interleaved trials, rats took more time on average to respond in trials in which they had to discriminate more similar stimuli. For both the motion and image tasks, the dependence of reaction time on ambiguity is weak, as if rats prioritized speed over accuracy. Therefore we asked whether rats can change the priority of speed and accuracy adaptively in response to a change in reward contingencies. For two rats, the penalty delay was increased from 2 to 6 s. When the penalty was longer, reaction times increased, and accuracy improved. This demonstrates that rats can flexibly adjust their behavioral strategy in response to the cost of errors.

  12. Timing and Tuning for Familiarity of Cortical Responses to Faces

    PubMed Central

    Bobes, Maria A.; Lage Castellanos, Agustin; Quiñones, Ileana; García, Lorna; Valdes-Sosa, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Different kinds of known faces activate brain areas to dissimilar degrees. However, the tuning to type of knowledge, and the temporal course of activation, of each area have not been well characterized. Here we measured, with functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activity elicited by unfamiliar, visually familiar, and personally-familiar faces. We assessed response amplitude and duration using flexible hemodynamic response functions, as well as the tuning to face type, of regions within the face processing system. Core face processing areas (occipital and fusiform face areas) responded to all types of faces with only small differences in amplitude and duration. In contrast, most areas of the extended face processing system (medial orbito-frontal, anterior and posterior cingulate) had weak responses to unfamiliar and visually-familiar faces, but were highly tuned and exhibited prolonged responses to personally-familiar faces. This indicates that the neural processing of different types of familiar faces not only differs in degree, but is probably mediated by qualitatively distinct mechanisms. PMID:24130761

  13. Timing and tuning for familiarity of cortical responses to faces.

    PubMed

    Bobes, Maria A; Lage Castellanos, Agustin; Quiñones, Ileana; García, Lorna; Valdes-Sosa, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Different kinds of known faces activate brain areas to dissimilar degrees. However, the tuning to type of knowledge, and the temporal course of activation, of each area have not been well characterized. Here we measured, with functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activity elicited by unfamiliar, visually familiar, and personally-familiar faces. We assessed response amplitude and duration using flexible hemodynamic response functions, as well as the tuning to face type, of regions within the face processing system. Core face processing areas (occipital and fusiform face areas) responded to all types of faces with only small differences in amplitude and duration. In contrast, most areas of the extended face processing system (medial orbito-frontal, anterior and posterior cingulate) had weak responses to unfamiliar and visually-familiar faces, but were highly tuned and exhibited prolonged responses to personally-familiar faces. This indicates that the neural processing of different types of familiar faces not only differs in degree, but is probably mediated by qualitatively distinct mechanisms.

  14. Leveraging First Response Time into the Knowledge Tracing Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yutao; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    The field of educational data mining has been using the Knowledge Tracing model, which only look at the correctness of student first response, for tracking student knowledge. Recently, lots of other features are studied to extend the Knowledge Tracing model to better model student knowledge. The goal of this paper is to analyze whether or not the…

  15. Motherhood and drug-dependency: the attributes of full-time versus part-time responsibility for child care.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M R; Berry, G L

    1994-10-01

    This study examined differences between the maternal characteristics of African-American drug-dependent mothers who have full-time responsibility for child care and those having part-time responsibility. The study revealed that full-time mothers have significantly higher levels of maternal adaptation than part-time mothers. For part-time mothers, the level of maternal adaptation or self-esteem did not fluctuate, regardless of whether she saw the child 4 days a week or once a month. The article identifies variables that may facilitate better maternal behaviors among drug-dependent mothers.

  16. Utilizing Response Time Distributions for Item Selection in CAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Zhewen; Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for item selection in computerized adaptive testing only focus on item information without taking into consideration the time required to answer an item. As a result, some examinees may receive a set of items that take a very long time to finish, and information is not accrued as efficiently as possible. The authors propose two…

  17. Online versus offline: The Web as a medium for response time data collection.

    PubMed

    Chetverikov, Andrey; Upravitelev, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    The Internet provides a convenient environment for data collection in psychology. Modern Web programming languages, such as JavaScript or Flash (ActionScript), facilitate complex experiments without the necessity of experimenter presence. Yet there is always a question of how much noise is added due to the differences between the setups used by participants and whether it is compensated for by increased ecological validity and larger sample sizes. This is especially a problem for experiments that measure response times (RTs), because they are more sensitive (and hence more susceptible to noise) than, for example, choices per se. We used a simple visual search task with different set sizes to compare laboratory performance with Web performance. The results suggest that although the locations (means) of RT distributions are different, other distribution parameters are not. Furthermore, the effect of experiment setting does not depend on set size, suggesting that task difficulty is not important in the choice of a data collection method. We also collected an additional online sample to investigate the effects of hardware and software diversity on the accuracy of RT data. We found that the high diversity of browsers, operating systems, and CPU performance may have a detrimental effect, though it can partly be compensated for by increased sample sizes and trial numbers. In sum, the findings show that Web-based experiments are an acceptable source of RT data, comparable to a common keyboard-based setup in the laboratory. PMID:26170056

  18. Online versus offline: The Web as a medium for response time data collection.

    PubMed

    Chetverikov, Andrey; Upravitelev, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    The Internet provides a convenient environment for data collection in psychology. Modern Web programming languages, such as JavaScript or Flash (ActionScript), facilitate complex experiments without the necessity of experimenter presence. Yet there is always a question of how much noise is added due to the differences between the setups used by participants and whether it is compensated for by increased ecological validity and larger sample sizes. This is especially a problem for experiments that measure response times (RTs), because they are more sensitive (and hence more susceptible to noise) than, for example, choices per se. We used a simple visual search task with different set sizes to compare laboratory performance with Web performance. The results suggest that although the locations (means) of RT distributions are different, other distribution parameters are not. Furthermore, the effect of experiment setting does not depend on set size, suggesting that task difficulty is not important in the choice of a data collection method. We also collected an additional online sample to investigate the effects of hardware and software diversity on the accuracy of RT data. We found that the high diversity of browsers, operating systems, and CPU performance may have a detrimental effect, though it can partly be compensated for by increased sample sizes and trial numbers. In sum, the findings show that Web-based experiments are an acceptable source of RT data, comparable to a common keyboard-based setup in the laboratory.

  19. Real-time earthquake monitoring: Early warning and rapid response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A panel was established to investigate the subject of real-time earthquake monitoring (RTEM) and suggest recommendations on the feasibility of using a real-time earthquake warning system to mitigate earthquake damage in regions of the United States. The findings of the investigation and the related recommendations are described in this report. A brief review of existing real-time seismic systems is presented with particular emphasis given to the current California seismic networks. Specific applications of a real-time monitoring system are discussed along with issues related to system deployment and technical feasibility. In addition, several non-technical considerations are addressed including cost-benefit analysis, public perceptions, safety, and liability.

  20. High Accuracy Fuel Flowmeter, Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, C.; Rose, L.; Chan, A.; Chin, B.; Gregory, W.

    1983-01-01

    Technology related to aircraft fuel mass - flowmeters was reviewed to determine what flowmeter types could provide 0.25%-of-point accuracy over a 50 to one range in flowrates. Three types were selected and were further analyzed to determine what problem areas prevented them from meeting the high accuracy requirement, and what the further development needs were for each. A dual-turbine volumetric flowmeter with densi-viscometer and microprocessor compensation was selected for its relative simplicity and fast response time. An angular momentum type with a motor-driven, spring-restrained turbine and viscosity shroud was selected for its direct mass-flow output. This concept also employed a turbine for fast response and a microcomputer for accurate viscosity compensation. The third concept employed a vortex precession volumetric flowmeter and was selected for its unobtrusive design. Like the turbine flowmeter, it uses a densi-viscometer and microprocessor for density correction and accurate viscosity compensation.

  1. The Impact of Item Format and Examinee Characteristics on Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Brian J.; Johnston, Mary M.; Lipner, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Current research on examination response time has focused on tests comprised of traditional multiple-choice items. Consequently, the impact of other innovative or complex item formats on examinee response time is not understood. The present study used multilevel growth modeling to investigate examinee characteristics associated with response time…

  2. Using Response Time to Detect Item Preknowledge in Computer-Based Licensure Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Hong; Staniewska, Dorota; Reckase, Mark; Woo, Ada

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of how to detect item preknowledge using item response time data in two computer-based large-scale licensure examinations. Item preknowledge is indicated by an unexpected short response time and a correct response. Two samples were used for detecting item preknowledge for each examination. The first sample was from…

  3. Children with autism spectrum disorders show abnormal conditioned response timing on delay, but not trace, eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Oristaglio, J; Hyman West, S; Ghaffari, M; Lech, M S; Verma, B R; Harvey, J A; Welsh, J P; Malone, R P

    2013-09-17

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and age-matched typically-developing (TD) peers were tested on two forms of eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a Pavlovian associative learning paradigm where subjects learn to execute an appropriately-timed eyeblink in response to a previously neutral conditioning stimulus (CS). One version of the task, trace EBC, interposes a stimulus-free interval between the presentation of the CS and the unconditioned stimulus (US), a puff of air to the eye which causes the subjects to blink. In delay EBC, the CS overlaps in time with the delivery of the US, usually with both stimuli terminating simultaneously. ASD children performed normally during trace EBC, exhibiting no differences from TD subjects with regard to the learning rate or the timing of the conditioned response. However, when subsequently tested on delay EBC, subjects with ASD displayed abnormally-timed conditioned eye blinks that began earlier and peaked sooner than those of TD subjects, consistent with previous findings. The results suggest an impaired ability of children with ASD to properly time conditioned eye blinks which appears to be specific to delay EBC. We suggest that this deficit may reflect a dysfunction of the cerebellar cortex in which increases in the intensity or duration of sensory input can temporarily disrupt the accuracy of motor timing over short temporal intervals.

  4. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in man. 1: Effect of stimulus rise-fall time and duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Squires, N.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Short latency (under 10 msec) evoked responses elicited by bursts of white noise were recorded from the scalp of human subjects. Response alterations produced by changes in the noise burst duration (on-time) inter-burst interval (off-time), and onset and offset shapes are reported and evaluated. The latency of the most prominent response component, wave V, was markedly delayed with increases in stimulus rise-time but was unaffected by changes in fall-time. The amplitude of wave V was insensitive to changes in signal rise-and-fall times, while increasing signal on-time produced smaller amplitude responses only for sufficiently short off-times. It is concluded that wave V of the human auditory brainstem evoked response is solely an onset response.

  5. Harnessing data structure for recovery of randomly missing structural vibration responses time history: Sparse representation versus low-rank structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongchao; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Randomly missing data of structural vibration responses time history often occurs in structural dynamics and health monitoring. For example, structural vibration responses are often corrupted by outliers or erroneous measurements due to sensor malfunction; in wireless sensing platforms, data loss during wireless communication is a common issue. Besides, to alleviate the wireless data sampling or communication burden, certain accounts of data are often discarded during sampling or before transmission. In these and other applications, recovery of the randomly missing structural vibration responses from the available, incomplete data, is essential for system identification and structural health monitoring; it is an ill-posed inverse problem, however. This paper explicitly harnesses the data structure itself-of the structural vibration responses-to address this (inverse) problem. What is relevant is an empirical, but often practically true, observation, that is, typically there are only few modes active in the structural vibration responses; hence a sparse representation (in frequency domain) of the single-channel data vector, or, a low-rank structure (by singular value decomposition) of the multi-channel data matrix. Exploiting such prior knowledge of data structure (intra-channel sparse or inter-channel low-rank), the new theories of ℓ1-minimization sparse recovery and nuclear-norm-minimization low-rank matrix completion enable recovery of the randomly missing or corrupted structural vibration response data. The performance of these two alternatives, in terms of recovery accuracy and computational time under different data missing rates, is investigated on a few structural vibration response data sets-the seismic responses of the super high-rise Canton Tower and the structural health monitoring accelerations of a real large-scale cable-stayed bridge. Encouraging results are obtained and the applicability and limitation of the presented methods are discussed.

  6. Change in response time of stroke patients and controls during rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Korner-Bitensky, N; Mayo, N E; Kaizer, F

    1990-02-01

    In this study we investigated motor response times of stroke patients at admission to a rehabilitation hospital and again after 6 wk of hospitalization. A prospective comparative study was carried out on 164 stroke patients; 48 hospitalized patients served as controls. Mean motor response times to visual stimuli presented in the left and right visual fields and to centrally presented stimuli were studied. The principle finding was that stroke patients improved significantly in their response times from initial to final evaluation. While at initial assessment they performed significantly more slowly than controls, by final assessment the response times of the two groups did not differ. Visual hemineglect influenced change in response time differentially depending on side of lesion: right hemisphere lesion patients with neglect improved, whereas left hemisphere lesion patients with neglect actually deteriorated. The presence of depression influenced right hemisphere lesion patients' response times and change in response times but it did not have any influence for left hemisphere lesion patients. The findings that response time generally improved during rehabilitation has important implications for the treatment of individuals with brain injury. It will be important to identify therapeutic practices which will be effective in the remediation of response time for all patients. Ultimately the goal of intervening in slow response time is to improve performance of functional activities which are influenced by an individual's ability to respond to visual stimuli.

  7. Digital angiographic impulse response analysis of regional myocardial perfusion: linearity, reproducibility, accuracy, and comparison with conventional indicator dilution curve parameters in phantom and canine models.

    PubMed

    Eigler, N L; Pfaff, J M; Zeiher, A; Whiting, J S; Forrester, J S

    1989-05-01

    The system mean transit time (Tsys) of the impulse response function describing contrast material transit through the coronary circulation was determined from serial digital angiographic images. The linearity, reproducibility, and relations with regional myocardial perfusion and conventional time-density curve parameters, time to peak concentration (TPC), and exponential washout rate (k) were assessed in a dynamic flow x-ray phantom (n = 46) and in six open-chest dogs (n = 102) while coronary flow was altered by stenosis and/or hyperemic stimuli. In the phantom studies, the inverse of the system mean transit time (Tsys-1) closely predicted flow/volume (r = 0.99, slope = 0.99). In dogs, Tsys-1 was independent of the shape of the contrast bolus injection (single or double-peaked), class of contrast agent (ionic or nonionic), the type of hyperemic stimulus (dipyridamole, dipyridamole plus norepinephrine, transient total occlusion, or ionic contrast media), and was highly reproducible between adjacent myocardial regions served by the same artery (r = 0.98 +/- 0.01). There was a strong correlation between Tsys-1 and regional coronary flow for stenotic and/or hyperemic vessels (r = 0.94, distribution volume = 14.9 ml/100 g) over a wide range (0-514 ml/min/100 g). Tsys-1 performed better than conventional time-density curve parameters TPC-1 and k for predicting phantom flow/volume ratios and regional myocardial blood flow in the dog. These data suggest that both digital coronary angiography and coronary contrast transit can be modeled as linear systems and that impulse response analysis may provide accurate and reproducible estimates of regional myocardial blood flow.

  8. Accuracy of the electron transport in mcnp5 and its suitability for ionization chamber response simulations: A comparison with the egsnrc and penelope codes

    SciTech Connect

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Siiskonen, Teemu; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Hippelaeinen, Eero; Savolainen, Sauli

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, accuracy of the mcnp5 code in the electron transport calculations and its suitability for ionization chamber (IC) response simulations in photon beams are studied in comparison to egsnrc and penelope codes. Methods: The electron transport is studied by comparing the depth dose distributions in a water phantom subdivided into thin layers using incident energies (0.05, 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV) for the broad parallel electron beams. The IC response simulations are studied in water phantom in three dosimetric gas materials (air, argon, and methane based tissue equivalent gas) for photon beams ({sup 60}Co source, 6 MV linear medical accelerator, and mono-energetic 2 MeV photon source). Two optional electron transport models of mcnp5 are evaluated: the ITS-based electron energy indexing (mcnp5{sub ITS}) and the new detailed electron energy-loss straggling logic (mcnp5{sub new}). The electron substep length (ESTEP parameter) dependency in mcnp5 is investigated as well. Results: For the electron beam studies, large discrepancies (>3%) are observed between the mcnp5 dose distributions and the reference codes at 1 MeV and lower energies. The discrepancy is especially notable for 0.1 and 0.05 MeV electron beams. The boundary crossing artifacts, which are well known for the mcnp5{sub ITS}, are observed for the mcnp5{sub new} only at 0.1 and 0.05 MeV beam energies. If the excessive boundary crossing is eliminated by using single scoring cells, the mcnp5{sub ITS} provides dose distributions that agree better with the reference codes than mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5 dose estimates for the gas cavity agree within 1% with the reference codes, if the mcnp5{sub ITS} is applied or electron substep length is set adequately for the gas in the cavity using the mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5{sub new} results are found highly dependent on the chosen electron substep length and might lead up to 15% underestimation of the absorbed dose. Conclusions: Since the mcnp5 electron

  9. 5 CFR 1820.4 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... simple and more complex requests based on the amount of work and/or time needed to process the request..., or that the requester faces an imminent deadline for filing with, the Merit Systems Protection Board... knowledge and belief, explaining in detail the basis for requesting expedited processing. For example,...

  10. Physiological Evidence for Response Inhibition in Choice Reaction Time Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burle, Boris; Vidal, Frank; Tandonnet, Christophe; Hasbroucq, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    Inhibition is a widely used notion proposed to account for data obtained in choice reaction time (RT) tasks. However, this concept is weakly supported by empirical facts. In this paper, we review a series of experiments using Hoffman reflex, transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography to study inhibition in choice RT tasks. We…

  11. 4 CFR 201.7 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 201.7 Timing of... disclosed in part shall be marked or annotated to show the amount of information deleted unless doing so would harm an interest protected by an applicable exemption. The location of the information...

  12. Quantized response times are a signature of a neuronal bottleneck in decision

    PubMed Central

    Perona, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The histograms of response times of optimal YES/NO decisions that are computed from a single sensory Poisson neuron are highly structured. In particular, response times in NO decisions are quantized to a small set of times, while response times in YES decisions have a multimodal structure. Both the times of NO decisions, as well as the modes of the the histogram of YES decisions, are associated to the number of action potentials that were necessary to reach the decision. Their value is a function of the firing rate of the neuron in response to the states of the stimulus. PMID:24782750

  13. Meteorological data assimilation for real-time emergency response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, G.; Chan, S.T.

    1996-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. Diverse data assimilation techniques are required to meet the needs of a new generation of ARAC models and to take advantage of the rapidly expanding availability of meteorological data. We are developing a hierarchy of algorithms to provide gridded meteorological fields which can be used to drive dispersion codes or to provide initial fields for mesoscale models. Data to be processed include winds, temperature, moisture, and turbulence.

  14. Time-Dependent Response Versus Scan Angle for MODIS Reflective Solar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, Amit; Chen, Hongda; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu

    2014-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments currently operate onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA's) Terra and Aqua spacecraft, launched on December 18, 1999 and May 4, 2002, respectively. MODIS has 36 spectral bands, among which 20 are reflective solar bands (RSBs) covering a spectral range from 0.412 to 2.13 µm. The RSBs are calibrated on orbit using a solar diffuser (SD) and an SD stability monitor and with additional measurements from lunar observations via a space view (SV) port. Selected pseudo-invariant desert sites are also used to track the RSB on-orbit gain change, particularly for short-wavelength bands. MODIS views the Earth surface, SV, and the onboard calibrators using a two-sided scan mirror. The response versus scan angle (RVS) of the scan mirror was characterized prior to launch, and its changes are tracked using observations made at different angles of incidence from onboard SD, lunar, and Earth view (EV) measurements. These observations show that the optical properties of the scan mirror have experienced large wavelength-dependent degradation in both the visible and near infrared spectral regions. Algorithms have been developed to track the on-orbit RVS change using the calibrators and the selected desert sites. These algorithms have been applied to both Terra and Aqua MODIS Level 1B (L1B) to improve the EV data accuracy since L1B Collection 4, refined in Collection 5, and further improved in the latest Collection 6 (C6). In C6, two approaches have been used to derive the time-dependent RVS for MODIS RSB. The first approach relies on data collected from sensor onboard calibrators and mirror side ratios from EV observations. The second approach uses onboard calibrators and EV response trending from selected desert sites. This approach is mainly used for the bands with much larger changes in their time-dependent RVS, such as the Terra MODIS bands 1-4, 8, and 9 and the Aqua MODIS bands 8- and 9

  15. Time-domain solution for transient dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuanming; Liu, Hanlong; Chu, Jian; Cheng, Ke

    2015-06-01

    The propagation of stress waves in a large-diameter pipe pile for low strain dynamic testing cannot be explained properly by traditional 1D wave theories. A new computational model is established to obtain a wave equation that can describe the dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile to a transient point load during a low strain integrity test. An analytical solution in the time domain is deduced using the separation of variables and variation of constant methods. The validity of this new solution is verified by an existing analytical solution under free boundary conditions. The results of this time domain solution are also compared with the results of a frequency domain solution and field test data. The comparisons indicate that the new solution agrees well with the results of previous solutions. Parametric studies using the new solution with reference to a case study are also carried out. The results show that the mode number affects the accuracy of the dynamic response. A mode number greater than 10 is required to enable the calculated dynamic responses to be independent of the mode number. The dynamic response is also greatly affected by soil properties. The larger the side resistance, the smaller the displacement response and the smaller the reflected velocity wave crest. The displacement increases as the stress waves propagate along the pile when the pile shaft is free. The incident waves of displacement and velocity responses of the pile are not the same among different points in the circumferential direction on the pile top. However, the arrival time and peak value of the pile tip reflected waves are almost the same among different points on the pile top.

  16. A hybrid model for improving response time in distributed data mining.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Shonali; Loke, Seng W; Zaslasvky, Arkady

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents a hybrid distributed data mining (DDM) model for optimization of response time. The model combines a mobile agent approach with client server strategies to reduce the overall response time. The hybrid model proposes and develops accurate a priori estimates of the computation and communication components of response time as the costing strategy to support optimization. Experimental evaluation of the hybrid model is presented. PMID:15619946

  17. A hybrid model for improving response time in distributed data mining.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Shonali; Loke, Seng W; Zaslasvky, Arkady

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents a hybrid distributed data mining (DDM) model for optimization of response time. The model combines a mobile agent approach with client server strategies to reduce the overall response time. The hybrid model proposes and develops accurate a priori estimates of the computation and communication components of response time as the costing strategy to support optimization. Experimental evaluation of the hybrid model is presented.

  18. Do Young and Old Preschoolers Exhibit Response Bias Due to Different Mechanisms? Investigating Children's Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that younger preschoolers exhibit a yes bias due to underdeveloped cognitive abilities, whereas older preschoolers exhibit a response bias due to other factors. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the response latency to yes-no questions pertaining to familiar and unfamiliar objects in 3- to 6-year-olds. The…

  19. Abrupt rise of new machine ecology beyond human response time

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Neil; Zhao, Guannan; Hunsader, Eric; Qi, Hong; Johnson, Nicholas; Meng, Jing; Tivnan, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Society's techno-social systems are becoming ever faster and more computer-orientated. However, far from simply generating faster versions of existing behaviour, we show that this speed-up can generate a new behavioural regime as humans lose the ability to intervene in real time. Analyzing millisecond-scale data for the world's largest and most powerful techno-social system, the global financial market, we uncover an abrupt transition to a new all-machine phase characterized by large numbers of subsecond extreme events. The proliferation of these subsecond events shows an intriguing correlation with the onset of the system-wide financial collapse in 2008. Our findings are consistent with an emerging ecology of competitive machines featuring ‘crowds' of predatory algorithms, and highlight the need for a new scientific theory of subsecond financial phenomena. PMID:24022120

  20. An FPGA-based frequency response analyzer for multisine and stepped sine measurements on stationary and time-varying impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, B.; Fernandez, X.; Reig, S.; Bragos, R.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based frequency response analyzer (FRA) for impedance frequency response function (FRF) measurements using periodic excitations, i.e. sine waves and multisines. The stepped sine measurement uses two dedicated hardware-built digital embedded multiplier blocks to extract the phase and quadrature components of the output signal. The multisine FRF measurements compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the input/output signals. In this paper, we describe its design, implementation and performance evaluation, performing electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements on phantoms. The stepped sine accuracy is 1.21% at 1 kΩ (1%), the precision is 35 mΩ and the total harmonic distortion plus noise (THD+N) is -120 dB. As for the multisine impedance FRF measurements, the magnitude and phase precision are, respectively, 0.23 Ω at 48.828 kHz and 0.021 deg at 8.087 MHz when measuring a resistor 505 Ω (1%). The magnitude accuracy is 0.55% at 8.087 MHz while the phase accuracy is 0.17 deg at 6.54 MHz. In all, the stepped sine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 84 dB and 65 dB at frequencies below and above 1 MHz respectively. The SNR for the multisine FRF measurements is above 65 dB (30 kHz-10 MHz). The FRA bandwidth is 610.4 mHz-12.5 MHz and the maximum FRF measurement rate exciting with multisines starting at 30 kHz is 200 spectra s-1. Based on its technical specifications and versatility, the FRA presented can be used in many applications, e.g. for getting insight quickly into the instantaneous impedance FRF of the time-varying impedance under test.

  1. Process dissociation, cognitive architecture, and response time: comments on Lindsay and Jacoby (1994)

    PubMed

    Hillstrom, A P; Logan, G D

    1997-10-01

    Process dissociation is based on 2 assumptions about the processes being dissociated: invariance of the processes across situations, and stochastic independence of the processes. In a recent application of process dissociation to the Stroop task (D. S. Lindsay & L. L. Jacoby, 1994), both of those assumptions were violated. It is argued that these violations were due to (a) an oversimplification of the processing architecture that ignores common stages such as guessing and response selection, (b) an assumption that the more automatic process (word reading) dominates over the intended process (color naming) in determining responses, and (c) an assumption that switching from the more common speeded response instruction (measuring speed) to a deadline response instruction (measuring accuracy) does not change processing. General implications for applying process dissociation to dynamic tasks are discussed.

  2. Determinants of timing and amplitude in the plant general stress response.

    PubMed

    Bjornson, Marta; Dandekar, Abhaya; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-02-01

    Plants have evolved intricate signaling cascades to rapidly and effectively respond to biotic and abiotic challenges. The precise timing of these responses enables optimal resource reallocation to maintain the balance between stress adaptation and growth. Thus, an in-depth understanding of the immediate and long-term mechanisms regulating resource allocation is critical in deciphering how plants withstand environmental challenges. To date however, understanding of this tradeoff has focused on the amplitude of long-term responses, rather than the timing of rapid stress responses. This review presents current knowledge on kinetics of secondary messengers involved in regulation of rapid and general stress responses, followed by rapid stress responsive transduction machinery, and finally the transcriptional response of a functional general stress responsive cis-element. Within this context we discuss the role of timing of initial peak activation and later oscillating peak responses, and explore hormonal and stress signaling crosstalk confounding greater understanding of these cascades.

  3. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status.

    PubMed

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L

    2013-05-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but "blocking out time" and "time shifting" suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  4. Where the ocean influences the impulse response and its effect on synchronous changes of acoustic travel time.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, John L

    2011-12-01

    In 1983, sounds at 133 Hz, 0.06 s resolution were transmitted in the Pacific for five days at 2 min intervals over 3709 km between bottom-mounted instruments maintained with atomic clocks. In 1989, a technique was developed to measure changes in acoustic travel time with an accuracy of 135 microseconds at 2 min intervals for selected windows of travel time within the impulse response. The data have short-lived 1 to 10 ms oscillations of travel time with periods less than a few days. Excluding tidal effects, different windows exhibited significant synchronized changes in travel time for periods shorter than 10 h. In the 1980s, this phenomenon was not understood because internal waves have correlation lengths of a few kilometers which are smaller than the way sound was thought to sample the ocean along well-separated and distinct rays corresponding to different windows. The paradox's resolution comes from modern theories that replace the ray-picture with finite wavelength representations that predict sound can be influenced in the upper ocean over horizontal scales such as 20 km or more. Thus, different windows are influenced by the same short-scale fluctuations of sound speed. This conclusion is supported by the data and numerical simulations of the impulse response.

  5. Stable measures of number sense accuracy in math learning disability: Is it time to proceed from basic science to clinical application?

    PubMed

    Júlio-Costa, Annelise; Starling-Alves, Isabella; Lopes-Silva, Júlia Beatriz; Wood, Guilherme; Haase, Vitor Geraldi

    2015-12-01

    Math learning disability (MLD) or developmental dyscalculia is a highly prevalent and persistent difficulty in learning arithmetic that may be explained by different cognitive mechanisms. The accuracy of the number sense has been implicated by some evidence as a core deficit in MLD. However, research on this topic has been mainly conducted in demographically selected samples, using arbitrary cut-off scores to characterize MLD. The clinical relevance of the association between number sense and MLD remains to be investigated. In this study, we aimed at assessing the stability of a number sense accuracy measure (w) across five experimental sessions, in two clinically defined cases of MLD. Stable measures of number sense accuracy estimate are required to clinically characterize subtypes of MLD and to make theoretical inferences regarding the underlying cognitive mechanisms. G. A. was a 10-year-old boy with MLD in the context of dyslexia and phonological processing impairment and his performance remained steadily in the typical scores range. The performance of H. V., a 9-year-old girl with MLD associated with number sense inaccuracy, remained consistently impaired across measurements, with a nonsignificant tendency to worsen. Qualitatively, H. V.'s performance was also characterized by greater variability across sessions. Concomitant clinical observations suggested that H. V.'s difficulties could be aggravated by developing symptoms of mathematics anxiety. Results in these two cases are in line with the hypotheses that at least two reliable patterns of cognitive impairment may underlie math learning difficulties in MLD, one related to number sense inaccuracy and the other to phonological processing impairment. Additionally, it indicates the need for more translational research in order to examine the usefulness and validity of theoretical advances in numerical cognition to the clinical neuropsychological practice with MLD. PMID:26459122

  6. Stable measures of number sense accuracy in math learning disability: Is it time to proceed from basic science to clinical application?

    PubMed

    Júlio-Costa, Annelise; Starling-Alves, Isabella; Lopes-Silva, Júlia Beatriz; Wood, Guilherme; Haase, Vitor Geraldi

    2015-12-01

    Math learning disability (MLD) or developmental dyscalculia is a highly prevalent and persistent difficulty in learning arithmetic that may be explained by different cognitive mechanisms. The accuracy of the number sense has been implicated by some evidence as a core deficit in MLD. However, research on this topic has been mainly conducted in demographically selected samples, using arbitrary cut-off scores to characterize MLD. The clinical relevance of the association between number sense and MLD remains to be investigated. In this study, we aimed at assessing the stability of a number sense accuracy measure (w) across five experimental sessions, in two clinically defined cases of MLD. Stable measures of number sense accuracy estimate are required to clinically characterize subtypes of MLD and to make theoretical inferences regarding the underlying cognitive mechanisms. G. A. was a 10-year-old boy with MLD in the context of dyslexia and phonological processing impairment and his performance remained steadily in the typical scores range. The performance of H. V., a 9-year-old girl with MLD associated with number sense inaccuracy, remained consistently impaired across measurements, with a nonsignificant tendency to worsen. Qualitatively, H. V.'s performance was also characterized by greater variability across sessions. Concomitant clinical observations suggested that H. V.'s difficulties could be aggravated by developing symptoms of mathematics anxiety. Results in these two cases are in line with the hypotheses that at least two reliable patterns of cognitive impairment may underlie math learning difficulties in MLD, one related to number sense inaccuracy and the other to phonological processing impairment. Additionally, it indicates the need for more translational research in order to examine the usefulness and validity of theoretical advances in numerical cognition to the clinical neuropsychological practice with MLD.

  7. Time delays between core power production and external detector response from Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1996-08-01

    One primary concern for design of safety systems for reactors is the time response of external detectors to changes in the core. This paper describes a way to estimate the time delay between the core power production and the external detector response using Monte Carlo calculations and suggests a technique to measure the time delay. The Monte Carlo code KENO-NR was used to determine the time delay between the core power production and the external detector response for a conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. The Monte Carlo estimated time delay was determined to be about 10 ms for this conceptual design of the ANS reactor.

  8. Diagnosis Accuracy of Mean Arterial Pressure Variation during a Lung Recruitment Maneuver to Predict Fluid Responsiveness in Thoracic Surgery with One-Lung Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Woon-Seok; Oh, Chung-Sik; Park, Chulmin; Shin, Bo Mi; Yoon, Tae-Gyoon; Rhee, Ka-Young; Woo, Nam-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lung recruitment maneuver (LRM) during thoracic surgery can reduce systemic venous return and resulting drop in systemic blood pressure depends on the patient's fluid status. We hypothesized that changes in systemic blood pressure during the transition in LRM from one-lung ventilation (OLV) to two-lung ventilation (TLV) may provide an index to predict fluid responsiveness. Methods. Hemodynamic parameters were measured before LRM (T0); after LRM at the time of the lowest mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) (T1) and at 3 minutes (T2); before fluid administration (T3); and 5 minutes after ending it (T4). If the stroke volume index increased by >25% following 10 mL/kg colloid administration for 30 minutes, then the patients were assigned to responder group. Results. Changes in MAP, central venous pressure (CVP), and stroke volume variation (SVV) between T0 and T1 were significantly larger in responders. Areas under the curve for change in MAP, CVP, and SVV were 0.852, 0.759, and 0.820, respectively; the optimal threshold values for distinguishment of responders were 9.5 mmHg, 0.5 mmHg, and 3.5%, respectively. Conclusions. The change in the MAP associated with LRM at the OLV to TLV conversion appears to be a useful indicator of fluid responsiveness after thoracic surgery. Trial Registration. This trial is registered at Clinical Research Information Service with KCT0000774.

  9. 40 CFR 91.314 - Analyzer accuracy and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 91.314 Section 91.314 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Provisions § 91.314 Analyzer accuracy and specifications. (a) Measurement accuracy—general. The analyzers... precision is defined as 2.5 times the standard deviation(s) of 10 repetitive responses to a...

  10. 40 CFR 91.314 - Analyzer accuracy and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 91.314 Section 91.314 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Provisions § 91.314 Analyzer accuracy and specifications. (a) Measurement accuracy—general. The analyzers... precision is defined as 2.5 times the standard deviation(s) of 10 repetitive responses to a...

  11. Effects of time response on the point spread function of a scanning radiometer.

    PubMed

    Smith, G L

    1994-10-20

    Scanning radiometers on satellites have a finite response time, because of the detector and the associated electronics. The radiometer measurement as it scans over a point source of radiation of unit strength is the point spread function (PSF). The time response causes a widening and skewing of the PSF. The PSF of a scanning radiometer that has well-focused optics together with time responses for the detector and electronic filter is treated in the time domain. The PSF can be expressed in terms of the system time response to a step input. For a first-order system time response, the displacement of the centroid is the product of the system time constant and the scan rate of the radiometer. The electronic filter further displaces the centroid of the PSF by the product of the scan rate and the filter time constant. Also, the width of the PSF in the scan direction will be increased because of the system time response. The minimum resolvable feature is of the order of the width of the PSF, thus the system time response limits the resolution in the scan direction that can be obtained. The analysis is illustrated by applying it to the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System experiment scanning radiometer.

  12. Fabrication of a Porous Fiber Cladding Material Using Microsphere Templating for Improved Response Time with Fiber Optic Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Paul E.; Rigo, M. Veronica; Geissinger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A highly porous optical-fiber cladding was developed for evanescent-wave fiber sensors, which contains sensor molecules, maintains guiding conditions in the optical fiber, and is suitable for sensing in aqueous environments. To make the cladding material (a poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) polymer) highly porous, a microsphere templating strategy was employed. The resulting pore network increases transport of the target analyte to the sensor molecules located in the cladding, which improves the sensor response time. This was demonstrated using fluorescein-based pH sensor molecules, which were covalently attached to the cladding material. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the structure of the templated polymer and the large network of interconnected pores. Fluorescence measurements showed a tenfold improvement in the response time for the templated polymer and a reliable pH response over a pH range of five to nine with an estimated accuracy of 0.08 pH units. PMID:22654644

  13. A Response to an Article Published in "Educational Research"'s Special Issue on Assessment (June 2009). What Can Be Inferred about Classification Accuracy from Classification Consistency?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramley, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Background: A recent article published in "Educational Research" on the reliability of results in National Curriculum testing in England (Newton, "The reliability of results from national curriculum testing in England," "Educational Research" 51, no. 2: 181-212, 2009) suggested that: (1) classification accuracy can be calculated from…

  14. Children with autism spectrum disorders show abnormal conditioned response timing on delay, but not trace, eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Oristaglio, Jeff; West, Susan Hyman; Ghaffari, Manely; Lech, Melissa S.; Verma, Beeta R.; Harvey, John A.; Welsh, John P.; Malone, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and age-matched typically-developing (TD) peers were tested on two forms of eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a Pavlovian associative learning paradigm where subjects learn to execute an appropriately-timed eyeblink in response to a previously neutral conditioning stimulus (CS). One version of the task, trace EBC, interposes a stimulus-free interval between the presentation of the CS and the unconditioned stimulus (US), a puff of air to the eye which causes subjects to blink. In delay EBC, the CS overlaps in time with the delivery of the US, usually with both stimuli terminating simultaneously. ASD children performed normally during trace EBC, exhibiting no differences from typically-developing (TD) subjects with regard to learning rate or the timing of the CR. However, when subsequently tested on delay EBC, subjects with ASD displayed abnormally-timed conditioned eye blinks that began earlier and peaked sooner than those of TD subjects, consistent with previous findings. The results suggest an impaired ability of children with ASD to properly time conditioned eye blinks which appears to be specific to delay EBC. We suggest that this deficit may reflect a dysfunction of cerebellar cortex in which increases in the intensity or duration of sensory input can temporarily disrupt the accuracy of motor timing over short temporal intervals. PMID:23769889

  15. 75 FR 79961 - Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater Horizon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon SONSat the FOSC's request. 75 FR 37712. The rule also confirmed that...; 2050-AG63 Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater.... Oil Spill Response Resources Return Time Several comments noted concerns about the return of assets...

  16. Setting the Response Time Threshold Parameter to Differentiate Solution Behavior from Rapid-Guessing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Xiaojing J.; Wise, Steven L.; Bhola, Dennison S.

    2007-01-01

    This study compared four methods for setting item response time thresholds to differentiate rapid-guessing behavior from solution behavior. Thresholds were either (a) common for all test items, (b) based on item surface features such as the amount of reading required, (c) based on visually inspecting response time frequency distributions, or (d)…

  17. A Mixture Proportional Hazards Model with Random Effects for Response Times in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a new model for test response times is proposed that combines latent class analysis and the proportional hazards model with random effects in a similar vein as the mixture factor model. The model assumes the existence of different latent classes. In each latent class, the response times are distributed according to a…

  18. The Simplest Complete Model of Choice Response Time: Linear Ballistic Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    We propose a linear ballistic accumulator (LBA) model of decision making and reaction time. The LBA is simpler than other models of choice response time, with independent accumulators that race towards a common response threshold. Activity in the accumulators increases in a linear and deterministic manner. The simplicity of the model allows…

  19. First passage time: Connecting random walks to functional responses in heterogeneous environments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. A.; McKenzie, H.; Merrill, E.

    2010-12-01

    In this talk I will outline first passage time analysis for animals undertaking complex movement patterns, and will demonstrate how first passage time can be used to derive functional responses in predator prey systems. The result is a new approach to understanding type III functional responses based on a random walk model. I will extend the analysis to heterogeneous environments to assess the effects of linear features on functional responses in wolves and elk using GPS tracking data.

  20. The accuracy with which the 5 times sit-to-stand test, versus gait speed, can identify poor exercise tolerance in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Llamazares-Herrán, Eduardo; de Oliveira-Sousa, Silvana Loana; Sánchez-Martinez, Mª Piedad; Escolar-Reina, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Identifying those patients who underperform in the 6-minute walk test (6MWT <350 m), and the reasons for their poor performance, is a major concern in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To explore the accuracy and relevance of the 4-m gait-speed (4MGS) test, and the 5-repetition sit-to-stand (5STS) test, as diagnostic markers, and clinical determinants, of poor performance in the 6MWT. We recruited 137 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to participate in our cross-sectional study. Patients completed the 4MGS and 5STS tests, with quantitative (in seconds) and qualitative ordinal data collected; the latter were categorized using a scale of 0 to 4. The following potential covariates and clinical determinants of poor 6MWT were collated: age, quadriceps muscle-strength (QMS), health status, dyspnea, depression, and airflow limitation. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve data (AUC) was used to assess accuracy, with logistic regression used to explore relevance as clinical determinants. The AUCs generated using the 4MGS and 5STS tests were comparable, at 0.719 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.629–0.809) and 0.711 (95% CI 0.613–0.809), respectively. With ordinal data, the 5STS test was most accurate (AUC of 0.732; 95% CI 0.645–0.819); the 4MGS test showed poor discriminatory power (AUC <0.7), although accuracy improved (0.726, 95% CI 0.637–0.816) when covariates were included. Unlike the 4MGS test, the 5STS test provided a significant clinical determinant of a poor 6MWT (odds ratio 1.23, 95% CI 1.05–1.44). The 5STS test reliably predicts a poor 6MWT, especially when using ordinal data. Used alone, the 4MGS test is reliable when measured with continuous data. PMID:27583918

  1. Emotional Responses during Reading: Physiological Responses Predict Real-Time Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Samantha G.; Willett, John B.; Fischer, Kurt W.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between emotional responses and reading performance in middle-school students. Although a large number of prior studies have investigated the relationship between emotion and reading, those studies have concentrated primarily on relatively static and distal measures of emotion. In this research, we measured…

  2. Response Times for Correct and Incorrect Item Responses on Computerized Adaptive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Shu-Ren; Plake, Barbara S.; Ferdous, Abdullah A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the time different ability level examinees spend taking a CAT on demanding items to these examinees. It was also found that high able examinees spend more time on the pretest items, which are not tailored to the examinees' ability level, than do lower ability examinees. Higher able examinees showed persistence with test…

  3. Performing dynamic time history analyses by extension of the response spectrum method

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate the dynamic time history response of finite element models using results from response spectrum analyses. The proposed ''modified'' time history method does not represent a new mathematical approach to dynamic analysis but suggests a more efficient ordering of the analytical equations and procedures. The modified time history method is considerably faster and less expensive to use than normal time history methods. This paper presents the theory and implementation of the modified time history approach along with comparisons of the modified and normal time history methods for a prototypic seismic piping design problem.

  4. The evaluation of time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Nasiripour, Amir Ashkan; Fakhri, Mahmood; Bakhtiari, Ahad; Azari, Samad; Akbarzadeh, Arash; Goli, Ali; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2014-09-28

    This study evaluated the time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah. This study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study 500 cases of patients from Shahrivar (September) 2012 to the end of Shahrivar (September) 2013 were selected and studied by the non-probability quota method. The measuring tool included a preset cases record sheet and sampling method was completing the cases record sheet by referring to the patients' cases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test, benchmark Eta (Eta), Games-Howell post hoc test). The results showed that the interval mean between receiving the mission to reaching the scene, between reaching the scene to moving from the scene, and between moving from the scene to a health center was 7.28, 16.73 and 7.28 minutes. The overall mean of time performance from the scene to the health center was 11.34 minutes. Any intervention in order to speed up service delivery, reduce response times, ambulance equipment and facilities required for accuracy, validity and reliability of the data recorded in the emergency dispatch department, Continuing Education of ambulance staffs, the use of manpower with higher specialize levels such as nurses, supply the job satisfaction, and increase the coordination with other departments that are somehow involved in this process can provide the ground for reducing the loss and disability resulting from traffic accidents.

  5. Effect of prolonged bedrest and plus Gz acceleration on peripheral visual response time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Peripheral visual response time changes during +G sub z acceleration following fourteen days of bedrest are considered as well as what effect prolonged bedrest has upon this response. Eighteen test lights, placed 10 deg are apart along the horizontal meridian of the subject's field of view, were presented in a random sequence. The subject was instructed to press a button as soon as a light appeared. Response time testing occurred periodically during bedrest and continuously during centrifugation testing. The results indicate that: (1) mean response time is significantly longer to stimuli imaged in the far periphery than to stimuli imaged closer to the line of sight; (2) mean response time at each stimulus position tends to be longer at plateau g than during the preacceleration baseline period; (3) mean response time tends to lengthen as the g level is increased; (4) peripheral visual response time during +G sub x acceleration at 2, 3.2, and 3.8 g was not a reliable advanced indicator that blackout was going to occur; and (5) the subject's field of view collapsed rapidly just before blackout. Bedrest data showed that the distribution of response times to stimuli imaged across the subject's horizontal retinal meridian remained remarkably constant from day to day during both the bedrest and recovery periods.

  6. Psychophysics in a Web browser? Comparing response times collected with JavaScript and Psychophysics Toolbox in a visual search task.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Joshua R; Motz, Benjamin A

    2016-03-01

    Behavioral researchers are increasingly using Web-based software such as JavaScript to conduct response time experiments. Although there has been some research on the accuracy and reliability of response time measurements collected using JavaScript, it remains unclear how well this method performs relative to standard laboratory software in psychologically relevant experimental manipulations. Here we present results from a visual search experiment in which we measured response time distributions with both Psychophysics Toolbox (PTB) and JavaScript. We developed a methodology that allowed us to simultaneously run the visual search experiment with both systems, interleaving trials between two independent computers, thus minimizing the effects of factors other than the experimental software. The response times measured by JavaScript were approximately 25 ms longer than those measured by PTB. However, we found no reliable difference in the variability of the distributions related to the software, and both software packages were equally sensitive to changes in the response times as a result of the experimental manipulations. We concluded that JavaScript is a suitable tool for measuring response times in behavioral research. PMID:25761390

  7. Psychophysics in a Web browser? Comparing response times collected with JavaScript and Psychophysics Toolbox in a visual search task.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Joshua R; Motz, Benjamin A

    2016-03-01

    Behavioral researchers are increasingly using Web-based software such as JavaScript to conduct response time experiments. Although there has been some research on the accuracy and reliability of response time measurements collected using JavaScript, it remains unclear how well this method performs relative to standard laboratory software in psychologically relevant experimental manipulations. Here we present results from a visual search experiment in which we measured response time distributions with both Psychophysics Toolbox (PTB) and JavaScript. We developed a methodology that allowed us to simultaneously run the visual search experiment with both systems, interleaving trials between two independent computers, thus minimizing the effects of factors other than the experimental software. The response times measured by JavaScript were approximately 25 ms longer than those measured by PTB. However, we found no reliable difference in the variability of the distributions related to the software, and both software packages were equally sensitive to changes in the response times as a result of the experimental manipulations. We concluded that JavaScript is a suitable tool for measuring response times in behavioral research.

  8. The Largest Response Component in the Motor Cortex Reflects Movement Timing but Not Movement Type

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Ryu, Stephen I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neural activity in monkey motor cortex (M1) and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) can reflect a chosen movement well before that movement begins. The pattern of neural activity then changes profoundly just before movement onset. We considered the prediction, derived from formal considerations, that the transition from preparation to movement might be accompanied by a large overall change in the neural state that reflects when movement is made rather than which movement is made. Specifically, we examined “components” of the population response: time-varying patterns of activity from which each neuron’s response is approximately composed. Amid the response complexity of individual M1 and PMd neurons, we identified robust response components that were “condition-invariant”: their magnitude and time course were nearly identical regardless of reach direction or path. These condition-invariant response components occupied dimensions orthogonal to those occupied by the “tuned” response components. The largest condition-invariant component was much larger than any of the tuned components; i.e., it explained more of the structure in individual-neuron responses. This condition-invariant response component underwent a rapid change before movement onset. The timing of that change predicted most of the trial-by-trial variance in reaction time. Thus, although individual M1 and PMd neurons essentially always reflected which movement was made, the largest component of the population response reflected movement timing rather than movement type. PMID:27761519

  9. Accuracy of the centenarian numbers in Okinawa and the role of the Okinawan diet on longevity: responses to Le Bourg about the article "Exploring the impact of climate on human longevity".

    PubMed

    Robine, Jean-Marie; Herrmann, François R; Arai, Yasumichi; Willcox, D Craig; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Makoto; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2013-08-01

    This response letter addresses two points raised by le Bourg when discussing our previous paper entitled "Exploring the impact of climate on human longevity". First, the arguments explaining the accuracy of the numbers of centenarian in Okinawa are developed, and second the composition and healthfulness of the traditional Okinawan diet are described as well as the changes in dietary pattern and their impact on longevity.

  10. A new method for measuring the response time of the high pressure ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentao; Shen, Yixiong; An, Jigang

    2012-08-01

    Time response is an important performance characteristic for gas-pressurized ionization chambers. To study the time response, it is especially crucial to measure the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. In this paper, a new approach is proposed to study the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. It is carried out with a short-pulsed X-ray source and a high-speed digitizer. The ion drift time in the chamber is then determined from the digitized data. By measuring the ion drift time of a 15 atm xenon testing chamber, the method has been proven to be effective in the time response studies of ionization chambers.

  11. Detector response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry at high pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulcicek, Erol E.; Boyle, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Dead time effects in chevron configured dual microchannel plates (MCPs) are investigated. Response times are determined experimentally for one chevron-configured dual MCP-type detector and two discrete dynode-type electron multipliers with 16 and 23 resistively divided stages. All of these detectors are found to be suitable for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), yielding 3-6-ns (FWHM) response times triggered on a single ion pulse. It is concluded that, unless there are viable solutions to overcome dead time disadvantages for continuous dynode detectors, suitable discrete dynode detectors for TOF MS appear to have a significant advantage for high repetition rate operation.

  12. Voice reaction times with recognition for Commodore computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Putney, R. Thompson

    1990-01-01

    Hardware and software modifications are presented that allow for collection and recognition by a Commodore computer of spoken responses. Responses are timed with millisecond accuracy and automatically analyzed and scored. Accuracy data for this device from several experiments are presented. Potential applications and suggestions for improving recognition accuracy are also discussed.

  13. Estimating Testing Time: The Effects of Item Characteristics on Response Latency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkitis, Perry N.; And Others

    The relationship between test item characteristics and testing time was studied for a computer-administered licensing examination. One objective of the study was to develop a model to predict testing time on the basis of known item characteristics. Response latencies (i.e., the amount of time taken by examinees to read, review, and answer items)…

  14. Effects of Arm Ergometry Exercise on the Reaction, Movement and Response Times of the Lower Extremities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Richard G.

    A study determined the effects of fatigue produced in the upper extremities on the reaction time, movement time, and response time of the lower extremities in 30 male subjects, 19-25 years old. Each subject participated in a 10 trial practice session one day prior to the experiment and immediately preceding the pre-test. The pre-test consisted of…

  15. Nonlinear response to a click in a time-domain model of the mammalian ear.

    PubMed

    Meaud, Julien; Lemons, Charlsie

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a state-space implementation of a previously developed frequency-domain model of the cochlea is coupled to a lumped parameter model of the middle ear. After validation of the time-domain model by comparison of its steady-state response to results obtained with a frequency-domain formulation, the nonlinear response of the cochlea to clicks is investigated. As observed experimentally, a compressive nonlinearity progressively develops within the first few cycles of the response of the basilar membrane (BM). Furthermore, a time-frequency analysis shows that the instantaneous frequency of the BM response to a click progressively approaches the characteristic frequency. This phenomenon, called glide, is predicted at all stimulus intensities, as in experiments. In typical experiments with sensitive animals, the click response is characterized by a long ringing and the response envelope includes several lobes. In order to achieve similar results, inhomogeneities are introduced in the cochlear model. Simulations demonstrate the strong link between characteristics of the frequency response, such as dispersion and frequency-dependent nonlinearity, and characteristics of the time-domain response, such as the glide and a time-dependent nonlinearity. The progressive buildup of cochlear nonlinearity in response to a click is shown to be a consequence of the glide and of frequency-dependent nonlinearity.

  16. Quantification and classification of neuronal responses in kernel-smoothed peristimulus time histograms.

    PubMed

    Hill, Michael R H; Fried, Itzhak; Koch, Christof

    2015-02-15

    Peristimulus time histograms are a widespread form of visualizing neuronal responses. Kernel convolution methods transform these histograms into a smooth, continuous probability density function. This provides an improved estimate of a neuron's actual response envelope. We here develop a classifier, called the h-coefficient, to determine whether time-locked fluctuations in the firing rate of a neuron should be classified as a response or as random noise. Unlike previous approaches, the h-coefficient takes advantage of the more precise response envelope estimation provided by the kernel convolution method. The h-coefficient quantizes the smoothed response envelope and calculates the probability of a response of a given shape to occur by chance. We tested the efficacy of the h-coefficient in a large data set of Monte Carlo simulated smoothed peristimulus time histograms with varying response amplitudes, response durations, trial numbers, and baseline firing rates. Across all these conditions, the h-coefficient significantly outperformed more classical classifiers, with a mean false alarm rate of 0.004 and a mean hit rate of 0.494. We also tested the h-coefficient's performance in a set of neuronal responses recorded in humans. The algorithm behind the h-coefficient provides various opportunities for further adaptation and the flexibility to target specific parameters in a given data set. Our findings confirm that the h-coefficient can provide a conservative and powerful tool for the analysis of peristimulus time histograms with great potential for future development. PMID:25475352

  17. Relative Accuracy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  18. The response time of the Changjiang plume to river discharge in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Rui; Wu, Hui; Zhu, Jianrong; Li, Lu

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model was used to study the response time of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River plume to river discharge by artificially increasing the runoff over a short period and investigating the variation of salinity in the plume region. The time lagged between the change of river discharge and the change of salinity that reaches the 10% of the adjusted value is considered as the response time in this study. The response times in the plume region differed slightly when the river discharge during the spring tide and the neap tide was increased. Specifically, the response times near the river mouth and in the plume edge were ~ 1 days and more than 15 days, respectively. The brackish water volumes were also calculated to determine the variations in the plume extensions over time. A tracer was released to study the transport time from the Datong station to the East China Sea using the concept of water age. The tracer transport time ranged from 10 days near the river mouth to more than 50 days at the edge of the plume, which is much longer than the response time of the surface salinity.

  19. 49 CFR 234.103 - Timely response to report of malfunction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION PLANS... Highway-Rail Grade Crossings § 234.103 Timely response to report of malfunction. (a) Upon receipt of...

  20. 49 CFR 234.103 - Timely response to report of malfunction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION PLANS... Highway-Rail Grade Crossings § 234.103 Timely response to report of malfunction. (a) Upon receipt of...