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Sample records for accuracy sensitivity specificity

  1. Indium-111 white blood cell scans: Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and normal patterns of distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Guze, B.H.; Webber, M.M.; Hawkins, R.A.; Sinha, K.

    1990-01-01

    The UCLA Hospital experience with indium-111 labeled white blood cells was reviewed. There were a total of 345 consecutive cases covering a broad range of clinical indications. The overall sensitivity of the method was 79%, specificity was 62%, and accuracy was 73%. The sensitivity for suspected osteomyelitis cases was 84%, with a specificity of 65% and an accuracy of 75%. For other cases sensitivity was 77%, specificity was 60%, and accuracy was 72%. Furthermore, patterns of normal distribution were reviewed.

  2. Accuracy, Precision, Sensitivity, and Specificity of Noninvasive ICP Absolute Value Measurements.

    PubMed

    Krakauskaite, Solventa; Petkus, Vytautas; Bartusis, Laimonas; Zakelis, Rolandas; Chomskis, Romanas; Preiksaitis, Aidanas; Ragauskas, Arminas; Matijosaitis, Vaidas; Petrikonis, Kestutis; Rastenyte, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    An innovative absolute intracranial pressure (ICP) value measurement method has been validated by multicenter comparative clinical studies. The method is based on two-depth transcranial Doppler (TCD) technology and uses intracranial and extracranial segments of the ophthalmic artery as pressure sensors. The ophthalmic artery is used as a natural pair of "scales" that compares ICP with controlled pressure Pe, which is externally applied to the orbit. To balance the scales, ICP = Pe a special two-depth TCD device was used as a pressure balance indicator. The proposed method is the only noninvasive ICP measurement method that does not need patient-specific calibration. PMID:27165929

  3. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  4. Data mining methods in the prediction of Dementia: A real-data comparison of the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, neural networks, support vector machines, classification trees and random forests

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dementia and cognitive impairment associated with aging are a major medical and social concern. Neuropsychological testing is a key element in the diagnostic procedures of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), but has presently a limited value in the prediction of progression to dementia. We advance the hypothesis that newer statistical classification methods derived from data mining and machine learning methods like Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines and Random Forests can improve accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of predictions obtained from neuropsychological testing. Seven non parametric classifiers derived from data mining methods (Multilayer Perceptrons Neural Networks, Radial Basis Function Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, CART, CHAID and QUEST Classification Trees and Random Forests) were compared to three traditional classifiers (Linear Discriminant Analysis, Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Logistic Regression) in terms of overall classification accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, Area under the ROC curve and Press'Q. Model predictors were 10 neuropsychological tests currently used in the diagnosis of dementia. Statistical distributions of classification parameters obtained from a 5-fold cross-validation were compared using the Friedman's nonparametric test. Results Press' Q test showed that all classifiers performed better than chance alone (p < 0.05). Support Vector Machines showed the larger overall classification accuracy (Median (Me) = 0.76) an area under the ROC (Me = 0.90). However this method showed high specificity (Me = 1.0) but low sensitivity (Me = 0.3). Random Forest ranked second in overall accuracy (Me = 0.73) with high area under the ROC (Me = 0.73) specificity (Me = 0.73) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). Linear Discriminant Analysis also showed acceptable overall accuracy (Me = 0.66), with acceptable area under the ROC (Me = 0.72) specificity (Me = 0.66) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). The remaining classifiers showed

  5. Prostate-specific antigen testing accuracy in community practice

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Richard M; Gilliland, Frank D; Adams-Cameron, Meg; Hunt, William C; Key, Charles R

    2002-01-01

    Background Most data on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing come from urologic cohorts comprised of volunteers for screening programs. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of PSA testing for detecting prostate cancer in community practice. Methods PSA testing results were compared with a reference standard of prostate biopsy. Subjects were 2,620 men 40 years and older undergoing (PSA) testing and biopsy from 1/1/95 through 12/31/98 in the Albuquerque, New Mexico metropolitan area. Diagnostic measures included the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. Results Cancer was detected in 930 subjects (35%). The area under the ROC curve was 0.67 and the PSA cutpoint of 4 ng/ml had a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 33%. The likelihood ratio for a positive test (LR+) was 1.28 and 0.42 for a negative test (LR-). PSA testing was most sensitive (90%) but least specific (27%) in older men. Age-specific reference ranges improved specificity in older men (49%) but decreased sensitivity (70%), with an LR+ of 1.38. Lowering the PSA cutpoint to 2 ng/ml resulted in a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 20%, and an LR+ of 1.19. Conclusions PSA testing had fair discriminating power for detecting prostate cancer in community practice. The PSA cutpoint of 4 ng/ml was sensitive but relatively non-specific and associated likelihood ratios only moderately revised probabilities for cancer. Using age-specific reference ranges and a PSA cutpoint below 4 ng/ml improved test specificity and sensitivity, respectively, but did not improve the overall accuracy of PSA testing. PMID:12398793

  6. Accuracy of differential sensitivity for one-dimensional shock problems

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, R.J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Rightley, M.L.

    1998-07-01

    The technique called Differential Sensitivity has been applied to the system of Eulerian continuum mechanics equations solved by a hydrocode. Differential Sensitivity uses forward and adjoint techniques to obtain output response sensitivity to input parameters. Previous papers have described application of the technique to two-dimensional, multi-component problems. Inaccuracies in the adjoint solutions have prompted us to examine our numerical techniques in more detail. Here we examine one-dimensional, one material shock problems. Solution accuracy is assessed by comparison to sensitivities obtained by automatic differentiation and a code-based adjoint differentiation technique. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. 40 CFR 91.305 - Dynamometer specifications and calibration accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specifications. (1) The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of engine speed and torque... accuracy. (1) The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of engine torque and...

  8. 40 CFR 91.305 - Dynamometer specifications and calibration accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specifications. (1) The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of engine speed and torque... accuracy. (1) The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of engine torque and...

  9. 40 CFR 91.305 - Dynamometer specifications and calibration accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specifications. (1) The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of engine speed and torque... accuracy. (1) The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of engine torque and...

  10. 40 CFR 91.305 - Dynamometer specifications and calibration accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specifications. (1) The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of engine speed and torque... accuracy. (1) The dynamometer test stand and other instruments for measurement of engine torque and...

  11. Sensitivity and accuracy of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.; Lussier, S.; Norberg-King, T.; Poucher, S.; Thursby, G.

    1995-12-31

    Direct measurement of effluent toxicity is a critical tool in controlling ambient toxicity. Lack of water quality criteria for many commonly discharged chemicals and complicated toxicological interactions in complex effluents are common. Complex effluent toxicity tests should provide limits as protective as National Criteria for single chemicals. One way to evaluate WET test sensitivity and accuracy is to compare WET test results with single chemicals to the National Criteria for these chemicals. A study of eight criteria chemicals (ammonia, analine, cadmium, carbaryl, copper, lead, methyl parathion, and zinc), two freshwater WET tests (Pimephales and Ceriodaphnia), and four marine WET tests (Arbacia, Champia, Menidia, and Mysidopsis) was conducted to provide this comparison. The most sensitive of the freshwater and marine WET tests with each chemical were generally less protective than the National Final Chronic Value (FCV) concentration by factors ranging from 1.09 to 44. Less-sensitive WET tests with each chemical represented significant underestimation of chronic toxicity by factors often in the range of 100--10,000. In two instances WET test results (copper and Champia, zinc and Ceriodaphnia) were below FCV by factors of 1.85 and 3.4, respectively. It is recognized that Champia is extremely sensitive to copper and that Daphnids may not be protected by the current National zinc criterion, thus these results are not surprising. Adequate accuracy for WET tests usually requires that the most sensitive WET-test species by utilized. Although the bias of WET tests to underestimate chronic toxicity is relatively small, it should be considered in the selection of test endpoints and application of WET data.

  12. Methods in Use for Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Evaluation, and Target Accuracy Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; G. Aliberti

    2007-10-01

    Sensitivity coefficients can be used for different objectives like uncertainty estimates, design optimization, determination of target accuracy requirements, adjustment of input parameters, and evaluations of the representativity of an experiment with respect to a reference design configuration. In this paper the theory, based on the adjoint approach, that is implemented in the ERANOS fast reactor code system is presented along with some unique tools and features related to specific types of problems as is the case for nuclide transmutation, reactivity loss during the cycle, decay heat, neutron source associated to fuel fabrication, and experiment representativity.

  13. Accuracy of critical-temperature sensitivity coefficients predicted by multilayered composite plate theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Burton, Scott

    1992-01-01

    An assessment is made of the accuracy of the critical-temperature sensitivity coefficients of multilayered plates predicted by different modeling approaches, based on two-dimensional shear-deformation theories. The sensitivity coefficients considered measure the sensitivity of the critical temperatures to variations in different lamination and material parameters of the plate. The standard of comparison is taken to be the sensitivity coefficients obtained by the three-dimensional theory of thermoelasticity. Numerical studies are presented showing the effects of variation in the geometric and lamination parameters of the plate on the accuracy of both the sensitivity coefficients and the critical temperatures predicted by the different modeling approaches.

  14. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  15. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-21

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation. PMID:26531324

  16. Analysis and improvement of accuracy, sensitivity, and resolution of the coherent gradient sensing method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuelin; Zhang, Changxing; Feng, Xue; Duan, Zhiyin

    2016-06-10

    The coherent gradient sensing (CGS) method, one kind of shear interferometry sensitive to surface slope, has been applied to full-field curvature measuring for decades. However, its accuracy, sensitivity, and resolution have not been studied clearly. In this paper, we analyze the accuracy, sensitivity, and resolution for the CGS method based on the derivation of its working principle. The results show that the sensitivity is related to the grating pitch and distance, and the accuracy and resolution are determined by the wavelength of the laser beam and the diameter of the reflected beam. The sensitivity is proportional to the ratio of grating distance to its pitch, while the accuracy will decline as this ratio increases. In addition, we demonstrate that using phase gratings as the shearing element can improve the interferogram and enhance accuracy, sensitivity, and resolution. The curvature of a spherical reflector is measured by CGS with Ronchi gratings and phase gratings under different experimental parameters to illustrate this analysis. All of the results are quite helpful for CGS applications. PMID:27409035

  17. Sensitivity and accuracy analysis of CT image in PRISM autocontouring using confusion matrix and ROC/AUC curve methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunisa, Regina; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    The research was conducted to evaluate and analyze the results of the CT image autocontouring Prism TPS using confusion matrix and ROC methods. This study begins by treating thoracic CT images using a grayscale format TPS Prism software. Autocontouring done in the area of spinal cord and right lung with appropriate parameter settings window. The average value of the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for 23 slices of spinal cord are 0.93, 0.99, and 0.99. For two slices of the right lung, average value of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 2 slices were 0.99, 0.99, and 0.99. These values are classified as `Excellent'.

  18. Accuracy of Patient Specific Cutting Blocks in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Naeder; Kühnel, Stefanie P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Long-term survival of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is mainly determined by optimal positioning of the components and prosthesis alignment. Implant positioning can be optimized by computer assisted surgery (CAS). Patient specific cutting blocks (PSCB) seem to have the potential to improve component alignment compared to the conventional technique and to be comparable to CAS. Methods. 113 knees were selected for PSI and included in this study. Pre- and postoperative mechanical axis, represented by the hip-knee-angle (HKA), the proximal tibial angle (PTA), the distal femoral angle (DFA), and the tibial slope (TS) were measured and the deviation from expected ideal values was calculated. Results. With a margin of error of ±3°, success rates were 81.4% for HKA, 92.0% for TPA, and 94.7% for DFA. With the margin of error for alignments extended to ±4°, we obtained a success rate of 92.9% for the HKA, 98.2% for the PTA, and 99.1% for the DFA. The TS showed postoperative results of 2.86 ± 2.02° (mean change 1.76 ± 2.85°). Conclusion. PSCBs for TKA seem to restore the overall leg alignment. Our data suggest that each individual component can be implanted accurately and the results are comparable to the ones in CAS. PMID:25254210

  19. Odor-Specific Loss of Smell Sensitivity with Age as Revealed by the Specific Sensitivity Test.

    PubMed

    Seow, Yi-Xin; Ong, Peter K C; Huang, Dejian

    2016-07-01

    The perception of odor mixtures plays an important role in human food intake, behavior, and emotions. Decline of smell acuity with normal aging could impact food perception and preferences at various ages. However, since the landmark Smell Survey by National Geographic, little has been elucidated on differences in the onset and extent of loss in olfactory sensitivity toward single odorants. Here, using the Specific Sensitivity test, we show the onset and extent of loss in both identification and detection thresholds of odorants with age are odorant-specific. Subjects of Chinese descent in Singapore (186 women, 95 men), aged 21-80 years, were assessed for olfactory sensitivity of 10 odorants from various odor groups. Notably, subjects in their 70s required 179 times concentration of rose-like odorant (2-phenylethanol) than subjects in the 20s, while thresholds for onion-like 2-methyloxolane-3-thiol only differed by 3 times between the age groups. In addition, identification rate for 2-phenylethanol was negatively correlated with age throughout adult life whereas mushroom-like oct-1-en-3-ol was equally identified by subjects across all ages. Our results demonstrated the girth of differentiated olfactory loss due to normal ageing, which potentially affect overall perception and preferences of odor mixtures with age. PMID:27001718

  20. Variola Virus-Specific Diagnostic Assays: Characterization, Sensitivity, and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kondas, Ashley V.; Olson, Victoria A.; Li, Yu; Abel, Jason; Laker, Miriam; Rose, Laura; Wilkins, Kimberly; Turner, Jonathan; Kline, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A public health response relies upon rapid and reliable confirmation of disease by diagnostic assays. Here, we detail the design and validation of two variola virus-specific real-time PCR assays, since previous assays cross-reacted with newly identified cowpox viruses. The assay specificity must continually be reassessed as other closely related viruses are identified. PMID:25673790

  1. Enhancing detection sensitivity and accuracy on “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” through next generation sequencing technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” is associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease). Detection of this unculturable bacterium exclusively depends on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Appropriate primer design is key to assure detection sensitivity and accuracy, which depend on qua...

  2. Sensitivity of grass and alfalfa reference evapotranspiration to weather station sensor accuracy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the relative effects of measurement errors in climate data input parameters on the accuracy of calculated reference crop evapotranspiration (ET) using the ASCE-EWRI Standardized Reference ET Equation. Data for the period of 1991 to 2008 from an autom...

  3. Decoding Accuracy in Supplementary Motor Cortex Correlates with Perceptual Sensitivity to Tactile Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junsuk; Chung, Yoon Gi; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Wallraven, Christian; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual sensitivity to tactile roughness varies across individuals for the same degree of roughness. A number of neurophysiological studies have investigated the neural substrates of tactile roughness perception, but the neural processing underlying the strong individual differences in perceptual roughness sensitivity remains unknown. In this study, we explored the human brain activation patterns associated with the behavioral discriminability of surface texture roughness using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). First, a whole-brain searchlight multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) was used to find brain regions from which we could decode roughness information. The searchlight MVPA revealed four brain regions showing significant decoding results: the supplementary motor area (SMA), contralateral postcentral gyrus (S1), and superior portion of the bilateral temporal pole (STP). Next, we evaluated the behavioral roughness discrimination sensitivity of each individual using the just-noticeable difference (JND) and correlated this with the decoding accuracy in each of the four regions. We found that only the SMA showed a significant correlation between neuronal decoding accuracy and JND across individuals; Participants with a smaller JND (i.e., better discrimination ability) exhibited higher decoding accuracy from their voxel response patterns in the SMA. Our findings suggest that multivariate voxel response patterns presented in the SMA represent individual perceptual sensitivity to tactile roughness and people with greater perceptual sensitivity to tactile roughness are likely to have more distinct neural representations of different roughness levels in their SMA. PMID:26067832

  4. Risk sensitivity in a motor task with speed-accuracy trade-off

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Daniel A.; Wolpert, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    When a racing driver steers a car around a sharp bend, there is a trade-off between speed and accuracy, in that high speed can lead to a skid whereas a low speed increases lap time, both of which can adversely affect the driver's payoff function. While speed-accuracy trade-offs have been studied extensively, their susceptibility to risk sensitivity is much less understood, since most theories of motor control are risk neutral with respect to payoff, i.e., they only consider mean payoffs and ignore payoff variability. Here we investigate how individual risk attitudes impact a motor task that involves such a speed-accuracy trade-off. We designed an experiment where a target had to be hit and the reward (given in points) increased as a function of both subjects' endpoint accuracy and endpoint velocity. As faster movements lead to poorer endpoint accuracy, the variance of the reward increased for higher velocities. We tested subjects on two reward conditions that had the same mean reward but differed in the variance of the reward. A risk-neutral account predicts that subjects should only maximize the mean reward and hence perform identically in the two conditions. In contrast, we found that some (risk-averse) subjects chose to move with lower velocities and other (risk-seeking) subjects with higher velocities in the condition with higher reward variance (risk). This behavior is suboptimal with regard to maximizing the mean number of points but is in accordance with a risk-sensitive account of movement selection. Our study suggests that individual risk sensitivity is an important factor in motor tasks with speed-accuracy trade-offs. PMID:21430284

  5. Risk sensitivity in a motor task with speed-accuracy trade-off.

    PubMed

    Nagengast, Arne J; Braun, Daniel A; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2011-06-01

    When a racing driver steers a car around a sharp bend, there is a trade-off between speed and accuracy, in that high speed can lead to a skid whereas a low speed increases lap time, both of which can adversely affect the driver's payoff function. While speed-accuracy trade-offs have been studied extensively, their susceptibility to risk sensitivity is much less understood, since most theories of motor control are risk neutral with respect to payoff, i.e., they only consider mean payoffs and ignore payoff variability. Here we investigate how individual risk attitudes impact a motor task that involves such a speed-accuracy trade-off. We designed an experiment where a target had to be hit and the reward (given in points) increased as a function of both subjects' endpoint accuracy and endpoint velocity. As faster movements lead to poorer endpoint accuracy, the variance of the reward increased for higher velocities. We tested subjects on two reward conditions that had the same mean reward but differed in the variance of the reward. A risk-neutral account predicts that subjects should only maximize the mean reward and hence perform identically in the two conditions. In contrast, we found that some (risk-averse) subjects chose to move with lower velocities and other (risk-seeking) subjects with higher velocities in the condition with higher reward variance (risk). This behavior is suboptimal with regard to maximizing the mean number of points but is in accordance with a risk-sensitive account of movement selection. Our study suggests that individual risk sensitivity is an important factor in motor tasks with speed-accuracy trade-offs. PMID:21430284

  6. Accuracy of the domain method for the material derivative approach to shape design sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, R. J.; Botkin, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical accuracy for the boundary and domain methods of the material derivative approach to shape design sensitivities is investigated through the use of mesh refinement. The results show that the domain method is generally more accurate than the boundary method, using the finite element technique. It is also shown that the domain method is equivalent, under certain assumptions, to the implicit differentiation approach not only theoretically but also numerically.

  7. The devil is in the specificity: the negative effect of prediction specificity on prediction accuracy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Song-Oh; Suk, Kwanho; Goo, Jin Kyung; Lee, Jiheon; Lee, Seon Min

    2013-07-01

    In the research reported here, we proposed and demonstrated the prediction-specificity effect, which states that people's prediction of the general outcome of an event (e.g., the winner of a soccer match) is less accurate when the prediction question is framed in a more specific manner (e.g., guessing the score) rather than in a less specific manner (e.g., guessing the winner). We demonstrated this effect by examining people's predictions on actual sports games both in field and laboratory studies. In Study 1, the analysis of 19 billion bets from a commercial sports-betting business provided evidence for the effect of prediction specificity. This effect was replicated in three controlled laboratory studies, in which participants predicted the outcomes of a series of soccer matches. Furthermore, the negative effect of prediction specificity was mediated by participants' underweighting of important holistic information during decision making. PMID:23660410

  8. Effects of domain-specific exercise load on speed and accuracy of a domain-specific perceptual-cognitive task.

    PubMed

    Schapschröer, M; Baker, J; Schorer, J

    2016-08-01

    In the context of perceptual-cognitive expertise it is important to know whether physiological loads influence perceptual-cognitive performance. This study examined whether a handball specific physical exercise load influenced participants' speed and accuracy in a flicker task. At rest and during a specific interval exercise of 86.5-90% HRmax, 35 participants (experts: n=8, advanced: n=13, novices, n=14) performed a handball specific flicker task with two types of patterns (structured and unstructured). For reaction time, results revealed moderate effect sizes for group, with experts reacting faster than advanced and advanced reacting faster than novices, and for structure, with structured videos being performed faster than unstructured ones. A significant interaction for structure×group was also found, with experts and advanced players faster for structured videos, and novices faster for unstructured videos. For accuracy, significant main effects were found for structure with structured videos solved more accurately. A significant interaction for structure×group was revealed, with experts and advanced more accurate for structured scenes and novices more accurate for unstructured scenes. A significant interaction was also found for condition×structure; at rest, unstructured and structured scenes were performed with the same accuracy while under physical exercise, structured scenes were solved more accurately. No other interactions were found. These results were somewhat surprising given previous work in this area, although the impact of a specific physical exercise on a specific perceptual-cognitive task may be different from those tested generally. PMID:27173640

  9. Evidence mapping for decision making: feasibility versus accuracy – when to abandon high sensitivity in electronic searches

    PubMed Central

    Buchberger, Barbara; Krabbe, Laura; Lux, Beate; Mattivi, Jessica Tajana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mapping the evidence is a relatively new methodological approach and may be helpful for the development of research questions and decisions about their relevance and priority. However, the amount of data available today leads to challenges for scientists sometimes being confronted with literature searches retrieving over 30,000 results for screening. Objectives: We conducted an evidence mapping of the topic “diabetes and driving” to investigate its suitability for an evidence-based national clinical guideline. In addition, we compared a highly sensitive search with a highly specific one. Methods: Based on a systematic review, our database searches were limited to publications from 2002 to present in English and German language. Results: Due to the strongly focused topic and the limits, our sensitive search identified a manageable number of references including sufficient evidence to answer our research question. Using the specific search strategy, we achieved a reduction of citations by 25%, concurrently identifying 88% of relevant references. Conclusions: Evidence mapping with the intention of gaining an overview of a research field does not require high level accuracy in contrary to systematic reviews. Keeping this distinction in mind, a mass of extraneous information will be avoided by using specific instead of highly sensitive search strategies. PMID:27499726

  10. Comparative assessment of thematic accuracy of GLC maps for specific applications using existing reference data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsendbazar, N. E.; de Bruin, S.; Mora, B.; Schouten, L.; Herold, M.

    2016-02-01

    Inputs to various applications and models, current global land cover (GLC) maps are based on different data sources and methods. Therefore, comparing GLC maps is challenging. Statistical comparison of GLC maps is further complicated by the lack of a reference dataset that is suitable for validating multiple maps. This study utilizes the existing Globcover-2005 reference dataset to compare thematic accuracies of three GLC maps for the year 2005 (Globcover, LC-CCI and MODIS). We translated and reinterpreted the LCCS (land cover classification system) classifier information of the reference dataset into the different map legends. The three maps were evaluated for a variety of applications, i.e., general circulation models, dynamic global vegetation models, agriculture assessments, carbon estimation and biodiversity assessments, using weighted accuracy assessment. Based on the impact of land cover confusions on the overall weighted accuracy of the GLC maps, we identified map improvement priorities. Overall accuracies were 70.8 ± 1.4%, 71.4 ± 1.3%, and 61.3 ± 1.5% for LC-CCI, MODIS, and Globcover, respectively. Weighted accuracy assessments produced increased overall accuracies (80-93%) since not all class confusion errors are important for specific applications. As a common denominator for all applications, the classes mixed trees, shrubs, grasses, and cropland were identified as improvement priorities. The results demonstrate the necessity of accounting for dissimilarities in the importance of map classification errors for different user application. To determine the fitness of use of GLC maps, accuracy of GLC maps should be assessed per application; there is no single-figure accuracy estimate expressing map fitness for all purposes.

  11. Repeated significance tests of linear combinations of sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic biomarker.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mixia; Shu, Yu; Li, Zhaohai; Liu, Aiyi

    2016-08-30

    A sequential design is proposed to test whether the accuracy of a binary diagnostic biomarker meets the minimal level of acceptance. The accuracy of a binary diagnostic biomarker is a linear combination of the marker's sensitivity and specificity. The objective of the sequential method is to minimize the maximum expected sample size under the null hypothesis that the marker's accuracy is below the minimal level of acceptance. The exact results of two-stage designs based on Youden's index and efficiency indicate that the maximum expected sample sizes are smaller than the sample sizes of the fixed designs. Exact methods are also developed for estimation, confidence interval and p-value concerning the proposed accuracy index upon termination of the sequential testing. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26947768

  12. Assessing the dependence of sensitivity and specificity on prevalence in meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jialiang; Fine, Jason P

    2011-10-01

    We consider modeling the dependence of sensitivity and specificity on the disease prevalence in diagnostic accuracy studies. Many meta-analyses compare test accuracy across studies and fail to incorporate the possible connection between the accuracy measures and the prevalence. We propose a Pearson type correlation coefficient and an estimating equation-based regression framework to help understand such a practical dependence. The results we derive may then be used to better interpret the results from meta-analyses. In the biomedical examples analyzed in this paper, the diagnostic accuracy of biomarkers are shown to be associated with prevalence, providing insights into the utility of these biomarkers in low- and high-prevalence populations. PMID:21525421

  13. Domain-specific impairment in metacognitive accuracy following anterior prefrontal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jihye; Golfinos, John G.; Blackmon, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have the capacity to evaluate the success of cognitive processes, known as metacognition. Convergent evidence supports a role for anterior prefrontal cortex in metacognitive judgements of perceptual processes. However, it is unknown whether metacognition is a global phenomenon, with anterior prefrontal cortex supporting metacognition across domains, or whether it relies on domain-specific neural substrates. To address this question, we measured metacognitive accuracy in patients with lesions to anterior prefrontal cortex (n = 7) in two distinct domains, perception and memory, by assessing the correspondence between objective performance and subjective ratings of performance. Despite performing equivalently to a comparison group with temporal lobe lesions (n = 11) and healthy controls (n = 19), patients with lesions to the anterior prefrontal cortex showed a selective deficit in perceptual metacognitive accuracy (meta-d’/d’, 95% confidence interval 0.28–0.64). Crucially, however, the anterior prefrontal cortex lesion group’s metacognitive accuracy on an equivalent memory task remained unimpaired (meta-d’/d’, 95% confidence interval 0.78–1.29). Metacognitive accuracy in the temporal lobe group was intact in both domains. Our results support a causal role for anterior prefrontal cortex in perceptual metacognition, and indicate that the neural architecture of metacognition, while often considered global and domain-general, comprises domain-specific components that may be differentially affected by neurological insult. PMID:25100039

  14. Deconvolution improves the accuracy and depth sensitivity of time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Mamadou; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved (TR) techniques have the potential to distinguish early- from late-arriving photons. Since light travelling through superficial tissue is detected earlier than photons that penetrate the deeper layers, time-windowing can in principle be used to improve the depth sensitivity of TR measurements. However, TR measurements also contain instrument contributions - referred to as the instrument-response-function (IRF) - which cause temporal broadening of the measured temporal-point-spread-function (TPSF). In this report, we investigate the influence of the IRF on pathlength-resolved absorption changes (Δμa) retrieved from TR measurements using the microscopic Beer-Lambert law (MBLL). TPSFs were acquired on homogeneous and two-layer tissue-mimicking phantoms with varying optical properties. The measured IRF and TPSFs were deconvolved to recover the distribution of time-of-flights (DTOFs) of the detected photons. The microscopic Beer-Lambert law was applied to early and late time-windows of the TPSFs and DTOFs to access the effects of the IRF on pathlength-resolved Δμa. The analysis showed that the late part of the TPSFs contains substantial contributions from early-arriving photons, due to the smearing effects of the IRF, which reduced its sensitivity to absorption changes occurring in deep layers. We also demonstrated that the effects of the IRF can be efficiently eliminated by applying a robust deconvolution technique, thereby improving the accuracy and sensitivity of TR measurements to deep-tissue absorption changes.

  15. Sensitivity and Specificity of Polysomnographic Criteria for Defining Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Jack D.; Ulmer, Christi S.; Means, Melanie K.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: In recent years, polysomnography-based eligibility criteria have been increasingly used to identify candidates for insomnia research, and this has been particularly true of studies evaluating pharmacologic therapy for primary insomnia. However, the sensitivity and specificity of PSG for identifying individuals with insomnia is unknown, and there is no consensus on the criteria sets which should be used for participant selection. In the current study, an archival data set was used to test the sensitivity and specificity of PSG measures for identifying individuals with primary insomnia in both home and lab settings. We then evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the eligibility criteria employed in a number of recent insomnia trials for identifying primary insomnia sufferers in our sample. Design: Archival data analysis. Settings: Study participants' homes and a clinical sleep laboratory. Participants: Adults: 76 with primary insomnia and 78 non-complaining normal sleepers. Measurements and Results: ROC and cross-tabs analyses were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of PSG-derived total sleep time, latency to persistent sleep, wake after sleep onset, and sleep efficiency for discriminating adults with primary insomnia from normal sleepers. None of the individual criteria accurately discriminated PI from normal sleepers, and none of the criteria sets used in recent trials demonstrated acceptable sensitivity and specificity for identifying primary insomnia. Conclusions: The use of quantitative PSG-based selection criteria in insomnia research may exclude many who meet current diagnostic criteria for an insomnia disorder. Citation: Edinger JD; Ulmer CS; Means MK. Sensitivity and specificity of polysomnographic criteria for defining insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(5):481-491. PMID:23674940

  16. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Shana O; Mirkin, Chad A; Walt, David R; Ismagilov, Rustem F; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices. PMID:25466541

  17. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices. PMID:25466541

  18. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices.

  19. Toward Improved Force-Field Accuracy through Sensitivity Analysis of Host-Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jian; Fenley, Andrew T.; Henriksen, Niel M.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capability of atomistic computer models to predict the thermodynamics of noncovalent binding is critical for successful structure-based drug design, and the accuracy of such calculations remains limited by non-optimal force field parameters. Ideally, one would incorporate protein-ligand affinity data into force field parametrization, but this would be inefficient and costly. We now demonstrate that sensitivity analysis can be used to efficiently tune Lennard-Jones parameters of aqueous host-guest systems for increasingly accurate calculations of binding enthalpy. These results highlight the promise of a comprehensive use of calorimetric host-guest binding data, along with existing validation data sets, to improve force field parameters for the simulation of noncovalent binding, with the ultimate goal of making protein-ligand modeling more accurate and hence speeding drug discovery. PMID:26181208

  20. Vibrational sensitivity of a measuring instrument and methods of increasing the accuracy of its determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mironov, Y. S.

    1973-01-01

    The properties and peculiarities of two groups of measuring systems reacting to vibrations are discussed. Specifically, results of the action of a three dimensional, cophasal, monoharmonic vibration on the linear system of a measuring instrument was analyzed. Data are also given on the connection between vibration sensitivity and vibration resistance for instruments, methods for estimating vibration resistance, and formulas for expressing test results of vibration resistance. Experimental data are also given for decreasing errors in nonlinear systems during vibrations.

  1. Travel-time source-specific station correction improves location accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, Alessandra; Materni, Valerio; Chiappini, Stefano; Carluccio, Roberto; Console, Rodolfo; Chiappini, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Accurate earthquake locations are crucial for investigating seismogenic processes, as well as for applications like verifying compliance to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Earthquake location accuracy is related to the degree of knowledge about the 3-D structure of seismic wave velocity in the Earth. It is well known that modeling errors of calculated travel times may have the effect of shifting the computed epicenters far from the real locations by a distance even larger than the size of the statistical error ellipses, regardless of the accuracy in picking seismic phase arrivals. The consequences of large mislocations of seismic events in the context of the CTBT verification is particularly critical in order to trigger a possible On Site Inspection (OSI). In fact, the Treaty establishes that an OSI area cannot be larger than 1000 km2, and its larger linear dimension cannot be larger than 50 km. Moreover, depth accuracy is crucial for the application of the depth event screening criterion. In the present study, we develop a method of source-specific travel times corrections based on a set of well located events recorded by dense national seismic networks in seismically active regions. The applications concern seismic sequences recorded in Japan, Iran and Italy. We show that mislocations of the order of 10-20 km affecting the epicenters, as well as larger mislocations in hypocentral depths, calculated from a global seismic network and using the standard IASPEI91 travel times can be effectively removed by applying source-specific station corrections.

  2. Effects of reproductive state on olfactory sensitivity suggest odor specificity.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johan N; McClintock, Martha K; Olsson, Mats J

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies of reproductive state and olfactory sensitivity in women have not directly compared thresholds for social and environmental odors. Here, we used successive dilutions presented in a staircase protocol to determine olfactory thresholds for androstadienone, a social odor produced by men, and rose, an environmental odor signaling a source of micronutrients essential for successful implantation, prenatal development and maternal health. Fertile women were more sensitive to the social than the environmental odor, while women using oral contraceptives, a non-fertile hormonal state similar to early pregnancy, were more sensitive to the environmental odor. This preliminary study sets the stage for further work on the interaction between hormonal states and sensitivity to specific odors with reproductive significance. PMID:16084006

  3. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2006-02-15

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  4. Detailed high-accuracy megavoltage transmission measurements: A sensitive experimental benchmark of EGSnrc

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: There are three goals for this study: (a) to perform detailed megavoltage transmission measurements in order to identify the factors that affect the measurement accuracy, (b) to use the measured data as a benchmark for the EGSnrc system in order to identify the computational limiting factors, and (c) to provide data for others to benchmark Monte Carlo codes. Methods: Transmission measurements are performed at the National Research Council Canada on a research linac whose incident electron parameters are independently known. Automated transmission measurements are made on-axis, down to a transmission value of {approx}1.7%, for eight beams between 10 MV (the lowest stable MV beam on the linac) and 30 MV, using fully stopping Be, Al, and Pb bremsstrahlung targets and no fattening filters. To diversify energy differentiation, data are acquired for each beam using low-Z and high-Z attenuators (C and Pb) and Farmer chambers with low-Z and high-Z buildup caps. Experimental corrections are applied for beam drifts (2%), polarity (2.5% typical maximum, 6% extreme), ion recombination (0.2%), leakage (0.3%), and room scatter (0.8%)-the values in parentheses are the largest corrections applied. The experimental setup and the detectors are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included (up to a 5.6% effect). A detailed sensitivity analysis is carried out for the measured and calculated transmission data. Results: The developed experimental protocol allows for transmission measurements with 0.4% uncertainty on the smallest signals. Suggestions for accurate transmission measurements are provided. Measurements and EGSnrc calculations agree typically within 0.2% for the sensitivity of the transmission values to the detector details, to the bremsstrahlung target material, and to the incident electron energy. Direct comparison of the measured and calculated transmission data shows agreement better than 2% for C (3.4% for the 10 MV beam) and

  5. Specificity and sensitivity of glucocorticoid signaling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Cain, Derek W; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-08-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids regulate a variety of physiologic processes and are crucial to the systemic stress response. Glucocorticoid receptors are expressed throughout the body, but there is considerable heterogeneity in glucocorticoid sensitivity and induced biological responses across tissues. The immunoregulatory properties of glucocorticoids are exploited in the clinic for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders as well as certain hematological malignancies, but adverse side effects hamper prolonged use. Fully understanding the molecular events that shape the physiologic effects of glucocorticoid treatment will provide insight into optimal glucocorticoid therapies, reliable assessment of glucocorticoid sensitivity in patients, and may advance the development of novel GR agonists that exert immunosuppressive effects while avoiding harmful side effects. In this review, we provide an overview of mechanisms that affect glucocorticoid specificity and sensitivity in health and disease, focusing on the distinct isoforms of the glucocorticoid receptor and their unique regulatory and functional properties. PMID:26303082

  6. Accuracy and efficacy of osteotomy in total knee arthroplasty with patient-specific navigational template

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yudong; Ding, Jing; Xu, Yongqing; Hou, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    This study develops and validates a novel patient-specific navigational template for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 70 patients who underwent TKA were randomized and divided into conventional method group and navigational template group. In the navigational template group, the patient-specific navigational templates were designed and used intraoperatively to assist 35 patients with knee arthroplasty. Information on operation time and blood loss was recorded. After surgery, the positions of the prosthesis were evaluated using CT scan and X-rays. Analysis showed significant differences in errors between the two techniques. In addition, mean operation time and mean blood loss were statistically and significantly lower in the navigational template group than in the conventional group. Overall, the navigational template method showed a high degree of accuracy and efficacy. PMID:26550129

  7. The sensitivity and accuracy of a cone beam CT in detecting the chorda tympani.

    PubMed

    Hiraumi, Harukazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Yamamoto, Norio; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2016-04-01

    The facial recess approach through posterior tympanotomy is the standard approach in cochlear implantation surgery. The size of the facial recess is highly variable, depending on the course of the chorda tympani. Despite their clinical importance, little is known about the sensitivity and accuracy of imaging studies in the detection of the chorda tympani. A total of 13 human temporal bones were included in this study. All of the temporal bones were submitted to a cone beam CT (Accuitomo, Morita, Japan). The multi-planar reconstruction images were rotated around the mastoid portion of the facial nerve to locate the branches of the facial nerve. A branch was diagnosed as the chorda tympani when it entered the tympanic cavity near the notch of Rivinus. The distance between the bifurcation and the tip of the short crus of the incus was measured. In all temporal bones, the canal of the chorda tympani or the posterior canaliculus was detected. In the CT-based evaluation, the average distance from the bifurcation to the incus short crus was 12.6 mm (8.3-15.8 mm). The actual distance after dissection was 12.4 mm (8.2-16.4 mm). The largest difference between the distances evaluated with the two procedures was 1.1 mm. Cone beam CT is very useful in detecting the course of the chorda tympani within the temporal bone. The measured distance is accurate. PMID:25956616

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of parallel or serial serological testing for detection of canine Leishmania infection

    PubMed Central

    de Arruda, Mauro Maciel; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges; Marcelino, Andreza Pain; Barbosa, José Ronaldo; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, human and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) caused byLeishmania infantum has undergone urbanisation since 1980, constituting a public health problem, and serological tests are tools of choice for identifying infected dogs. Until recently, the Brazilian zoonoses control program recommended enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) as the screening and confirmatory methods, respectively, for the detection of canine infection. The purpose of this study was to estimate the accuracy of ELISA and IFA in parallel or serial combinations. The reference standard comprised the results of direct visualisation of parasites in histological sections, immunohistochemical test, or isolation of the parasite in culture. Samples from 98 cases and 1,327 noncases were included. Individually, both tests presented sensitivity of 91.8% and 90.8%, and specificity of 83.4 and 53.4%, for the ELISA and IFA, respectively. When tests were used in parallel combination, sensitivity attained 99.2%, while specificity dropped to 44.8%. When used in serial combination (ELISA followed by IFA), decreased sensitivity (83.3%) and increased specificity (92.5%) were observed. Serial testing approach improved specificity with moderate loss in sensitivity. This strategy could partially fulfill the needs of public health and dog owners for a more accurate diagnosis of CVL. PMID:26910354

  9. Sensitivity and specificity of parallel or serial serological testing for detection of canine Leishmania infection.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Mauro Maciel de; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges; Marcelino, Andreza Pain; Barbosa, José Ronaldo; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra

    2016-03-01

    In Brazil, human and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) caused by Leishmania infantum has undergone urbanisation since 1980, constituting a public health problem, and serological tests are tools of choice for identifying infected dogs. Until recently, the Brazilian zoonoses control program recommended enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) as the screening and confirmatory methods, respectively, for the detection of canine infection. The purpose of this study was to estimate the accuracy of ELISA and IFA in parallel or serial combinations. The reference standard comprised the results of direct visualisation of parasites in histological sections, immunohistochemical test, or isolation of the parasite in culture. Samples from 98 cases and 1,327 noncases were included. Individually, both tests presented sensitivity of 91.8% and 90.8%, and specificity of 83.4 and 53.4%, for the ELISA and IFA, respectively. When tests were used in parallel combination, sensitivity attained 99.2%, while specificity dropped to 44.8%. When used in serial combination (ELISA followed by IFA), decreased sensitivity (83.3%) and increased specificity (92.5%) were observed. Serial testing approach improved specificity with moderate loss in sensitivity. This strategy could partially fulfill the needs of public health and dog owners for a more accurate diagnosis of CVL. PMID:26910354

  10. Sulfhydryl-specific probe for monitoring protein redox sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Jin; Ha, Sura; Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Hyun Joo; Lee, Hee-Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2014-12-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate various biological processes by modifying reactive cysteine residues in the proteins participating in the relevant signaling pathways. Identification of ROS target proteins requires specific reagents that identify ROS-sensitive cysteine sulfhydryls that differ from the known alkylating agents, iodoacetamide and N-ethylmaleimide, which react nonspecifically with oxidized cysteines including sulfenic and sulfinic acid. We designed and synthesized a novel reagent, methyl-3-nitro-4-(piperidin-1-ylsulfonyl)benzoate (NPSB-1), that selectively and specifically reacts with the sulfhydryl of cysteines in model compounds. We validated the specificity of this reagent by allowing it to react with recombinant proteins followed by peptide sequencing with nanoUPLC-ESI-q-TOF tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and mutant studies employed it to identify cellular proteins containing redox-sensitive cysteine residues. We also obtained proteins from cells treated with various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, labeled them with biotinylated NPSB-1 (NPSB-B), pulled them down with streptavidin beads, and identified them with MS/MS. We grouped these proteins into four families: (1) those having reactive cysteine residues easily oxidized by hydrogen peroxide, (2) those with cysteines reactive only under mild oxidative stress, (3) those with cysteines reactive only after exposure to oxidative stress, and (4) those with cysteines that are reactive regardless of oxidative stress. These results confirm that NPSBs can serve as novel chemical probes for specifically capturing reactive cysteine residues and as powerful tools for measuring their oxidative sensitivity and can help to understand the function of cysteine modifications in ROS-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:25354229

  11. Sensitivity and Specificity of French Language and Processing Measures for the Identification of Primary Language Impairment at Age 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thordardottir, Elin; Kehayia, Eva; Mazer, Barbara; Lessard, Nicole; Majnemer, Annette; Sutton, Ann; Trudeau, Natacha; Chilingaryan, Gevorg

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Research on the diagnostic accuracy of different language measures has focused primarily on English. This study examined the sensitivity and specificity of a range of measures of language knowledge and language processing for the identification of primary language impairment (PLI) in French-speaking children. Because of the lack of…

  12. Factors affecting sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic test: the exercise thallium scintigram

    SciTech Connect

    Detrano, R.; Janosi, A.; Lyons, K.P.; Marcondes, G.; Abbassi, N.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1988-04-01

    Technical and methodological factors might affect the reported accuracies of diagnostic tests. To assess their influence on the accuracy of exercise thallium scintigraphy, the medical literature (1977 to 1986) was non-selectively searched and meta-analysis was applied to the 56 publications thus retrieved. These were analyzed for year of publication, sex and mean age of patients, percentage of patients with angina pectoris, percentage of patients with prior myocardial infarction, percentage of patients taking beta-blocking medications, and for angiographic referral (workup) bias, blinding of tests, and technical factors. The percentage of patients with myocardial infarction had the highest correlation with sensitivity (0.45, p = 0.0007). Only the inclusion of subjects with prior infarction and the percentage of men in the study group were independently and significantly (p less than 0.05) related to test sensitivity. Both the presence of workup bias and publication year adversely affected specificity (p less than 0.05). Of these two factors, publication year had the strongest association by stepwise linear regression. This analysis suggests that the reported sensitivity of thallium scintigraphy is higher and the specificity lower than that expected in clinical practice because of the presence of workup bias and the inappropriate inclusion of post-infarct patients.

  13. Accuracy of Computational Cerebral Aneurysm Hemodynamics Using Patient-Specific Endovascular Measurements

    PubMed Central

    McGah, Patrick M.; Levitt, Michael R.; Barbour, Michael C.; Morton, Ryan P.; Nerva, John D.; Mourad, Pierre D.; Ghodke, Basavaraj V.; Hallam, Danial K.; Sekhar, Laligam N.; Kim, Louis J.; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Computational hemodynamic simulations of cerebral aneurysms have traditionally relied on stereotypical boundary conditions (such as blood flow velocity and blood pressure) derived from published values as patient-specific measurements are unavailable or difficult to collect. However, controversy persists over the necessity of incorporating such patient specific conditions into computational analyses. We perform simulations using both endovascular-derived patient-specific and typical literature-derived inflow and outflow boundary conditions. Detailed three-dimensional anatomical models of the cerebral vasculature are developed from rotational angiography data, and blood flow velocity and pressure are measured in situ by a dual-sensor pressure and velocity endovascular guidewire at multiple peri-aneurysmal locations in ten unruptured cerebral aneurysms. These measurements are used to define inflow and outflow boundary conditions for computational hemodynamic models of the aneurysms. The additional in situ measurements which are not prescribed in the simulation are then used to assess the accuracy of the simulated flow velocity and pressure drop. Simulated velocities using patient-specific boundary conditions show good agreement with the guidewire measurements at measurement locations inside the domain, with no bias in the agreement and a random scatter of ≈25%. Simulated velocities using the simplified, literature-derived values show a systematic bias and over-predicted velocity by ≈30% with a random scatter of ≈40%. Computational hemodynamics using endovascularly measured patient-specific boundary conditions have the potential to improve treatment predictions as they provide more accurate and precise results of the aneurysmal hemodynamics than those based on commonly accepted reference values for boundary conditions. PMID:24162859

  14. Spatial variability in sensitivity of reference crop ET to accuracy of climate data in the Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A detailed sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the relative effects of measurement errors in climate data input parameters on the accuracy of calculated reference crop evapotranspiration (ET) using the ASCE-EWRI Standardized Reference ET Equation. Data for the period of 1995 to 2008, fro...

  15. Sensitivity Analysis for Characterizing the Accuracy and Precision of JEM/SMILES Mesospheric O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili Mahani, M.; Baron, P.; Kasai, Y.; Murata, I.; Kasaba, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the Superconducting sub-Millimeter Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) measurements of mesospheric ozone, O3. As the first step, the error due to the impact of Mesospheric Temperature Inversions (MTIs) on ozone retrieval has been determined. The impacts of other parameters such as pressure variability, solar events, and etc. on mesospheric O3 will also be investigated. Ozone, is known to be important due to the stratospheric O3 layer protection of life on Earth by absorbing harmful UV radiations. However, O3 chemistry can be studied purely in the mesosphere without distraction of heterogeneous situation and dynamical variations due to the short lifetime of O3 in this region. Mesospheric ozone is produced by the photo-dissociation of O2 and the subsequent reaction of O with O2. Diurnal and semi-diurnal variations of mesospheric ozone are associated with variations in solar activity. The amplitude of the diurnal variation increases from a few percent at an altitude of 50 km, to about 80 percent at 70 km. Although despite the apparent simplicity of this situation, significant disagreements exist between the predictions from the existing models and observations, which need to be resolved. SMILES is a highly sensitive radiometer with a few to several tens percent of precision from upper troposphere to the mesosphere. SMILES was developed by the Japanese Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) located at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES has successfully measured the vertical distributions and the diurnal variations of various atmospheric species in the latitude range of 38S to 65N from October 2009 to April 2010. A sensitivity analysis is being conducted to investigate the expected precision and accuracy of the mesospheric O3 profiles (from 50 to 90 km height) due to the impact of Mesospheric Temperature

  16. Sensitivity analysis of state-specific multireference perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabados, Ágnes

    2011-05-01

    State-specific multireference perturbation theory (SS-MRPT) developed by Mukherjee et al. [Int. J. Mol. Sci. 3, 733 (2002)] is examined focusing on the dependence of the perturbed energy on the initial model space coefficients. It has been observed earlier, that non-physical kinks may appear on the potential energy surface obtained by SS-MRPT while related coupled-cluster methods may face convergence difficulties. Though exclusion or damping of the division by small coefficients may alleviate the problem, it is demonstrated here that the effect does not originate in an ill-defined division. It is shown that non-negligible model space coefficients may also be linked with the problem. Sensitivity analysis is suggested as a tool for detecting the coefficient responsible. By monitoring the singular values of sensitivity matrices, orders of magnitude increase is found in the largest value, in the vicinity of the problematic geometry point on the potential energy surface. The drastic increase of coefficient sensitivities is found to be linked with a degeneracy of the target root of the effective Hamiltonian. The nature of the one-electron orbitals has a profound influence on the picture: a rotation among active orbitals may screen or worsen the effect.

  17. A protein multiplex microarray substrate with high sensitivity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fici, Dolores A.; McCormick, William; Brown, David W.; Herrmann, John E.; Kumar, Vikram; Awdeh, Zuheir L.

    2010-01-01

    The problems that have been associated with protein multiplex microarray immunoassay substrates and existing technology platforms include: binding, sensitivity, a low signal to noise ratio, target immobilization and the optimal simultaneous detection of diverse protein targets. Current commercial substrates for planar multiplex microarrays rely on protein attachment chemistries that range from covalent attachment to affinity ligand capture, to simple adsorption. In this pilot study, experimental performance parameters for direct monoclonal mouse IgG detection were compared for available two and three dimensional slide surface coatings with a new colloidal nitrocellulose substrate. New technology multiplex microarrays were also developed and evaluated for the detection of pathogen specific antibodies in human serum and the direct detection of enteric viral antigens. Data supports the nitrocellulose colloid as an effective reagent with the capacity to immobilize sufficient diverse protein target quantities for increased specificory signal without compromising authentic protein structure. The nitrocellulose colloid reagent is compatible with the array spotters and scanners routinely used for microarray preparation and processing. More importantly, as an alternate to fluorescence, colorimetric chemistries may be used for specific and sensitive protein target detection. The advantages of the nitrocellulose colloid platform indicate that this technology may be a valuable tool for the further development and expansion of multiplex microarray immunoassays in both the clinical and research laborat environment. PMID:20974147

  18. Accuracy of Computational Cerebral Aneurysm Hemodynamics Using Patient-Specific Endovascular Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Levitt, Michael; Barbour, Michael; Mourad, Pierre; Kim, Louis; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    We study the hemodynamic conditions in patients with cerebral aneurysms through endovascular measurements and computational fluid dynamics. Ten unruptured cerebral aneurysms were clinically assessed by three dimensional rotational angiography and an endovascular guidewire with dual Doppler ultrasound transducer and piezoresistive pressure sensor at multiple peri-aneurysmal locations. These measurements are used to define boundary conditions for flow simulations at and near the aneurysms. The additional in vivo measurements, which were not prescribed in the simulation, are used to assess the accuracy of the simulated flow velocity and pressure. We also performed simulations with stereotypical literature-derived boundary conditions. Simulated velocities using patient-specific boundary conditions showed good agreement with the guidewire measurements, with no systematic bias and a random scatter of about 25%. Simulated velocities using the literature-derived values showed a systematic over-prediction in velocity by 30% with a random scatter of about 40%. Computational hemodynamics using endovascularly-derived patient-specific boundary conditions have the potential to improve treatment predictions as they provide more accurate and precise results of the aneurysmal hemodynamics. Supported by an R03 grant from NIH/NINDS

  19. Real-Word and Nonword Repetition in Italian-Speaking Children with Specific Language Impairment: A Study of Diagnostic Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Dispaldro, Marco; Leonard, Laurence B.; Deevy, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Using two different scoring methods, we examined the diagnostic accuracy of both real-word and nonword repetition in identifying Italian-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: A total of 34 children aged 3;11 to 5;8 participated – 17 children with SLI and 17 typically developing children matched for age (TD-A children). Children completed real-word and nonword repetition tasks. The capacity of real-word and nonword repetition tasks to discriminate children with SLI from TD-A was examined through binary logistic regression and response operating characteristics curves. Results: Both real-word and nonword repetition showed good (or excellent) sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing children with SLI from their typically developing peers. Conclusions: Nonword repetition appears to be a useful diagnostic indicator for Italian, as in other languages. In addition, real-word repetition also holds promise. The contributions of each type of measure are discussed. PMID:22761319

  20. Sensitivity and Specificity of Hypnosis Effects on Gastric Myoelectrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Weimer, Katja; Muth, Eric R.; Zipfel, Stephan; Martens, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The effects of hypnosis on physiological (gastrointestinal) functions are incompletely understood, and it is unknown whether they are hypnosis-specific and gut-specific, or simply unspecific effects of relaxation. Design Sixty-two healthy female volunteers were randomly assigned to either a single session of hypnotic suggestion of ingesting an appetizing meal and an unappetizing meal, or to relax and concentrate on having an appetizing or unappetizing meal, while the electrogastrogram (EGG) was recorded. At the end of the session, participants drank water until they felt full, in order to detect EGG-signal changes after ingestion of a true gastric load. During both conditions participants reported their subjective well-being, hunger and disgust at several time points. Results Imagining eating food induced subjective feelings of hunger and disgust as well as changes in the EGG similar to, but more pronounced than those seen with a real gastric water load during both hypnosis and relaxation conditions. These effects were more pronounced when imagining an appetizing meal than with an unappetizing meal. There was no significant difference between the hypnosis and relaxation conditions. Conclusion Imagination with and without hypnosis exhibits similar changes in subjective and objective measures in response to imagining an appetizing and an unappetizing food, indicating high sensitivity but low specificity. PMID:24358287

  1. Sensitivity and specificity of the Major Depression Inventory in outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Cuijpers, Pim; Dekker, Jack; Noteboom, Annemieke; Smits, Niels; Peen, Jaap

    2007-01-01

    Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) is a new, brief, self-report measure for depression based on the DSM-system, which allows clinicians to assess the presence of a depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV, but also to assess the severity of the depressive symptoms. Methods We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and psychometric qualities of the MDI in a consecutive sample of 258 psychiatric outpatients. Of these patients, 120 had a mood disorder (70 major depression, 49 dysthymia). A total of 139 subjects had a comorbid axis-I diagnosis, and 91 subjects had a comorbid personality disorder. Results Crohnbach's alpha of the MDI was a satisfactory 0.89, and the correlation between the MDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90 was 0.79 (p < .001). Subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD) had a significantly higher MDI score than subjects with anxiety disorders (but no MDD), dysthymias, bipolar, psychotic, other neurotic disorders, and subjects with relational problems. In ROC analysis we found that the area under the curve was 0.68 for the MDI. A good cut-off point for the MDI seems to be 26, with a sensitivity of 0.66, and a specificity of 0.63. The indication of the presence of MDD based on the MDI had a moderate agreement with the diagnosis made by a psychiatrist (kappa: 0.26). Conclusion The MDI is an attractive, brief depression inventory, which seems to be a reliable tool for assessing depression in psychiatric outpatients. PMID:17688685

  2. Metal-specific lymphocytes: biomarkers of sensitivity in man.

    PubMed

    Stejskal, Vera DM; Danersund, Antero; Lindvall, Anders; Hudecek, Romuald; Nordman, Veronica; Yaqob, Amer; Mayer, Wolfgang; Bieger, Wilfried; Lindh, Ulf

    1999-01-01

    Many patients attribute their health problems to amalgam and other dental metals. In genetically susceptible indviduals, mercury and gold may function as haptens and elicit allergic and autoimmune reactions. The frequency of metal-induced lymphocyte responses was examined in 3,162 patients in three European laboratories using MELISA(R), an optimized lymphocyte proliferation test. The patients suffered from local and systemic symptoms attributed to dental restorations. The effect of dental metal removal was studied in 111 patients with metal hypersensitivity and symptoms resembling Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). After consultation with a dentist the patients decided to replace their metal restorations with non-metallic materials. The changes in health and in vitro lymphocyte reactivity were studied by inquiries and follow-up MELISA(R). Lymphocyte reactivity was also analyzed in 116 healthy subjects with no complaints of metal allergy. A significant number of patients had metal-specific lymphocytes in the blood. Nickel was the most common sensitizer, followed by inorganic mercury, gold, phenylmercury, cadmium and palladium. As compared to lymphocyte responses in healthy subjects, the CFS group had significantly increased responses to several metals, especially to inorganic mercury, phenylmercury and gold. Following dental metal removal, 83 patients (76%) reported long-term health improvement. Twenty-four patients (22%) reported unchanged health and two (2%) reported worsening of symptoms. Following dental metal replacement, the lymphocyte reactivity to metals decreased as well. We propose that an inflammatory process induced by metals may modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis) and trigger multiple non-specific symptoms characterizing CFS and other chronic conditions like myalgic encephalitis (ME) and multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). PMID:11460087

  3. Accuracy of patient-specific instrumentation in anatomic and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dallalana, Richard James; McMahon, Ryan A.; East, Ben; Geraghty, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Glenoid component malposition is associated with poor function and early failure of both anatomic and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Glenoid positioning is challenging particularly in the setting of bone loss or deformity. Recently, the use of computer assistance has been shown to reduce implantation error. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of patient-specific instrumentation in cases of anatomic and reverse shoulder replacement in vivo. Methods: Twenty patients underwent total shoulder arthroplasty using a computed tomography (CT)-based patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) system, ten anatomic and ten reverse. Preoperative three-dimensional digital templating of glenoid component position was undertaken and surgery then performed using a custom-made guide. Postoperative CT scans were used to compare final implanted component position to the preoperatively planned position in the same patient. Results: Final component position and orientation closely reflected the preoperatively templated position. Mean deviation in the glenoid version from planned was 1.8° ±1.9° (range, 0.1°–7.3°). Mean deviation in inclination was 1.3° ±1.0° (range, 0.2°–4.5°). Mean deviation in position on the glenoid face was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm (range, 0.0–1.3 mm) in the anteroposterior plane and 0.8 ± 0.5 mm (range, 0.0–1.9 mm) in the superoinferior plane. Actual achieved version was within 7° of neutral in all cases except for one where it was deliberately planned to be outside of this range. Conclusion: PSI in both anatomic and reverse shoulder arthroplasty is highly accurate in guiding glenoid component implantation in vivo. The system can reliably correct bony deformity. PMID:27186057

  4. Global Sensitivity Analysis of Environmental Models: Convergence, Robustness and Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, F.; Pianosi, F.; Hartmann, A. J.; Wagener, T.

    2014-12-01

    Sensitivity analysis aims to characterize the impact that changes in model input factors (e.g. the parameters) have on the model output (e.g. simulated streamflow). It is a valuable diagnostic tool for model understanding and for model improvement, it enhances calibration efficiency, and it supports uncertainty and scenario analysis. It is of particular interest for environmental models because they are often complex, non-linear, non-monotonic and exhibit strong interactions between their parameters. However, sensitivity analysis has to be carefully implemented to produce reliable results at moderate computational cost. For example, sample size can have a strong impact on the results and has to be carefully chosen. Yet, there is little guidance available for this step in environmental modelling. The objective of the present study is to provide guidelines for a robust sensitivity analysis, in order to support modellers in making appropriate choices for its implementation and in interpreting its outcome. We considered hydrological models with increasing level of complexity. We tested four sensitivity analysis methods, Regional Sensitivity Analysis, Method of Morris, a density-based (PAWN) and a variance-based (Sobol) method. The convergence and variability of sensitivity indices were investigated. We used bootstrapping to assess and improve the robustness of sensitivity indices even for limited sample sizes. Finally, we propose a quantitative validation approach for sensitivity analysis based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics.

  5. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to errors in musculo-skeletal geometry.

    PubMed

    Carbone, V; van der Krogt, M M; Koopman, H F J M; Verdonschot, N

    2012-09-21

    Subject-specific musculo-skeletal models of the lower extremity are an important tool for investigating various biomechanical problems, for instance the results of surgery such as joint replacements and tendon transfers. The aim of this study was to assess the potential effects of errors in musculo-skeletal geometry on subject-specific model results. We performed an extensive sensitivity analysis to quantify the effect of the perturbation of origin, insertion and via points of each of the 56 musculo-tendon parts contained in the model. We used two metrics, namely a Local Sensitivity Index (LSI) and an Overall Sensitivity Index (OSI), to distinguish the effect of the perturbation on the predicted force produced by only the perturbed musculo-tendon parts and by all the remaining musculo-tendon parts, respectively, during a simulated gait cycle. Results indicated that, for each musculo-tendon part, only two points show a significant sensitivity: its origin, or pseudo-origin, point and its insertion, or pseudo-insertion, point. The most sensitive points belong to those musculo-tendon parts that act as prime movers in the walking movement (insertion point of the Achilles Tendon: LSI=15.56%, OSI=7.17%; origin points of the Rectus Femoris: LSI=13.89%, OSI=2.44%) and as hip stabilizers (insertion points of the Gluteus Medius Anterior: LSI=17.92%, OSI=2.79%; insertion point of the Gluteus Minimus: LSI=21.71%, OSI=2.41%). The proposed priority list provides quantitative information to improve the predictive accuracy of subject-specific musculo-skeletal models. PMID:22867762

  6. Accuracy of patient specific organ-dose estimates obtained using an automated image segmentation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat-Schmidt, Taly; Wang, Adam; Coradi, Thomas; Haas, Benjamin; Star-Lack, Josh

    2016-03-01

    The overall goal of this work is to develop a rapid, accurate and fully automated software tool to estimate patient-specific organ doses from computed tomography (CT) scans using a deterministic Boltzmann Transport Equation solver and automated CT segmentation algorithms. This work quantified the accuracy of organ dose estimates obtained by an automated segmentation algorithm. The investigated algorithm uses a combination of feature-based and atlas-based methods. A multiatlas approach was also investigated. We hypothesize that the auto-segmentation algorithm is sufficiently accurate to provide organ dose estimates since random errors at the organ boundaries will average out when computing the total organ dose. To test this hypothesis, twenty head-neck CT scans were expertly segmented into nine regions. A leave-one-out validation study was performed, where every case was automatically segmented with each of the remaining cases used as the expert atlas, resulting in nineteen automated segmentations for each of the twenty datasets. The segmented regions were applied to gold-standard Monte Carlo dose maps to estimate mean and peak organ doses. The results demonstrated that the fully automated segmentation algorithm estimated the mean organ dose to within 10% of the expert segmentation for regions other than the spinal canal, with median error for each organ region below 2%. In the spinal canal region, the median error was 7% across all data sets and atlases, with a maximum error of 20%. The error in peak organ dose was below 10% for all regions, with a median error below 4% for all organ regions. The multiple-case atlas reduced the variation in the dose estimates and additional improvements may be possible with more robust multi-atlas approaches. Overall, the results support potential feasibility of an automated segmentation algorithm to provide accurate organ dose estimates.

  7. Highly sensitive and specific novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of transitional bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Nandi, Sayantani; Tan, Tuan Zea; Ler, Siok Ghee; Chia, Kee Seng; Lim, Wei-Yen; Bütow, Zentia; Vordos, Dimitrios; De laTaille, Alexandre; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Raida, Manfred; Beyer, Burkhard; Ricci, Estelle; Colombel, Marc; Chong, Tsung Wen; Chiong, Edmund; Soo, Ross; Park, Mi Kyoung; Ha, Hong Koo; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2015-01-01

    Transitional bladder carcinoma (BCa) is prevalent in developed countries, particularly among men. Given that these tumors frequently recur or progress, the early detection and subsequent monitoring of BCa at different stages is critical. Current BCa diagnostic biomarkers are not sufficiently sensitive for substituting or complementing invasive cystoscopy. Here, we sought to identify a robust set of urine biomarkers for BCa detection. Using a high-resolution, mass spectrometry-based, quantitative proteomics approach, we measured, compared and validated protein variations in 451 voided urine samples from healthy subjects, non-bladder cancer patients and patients with non-invasive and invasive BCa. We identified five robust biomarkers: Coronin-1A, Apolipoprotein A4, Semenogelin-2, Gamma synuclein and DJ-1/PARK7. In diagnosing Ta/T1 BCa, these biomarkers achieved an AUC of 0.92 and 0.98, respectively, using ELISA and western blot data (sensitivity, 79.2% and 93.9%; specificity, 100% and 96.7%, respectively). In diagnosing T2/T3 BCa, an AUC of 0.94 and 1.0 was attained (sensitivity, 86.4% and 100%; specificity, 100%) using the same methods. Thus, our multiplex biomarker panel offers unprecedented accuracy for the diagnosis of BCa patients and provides the prospect for a non-invasive way to detect bladder cancer. PMID:25915536

  8. Highly sensitive and specific novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of transitional bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Nandi, Sayantani; Tan, Tuan Zea; Ler, Siok Ghee; Chia, Kee Seng; Lim, Wei-Yen; Bütow, Zentia; Vordos, Dimitrios; De la Taille, Alexandre; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Raida, Manfred; Beyer, Burkhard; Ricci, Estelle; Colombel, Marc; Chong, Tsung Wen; Chiong, Edmund; Soo, Ross; Park, Mi Kyoung; Ha, Hong Koo; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2015-05-30

    Transitional bladder carcinoma (BCa) is prevalent in developed countries, particularly among men. Given that these tumors frequently recur or progress, the early detection and subsequent monitoring of BCa at different stages is critical. Current BCa diagnostic biomarkers are not sufficiently sensitive for substituting or complementing invasive cystoscopy. Here, we sought to identify a robust set of urine biomarkers for BCa detection. Using a high-resolution, mass spectrometry-based, quantitative proteomics approach, we measured, compared and validated protein variations in 451 voided urine samples from healthy subjects, non-bladder cancer patients and patients with non-invasive and invasive BCa. We identified five robust biomarkers: Coronin-1A, Apolipoprotein A4, Semenogelin-2, Gamma synuclein and DJ-1/PARK7. In diagnosing Ta/T1 BCa, these biomarkers achieved an AUC of 0.92 and 0.98, respectively, using ELISA and western blot data (sensitivity, 79.2% and 93.9%; specificity, 100% and 96.7%, respectively). In diagnosing T2/T3 BCa, an AUC of 0.94 and 1.0 was attained (sensitivity, 86.4% and 100%; specificity, 100%) using the same methods. Thus, our multiplex biomarker panel offers unprecedented accuracy for the diagnosis of BCa patients and provides the prospect for a non-invasive way to detect bladder cancer. PMID:25915536

  9. A meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of dengue virus-specific IgA antibody-based tests for detection of dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Alagarasu, K; Walimbe, A M; Jadhav, S M; Deoshatwar, A R

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA)-based tests have been evaluated in different studies for their utility in diagnosing dengue infections. In most of the studies, the results were inconclusive because of a small sample size. Hence, a meta-analysis involving nine studies with 2096 samples was performed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of IgA-based tests in diagnosing dengue infections. The analysis was conducted using Meta-Disc software. The results revealed that IgA-based tests had an overall sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of 73·9%, 95·2%, 66·7, 22·0 and 0·25, respectively. Significant heterogeneity was observed between the studies. The type of test, infection status and day of sample collection influenced the diagnostic accuracy. The IgA-based diagnostic tests showed a greater accuracy when the samples were collected 4 days after onset of symptoms and for secondary infections. The results suggested that IgA-based tests had a moderate level of accuracy and are diagnostic of the disease. However, negative results cannot be used alone for dengue diagnosis. More prospective studies comparing the diagnostic accuracy of combinations of antigen-based tests with either IgA or IgM are needed and might be useful for suggesting the best strategy for dengue diagnosis. PMID:26289218

  10. Effect of mesh distortion on the accuracy of transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients in multilayered composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Kim, Yong H.

    1995-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of mesh distortion on the accuracy of transverse shear stresses and their first-order and second-order sensitivity coefficients in multilayered composite panels subjected to mechanical and thermal loads. The panels are discretized by using a two-field degenerate solid element, with the fundamental unknowns consisting of both displacement and strain components, and the displacement components having a linear variation throughout the thickness of the laminate. A two-step computational procedure is used for evaluating the transverse shear stresses. In the first step, the in-plane stresses in the different layers are calculated at the numerical quadrature points for each element. In the second step, the transverse shear stresses are evaluated by using piecewise integration, in the thickness direction, of the three-dimensional equilibrium equations. The same procedure is used for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of transverse shear stresses. Numerical results are presented showing no noticeable degradation in the accuracy of the in-plane stresses and their sensitivity coefficients with mesh distortion. However, such degradation is observed for the transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients. The standard of comparison is taken to be the exact solution of the three-dimensional thermoelasticity equations of the panel.

  11. [Sensitivity and specificity of new commercial tests for the detection of specific Echinococcus antibodies].

    PubMed

    Auer, Herbert; Stöckl, Cornelia; Suhendra, Susanne; Schneider, Renate

    2009-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by Echinococcus granulosus, and alveolar echinococcosis (AE), caused by E. multilocularis belong to the most serious parasitic diseases. Both forms of echinococcosis occur in Austria; in addition, imported cases are diagnosed and treated regularly in Austria. Diagnosis of echinococcosis is based on clinical symptoms, imaging techniques and particularly on the detection of specific antibodies in serum specimens of patients. For decades several companies have been providing commercial Echinococcus antigens and echinococcosis tests based on different methods, i.e. complement fixation test (CFT) and electrophoretic methods (CIEP, IEP) in the past and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), western blot assays (WB) and indirect haemagglutination assays (IHA) in recent years. During the last years two studies have been carried out in our laboratory in order to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of two commercial E. granulosus antigens (the synthetic p176 antigen, arc 5 antigen) and three commercial testkits (IHA from Dade Behring, IHA from Fumouze, ELISA from Novagnost-Dade Behring). Sera of patients with histologically and/or molecular biologically confirmed cystic or alveolar echinococcosis, of patients with other parasitic infections and of healthy people were tested comparatively for specific Echinococcus antibodies. The synthetic p176 antigen proved to be a highly specific but a insensitive antigen, whereas both the indirect haemagglutination assay as well as the Novagnost-ELISA showed a much higher sensitivity but only moderate specificity. Our studies demonstrated that neither the commercial antigens nor the test kits tested should be used as a primary test in a routine laboratory for the diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis or of alveolar echinococcosis. PMID:19915815

  12. Generation of a sensitive TNFR2-specific murine assays system.

    PubMed

    Ando, D; Kamada, H; Inoue, M; Taki, S; Furuya, T; Abe, Y; Nagano, K; Tsutsumi, Y; Tsunoda, S

    2016-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)/TNF receptors (TNFR1/TNFR2) are considered to be potential drug targets to treat refractory diseases, including autoimmune diseases and malignant tumors. However, their specific functions, especially in the case of TNFR2, are poorly understood. In this study, we constructed a mouse TNFR2 (mTNFR2)-mediated biological assay system that shows no effects of mouse TNFR1 (mTNFR1) in order to screen mTNFR2-selective stimulating agents. Mouse TNFR1(-/-)R2(-/-) preadipocytes were transfected with the gene encoding the mTNFR2/mouse Fas (mFas) chimeric receptor in which the extracellular and transmembrane domains of mTNFR2 were fused to the intracellular domain of mFas. Our results demonstrated that this cell line exhibits highly sensitive mTNFR2-mediated cytotoxic effects. We propose that this mTNFR2-mediated biological assay system would be a useful tool to screen for mTNFR2-selective stimulating agents. PMID:27348964

  13. Multiplex Detection of Rare Mutations by Picoliter Droplet Based Digital PCR: Sensitivity and Specificity Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Zonta, Eleonora; Garlan, Fanny; Pécuchet, Nicolas; Perez-Toralla, Karla; Caen, Ouriel; Milbury, Coren; Didelot, Audrey; Fabre, Elizabeth; Blons, Hélène; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Taly, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    In cancer research, the accuracy of the technology used for biomarkers detection is remarkably important. In this context, digital PCR represents a highly sensitive and reproducible method that could serve as an appropriate tool for tumor mutational status analysis. In particular, droplet-based digital PCR approaches have been developed for detection of tumor-specific mutated alleles within plasmatic circulating DNA. Such an approach calls for the development and validation of a very significant quantity of assays, which can be extremely costly and time consuming. Herein, we evaluated assays for the detection and quantification of various mutations occurring in three genes often misregulated in cancers: the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and the Tumoral Protein p53 (TP53) genes. In particular, commercial competitive allele-specific TaqMan® PCR (castPCR™) technology, as well as TaqMan® and ZEN™ assays, have been evaluated for EGFR p.L858R, p.T790M, p.L861Q point mutations and in-frame deletions Del19. Specificity and sensitivity have been determined on cell lines DNA, plasmatic circulating DNA of lung cancer patients or Horizon Diagnostics Reference Standards. To show the multiplexing capabilities of this technology, several multiplex panels for EGFR (several three- and four-plexes) have been developed, offering new "ready-to-use" tests for lung cancer patients. PMID:27416070

  14. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The poster provides an overview of techniques to improve the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) sensitivity. It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) when used for sensitivity studies for TES MapYear = 0 and large optical depth values such as tau = 3 is less than realistic. A preliminary fix has been made to Mars-GRAM by adding a density factor value that was determined for tau = 0.3, 1 and 3.

  15. Real-Word and Nonword Repetition in Italian-Speaking Children with Specific Language Impairment: A Study of Diagnostic Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispaldro, Marco; Leonard, Laurence B.; Deevy, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Using 2 different scoring methods, the authors examined the diagnostic accuracy of both real-word and nonword repetition in identifying Italian-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: A total of 34 children ages 3;11-5;8 (years;months) participated--17 children with SLI and 17 typically developing…

  16. Sensitive and specific liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric assay for barnidipine in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Pawula, M; Watson, D; Teramura, T; Watanabe, T; Higuchi, S; Cheng, K N

    1998-11-20

    A sensitive and specific LC-MS-MS assay has been developed and validated for barnidipine (1-benzyl-3-pyrrolidinyl)methyl-2,6-dimethyl-4(m-nitrophenyl)-1,4-dihydr opyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate). The assay involves a simple and rapid solid-phase extraction procedure. Sample analysis was on a Spherisorb S3ODS2 100 mmX2 mm I.D. column, with a Finnigan TSQ 7000 mass spectrometer, using an electrospray interface and selective reaction monitoring (SRM). The intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy, determined as the coefficient of variation and relative error, respectively, were 11.8% or less. The limit of quantitation was 0.03 ng/ml, and the calibration was linear between 0.03 and 3.0 ng/ml. The method has been used successfully for the measurement of over two thousand human plasma samples from pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:9869371

  17. Incorporation of Inter-Subject Information to Improve the Accuracy of Subject-Specific P300 Classifiers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minpeng; Liu, Jing; Chen, Long; Qi, Hongzhi; He, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Although the inter-subject information has been demonstrated to be effective for a rapid calibration of the P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI), it has never been comprehensively tested to find if the incorporation of heterogeneous data could enhance the accuracy. This study aims to improve the subject-specific P300 classifier by adding other subject's data. A classifier calibration strategy, weighted ensemble learning generic information (WELGI), was developed, in which elementary classifiers were constructed by using both the intra- and inter-subject information and then integrated into a strong classifier with a weight assessment. 55 subjects were recruited to spell 20 characters offline using the conventional P300-based BCI, i.e. the P300-speller. Four different metrics, the P300 accuracy and precision, the round accuracy, and the character accuracy, were performed for a comprehensive investigation. The results revealed that the classifier constructed on the training dataset in combination with adding other subject's data was significantly superior to that without the inter-subject information. Therefore, the WELGI is an effective classifier calibration strategy which uses the inter-subject information to improve the accuracy of subject-specific P300 classifiers, and could also be applied to other BCI paradigms. PMID:27005002

  18. Sensitivity and Specificity of a Novel Approach to Confirm the Depth of the Endotracheal Tube

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yansong; Xie, Ying; Hu, Bailong; Wang, Jing; Song, Haibo; Wei, Xinchuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to explore the sensitivity and specificity an approach to confirm the depth of the endotracheal tube. It was a prospective, diagnostic study (Registration number: chiCTR-TRC-14005170) conducted in the Department of Anesthesiology of West China Hospital. A total of 100 patients underwent general anesthesia were included. The distance between the upper margin of the cuff and the manubriosternal joint (CM) and the distance between the upper margin of the cuff and the carina (CC) were measured. The accuracy of the confirmed approach against fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) was evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. The correlation and agreement between CM and CC were explored. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were determined to be 94.74% (95% CI: 87.07–98.55%), 79.17% (95% CI: 57.85–92.87%), 93.51% (95% CI: 85.49–97.86%), 82.61% (95% CI: 61.22%–95.05%), respectively. The κ value was 0.75 (95% CI: 0.60–0.90). There was a significant correlation between CM and CC (P < 0.001) with a correlation coefficient of 0.91(95% CI: 0.87–0.94). Bland and Altman plots also demonstrated a good agreement between the CM and CC. This novel method may be used to confirm the depth of the endotracheal tubes. PMID:26313810

  19. Sensitivity of Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) Mission Navigation Accuracy to Major Error Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Corwin; Long, Anne; Car[emter. Russell

    2011-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission consists of four satellites flying in formation in highly elliptical orbits about the Earth, with a primary objective of studying magnetic reconnection. The baseline navigation concept is independent estimation of each spacecraft state using GPS pseudorange measurements referenced to an Ultra Stable Oscillator (USO) with accelerometer measurements included during maneuvers. MMS state estimation is performed onboard each spacecraft using the Goddard Enhanced Onboard Navigation System (GEONS), which is embedded in the Navigator GPS receiver. This paper describes the sensitivity of MMS navigation performance to two major error sources: USO clock errors and thrust acceleration knowledge errors.

  20. Improved optical axis determination accuracy for fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2013-03-01

    We report on a new calibration technique that permits the accurate extraction of sample Jones matrix and hence fast-axis orientation by using fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) that is completely based on non polarization maintaining fiber such as SMF-28. In this technique, two quarter waveplates are used to completely specify the parameters of the system fibers in the sample arm so that the Jones matrix of the sample can be determined directly. The device was validated on measurements of a quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a single-mode fiber-based swept-source PS-OCT system.

  1. The effect of biomechanical variables on force sensitive resistor error: Implications for calibration and improved accuracy.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Jonathon S; Evans, Katherine R; Hebert, Jacqueline S; Marasco, Paul D; Carey, Jason P

    2016-03-21

    Force Sensitive Resistors (FSRs) are commercially available thin film polymer sensors commonly employed in a multitude of biomechanical measurement environments. Reasons for such wide spread usage lie in the versatility, small profile, and low cost of these sensors. Yet FSRs have limitations. It is commonly accepted that temperature, curvature and biological tissue compliance may impact sensor conductance and resulting force readings. The effect of these variables and degree to which they interact has yet to be comprehensively investigated and quantified. This work systematically assesses varying levels of temperature, sensor curvature and surface compliance using a full factorial design-of-experiments approach. Three models of Interlink FSRs were evaluated. Calibration equations under 12 unique combinations of temperature, curvature and compliance were determined for each sensor. Root mean squared error, mean absolute error, and maximum error were quantified as measures of the impact these thermo/mechanical factors have on sensor performance. It was found that all three variables have the potential to affect FSR calibration curves. The FSR model and corresponding sensor geometry are sensitive to these three mechanical factors at varying levels. Experimental results suggest that reducing sensor error requires calibration of each sensor in an environment as close to its intended use as possible and if multiple FSRs are used in a system, they must be calibrated independently. PMID:26903413

  2. Updating Mars-GRAM to Increase the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hiliary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). During the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process, it was discovered that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear set to 0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. As a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented from work being done to derive better multipliers by including variation with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data. The addition of these more precise density factors to Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  3. Novice Reviewers Retain High Sensitivity and Specificity of Posterior Segment Disease Identification with iWellnessExam™

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Catherine; Nath, Sanjeev; Sherman, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Four novices to Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) image review were provided a brief lecture on the interpretation of iVue iWellnessExam™ findings (available on iVue® SD-OCT, Optovue, Inc., Fremont, CA). For a cohort of 126 (Confirmed) Normal, 101 (Confirmed) Disease subjects, iWellnessExam™ OD, OS, and OU reports were provided. Each novice independently reviewed and sorted the subjects into one of four categories: normal, retinal disease, optic nerve (ON) disease, and retinal + ON disease. Their accuracy is compared between the novices and with an expert reviewer. Results. Posterior segment disease was properly detected by novices with sensitivities of 90.6%, any disease; 84.3%, retinal disease; 88.0%, ON disease; expert sensitivity: 96.0%, 95.5%, and 90.0%, respectively; specificity: 84.3%, novices; 99.2%, expert. Novice accuracy correlates best with clinical exposure and amount of time spent reviewing each image set. The novices' negative predictive value was 92.0% (i.e., very few false negatives). Conclusions. Novices can be trained to screen for posterior segment disease efficiently and effectively using iWellnessExam™ data, with high sensitivity, while maintaining high specificity. Novice reviewer accuracy covaries with both clinical exposure and time spent per image set. These findings support exploration of training nonophthalmic technicians in a primary medical care setting. PMID:26881058

  4. A Sensitive and Specific Neural Signature for Picture-Induced Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Luke J.; Gianaros, Peter J.; Manuck, Stephen B.; Krishnan, Anjali; Wager, Tor D.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging has identified many correlates of emotion but has not yet yielded brain representations predictive of the intensity of emotional experiences in individuals. We used machine learning to identify a sensitive and specific signature of emotional responses to aversive images. This signature predicted the intensity of negative emotion in individual participants in cross validation (n =121) and test (n = 61) samples (high–low emotion = 93.5% accuracy). It was unresponsive to physical pain (emotion–pain = 92% discriminative accuracy), demonstrating that it is not a representation of generalized arousal or salience. The signature was comprised of mesoscale patterns spanning multiple cortical and subcortical systems, with no single system necessary or sufficient for predicting experience. Furthermore, it was not reducible to activity in traditional “emotion-related” regions (e.g., amygdala, insula) or resting-state networks (e.g., “salience,” “default mode”). Overall, this work identifies differentiable neural components of negative emotion and pain, providing a basis for new, brain-based taxonomies of affective processes. PMID:26098873

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of stroboscopy in preoperative differentiation of dysplasia from early invasive glottic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    El-Demerdash, A; Fawaz, S A; Sabri, S M; Sweed, Ahmed; Rabie, H

    2015-05-01

    Leukoplakia is a descriptive clinical term designating a white patch or plaque of the mucosa and must be complemented by histology, which can range from simple totally benign keratosis with or without atypia up to invasive carcinoma. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of videostroboscopy in preoperative differentiation of early invasive glottic carcinoma from intraepithelial atypia and dysplasia. 46 patients with a total of 60 leukoplakia lesions on the vocal folds were included in the study. Videostroboscopy was used to divide them into two groups based on preservation of the mucosal wave and this was correlated with the final pathology after treatment. The sensitivity and specificity of videostroboscopy in predicting invasive nature of the lesions based on absence or reduction of the mucosal wave were 96.8 and 92.8 %, respectively, with an overall accuracy of 95 %. We suggest that routine application of videostroboscopy can be an important, simple, non-invasive tool, to achieve, in a single procedure, proper and accurate evaluation of glottic leukoplakia. PMID:25649284

  6. Improving Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Extensively utilized for numerous mission applications, the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model. In a Monte-Carlo mode, Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is used to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Mars-GRAM has been found to be inexact when used during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3. Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) from the surface to 80 km altitude. Mars-GRAM with the MapYear parameter set to 0 utilizes results from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 at all locations for the entire year. Imprecise atmospheric density and pressure at all altitudes is a consequence of this use of MGCM with tau=3. Density factor values have been determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 as a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem. These factors adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. These density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls and are included in Mars-GRAM Release 1.3. Work currently being done, to derive better multipliers by including variations with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data, will be highlighted in the presentation. The TES limb data utilized in this process has been validated by a comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). This comparison study was undertaken for locations on Mars of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST. The more precise density factors will be included in Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 and thus improve the results of future sensitivity studies done for large

  7. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars- GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars- GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear=0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  8. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM’s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  9. A more sensitive and specific radioenzymatic assay for catecholamines

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.; Ziegler, M.G. )

    1990-01-01

    This modification of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) based radioenzymatic assay for norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) improves sensitivity, selectivity and eliminates many inhibitors of COMT. Prior to assay, samples are extracted into heptane with diphenylborate, then into dilute acetic acid. This extraction procedure has an efficiency of 78% for NE but less than 2% for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). The extraction procedure also excludes calcium and other COMT inhibitors present in urine, plasma and every tissue tested. This eliminates the requirement for individual standardization of tissue and urine samples. Sensitivity of the assay for NE and E is 10 and 6 pg/ml respectively in 1 ml of plasma. The intraassay coefficients of variation for NE and E are 4 and 13% and the interassay coefficients of variation for NE and E are 10 and 16% in a human plasma sample containing low catecholamine levels. The assay permits quantitation of plasma E levels that were undetectable in prior assays.

  10. Sensitivity, Specificity, and the Hybridization Isotherms of DNA Chips

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, A.; Buhot, A.; Zhulina, E.B.

    2004-01-01

    Competitive hybridization, at the surface and in the bulk, lowers the sensitivity of DNA chips. Competitive surface hybridization occurs when different targets can hybridize with the same probe. Competitive bulk hybridization takes place when the targets can hybridize with free complementary chains in the solution. The effects of competitive hybridization on the thermodynamically attainable performance of DNA chips are quantified in terms of the hybridization isotherms of the spots. These relate the equilibrium degree of the hybridization to the bulk composition. The hybridization isotherm emerges as a Langmuir isotherm modified for electrostatic interactions within the probe layer. The sensitivity of the assay in equilibrium is directly related to the slope of the isotherm. A simpler description is possible, in terms of c50 values specifying the bulk composition corresponding to 50% hybridization at the surface. The effects of competitive hybridization are important for the quantitative analysis of DNA chip results, especially when used to study point mutations. PMID:14747310

  11. Mapping Local Protein Electrostatics by EPR of pH-Sensitive Thiol-Specific Nitroxide† ¶

    PubMed Central

    Voinov, Maxim A.; Ruuge, Andres; Reznikov, Vladimir A.; Grigor’ev, Igor A.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2013-01-01

    A first thiol-specific pH-sensitive nitroxide spin label of the imidazolidine series -methanethiosulfonic acid S-(1-oxyl-2,2,3,5,5-pentamethylimidazolidin-4-ylmethyl) ester (IMTSL) - has been synthesized and characterized. X- (9 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) EPR spectral parameters of the new spin label in its free form and covalently attached to an amino acid cysteine and a tripeptide glutathione were studied as a function of pH and solvent polarity. pKa value of protonatable tertiary amino group of the spin label was found to be unaffected by other ionizable groups present in side chains of unstructured small peptides. The W-band EPR spectra were shown to allow for pKa determination from precise g-factor measurements. Is has been demonstrated that high accuracy of pKa determination for pH-sensitive nitroxides could be achieved regardless the frequency of measurements or the regime of spin exchange: fast at X-band and slow at W-band. IMTSL was found to react specifically with a model protein - iso-1-cytochrome c from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae - giving EPR spectra very similar to those of the most commonly employed cysteine-specific label MTSL. CD data indicated no perturbations to the overall protein structure upon IMTSL labeling. It was found that for IMTSL, giso correlates linearly with Aiso but the slopes are different for the neutral and charged forms of the nitroxide. This finding was attributed to the solvent effects on the spin density at the oxygen atom of the N–O group and on the excitation energy of the oxygen lone-pair orbital. PMID:18426227

  12. Species-specific temperature sensitivity of TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Willem J; Anderson, Evan O; Hoffstaetter, Lydia J; Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal ion channel sensitive to temperature and chemical stimuli. The importance of temperature and aversive chemical detection for survival has driven the evolutionary diversity of TRPA1 sensitivity. This diversity can be observed in the various roles of TRPA1 in different species, where it is proposed to act as a temperature-insensitive chemosensor, a heat transducer, a noxious cold transducer, or a detector of low-intensity heat for prey localization. Exploring the variation of TRPA1 functions among species provides evolutionary insight into molecular mechanisms that fine-tune thermal and chemical sensitivity, and offers an opportunity to address basic principles of temperature gating in ion channels. A decade of research has yielded a number of hypotheses describing physiological roles of TRPA1, modulators of its activity, and biophysical principles of gating. This review surveys the diversity of TRPA1 adaptations across evolutionary taxa and explores possible mechanisms of TRPA1 activation. PMID:27227025

  13. Species-specific temperature sensitivity of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Willem J; Anderson, Evan O; Hoffstaetter, Lydia J; Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal ion channel sensitive to temperature and chemical stimuli. The importance of temperature and aversive chemical detection for survival has driven the evolutionary diversity of TRPA1 sensitivity. This diversity can be observed in the various roles of TRPA1 in different species, where it is proposed to act as a temperature-insensitive chemosensor, a heat transducer, a noxious cold transducer, or a detector of low-intensity heat for prey localization. Exploring the variation of TRPA1 functions among species provides evolutionary insight into molecular mechanisms that fine-tune thermal and chemical sensitivity, and offers an opportunity to address basic principles of temperature gating in ion channels. A decade of research has yielded a number of hypotheses describing physiological roles of TRPA1, modulators of its activity, and biophysical principles of gating. This review surveys the diversity of TRPA1 adaptations across evolutionary taxa and explores possible mechanisms of TRPA1 activation. PMID:27227025

  14. Using Lunar Observations to Validate Pointing Accuracy and Geolocation, Detector Sensitivity Stability and Static Point Response of the CERES Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Janet L.; Smith, G. Louis; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Validation of in-orbit instrument performance is a function of stability in both instrument and calibration source. This paper describes a method using lunar observations scanning near full moon by the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. The Moon offers an external source whose signal variance is predictable and non-degrading. From 2006 to present, these in-orbit observations have become standardized and compiled for the Flight Models -1 and -2 aboard the Terra satellite, for Flight Models-3 and -4 aboard the Aqua satellite, and beginning 2012, for Flight Model-5 aboard Suomi-NPP. Instrument performance measurements studied are detector sensitivity stability, pointing accuracy and static detector point response function. This validation method also shows trends per CERES data channel of 0.8% per decade or less for Flight Models 1-4. Using instrument gimbal data and computed lunar position, the pointing error of each detector telescope, the accuracy and consistency of the alignment between the detectors can be determined. The maximum pointing error was 0.2 Deg. in azimuth and 0.17 Deg. in elevation which corresponds to an error in geolocation near nadir of 2.09 km. With the exception of one detector, all instruments were found to have consistent detector alignment from 2006 to present. All alignment error was within 0.1o with most detector telescopes showing a consistent alignment offset of less than 0.02 Deg.

  15. Using lunar observations to validate pointing accuracy and geolocation, detector sensitivity stability and static point response of the CERES instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Janet; Smith, G. Louis; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Validation of in-orbit instrument performance is a function of stability in both instrument and calibration source. This paper describes a method using lunar observations scanning near full moon by the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. The Moon offers an external source whose signal variance is predictable and non-degrading. From 2006 to present, these in-orbit observations have become standardized and compiled for the Flight Models -1 and -2 aboard the Terra satellite, for Flight Models-3 and -4 aboard the Aqua satellite, and beginning 2012, for Flight Model-5 aboard Suomi-NPP. Instrument performance measurements studied are detector sensitivity stability, pointing accuracy and static detector point response function. This validation method also shows trends per CERES data channel of 0.8% per decade or less for Flight Models 1-4. Using instrument gimbal data and computed lunar position, the pointing error of each detector telescope, the accuracy and consistency of the alignment between the detectors can be determined. The maximum pointing error was 0.2o in azimuth and 0.17o in elevation which corresponds to an error in geolocation near nadir of 2.09 km. With the exception of one detector, all instruments were found to have consistent detector alignment from 2006 to present. All alignment error was within 0.1o with most detector telescopes showing a consistent alignment offset of less than 0.02o.

  16. ICan: An Optimized Ion-Current-Based Quantification Procedure with Enhanced Quantitative Accuracy and Sensitivity in Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding availability of high-resolution mass spectrometry has substantially enhanced the ion-current-based relative quantification techniques. Despite the increasing interest in ion-current-based methods, quantitative sensitivity, accuracy, and false discovery rate remain the major concerns; consequently, comprehensive evaluation and development in these regards are urgently needed. Here we describe an integrated, new procedure for data normalization and protein ratio estimation, termed ICan, for improved ion-current-based analysis of data generated by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS). ICan achieved significantly better accuracy and precision, and lower false-positive rate for discovering altered proteins, over current popular pipelines. A spiked-in experiment was used to evaluate the performance of ICan to detect small changes. In this study E. coli extracts were spiked with moderate-abundance proteins from human plasma (MAP, enriched by IgY14-SuperMix procedure) at two different levels to set a small change of 1.5-fold. Forty-five (92%, with an average ratio of 1.71 ± 0.13) of 49 identified MAP protein (i.e., the true positives) and none of the reference proteins (1.0-fold) were determined as significantly altered proteins, with cutoff thresholds of ≥1.3-fold change and p ≤ 0.05. This is the first study to evaluate and prove competitive performance of the ion-current-based approach for assigning significance to proteins with small changes. By comparison, other methods showed remarkably inferior performance. ICan can be broadly applicable to reliable and sensitive proteomic survey of multiple biological samples with the use of high-resolution MS. Moreover, many key features evaluated and optimized here such as normalization, protein ratio determination, and statistical analyses are also valuable for data analysis by isotope-labeling methods. PMID:25285707

  17. Associations among Context-Specific Maternal Protective Behavior, Toddler Fearful Temperament, and Maternal Accuracy and Goals.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Elizabeth J; Buss, Kristin A

    2012-11-01

    Maternal protective responses to temperamentally fearful toddlers have previously been found to relate to increased risk for children's development of anxiety-spectrum problems. Not all protective behavior is "overprotective," and not all mothers respond to toddlers' fear with protection. Therefore, the current study aimed to identify conditions under which an association between fearful temperament and protective maternal behavior occurs. Participants included 117 toddlers and their mothers, who were observed in a variety of laboratory tasks. Mothers predicted their toddlers' fear reactions in these tasks and reported the importance of parent-centered goals for their children's shyness. Protective behavior displayed in low-threat, but not high-threat, contexts related to concurrently observed fearful temperament and to mother-reported shy/inhibited behavior one year later. The relation between fearful temperament and protective behavior in low-threat, but not high-threat, contexts was strengthened by maternal accuracy in anticipating children's fear and maternal parent-centered goals for children's shyness. PMID:23226924

  18. Specific detection of Aspergillus parasiticus in wheat flour using a highly sensitive PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sardiñas, Noelia; Vázquez, Covadonga; Gil-Serna, Jessica; González-Jaen, M Teresa; Patiño, Belén

    2010-06-01

    Aspergillus parasiticus is one of the most important aflatoxin-producing species that contaminates foodstuffs and beverages for human consumption. In this work, a specific and highly sensitive PCR protocol was developed to detect A. parasiticus using primers designed on the multicopy internal transcribed region of the rDNA unit (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA). The assay proved to be highly specific for A. parasiticus when tested on a wide range of related and other fungal species commonly found in commodities, and allowing discrimination from the closely related A. flavus. Accuracy of detection and quantification by conventional PCR were tested with genomic DNA obtained from wheat flour artificially contaminated with spore suspensions of known concentrations. Spore concentrations equal or higher than 10(6) spore/g could be detected by the assay directly without prior incubation of the samples. The assay described is suitable for incorporation in routine analyses at critical points of the food chain within HACCP strategies. PMID:20486001

  19. Predictive models of lameness in dairy cows achieve high sensitivity and specificity with force measurements in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Dunthorn, Jason; Dyer, Robert M; Neerchal, Nagaraj K; McHenry, Jonathan S; Rajkondawar, Parimal G; Steingraber, Gary; Tasch, Uri

    2015-11-01

    Lameness remains a significant cause of production losses, a growing welfare concern and may be a greater economic burden than clinical mastitis . A growing need for accurate, continuous automated detection systems continues because US prevalence of lameness is 12.5% while individual herds may experience prevalence's of 27.8-50.8%. To that end the first force-plate system restricted to the vertical dimension identified lame cows with 85% specificity and 52% sensitivity. These results lead to the hypothesis that addition of transverse and longitudinal dimensions could improve sensitivity of lameness detection. To address the hypothesis we upgraded the original force plate system to measure ground reaction forces (GRFs) across three directions. GRFs and locomotion scores were generated from randomly selected cows and logistic regression was used to develop a model that characterised relationships of locomotion scores to the GRFs. This preliminary study showed 76 variables across 3 dimensions produced a model with greater than 90% sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating curve (AUC). The result was a marked improvement on the 52% sensitivity, and 85% specificity previously observed with the 1 dimensional model or the 45% sensitivities reported with visual observations. Validation of model accuracy continues with the goal to finalise accurate automated methods of lameness detection. PMID:26278403

  20. Dichotomy in perceptual learning of interval timing: calibration of mean accuracy and precision differ in specificity and time course.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Hansem; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Our brain is inexorably confronted with a dynamic environment in which it has to fine-tune spatiotemporal representations of incoming sensory stimuli and commit to a decision accordingly. Among those representations needing constant calibration is interval timing, which plays a pivotal role in various cognitive and motor tasks. To investigate how perceived time interval is adjusted by experience, we conducted a human psychophysical experiment using an implicit interval-timing task in which observers responded to an invisible bar drifting at a constant speed. We tracked daily changes in distributions of response times for a range of physical time intervals over multiple days of training with two major types of timing performance, mean accuracy and precision. We found a decoupled dynamics of mean accuracy and precision in terms of their time course and specificity of perceptual learning. Mean accuracy showed feedback-driven instantaneous calibration evidenced by a partial transfer around the time interval trained with feedback, while timing precision exhibited a long-term slow improvement with no evident specificity. We found that a Bayesian observer model, in which a subjective time interval is determined jointly by a prior and likelihood function for timing, captures the dissociative temporal dynamics of the two types of timing measures simultaneously. Finally, the model suggested that the width of the prior, not the likelihoods, gradually shrinks over sessions, substantiating the important role of prior knowledge in perceptual learning of interval timing. PMID:23076112

  1. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    PubMed

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  2. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  3. Improved accuracy with 3D planning and patient-specific instruments during simulated pelvic bone tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Cartiaux, Olivier; Paul, Laurent; Francq, Bernard G; Banse, Xavier; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In orthopaedic surgery, resection of pelvic bone tumors can be inaccurate due to complex geometry, limited visibility and restricted working space of the pelvis. The present study investigated accuracy of patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) for bone-cutting during simulated tumor surgery within the pelvis. A synthetic pelvic bone model was imaged using a CT-scanner. The set of images was reconstructed in 3D and resection of a simulated periacetabular tumor was defined with four target planes (ischium, pubis, anterior ilium, and posterior ilium) with a 10-mm desired safe margin. Patient-specific instruments for bone-cutting were designed and manufactured using rapid-prototyping technology. Twenty-four surgeons (10 senior and 14 junior) were asked to perform tumor resection. After cutting, ISO1101 location and flatness parameters, achieved surgical margins and the time were measured. With PSI, the location accuracy of the cut planes with respect to the target planes averaged 1 and 1.2 mm in the anterior and posterior ilium, 2 mm in the pubis and 3.7 mm in the ischium (p < 0.0001). Results in terms of the location of the cut planes and the achieved surgical margins did not reveal any significant difference between senior and junior surgeons (p = 0.2214 and 0.8449, respectively). The maximum differences between the achieved margins and the 10-mm desired safe margin were found in the pubis (3.1 and 5.1 mm for senior and junior surgeons respectively). Of the 24 simulated resection, there was no intralesional tumor cutting. This study demonstrates that using PSI technology during simulated bone cuts of the pelvis can provide good cutting accuracy. Compared to a previous report on computer assistance for pelvic bone cutting, PSI technology clearly demonstrates an equivalent value-added for bone cutting accuracy than navigation technology. When in vivo validated, PSI technology may improve pelvic bone tumor surgery by providing clinically acceptable margins. PMID

  4. Sensitivity of Flux Accuracy to Setup of Fossil Fuel and Biogenic CO2 Inverse System in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, K.; Lauvaux, T.; Deng, A.; Lopez-Coto, I.; Gurney, K. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Turnbull, J. C.; Davis, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) aims to utilize a variety of measurements and a high resolution inversion system to estimate the spatial distribution and the temporal variation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the city of Indianapolis. We separated biogenic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes and tested the sensitivity of inverse flux estimates to inverse system configurations by performing Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). The a priori CO2 emissions from Hestia were aggregated to 1 km resolution to represent emissions from the Indianapolis metropolitan area and its surroundings. With the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled to a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM), the physical relations between concentrations at the tower locations and emissions at the surface were simulated at 1 km spatial resolution, hourly. Within a Bayesian synthesis inversion framework, we tested the effect of multiple parameters on our ability to infer fossil fuel CO2 fluxes: the presence of biogenic CO2 fluxes in the optimization procedure, the use of fossil fuel CO2 concentration measurements, the impact of reduced transport errors, the sensitivity to observation density, and the spatio-temporal properties of prior errors. The results indicate that the presence of biogenic CO2 fluxes obviously weakens the ability to invert for the fossil fuel CO2 emissions in an urban environment, but having relatively accurate fossil fuel CO2 concentration measurements can effectively compensate the interference from the biogenic flux component. Reduced transport error and more intensive measurement networks are two possible approaches to retrieve the spatial pattern of the fluxes and decrease the bias in inferred whole-city fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The accuracy of posterior fluxes is very sensitive to the spatial correlation length in the prior flux errors which, if they exist, can enhance significantly our ability to recover the known fluxes

  5. Sensitive, Fast, and Specific Immunoassays for Methyltestosterone Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Na; Song, Shanshan; Peng, Juan; Liu, Liqiang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai

    2015-01-01

    An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) and an immunochromatographic strip assay using a highly specific monoclonal antibody, were developed to detect methyltestosterone (MT) residues in animal feed. The optimized icELISA had a half-inhibition concentration value of 0.26 ng/mL and a limit of detection value of 0.045 ng/mL. There was no cross-reactivity with eight analogues, revealing high specificity for MT. Based on icELISA results, the recovery rate of MT in animal feed was 82.4%–100.6%. The results were in accordance with those obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The developed immunochromatographic strip assay, as the first report for MT detection, had a visual cut-off value of 1 ng/mL in PBS, 2.5 ng/g in fish feed, and 2.5 ng/g in pig feed. Therefore, these immunoassays are useful and fast tools for MT residue detection in animal feed. PMID:25938198

  6. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rettmann, Maryam E. Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon J.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Robb, Richard A.; Kwartowitz, David M.; Gunawan, Mia; Johnson, Susan B.; Packer, Douglas L.; Dalegrave, Charles; Kolasa, Mark W.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved

  7. The Gastric/Pancreatic Amylase Ratio Predicts Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula With High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shuo; Shi, Xiao-Ju; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Ping; Lv, Guo-Yue; Du, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Si-Yuan; Wang, Guang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article aims to identify risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) and evaluate the gastric/pancreatic amylase ratio (GPAR) on postoperative day (POD) 3 as a POPF predictor in patients who undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). POPF significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity in patients who undergo PD. Previously identified predictors for POPF often have low predictive accuracy. Therefore, accurate POPF predictors are needed. In this prospective cohort study, we measured the clinical and biochemical factors of 61 patients who underwent PD and diagnosed POPF according to the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula. We analyzed the association between POPF and various factors, identified POPF risk factors, and evaluated the predictive power of the GPAR on POD3 and the levels of serum and ascites amylase. Of the 61 patients, 21 developed POPF. The color of the pancreatic drain fluid, POD1 serum, POD1 median output of pancreatic drain fluid volume, and GPAR were significantly associated with POPF. The color of the pancreatic drain fluid and high GPAR were independent risk factors. Although serum and ascites amylase did not predict POPF accurately, the cutoff value was 1.24, and GPAR predicted POPF with high sensitivity and specificity. This is the first report demonstrating that high GPAR on POD3 is a risk factor for POPF and showing that GPAR is a more accurate predictor of POPF than the previously reported amylase markers. PMID:25621676

  8. High sensitivity and accuracy dissolved oxygen (DO) detection by using PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) sensing film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Honglin; Wang, Ying; Tian, Yanqing; Zhao, Jiupeng; Li, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Fluorinated acrylate polymer has received great interest in recent years due to its extraordinary characteristics such as high oxygen permeability, good stability, low surface energy and refractive index. In this work, platinum octaethylporphyrin/poly(methylmethacrylate-co-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA)) oxygen sensing film was prepared by the immobilizing of PtOEP in a poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) matrix and the technological readiness of optical properties was established based on the principle of luminescence quenching. It was found that the oxygen-sensing performance could be improved by optimizing the monomer ratio (MMA/TFEMA=1:1), tributylphosphate(TBP, 0.05mL) and PtOEP (5μg) content. Under this condition, the maximum quenching ratio I0/I100 of the oxygen sensing film is obtained to be about 8.16, Stern-Volmer equation is I0/I=1.003+2.663[O2] (R(2)=0.999), exhibiting a linear relationship, good photo-stability, high sensitivity and accuracy. Finally, the synthesized PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) sensing film was used for DO detection in different water samples. PMID:27450122

  9. Specificity, accuracy, and interpretation of measurements of ethylene oxide gas concentrations during sterilization using a microwave spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.; Matthews, I. P.; Dickinson, W.

    1997-07-01

    This article reports the update in the design of a microwave spectrometer for measuring concentrations of ethylene oxide gas during sterilization. The specificity of the measurement (absorption line at 23.134 GHz) using the spectrometer has been found to be virtually 100%. A great number of calibrations have been conducted in the range of concentrations 100% to 40% of ethylene oxide gas at intervals of -10% in order to determine the accuracy of the spectrometer. It was found that the maximum standard deviation from the regression curve was 1.2% full scale (0%-100%). A mathematical model based on a diffusion equation has been developed and was used to interpret the real time measurement data during sterilization. Numerical simulation using this model has demonstrated that it is possible to predict the dynamic distributions of ethylene oxide concentration within the load being sterilized.

  10. Efficient Noninferiority Testing Procedures for Simultaneously Assessing Sensitivity and Specificity of Two Diagnostic Tests.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Amei, Amei; Young, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity are often used to assess the performance of a diagnostic test with binary outcomes. Wald-type test statistics have been proposed for testing sensitivity and specificity individually. In the presence of a gold standard, simultaneous comparison between two diagnostic tests for noninferiority of sensitivity and specificity based on an asymptotic approach has been studied by Chen et al. (2003). However, the asymptotic approach may suffer from unsatisfactory type I error control as observed from many studies, especially in small to medium sample settings. In this paper, we compare three unconditional approaches for simultaneously testing sensitivity and specificity. They are approaches based on estimation, maximization, and a combination of estimation and maximization. Although the estimation approach does not guarantee type I error, it has satisfactory performance with regard to type I error control. The other two unconditional approaches are exact. The approach based on estimation and maximization is generally more powerful than the approach based on maximization. PMID:26366190

  11. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A.; Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight

  12. The sensitivity and specificity of F-DOPA PET in a movement disorder clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nevein; Kusmirek, Joanna; Struck, Aaron F; Floberg, John M; Perlman, Scott B; Gallagher, Catherine; Hall, Lance T

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Early PD may present a diagnostic challenge with broad differential diagnoses that are not associated with nigral degeneration or striatal dopamine deficiency. Therefore, the early clinical diagnosis alone may not be accurate and this reinforces the importance of functional imaging targeting the pathophysiology of the disease process. 18F-DOPA L-6-[18F] fluoro-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalnine (18F-DOPA) is a positron emission tomography (PET) agent that measures the uptake of dopamine precursors for assessment of presynaptic dopaminergic integrity and has been shown to accurately reflect the monoaminergic disturbances in PD. In this study, we aim to illustrate our local experience to determine the accuracy of 18F-DOPA PET for diagnosis of PD. We studied a total of 27 patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out for all patients that underwent 18F-DOPA PET brain scan for motor symptoms suspicious for PD between 2001-2008. Both qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of the scans were performed. The patient’s medical records were then assessed for length of follow-up, response to levodopa, clinical course of illness, and laterality of symptoms at time of 18F-DOPA PET. The eventual diagnosis by the referring neurologist, movement disorder specialist, was used as the reference standard for further analysis. Of the 28 scans, we found that one was a false negative, 20 were true positives, and 7 were true negatives. The resultant values are Sensitivity 95.4% (95% CI: 100%-75.3%), Specificity 100% (95% CI: 100%-59.0%), PPV 100% (95% CI 100%-80.7%), and NPV 87.5% (95% CI: 99.5%-50.5%). PMID:27069770

  13. Sensitivity and Specificity of Portable Hearing Screening in Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Carolina Louise; Bós, Ângelo José Gonçalves; Gonçalves, Andréa Krüger; Olchik, Maira Rozenfeld; Flores, Leticia Sousa; Seimetz, Bruna Macagnin; Bauer, Magda Aline; Coradini, Patricia Pérez; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hearing screening allows the identification of individuals with hearing loss. Aim To determine the sensitivity and specificity of a portable hearing screening device in middle-aged and older adults using the manufacturer scoring and a scoring system proposed by the researchers. Methods In this transversal study, participants underwent anamnesis, otoscopy, and hearing screening using portable equipment. After this, a pure tone audiometry was performed, with participants classified into two groups: with and without hearing loss. The sensitivity and specificity of the hearing screening were calculated for the right and left ears using two methods of interpretation: the original method recommended by the manufacturer (criteria 1) and the method proposed by researchers (criteria 2). Results The sample consisted of 55 individuals, 83.6% (n = 46) of whom were women. Per criteria 1, the sensitivities were 26.3 (right ear) and 21.4% (left ear). The specificity was 100% for both ears. Using criteria 2, the sensitivity was 94.7 (right ear) and 100% (left ear). The specificity was 74.3 (right ear) and 65.9% (left ear). Conclusion This study showed that the criteria proposed by the manufacturer presented low sensitivity in the hearing screening. The criteria proposed by the researchers to achieve a more efficient performance reached high and balanced values for sensitivity and specificity. PMID:25992058

  14. Accuracy of CT-based patient-specific guides for total knee arthroplasty in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Schotanus, M G M; van Haaren, E H; Hendrickx, R P M; Jansen, E J P; Kort, N P

    2015-12-01

    Published clinical trials who studied the accuracy of patient-specific guides (PSG) for total knee arthroplasty exclude patients with articular deformity of the knee joint. We prospectively analysed a series of 30 patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint with use of PSG. At 1 year post-operative, the achieved biomechanical (HKA) axis and varus/valgus of the femur and tibia components were measured on anterior-posterior (AP) long-standing weight-bearing radiographs. Flexion/extension of the femoral and AP slope of the tibia component was measured on standard lateral radiographs. Percentages >3° deviation of the pre-operative planned HKA axis and individual implant components were considered as outliers. Approved and used implant size, median blood loss (ml) and operation time (min) were obtained from the operation records. Pre- and 1-year post-operative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were performed. Eighty-three per cent of the patients had a HKA axis restored <3° of the pre-operative planned alignment. Varus/valgus outliers were 0.0 and 6.7 % for the femoral and tibial components, respectively. Percentages of outliers of flexion/extension were 36.7 % for the femoral component and 10.0 % for the AP slope of the tibial component. Median blood loss was 300 ml (50-700), while operation time was 67 min (44-144). In 20 % of all cases, the approved implant size was changed into one size smaller. One-year post-operative PROMs improved significantly. We conclude that the accuracy of CT-based PSG is not impaired in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis and this modality can restore biomechanical limb alignment. PMID:26265403

  15. Analyzing the tradeoff between electrical complexity and accuracy in patient-specific computational models of deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Bryan; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an adjunctive therapy that is effective in treating movement disorders and shows promise for treating psychiatric disorders. Computational models of DBS have begun to be utilized as tools to optimize the therapy. Despite advancements in the anatomical accuracy of these models, there is still uncertainty as to what level of electrical complexity is adequate for modeling the electric field in the brain and the subsequent neural response to the stimulation. Approach. We used magnetic resonance images to create an image-based computational model of subthalamic DBS. The complexity of the volume conductor model was increased by incrementally including heterogeneity, anisotropy, and dielectric dispersion in the electrical properties of the brain. We quantified changes in the load of the electrode, the electric potential distribution, and stimulation thresholds of descending corticofugal (DCF) axon models. Main results. Incorporation of heterogeneity altered the electric potentials and subsequent stimulation thresholds, but to a lesser degree than incorporation of anisotropy. Additionally, the results were sensitive to the choice of method for defining anisotropy, with stimulation thresholds of DCF axons changing by as much as 190%. Typical approaches for defining anisotropy underestimate the expected load of the stimulation electrode, which led to underestimation of the extent of stimulation. More accurate predictions of the electrode load were achieved with alternative approaches for defining anisotropy. The effects of dielectric dispersion were small compared to the effects of heterogeneity and anisotropy. Significance. The results of this study help delineate the level of detail that is required to accurately model electric fields generated by DBS electrodes.

  16. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  17. A Rapid In-Clinic Test Detects Acute Leptospirosis in Dogs with High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kodjo, Angeli; Calleja, Christophe; Loenser, Michael; Lin, Dan; Lizer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    A rapid IgM-detection immunochromatographic test (WITNESS® Lepto, Zoetis) has recently become available to identify acute canine leptospirosis at the point of care. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated by comparison with the microscopic agglutination assay (MAT), using a positive cut-off titer of ≥800. Banked serum samples from dogs exhibiting clinical signs and suspected leptospirosis were selected to form three groups based on MAT titer: (1) positive (n = 50); (2) borderline (n = 35); and (3) negative (n = 50). Using an analysis to weight group sizes to reflect French prevalence, the sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 93.5% (88.2% unweighted), respectively. This test rapidly identifies cases of acute canine leptospirosis with high levels of sensitivity and specificity with no interference from previous vaccination. PMID:27110562

  18. Verification of Accuracy of CyberKnife Tumor-tracking Radiation Therapy Using Patient-specific Lung Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jinhong; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kwak, Jungwon; Yoon, KyoungJun; Choi, Wonsik; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung; Cho, Byungchul

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of the CyberKnife Xsight Lung Tracking System (XLTS) compared with that of a fiducial-based target tracking system (FTTS) using patient-specific lung phantoms. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional printing technology was used to make individualized lung phantoms that closely mimicked the lung anatomy of actual patients. Based on planning computed tomographic data from 6 lung cancer patients who underwent stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using the CyberKnife, the volume above a certain Hounsfield unit (HU) was assigned as the structure to be filled uniformly with polylactic acid material by a 3-dimensional printer (3D Edison, Lokit, Korea). We evaluated the discrepancies between the measured and modeled target positions, representing the total tracking error, using 3 log files that were generated during each treatment for both the FTTS and the XLTS. We also analyzed the γ index between the film dose measured under the FTTS and XLTS. Results: The overall mean values and standard deviations of total tracking errors for the FTTS were 0.36 ± 0.39 mm, 0.15 ± 0.64 mm, and 0.15 ± 0.62 mm for the craniocaudal (CC), left–right (LR), and anteroposterior (AP) components, respectively. Those for the XLTS were 0.38 ± 0.54 mm, 0.13 ± 0.18 mm, and 0.14 ± 0.37 mm for the CC, LR, and AP components, respectively. The average of γ passing rates was 100% for the criteria of 3%, 3 mm; 99.6% for the criteria of 2%, 2 mm; and 86.8% for the criteria of 1%, 1 mm. Conclusions: The XLTS has segmentation accuracy comparable with that of the FTTS and small total tracking errors.

  19. Intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility and accuracy of the LuSens assay: A reporter gene-cell line to detect keratinocyte activation by skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Stein, Nadine; Aumann, Alexandra; Remus, Tina; Edwards, Amber; Norman, Kimberly G; Ryan, Cindy; Bader, Jackie E; Fehr, Markus; Burleson, Florence; Foertsch, Leslie; Wang, Xiaohong; Gerberick, Frank; Beilstein, Paul; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Mehling, Annette; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Several non-animal methods are now available to address the key events leading to skin sensitization as defined by the adverse outcome pathway. The KeratinoSens assay addresses the cellular event of keratinocyte activation and is a method accepted under OECD TG 442D. In this study, the results of an inter-laboratory evaluation of the "me-too" LuSens assay, a bioassay that uses a human keratinocyte cell line harboring a reporter gene construct composed of the rat antioxidant response element (ARE) of the NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene and the luciferase gene, are described. Earlier in-house validation with 74 substances showed an accuracy of 82% in comparison to human data. When used in a battery of non-animal methods, even higher predictivity is achieved. To meet European validation criteria, a multicenter study was conducted in 5 laboratories. The study was divided into two phases, to assess 1) transferability of the method, and 2) reproducibility and accuracy. Phase I was performed by testing 8 non-coded test substances; the results showed a good transferability to naïve laboratories even without on-site training. Phase II was performed with 20 coded test substances (performance standards recommended by OECD, 2015). In this phase, the intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility as well as accuracy of the method was evaluated. The data demonstrate a remarkable reproducibility of 100% and an accuracy of over 80% in identifying skin sensitizers, indicating a good concordance with in vivo data. These results demonstrate good transferability, reliability and accuracy of the method thereby achieving the standards necessary for use in a regulatory setting to detect skin sensitizers. PMID:26796489

  20. Sensitivity and specificity of dosing alerts for dosing errors among hospitalized pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Porter, Kyle; Nahata, Milap C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the sensitivity and specificity of a dosing alert system for dosing errors and to compare the sensitivity of a proprietary system with and without institutional customization at a pediatric hospital. Methods A retrospective analysis of medication orders, orders causing dosing alerts, reported adverse drug events, and dosing errors during July, 2011 was conducted. Dosing errors with and without alerts were identified and the sensitivity of the system with and without customization was compared. Results There were 47 181 inpatient pediatric orders during the studied period; 257 dosing errors were identified (0.54%). The sensitivity of the system for identifying dosing errors was 54.1% (95% CI 47.8% to 60.3%) if customization had not occurred and increased to 60.3% (CI 54.0% to 66.3%) with customization (p=0.02). The sensitivity of the system for underdoses was 49.6% without customization and 60.3% with customization (p=0.01). Specificity of the customized system for dosing errors was 96.2% (CI 96.0% to 96.3%) with a positive predictive value of 8.0% (CI 6.8% to 9.3). All dosing errors had an alert over-ridden by the prescriber and 40.6% of dosing errors with alerts were administered to the patient. The lack of indication-specific dose ranges was the most common reason why an alert did not occur for a dosing error. Discussion Advances in dosing alert systems should aim to improve the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the system for dosing errors. Conclusions The dosing alert system had a low sensitivity and positive predictive value for dosing errors, but might have prevented dosing errors from reaching patients. Customization increased the sensitivity of the system for dosing errors. PMID:24496386

  1. The specificity of cognitive vulnerabilities to emotional disorders: anxiety sensitivity, looming vulnerability and explanatory style.

    PubMed

    Reardon, John M; Williams, Nathan L

    2007-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders share considerable phenomenological and diagnostic overlap. Several models have advanced the understanding of the phenomenological overlap of anxiety and depression; however, identification of disorder-specific etiological mechanisms remains elusive. Recently, research has advanced several cognitive vulnerability-stress models proposing that one's characteristic way of attending to, interpreting, and remembering negative events contributes vulnerability to psychopathology. These cognitive vulnerabilities may elucidate specific etiological mechanisms that distinguish mood and anxiety pathology. The present study examines the specificity of three cognitive vulnerability constructs, the looming cognitive style, anxiety sensitivity, and explanatory style, in the prediction of latent anxiety disorder symptoms and latent depression symptoms. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that the looming cognitive style demonstrated specificity predicting only anxiety disorder symptoms whereas anxiety sensitivity and a pessimistic explanatory style predicted both anxiety disorder and mood disorder symptoms. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:17070666

  2. Mesocosm Community Response Sensitivities to Specific Conductivity Comprised of Different Major Ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional toxicity test assays have been used to evaluate the relative sensitivity to different major ion mixtures as a proxy for understanding what the response of aquatic species growing in their natural environment would be during exposure to specific conductivity stress ema...

  3. Simple, specific, sensitive and rapid loop-mediated method for detecting Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun-Ming; Liu, Xi-Lin; Ma, Jing; Li, Yan-Song; Hu, Pan; Zou, De-Ying; Guo, Xing; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Tang, Feng; Liu, Nan-Nan; Wei, Li-Bin; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Ren, Hong-Lin; Lu, Shi-Ying

    2014-05-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) is a main pathogenic bacterium causing diarrhea and yersiniosis occurs in both developed and developing countries with high incidence. YE in contaminated food is able to survive for a long duration even under cold storage, thereby enhancing the risk of food infection. In this study, a new loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method showing the characteristics of simplicity, rapidity, high specificity and sensitivity was established by targeting outL of pathogenic YE. Two inner-primers and outer-primers were designed and LAMP reaction was optimized for Mg2+, betaine, dNTPs and inner primers concentrations, reaction temperature and time. Sensitivity and specificity of the LAMP assay was evaluated using YE genomic DNA and those of 44 different bacteria strains, respectively. Validation of LAMP detection method was by employing meat samples spiked with varying CFU of YE. The optimized LAMP assay was specific, capable of detecting 97 fg of genomic DNA (equivalent to 37 genome copies) of YE (100-fold more sensitive than PCR) and 80 CFU/ml of YE-spiked meat samples based on ethidium bromide stained amplicon bands on agarose gel-electrophoresis and on GelRed fluorescence of the LAMP reaction solution, respectively. This rapid, sensitive and specific LAMP technique should enable application in field inspection of Y. enterocolitica in food. PMID:24974652

  4. Sensitivity and Specificity of Depression Questionnaires in a College-Age Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shean, Glenn; Baldwin, Gretchen

    2008-01-01

    The authors evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II; A. T. Beck, R. A. Steer, & G. K. Brown, 1996) and Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CESD; L. S. Radloff, 1977) questionnaires for a college-student sample. Results indicate that the BDI-II and CES-D evidenced satisfactory levels of…

  5. California Verbal Learning Test Indicators of Malingered Neurocognitive Dysfunction: Sensitivity and Specificity in Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Kelly L.; Greve, Kevin W.; Bianchini, Kevin J.; Brennan, Adrianne

    2006-01-01

    The present study used well-defined traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mixed neurological (other than TBI) and psychiatric samples to examine the specificity and sensitivity to Malingered Neurocognitive Dysfunction (MND) of four individual California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) variables and eight composite CVLT malingering indicators. Participants…

  6. Utility of the Spelling Sensitivity Score to Analyze Spellings of Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Krimm, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of the Spelling Sensitivity Score (SSS) beyond percentage correct scoring in analyzing the spellings of children with specific language impairment (SLI). Participants were 31 children with SLI and 28 children with typical language in grades 2-4. Spellings of individual words were scored using…

  7. The Sensitivity and Specificity of Depression Screening Tools among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ailey, Sarah H.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the validity and the sensitivity and specificity of depression screening tools among adults with intellectual and disabilities (ID). Subjects (N = 75) were interviewed with the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the Glasgow Depression Scale for People with a Learning Disability (GDS-LD) and also completed a clinical…

  8. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Modified for Individuals Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittich, Walter; Phillips, Natalie; Nasreddine, Ziad S.; Chertkow, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Evaluating the cognitive status of individuals who are visually impaired is limited by the design of the test that is used. This article presents data on the sensitivity and specificity of the version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment for people who are visually impaired. The original validation data were reanalyzed, excluding the five visual…

  9. Highly sensitive and specific colorimetric detection of cancer cells via dual-aptamer target binding strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Fan, Daoqing; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2015-11-15

    Simple, rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cancer cells is of great importance for early and accurate cancer diagnostics and therapy. By coupling nanotechnology and dual-aptamer target binding strategies, we developed a colorimetric assay for visually detecting cancer cells with high sensitivity and specificity. The nanotechnology including high catalytic activity of PtAuNP and magnetic separation & concentration plays a vital role on the signal amplification and improvement of detection sensitivity. The color change caused by small amount of target cancer cells (10 cells/mL) can be clearly distinguished by naked eyes. The dual-aptamer target binding strategy guarantees the detection specificity that large amount of non-cancer cells and different cancer cells (10(4) cells/mL) cannot cause obvious color change. A detection limit as low as 10 cells/mL with detection linear range from 10 to 10(5) cells/mL was reached according to the experimental detections in phosphate buffer solution as well as serum sample. The developed enzyme-free and cost effective colorimetric assay is simple and no need of instrument while still provides excellent sensitivity, specificity and repeatability, having potential application on point-of-care cancer diagnosis. PMID:26042871

  10. Quantification of HLA class II-specific memory B cells in HLA-sensitized individuals.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Gonca E; de Vaal, Yvonne J H; Roelen, Dave L; Buchli, Rico; Claas, Frans H J; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2015-03-01

    For the quantification of HLA-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood of sensitized individuals, a limited number of methods are available. However, none of these are capable of detecting memory B cells directed at HLA class II molecules. Since the majority of antibodies that occur after transplantation appear to be specific for HLA class II, our aim was to develop an assay to detect and quantify HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. By using biotinylated soluble HLA class II molecules as detection agent, we were able to develop an HLA class II-specific memory B cell ELISPOT assay. The assay was validated using B cell-derived hybridomas that produce human monoclonal antibodies directed at specific HLA class II molecules. In pregnancy-immunized females, we found memory B cell frequencies ranging from 25 to 756 spots per 10(6) B cells specific for the immunizing paternal HLA class II molecules, whereas in non-immunized males no significant spot formation was detected. Here, we present a novel ELISPOT assay for quantifying HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. This technique provides a unique tool for monitoring the HLA class II-specific memory B cell pool in sensitized transplant recipients. PMID:25636565

  11. Compact diffraction grating laser wavemeter with sub-picometer accuracy and picowatt sensitivity using a webcam imaging sensor.

    PubMed

    White, James D; Scholten, Robert E

    2012-11-01

    We describe a compact laser wavelength measuring instrument based on a small diffraction grating and a consumer-grade webcam. With just 1 pW of optical power, the instrument achieves absolute accuracy of 0.7 pm, sufficient to resolve individual hyperfine transitions of the rubidium absorption spectrum. Unlike interferometric wavemeters, the instrument clearly reveals multimode laser operation, making it particularly suitable for use with external cavity diode lasers and atom cooling and trapping experiments. PMID:23206048

  12. Compact diffraction grating laser wavemeter with sub-picometer accuracy and picowatt sensitivity using a webcam imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, James D.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2012-11-01

    We describe a compact laser wavelength measuring instrument based on a small diffraction grating and a consumer-grade webcam. With just 1 pW of optical power, the instrument achieves absolute accuracy of 0.7 pm, sufficient to resolve individual hyperfine transitions of the rubidium absorption spectrum. Unlike interferometric wavemeters, the instrument clearly reveals multimode laser operation, making it particularly suitable for use with external cavity diode lasers and atom cooling and trapping experiments.

  13. Development of Sensitive and Specific Analysis of Vildagliptin in Pharmaceutical Formulation by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Uçaktürk, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and fully validated for the determination of vildagliptin (VIL) in pharmaceutical formulation. Prior to GC-MS analysis, VIL was efficiently derivatized with MSTFA/NH4I/β-mercaptoethanol at 60°C for 30 min. The obtained O-TMS derivative of VIL was detected by selected ion monitoring mode using the diagnostic ions m/z 223 and 252. Nandrolone was chosen as internal standard. The GC-MS method was fully validated by the following validation parameters: limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ), linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, stability, robustness, and ruggedness. LOD and LOQ were found to be 1.5 and 3.5 ng mL−1, respectively. The GC-MS method is linear in the range of 3.5–300 ng mL−1. The intra- and interday precision values were less than ≤3.62%. The intra- and interday accuracy values were found in the range of −0.26–2.06%. Finally, the GC-MS method was successfully applied to determine VIL in pharmaceutical formulation. PMID:26682085

  14. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  15. Giant magnetoresistive sensor array for sensitive and specific multiplexed food allergen detection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-06-15

    Current common allergen detection methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and dip-stick methods, do not provide adequate levels of sensitivity and specificity for at-risk allergic patients. A method for performing highly sensitive and specific detection of multiple food allergens is thus imperative as food allergies are becoming increasingly recognized as a major healthcare concern, affecting an estimated 4% of the total population. We demonstrate first instance of sensitive and specific multiplexed detection of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and wheat allergen Gliadin using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. Commercialized ELISA kits for Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 report limits of detection (LODs) at 31.5 ng/mL and 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. In addition, the 96-well-based ELISA developed in-house for Gliadin was found to have a LOD of 40 ng/mL. Our multiplexed GMR-based assay demonstrates the ability to perform all three assays on the same chip specifically and with sensitivities at LODs about an order of magnitude lower than those of 96-well-based ELISAs. LODs of GMR-based assays developed for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Gliadin were 7.0 ng/mL, 0.2 ng/mL, and 1.5 ng/mL, respectively, with little to no cross-reactivity. These LODs are clinically important as some patients could react strongly against such low allergen levels. Given the limitations of current industrial detection technology, multiplexed GMR-based assays provide a method for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous detection of any combination of food-product allergens, thus protecting allergic patients from life-threatening events, including anaphylaxis, by unintentional consumption. PMID:26859787

  16. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Kaza, Aditya K.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2±0.3% and 98.0±0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2±0.3% and 94.0±2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  17. Individual differences in response speed and accuracy are associated to specific brain activities of two interacting systems

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Rinaldo Livio; Berchicci, Marika; Spinelli, Donatella; Di Russo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates the neurocognitive stages involved in the speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT). Contrary to previous approach, we did not manipulate speed and accuracy instructions: participants were required to be fast and accurate in a go/no-go task, and we selected post-hoc the groups based on the subjects’ spontaneous behavioral tendency. Based on the reaction times, we selected the fast and slow groups (Speed-groups), and based on the percentage of false alarms, we selected the accurate and inaccurate groups (Accuracy-groups). The two Speed-groups were accuracy-matched, and the two Accuracy-groups were speed-matched. High density electroencephalographic (EEG) and stimulus-locked analyses allowed us to observe group differences both before and after the stimulus onset. Long before the stimulus appearance, the two Speed-groups showed different amplitude of the Bereitschaftspotential (BP), reflecting the activity of the supplementary motor area (SMA); by contrast, the two Accuracy-groups showed different amplitude of the prefrontal negativity (pN), reflecting the activity of the right prefrontal cortex (rPFC). In addition, the post-stimulus event-related potential (ERP) components showed differences between groups: the P1 component was larger in accurate than inaccurate group; the N1 and N2 components were larger in the fast than slow group; the P3 component started earlier and was larger in the fast than slow group. The go minus no-go subtractive wave enhancing go-related processing revealed a differential prefrontal positivity (dpP) that peaked at about 330 ms; the latency and the amplitude of this peak were associated with the speed of the decision process and the efficiency of the stimulus-response mapping, respectively. Overall, data are consistent with the view that speed and accuracy are processed by two interacting but separate neurocognitive systems, with different features in both the anticipation and the response execution phases. PMID:25100961

  18. Development of a highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Sudan I in food samples.

    PubMed

    Han, Dan; Yu, Meng; Knopp, Dietmar; Niessner, Reinhard; Wu, Mei; Deng, Anping

    2007-08-01

    A highly selective and sensitive indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Sudan I was developed. Two hapten derivatives with different lengths of carboxylic spacer at the azo-bound para-position were synthesized and coupled to carrier proteins. The hapten-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugates were used as immunogens, while the hapten-ovalbumin (OA) conjugates were applied as coating antigens. The antisera which were obtained from four immunized rabbits were characterized in terms of sensitivity and specificity. At optimal experimental conditions it was found that IC50 and LOD values of seven pairs based on four antisera and two coating antigens were in the range of 0.3-2 ng/mL and 0.02-0.1 ng/mL, respectively. The most sensitive ELISA could be established with Sudan I-propionic acid-OA coating antigen and the antiserum which was obtained with the corresponding immunogen. The cross-reactivity values of the four antisera with Sudan II, III, and IV was estimated with 0.1-14.3%. No cross-reactivity was found with six edible colorants Sunset yellow, Amarant, Kermes, Indigotin, Bright blue and Lemon yellow, indicating high specificity for Sudan I. Six food samples were fortified with Sudan I and extracted by simple sample preparation. The methanolic extracts after dilution with methanol:water (5:95, v/v) were analyzed by the developed ELISA. Assay precision and accuracy was estimated by determination of three replicates. Acceptable recovery rates of 92.5-114% and intra-assay coefficients of variation of 5.9-24.8% were obtained. The data were validated by conventional HPLC method. As revealed, both methods were highly correlated (r = 0.9851, n = 7), demonstrating the applicability of the developed ELISA for Sudan I analysis in food samples. PMID:17622156

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of the user-seal-check in determining the fit of N95 respirators.

    PubMed

    Lam, S C; Lee, J K L; Yau, S Y; Charm, C Y C

    2011-03-01

    N95 respirators are recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to prevent the inhalation of droplets which may transmit respiratory pathogens. The reliability of N95 respirators in preventing transmission depends on their fit to the wearer. Quantitative fit testing (QNFT) is the gold standard used to determine this fit objectively. The manufacturers of the respirators also recommend performing a self-reported user-seal-check to detect for leakage. This study aims to investigate the capability of the user-seal-check in determining the fit of N95 respirators by investigating the sensitivity and specificity of the user-seal-check compared with QNFT. A prospective and cross-sectional research design was used. A total of 204 local Chinese undergraduate nursing students were recruited to test two commonly used respirator models (3M 1860S and 3M 1862). The results of the user-seal-check were compared with the results of the gold standard QNFT using the Condensation Nucleus Counter Fit Tester System. The sensitivity and specificity of the user-seal-check results obtained with the respirators were calculated. The results indicated low sensitivity, accuracy and predictive value of the user-seal-check in determining the fit of the N95 respirators. The user-seal-check was not found to be reliable as a substitute for QNFT. The results also suggested that the user-seal-check may be unreliable for detecting gross leakage. We recommend that QNFT is used to determine the fit of N95 respirators. PMID:21236516

  20. A LC–MS/MS method for the specific, sensitive, and simultaneous quantification of 5-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinglan; Yasuda, Makiko; Desnick, Robert J.; Balwani, Manisha; Bishop, David; Yu, Chunli

    2012-01-01

    Accurate determinations of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) in physiologic fluids are required for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of acute porphyrias. Current colorimetric methods are insensitive and over-estimate ALA and PBG due to poor specificity, while LC–MS/MS methods increase sensitivity, but have limited matrices. An LC–MS/MS method was developed to simultaneously determine ALA and PBG concentrations in fluids or tissues which were solid phase extracted, butanol derivatized, and quantitated by selective reaction monitoring using 13C5, 15N-ALA and 2,4-13C2-PBG internal standards. ALA was separated from interfering compounds on a reverse phase C8-column. For ALA and PBG, the matrix effects (87.3–105%) and process efficiencies (77.6–97.8% and 37.2–41.6%, respectively) were acceptable in plasma and urine matrices. The assay was highly sensitive for ALA and PBG (LLOQ = 0.05 µM with 25 µL urine or 100 µL plasma), and required ~4 h from extraction to results. ALA and PBG accuracy ranged from 88.2 to 110% (n = 10); intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variations were <10% for urine and plasma. In clinical applications, patients with mutation-confirmed acute porphyrias had normal to slightly increased urinary ALA and PBG levels when asymptomatic, and high levels during acute attacks, which decreased with hemin therapy. In AIP mice, baseline ALA and PBG levels in urine, plasma, and liver were increased after phenobarbital induction 28-/63-, 42-/266-, and 13-/316-fold, respectively. This LC–MS/MS method is rapid, specific, highly sensitive, accurate, and simultaneously measures ALA and PBG in urine, plasma, and tissues permitting porphyria clinical diagnoses, therapeutic monitoring, and research. PMID:21783436

  1. Probing the target-specific inhibition of sensitized protein tyrosine phosphatases with biarsenical probes

    PubMed Central

    Pomorski, Adam; Adamczyk, Justyna; Bishop, Anthony C.; Krężel, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Selective control of enzyme activity is critical for elucidating the roles of specific proteins in signaling pathways. One potential means for developing truly target-specific inhibitors involves the use of protein engineering to sensitize a target enzyme to inhibition by a small molecule that does not inhibit homologous wild-type enzymes. Previously, it has been shown that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) can be sensitized to inhibition by a biarsenical probe, FlAsH-EDT2, which inhibits PTP activity by specifically binding to cysteine residues that have been introduced into catalytically important regions. In the present study, we developed an array of biarsenical probes, some newly synthesized and some previously reported, to investigate for the first time the structure-activity relationships for PTP inhibition by biarsenicals. Our data show that biarsenical probes which contain substitutions at the 2′ and 7′ positions are more effective than FlAsH-EDT2 at inhibiting sensitized PTPs. The increased potency of 2′,7′-substituted probes was observed when PTPs were assayed with both para-nitrophenylphosphate and phosphopeptide PTP substrates and at multiple probe concentrations. The data further indicate that the enhanced inhibitory properties are the result of increased binding affinity between the 2′,7′-substituted biarsenical probes and sensitized PTPs. In addition we provide previously unknown physicochemical and stability data for various biarsenical probes. PMID:25460004

  2. A sensitive and specific two-site enzyme-immunoassay for human calcitonin using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seth, R; Motté, P; Kehely, A; Wimalawansa, S J; Self, C H; Bellet, D; Bohuon, C; MacIntyre, I

    1988-11-01

    A highly sensitive, specific and rapid two-site enzyme-immunometric assay (EIA) for the measurement of immunoreactive (ir) human calcitonin (hCT) in human plasma was developed using high-affinity monoclonal antibodies. The assay was validated in terms of sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility and its performance compared with that of a radioimmunoassay (RIA) employing a polyclonal antiserum. The sensitivity of the overnight EIA (2 pmol/l) was comparable with the long-incubation (7 days) RIA. The overnight RIA had a sensitivity of 10 pmol/l. The inter- and intra-assay variations of the EIA were less than 12%. Some related and non-related peptides were compared with synthetic hCT for cross-reactivity in the assay and were found to be negative. The mean recovery of added synthetic hCT from plasma of normal volunteers was 96%. Both RIA and EIA have been applied to the measurement of ir-hCT in normal volunteers and in patients with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. In both groups, the level of ir-hCT measured by EIA was found to be lower than that measured by RIA, presumably due to the ability of the more specific EIA to detect only the 'mature' form of the hormone. EIA offers an attractive alternative to the more cumbersome and lengthy RIA in current usage, with the added advantage of employing a non-isotopic label. PMID:3058855

  3. HMX and HNS Shock Sensitivity Correlation with Specific Heat and Reactive Temperature Magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingsley, J. P.

    1999-06-01

    A paper in the 1995 SCCM Conference Proceedings(pages 429-432) documents that shock sensitivity of five explosives(TETRYL, PETN,TNT, RDX, and TATB) could be correlated with their specific heats and reactive temperature magnitudes. In fact, it was demonstrated that the shock sensitivity of these explosives was basically related to their reactive temperatures such as T(melt), T(phase change), and T(explode). Two additional explosives(HMX and HNS) have also been investigated and similar results are documented in this article. Thus, this concept has been affirmatively demonstrated via comparisons with experimental results for seven important explosive chemical compounds.

  4. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of a forearm blood pressure measurement method in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Marie-Ève; Cloutier, Lyne; Poirier, Paul

    2015-04-01

    For blood pressure assessment, it has been reported that forearm blood pressure measurement appears to be as valid as an upper-arm blood pressure measurement method in individuals with severe obesity when correlated to the intra-arterial method, considered as the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for the presence of systemic hypertension in 25 severely obese patients from 352 blood pressure measurements were calculated. The sensitivity (0.98) and the positive predictive value (0.93) for hypertension on forearm blood pressure measurements are excellent, indicating that the forearm approach is a promising alternative to systemic hypertension diagnosis in severe obesity. PMID:25757220

  5. Differential sensitivities of transcription factor target genes underlie cell type-specific gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Kim, Shin-Il; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2006-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor levels and activities dictate developmental fate. Such a change might affect the full ensemble of target genes for a factor or only uniquely sensitive targets. We investigated the relationship among activity of the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1, chromatin occupancy, and target gene sensitivity. Graded activation of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells revealed high-, intermediate-, and low-sensitivity targets. GATA-1 activity requirements for occupancy and transcription often correlated. A GATA-1 amino-terminal deletion mutant severely deregulated the low-sensitivity gene Tac-2. Thus, cells expressing different levels of a cell type-specific activator can have qualitatively distinct target gene expression patterns, and factor mutations preferentially deregulate low-sensitivity genes. Unlike other target genes, GATA-1-mediated Tac-2 regulation was bimodal, with activation followed by repression, and the coregulator Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) selectively mediated repression. A GATA-1 mutant defective in FOG-1 binding occupied a Tac-2 regulatory region at levels higher than wild-type GATA-1, whereas FOG-1 facilitated chromatin occupancy at a distinct target site. These results indicate that FOG-1 is a determinant of GATA factor target gene sensitivity by either facilitating or opposing chromatin occupancy. PMID:17043224

  6. Sensitivity to spectral interaural intensity difference cues in space-specific neurons of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Arthur, B J

    2004-02-01

    Barn owls use interaural intensity differences to localize sounds in the vertical plane. At a given elevation the magnitude of the interaural intensity difference cue varies with frequency, creating an interaural intensity difference spectrum of cues which is characteristic of that direction. To test whether space-specific cells are sensitive to spectral interaural intensity difference cues, pure-tone interaural intensity difference tuning curves were taken at multiple different frequencies for single neurons in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus. For a given neuron, the interaural intensity differences eliciting the maximum response (the best interaural intensity differences) changed with the frequency of the stimulus by an average maximal difference of 9.4+/-6.2 dB. The resulting spectral patterns of these neurally preferred interaural intensity differences exhibited a high degree of similarity to the acoustic interaural intensity difference spectra characteristic of restricted regions in space. Compared to stimuli whose interaural intensity difference spectra matched the preferred spectra, stimuli with inverted spectra elicited a smaller response, showing that space-specific neurons are sensitive to the shape of the spectrum. The underlying mechanism is an inhibition for frequency-specific interaural intensity differences which differ from the preferred spectral pattern. Collectively, these data show that space-specific neurons are sensitive to spectral interaural intensity difference cues and support the idea that behaving barn owls use such cues to precisely localize sounds. PMID:14669025

  7. Cellular heterogeneity mediates inherent sensitivity-specificity tradeoff in cancer targeting by synthetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Morel, Mathieu; Shtrahman, Roman; Rotter, Varda; Nissim, Lior; Bar-Ziv, Roy H

    2016-07-19

    Synthetic gene circuits are emerging as a versatile means to target cancer with enhanced specificity by combinatorial integration of multiple expression markers. Such circuits must also be tuned to be highly sensitive because escape of even a few cells might be detrimental. However, the error rates of decision-making circuits in light of cellular variability in gene expression have so far remained unexplored. Here, we measure the single-cell response function of a tunable logic AND gate acting on two promoters in heterogeneous cell populations. Our analysis reveals an inherent tradeoff between specificity and sensitivity that is controlled by the AND gate amplification gain and activation threshold. We implement a tumor-mimicking cell-culture model of cancer cells emerging in a background of normal ones, and show that molecular parameters of the synthetic circuits control specificity and sensitivity in a killing assay. This suggests that, beyond the inherent tradeoff, synthetic circuits operating in a heterogeneous environment could be optimized to efficiently target malignant state with minimal loss of specificity. PMID:27385823

  8. A Molecular Assay for Sensitive Detection of Pathogen-Specific T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Mitchell, Jessica E.; Chetty, Shivan; Govender, Pamla; Huang, Kuan-Hsiang Gary; Fletcher, Helen A.; Webster, Daniel P.; Brown, Sebastian; Kasmar, Anne; Millington, Kerry; Day, Cheryl L.; Mkhwanazi, Nompumelelo; McClurg, Cheryl; Chonco, Fundisiwe; Lalvani, Ajit; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Klenerman, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe the development and validation of a highly sensitive assay of antigen-specific IFN-γ production using real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for two reporters - monokine-induced by IFN-γ (MIG) and the IFN-γ inducible protein-10 (IP10). We developed and validated the assay and applied it to the detection of CMV, HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) specific responses, in a cohort of HIV co-infected patients. We compared the sensitivity of this assay to that of the ex vivo RD1 (ESAT-6 and CFP-10)-specific IFN-γ Elispot assay. We observed a clear quantitative correlation between the two assays (P<0.001). Our assay proved to be a sensitive assay for the detection of MTB-specific T cells, could be performed on whole blood samples of fingerprick (50 uL) volumes, and was not affected by HIV-mediated immunosuppression. This assay platform is potentially of utility in diagnosis of infection in this and other clinical settings. PMID:21853018

  9. Reduced Accuracy and Sensitivity in the Perception of Emotional Facial Expressions in Individuals with High Autism Spectrum Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poljac, Ervin; Poljac, Edita; Wagemans, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is among other things characterized by specific impairments in emotion processing. It is not clear, however, to what extent the typical decline in affective functioning is related to the specific autistic traits. We employed "The Autism Spectrum-Quotient" (AQ) to quantify autistic traits in a group of 500…

  10. Increased sensitivity of fast BOLD fMRI with a subject-specific hemodynamic response function and application to epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Sébastien; Safi-Harb, Mouna; Levan, Pierre; An, Dongmei; Watanabe, Satsuki; Gotman, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Activation detection in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) typically assumes the hemodynamic response to neuronal activity to be invariant across brain regions and subjects. Reports of substantial variability of the morphology of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) responses are accumulating, suggesting that the use of a single generic model of the expected response in general linear model (GLM) analyses does not provide optimal sensitivity due to model misspecification. Relaxing assumptions of the model can limit the impact of hemodynamic response function (HRF) variability, but at a cost on model parsimony. Alternatively, better specification of the model could be obtained from a priori knowledge of the HRF of a given subject, but the effectiveness of this approach has only been tested on simulation data. Using fast BOLD fMRI, we characterized the variability of hemodynamic responses to a simple event-related auditory-motor task, as well as its effect on activation detection with GLM analyses. We show the variability to be higher between subjects than between regions and variation in different regions to correlate from one subject to the other. Accounting for subject-related variability by deriving subject-specific models from responses to the task in some regions lead to more sensitive detection of responses in other regions. We applied the approach to epilepsy patients, where task-derived patient-specific models provided additional information compared to the use of a generic model for the detection of BOLD responses to epileptiform activity identified on scalp electro-encephalogram (EEG). This work highlights the importance of improving the accuracy of the model for detecting neuronal activation with fMRI, and the fact that it can be done at no cost to model parsimony through the acquisition of independent a priori information about the hemodynamic response. PMID:24582920

  11. Accuracy of a prey-specific DNA assay and a generic prey-immunomarking assay for detecting predation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Predator gut examinations are useful for detecting arthropod predation events. Here, the accuracy and reproducibility of two different types of gut assays are tested on various predator species that consumed an immature lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens), that was externally labelled with ra...

  12. Defining ploidy-specific thresholds in array comparative genomic hybridization to improve the sensitivity of detection of single copy alterations in cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ng, Grace; Huang, Jingxiang; Roberts, Ian; Coleman, Nicholas

    2006-09-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is being widely used to screen for recurrent genomic copy number alterations in neoplasms, with imbalances typically detected through the application of gain and loss thresholds. Review of array CGH publications for the year 2005 showed that a wide range of thresholds are used. However, the effect of sample ploidy on the sensitivity of these thresholds for single copy alterations (SCAs) has not been evaluated. Here, we describe a method to evaluate the detection accuracy of thresholds for detecting SCAs in cell line array CGH data. By applying a hidden Markov model-based method, we segmented array CGH data from well-karyotyped cell lines and generated ploidy-specific sensitivity-specificity plots, from which we identified optimum thresholds relevant to sample ploidy. We demonstrate that commonly used nonploidy-specific thresholds are suboptimal in their ability to call SCAs, particularly when applied to hypertriploid or tetraploid cell lines. We conclude that the use of ploidy-specific thresholds improves the sensitivity of thres-hold-based array CGH for detecting SCAs in cell lines. Because polyploidy is a common feature of cancer cells, the application of ploidy-specific thresholds to cell lines (and potentially to clinical samples) may improve the detection sensitivity of SCAs of biological significance. PMID:16931585

  13. Sensitivity of a mesoscale model to initial specification of relative humidity, liquid water and vertical motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, M. W.; Perkey, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of synoptic scale initial conditions on the accuracy of mesoscale precipitation modeling is investigated. Attention is focused on the relative importance of the water vapor, cloud water, rain water, and vertical motion, with the analysis carried out using the Limited Area Mesoscale Prediction System (LAMPS). The fully moist primitive equation model has 15 levels and a terrain-following sigma coordinate system. A K-theory approach was implemented to model the planetary boundary layer. A total of 15 sensitivity simulations were run to investigate the effects of the synoptic initial conditions of the four atmospheric variables. The absence of synoptic cloud and rain water amounts in the initialization caused a 2 hr delay in the onset of precipitation. The delay was increased if synoptic-scale vertical motion was used instead of mesoscale values. Both the delays and a choice of a smoothed moisture field resulted in underestimations of the total rainfall.

  14. Sensitivity and specificity of rapid influenza testing of children in a community setting 1

    PubMed Central

    Stebbins, Samuel; Stark, James H.; Prasad, Ramakrishna; Thompson, William W.; Mitruka, Kiren; Rinaldo, Charles; Vukotich, Charles J.; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Stebbins et al. (2011) Sensitivity and specificity of rapid influenza testing of children in a community setting. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(2), 104–109. Introduction  Rapid influenza testing (RFT) allows for a rapid point‐of‐care diagnosis of influenza. The Quidel QuickVue® Influenza A+B test (QuickVue) has a reported manufacturer’s sensitivity and specificity of 73% and 96%, respectively, with nasal swabs. However, investigators have shown sensitivities ranging from 22% to 77% in community settings. Methods  The QuickVue rapid influenza test was evaluated in a population of elementary (K‐5) school children, using testing in the home, as part of the Pittsburgh Influenza Prevention Project during the 2007–2008 influenza season. The QuickVue test was performed with nasal swab in full accordance with package instructions and compared with the results of nasal swab semi‐quantitative RT‐PCR. Results  Sensitivity of the QuickVue was found to be 27% in this sample. There was no statistically valid correlation between the semi‐quantitative PCR result and the QuickVue result. Conclusions  This study is consistent with the low sensitivity of the QuickVue test also reported by others. Viral load, technique, and the use of nasal swabs were examined as contributing factors but were not found to be explanations for this result. Community testing includes patients who are on the lower spectrum of illness which would not be the case in hospital or clinic samples. This suggests that RFT is less sensitive for patients at the lower spectrum of illness, with less severe disease. PMID:21306573

  15. Autism Spectrum Disorder in the DSM-5: Diagnostic Sensitivity and Specificity in Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Christiansz, Jessica A; Gray, Kylie M; Taffe, John; Tonge, Bruce J

    2016-06-01

    Changes to the DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) criteria raised concerns among parents and practitioners that the criteria may exclude some children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). Few studies have examined DSM-5 sensitivity and specificity in children less than 5 years of age. This study evaluated 185 children aged 20-55 months with DSM-IV PDD or developmental delay. Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) data was assigned to DSM-5 subdomains. Children displaying the required symptomatology were classified with DSM-5 ASD. DSM-IV clinical diagnoses were compared to DSM-5 classifications. Using combined ADI-R/ADOS information, sensitivity was .84 and specificity was .54. Comorbid behaviour and emotional problems were significantly lower in children with PDD that did not meet DSM-5 criteria. PMID:26861716

  16. Development of a highly sensitive and specific immunoassay for enrofloxacin based on heterologous coating haptens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhui; Zhang, Huiyan; Ni, Hengjia; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2014-04-11

    In the paper, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent immunoassay (ELISA) for detection of enrofloxacin was described using one new derivative of enrofloxacin as coating hapten, resulting in surprisingly high sensitivity and specificity. Incorporation of aminobutyric acid (AA) in the new derivative of enrofloxacin had decreased the IC50 of the ELISA for enrofloxacin from 1.3 μg L(-1) to as low as 0.07 μg L(-1). The assay showed neglect cross-reactivity for other fluoroquinolones but ofloxacin (8.23%), marbofloxacin (8.97%) and pefloxacin (7.29%). Analysis of enrofloxacin fortified chicken muscle showed average recoveries from 81 to 115%. The high sensitivity and specificity of the assay makes it a suitable screening method for the determination of low levels of enrofloxacin in chicken muscle without clean-up step. PMID:24745749

  17. Sensitivity and specificity of the functional hallux limitus test to predict foot function.

    PubMed

    Payne, Craig; Chuter, Vivienne; Miller, Kathryn

    2002-05-01

    Functional hallux limitus is an underrecognized entity that generally does not produce symptoms but can result in a variety of compensatory mechanisms that can produce symptoms. Clinically, hallux limitus can be determined by assessing the range of motion available at the first metatarsophalangeal joint while the first ray is prevented from plantarflexing. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of this clinical test to predict abnormal excessive midtarsal joint function during gait. A total of 86 feet were examined for functional hallux limitus and abnormal pronation of the midtarsal joint during late midstance. The test had a sensitivity of 0.72 and a specificity of 0.66, suggesting that clinicians should consider functional hallux limitus when there is late midstance pronation of the midtarsal joint during gait. PMID:12015407

  18. Derivatization of estrogens enhances specificity and sensitivity of analysis of human plasma and serum by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Faqehi, Abdullah M M; Cobice, Diego F; Naredo, Gregorio; Mak, Tracy C S; Upreti, Rita; Gibb, Fraser W; Beckett, Geoffrey J; Walker, Brian R; Homer, Natalie Z M; Andrew, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    Estrogens circulate at concentrations less than 20pg/mL in men and postmenopausal women, presenting analytical challenges. Quantitation by immunoassay is unreliable at these low concentrations. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers greater specificity and sometimes greater sensitivity, but ionization of estrogens is inefficient. Introduction of charged moieties may enhance ionization, but many such derivatives of estrogens generate non-specific product ions originating from the "reagent" group. Therefore an approach generating derivatives with product ions specific to individual estrogens was sought. Estrogens were extracted from human plasma and serum using solid phase extraction and derivatized using 2-fluoro-1-methylpyridinium-p-toluenesulfonate (FMP-TS). Electrospray in positive mode with multiple reaction monitoring using a QTrap 5500 mass spectrometer was used to quantify "FMP" derivatives of estrogens, following LC separation. Transitions for the FMP derivatives of estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) were compound specific (m/z 362→238 and m/z 364→128, respectively). The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.2pg on-column and the method was linear from 1-400pg/sample. Measures of intra- and inter-assay variability, precision and accuracy were acceptable (<20%). The derivatives were stable over 24h at 10°C (7-9% degradation). Using this approach, E1 and E2, respectively were detected in human plasma and serum: pre-menopausal female serum (0.5mL) 135-473, 193-722pmol/L; male plasma (1mL) 25-111, 60-180pmol/L and post-menopausal female plasma (2mL), 22-78, 29-50pmol/L. Thus FMP derivatization, in conjunction with LC-MS/MS, is suitable for quantitative analysis of estrogens in low abundance in plasma and serum, offering advantages in specificity over immunoassay and existing MS techniques. PMID:26946022

  19. Tailoring Catalytic Activity of Pt Nanoparticles Encapsulated Inside Dendrimers by Tuning Nanoparticle Sizes with Subnanometer Accuracy for Sensitive Chemiluminescence-Based Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyojung; Ju, Youngwon; Kim, Joohoon

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report the size-dependent catalysis of Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) having well-defined sizes over the range of 1-3 nm with subnanometer accuracy for the highly enhanced chemiluminescence of the luminol/H2O2 system. This size-dependent catalysis is ascribed to the differences in the chemical states of the Pt DENs as well as in their surface areas depending on their sizes. Facile and versatile applications of the Pt DENs in diverse oxidase-based assays are demonstrated as efficient catalysts for sensitive chemiluminescence-based analyses. PMID:27032992

  20. High-Resolution Functional Connectivity Density: Hub Locations, Sensitivity, Specificity, Reproducibility, and Reliability.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Dardo; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-07-01

    Brain regions with high connectivity have high metabolic cost and their disruption is associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior neuroimaging studies have identified at the group-level local functional connectivity density ( L: FCD) hubs, network nodes with high degree of connectivity with neighboring regions, in occipito-parietal cortices. However, the individual patterns and the precision for the location of the hubs were limited by the restricted spatiotemporal resolution of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures collected at rest. In this work, we show that MRI datasets with higher spatiotemporal resolution (2-mm isotropic; 0.72 s), collected under the Human Connectome Project (HCP), provide a significantly higher precision for hub localization and for the first time reveal L: FCD patterns with gray matter (GM) specificity >96% and sensitivity >75%. High temporal resolution allowed effective 0.01-0.08 Hz band-pass filtering, significantly reducing spurious L: FCD effects in white matter. These high spatiotemporal resolution L: FCD measures had high reliability [intraclass correlation, ICC(3,1) > 0.6] but lower reproducibility (>67%) than the low spatiotemporal resolution equivalents. GM sensitivity and specificity benchmarks showed the robustness of L: FCD to changes in model parameter and preprocessing steps. Mapping individual's brain hubs with high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility supports the use of L: FCD as a biomarker for clinical applications in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26223259

  1. From specificity to sensitivity: affective states modulate visual working memory for emotional expressive faces.

    PubMed

    Maran, Thomas; Sachse, Pierre; Furtner, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that visual working memory (VWM) preferentially remembers angry looking faces. However, the meaning of facial actions is construed in relation to context. To date, there are no studies investigating the role of perceiver-based context when processing emotional cues in VWM. To explore the influence of affective context on VWM for faces, we conducted two experiments using both a VWM task for emotionally expressive faces and a mood induction procedure. Affective context was manipulated by unpleasant (Experiment 1) and pleasant (Experiment 2) IAPS pictures in order to induce an affect high in motivational intensity (defensive or appetitive, respectively) compared to a low arousal control condition. Results indicated specifically increased sensitivity of VWM for angry looking faces in the neutral condition. Enhanced VWM for angry faces was prevented by inducing affects of high motivational intensity. In both experiments, affective states led to a switch from specific enhancement of angry expressions in VWM to an equally sensitive representation of all emotional expressions. Our findings demonstrate that emotional expressions are of different behavioral relevance for the receiver depending on the affective context, supporting a functional organization of VWM along with flexible resource allocation. In VWM, stimulus processing adjusts to situational requirements and transitions from a specifically prioritizing default mode in predictable environments to a sensitive, hypervigilant mode in exposure to emotional events. PMID:26379609

  2. From specificity to sensitivity: affective states modulate visual working memory for emotional expressive faces

    PubMed Central

    Maran, Thomas; Sachse, Pierre; Furtner, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that visual working memory (VWM) preferentially remembers angry looking faces. However, the meaning of facial actions is construed in relation to context. To date, there are no studies investigating the role of perceiver-based context when processing emotional cues in VWM. To explore the influence of affective context on VWM for faces, we conducted two experiments using both a VWM task for emotionally expressive faces and a mood induction procedure. Affective context was manipulated by unpleasant (Experiment 1) and pleasant (Experiment 2) IAPS pictures in order to induce an affect high in motivational intensity (defensive or appetitive, respectively) compared to a low arousal control condition. Results indicated specifically increased sensitivity of VWM for angry looking faces in the neutral condition. Enhanced VWM for angry faces was prevented by inducing affects of high motivational intensity. In both experiments, affective states led to a switch from specific enhancement of angry expressions in VWM to an equally sensitive representation of all emotional expressions. Our findings demonstrate that emotional expressions are of different behavioral relevance for the receiver depending on the affective context, supporting a functional organization of VWM along with flexible resource allocation. In VWM, stimulus processing adjusts to situational requirements and transitions from a specifically prioritizing default mode in predictable environments to a sensitive, hypervigilant mode in exposure to emotional events. PMID:26379609

  3. Sensitivity and Specificity of Galectin-3 and Glypican-3 in Follicular-Patterned and Other Thyroid Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Sheren Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diagnosing follicular-patterned thyroid neoplasm can be quiet challenging in some cases, where an immunohistochemical profiling becomes mandatory. Galectin-3 may be a helpful tool for classical PTC diagnosis, but it cannot be considered as a diagnostic marker of malignancy. Glypican-3, in contrast, is not thoroughly studied in thyroid neoplasms. Aim Determine the sensitivity and specificity of galectin-3 and glypican-3 in diagnosing thyroid carcinoma and follicular-patterned thyroid carcinoma. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted on archival blocks diagnosed from pathology department between 2010 and 2012 including 17 cases of follicular adenoma, 16 cases of Classic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC), 6 cases of Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (FVPTC), 3 cases of follicular carcinoma, 5 cases of medullary carcinoma and 1 case of Hürthle cell carcinoma. The nearby non neoplastic (normal) thyroid follicles present in both adenoma and carcinoma cases were also evaluated. Study Design Evaluation of both galectin-3 and glypican-3 expression using standard immunohistochemical techniques. Statistical Analysis Used Descriptive analysis of the variables and statistical significances were calculated by non-parametric chi-square test using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 12.0 (SPSS). Results Five (30%) and 4 (24%) out of the 17 studied follicular adenoma cases, were positively stained by galectin-3 and glypican-3 respectively, while 30 (97%) and 25 (81%) cases out of the studied 31 carcinoma cases were positively stained by galectin-3 and glypican-3 respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of galectin-3 vs. glypican-3 in discrimination between thyroid carcinoma and adenoma was 96.8%, 70.6%, and 87.5%vs. 81% 76.5% and 79% respectively. As for the discrimination between follicular-patterned thyroid carcinoma and follicular adenoma it was 90%, 71% and 78% vs. 90% 76.5% and 82

  4. Establishment of a sensitive and specific hyper-branched rolling circle amplification assay and test strip for TSV.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuran; Yin, Weili; Wang, Ying; Wang, Gongpu; Li, Bafang

    2014-12-01

    A specific padlock probe (PLP) and detection probe were designed to target the capsid protein gene of Taura syndrome virus (TSV), and a hyper-branched rolling circle amplification (HRCA) assay and a corresponding strip-based test were produced. The reaction time and temperature were optimized for both. The PLPs were linked with the target sequence via T4 DNA ligase under conditions of 37°C for 30 min, followed by reaction with Bst DNA polymerase Large Fragment at 61°C for 30 min, and then the test strip was made using the detection probe. Both the assay and the strip had similarly high accuracy and specificity, and their sensitivity was close to 10 copies, which is 100 times higher than that of conventional RT-PCR. We tested 89 batches of shrimps for TSV to assess the HRCA assay and test strip; the results indicated that the TSV HRCA assay and the test strip are rapid diagnostic tools for detection in the field, and have potential for early diagnosis of TSV. PMID:25196450

  5. Sensitive and Specific Measurement of Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Morley, Alexander A.; Latham, Sue; Brisco, Michael J.; Sykes, Pamela J.; Sutton, Rosemary; Hughes, Elizabeth; Wilczek, Vicki; Budgen, Bradley; van Zanten, Katrina; Kuss, Bryone J.; Venn, Nicola C.; Norris, Murray D.; Crock, Catherine; Storey, Colin; Revesz, Tamas; Waters, Keith

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive and specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method, involving three rounds of amplification with two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers directed against an rearrangement, was developed to quantify minimal residual disease (MRD) in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). For a single sample containing 10 μg of good quality DNA, MRD was quantifiable down to approximately 10−6, which is at least 1 log more sensitive than current methods. Nonspecific amplification was rarely observed. The standard deviation of laboratory estimations was 0.32 log units at moderate or high levels of MRD, but increased markedly as the level of MRD and the number of intact marker gene rearrangements in the sample fell. In 23 children with ALL studied after induction therapy, the mean MRD level was 1.6 × 10−5 and levels ranged from 1.5 × 10−2 to less than 10−7. Comparisons with the conventional one-round quantitative polymerase chain reaction method on 29 samples from another 24 children who received treatment resulted in concordant results for 22 samples and discordant results for seven samples. The sensitivity and specificity of the method are due to the use of nested polymerase chain reaction, one segment-specific and two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, and the use of a large amount of good quality DNA. This method may improve MRD-based decisions on treatment for ALL patients, and the principles should be applicable to DNA-based MRD measurements in other disorders. PMID:19324989

  6. Sensitivity and specificity of nonmydriatic digital imaging in screening diabetic retinopathy in Indian eyes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishali; Bansal, Reema; Gupta, Amod; Bhansali, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nonmydriatic digital imaging (NMDI) is ideal for screening diabetic retinopathy (DR), but its use in Indian eyes has not been evaluated. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of NMDI as a screening tool in detecting DR in Indian eyes. Design: A prospective, nonrandomized, noncomparative, noninterventional study. Materials and Methods: A total of 500 diabetic patients visiting the endocrinology clinic (September 2008-June 2010) underwent NMDI (Zeiss Procam), followed by routine dilated fundus photography (FP; Zeiss Visupac 450+) of 345° retinal fields (1) optic disc and macula, (2) superotemporal, and (3) nasal to optic disc. Two-masked retina specialists graded the images for quality and severity of DR, and compared between NMDI and dilated FP. Statistical Analysis: SPSS Windows 17 for version. Results: Mean age was 52.97 ± 13.46 years (306 males: 194 females). The rate of ungradable images was 30.6% and 31% by the two observers. By observer 1, the sensitivity and specificity of detecting any DR was 58.8% and 69.1%, respectively, (κ = 0.608) and sight-threatening DR (STDR) was 63.1% and 68.9%, respectively, (κ = 0.641). By observer 2, the sensitivity and specificity was 57.3% and 68.3%, respectively, for any DR (κ = 0.593) and 62.8% and 68.3%, respectively, for STDR (κ = 0.637). The level of agreement between two observers was high (κ = 0.96). Conclusion: A high rate of poor quality photographs and low sensitivity limited the use of NMDI as a perfect screening system, particularly in dark iris population with diabetes as seen in Indian eyes. PMID:25230960

  7. Maltodextrin-based imaging probes detect bacteria in vivo with high sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xinghai; Lee, Seungjun; Wang, Zhirui; Kim, Dongin; Stubblefield, Bryan; Gilbert, Eric; Murthy, Niren

    2011-08-01

    The diagnosis of bacterial infections remains a major challenge in medicine. Although numerous contrast agents have been developed to image bacteria, their clinical impact has been minimal because they are unable to detect small numbers of bacteria in vivo, and cannot distinguish infections from other pathologies such as cancer and inflammation. Here, we present a family of contrast agents, termed maltodextrin-based imaging probes (MDPs), which can detect bacteria in vivo with a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported, and can detect bacteria using a bacteria-specific mechanism that is independent of host response and secondary pathologies. MDPs are composed of a fluorescent dye conjugated to maltohexaose, and are rapidly internalized through the bacteria-specific maltodextrin transport pathway, endowing the MDPs with a unique combination of high sensitivity and specificity for bacteria. Here, we show that MDPs selectively accumulate within bacteria at millimolar concentrations, and are a thousand-fold more specific for bacteria than mammalian cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MDPs can image as few as 105 colony-forming units in vivo and can discriminate between active bacteria and inflammation induced by either lipopolysaccharides or metabolically inactive bacteria.

  8. Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1992-10-02

    An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

  9. Specific and sensitive detection of the conifer pathogen Gremmeniella abietina by nested PCR

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing-Yin; Hansson, Per; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2005-01-01

    Background Gremmeniella abietina (Lagerb.) Morelet is an ascomycete fungus that causes stem canker and shoot dieback in many conifer species. The fungus is widespread and causes severe damage to forest plantations in Europe, North America and Asia. To facilitate early diagnosis and improve measures to control the spread of the disease, rapid, specific and sensitive detection methods for G. abietina in conifer hosts are needed. Results We designed two pairs of specific primers for G. abietina based on the 18S rDNA sequence variation pattern. These primers were validated against a wide range of fungi and 14 potential conifer hosts. Based on these specific primers, two nested PCR systems were developed. The first system employed universal fungal primers to enrich the fungal DNA targets in the first round, followed by a second round selective amplification of the pathogen. The other system employed G. abietina-specific primers in both PCR steps. Both approaches can detect the presence of G. abietina in composite samples with high sensitivity, as little as 7.5 fg G. abietina DNA in the host genomic background. Conclusion The methods described here are rapid and can be applied directly to a wide range of conifer species, without the need for fungal isolation and cultivation. Therefore, it represents a promising alternative to disease inspection in forest nurseries, plantations and quarantine control facilities. PMID:16280082

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of an abbreviated 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test for measurement of pancreatic exocrine function

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Viola; Wolfram, Kristina U; Rosien, Ulrich; Layer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background A modified 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test (13C -MTGT) detects moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency noninvasively and reliably, but it requires prolonged breath sampling (6 hours (hr)). Objective We aimed to investigate whether 13C -MTGT can be abbreviated, to optimize clinical usability. Methods We analyzed the 13C-MTGT of 200 consecutive patients, retrospectively. Cumulative 1–5 hr 13C-exhalation values were compared with the standard parameter (6-hr cumulative 13C-exhalation). We determined the sensitivity and specificity of shortened breath sampling periods, by comparison with the normal values from 10 healthy volunteers, whom also underwent a secretin test to quantitate pancreatic secretion. Moreover, we evaluated the influence of gastric emptying (GE), using a 13C-octanoic acid breath test in a subset (N = 117). Results The 1–5 hr cumulative 13C-exhalation tests correlated highly and significantly with the standard parameter (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for detection of impaired lipolysis was high (≥77%), but the specificity was low (≥38%) for the early measurements. Both parameters were high after 4 hrs (88% and 94%, respectively) and 5 hrs (98% and 91%, respectively). Multivariate linear correlation analysis confirmed that GE strongly influenced early postprandial 13C-exhalation during the 13C-MTGT. Conclusion Shortening of the 13C -MTGT from 6 to 4 hrs of duration was associated with similar diagnostic accuracy, yet increased clinical usability. The influence of GE on early postprandial results of the 13C-MTGT precluded further abbreviation of the test. PMID:25083286

  11. Living cell dry mass measurement using quantitative phase imaging with quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry: an accuracy and sensitivity discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Savatier, Julien; Bon, Pierre; Galland, Frédéric; Abdeladim, Lamiae; Wattellier, Benoit; Monneret, Serge

    2015-12-01

    Single-cell dry mass measurement is used in biology to follow cell cycle, to address effects of drugs, or to investigate cell metabolism. Quantitative phase imaging technique with quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) allows measuring cell dry mass. The technique is very simple to set up, as it is integrated in a camera-like instrument. It simply plugs onto a standard microscope and uses a white light illumination source. Its working principle is first explained, from image acquisition to automated segmentation algorithm and dry mass quantification. Metrology of the whole process, including its sensitivity, repeatability, reliability, sources of error, over different kinds of samples and under different experimental conditions, is developed. We show that there is no influence of magnification or spatial light coherence on dry mass measurement; effect of defocus is more critical but can be calibrated. As a consequence, QWLSI is a well-suited technique for fast, simple, and reliable cell dry mass study, especially for live cells.

  12. Sensitization of olfactory guanylyl cyclase to a specific imprinted odorant in coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Dittman, A H; Quinn, T P; Nevitt, G A; Hacker, B; Storm, D R

    1997-08-01

    The role of cGMP in olfactory signaling is not fully understood, but it is believed to play a modulatory role in intracellular signaling in vertebrate olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). Here, we present evidence that cGMP in ORNs may play an important role in recognition of biologically relevant odors and olfactory learning. Specifically, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying olfactory imprinting in salmon. Salmon learn odors associated with their natal site as juveniles and later use these odors to guide their homing migration. This imprinting is believed to involve sensitization of the peripheral olfactory system to specific homestream odorants. We imprinted juvenile salmon to the odorant beta-phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) and examined the sensitivity of olfactory adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases to PEA during development. Stimulation of guanylyl cyclase activity by PEA was significantly greater in olfactory cilia isolated from PEA-imprinted salmon compared with PEA-naive fish only at the time of the homing migration, 2 years after PEA exposure. These results suggest that sensitization of olfactory guanylyl cyclase may play an important role in olfactory imprinting by salmon. PMID:9292727

  13. Dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma probe for sensitive and specific detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendong; Hou, Keyong; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2015-09-01

    A dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma (DARLTP) probe was developed for sensitive and specific detection of explosives by a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. The DARLTP probe was fabricated using a T-shaped quartz tube. The dopant gas was introduced into the plasma stream through a side-tube. Using CH2Cl2 doped wet air as the dopant gas, the detection sensitivities were improved about 4-fold (RDX), 4-fold (PETN), and 3-fold (tetryl) compared with those obtained using the conventional LTP. Furthermore, the formation of [M + (35)Cl](-) and [M + (37)Cl](-) for these explosives enhanced the specificity for their identification. Additionally, the quantities of fragment ions of tetryl and adduct ions such as [RDX + NO2](-) and [PETN + NO2](-) were dramatically reduced, which simplified the mass spectra and avoided the overlap of mass peaks for different explosives. The sensitivity improvement may be attributed to the increased intensity of reactant ion [HNO3 + NO3](-), which was enhanced 4-fold after the introduction of dopant gas. The limits of detection (LODs) for RDX, tetryl, and PETN were down to 3, 6, and 10 pg, respectively. Finally, an explosive mixture was successfully analyzed, demonstrating the potential of the DARLTP probe for qualitative and quantitative analysis of complicated explosives. PMID:26191543

  14. Inexpensive Designer Antigen for Anti-HIV Antibody Detection with High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Talha, Sheikh M.; Salminen, Teppo; Chugh, Deepti A.; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Soukka, Tero; Pettersson, Kim; Khanna, Navin

    2010-01-01

    A novel recombinant multiepitope protein (MEP) has been designed that consists of four linear, immunodominant, and phylogenetically conserved epitopes, taken from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-encoded antigens that are used in many third-generation immunoassay kits. This HIV-MEP has been evaluated for its diagnostic potential in the detection of anti-HIV antibodies in human sera. A synthetic MEP gene encoding these epitopes, joined by flexible peptide linkers in a single open reading frame, was designed and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant HIV-MEP was purified using a single affinity step, yielding >20 mg pure protein/liter culture, and used as the coating antigen in an in-house immunoassay. Bound anti-HIV antibodies were detected by highly sensitive time-resolved fluorometry, using europium(III) chelate-labeled anti-human antibody. The sensitivity and specificity of the HIV-MEP were evaluated using Boston Biomedica worldwide HIV performance, HIV seroconversion, and viral coinfection panels and were found to be comparable with those of commercially available anti-HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits. The careful choice of epitopes, high epitope density, and an E. coli-based expression system, coupled with a simple purification protocol and the use of europium(III) chelate-labeled tracer, provide the capability for the development of an inexpensive diagnostic test with high degrees of sensitivity and specificity. PMID:20089793

  15. Evaluation of new sensitizations in asthmatic children monosensitized to house dust mite by specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harmanci, Koray; Razi, Cem H; Toyran, Muge; Kanmaz, Gozde; Cengizlier, Mehmet R

    2010-03-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is one of the treatment modalities recomended for the management of asthma and allergic rhinitis by international guidelines. A potential benefit of immunotherapy (IT) is to prevent the development of sensitisation to new allergens. There is stil no conclusion on this subject. One hundred twenty-two children 8-18 years old with intermittent asthma, with or without allergic rhinitis, all of whom were monosensitised to house dust mite (HDM) were selected. Sixty two of these children accepted to receive SIT with HDM extract for 4 years and the remaining 60 did not accept SIT and were treated with asthma medications only. This second group of children served as the control group. At the end of the 4-year study period, 36 of the 53 patients (67.9%) in the SIT group showed no new sensitizations, compared to 38 of 52 (73.0%) in the control group (p = 0.141). The most frequent new sensitizations at the end of the study were pollens, grasses and olive polen, followed by animal dander, alternaria and cockroach. In conclusion, SIT may not prevent the onset of new sensitizations in asthmatic children monosensitized to house dust mites. Further investigation is required to clarify the immunologic mechanisms and other factors by which SIT reduces or not the development of new sensitizations in monosensitized children. PMID:20527510

  16. Highly sensitive nanoparticle-based immunoassays with elemental detection: Application to Prostate-Specific Antigen quantification.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cortes, Marta; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Costa-Fernandez, Jose M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-11-15

    One of the major challenges in developing novel assay methods for the detection of biomolecules is achieving high sensitivity, because of the ultralow concentrations typically in clinical samples. Here, a Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots-based immunoassay platform is presented for highly sensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Ultrahigh sensitivity is achieved through gold deposition on the surface of the nanoparticle tags acting as catalytic seeds, thus effectively amplifying the size of the metallic nanoparticles after the immunoassay and before the tag detection. Elemental mass spectrometry measurement of the gold content allowed detection of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) at the low attog mL(-1) level. Moreover, the developed method showed not only an extremely high sensitivity for PSA detection but also a broad dynamic range, higher than 8 orders of magnitude, particularly useful for clinical studies involving quantitative detection of diverse biomarkers at their very different relevant concentration levels. Its applicability to discriminate small differences in PSA concentrations at low levels (few pgmL(-1)) in real serum samples was successfully evaluated. PMID:27162143

  17. Broadband and highly sensitive comb-assisted cavity ring down spectroscopy of CO near 1.57 μm with sub-MHz frequency accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelain, D.; Sala, T.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.; Marangoni, M.; Campargue, A.

    2015-03-01

    A self-referenced frequency comb has been combined with a cavity ring down (CRD) spectrometer to achieve a sub-MHz accuracy on the derived positions of the absorption lines. The frequency emitted by the distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode used in the spectrometer was obtained from the frequency of its beat note with the closest mode of the frequency comb. This delivers excellent frequency accuracy over a broad spectral region with sensitivity (noise equivalent absorption) of 1×10-11 cm-1 Hz-1/2. This setup is used to measure the absorption spectrum of CO over a wide range corresponding to the 3-0 band (6172.5-6418.0 cm-1). Accurate values of line centers are measured for a total of 184 lines of four CO isotopologues, namely 12C16O, 13C16O, 12C18O and 12C17O present in "natural" abundances in our sample. The measurements include the first extensive study of the 3-0 band of 12C18O and 12C17O, of the 4-1 hot band of 12C16O and the detection of new high-J transitions of the 3-0 band of 12C16O up to J=34. The line centers were corrected for the self-pressure shift and used to derive the upper state spectroscopic parameters. The obtained standard deviation of about 300 kHz and 500 kHz for the 3-0 band of 12C16O and of the minor isotopologues, respectively, is a good estimate of the average accuracy of the reported line centers. The resulting 3-0 line list of 12C16O provided as Supplementary material includes 69 reference line positions with a 300 kHz accuracy for the 6183-6418 cm-1 region.

  18. Improving sensitivity and accuracy of pore structural characterisation using scanning curves in integrated gas sorption and mercury porosimetry experiments.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Iain; Lunel, Marie; Bakalis, Serafim; Fletcher, Robin S; Holt, Elizabeth M; Rigby, Sean P

    2014-03-01

    Gas sorption scanning curves are increasingly used as a means to supplement the pore structural information implicit in boundary adsorption and desorption isotherms to obtain more detailed pore space descriptors for disordered solids. However, co-operative adsorption phenomena set fundamental limits to the level of information that conventional scanning curve experiments can deliver. In this work, we use the novel integrated gas sorption and mercury porosimetry technique to show that crossing scanning curves are obtained for some through ink-bottle pores within a disordered solid, thence demonstrating that their shielded pore bodies are undetectable using conventional scanning experiments. While gas sorption alone was not sensitive enough to detect these pore features, the integrated technique was, and, thence, this synergistic method is more powerful than the two individual techniques applied separately. The integrated method also showed how the appropriate filling mechanism equation (e.g. meniscus geometry for capillary condensation equations), to use to convert filling pressure to pore size, varied with position along the adsorption branch, thereby enabling avoidance of the further systematic error introduced into PSDs by assuming a single filling mechanism for disordered solids. PMID:24407663

  19. Tetrathiatriarylmethyl radical with a single aromatic hydrogen as a highly sensitive and specific superoxide probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangping; Song, Yuguang; De Pascali, Francesco; Liu, Xiaoping; Villamena, Frederick A; Zweier, Jay L

    2012-12-01

    Superoxide (O(2)(•-)) plays crucial roles in normal physiology and disease; however, its measurement remains challenging because of the limited sensitivity and/or specificity of prior detection methods. We demonstrate that a tetrathiatriarylmethyl (TAM) radical with a single aromatic hydrogen (CT02-H) can serve as a highly sensitive and specific O(2)(•-) probe. CT02-H is an analogue of the fully substituted TAM radical CT-03 (Finland trityl) with an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) doublet signal due to its aromatic hydrogen. Owing to the neutral nature and negligible steric hindrance of the hydrogen, O(2)(•-) preferentially reacts with CT02-H at this site with production of the diamagnetic quinone methide via oxidative dehydrogenation. Upon reaction with O(2)(•-), CT02-H loses its EPR signal and this EPR signal decay can be used to quantitatively measure O(2)(•-). This is accompanied by a change in color from green to purple, with the quinone methide product exhibiting a unique UV-Vis absorbance (ε=15,900 M(-1) cm(-1)) at 540 nm, providing an additional O(2)(•-) detection method. More than five-fold higher reactivity of CT02-H for O(2)(•-) relative to CT-03 was demonstrated, with a second-order rate constant of 1.7×10(4) M(-1) s(-1) compared to 3.1×10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for CT-03. CT02-H exhibited high specificity for O(2)(•-) as evidenced by its inertness to other oxidoreductants. The O(2)(•-) generation rates detected by CT02-H from xanthine/xanthine oxidase were consistent with those measured by cytochrome c reduction but detection sensitivity was 10- to 100-fold higher. EPR detection of CT02-H enabled measurement of very low O(2)(•-) flux with a detection limit of 0.34 nM/min over 120 min. HPLC in tandem with electrochemical detection was used to quantitatively detect the stable quinone methide product and is a highly sensitive and specific method for measurement of O(2)(•-), with a sensitivity limit of ~2×10(-13) mol (10 nM with 20

  20. Volatile organic compounds as biomarkers of bladder cancer: Sensitivity and specificity using trained sniffer dogs.

    PubMed

    Willis, Carolyn M; Britton, Lezlie E; Harris, Rob; Wallace, Joshua; Guest, Claire M

    In a previous canine study, we demonstrated that volatile organic compounds specific to bladder cancer are present in urine headspace, subsequently showing that up to 70% of tumours can be correctly classified using an electronic nose. This study aimed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity which can be achieved by a group of four trained dogs. In a series of 30 double-blind test runs, each consisting of one bladder cancer urine sample placed alongside six controls, the highest sensitivity achieved by the best performing dog was 73% (95% CI 55-86%), with the group as a whole correctly identifying the cancer samples 64% (95% CI 55-73%) of the time. Specificity of the dogs individually ranged from 92% (95% CI 82-97%) for urine samples obtained from healthy, young volunteers down to 56% (95% CI 42-68%) for those taken from older patients with non-cancerous urological disease. Odds ratio comparisons confirmed a significant decrease in performance as the extent of urine dipstick abnormality and/or pathology amongst the control population increased. Importantly, however, statistical analysis indicated that covariates such as smoking, gender and age, as well as blood, protein and /or leucocytes in the urine did not significantly alter the odds of response to the cancer samples. Our results provide further evidence that volatile biomarkers for bladder cancer exist in urine headspace, and that these have the potential to be exploited for diagnosis. PMID:22012770

  1. Sensitive and Specific In-Situ Sensor for Monitoring Contaminated Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Watson, David B; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Nazarov, Erkinjun; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of a high-sensitivity and high-specificity sensor, combining membrane extraction, pre-concentration, and gas-chromatographic differential mobility spectrometry (GC/DMS), for in situ detection of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. Direct in-situ detection was achieved by membrane conversion of aqueous analyte to vapor, followed by vapor spectroscopy using GC/DMS analyzer. The limit of detection (LOD) reaches 0.37 parts per billion in volume (ppbv), or 0.54 ug/L, for aqueous trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1.6 ug/L for perchloroethylene (PCE) by incorporating a preconcentrator between the membrane extraction and GC/DMS detection systems. The high specificity was achieved using two-dimensional separation parameters of GC retention time and DMS compensation voltage. The presence of co-contaminants and foreign contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, CCl4, and CHCl3 did not interfere with the identification of chlorinated hydrocarbons. This highly-sensitive and -specific sensor paves the way for developing field-deployable sensors for in-situ and real-time monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater and surface water.

  2. Prdm13 regulates subtype specification of retinal amacrine interneurons and modulates visual sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Sanuki, Rikako; Sugita, Yuko; Imai, Wataru; Yamazaki, Ryoji; Kozuka, Takashi; Ohsuga, Mizuki; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2015-05-20

    Amacrine interneurons, which are highly diversified in morphological, neurochemical, and physiological features, play crucial roles in visual information processing in the retina. However, the specification mechanisms and functions in vision for each amacrine subtype are not well understood. We found that the Prdm13 transcriptional regulator is specifically expressed in developing and mature amacrine cells in the mouse retina. Most Prdm13-positive amacrine cells are Calbindin- and Calretinin-positive GABAergic or glycinergic neurons. Absence of Prdm13 significantly reduces GABAergic and glycinergic amacrines, resulting in a specific defect of the S2/S3 border neurite bundle in the inner plexiform layer. Forced expression of Prdm13 distinctively induces GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells but not cholinergic amacrine cells, whereas Ptf1a, an upstream transcriptional regulator of Prdm13, induces all of these subtypes. Moreover, Prdm13-deficient mice showed abnormally elevated spatial, temporal, and contrast sensitivities in vision. Together, these results show that Prdm13 regulates development of a subset of amacrine cells, which newly defines an amacrine subtype to negatively modulate visual sensitivities. Our current study provides new insights into mechanisms of the diversification of amacrine cells and their function in vision. PMID:25995483

  3. Automated Analysis of Cell Cycle Phase-Specific DNA Damage Reveals Phase-Specific Differences in Cell Sensitivity to Etoposide.

    PubMed

    Luzhin, Artem V; Velichko, Artem K; Razin, Sergey V; Kantidze, Omar L

    2016-10-01

    The comet assay is one of the most widely used approaches for detecting DNA damage; generally, it provides information on the cell population-averaged level of DNA damage. Here, we present an automatic technique for easy measurement of standard comet characteristics and an annotation of the cell cycle phase of each comet. The approach includes the modified neutral comet assay and a pipeline for CellProfiler software designed to analyze DNA damage-related characteristics and annotate the cell cycle phase of each comet. Using this technique we have performed cell cycle phase-specific analysis of DNA damage induced by the topoisomerase II poison etoposide and have shown that the sensitivity of cells to this drug dramatically differed according to their cell cycle phase. It became evident from our results that the proposed protocol provides important additional information that often remains hidden in a standard comet analysis of an asynchronous cell population. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2209-2214, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27240930

  4. The alteration of pain sensitivity at disease-specific acupuncture points in premenstrual syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chae, Younbyoung; Kim, Hee-Young; Lee, Hwa-Jin; Park, Hi-Joon; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; An, Kyungeh; Lee, Hyejung

    2007-04-01

    Acupuncture points (APs) are well known to be small regions of local or referred pain that are more sensitive than surrounding tissue. Based on bibliographical and clinical data, specific conditions are commonly believed to change the pain sensitivity at corresponding APs. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the pressure pain threshold (PPT) of specific APs is associated with the severity of premenstrual syndrome. The 46 participants were female students attending a middle school. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) was measured using a structured questionnaire, the menstruation distress questionnaire (MDQ). High PMS (HP) and low PMS (LP) groups were divided based on their MDQ scores. The PPTs at sites in the leg (the APs SP6, GB39, and LR3 and a non-AP 2-cm anterior to SP6) and in the arm (the APs PC6, TE5, and LI4 and a non-AP 2-cm proximal to PC6) were measured using an algometer. The PPT of the HP group at SP6 was significantly lower than that of the LP group (13.50 +/- 0.73 vs. 16.30 +/- 0.66 kilopascals, P < 0.05), but not at other APs or at non-APs. The findings of our study support the hypothesis that the alteration of pain threshold at specific APs is associated with the severity of corresponding diseases. Further studies are needed to determine whether an observation of pain sensitivity at the APs could be used as an adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of a clinical problem. PMID:17378970

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of the amer dizziness diagnostic scale (adds) for patients with vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Al Saif, Amer; Alsenany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the sensitivity and specificity of a newly developed diagnostic tool, the Amer Dizziness Diagnostic Scale (ADDS), to evaluate and differentially diagnose vestibular disorder and to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the scale and its usefulness in clinical practice. [Subjects and Methods] Two hundred subjects of both genders (72 males, 128 females) aged between 18 to 60 (49.5±7.8) who had a history of vertigo and/or dizziness symptoms for this previous two weeks or less were recruited for the study. All subjects were referred by otolaryngologists, neurologists or family physicians in and around Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. On the first clinic visit, all the patients were evaluated once using the ADDS, following which they underwent routine testing of clinical signs and symptoms, audiometry, and a neurological examination, coupled with tests of Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex function, which often serves as the “gold standard” for determining the probability of a vestibular deficit. [Results] The results show that the ADDS strongly correlated with “true-positive” and “true-negative” responses for determining the probability of a vestibular disorder (r =0.95). A stepwise linear regression was conducted and the results indicate that the ADDS was a significant predictor of “true-positive” and “true-negative” responses in vestibular disorders (R2 =0.90). Approximately 90% of the variability in the vestibular gold standard test was explained by its relationship to the ADDS. Moreover, the ADDS was found to have a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 96%. [Conclusion] This study showed that the Amer Dizziness Diagnostic Scale has high sensitivity and specificity and that it can be used as a method of differential diagnosis for patients with vestibular disorders. PMID:25642046

  6. The sensitivity and specificity of control surface injuries in aircraft accident fatalities.

    PubMed

    Campman, Steven C; Luzi, Scott A

    2007-06-01

    Among the important determinations that aircraft crash investigators try to make is which occupant of an aircraft was attempting to control the aircraft at the time of the crash. The presence or absence of certain injuries of the extremities is used to help make this determination. These "control surface injuries" reportedly occur when crash forces are applied to a pilot's hands and feet through the aircraft's controls. We sought to clarify the significance of these injuries and the frequency with which their presence indicates that the decedent was the person that might have been trying to control the aircraft, questions that are frequently asked of the examining pathologist. We studied sequential fatalities of airplane and helicopter crashes in which autopsies were performed by the Office of the Armed Forces Medical Examiner, excluding those that were known to have been incapacitated before the crash and those that were known to have attempted to escape from the aircraft, collecting 100 "qualified" crash decedents. The incidence of control surface injuries was determined for both pilots and passengers. The sensitivity and specificity of control surface injuries were calculated by classifying the decedents into a 4-cell diagnostic matrix. The positive and negative predictive values for control surface injuries were also calculated. Injuries that met the published definitions of control surface injuries had high incidences in passengers, as well as pilots, giving the term control surface injury a diagnostically unacceptable sensitivity and specificity for indicating "a pilot attempting to control an aircraft." We offer caveats and refinements to the definition of these injuries that help to increase the sensitivity and specificity of this term. PMID:17525559

  7. The sensitivity of patient specific IMRT QC to systematic MLC leaf bank offset errors

    SciTech Connect

    Rangel, Alejandra; Palte, Gesa; Dunscombe, Peter

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Patient specific IMRT QC is performed routinely in many clinics as a safeguard against errors and inaccuracies which may be introduced during the complex planning, data transfer, and delivery phases of this type of treatment. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting systematic errors in MLC leaf bank position with patient specific checks. Methods: 9 head and neck (H and N) and 14 prostate IMRT beams were delivered using MLC files containing systematic offsets ({+-}1 mm in two banks, {+-}0.5 mm in two banks, and 1 mm in one bank of leaves). The beams were measured using both MAPCHECK (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL) and the aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Comparisons with calculated fields, without offsets, were made using commonly adopted criteria including absolute dose (AD) difference, relative dose difference, distance to agreement (DTA), and the gamma index. Results: The criteria most sensitive to systematic leaf bank offsets were the 3% AD, 3 mm DTA for MAPCHECK and the gamma index with 2% AD and 2 mm DTA for the EPID. The criterion based on the relative dose measurements was the least sensitive to MLC offsets. More highly modulated fields, i.e., H and N, showed greater changes in the percentage of passing points due to systematic MLC inaccuracy than prostate fields. Conclusions: None of the techniques or criteria tested is sufficiently sensitive, with the population of IMRT fields, to detect a systematic MLC offset at a clinically significant level on an individual field. Patient specific QC cannot, therefore, substitute for routine QC of the MLC itself.

  8. Sensitive and specific miRNA detection method using SplintR Ligase.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jingmin; Vaud, Sophie; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Posfai, Janos; McReynolds, Larry A

    2016-07-27

    We describe a simple, specific and sensitive microRNA (miRNA) detection method that utilizes Chlorella virus DNA ligase (SplintR(®) Ligase). This two-step method involves ligation of adjacent DNA oligonucleotides hybridized to a miRNA followed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). SplintR Ligase is 100X faster than either T4 DNA Ligase or T4 RNA Ligase 2 for RNA splinted DNA ligation. Only a 4-6 bp overlap between a DNA probe and miRNA was required for efficient ligation by SplintR Ligase. This property allows more flexibility in designing miRNA-specific ligation probes than methods that use reverse transcriptase for cDNA synthesis of miRNA. The qPCR SplintR ligation assay is sensitive; it can detect a few thousand molecules of miR-122. For miR-122 detection the SplintR qPCR assay, using a FAM labeled double quenched DNA probe, was at least 40× more sensitive than the TaqMan assay. The SplintR method, when coupled with NextGen sequencing, allowed multiplex detection of miRNAs from brain, kidney, testis and liver. The SplintR qPCR assay is specific; individual let-7 miRNAs that differ by one nucleotide are detected. The rapid kinetics and ability to ligate DNA probes hybridized to RNA with short complementary sequences makes SplintR Ligase a useful enzyme for miRNA detection. PMID:27154271

  9. Sensitive, Rapid, and Specific Bioassay for the Determination of Antilipogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ulitzur, S.; Goldberg, I.

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid bioassay for the determination of the antilipogenic compounds cerulenin and CM-55 is described. The bioassay is based on the inhibitory effect of cerulenin and CM-55 on the in vivo luminescence of an aldehyde-requiring mutant of the marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi. A total quantity as low as 0.1 μg of cerulenin can be determined within 15 min with an error of ±2%. The bioassay, as presented, is specific for compounds that are known to inhibit fatty acid biosynthesis and, as such, it might be used as a general screening method for the detection of antilipogenic compounds. PMID:303076

  10. Sensitive and specific polymerase chain reaction detection of Toxoplasma gondii for veterinary and medical diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, J M; Gajadhar, A A

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii. A universal- and a T. gondii-specific primer was used to amplify a region of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. This approach allows for a theoretical detection limit of 0.01 zoite of T. gondii per sample assayed. Experiments showed that this PCR method could detect 0.1 pg of T. gondii DNA, which represents about one organism. Polymerase chain reaction tests using DNAs of cat, dog, swine, cattle, human, Sarcocystis cruzi, Eimeria ahsata, E. vermiformis, and Escherichia coli indicated no cross-reaction with nucleic acids of hosts, related coccidia, or bacteria. Data on the sensitivity and specificity suggest that this PCR assay could be extremely useful for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in human and veterinary medicine, as well as for food safety surveys. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:8431804

  11. Sensitivity and Specificity of a Urine Circulating Anodic Antigen Test for the Diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium in Low Endemic Settings

    PubMed Central

    Knopp, Stefanie; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.; Koukounari, Artemis; Cercamondi, Colin I.; Ame, Shaali M.; Ali, Said M.; de Dood, Claudia J.; Mohammed, Khalfan A.; Utzinger, Jürg; Rollinson, David; van Dam, Govert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Elimination of schistosomiasis as a public health problem and interruption of transmission in selected areas are key goals of the World Health Organization for 2025. Conventional parasitological methods are insensitive for the detection of light-intensity infections. Techniques with high sensitivity and specificity are required for an accurate diagnosis in low-transmission settings and verification of elimination. We determined the accuracy of a urine-based up-converting phosphor-lateral flow circulating anodic antigen (UCP-LF CAA) assay for Schistosoma haematobium diagnosis in low-prevalence settings in Zanzibar, Tanzania. Methodology A total of 1,740 urine samples were collected in 2013 from children on Pemba Island, from schools where the S. haematobium prevalence was <2%, 2–5%, and 5–10%, based on a single urine filtration. On the day of collection, all samples were tested for microhematuria with reagent strips and for the presence of S. haematobium eggs with microscopy. Eight months later, 1.5 ml of urine from each of 1,200 samples stored at -20°C were analyzed by UCP-LF CAA assay, while urine filtration slides were subjected to quality control (QCUF). In the absence of a true ‘gold’ standard, the diagnostic performance was calculated using latent class analyses (LCA). Principal Findings The ‘empirical’ S. haematobium prevalence revealed by UCP-LF CAA, QCUF, and reagent strips was 14%, 5%, and 4%, respectively. LCA revealed a sensitivity of the UCP-LF CAA, QCUF, and reagent strips of 97% (95% confidence interval (CI): 91–100%), 86% (95% CI: 72–99%), and 67% (95% CI: 52–81%), respectively. Test specificities were consistently above 90%. Conclusions/Significance The UCP-LF CAA assay shows high sensitivity for the diagnosis of S. haematobium in low-endemicity settings. Empirically, it detects a considerably higher number of infections than microscopy. Hence, the UCP-LF CAA employed in combination with QCUF, is a promising tool for

  12. Integrating Domain Specific Knowledge and Network Analysis to Predict Drug Sensitivity of Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sebo; Sundaresan, Varsha; Zhou, Lei; Kahveci, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    One of fundamental challenges in cancer studies is that varying molecular characteristics of different tumor types may lead to resistance to certain drugs. As a result, the same drug can lead to significantly different results in different types of cancer thus emphasizing the need for individualized medicine. Individual prediction of drug response has great potential to aid in improving the clinical outcome and reduce the financial costs associated with prescribing chemotherapy drugs to which the patient's tumor might be resistant. In this paper we develop a network based classifier (NBC) method for predicting sensitivity of cell lines to anticancer drugs from transcriptome data. In the literature, this strategy has been used for predicting cancer types. Here, we extend it to estimate sensitivity of cells from different tumor types to various anticancer drugs. Furthermore, we incorporate domain specific knowledge such as the use of apoptotic gene list and clinical dose information in our method to impart biological significance to the prediction. Our experimental results suggest that our network based classifier (NBC) method outperforms existing classifiers in estimating sensitivity of cell lines for different drugs. PMID:27607242

  13. Sensitivity requirements of assisted BDS and GPS in specification 3GPP TS 36.171

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoxi; Chen, Xin; Ying, Rendong; Yang, Genke

    2016-01-01

    With the needs of growing location-based service, a more high-performance satellite positioning technology - assisted global navigation satellite system (A-GNSS assisted-GNSS) becomes a new hotspot in area of navigation and positioning. Now, 3GPP has already provided supports for GPS, Galileo, GLONASS and QZSS, SBAS, so standardization work of introduction BDS into 3GPP organization is very imperative. In this paper, we first analysis the performance of GPS L1 C/A with assistant information, then by taking into account the difference between BDS and GPS, including the unique nature of GEO/NGEO satellites' navigation message data length and format, we design the sensitivity requirements of BDS B1 following A-GPS. The results between A-GPS and A-BDS of typical sensitivity test cases are shown in this paper, which show that the suggested sensitivity requirements satisfy the minimum performance requirements under technical specification of 3GPP TS 36.171.

  14. Use of Sensitive and Specific Biomolecular and Mass Spectrometric Techniques to Monitor the Performance of In-Situ Hydrocarbon Biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Kane, S. R.; Legler, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) can be a cost-effective and viable approach for remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater. However, regulatory acceptance of the approach is often contingent on monitoring that can convincingly demonstrate the role of microbial degradation. Recent advances in anaerobic hydrocarbon biochemistry, analytical chemistry, and molecular biology have fostered the development of powerful techniques that can be applied to MNA of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes). Here, I discuss two independent methods that have been developed to monitor in situ, anaerobic biodegradation of toluene and xylenes. A method has been developed for rapid, sensitive, and highly selective detection of distinctive indicators of anaerobic alkylbenzene metabolism. The target metabolites, benzylsuccinic acid and methylbenzylsuccinic acid isomers, have no known sources other than anaerobic toluene or xylene degradation; thus, their mere presence in groundwater provides definitive evidence of in situ metabolism. The method, which involves small sample size (<1 mL) and no extraction/concentration steps, relies on isotope dilution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring. Detection limits for benzylsuccinates were determined to be ca. 0.3 μg/L and accuracy and precision were favorable in a groundwater matrix. A monitoring method based on quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) analysis has been developed to specifically quantify populations of anaerobic methylbenzene-degrading bacteria in aquifer sediment. The method targets a catabolic gene (bssA) associated with the first step of anaerobic toluene and xylene degradation. The method has proven to be sensitive (detection limit ca. 5 gene copies) and has a linear range of > 7 orders of magnitude. Application of these two methods in field studies will be discussed in the context of the methods' strengths and limitations. Field data will

  15. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Persons With Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Homaifar, Beeta Y.; Brenner, Lisa A.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Harwood, Jeri F.; Thompson, Caitlin; Filley, Christopher M.; Kelly, James P.; Adler, Lawrence E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to examine the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) sample using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to determine how well the BDI-II identifies depression. An ROC curve allows for analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic test using various cutoff points to determine the number of true positives, true negatives, false positives, and false negatives. Design This was a secondary analysis of data gathered from an observational study. We examined BDI-II scores in a sample of 52 veterans with remote histories of TBI. Setting This study was completed at a Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center. Participants Participants were veterans eligible to receive VA health care services. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Outcome measures included the BDI-II and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-IV). Results We generated an ROC curve to determine how well the BDI-II identifies depression using the SCID-IV as the criterion standard for diagnosing depression, defined here as a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Results indicated a cutoff score of at least 19 if one has a mild TBI or at least 35 if one has a moderate or severe TBI. These scores maximize sensitivity (87%) and specificity (79%). Conclusions Clinicians working with persons with TBI can use the BDI-II to determine whether depressive symptoms warrant further assessment. PMID:19345782

  16. Rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of Clostridium tetani by loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dongneng; Pu, Xiaoyun; Wu, Jiehong; Li, Meng; Liu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is a specific infectious disease, which is often associated with catastrophic events such as earthquakes, traumas, and war wounds. The obligate anaerobe Clostridium tetani is the pathogen that causes tetanus. Once the infection of tetanus progresses to an advanced stage within the wounds of limbs, the rates of amputation and mortality increase manifold. Therefore, it is necessary to devise a rapid and sensitive point-of-care detection method for C. tetani so as to ensure an early diagnosis and clinical treatment of tetanus. In this study, we developed a detection method for C. tetani using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, wherein the C. tetani tetanus toxin gene was used as the target gene. The method was highly specific and sensitive, with a detection limit of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/ml, and allowed quantitative analysis. While detecting C. tetani in clinical samples, it was found that the LAMP results completely agreed with those of the traditional API 20A anaerobic bacteria identification test. As compared with the traditional API test and PCR assay, LAMP detection of C. tetani is simple and rapid, and the results can be identified through naked-eye observation. Therefore, it is an ideal and rapid point-of-care testing method for tetanus. PMID:23314360

  17. Sensitivity and Specificity of a Novel Classifier for the Early Diagnosis of Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Nguyen Minh; Nhan, Ho Thi; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Hung, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Ha Manh; Tram, Ta Van; Ha, Nguyen Le Da; Loi, Phan; Quang, Han Khoi; Kien, Duong Thi Hue; Hubbard, Sonya; Chau, Tran Nguyen Bich; Wills, Bridget; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue is the commonest arboviral disease of humans. An early and accurate diagnosis of dengue can support clinical management, surveillance and disease control and is central to achieving the World Health Organisation target of a 50% reduction in dengue case mortality by 2020. Methods 5729 children with fever of <72hrs duration were enrolled into this multicenter prospective study in southern Vietnam between 2010-2012. A composite of gold standard diagnostic tests identified 1692 dengue cases. Using statistical methods, a novel Early Dengue Classifier (EDC) was developed that used patient age, white blood cell count and platelet count to discriminate dengue cases from non-dengue cases. Results The EDC had a sensitivity of 74.8% (95%CI: 73.0-76.8%) and specificity of 76.3% (95%CI: 75.2-77.6%) for the diagnosis of dengue. As an adjunctive test alongside NS1 rapid testing, sensitivity of the composite test was 91.6% (95%CI: 90.4-92.9%). Conclusions We demonstrate that the early diagnosis of dengue can be enhanced beyond the current standard of care using a simple evidence-based algorithm. The results should support patient management and clinical trials of specific therapies. PMID:25836753

  18. Sensitivity and specificity of fluid-blood levels for coagulopathy in acute intracerebral hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, M.J.; Hardee, E.P.; Hayman, L.A.; Contant, C.F. Jr. )

    1994-02-01

    To characterize the imaging features of intracerebral hemorrhages in patients with coagulopathies that alter prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time. A fluid-blood level was defined as a horizontal interface between hypodense bloody serum layered above hyperdense settled blood. The prevalence of fluid-blood levels in acute intracerebral hemorrhages was determined on third-generation CT scans in 32 patients with elevation in prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time. This was compared with the frequency of fluid-blood levels in 185 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage in which there was no laboratory evidence of coagulopathy. The probability of finding a fluid-blood level in an intracerebral hemorrhage of a patient with abnormal prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time was 59% (sensitivity). The probability that there will be no fluid-blood level in a patient with a normal prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time was 98% (specificity). Fluid-blood levels in acute intracerebral hemorrhage are moderately sensitive to the presence of coagulopathy (i.e., abnormal prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time) and highly specific for this condition. Thus, an intracerebral hemorrhage with a fluid-blood level should prompt a thorough search for coagulopathy because early treatment of this condition may improve the 40% mortality in these patients. Caution should be used to distinguish the horizontal interface of a fluid-blood level from a clot with a flat top. A decubitus CT is useful in these rare instances. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of immunochromatographic strip test in diagnosis of childhood kala-azar.

    PubMed

    Rouf, M A; Rahman, M E; Islam, M N; Islam, M N; Ferdous, N N; Hossain, M A

    2009-01-01

    In Bangladesh, the total population at risk for kala-azar exceeds 20 million (18%) living in 88 Thana (19%) of 27 districts (42%). A confirmatory diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) is done by demonstration of the parasite (LD body) in organ aspirates or tissue biopsy sample, an invasive procedure with relatively low sensitivity. To assess the diagnostic usefulness of ICT for antibody against the leishmanial antigen rK39 & its feasibility for use under field conditions (rural areas). An experimental study conducted during January, 2003 to July, 2003 in pediatrics department of MMCH including 60 confirmedly diagnosed KA cases & 60 controls having diseases other than KA. One drop of peripheral blood is applied to the nitrocellulose strip & 3 drops of test buffer is added to the dried blood. Observing 2 visible bands indicates presence of IgG anti-K39. The rK39 strip test was positive in 57 out of 60 confirmed KA case diagnosed by LD body demonstration in splenic or bone marrow aspirate. The estimated sensitivity was 95%. One control diagnosed as other than KA had positive strip test but negative aspirate smear. The estimated specificity of the strip test was 98.3%. The predictive value of a positive result is 98.3% & that of a negative result is 93.5%. rK39 strip test is highly sensitive & specific in our situation & it can be used as a simple & the best method for diagnosis of KA in rural areas. PMID:19377416

  20. Accuracy of phenotyping children with autism based on parent report: what specifically do we gain phenotyping "rapidly"?

    PubMed

    Warren, Zachary; Vehorn, Alison; Dohrmann, Elizabeth; Nicholson, Amy; Sutcliffe, James S; Veenstra-Vanderweele, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is considered among the most heritable of all neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders, but identification of etiologically significant genetic markers and risk variants has been hampered by a lack of sufficiently large samples. Rapid phenotyping procedures, where self-report measures are used instead of extensive clinical assessment, have been proposed as methods for amassing large genetic databases due to their hypothesized time-efficiency and affordability. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of potential rapid phenotyping procedures using the Social Communication Questionnaire and the Social Responsiveness Scale in a sample of 333 children who also received extensive phenotypic assessments. While the rapid phenotyping measures were able to accurately identify a large number of children with ASD, they also frequently failed to differentiate children with ASD from children with other complex neurobehavioral profiles. These data support the continued need of expert clinical validation in combination with rapid phenotyping procedures in order to accurately amass large-scale genetic collections of children with ASD. PMID:21972233

  1. Sensitivity and Specificity of a New Vertical Flow Rapid Diagnostic Test for the Serodiagnosis of Human Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Goarant, Cyrille; Bourhy, Pascale; D'Ortenzio, Eric; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Mauron, Carine; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Bruyère-Ostells, Lilian; Gourinat, Ann-Claire; Picardeau, Mathieu; Nato, Faridabano; Chanteau, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leptospirosis is a growing public health concern in many tropical and subtropical countries. However, its diagnosis is difficult because of non-specific symptoms and concurrent other endemic febrile diseases. In many regions, the laboratory diagnosis is not available due to a lack of preparedness and simple diagnostic assay or difficult access to reference laboratories. Yet, an early antibiotic treatment is decisive to the outcome. The need for Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs) for bedside diagnosis of leptospirosis has been recognized. We developed a vertical flow immunochromatography strip RDT detecting anti-Leptospira human IgM and evaluated it in patients from New Caledonia, France, and French West Indies. Methodology/Principal Findings: Whole killed Leptospira fainei cells were used as antigen for the test line and purified human IgM as the control line. The mobile phase was made of gold particles conjugated with goat anti-human IgM. Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy criteria were used to assess the performance of this RDT. The Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT) was used as the gold standard with a cut-off titer of ≥400. The sensitivity was 89.8% and the specificity 93.7%. Positive and negative Likelihood Ratios of 14.18 and 0.108 respectively, and a Diagnostic Odds Ratio of 130.737 confirmed its usefulness. This RDT had satisfactory reproducibility, repeatability, thermal tolerance and shelf-life. The comparison with MAT evidenced the earliness of the RDT to detect seroconversion. When compared with other RDT, the Vertical Flow RDT developed displayed good diagnostic performances. Conclusions/Significance This RDT might be used as a point of care diagnostic tool in limited resources countries. An evaluation in field conditions and in other epidemiological contexts should be considered to assess its validity over a wider range of serogroups or when facing different endemic pathogens. It might prove useful in endemic contexts or

  2. Sensitivity and specificity of human brain glutathione concentrations measured using short-TE (1) H MRS at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Deelchand, Dinesh K; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Hodges, James S; Terpstra, Melissa

    2016-05-01

    Although the MR editing techniques that have traditionally been used for the measurement of glutathione (GSH) concentrations in vivo address the problem of spectral overlap, they suffer detriments associated with inherently long TEs. The purpose of this study was to characterize the sensitivity and specificity for the quantification of GSH concentrations without editing at short TE. The approach was to measure synthetically generated changes in GSH concentrations from in vivo stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) spectra after in vitro GSH spectra had been added to or subtracted from them. Spectra from five test subjects were synthetically altered to mimic changes in the GSH signal. To account for different background noise between measurements, retest spectra (from the same individuals as used to generate the altered data) and spectra from five other individuals were compared with the synthetically altered spectra to investigate the reliability of the quantification of GSH concentration. Using STEAM spectroscopy at 7 T, GSH concentration differences on the order of 20% were detected between test and retest studies, as well as between differing populations in a small sample (n = 5) with high accuracy (R(2) > 0.99) and certainty (p ≤ 0.01). Both increases and decreases in GSH concentration were reliably quantified with small impact on the quantification of ascorbate and γ-aminobutyric acid. These results show the feasibility of using short-TE (1) H MRS to measure biologically relevant changes and differences in human brain GSH concentration. Although these outcomes are specific to the experimental approach used and the spectral quality achieved, this study serves as a template for the analogous scrutiny of quantification reliability for other compounds, methodologies and spectral qualities. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26900755

  3. Derivatization of estrogens enhances specificity and sensitivity of analysis of human plasma and serum by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Faqehi, Abdullah M.M.; Cobice, Diego F.; Naredo, Gregorio; Mak, Tracy C.S.; Upreti, Rita; Gibb, Fraser W.; Beckett, Geoffrey J.; Walker, Brian R.; Homer, Natalie Z.M.; Andrew, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens circulate at concentrations less than 20 pg/mL in men and postmenopausal women, presenting analytical challenges. Quantitation by immunoassay is unreliable at these low concentrations. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) offers greater specificity and sometimes greater sensitivity, but ionization of estrogens is inefficient. Introduction of charged moieties may enhance ionization, but many such derivatives of estrogens generate non-specific product ions originating from the “reagent” group. Therefore an approach generating derivatives with product ions specific to individual estrogens was sought. Estrogens were extracted from human plasma and serum using solid phase extraction and derivatized using 2-fluoro-1-methylpyridinium-p-toluenesulfonate (FMP-TS). Electrospray in positive mode with multiple reaction monitoring using a QTrap 5500 mass spectrometer was used to quantify “FMP” derivatives of estrogens, following LC separation. Transitions for the FMP derivatives of estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) were compound specific (m/z 362→238 and m/z 364→128, respectively). The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.2 pg on-column and the method was linear from 1–400 pg/sample. Measures of intra- and inter-assay variability, precision and accuracy were acceptable (<20%). The derivatives were stable over 24 h at 10 °C (7–9% degradation). Using this approach, E1 and E2, respectively were detected in human plasma and serum: pre-menopausal female serum (0.5 mL) 135–473, 193–722 pmol/L; male plasma (1 mL) 25–111, 60–180 pmol/L and post-menopausal female plasma (2 mL), 22–78, 29–50 pmol/L. Thus FMP derivatization, in conjunction with LC–MS/MS, is suitable for quantitative analysis of estrogens in low abundance in plasma and serum, offering advantages in specificity over immunoassay and existing MS techniques. PMID:26946022

  4. Specificity and sensitivity of respiratory impedance in assessing reversibility of airway obstruction in children.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, H K; Marchal, F; Derelle, J; Hatahet, R; Moneret-Vautrin, D; Monin, P

    1995-04-01

    Flow in the upper airway wall induces significant error in estimating respiratory impedance by the standard forced oscillation technique in subjects with airway obstruction and may be minimized by oscillating pressure around the subject's head (head generator technique). The aim of this study was to determine whether the latter improves the power of forced oscillations in detecting airway response to bronchodilators in children. Seventy-five children with airway obstruction were studied (ages 5.5 to 15 years old). Fifty-three had asthma and 22, cystic fibrosis. A bronchodilator was administered, and the percent changes in respiratory resistance at 10 Hz (Rrs10), 20 Hz (Rrs20), respiratory compliance (Crs), and resonant frequency (fn) with standard and head generator were compared with the corresponding change in FEV1. The response was positive in 38 (delta % FEV1 > or = 15%) and negative in 37 patients. Data on Rrs10, Crs, and fn could not be obtained in 7, 8, and 4 subjects, respectively, for technical reasons. The delta % Rrs20 was not different between head and standard generator in nonresponders (mean +/- SEM: -19.0 +/- 4.5, vs -11.8 +/- 3.1%), but significantly larger with head than standard generator in responders (-54.1 +/- 3.0 vs -26.5 +/- 2.4%; p < 0.001). The optimal decision level determined by Receiver Operation Characteristic analysis showed that, compared with the standard method, the head generator improved the specificity of Rrs20 (78 vs 65%) with no change in sensitivity (76% for both). Resonant frequency had larger sensitivity with standard than with head generator (91 vs 53%) but slightly lower specificity (70 vs 78%). Finally, delta %Crs was more specific (72 vs 67%) and more sensitive (68 vs 52%) with standard than with head generator. The overall incidence of false results was lower with the head generator than with the standard generator for resistance and lower with the standard generator than with the head generator for fn and compliance

  5. Estimation of normalized point-source sensitivity of segment surface specifications for extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Byoung-Joon; Nissly, Carl; Troy, Mitchell; Angeli, George; Bernier, Robert; Stepp, Larry; Williams, Eric

    2013-06-20

    We present a method which estimates the normalized point-source sensitivity (PSSN) of a segmented telescope when only information from a single segment surface is known. The estimation principle is based on a statistical approach with an assumption that all segment surfaces have the same power spectral density (PSD) as the given segment surface. As presented in this paper, the PSSN based on this statistical approach represents a worst-case scenario among statistical random realizations of telescopes when all segment surfaces have the same PSD. Therefore, this method, which we call the vendor table, is expected to be useful for individual segment specification such as the segment polishing specification. The specification based on the vendor table can be directly related to a science metric such as PSSN and provides the mirror vendors significant flexibility by specifying a single overall PSSN value for them to meet. We build a vendor table for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and test it using multiple mirror samples from various mirror vendors to prove its practical utility. Accordingly, TMT has a plan to adopt this vendor table for its M1 segment final mirror polishing requirement. PMID:23842151

  6. What can we learn from European continuous atmospheric CO2 measurements to quantify regional fluxes Part 2: Sensitivity of flux accuracy to inverse setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carouge, C.; Peylin, P.; Rayner, P. J.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.; Ciais, P.

    2008-10-01

    An inverse model using atmospheric CO2 observations from a European network of stations to reconstruct daily CO2 fluxes and their uncertainties over Europe at 50 km resolution has been developed within a Bayesian framework. We use the pseudo-data or identical twin approach in which we try to recover known fluxes using a range of perturbations to the input. In this second part, the focus is put on the sensitivity of flux accuracy to the inverse setup, varying the prior flux errors, the pseudo-data errors and the network of stations. We show that, under a range of assumptions about prior error and data error we can recover fluxes reliably at the scale of 1000 km and 10 days. At smaller scales the performance is highly sensitive to details of the inverse set-up. The use of temporal correlations in the flux domain appears to be of the same importance as the spatial correlations. We also note that the use of simple, isotropic correlations on the prior flux errors is more reliable than the use of apparently physically-based errors. Finally, increasing the European atmospheric network density improves the area with significant error reduction in the flux retrieval.

  7. Specific telomere dysfunction induced by GRN163L increases radiation sensitivity in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Millan, Jaime; Goldblatt, Erin M.; Gryaznov, Sergei M.; Mendonca, Marc S.; Herbert, Brittney-Shea . E-mail: brherber@iupui.edu

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Telomerase is expressed in 80-90% of tumor cells, but is absent in most somatic cells. The absence of telomerase activity results in progressive telomere shortening, leading to cellular senescence or death through deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage signals. In addition, a role for telomerase in DNA damage repair has also been suggested. A specific telomerase inhibitor, GRN163L that is complementary to the template region of the telomerase ribonucleic acid component (hTR). We hypothesized that exposure to GRN163L, either through immediate inhibition of telomerase activity or through eventual telomere shortening and dysfunction, may enhance radiation sensitivity. Our goal was to test whether the treatment with GRN163L enhances sensitivity to irradiation (IR) in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were treated with or without GRN163L for 2-42 days. Inhibition of telomerase activity and shortening of telomeres were confirmed. Cells were then irradiated and clonogenic assays were performed to show cell survival differences. In vivo studies using MDA-MB-231 xenografts were performed to corroborate the in vitro results. Results: We show that cells with shortened telomeres due to GRN163L enhance the effect on IR reducing survival by an additional 30% (p < 0.01). These results are confirmed in vivo, with a significant decrease in tumor growth in mice exposed to GRN163L. Conclusions: We found that GRN163L is a promising adjuvant treatment in combination with radiation therapy that may improve the therapeutic index by enhancing the radiation sensitivity. These studies prompt further investigation as to whether this combination can be applied to other cancers and the clinic.

  8. Specific and sensitive detection of Alcaligenes species from an agricultural environment.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyo; Niwa, Masumi; Nishimura, Norihiro

    2013-03-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay to specifically detect and quantify the genus Alcaligenes in samples from the agricultural environment, such as vegetables and farming soils, was developed. The minimum detection sensitivity was 106 fg of pure culture DNA, corresponding to DNA extracted from two cells of Alcaligenes faecalis. To evaluate the detection limit of A. faecalis, serially diluted genomic DNA from this organism was mixed with DNA extracted from soil and vegetables and then a standard curve was constructed. It was found that Alcaligenes species are present in the plant phytosphere at levels 10(2)-10(4) times lower than those in soil. The approach presented here will be useful for tracking or quantifying species of the genus Alcaligenes in the agricultural environment. PMID:23489084

  9. Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chili peppers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Julius, David

    2002-02-01

    Chili peppers produce the pungent vanilloid compound capsaicin, which offers protection from predatory mammals. Birds are indifferent to the pain-producing effects of capsaicin and therefore serve as vectors for seed dispersal. Here, we determine the molecular basis for this species-specific behavioral response by identifying a domain of the rat vanilloid receptor that confers sensitivity to capsaicin to the normally insensitive chicken ortholog. Like its mammalian counterpart, the chicken receptor is activated by heat or protons, consistent with the fact that both mammals and birds detect noxious heat and experience thermal hypersensitivity. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the ecological phenomenon of directed deterence and suggest that the capacity to detect capsaicin-like inflammatory substances is a recent acquisition of mammalian vanilloid receptors. PMID:11853675

  10. Targeted disruption of cocaine-activated accumbens neurons prevents context-specific sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Eisuke; Golden, Sam A.; Harvey, Brandon K.; Guez, Danielle H.; Berkow, Alexander; Simmons, Danielle E.; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Nair, Sunila G.; Uejima, Jamie L.; Marin, Marcelo T.; Mitchell, Timothy; Farquhar, David; Ghosh, Sukhen; Mattson, Brandi J.; Hope, Bruce T.

    2009-01-01

    Learned associations between effects of abused drugs and the drug administration environment play important roles in drug addiction. Histochemical and electrophysiological studies suggest that these associations are encoded in sparsely distributed nucleus accumbens neurons that are selectively activated by drugs and drug-associated cues. Although correlations between accumbens neuronal activity and responsivity to drugs and drug cues have been observed, no technique exists for selectively manipulating these activated neurons and establishing their causal role in behavioral effects of drugs and drug cues. Here we describe a novel method, termed ‘Daun02-inactivation method’, that selectively inactivates a minority of neurons activated by cocaine in an environment repeatedly paired with cocaine to demonstrate a causal role for these activated neurons in context-specific cocaine-induced psychomotor sensitization in rats. This method provides a new tool to study causal roles of selectively activated neurons in behavioral effects of drugs and drug cues and in other learned behaviors. PMID:19620976

  11. Highly sensitive assay for acetylcholinesterase activity and inhibition based on a specifically reactive photonic nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Li, Xuesong; Cui, Jiecheng; Li, Jian; Lan, Yue; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2014-09-10

    Assays for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with high sensitivity and high selectivity as well as facile manipulation have been urgently required in various fields. In this work, a reaction-based photonic strategy was developed for the efficient assay of AChE activity and inhibition based on the synergetic combination of the specific thiol-maleimide addition reaction with photonic porous structure. It was found that various applications including detection of AChE activity, measurement of the related enzymatic kinetics, and screening of inhibitors could be efficiently implemented using such strategy. Remarkably, the unique photonic nanostructure endows the constructed sensing platform with high sensitivity with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 mU/mL for AChE activity, high selectivity, and self-reporting signaling. Moreover, the label-free solid film-based sensing approach described here has advantages of facile manipulation and bare-eye readout, compared with conventional liquid-phase methods, exhibiting promising potential in practical application for the AChE assay. PMID:25130420

  12. Giardiasis: an update review on sensitivity and specificity of methods for laboratorial diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Renata; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-10-01

    Giardiasis is a major cause of diarrhoea transmitted by ingestion of contaminated water and food with cysts, and it has been spread among people with poor oral hygiene. The traditional diagnosis is performed by identifying trophozoites and cysts of Giardia duodenalis through microscopy of faecal samples. In addition to microscopy, different methods have been validated for giardiasis diagnosis which are based on immunologic and molecular analyses. The aim of this study was to conduct a review of the main methods applied in clinical laboratory for diagnosis of giardiasis, in the last 10years, regarding the specificity and sensitivity criteria. It was observed high variability in the performance of the same methodology across studies; however, several techniques have been considered better than microscopy. The later, although gold standard, presents low sensitivity in cases of low number of cysts in the sample, and the experience of the microscopist must also be considered. We conclude that microscopy should still be held and complementary technique is recommended, in order to provide a reliable diagnosis and a proper treatment of the patient. PMID:27546714

  13. Specificity and sensitivity of the olfactory organ of the zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Michel, W C; Lubomudrov, L M

    1995-01-01

    1. The specificity and sensitivity of the olfactory organ of adult zebrafish, Danio rerio, to selected amino acid, bile acid, and steroid odorants were characterized using the electro-olfactogram recording technique. The olfactory organ was responsive to 28 of the 29 odorants tested. 2. All of the 100 microM amino acid and bile acid stimulants elicited a negative-going response that was significantly greater than the response to the artificial fresh-water control. The general pattern of relative stimulatory effectiveness established for the amino acid stimuli was neutral amino acids > basic amino acids > acidic amino acids > imino acids. The general pattern of relative stimulatory effectiveness of 100 microM bile acid stimuli was taurine-conjugated bile acids > glycine-conjugated bile acids approximately non-conjugated bile acids. The responses to the most stimulatory bile acid odorants were up to 40% larger than the responses to the most stimulatory amino acid odorants. 3. The response threshold for cysteine and taurocholic acid, the most stimulatory of the amino acid and bile acid stimuli tested, was approximately 10(-8) M. Females are significantly more sensitive to these odorants than males. PMID:7636767

  14. Content-specific expectations enhance stimulus detectability by increasing perceptual sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Stein, Timo; Peelen, Marius V

    2015-12-01

    The detectability of an object in our visual environment is primarily determined by the object's low-level visual salience, resulting from the physical characteristics of the object and its surroundings. In the present study we demonstrate that object detectability is additionally influenced by internally generated expectations about object properties, and that these influences are mediated by changes in perceptual sensitivity. Using continuous flash suppression (CFS) to render objects invisible, we found that providing valid information about the category membership of the object (e.g., "car") before stimulus presentation facilitated awareness of the object, as shown by improved localization performance relative to a noninformative baseline condition and to a condition with invalid prior information. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that the effect of expectation on detection generalized to binocular viewing conditions, with valid category cues facilitating the localization and detection of briefly presented objects. Experiment 4 extended these results to simple stimuli (oriented Gabor patches), for which valid orientation information improved localization performance. Finally, in Experiment 5 we found that the effect of expectation on detection and localization performance partly reflects increased perceptual sensitivity, as evidenced by decreased contrast detection thresholds for validly cued stimuli relative to noncued and invalidly cued stimuli. Together, these findings demonstrate that prior information about specific object properties dynamically enhances the effective signal of visual input matching the expected content, thereby biasing object detection in favor of expected objects. PMID:26460783

  15. Sensitivity in error detection of patient specific QA tools for IMRT plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lat, S. Z.; Suriyapee, S.; Sanghangthum, T.

    2016-03-01

    The high complexity of dose calculation in treatment planning and accurate delivery of IMRT plan need high precision of verification method. The purpose of this study is to investigate error detection capability of patient specific QA tools for IMRT plans. The two H&N and two prostate IMRT plans with MapCHECK2 and portal dosimetry QA tools were studied. Measurements were undertaken for original and modified plans with errors introduced. The intentional errors composed of prescribed dose (±2 to ±6%) and position shifting in X-axis and Y-axis (±1 to ±5mm). After measurement, gamma pass between original and modified plans were compared. The average gamma pass for original H&N and prostate plans were 98.3% and 100% for MapCHECK2 and 95.9% and 99.8% for portal dosimetry, respectively. In H&N plan, MapCHECK2 can detect position shift errors starting from 3mm while portal dosimetry can detect errors started from 2mm. Both devices showed similar sensitivity in detection of position shift error in prostate plan. For H&N plan, MapCHECK2 can detect dose errors starting at ±4%, whereas portal dosimetry can detect from ±2%. For prostate plan, both devices can identify dose errors starting from ±4%. Sensitivity of error detection depends on type of errors and plan complexity.

  16. Effect of four-week repeated inhalation exposure to unconjugated azodicarbonamide on specific and non-specific airway sensitivity of the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, R F; Medinsky, M A; Hobbs, C H; Bice, D E; Bechtold, W E; Cheng, Y S; Gillett, N A; Birnbaum, L S; Mauderly, J L

    1989-06-01

    Reports of respiratory problems among industrial workers exposed repeatedly by inhalation to azodicarbonamide (ADA) raised concern that ADA might be a pulmonary sensitizer. We used a non-invasive method for measuring specific airway conductance to evaluate the potential for repeated inhalation of unconjugated ADA to cause specific or non-specific pulmonary sensitization in the guinea pig. Two groups of male Hartley guinea pigs were exposed 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks to aerosolized ADA at 51 or 200 mg/m3, or to filtered air as controls. One group was tested for specific sensitization to ADA by measuring specific airway conductance during inhalation challenge with ADA before and on the third day after the 4-week ADA exposure. The ADA concentrations for the challenges were identical to the repeated exposure concentrations (51 or 200 mg/m3, 200 mg/m3 for controls). The other group was tested for non-specific airway sensitization by inhalation challenge with aerosolized histamine before and after the 4-week ADA exposure. Histamine was administered in stepwise increasing concentrations to elicit an airway response in each guinea pig. Skin tests for immunological responses to ADA, body weight and histopathology of the respiratory tract and skin test sites were also evaluated. The 4-week exposure to ADA did not result in either specific or non-specific airway sensitization. The ADA exposure did not induce positive skin reactions, influence body weight or cause histopathological responses. These results indicate that ADA, acting alone (i.e. not conjugated to a protein), is not a pulmonary sensitizer in the guinea pig exposed repeatedly for 4 weeks and challenged to simulate a 'Monday morning' exposure. PMID:2745922

  17. An extremely sensitive species-specific ARMS PCR test for the presence of tiger bone DNA.

    PubMed

    Wetton, Jon H; Tsang, Carol S F; Roney, Chris A; Spriggs, Adrian C

    2002-04-18

    The survival of the tiger (Panthera tigris) is seriously threatened by poaching to provide raw materials for traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). Most highly prized are the tiger's bones, which are used in combination with other animal and plant derivatives in pills and plasters for the treatment of rheumatism and other ailments. Hundreds of patent remedies have been produced which claim to contain tiger bone, but proof of its presence is needed if legislation prohibiting the trade in endangered species is to be enforced.A highly sensitive tiger-specific real-time PCR assay has been developed to address this problem. Using primers specific to the tiger mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, successful amplification has been reliably achieved from blood, hair and bone as well as from a range of TCMs spiked with 0.5% tiger bone. Although capable of detecting fewer than 10 substrate molecules, the seven varieties of TCM pills and plasters tested showed no detectable trace of tiger DNA before spiking. Furthermore, sequencing several "tiger bone" fragments seized from TCM shops has shown that they actually originated from cattle and pigs. The potential effects of traditional bone preparation methods, evidence that much lower concentrations are used than alleged on TCM packaging, and substitution of bones from other species all suggest a low likelihood of detecting tiger DNA in patent medicines. Despite this, the basic methods have been thoroughly proven and can be readily applied to derivatives from other Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) protected species, providing a rapid and highly sensitive forensic test for species of origin. Potential applications to the monitoring of wild populations are demonstrated by the successful identification of shed hairs and faecal samples. PMID:12084490

  18. Measurement of human growth hormone in urine: development and validation of a sensitive and specific assay.

    PubMed

    Hourd, P; Edwards, R

    1989-04-01

    A specific solid-phase immunoradiometric assay (IRMA), optimized for maximum sensitivity, has been developed for measurement of human GH (hGH) in urine. The sensitivity varied with sample size, giving a range of 0.001 to 0.003 mU/l for a sample volume of 2 ml. Recovery and dilution experiments, together with chromatography of urine samples, indicate that the method is specific for hGH. Added exogenous hGH was measured with a mean recovery of 101 +/- 10% (S.D.) for 1 ml samples and 87 +/- 8% for 2 ml samples. Measurements of samples diluted at 1:2 and 1:4 gave values of 97.4 and 96.6% respectively of those expected. Cross-reactions of human placental lactogen and prolactin were less than 0.008 and 0.04% respectively on a mol/mol basis. The assay was insensitive to the presence of NaCl (50-500 mmol/l), urea (50-1000 mmol/l), creatinine (1-20 mmol/l), Ca2+ ions (1-20 mmol/l), SO4(2-) ions (1-1000 mmol/l), Mg2+ ions (0.05-50 mmol/l), 0.5-5% (w/v) glucose and a pH range of 6-9. Chromatography of unextracted samples showed that the immunoreactive material in urine eluted in a single homogenous peak with a similar position to monomeric pituitary hGH (22 kDa). Administered hGH (0.002%) was recovered in urine collected over a 2-h period following an intravenous injection. The urine output of hGH showed a good correlation with serum hGH in 18 patients following routine insulin tolerance tests and in 25 patients following an oral glucose tolerance test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2715756

  19. Sensitivity of a subject-specific musculoskeletal model to the uncertainties on the joint axes location.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Saulo; Valente, Giordano; Viceconti, Marco; Taddei, Fulvia

    2015-01-01

    Subject-specific musculoskeletal models have become key tools in the clinical decision-making process. However, the sensitivity of the calculated solution to the unavoidable errors committed while deriving the model parameters from the available information is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to calculate the sensitivity of all the kinematics and kinetics variables to the inter-examiner uncertainty in the identification of the lower limb joint models. The study was based on the computer tomography of the entire lower-limb from a single donor and the motion capture from a body-matched volunteer. The hip, the knee and the ankle joint models were defined following the International Society of Biomechanics recommendations. Using a software interface, five expert anatomists identified on the donor's images the necessary bony locations five times with a three-day time interval. A detailed subject-specific musculoskeletal model was taken from an earlier study, and re-formulated to define the joint axes by inputting the necessary bony locations. Gait simulations were run using OpenSim within a Monte Carlo stochastic scheme, where the locations of the bony landmarks were varied randomly according to the estimated distributions. Trends for the joint angles, moments, and the muscle and joint forces did not substantially change after parameter perturbations. The highest variations were as follows: (a) 11° calculated for the hip rotation angle, (b) 1% BW × H calculated for the knee moment and (c) 0.33 BW calculated for the ankle plantarflexor muscles and the ankle joint forces. In conclusion, the identification of the joint axes from clinical images is a robust procedure for human movement modelling and simulation. PMID:24963785

  20. [Mucin-like carcinoma-associated antigen: sensitivity and specificity in metastatic breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ammon, A; Eiffert, H; Alhusen, R; Weber, M; Rümelin, B; Groh, E; Bartsch, H; Marschner, N; Nagel, G A; Krieger, G

    1990-06-01

    The clinical usefulness of a tumor marker essentially depends on its sensitivity and specificity for a certain tumor. To prove, wheather the new tumor marker 'mucin-like carcinoma-associated antigen' could be used for the management of breast cancer patients, we determined its serum concentration in 50 healthy blood donors, 130 patients with various non-malignant diseases, 138 patients with different metastazised tumors and 137 breast cancer patients. 78 of the breast cancer patients had known metastases while 59 had no evidence of disease after initial surgical and adjuvant therapy. Only 2% of the blood donors and 3% of the patients with non-malignant diseases exceeded the cut-off level of 15 U/ml. In contrast to these findings, 28% of patients with various metastazised tumors and 77% of patients with metastazised breast cancer had serum levels above 15 U/ml. Breast cancer patients without evidence of disease had elevated marker values in only 3%. In breast cancer the serum levels of this antigen depends on the type of metastases. Maximal concentrations were found in mixed metastases while cutaneous or lymph-node metastases showed the lowest rate of positivity. Furthermore a good correlation of serial determined marker levels with the course of the disease was observed, so that we conclude, that mucin-like carcinoma-associated antigen can be used in follow-up of patients with metastazised breast cancer. Because of its high sensitivity and specificity it provides some advantage over other markers used in this disease. PMID:2204009

  1. Redox-sensitive YFP sensors for monitoring dynamic compartment-specific glutathione redox state.

    PubMed

    Banach-Latapy, Agata; He, Tiantian; Dardalhon, Michèle; Vernis, Laurence; Chanet, Roland; Huang, Meng-Er

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular redox homeostasis is crucial for many cellular functions but accurate measurements of cellular compartment-specific redox states remain technically challenging. Genetically encoded biosensors including the glutathione-specific redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP) may provide an alternative way to overcome the limitations of conventional glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) redox measurements. This study describes the use of rxYFP sensors for investigating compartment-specific steady redox state and their dynamics in response to stress in human cells. RxYFP expressed in the cytosol, nucleus, or mitochondrial matrix of HeLa cells was responsive to the intracellular redox state changes induced by reducing as well as oxidizing agents. Compartment-targeted rxYFP sensors were able to detect different steady-state redox conditions among the cytosol, nucleus, and mitochondrial matrix. These sensors expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes HEK001 responded to stress induced by ultraviolet A radiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rxYFP sensors were able to sense dynamic and compartment-specific redox changes caused by 100 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Mitochondrial matrix-targeted rxYFP displayed a greater dynamics of oxidation in response to a H2O2 challenge than the cytosol- and nucleus-targeted sensors, largely due to a more alkaline local pH environment. These observations support the view that mitochondrial glutathione redox state is maintained and regulated independently from that of the cytosol and nucleus. Taken together, our data show the robustness of the rxYFP sensors to measure compartmental redox changes in human cells. Complementary to existing redox sensors and conventional redox measurements, compartment-targeted rxYFP sensors provide a novel tool for examining mammalian cell redox homeostasis, permitting high-resolution readout of steady glutathione state and dynamics of redox changes. PMID:23891676

  2. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  3. A species-specific polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid and sensitive detection of Colletotrichum capsici.

    PubMed

    Torres-Calzada, C; Tapia-Tussell, R; Quijano-Ramayo, A; Martin-Mex, R; Rojas-Herrera, R; Higuera-Ciapara, I; Perez-Brito, D

    2011-09-01

    Colletotrichum capsici is an important fungal species that causes anthracnose in many genera of plants causing severe economic losses worldwide. A primer set was designed based on the sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions for use in a conventional PCR assay. The primer set (CcapF/CcapR) amplified a single product of 394 bp with DNA extracted from 20 Mexican isolates of C. capsici. The specificity of primers was confirmed by the absence of amplified product with DNA of four other Colletotrichum species and eleven different fungal genera. This primer set is capable of amplifying only C. capsici from different contaminated tissues or fungal structures, thereby facilitating rapid diagnoses as there is no need to isolate and cultivate the fungus in order to identify it. The sensitivity of detection with this PCR method was 10 pg of genomic DNA from the pathogen. This is the first report of a C. capsici-specific primer set. It allows rapid pathogen detection and provides growers with a powerful tool for a rational selection of fungicides to control anthracnose in different crops and in the post-harvest stage. PMID:21253896

  4. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  5. Antigen-Specific IP-10 Release Is a Sensitive Biomarker of Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sven D C; McGill, Kevina; Doyle, Mairead B; Goosen, Wynand J; van Helden, Paul D; Gormley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used ante-mortem diagnostic tests for tuberculosis in cattle are the tuberculin skin test and the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay, both of which measure cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium bovis infection. However, limitations in the performance of these tests results in a failure to identify all infected animals. In attempting to increase the range of diagnostic tests for tuberculosis, measurement of the cytokine IP-10 in antigen-stimulated blood has previously been shown to improve the detection of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis infection, in humans and African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer), respectively. In the present study, 60 cattle were identified by the single intradermal comparative tuberculin test as tuberculosis reactors (n = 24) or non-reactors (n = 36) and the release of IFN-γ and IP-10 in antigen-stimulated whole blood from these animals was measured using bovine specific ELISAs. There was a strong correlation between IP-10 and IFN-γ production in these samples. Moreover, measurement of the differential release of IP-10 in response to stimulation with M. bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) and M. avium PPD distinguished between reactor and non-reactor cattle with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 86%-100%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI, 85%-100%). These results suggest that IP-10 might prove valuable as a diagnostic biomarker of M. bovis infection in cattle. PMID:27167122

  6. Antigen-Specific IP-10 Release Is a Sensitive Biomarker of Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Kevina; Doyle, Mairead B.; Goosen, Wynand J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Gormley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used ante-mortem diagnostic tests for tuberculosis in cattle are the tuberculin skin test and the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay, both of which measure cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium bovis infection. However, limitations in the performance of these tests results in a failure to identify all infected animals. In attempting to increase the range of diagnostic tests for tuberculosis, measurement of the cytokine IP-10 in antigen-stimulated blood has previously been shown to improve the detection of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis infection, in humans and African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer), respectively. In the present study, 60 cattle were identified by the single intradermal comparative tuberculin test as tuberculosis reactors (n = 24) or non-reactors (n = 36) and the release of IFN-γ and IP-10 in antigen-stimulated whole blood from these animals was measured using bovine specific ELISAs. There was a strong correlation between IP-10 and IFN-γ production in these samples. Moreover, measurement of the differential release of IP-10 in response to stimulation with M. bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) and M. avium PPD distinguished between reactor and non-reactor cattle with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 86%–100%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI, 85%–100%). These results suggest that IP-10 might prove valuable as a diagnostic biomarker of M. bovis infection in cattle. PMID:27167122

  7. Maladaptive interpersonal schemas as sensitive and specific markers of borderline personality disorder among psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lisa J; Tanis, Thachell; Ardalan, Firouz; Yaseen, Zimri; Galynker, Igor

    2016-08-30

    Diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and mood and psychotic disorders characterized by major mood episodes (i.e., major depressive, bipolar and schizoaffective disorder) share marked overlap in symptom presentation, complicating differential diagnosis. The current study tests the hypothesis that maladaptive interpersonal schemas (MIS) are characteristic of BPD, but not of the major mood disorders. One hundred psychiatric inpatients were assessed by SCID I, SCID II and the Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ-S2). Logistic regression analyses tested the association between MIS (measured by the YSQ-S2) and BPD, bipolar, major depressive and schizoaffective disorder. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analyses assessed the sensitivity and specificity of MIS as a marker of BPD. After covariation for comorbidity with each of the 3 mood disorders, BPD was robustly associated with 4 out of 5 schema domains. In contrast, only one of fifteen regression analyses demonstrated a significant association between any mood disorder and schema domain after covariation for comorbid BPD. ROC analyses of the 5 schema domains suggested Disconnection/Rejection had the greatest power for identification of BPD cases. These data support the specific role of maladaptive interpersonal schemas in BPD and potentially contribute to greater conceptual clarity about the distinction between BPD and the major mood disorders. PMID:27394052

  8. Identification of specific gravity sensitive signal transduction pathways in human A431 carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, P. J.; de Groot, R. P.; Kruijer, W.; de Laat, S. W.; Verkleij, A. J.; Boonstra, J.

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) activates a well characterized signal transduction cascade in human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The influence of gravity on EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering and early gene expression as well as on actin polymerization and actin organization have been investigated. Different signalling pathways induced by the agents TPA, forskolin and A23187 that activate gene expression were tested for sensitivity to gravity. EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression were decreased in microgravity. However, constitutive β-2 microglobulin expression remained unaltered. Under simulated weightlessness conditions EGF- and TPA-induced c-fos expression was decreased, while forskolin- and A23187-induced c-fos expression was independent of the gravity conditions. These results suggest that gravity affects specific signalling pathways. Preliminary results indicate that EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering remained unaltered irrespective of the gravity conditions. Furthermore, the relative filamentous actin content of steady state A431 cells was enhanced under microgravity conditions and actin filament organization was altered. Under simulated weightlessness actin filament organization in steady state cells as well as in EGF-treated cells was altered as compared to the 1 G reference experiment. Interestingly the microtubule and keratin organization in untreated cells showed no difference with the normal gravity samples. This indicates that gravity may affect specific components of the signal transduction circuitry.

  9. Sensitive and specific immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for human thyroid stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Piaditis, G.P.; Hodgkinson, S.C.; McLean, C.; Lowry, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A liquid phase ''two-site'' immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) specific for human thyroid stimulating hormone (hTSH) is described. The assay is based on the simultaneous addition of affinity purified sheep anti hTSH IgG- SVI and rabbit anti hTSH antiserum to standards and unknowns followed by 4h incubation at room temperature. The separation of free labelled sheep IgG- SVI from that bound to hTSH is achieved by the addition of sheep anti-rabbit IgG Fc fragment antiserum. The radiolabelled sheep anti-hTSH IgG- SVI was pretreated with solid phase urinary postmenopausal gonadotropins to remove cross reaction with FSH and LH. The assay is specific for hTSH and no cross reaction with the other anterior pituitary glycoproteins or protein hormones has been found. In addition it is characterized by a wide operating range, rapid equilibration of reactants and high sensitivity. The precision of dose estimates was less than 10% between 0.25-2.5 microU/ml and less than 2.5% over the range 2.5-60 microU/ml.

  10. Aptamer-MIP hybrid receptor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Tamboli, Vibha; Harniman, Robert L; Estrela, Pedro; Allender, Chris J; Bowen, Jenna L

    2016-01-15

    This study reports the design and evaluation of a new synthetic receptor sensor based on the amalgamation of biomolecular recognition elements and molecular imprinting to overcome some of the challenges faced by conventional protein imprinting. A thiolated DNA aptamer with established affinity for prostate specific antigen (PSA) was complexed with PSA prior to being immobilised on the surface of a gold electrode. Controlled electropolymerisation of dopamine around the complex served to both entrap the complex, holding the aptamer in, or near to, it's binding conformation, and to localise the PSA binding sites at the sensor surface. Following removal of PSA, it was proposed that the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) cavity would act synergistically with the embedded aptamer to form a hybrid receptor (apta-MIP), displaying recognition properties superior to that of aptamer alone. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate subsequent rebinding of PSA to the apta-MIP surface. The apta-MIP sensor showed high sensitivity with a linear response from 100pg/ml to 100ng/ml of PSA and a limit of detection of 1pg/ml, which was three-fold higher than aptamer alone sensor for PSA. Furthermore, the sensor demonstrated low cross-reactivity with a homologous protein (human Kallikrein 2) and low response to human serum albumin (HSA), suggesting possible resilience to the non-specific binding of serum proteins. PMID:26318788

  11. Dose Calculation on KV Cone Beam CT Images: An Investigation of the Hu-Density Conversion Stability and Dose Accuracy Using the Site-Specific Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi

    2010-10-01

    Precise calibration of Hounsfield units (HU) to electron density (HU-density) is essential to dose calculation. On-board kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is used predominantly for patients' positioning, but will potentially be used for dose calculation. The impacts of varying 3 imaging parameters (mAs, source-imager distance [SID], and cone angle) and phantom size on the HU number accuracy and HU-density calibrations for CBCT imaging were studied. We proposed a site-specific calibration method to achieve higher accuracy in CBCT image-based dose calculation. Three configurations of the Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS) water equivalent electron density phantom were used to simulate sites including head, lungs, and lower body (abdomen/pelvis). The planning computed tomography (CT) scan was used as the baseline for comparisons. CBCT scans of these phantom configurations were performed using Varian Trilogy{sup TM} system in a precalibrated mode with fixed tube voltage (125 kVp), but varied mAs, SID, and cone angle. An HU-density curve was generated and evaluated for each set of scan parameters. Three HU-density tables generated using different phantom configurations with the same imaging parameter settings were selected for dose calculation on CBCT images for an accuracy comparison. Changing mAs or SID had small impact on HU numbers. For adipose tissue, the HU discrepancy from the baseline was 20 HU in a small phantom, but 5 times lager in a large phantom. Yet, reducing the cone angle significantly decreases the HU discrepancy. The HU-density table was also affected accordingly. By performing dose comparison between CT and CBCT image-based plans, results showed that using the site-specific HU-density tables to calibrate CBCT images of different sites improves the dose accuracy to {approx}2%. Our phantom study showed that CBCT imaging can be a feasible option for dose computation in adaptive radiotherapy approach if the site-specific

  12. Exploring a Three-Level Model of Calibration Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraw, Gregory; Kuch, Fred; Gutierrez, Antonio P.; Richmond, Aaron S.

    2014-01-01

    We compared 5 different statistics (i.e., G index, gamma, "d'", sensitivity, specificity) used in the social sciences and medical diagnosis literatures to assess calibration accuracy in order to examine the relationship among them and to explore whether one statistic provided a best fitting general measure of accuracy. College…

  13. [Sensitivity and specificity of flicker perimetry with Pulsar. Comparison with achromatic (white-on-white) perimetry in glaucoma patients].

    PubMed

    Göbel, K; Erb, C

    2013-02-01

    The early detection of functional glaucoma damage plays an increasingly more central role in the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma disease. Using selective perimetry detection of early glaucomatous defects is more likely and one of these methods is flicker perimetry with Pulsar. Flicker perimetry is used to analyze the temporal visual function in combination with spatial resolution and contrast sensitivity as opposed to standard automated perimetry which measures the differential light sensitivity with a non-specific stimulus. This study showed a higher sensitivity and specificity of Pulsar perimetry in comparison to achromatic perimetry in glaucoma patients. PMID:23338528

  14. Effects of ovariectomy and intrinsic aerobic capacity on tissue-specific insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Min; Rector, R Scott; Thyfault, John P; Zidon, Terese M; Padilla, Jaume; Welly, Rebecca J; Meers, Grace M; Morris, Matthew E; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Booth, Frank W; Kanaley, Jill A; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J

    2016-02-01

    High-capacity running (HCR) rats are protected against the early (i.e., ∼ 11 wk postsurgery) development of ovariectomy (OVX)-induced insulin resistance (IR) compared with low-capacity running (LCR) rats. The purpose of this study was to utilize the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp to determine whether 1) HCR rats remain protected from OVX-induced IR when the time following OVX is extended to 27 wk and 2) tissue-specific glucose uptake differences are responsible for the protection in HCR rats under sedentary conditions. Female HCR and LCR rats (n = 40; aged ∼ 22 wk) randomly received either OVX or sham (SHM) surgeries and then underwent the clamp 27 wk following surgeries. [3-(3)H]glucose was used to determine glucose clearance, whereas 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose (2-DG) was used to assess glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, brown adipose tissue (BAT), subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT), and visceral WAT. OVX decreased the glucose infusion rate and glucose clearance in both lines, but HCR had better insulin sensitivity than LCR (P < 0.05). In both lines, OVX significantly reduced glucose uptake in soleus and gastrocnemius muscles; however, HCR showed ∼ 40% greater gastrocnemius glucose uptake compared with LCR (P < 0.05). HCR also exhibited greater glucose uptake in BAT and visceral WAT compared with LCR (P < 0.05), yet these tissues were not affected by OVX in either line. In conclusion, OVX impairs insulin sensitivity in both HCR and LCR rats, likely driven by impairments in insulin-mediated skeletal muscle glucose uptake. HCR rats have greater skeletal muscle, BAT, and WAT insulin-mediated glucose uptake, which may aid in protection against OVX-associated insulin resistance. PMID:26646101

  15. A systems toxicology approach to elucidate the mechanisms involved in RDX species-specific sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Warner, Christopher M; Gust, Kurt A; Stanley, Jacob K; Habib, Tanwir; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J

    2012-07-17

    Interspecies uncertainty factors in ecological risk assessment provide conservative estimates of risk where limited or no toxicity data is available. We quantitatively examined the validity of interspecies uncertainty factors by comparing the responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to the energetic compound 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), a known neurotoxicant. Relative toxicity was measured through transcriptional, morphological, and behavioral end points in zebrafish and fathead minnow fry exposed for 96 h to RDX concentrations ranging from 0.9 to 27.7 mg/L. Spinal deformities and lethality occurred at 1.8 and 3.5 mg/L RDX respectively for fathead minnow and at 13.8 and 27.7 mg/L for zebrafish, indicating that zebrafish have an 8-fold greater tolerance for RDX than fathead minnow fry. The number and magnitude of differentially expressed transcripts increased with increasing RDX concentration for both species. Differentially expressed genes were enriched in functions related to neurological disease, oxidative-stress, acute-phase response, vitamin/mineral metabolism and skeletal/muscular disorders. Decreased expression of collagen-coding transcripts were associated with spinal deformity and likely involved in sensitivity to RDX. Our work provides a mechanistic explanation for species-specific sensitivity to RDX where zebrafish responded at lower concentrations with greater numbers of functions related to RDX tolerance than fathead minnow. While the 10-fold interspecies uncertainty factor does provide a reasonable cross-species estimate of toxicity in the present study, the observation that the responses between ZF and FHM are markedly different does initiate a call for concern regarding establishment of broad ecotoxicological conclusions based on model species such as zebrafish. PMID:22697906

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of 3-D texture analysis of lung parenchyma is better than 2-D for discrimination of lung pathology in stage 0 COPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ye; Sonka, Milan; McLennan, Geoffrey; Guo, Junfeng; Hoffman, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Lung parenchyma evaluation via multidetector-row CT (MDCT), has significantly altered clinical practice in the early detection of lung disease. Our goal is to enhance our texture-based tissue classification ability to differentiate early pathologic processes by extending our 2-D Adaptive Multiple Feature Method (AMFM) to 3-D AMFM. We performed MDCT on 34 human volunteers in five categories: emphysema in severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) as EC, emphysema in mild COPD (MC), normal appearing lung in COPD (NC), non-smokers with normal lung function (NN), smokers with normal function (NS). We volumetrically excluded the airway and vessel regions, calculated 24 volumetric texture features for each Volume of Interest (VOI); and used Bayesian rules for discrimination. Leave-one-out and half-half methods were used for testing. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. The accuracy of the leave-one-out method for the four-class classification in the form of 3-D/2-D is: EC: 84.9%/70.7%, MC: 89.8%/82.7%; NC: 87.5.0%/49.6%; NN: 100.0%/60.0%. The accuracy of the leave-one-out method for the two-class classification in the form of 3-D/2-D is: NN: 99.3%/71.6%; NS: 99.7%/74.5%. We conclude that 3-D AMFM analysis of the lung parenchyma improves discrimination compared to 2-D analysis of the same images.

  17. ZBTB16: a novel sensitive and specific biomarker for yolk sac tumor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Li, Faqian; Unger, Pamela D; Katerji, Hani; Yang, Qi; McMahon, Loralee; Burstein, David E

    2016-06-01

    Although the function of zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16 (ZBTB16) in spermatogenesis is well documented, expression of ZBTB16 in germ cell tumors has not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression and diagnostic utility of ZBTB16 in germ cell tumors. A total of 67 adult germ cell tumors were studied (62 testicular germ cell tumors, 2 ovarian yolk sac tumors, 1 mediastinal yolk sac tumor, and 2 retroperitoneal metastatic yolk sac tumors). The 62 testicular primary germ cell tumors are as follows: 34 pure germ cell tumors (20 seminomas, 8 embryonal carcinomas, 2 teratomas, 1 choriocarcinoma, 1 carcinoid, and 2 spermatocytic tumors) and 28 mixed germ cell tumors (composed of 13 embryonal carcinomas, 15 yolk sac tumors, 15 teratomas, 7 seminomas, and 3 choriocarcinomas in various combinations). Thirty-five cases contained germ cell neoplasia in situ. Yolk sac tumor was consistently reactive for ZBTB16. Among the 15 testicular yolk sac tumors in mixed germ cell tumors, all displayed moderate to diffuse ZBTB16 staining. ZBTB16 reactivity was present regardless of the histologic patterns of yolk sac tumor and ZBTB16 was able to pick up small foci of yolk sac tumor intermixed/embedded in other germ cell tumor subtype elements. Diffuse ZBTB16 immunoreactivity was also observed in 2/2 metastatic yolk sac tumors, 1/1 mediastinal yolk sac tumor, 2/2 ovarian yolk sac tumors, 2/2 spermatocytic tumors, 1/1 carcinoid, and the spermatogonial cells. All the other non-yolk sac germ cell tumors were nonreactive, including seminoma (n=27), embryonal carcinoma (n=21), teratoma (n=17), choriocarcinoma (n=4), and germ cell neoplasia in situ (n=35). The sensitivity and specificity of ZBTB16 in detecting yolk sac tumor among the germ cell tumors was 100% (20/20) and 96% (66/69), respectively. In conclusion, ZBTB16 is a highly sensitive and specific marker for yolk sac tumor. PMID:26916077

  18. Reinforcement Sensitivity and Risk for Psychopathology Following Exposure to Violence: A Vulnerability-Specificity Model in Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudino, Omar G.; Nadeem, Erum; Kataoka, Sheryl H.; Lau, Anna S.

    2012-01-01

    Urban Latino youth are exposed to high rates of violence, which increases risk for diverse forms of psychopathology. The current study aims to increase specificity in predicting responses by testing the hypothesis that youths' reinforcement sensitivity--behavioral inhibition (BIS) and behavioral approach (BAS)--is associated with specific clinical…

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of univariate MRI analysis of experimentally degraded cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping-Chang; Reiter, David A.; Spencer, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    MRI is increasingly used to evaluate cartilage in tissue constructs, explants, and animal and patient studies. However, while mean values of MR parameters, including T1, T2, magnetization transfer rate km, apparent diffusion coefficient ADC, and the dGEMRIC-derived fixed charge density, correlate with tissue status, the ability to classify tissue according to these parameters has not been explored. Therefore, the sensitivity and specificity with which each of these parameters was able to distinguish between normal and trypsin- degraded, and between normal and collagenase-degraded, cartilage explants were determined. Initial analysis was performed using a training set to determine simple group means to which parameters obtained from a validation set were compared. T1 and ADC showed the greatest ability to discriminate between normal and degraded cartilage. Further analysis with k-means clustering, which eliminates the need for a priori identification of sample status, generally performed comparably. Use of fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering to define centroids likewise did not result in improvement in discrimination. Finally, a FCM clustering approach in which validation samples were assigned in a probabilistic fashion to control and degraded groups was implemented, reflecting the range of tissue characteristics seen with cartilage degradation. PMID:19705467

  20. Species-specific alternative splicing generates a catalytically inactive form of human hormone-sensitive lipase.

    PubMed

    Laurell, H; Grober, J; Vindis, C; Lacombe, T; Dauzats, M; Holm, C; Langin, D

    1997-11-15

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyses the rate-limiting step of adipose tissue lipolysis. The enzyme is also expressed in steroidogenic tissues, mammary gland, muscle tissues and macrophages. A novel HSL mRNA termed hHSL-S, 228 bp shorter than the full-length HSL mRNA, was detected in human adipocytes. hHSL-S mRNA results from the in-frame skipping of exon 6, which encodes the serine residue of the catalytic triad. The corresponding 80 kDa protein was identified in human adipocytes after immunoprecipitation. The truncated protein expressed in COS cells showed neither lipase nor esterase activity but was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. hHSL-S mRNA was found in all human tissues expressing HSL, except brown adipose tissue from newborns. It represented approx. 20% of total HSL transcripts in human subcutaneous adipocytes. No alternative splicing was detected in other mammals. Human and mouse three-exon HSL minigenes transfected into primate and rodent cell lines reproduced the splicing pattern of the endogenous HSL genes. Analysis of hybrid human/mouse minigenes transfected into human cell lines showed that cis-acting elements responsible for the skipping of human exon 6 were restricted to a 247 bp region including exon 6 and the first 19 nt of intron 6. Moreover, divergence in exonic splicing elements between mouse and human was shown to be critical for the species-specific alternative splicing. PMID:9359844

  1. Sensitivity and Specificity for Detecting Basal Cell Carcinomas in Mohs Excisions with Confocal Fluorescence Mosaicing Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Karen, Julie K.; Dusza, Stephen W.; Tudisco, Marie; Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of confocal fluorescence mosaicing microscopy to rapidly detect basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) directly in thick and fresh Mohs surgical excisions. Mosaics of confocal images display large areas of tissue with high resolution and magnification equivalent to 2X, which is the standard magnification when examining pathology. Comparison of mosaics to Mohs frozen histopathology was shown to be excellent for all types of BCCs. However, the comparisons in the previous studies were visual and qualitative. In this paper, we report the results of a semi-quantitative preclinical study in which forty-five confocal mosaics were blindly evaluated for the presence (or absence) of BCC tumor. The evaluations were by two clinicians: a senior Mohs surgeon, with prior expertise in interpreting confocal images, and a novice Mohs fellow, with limited experience. The blinded evaluation was compared to the gold standard of frozen histopathology. BCCs were detected with an overall sensitivity of 96.6%, specificity of 89.2%, positive predictive value of 93.0% and negative predictive value of 94.7%. The results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of confocal mosaicing microscopy toward rapid surgical pathology-at-the-bedside to expedite and guide surgery. PMID:19566305

  2. Systematic evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of sibship determination by using 15 STR loci.

    PubMed

    Pu, Chang En; Linacre, Adrian

    2008-07-01

    Paternity disputes and other forms of kinship testing are routinely resolved using short tandem repeat (STR) DNA loci. Sibship determination is encountered in instances where the DNA profiles of two individuals are compared to determine if they are siblings. If either parent is available for testing then the situation is simplified but if neither parent of the two individuals is available for DNA testing, a combined sibling indices (CSI) for the determination of sibship between two people can be determined. Support for kinship is also based upon the sharing of alleles, particularly when both alleles are shared at the same locus, termed two-allele-sharing-loci (TASL). We report on the combination of CSI and TASL to enhance the determination of sibship. The 15 STR loci that comprise the Identifiler loci were applied to three populations using pairs of full siblings or unrelated pairs. Based upon the data obtained, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) can be applied to determining whether two DNA profiles come from full or non-sibling pairs. This report highlights the problems inherent in this form of kinship testing and recommends a combination use of CSI and TASL for sibship determination. PMID:18511010

  3. Programmed electrical stimulation of the ventricle: an efficient, sensitive, and specific protocol.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J D; Kim, S G; Ferrick, K J; Artoul, S G; Fink, D; Roth, J A; Johnston, D R; Williams, H R

    1992-04-01

    A relatively simple and efficient ventricular programmed electrical stimulation (PES) protocol was developed, capable of achieving high degrees of sensitivity and specificity. In a series of 481 subjects, 1, 2, and 3 extrastimuli (ES) were used successively during sinus rhythm and ventricular pacing at two drive cycle lengths, at one or more ventricular sites, together with rapid ventricular pacing, and other maneuvers such as isoproterenol infusion. Three ES were used immediately after two ES at each drive rate, rather than returning after completion of the protocol with two ES. Using the protocol, appropriate arrhythmias could be induced in 88% of all patients with ventricular fibrillation, 84% of all patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia (91% with underlying coronary disease), and 58% of patients with severe nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. There were significant differences in inducibility between patients whose ventricular arrhythmias were due to coronary artery disease and other causes. In contrast, sustained ventricular arrhythmias (all ventricular fibrillation) could be induced in only 5% of a control group of control patients, for a specificity of 95%. The protocol described is simpler and more efficient than those that use exhaustive testing of two ES before going to three ES. Three ES during sinus rhythm proved to be the most productive step, with a higher yield ratio (true: false-positives) than two ES or three ES during pacing, especially at faster rates. Greater efficiency is also achieved by leaving the timing of an extrastimulus just beyond its effective refractory period when an additional extrastimulus is to be added, compared to protocols in which the extrastimulus is moved later in the cycle and then decremented in tandem with the additional extrastimulus. Coupling intervals less than 200 msec produced some false-positives, but fewer overall than intervals greater than or equal to 200 msec, and with yield ratios comparable to

  4. Imaging Non-Specific Wrist Pain: Interobserver Agreement and Diagnostic Accuracy of SPECT/CT, MRI, CT, Bone Scan and Plain Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Huellner, Martin W.; Bürkert, Alexander; Strobel, Klaus; Pérez Lago, María del Sol; Werner, Lennart; Hug, Urs; von Wartburg, Urs; Seifert, Burkhardt; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chronic hand and wrist pain is a common clinical issue for orthopaedic surgeons and rheumatologists. The purpose of this study was 1. To analyze the interobserver agreement of SPECT/CT, MRI, CT, bone scan and plain radiographs in patients with non-specific pain of the hand and wrist, and 2. to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these imaging methods in this selected patient population. Materials and Methods Thirty-two consecutive patients with non-specific pain of the hand or wrist were evaluated retrospectively. All patients had been imaged by plain radiographs, planar early-phase imaging (bone scan), late-phase imaging (SPECT/CT including bone scan and CT), and MRI. Two experienced and two inexperienced readers analyzed the images with a standardized read-out protocol. Reading criteria were lesion detection and localisation, type and etiology of the underlying pathology. Diagnostic accuracy and interobserver agreement were determined for all readers and imaging modalities. Results The most accurate modality for experienced readers was SPECT/CT (accuracy 77%), followed by MRI (56%). The best performing, though little accurate modality for inexperienced readers was also SPECT/CT (44%), followed by MRI and bone scan (38% each). The interobserver agreement of experienced readers was generally high in SPECT/CT concerning lesion detection (kappa 0.93, MRI 0.72), localisation (kappa 0.91, MRI 0.75) and etiology (kappa 0.85, MRI 0.74), while MRI yielded better results on typification of lesions (kappa 0.75, SPECT/CT 0.69). There was poor agreement between experienced and inexperienced readers in SPECT/CT and MRI. Conclusions SPECT/CT proved to be the most helpful imaging modality in patients with non-specific wrist pain. The method was found reliable, providing high interobserver agreement, being outperformed by MRI only concerning the typification of lesions. We believe it is beneficial to integrate SPECT/CT into the diagnostic imaging algorithm of chronic wrist

  5. MuSE: accounting for tumor heterogeneity using a sample-specific error model improves sensitivity and specificity in mutation calling from sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu; Xi, Liu; Hughes, Daniel S T; Zhang, Jianjun; Zhang, Jianhua; Futreal, P Andrew; Wheeler, David A; Wang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    Subclonal mutations reveal important features of the genetic architecture of tumors. However, accurate detection of mutations in genetically heterogeneous tumor cell populations using next-generation sequencing remains challenging. We develop MuSE ( http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/main/MuSE ), Mutation calling using a Markov Substitution model for Evolution, a novel approach for modeling the evolution of the allelic composition of the tumor and normal tissue at each reference base. MuSE adopts a sample-specific error model that reflects the underlying tumor heterogeneity to greatly improve the overall accuracy. We demonstrate the accuracy of MuSE in calling subclonal mutations in the context of large-scale tumor sequencing projects using whole exome and whole genome sequencing. PMID:27557938

  6. Differential sensitivity of melanoma cell lines with BRAFV600E mutation to the specific Raf inhibitor PLX4032

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Blocking oncogenic signaling induced by the BRAFV600E mutation is a promising approach for melanoma treatment. We tested the anti-tumor effects of a specific inhibitor of Raf protein kinases, PLX4032/RG7204, in melanoma cell lines. PLX4032 decreased signaling through the MAPK pathway only in cell lines with the BRAFV600E mutation. Seven out of 10 BRAFV600E mutant cell lines displayed sensitivity based on cell viability assays and three were resistant at concentrations up to 10 μM. Among the sensitive cell lines, four were highly sensitive with IC50 values below 1 μM, and three were moderately sensitive with IC50 values between 1 and 10 μM. There was evidence of MAPK pathway inhibition and cell cycle arrest in both sensitive and resistant cell lines. Genomic analysis by sequencing, genotyping of close to 400 oncogeninc mutations by mass spectrometry, and SNP arrays demonstrated no major differences in BRAF locus amplification or in other oncogenic events between sensitive and resistant cell lines. However, metabolic tracer uptake studies demonstrated that sensitive cell lines had a more profound inhibition of FDG uptake upon exposure to PLX4032 than resistant cell lines. In conclusion, BRAFV600E mutant melanoma cell lines displayed a range of sensitivities to PLX4032 and metabolic imaging using PET probes can be used to assess sensitivity. PMID:20406486

  7. Sensitivity and specificity of vibrometry for detection of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gerr, F; Letz, R; Harris-Abbott, D; Hopkins, L C

    1995-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to assess the utility of vibrotactile thresholds (VTs) obtained before and after a 10-minute period of wrist flexion as a method for detection of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among adult subjects. Subjects with hand discomfort were recruited from patients referred to a university-based electromyography laboratory. Asymptomatic subjects were recruited from among office and technical staff at a professional school. In addition to electrophysiologic evaluation (EP), all subjects were offered VT measurement of the index and small fingers, bilaterally, before and after a 10-minute period of wrist flexion. A total of 144 subjects were recruited, and three hand-condition groups were established: 57 hands had symptoms and EP results compatible with CTS (Group 1), 58 hands had symptoms compatible with CTS and normal EP results (Group 2), and 123 hands had no symptoms and normal EP results (Group 3). Group 1 was considered the "disease-positive" group, and Groups 2 and 3 were both considered "disease-negative" groups. Analyses were performed separately for dominant and nondominant hands, and results were pooled when appropriate. Outcomes of interest were the VTs obtained from the index and small fingers before and after 10 minutes of maximal voluntary wrist flexion as well as variables calculated from them. Significant differences in mean VT were observed between the three hand-condition groups for most of the outcomes evaluated. At any given level of specificity, the sensitivity of vibrometry performed after 10 minutes of wrist flexion was approximately two times that obtained before wrist flexion for detection of electrophysiologically confirmed CTS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8528719

  8. Reliability analysis of the resting state can sensitively and specifically identify the presence of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, F M; Yang, M; Baxter, L; von Deneen, K M; Collingwood, J; He, G; White, K; Korenkevych, D; Savenkov, A; Heilman, K M; Gold, M; Liu, Y

    2013-07-15

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by a number of motor and behavioral abnormalities that could be considered deficits of a "no task" or "resting" state, including resting motor findings and defects in emerging from a resting state (e.g., resting tremor, elevated resting tone, abulia, akinesia, apathy). PET imaging, and recently, the MRI technique of continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) have shown evidence of changes in metabolic patterns in individuals with PD. The purpose of this study was to learn if the presence of PD could be "predicted" based on resting fluctuations of the BOLD signal. Participants were 15 healthy controls, 14 subjects with PD, and 1 subject who presented as a control but later developed PD. The amplitude of the low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was used as an index of brain activity level in the resting state. Participants with PD using this index showed a reliable decrease in activity in a number of regions, including the supplementary motor cortex, the mesial prefrontal cortex, the right middle frontal gyrus, and the left cerebellum (lobule VII/VIII) as well as increased activity in the right cerebellum (lobule IV/V). Using a cross validation approach we term "Reliability Mapping of Regional Differences" (RMRD) to analyze our sample, we were able to reliably distinguish participants with PD from controls with 92% sensitivity and 87% specificity. Our "pre-diagnostic" subject segregated in our analysis with the PD group. These results suggest that resting fMRI should be considered for development as a biomarker and analytical tool for evaluation of PD. PMID:21924367

  9. Patterning the Cone Mosaic Array in Zebrafish Retina Requires Specification of Ultraviolet-Sensitive Cones

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Pamela A.; Colvin, Steven M.; Jabeen, Zahera; Nagashima, Mikiko; Barthel, Linda K.; Hadidjojo, Jeremy; Popova, Lilia; Pejaver, Vivek R.; Lubensky, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Cone photoreceptors in teleost fish are organized in precise, crystalline arrays in the epithelial plane of the retina. In zebrafish, four distinct morphological/spectral cone types occupy specific, invariant positions within a regular lattice. The cone lattice is aligned orthogonal and parallel to circumference of the retinal hemisphere: it emerges as cones generated in a germinal zone at the retinal periphery are incorporated as single-cell columns into the cone lattice. Genetic disruption of the transcription factor Tbx2b eliminates most of the cone subtype maximally sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths and also perturbs the long-range organization of the cone lattice. In the tbx2b mutant, the other three cone types (red, green, and blue cones) are specified in the correct proportion, differentiate normally, and acquire normal, planar polarized adhesive interactions mediated by Crumbs 2a and Crumbs 2b. Quantitative image analysis of cell adjacency revealed that the cones in the tbx2b mutant primarily have two nearest neighbors and align in single-cell-wide column fragments that are separated by rod photoreceptors. Some UV cones differentiate at the dorsal retinal margin in the tbx2b mutant, although they are severely dysmorphic and are eventually eliminated. Incorporating loss of UV cones during formation of cone columns at the margin into our previously published mathematical model of zebrafish cone mosaic formation (which uses bidirectional interactions between planar cell polarity proteins and anisotropic mechanical stresses in the plane of the retinal epithelium to generate regular columns of cones parallel to the margin) reproduces many features of the pattern disruptions seen in the tbx2b mutant. PMID:24465536

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of Cobas TaqMan MTB real-time polymerase chain reaction for culture-proven Mycobacterium tuberculosis: meta-analysis of 26999 specimens from 17 Studies.

    PubMed

    Horita, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Sato, Takashi; Tsukahara, Toshinori; Nagakura, Hideyuki; Tashiro, Ken; Shibata, Yuji; Watanabe, Hiroki; Nagai, Kenjiro; Nakashima, Kentaro; Ushio, Ryota; Ikeda, Misako; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, studies on the diagnostic accuracy of COBAS TaqMan MTB (CTM) have been frequently reported with an unignorable discrepancy. The key inclusion criterion for this systematic review was original studies that could provide sufficient data for calculating the sensitivity and the specificity of CTM for M tuberculosis (TB) or M tuberculosis complex. The reference test was Mycobacterium culture. We used bivariate model for meta-analyses. Of the 201 candidate articles, we finally identified 17 eligible articles.Concerning the respiratory specimens, 1900 culture positive specimens and 20983 culture negative specimens from 15 studies were assessed. This provided the summary estimate sensitivity of 0.808 (95% CI 0.758-0.850) and the summary estimate specificity of 0.990 (95% CI 0.981-0.994). The area under curve was 0.956. The diagnostic odds ratio was 459 (95% CI 261-805, I(2) 26%). For the smear positive respiratory specimens, the sensitivity was 0.952 (95% CI 0.926-0.969) and the specificity was 0.916 (95% CI 0.797-0.968). For the smear negative respiratory specimens, the sensitivity and the specificity were 0.600 (95% CI 0.459-0.726) and 0.989 (95% CI 0.981-0.993), respectively. The diagnostic accuracy was poorer for the non-respiratory specimens, than for the respiratory specimens, but was acceptable. We believe that the information obtained from this study will aid physicians' decision making. PMID:26648113

  11. Sensitivity and specificity of the body mass index for the diagnosis of overweight/obesity in elderly.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes de; Cordeiro, Braian Alves; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Petroski, Edio Luiz

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this article was to verify the sensitivity and specificity of the body mass index (BMI) cut-off points proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) for the diagnosis of obesity in the elderly. A cross-sectional study was made with 180 healthy elderly subjects from Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. Body fat percentage (%BF) was determined using DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry). The BMI cut-off point of the NSI offers better sensitivity and specificity for men (73.7% and 72.5% respectively). For women, the lower the cut-off point the better the sensitivity, with a BMI of 25kg/m² (sensitivity of 76.3% and specificity of 100%) being the most accurate for diagnosing obesity in elderly women. The WHO cut-off point offered very low sensitivity (28.9%). The results of this investigation lead to the conclusion that the cut-off points proposed by the WHO and the ones adopted by the NSI and by Lipschitz are not good indicators of obesity for the elderly of either sex, since they offer low sensitivity. PMID:21229211

  12. The dynamics of pain: Evidence for simultaneous site-specific habituation and site-nonspecific sensitization in thermal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jepma, Marieke; Jones, Matt; Wager, Tor D.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated exposure to noxious stimuli changes their painfulness, due to multiple adaptive processes in the peripheral and central nervous system. Somewhat paradoxically, repeated stimulation can produce an increase (sensitization) or a decrease (habituation) in pain. Adaptation processes may also be body-site-specific or operate across body sites, and considering this distinction may help explain the conditions under which habituation vs. sensitization occurs. To dissociate the effects of site-specific and site-nonspecific adaptation processes, we examined reported pain in 100 participants during counterbalanced sequences of noxious thermal stimulation on multiple skin sites. Analysis of pain ratings revealed two opposing sequential effects: repeated stimulations of the same skin site produced temperature-dependent habituation, whereas repeated stimulations across different sites produced sensitization. Stimulation trials were separated by ~20 seconds and sensitization was unrelated to the distance between successively stimulated sites, suggesting that neither temporal nor spatial summation occurred. To explain these effects, we propose a dynamic model with two adaptation processes, one site-specific and one site-nonspecific. The model explains 93% of the variance in the group-mean pain ratings after controlling for current stimulation temperature, with its estimated parameters showing evidence for habituation for the site-specific process and sensitization for the site-nonspecific process. The two pain-adaptation processes revealed in this study, and the ability to disentangle them, may hold keys to understanding multiple pain-regulatory mechanisms and their disturbance in chronic-pain syndromes. Perspective This article presents novel evidence for simultaneous site-specific habituation and site-nonspecific sensitization in thermal pain, which can be disentangled (and the direction and strength of each process estimated) by a dynamic model. The dissociation of site-specific

  13. Sensitivity and Specificity of an Improved Rapid Latex Agglutination Test for Identification of Methicillin-Sensitive and -Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Smole, Sandra C.; Aronson, Elyssa; Durbin, Annette; Brecher, Stephen M.; Arbeit, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    The performance of a second-generation rapid agglutination kit, Slidex Staph Plus (SSP; bioMérieux), was compared to those of the Slidex Staph (SS; bioMérieux), Staphaurex (SRX; Murex Diagnostics), and BBL Staphyloslide (BBL; Becton Dickinson) kits by using 508 clinical isolates composed of 150 methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) organisms, 154 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) organisms, and 204 non-S. aureus Staphylococcus spp. Of the 508 isolates tested, 75% were fresh clinical isolates, with the remainder taken from five different freezer collections. All four agglutination tests had comparable sensitivities for MSSA and MRSA. However, the SS kit was significantly less specific (93.1%) than the three other tests (P > 0.05, McNemar test). These results demonstrate that the new rapid latex agglutination kit, SSP, was more specific for the identification of S. aureus than the previous version and performed comparably to the SRX and BBL kits. PMID:9542948

  14. Guidelines for Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Analysis of Trabecular Bone-Rich Regions in Mice: Improved Precision, Accuracy, and Sensitivity for Assessing Longitudinal Bone Changes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiayu; Lee, Soonchul; Uyeda, Michael; Tanjaya, Justine; Kim, Jong Kil; Pan, Hsin Chuan; Reese, Patricia; Stodieck, Louis; Lin, Andy; Ting, Kang; Kwak, Jin Hee; Soo, Chia

    2016-05-01

    Trabecular bone is frequently studied in osteoporosis research because changes in trabecular bone are the most common cause of osteoporotic fractures. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) analysis specific to trabecular bone-rich regions is crucial to longitudinal osteoporosis research. The purpose of this study is to define a novel method for accurately analyzing trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA. This method will be utilized to analyze scans obtained from the International Space Station in an upcoming study of microgravity-induced bone loss. Thirty 12-week-old BALB/c mice were studied. The novel method was developed by preanalyzing trabecular bone-rich sites in the distal femur, proximal tibia, and lumbar vertebrae via high-resolution X-ray imaging followed by DXA and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The key DXA steps described by the novel method were (1) proper mouse positioning, (2) region of interest (ROI) sizing, and (3) ROI positioning. The precision of the new method was assessed by reliability tests and a 14-week longitudinal study. The bone mineral content (BMC) data from DXA was then compared to the BMC data from micro-CT to assess accuracy. Bone mineral density (BMD) intra-class correlation coefficients of the new method ranging from 0.743 to 0.945 and Levene's test showing that there was significantly lower variances of data generated by new method both verified its consistency. By new method, a Bland-Altman plot displayed good agreement between DXA BMC and micro-CT BMC for all sites and they were strongly correlated at the distal femur and proximal tibia (r=0.846, p<0.01; r=0.879, p<0.01, respectively). The results suggest that the novel method for site-specific analysis of trabecular bone-rich regions in mice via DXA yields more precise, accurate, and repeatable BMD measurements than the conventional method. PMID:26956416

  15. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to Hill muscle-tendon model parameters in simulations of gait.

    PubMed

    Carbone, V; van der Krogt, M M; Koopman, H F J M; Verdonschot, N

    2016-06-14

    Subject-specific musculoskeletal (MS) models of the lower extremity are essential for applications such as predicting the effects of orthopedic surgery. We performed an extensive sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of potential errors in Hill muscle-tendon (MT) model parameters for each of the 56 MT parts contained in a state-of-the-art MS model. We used two metrics, namely a Local Sensitivity Index (LSI) and an Overall Sensitivity Index (OSI), to distinguish the effect of the perturbation on the predicted force produced by the perturbed MT parts and by all the remaining MT parts, respectively, during a simulated gait cycle. Results indicated that sensitivity of the model depended on the specific role of each MT part during gait, and not merely on its size and length. Tendon slack length was the most sensitive parameter, followed by maximal isometric muscle force and optimal muscle fiber length, while nominal pennation angle showed very low sensitivity. The highest sensitivity values were found for the MT parts that act as prime movers of gait (Soleus: average OSI=5.27%, Rectus Femoris: average OSI=4.47%, Gastrocnemius: average OSI=3.77%, Vastus Lateralis: average OSI=1.36%, Biceps Femoris Caput Longum: average OSI=1.06%) and hip stabilizers (Gluteus Medius: average OSI=3.10%, Obturator Internus: average OSI=1.96%, Gluteus Minimus: average OSI=1.40%, Piriformis: average OSI=0.98%), followed by the Peroneal muscles (average OSI=2.20%) and Tibialis Anterior (average OSI=1.78%) some of which were not included in previous sensitivity studies. Finally, the proposed priority list provides quantitative information to indicate which MT parts and which MT parameters should be estimated most accurately to create detailed and reliable subject-specific MS models. PMID:27131851

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of infrared thermography in detection of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Polat, B; Colak, A; Cengiz, M; Yanmaz, L E; Oral, H; Bastan, A; Kaya, S; Hayirli, A

    2010-08-01

    The objectives of this experiment were to determine interrelationships among mastitis indicators and evaluate the subclinical mastitis detection ability of infrared thermography (IRT) in comparison with the California Mastitis Test (CMT). Somatic cell count (SCC), CMT, and udder skin surface temperature (USST) data were compiled from 62 Brown Swiss dairy cows (days in milk=117+/-51, milk yield=14.7+/-5.2 kg; mean +/- SD). The CORR, REG, and NLIN procedures of Statistical Analysis System (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) were employed to attain interrelationships among mastitis indicators. The diagnostic merit of IRT as an indirect measure of subclinical mastitis was compared with CMT using the receiver operating characteristics curves. The udder skin surface temperature was positively correlated with the CMT score (r=0.86) and SCC (r=0.73). There was an exponential increase in SCC (SCC, x10(3) cells/mL=22.35 x e(1.31 x CMT score); R(2)=0.98) and a linear increase in USST (USST, degrees C=33.45+1.08 x CMT score; R(2)=0.75) as the CMT score increased. As SCC increased, USST increased logarithmically [USST, degrees C=28.72+0.49 x ln(SCC, x10(3) cells/mL); R(2)=0.72]. The USST for healthy quarters (SCC 400,000 cells/mL; n=135) (mean +/- SE; 33.45+/-0.09 vs. 35.80+/-0.08 degrees C). The sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 95.6, 93.6, 14.97, 0.05, 95.0, and 93.6, respectively, for IRT and 88.9, 98.9, 83.56, 0.11, 99.2, and 86.1, respectively, for CMT. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for IRT and CMT was not different. In conclusion, as a noninvasive and quick tool, IRT can be employed for screening subclinical mastitis via measuring USST, with a high predictive diagnostic ability similar to CMT when microbiological culturing is unavailable. However, the

  17. PI3 kinase is involved in cocaine behavioral sensitization and its reversal with brain area specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiuwu . E-mail: xwzhang@duke.edu; Mi Jing; Wetsel, William C.; Davidson, Colin; Xiong Xieying; Chen Qiang; Ellinwood, Everett H.; Lee, Tong H.

    2006-02-24

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is an important signaling molecule involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, survival, and phagocytosis, and may participate in various brain functions. To determine whether it is also involved in cocaine sensitization, we measured the p85{alpha}/p110 PI3K activity in the nuclear accumbens (NAc) shell, NAc core, and prefrontal cortex (PFC) following establishment of cocaine sensitization and its subsequent reversal. Naive rats were rank-ordered and split into either daily cocaine or saline pretreatment group based on their locomotor responses to an acute cocaine injection (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.). These two groups were then injected with cocaine (40 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline for 4 consecutive days followed by 9-day withdrawal. Cocaine sensitization was subsequently reversed by 5 daily injections of the D{sub 1}/D{sub 2} agonist pergolide (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) in combination with the 5-HT{sub 3} antagonist ondansetron (0.2 mg/kg, s.c., 3.5 h after pergolide injection). After another 9-day withdrawal, behavioral cocaine sensitization and its reversal were confirmed with an acute cocaine challenge (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.), and animals were sacrificed the next day for measurement of p85{alpha}/p110 PI3K activity. Cocaine-sensitized animals exhibited increased PI3K activity in the NAc shell, and this increase was reversed by combined pergolide/ondansetron treatment, which also reversed behavioral sensitization. In the NAc core and PFC, cocaine sensitization decreased and increased the PI3K activity, respectively. These changes, in contrast to that in the NAc shell, were not normalized following the reversal of cocaine-sensitization. Interestingly, daily injections of pergolide alone in saline-pretreated animals induced PI3K changes that were similar to the cocaine sensitization-associated changes in the NAc core and PFC but not the NAc shell; furthermore, these changes in saline-pretreated animals were prevented by ondansetron given 3.5 h after

  18. Sensitivity to spatial frequency and orientation content is not specific to face perception.

    PubMed

    Williams, N Rankin; Willenbockel, Verena; Gauthier, Isabel

    2009-09-01

    Prior work using a matching task between images that were complementary in spatial frequency and orientation information suggested that the representation of faces, but not objects, retains low-level spatial frequency (SF) information [Biederman, I., & Kalocsai, P. (1997). Neurocomputational bases of object and face recognition. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B Biological Sciences, 352, 1203-1219]. In two experiments, we reexamine the claim that face perception is uniquely sensitive to changes in SF. In contrast to prior work, we used a design allowing the computation of sensitivity and response criterion for each category, and in one experiment, equalized low-level image properties across object categories. In both experiments, we find that observers are sensitive to SF and orientation changes for upright and inverted faces and non-face objects. Differential response biases across categories contributed to a larger sensitivity for faces, but even sensitivity showed a larger effect for faces, especially when faces were upright and in a front-facing view. However, when objects were inverted, or upright but shown in a three-quarter view, the matching of objects and faces was equally sensitive to SF changes. Accordingly, face perception does not appear to be uniquely affected by changes in spatial filter components. PMID:19576237

  19. Evaluation of in utero sensitization by screening antigen-specific immunoglobulin E levels in umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Karakol, Burcu; Önal, Zehra Esra; Tabak, Yonca; Nuhoğlu, Çağatay; Ceran, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of asthma and atopic reactions is increasing worldwide. Previous reports have suggested that maternal exposure to allergens during pregnancy may have potential effects on allergic sensitization in infants. Aim To evaluate the effects of maternal exposure to environmental allergens during pregnancy on in-utero sensitization. Material and methods Two hundred mothers and their infants were analyzed in this cross-sectional study. Mothers were given a questionnaire that had a series of questions to evaluate the maternal allergic status and environmental exposures during pregnancy. Plasma specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels to pets, grass, food (nuts) of all mothers and their infants were analyzed by an immune-enzymatic assay. Results There was no significant correlation between plasma specific IgE positivity in mothers, with regard to keeping indoor domestic pets, living in grass habitat, eating nuts in diet. A significant correlation was found between specific IgE presence in mothers and allergic reactions; however, there was no correlation between plasma specific IgE positivity of mothers and infants. Conclusions We concluded that prenatal maternal sensitivity to environmental allergens could not be evaluated as a predictive factor for in-utero sensitization. PMID:26161059

  20. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED): A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSousa, Diogo Araujo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahao; Isolan, Luciano Rassier; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional community-based study was to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) to the diagnosis of anxiety disorders (AD). Participants were 119 students aged 9-18. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed by a psychiatrist throughout a structural clinical…

  1. Cognitive Errors, Anxiety Sensitivity, and Anxiety Control Beliefs: Their Unique and Specific Associations with Childhood Anxiety Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Carl F.; Costa, Natalie M.; Watts, Sarah E.; Taylor, Leslie K.; Cannon, Melinda F.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the interrelations among negative cognitive errors, anxiety sensitivity, and anxiety control beliefs and explored their unique and specific associations with anxiety symptoms in a community sample of youth. Existing research has suggested that these constructs are related to childhood anxiety disorder symptoms; however,…

  2. Assessing the Sensitivity and Specificity of the MAYSI-2 for Detecting Trauma among Youth in Juvenile Detention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerig, Patricia K.; Moeddel, Melissa Arnzen; Becker, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the sensitivity and specificity of the most widely used mental health screening instrument in juvenile detention, the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument (MAYSI-2), for detecting trauma and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among detained youth. The MAYSI-2 scales measuring Substance Use,…

  3. Assessment of Relationship-Specific Incentive and Threat Sensitivities: Predicting Satisfaction and Affect in Adult Intimate Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Kleinman, Brighid M.; Kaczynski, Karen J.; Carver, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    Self-report scales assessing relationship-specific incentive and threat sensitivity were created. Initial tests of factor structure and associations with relationship quality were conducted in a sample of persons in intimate relationships (Study 1). Associations with conceptually related measures were examined to determine convergent and…

  4. Analysis of the Sensitivity and Specificity of Noninvasive Imaging Tests for the Diagnosis of Renal Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Borelli, Flavio Antonio de Oliveira; Pinto, Ibraim M. F.; Amodeo, Celso; Smanio, Paola E. P.; Kambara, Antonio M.; Petisco, Ana Claudia G.; Moreira, Samuel M.; Paiva, Ricardo Calil; Lopes, Hugo Belotti; Sousa, Amanda G. M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aging and atherosclerosis are related to renovascular hypertension in elderly individuals. Regardless of comorbidities, renal artery stenosis is itself an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objective To define the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of noninvasive imaging tests used in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. Methods In a group of 61 patients recruited, 122 arteries were analized, thus permitting the definition of sensitivity, specificity, and the relative contribution of each imaging study performed (Doppler, scintigraphy and computed tomographic angiography in comparison to renal arteriography). Results The mean age was 65.43 years (standard deviation: 8.7). Of the variables related to the study population that were compared to arteriography, two correlated with renal artery stenosis, renal dysfunction and triglycerides. The median glomerular filtration rate was 52.8 mL/min/m2. Doppler showed sensitivity of 82.90%, specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 85% and negative predictive value of 66.70%. For tomography, sensitivity was 66.70%, specificity 80%, positive predictive value 87.50% and negative predictive value 55.20%. With these findings, we could identify the imaging tests that best detected stenosis. Conclusion Tomography and Doppler showed good quality and efficacy in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis, with Doppler having the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast medium for the assessment of a disease that is common in diabetics and is associated with renal dysfunction and severe left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24061685

  5. Theory of Planned Behavior: Sensitivity and Specificity in Predicting Graduation and Drop-Out among College and University Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Amsel, Rhonda; Jorgensen, Mary; Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Budd, Jillian; King, Laura; Jorgensen, Shirley; Asuncion, Jennison

    2016-01-01

    We examined sensitivity and specificity when using the three theory of planned behavior (TPB) scales (Perceived Behavioral Control, Subjective Norms, Attitude) to predict graduation and drop-out in a longitudinal study of 252 college and university students with disabilities and in a separate cross-sectional study of a random sample of 1380…

  6. Sensitivity of C-Tb: a novel RD-1-specific skin test for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Soren T; Peter, Jonathan G; Theron, Grant; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tingskov, Pernille N; Aggerbeck, Henrik; Kolbus, Daniel; Ruhwald, Morten; Andersen, Peter; Dheda, Keertan

    2016-03-01

    C-Tb, a novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target/10-kDa culture filtrate protein (ESAT-6/CFP-10)-specific skin test, has high specificity in bacille Calmette-Guerin-vaccinated healthy controls. However, the sensitivity of C-Tb has hitherto not been determined. The objective was to determine the sensitivity of C-Tb in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) in comparison with the tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT).C-Tb and TST were randomly administered in a double-blinded fashion to one or the other forearm in 253 patients with active TB with or without HIV co-infection. QFT-GIT testing was performed prior to skin testing.Using a receiver operating characteristic curve-derived cut-point of 5 mm, C-Tb sensitivity was similar to QFT-GIT (73.9 (95% CI 67.8-79.3) versus 75.1 (95% CI 69.3-80.2)), and similar in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients (76.7 (95% CI 69.0-83.3) versus 69.5 (95% CI 59.2-78.5)). However, sensitivity was significantly diminished in HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts <100 cells·mm(-3). C-Tb and QFT-GIT combined had significantly higher sensitivity than C-Tb alone (p<0.0001). C-Tb was safe with no significant adverse events. The 5 mm cut-point corresponded to that found in the previously published specificity study (TESEC-04).C-Tb has similar sensitivity compared with QFT-GIT for the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. Sensitivity was reduced only in HIV-infected patients with severe immunosuppression. Further studies in different settings are required to validate the proposed 5 mm cut-point. PMID:26677940

  7. Comparison of two dengue NS1 rapid tests for sensitivity, specificity and relationship to viraemia and antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. Rapid and easy diagnosis of dengue can assist patient triage and care-management. The detection of DENV NS1 on rapid lateral flow tests offers a fast route to a presumptive dengue diagnosis but careful evaluations are urgently needed as more and more people use them. Methods The sensitivity and specificity of the Bio-Rad NS1 Ag Strip and SD Dengue Duo (NS1/IgM/IgG) lateral flow rapid tests were evaluated in a panel of plasma samples from 245 Vietnamese patients with RT-PCR confirmed dengue and 47 with other febrile illnesses. Results The NS1 rapid tests had similar diagnostic sensitivities (respectively 61.6% and 62.4%) in confirmed dengue cases but were 100% specific. When IgM/IgG results from the SD Dengue Duo were included in the test interpretation, the sensitivity improved significantly from 62.4% with NS1 alone to 75.5% when NS1 and/or IgM was positive and 83.7% when NS1 and/or IgM and/or IgG was positive. Both NS1 assays were significantly more sensitive for primary than secondary dengue. NS1 positivity was associated with the underlying viraemia as NS1-positive samples had a significantly higher viraemia than NS1-negative samples. Conclusions These data suggest that the NS1 test component of these assays are highly specific and have similar levels of sensitivity. The IgM parameter in the SD Duo test improved overall test sensitivity without compromising specificity. The SD Dengue Duo lateral flow rapid test deserves further prospective evaluation in dengue endemic settings. PMID:20509940

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of acid phosphatase to detect prostate cancer using data from a hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Zwetsloot-Schonk, J H; Hermans, J; Frolich, M; Snitker, P; Souverijn, J H; Zwartendijk, J

    1990-07-01

    Indices of diagnostic tests, such as sensitivity and specificity, should be determined using diagnostic test results of patients tested in clinical practice. Hospital information systems that store data on diagnostic tests and diagnoses might be used for sampling the desired study population and in the actual process of collecting the data. This paper presents, as an example, a study calculating the sensitivity and specificity of the prostate-specific acid phosphatase test. All data needed in the study were obtained from the hospital information system of Leiden University Hospital. The final health status of each patient was assessed by the cancer registry of the system. The reason for ordering the test was deduced from data on histopathological examinations of prostatic tissue. The actual selections made from the central database are described in dataflow diagrams. The sensitivity of the test was found to be 0.34 and the specificity 0.88, using a discrimination value of 1.00 U/l. The impact of the reason for ordering the test on the specificity is illustrated. Possible biases of these measured values are discussed. PMID:2215263

  9. Development of A Sensitive and Specific Epitope-Blocking ELISA for Universal Detection of Antibodies to Human Enterovirus 71 Strains

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang; Kiener, Tanja K.; Lim, Xiao Fang; Tan, Yunrui; Raj, Kattur Venkatachalam Ashok; Tang, Manli; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Qingfeng; Kwang, Jimmy

    2013-01-01

    Background Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in young children. It is often associated with severe neurological diseases and mortalities in recent outbreaks across the Asia Pacific region. Currently, there is no efficient universal antibody test available to detect EV71 infections. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present study, an epitope-blocking ELISA was developed to detect specific antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human or animal sera. The assay relies on a novel monoclonal antibody (Mab 1C6) that specifically binds to capsid proteins in whole EV71 viruses without any cross reaction to any EV71 capsid protein expressed alone. The sensitivity and specificity of the epitope-blocking ELISA for EV71 was evaluated and compared to microneutralization using immunized animal sera to multiple virus genotypes of EV71 and coxsackieviruses. Further, 200 serum sample from human individuals who were potentially infected with EV71 viruses were tested in both the blocking ELISA and microneutralization. Results indicated that antibodies to EV71 were readily detected in immunized animals or human sera by the epitope blocking ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other enteroviruses yielded negative results. This assay is not only simpler to perform but also shows higher sensitivity and specificity as compared to microneutralization. Conclusion The epitope-blocking ELISA based on a unique Mab 1C6 provided highly sensitive and 100% specific detection of antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human sera. PMID:23383215

  10. High sensitivity and specificity of clinical microscopy in rural health facilities in western Kenya under an external quality assurance program.

    PubMed

    Wafula, Rebeccah; Sang, Edna; Cheruiyot, Olympia; Aboto, Angeline; Menya, Diana; O'Meara, Wendy Prudhomme

    2014-09-01

    Microscopic diagnosis of malaria is a well-established and inexpensive technique that has the potential to provide accurate diagnosis of malaria infection. However, it requires both training and experience. Although it is considered the gold standard in research settings, the sensitivity and specificity of routine microscopy for clinical care in the primary care setting has been reported to be unacceptably low. We established a monthly external quality assurance program to monitor the performance of clinical microscopy in 17 rural health centers in western Kenya. The average sensitivity over the 12-month period was 96% and the average specificity was 88%. We identified specific contextual factors that contributed to inadequate performance. Maintaining high-quality malaria diagnosis in high-volume, resource-constrained health facilities is possible. PMID:24935953

  11. A Sensitive IHC Method for Monitoring Autophagy-Specific Markers in Human Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    He, Helen; Yang, Yu; Xiang, Zhongmin; Yu, Lunyin; Chouitar, Jouhara; Yu, Jie; D'Amore, Natalie Roy; Li, Ping; Li, Zhi; Bowman, Douglas; Theisen, Matthew; Brownell, James E.; Tirrell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Use of tyramide signal amplification (TSA) to detect autophagy biomarkers in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) xenograft tissue. Materials and Methods. Autophagy marker regulation was studied in xenograft tissues using Amp HQ IHC and standard IHC methods. Results. The data demonstrate the feasibility of using high sensitivity TSA IHC assays to measure low abundant autophagy markers in FFPE xenograft tissue. PMID:27247826

  12. Specific Disgust Sensitivities Differentially Predict Interest in Careers of Varying Procedural-Intensity among Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consedine, Nathan S.; Windsor, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Mismatches between the needs of public health systems and student interests have led to renewed study on the factors predicting career specializations among medical students. While most work examines career and lifestyle values, emotional proclivities may be important; disgust sensitivity may help explain preferences for careers with greater and…

  13. Sensitivity and Specificity of Proposed "DSM-5" Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, James C.; Reichow, Brian; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the potential impact of proposed "DSM-5" diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method: The study focused on a sample of 933 participants evaluated during the "DSM-IV" field trial; 657 carried a clinical diagnosis of an ASD, and 276 were diagnosed with a non-autistic disorder. Sensitivity and…

  14. Sensitive and specific detection of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Horisaka, Tomoko; Fujita, Kayoko; Iwata, Taketoshi; Nakadai, Aya; Okatani, Alexandre T; Horikita, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Takahide; Honda, Eiichi; Yokomizo, Yuichi; Hayashidani, Hideki

    2004-11-01

    We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method able to detect Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains in 30 min by using six primers designed by targeting the inv gene. This method is more sensitive than PCR and might be a useful tool for detecting and identifying Y. pseudotuberculosis. PMID:15528740

  15. Children's school-breakfast reports and school-lunch reports (in 24-h dietary recalls): conventional and reporting-error-sensitive measures show inconsistent accuracy results for retention interval and breakfast location.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Suzanne D; Guinn, Caroline H; Smith, Albert F; Hitchcock, David B; Royer, Julie A; Puryear, Megan P; Collins, Kathleen L; Smith, Alyssa L

    2016-04-14

    Validation-study data were analysed to investigate retention interval (RI) and prompt effects on the accuracy of fourth-grade children's reports of school-breakfast and school-lunch (in 24-h recalls), and the accuracy of school-breakfast reports by breakfast location (classroom; cafeteria). Randomly selected fourth-grade children at ten schools in four districts were observed eating school-provided breakfast and lunch, and were interviewed under one of eight conditions created by crossing two RIs ('short'--prior-24-hour recall obtained in the afternoon and 'long'--previous-day recall obtained in the morning) with four prompts ('forward'--distant to recent, 'meal name'--breakfast, etc., 'open'--no instructions, and 'reverse'--recent to distant). Each condition had sixty children (half were girls). Of 480 children, 355 and 409 reported meals satisfying criteria for reports of school-breakfast and school-lunch, respectively. For breakfast and lunch separately, a conventional measure--report rate--and reporting-error-sensitive measures--correspondence rate and inflation ratio--were calculated for energy per meal-reporting child. Correspondence rate and inflation ratio--but not report rate--showed better accuracy for school-breakfast and school-lunch reports with the short RI than with the long RI; this pattern was not found for some prompts for each sex. Correspondence rate and inflation ratio showed better school-breakfast report accuracy for the classroom than for cafeteria location for each prompt, but report rate showed the opposite. For each RI, correspondence rate and inflation ratio showed better accuracy for lunch than for breakfast, but report rate showed the opposite. When choosing RI and prompts for recalls, researchers and practitioners should select a short RI to maximise accuracy. Recommendations for prompt selections are less clear. As report rates distort validation-study accuracy conclusions, reporting-error-sensitive measures are recommended. PMID

  16. Increased sensitivity for detecting avian influenza-specific antibodies by a modified hemagglutination inhibition assay using horse erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Na; Wang, Shi-Xia; Liu, Yun-Xi; Zhang, Pan-He; Zuo, Shu-Qing; Lin-Zhan; Dang, Rong-Li; Ma, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Chunhua; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Shan; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2008-10-01

    The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is a widely used serological method to measure the levels of protective antibody responses against influenza viruses. However, the traditional HI assay which uses chicken erythrocytes is not sufficiently sensitive for detecting HI antibodies specific to avian influenza viruses. Previously, it was demonstrated that employing an assay using horse erythrocytes was able to increase the sensitivity of HI assay. The current report describes further optimization of this modified HI assay. It was shown that this method was able to increase detection of HI activities in rabbit sera immunized with H5 HA antigens, and proved that this increased sensitivity is useful in dissecting the strain specificity of HI antibody responses. In addition, the modified HI assay using horse erythrocytes increased the sensitivity of detecting HI antibodies specific for three major serotypes of avian influenza viruses, H5, H7 and H9, in people who may have asymptomatic infection with avian influenza viruses. Based on these results, the optimized use of horse erythrocytes should be standard practice for detecting HI activities against avian influenza viruses. PMID:18634828

  17. Development of a highly sensitive and specific monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of Sudan I in food samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhen; Wei, Dapeng; Yang, Hong; Yang, Yuan; Xing, Weiwei; Li, Yuan; Deng, Anping

    2009-03-15

    The use of Sudan I as an additive in food products has been prohibited in the European Union and many other countries. In this study, a highly sensitive and specific monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of Sudan I in food samples was developed. The hapten derivative with a three-carbon-atom length of carboxylic spacer at the azobound para-position was synthesized and coupled to carrier proteins. The hapten-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate was used as an immunogen, while the hapten-ovalbumin (OVA) conjugate was applied as a coating antigen. The mAb against Sudan I was produced by hybridoma technique and the corresponding ELISA was characterized in terms of sensitivity, specificity, precision and accuracy. At optimal experimental conditions, the standard curve was constructed in concentrations of 0.1-100 ngmL(-1). The values of IC(50) for nine standard curves were in the range of 1.1-2.0 ngmL(-1) and the LOD at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 (S/N=3) was 0.07-0.14 ngmL(-1). The cross-reactivity values of the mAb with Sudan II, III and IV were 9.5%, 33.9% and 0.95%; no cross-reactivity was found with other six edible colorants: Lemon yellow, Bright blue, Indigotin, Kermes, Amarant and Sunset yellow, indicating the assay displays not only high sensitivity but also high specificity as well. The organic solvent effect on the assay was tested. It was observed that the ELISA was tolerated to 30% of methanol and 10% of acetonitrile without significant loss of IC(50) value. Six food samples were spiked with Sudan I and the methanolic extracts after appropriate dilution were analyzed by ELISA. Acceptable recovery rates of 88.2-110.5% and coefficients of variation of 2.5-17.4% were obtained. The ELISA for nine spiked samples was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a high correlation coefficient of 0.9840 (n=9). The mAb-based ELISA proven to be a feasible quantitative

  18. Adolescent exposure to cocaine, amphetamine, and methylphenidate cross-sensitizes adults to methamphetamine with drug- and sex-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Ryan A; Ross, Jordan M; Doyle, Hillary H; Helton, Amanda K; Picou, Brittany N; Schulz, Jordyn; Tavares, Chris; Bryant, Sarah; Dawson, Bryan L; Lloyd, Steven A

    2015-03-15

    The increasing availability, over-prescription, and misuse and abuse of ADHD psychostimulant medications in adolescent populations necessitates studies investigating the long-term effects of these drugs persisting into adulthood. Male and female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to amphetamine (AMPH) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), methylphenidate (MPD) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), or cocaine (COC) (5.0 mg/kg) from postnatal day 22 to 31, which represents an early adolescent period. After an extended period of drug abstinence, adult mice were challenged with a subacute methamphetamine (METH) dose (0.5 mg/kg), to test the long-term effects of adolescent drug exposures on behavioral cross-sensitization using an open field chamber. There were no sex- or dose-specific effects on motor activity in adolescent, saline-treated controls. However, AMPH, MPD, and COC adolescent exposures induced cross-sensitization to a subacute METH dose in adulthood, which is a hallmark of addiction and a marker of long-lasting plastic changes in the brain. Of additional clinical importance, AMPH-exposed male mice demonstrated increased cross-sensitization to METH in contrast to the female-specific response observed in MPD-treated animals. There were no sex-specific effects after adolescent COC exposures. This study demonstrates differential drug, dose, and sex-specific alterations induced by early adolescent psychostimulant exposure, which leads to behavioral alterations that persist into adulthood. PMID:25496784

  19. Linear and Logarithmic Speed-Accuracy Trade-Offs in Reciprocal Aiming Result from Task-Specific Parameterization of an Invariant Underlying Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bongers, Raoul M.; Fernandez, Laure; Bootsma, Reinoud J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the origins of linear and logarithmic speed-accuracy trade-offs from a dynamic systems perspective on motor control. In each experiment, participants performed 2 reciprocal aiming tasks: (a) a velocity-constrained task in which movement time was imposed and accuracy had to be maximized, and (b) a distance-constrained task in…

  20. Raman spectroscopy-based sensitive and specific detection of glycated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Horowitz, Gary L; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) has been increasingly accepted as a functional metric of mean blood glucose in the treatment of diabetic patients. Importantly, HbA1c provides an alternate measure of total glycemic exposure due to the representation of blood glucose throughout the day, including post-prandially. In this article, we propose and demonstrate the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a novel analytical method for quantitative detection of HbA1c, without using external dyes or reagents. Using the drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) technique, we observe that the nonenzymatic glycosylation (glycation) of the hemoglobin molecule results in subtle but discernible and highly reproducible changes in the acquired spectra, which enable the accurate determination of glycated and nonglycated hemoglobin using standard chemometric methods. The acquired Raman spectra display excellent reproducibility of spectral characteristics at different locations in the drop and show a linear dependence of the spectral intensity on the analyte concentration. Furthermore, in hemolysate models, the developed multivariate calibration models for HbA1c show a high degree of prediction accuracy and precision--with a limit of detection that is a factor of ~15 smaller than the lowest physiological concentrations encountered in clinical practice. The excellent accuracy and reproducibility achieved in this proof-of-concept study opens substantive avenues for characterization and quantification of the glycosylation status of (therapeutic) proteins, which are widely used for biopharmaceutical development. We also envision that the proposed approach can provide a powerful tool for high-throughput HbA1c sensing in multicomponent mixtures and potentially in hemolysate and whole blood lysate samples. PMID:22324826

  1. Isolation of a Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific DNA probe by subtraction hybridization and construction of species-specific oligonucleotide primers for sensitive detection by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Seal, S E; Jackson, L A; Daniels, M J

    1992-01-01

    A subtraction hybridization technique was employed to make a library enriched for Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific sequences. One cloned fragment, PS2096, hybridized under stringent conditions to DNA of 82 P. solanacearum strains representing all subgroups of the species. Other plant-associated bacteria, including closely related species such as Pseudomonas capacia, Pseudomonas picketti, or Pseudomonas syzygii, did not hybridize to PS2096. A minimum number of between 4 x 10(5) and 4 x 10(6) P. solanacearum cells could routinely be detected with PS2096 labelled either with [32P]dCTP or with digoxigenin-11-dUTP. To improve the sensitivity of detection, PS2096 was sequenced to allow the construction of specific oligonucleotide primers to be used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. After 50 cycles of amplification, 5 to 116 cells, depending on the strain, could reproducibly be detected by visualization of a 148-bp PCR product on an agarose gel. A preliminary field trial in Burundi with the probe and PCR primers has confirmed that they are sensitive tools for specifically detecting low-level infections of P. solanacearum in potato tubers. Images PMID:1482193

  2. Urinary microRNA-based signature improves accuracy of detection of clinically relevant prostate cancer within the prostate-specific antigen grey zone.

    PubMed

    Salido-Guadarrama, Alberto Ivan; Morales-Montor, Jorge Gustavo; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Langley, Elizabeth; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Cruz Colin, Jose Luis; Rodriguez-Dorantes, Mauricio

    2016-06-01

    At present, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is used as a clinical biomarker for prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis; however, a large number of patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with PSA levels in the 'gray area' (4-10 ng/ml) are currently subjected to unnecessary biopsy due to overdiagnosis. Certain microRNAs (miRs) have been proven to be useful biomarkers, several of which are detectable in bodily fluids. The present study identified and validated a urinary miR‑based signature to enhance the specificity of PCa diagnosis and to reduce the number of patients with benign conditions undergoing biopsy. Seventy‑three urine samples from Mexican patients with diagnosis of PCa with a Gleason score ≥7 and 70 patients diagnosed with BPH were collected after digital rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate. miR expression profiles were determined using TaqMan Low Density Array experiments, and normalized Ct values for the miRs were compared between PCa and BPH groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether miR detection in urine is suitable for distinguishing patients with PCa from those with BPH. The identified miR‑100/200b signature was significantly correlated with PCa. Using a multivariable logistic regression approach, a base model including the clinical variables age, prostate‑specific antigen (PSA), the percentage of free PSA and DRE was generated, and a second base model additionally contained the miR‑100/200b signature. ROC analysis demonstrated that the combined model significantly outperformed the capacity of PSA (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.01) to discriminate between PCa and BPH patients. In terms of evaluation of the sub‑group of patients in the gray zone of PSA levels, the performance of the combined model for predicting PCa cases was significantly superior to PSA level determination (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.009). In addition, decision curve analysis demonstrated that the

  3. Exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement has good sensitivity and specificity to detect lower extremity arterial stenosis assessed by computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Koch, Caroline; Chauve, Emmanuel; Chaudru, Ségolène; Le Faucheur, Alexis; Jaquinandi, Vincent; Mahé, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent disease diagnosed by the use of ankle-brachial index (ABI) at rest. In some clinical conditions (diabetes, renal insufficiency, advanced age), ABI can be falsely normal and other tests are required for the PAD diagnosis (American Heart Association statement). This study was conducted to determine the accuracy of exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement (exercise-TcPo2) in detection of arterial stenosis ≥50% using computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the gold standard.We retrospectively analyzed consecutive patients referred to our vascular unit (University Hospital, Rennes, France) for exercise-TcPo2 testing from 2014 to 2015. All included patients had a CTA performed within 3 months of the exercise-TcPo2 test. Exercise-TcPo2 was performed on treadmill (10% slope; 2 mph speed). We calculated the Delta from Resting Oxygen Pressure (DROP) index (expressed in mm Hg) at the proximal and distal levels. Two blinded physicians performed stenosis quantification on CTA. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to define a cutoff point to detect arterial stenosis ≥50%, stenosis ≥60%, and stenosis ≥70%.A total of 34 patients (mean age 64 ± 2 years old; 74% men) were analyzed. The highest areas under the curve (AUC) were found for 60% stenosis at both proximal and distal levels. For stenosis ≥50%, sensitivity and specificity of proximal minimal DROP were 80.9% [67.1-89.7], 81.0% [59.3-92.7] respectively. For stenosis ≥50%, sensitivity and specificity of distal minimal DROP were 73.2% [60.3-83.1], 83.3% [53.8-96.2], respectively. For stenosis ≥60%, sensitivity and specificity of proximal minimal DROP were 82.5% [67.6-91.5] and 85.7% [67.7-94.8] respectively. For stenosis ≥60%, sensitivity and specificity of distal minimal DROP were 80.4% [67.3-89.1] and 88.2% [64.2-97.7], respectively. For stenosis ≥70%, sensitivity and specificity of proximal minimal DROP were 85

  4. Evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of criteria for isolation of patients admitted to a specialized cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Cataneo, Caroline; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; e Castro, Paulo de Tarso Oliveira; Hayashida, Miyeko; Gir, Elucir

    2011-01-01

    Early isolation of patients possibly colonized by multi-resistant microorganisms can minimize their spread, reducing cases of hospital infection and the related costs. This study aimed to identify the sensitivity and specificity of the criteria for isolation of patients admitted to a specialized cancer hospital. Cross-sectional study with a population of 61 patients coming from other hospitals who were admitted to the hospital between March 1st and August 31th, 2009. At the moment of admission, a data collection instrument was filled out and nasal and anal swabs were collected for microbiological culture. Of the 56 patients who met the isolation criteria, 30 (49.2%) presented positive cultures for multi-resistant microorganisms and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently identified microorganism. Most patients colonized by multi-resistant microorganisms were isolated at the moment of admission. The sensitivity of the isolation criteria was 90% and the specificity was 6.5%. PMID:22030570

  5. Preliminary Observations on Sensitivity and Specificity of Magnetization Transfer Asymmetry for Imaging Myelin of Rat Brain at High Field

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Woong; Choi, Jiye; Cho, Janggeun; Lee, Chulhyun; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) has been often used for imaging myelination. Despite its high sensitivity, the specificity of MTR to myelination is not high because tissues with no myelin such as muscle can also show high MTR. In this study, we propose a new magnetization transfer (MT) indicator, MT asymmetry (MTA), as a new method of myelin imaging. The experiments were performed on rat brain at 9.4 T. MTA revealed high signals in white matter and significantly low signals in gray matter and muscle, indicating that MTA has higher specificity than MTR. Demyelination and remyelination studies demonstrated that the sensitivity of MTA to myelination was as high as that of MTR. These experimental results indicate that MTA can be a good biomarker for imaging myelination. In addition, MTA images can be efficiently acquired with an interslice MTA method, which may accelerate clinical application of myelin imaging. PMID:26413534

  6. Development of a Highly Sensitive and Specific Blastomycosis Antibody Enzyme Immunoassay Using Blastomyces dermatitidis Surface Protein BAD-1

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Brandhorst, T. Tristan; Hage, Chadi A.; Connolly, Patricia A.; Leland, Diane S.; Davis, Thomas E.; Klein, Bruce S.; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Serologic tests for antibodies to Blastomyces dermatitidis are not thought to be useful for the diagnosis of blastomycosis, in part due to the low sensitivity of immunodiffusion and complement fixation. Earlier studies have shown that the enzyme immunoassay improves the sensitivity of antibody detection for the diagnosis of blastomycosis. Microplates coated with the B. dermatitidis surface protein BAD-1 were used for testing sera from patients with proven blastomycosis or histoplasmosis and controls. Semiquantification was accomplished by using standards containing human anti-B. dermatitidis antibodies. The antibodies were detected in 87.8% of the patients with blastomycosis by the enzyme immunoassay compared to 15.0% by immunodiffusion. The specificities were 99.2% for patients with nonfungal infections and healthy subjects and 94.0% for patients with histoplasmosis. The results were highly reproducible on repeat testing. When combined with antigen testing, antibody testing improved the sensitivity from 87.8% to 97.6%. Enzyme immunoassay detection of antibodies against BAD-1 is highly specific, has greatly improved sensitivity over immunodiffusion, and may identify cases with negative results by antigen testing. This assay has the potential to aid in the diagnosis of blastomycosis. PMID:24285817

  7. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Posttest Probability of Parotid Fine-Needle Aspiration: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C. Carrie; Jethwa, Ashok R.; Khariwala, Samir S.; Johnson, Jonas; Shin, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To analyze the sensitivity and specificity of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) in distinguishing benign from malignant parotid disease. (2) To determine the anticipated posttest probability of malignancy and probability of non-diagnostic and indeterminate cytology with parotid FNA. Data Sources Independently corroborated computerized searches of PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register were performed. These were supplemented with manual searches and input from content experts. Review Methods Inclusion/exclusion criteria specified diagnosis of parotid mass, intervention with both FNA and surgical excision, and enumeration of both cytologic and surgical histopathologic results. The primary outcomes were sensitivity, specificity, and posttest probability of malignancy. Heterogeneity was evaluated with the I2 statistic. Meta-analysis was performed via a 2-level mixed logistic regression model. Bayesian nomograms were plotted via pooled likelihood ratios. Results The systematic review yielded 70 criterion-meeting studies, 63 of which contained data that allowed for computation of numerical outcomes (n = 5647 patients; level 2a) and consideration of meta-analysis. Subgroup analyses were performed in studies that were prospective, involved consecutive patients, described the FNA technique utilized, and used ultrasound guidance. The I2 point estimate was >70% for all analyses, except within prospectively obtained and ultrasound-guided results. Among the prospective subgroup, the pooled analysis demonstrated a sensitivity of 0.882 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.509–0.982) and a specificity of 0.995 (95% CI, 0.960–0.999). The probabilities of nondiagnostic and indeterminate cytology were 0.053 (95% CI, 0.030–0.075) and 0.147 (95% CI, 0.106–0.188), respectively. Conclusion FNA has moderate sensitivity and high specificity in differentiating malignant from benign parotid lesions. Considerable heterogeneity is present among studies. PMID:26428476

  8. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  9. Expression of functional diphtheria toxin receptors on highly toxin-sensitive mouse cells that specifically bind radioiodinated toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Naglich, J G; Rolf, J M; Eidels, L

    1992-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin (DT), a bacterial protein exotoxin, inactivates mammalian cell elongation factor 2 after toxin internalization by receptor-mediated endocytosis. To isolate the DT receptor, we cotransfected DT-resistant wild-type mouse L-M cells with a cDNA library constructed from RNA of highly toxin-sensitive monkey Vero cells and with a neomycin-resistance gene. Stably transfected G418-resistant L-M colonies were screened for DT sensitivity in a replica plate assay. After screening of 8000 colonies, one DT-sensitive (DTS) colony was isolated. The purified DTS mouse cells are highly toxin-sensitive; they are at least 1000-fold more sensitive than wild-type L-M cells and only approximately 10-fold less sensitive than Vero cells. Incubation of the DTS mouse cells with CRM 197, a nontoxic form of DT that competitively inhibits the binding of native DT to the toxin receptor, protected them from DT-mediated toxicity. More important, these DTS mouse cells express receptors on their cell surface that bind radioiodinated DT in a specific fashion, a property hitherto readily demonstrable only with highly toxin-sensitive cells of monkey origin. Furthermore, HA6DT, a DT fragment comprising the Mr 6000 carboxyl-terminal receptor-binding domain, inhibited the binding of radioiodinated toxin to these DTS mouse cells to the same extent as unlabeled DT. With these DTS mouse cells as a source of monkey cDNA, it should be possible to clone the gene encoding the DT receptor. PMID:1549577

  10. Good sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for detecting pseudotumors in 83 failed metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Reito, Aleksi; Pajamäki, Jorma; Puolakka, Timo; Eskelinen, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Ultrasound is used for imaging of pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) hips. Ultrasound has been compared with magnetic resonance imaging, but to date there have been no studies comparing ultrasound findings and revision findings. Methods We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of preoperative ultrasound for detecting pseudotumors in 82 patients with MoM hip replacement (82 hips). Ultrasound examinations were performed by 1 of 3 musculoskeletal radiologists, and pseudotumors seen by ultrasound were retrospectively classified as fluid-filled, mixed-type, or solid. Findings at revision surgery were retrieved from surgical notes and graded according to the same system as used for ultrasound findings. Results Ultrasound had a sensitivity of 83% (95% CI: 63–93) and a specificity of 92% (CI: 82–96) for detecting trochanteric region pseudotumors, and a sensitivity of 79% (CI: 62–89) and a specificity of 94% (CI: 83–98) for detecting iliopsoas-region pseudotumors. Type misclassification of pseudotumors found at revision occurred in 8 of 23 hips in the trochanteric region and in 19 of 33 hips in the iliopsoas region. Interpretation Despite the discrepancy in type classification between ultrasound and revision findings, the presence of pseudotumors was predicted well with ultrasound in our cohort of failed MoM hip replacements. PMID:25582840

  11. Multiple testing in fMRI: an empirical case study on the balance between sensitivity, specificity, and stability.

    PubMed

    Durnez, Joke; Roels, Sanne P; Moerkerke, Beatrijs

    2014-07-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a widespread technique in cognitive psychology that allows visualizing brain activation. The data analysis encompasses an enormous number of simultaneous statistical tests. Procedures that either control the familywise error rate or the false discovery rate have been applied to these data. These methods are mostly validated in terms of average sensitivity and specificity. However, procedures are not comparable if requirements on their error rates differ. Moreover, less attention has been given to the instability or variability of results. In a simulation study in the context of imaging, we first compare the Bonferroni and Benjamini-Hochberg procedures. Considering Bonferroni as a way to control the expected number of type I errors enables more lenient thresholding compared to familywise error rate control and a direct comparison between both procedures. We point out that while the same balance is obtained between average sensitivity and specificity, the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure appears less stable. Secondly, we have implemented the procedure of Gordon et al. () (originally proposed for gene selection) that includes stability, measured through bootstrapping, in the decision criterion. Simulations indicate that the method attains the same balance between sensitivity and specificity. It improves the stability of Benjamini-Hochberg but does not outperform Bonferroni, making this computationally heavy bootstrap procedure less appealing. Third, we show how stability of thresholding procedures can be assessed using real data. In a dataset on face recognition, we again find that Bonferroni renders more stable results. PMID:24804953

  12. Acute Rejection Associated with Donor-Specific Anti-MICA Antibody in a Highly Sensitized Pediatric Renal Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Shoba; Tsai, Eileen W.; Zhang, Qiuheng; Wallace, William D.; Reed, Elaine F.; Ettenger, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Allograft rejection in HLA identical transplant recipients and in patients without detectable donor specific anti-HLA antibodies has lead to the identification of non-HLA antigens as targets of the alloimmune response. Major Histocompatibility Complex class I-related chain A (MICA) antigen has been recognized as an important non-HLA target in renal transplantation. Recent studies have shown that anti-MICA antibodies are associated with acute renal allograft rejection and failure. Current cross match procedures using donor lymphocytes fail to detect MICA antibodies. Transplant candidates are not routinely tested for pre-sensitization to MICA antigens nor are transplant donors typed for MICA alleles. Optimal classification and treatment of acute rejection associated with MICA antibody remains unknown. In this case report, we are the first to describe the clinical course and treatment of donor specific MICA antibody associated with both Banff type II A acute cellular rejection (ACR) and antibody mediated rejection (AMR) in a highly sensitized pediatric renal re-transplant recipient. This case also emphasizes the importance of pre-transplant screening for donor specific MICA antibody especially in highly sensitized renal transplant patients.. PMID:21199204

  13. Specific capture of the hydrolysate on magnetic beads for sensitive detecting plant vacuolar processing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Meng; Zeng, Lizhang; Liu, Weipeng; Zhang, Tao; Xing, Da

    2016-05-15

    Conventional plant protease detection always suffers from high background interference caused by the complex coloring metabolites in plant cells. In this study, a bio-modified magnetic beads-based strategy was developed for sensitive and quantitative detection of plant vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) activity. Cleavage of the peptide substrate (ESENCRK-FITC) after asparagine residue by VPE resulted in the 2-cyano-6-amino-benzothiazole (CABT)-functionalized magnetic beads capture of the severed substrate CRK-FITC via a condensation reaction between CABT and cysteine (Cys). The catalytic activity was subsequently obtained by the confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry quantitative analysis. The sensor system integrated advantages of (i) the high efficient enrichment and separation capabilities of magnetic beads and (ii) the catalyst-free properties of the CABT-Cys condensation reaction. It exhibited a linear relationship between the fluorescence signal and the concentration of severed substrate in the range of 10-600 pM. The practical results showed that, compared with normal growth conditions, VPE activity was increased by 2.7-fold (307.2 ± 25.3 μM min(-1)g(-1)) upon cadmium toxicity stress. This platform effectively overcame the coloring metabolites-caused background interference, showing fine applicability for the detection of VPE activity in real samples. The strategy offers great sensitivity and may be further extended to other protease activity detection. PMID:26797250

  14. Auditory Profiles of Classical, Jazz, and Rock Musicians: Genre-Specific Sensitivity to Musical Sound Features

    PubMed Central

    Tervaniemi, Mari; Janhunen, Lauri; Kruck, Stefanie; Putkinen, Vesa; Huotilainen, Minna

    2016-01-01

    When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e., varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians' and non-musicians' accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians), timing (classical and jazz musicians), transposition (jazz musicians), and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians). Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content. PMID:26779055

  15. Auditory Profiles of Classical, Jazz, and Rock Musicians: Genre-Specific Sensitivity to Musical Sound Features.

    PubMed

    Tervaniemi, Mari; Janhunen, Lauri; Kruck, Stefanie; Putkinen, Vesa; Huotilainen, Minna

    2015-01-01

    When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e., varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians' and non-musicians' accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians), timing (classical and jazz musicians), transposition (jazz musicians), and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians). Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content. PMID:26779055

  16. PEG shielded MMP sensitive CPPs for efficient and tumor specific gene delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    Veiman, Kadi-Liis; Künnapuu, Kadri; Lehto, Tõnis; Kiisholts, Kristina; Pärn, Kalle; Langel, Ülo; Kurrikoff, Kaido

    2015-07-10

    Gene therapy has great potential to treat a range of different diseases, such as cancer. For that therapeutic gene can be inserted into a plasmid vector and delivered specifically to tumor cells. The most frequently used applications utilize lipoplex and polyplex approaches where DNA is non-covalently condensed into nanoparticles. However, lack of in vivo efficacy is the major concern that hinders translation of such gene therapeutic applications into clinics. In this work we introduce a novel method for in vivo delivery of plasmid DNA (pDNA) and efficient tumor-specific gene induction using intravenous (i.v) administration route. To achieve this, we utilize a cell penetrating peptide (CPP), PepFect14 (PF14), double functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a matrix metalloprotease (MMP) substrate. We show that this delivery vector effectively forms nanoparticles, where the condensed CPP and pDNA are shielded by the PEG, in an MMP-reversible manner. Administration of the complexes results in efficient induction of gene expression specifically in tumors, avoiding normal tissues. This strategy is a potent gene delivery platform that can be used for tumor-specific induction of a therapeutic gene. PMID:25935707

  17. Sensitivity and Specificity of Long Wave Infrared Imaging for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coben, Robert; Myers, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study was the first to investigate the efficacy of long wave infrared (LWIR) imaging as a diagnostic tool for ADHD. Method: with ADHD and a high level of specificity (94%) in discriminating those with ADHD from those with other diagnoses. The overall classification rate was 73.16%. This was indicative of a high level of…

  18. Sensitivity and Specificity of Proposed DSM-5 Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Marianne L.; Robins, Diana L.; Jashar, Dasal; Brennan, Laura; Fein, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis is based on behavioral presentation; changes in conceptual models or defining behaviors may significantly impact diagnosis and uptake of ASD-specific interventions. The literature examining impact of DSM-5 criteria is equivocal. Toddlers may be especially vulnerable to the stringent requirements of…

  19. Cell-specific intracellular anticancer drug delivery from mesoporous silica nanoparticles with pH sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhong; Cai, Kaiyong; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Beilu; Xu, Dawei

    2012-05-01

    A nanoreservoir for efficient intracellular anticancer drug delivery based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles end-capped with lactobionic acid-grafted bovine serum albumin is fabricated. It demonstrates great potential for both cell-specific endocytosis and intracellular pH-responsive controlled release of drugs. A possible endocytosis pathway/mechanism of the smart controlled drug release system is proposed. PMID:23184747

  20. Patient-specific geometrical modeling of orthopedic structures with high efficiency and accuracy for finite element modeling and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huajun; Xiang, Chunling; Zeng, Canjun; Ouyang, Hanbin; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-12-01

    We improved the geometrical modeling procedure for fast and accurate reconstruction of orthopedic structures. This procedure consists of medical image segmentation, three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction, and assignment of material properties. The patient-specific orthopedic structures reconstructed by this improved procedure can be used in the virtual surgical planning, 3D printing of real orthopedic structures and finite element analysis. A conventional modeling consists of: image segmentation, geometrical reconstruction, mesh generation, and assignment of material properties. The present study modified the conventional method to enhance software operating procedures. Patient's CT images of different bones were acquired and subsequently reconstructed to give models. The reconstruction procedures were three-dimensional image segmentation, modification of the edge length and quantity of meshes, and the assignment of material properties according to the intensity of gravy value. We compared the performance of our procedures to the conventional procedures modeling in terms of software operating time, success rate and mesh quality. Our proposed framework has the following improvements in the geometrical modeling: (1) processing time: (femur: 87.16 ± 5.90 %; pelvis: 80.16 ± 7.67 %; thoracic vertebra: 17.81 ± 4.36 %; P < 0.05); (2) least volume reduction (femur: 0.26 ± 0.06 %; pelvis: 0.70 ± 0.47, thoracic vertebra: 3.70 ± 1.75 %; P < 0.01) and (3) mesh quality in terms of aspect ratio (femur: 8.00 ± 7.38 %; pelvis: 17.70 ± 9.82 %; thoracic vertebra: 13.93 ± 9.79 %; P < 0.05) and maximum angle (femur: 4.90 ± 5.28 %; pelvis: 17.20 ± 19.29 %; thoracic vertebra: 3.86 ± 3.82 %; P < 0.05). Our proposed patient-specific geometrical modeling requires less operating time and workload, but the orthopedic structures were generated at a higher rate of success as compared with the conventional method. It is expected to benefit the surgical planning of orthopedic

  1. Nanogold-functionalized g-C3N4 nanohybrids for sensitive impedimetric immunoassay of prostate-specific antigen using enzymatic biocatalytic precipitation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li-Li; Ge, Jing-Ping; Zhou, Wen-Quan; Gao, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Xiong, Ya

    2016-11-15

    This work reports on a new impedimetric immunosensing strategy for sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in biological fluids. The assay was carried out on monoclonal anti-PSA capture antibody-modified glassy carbon electrode with a sandwich-type detection format. Gold nanoparticles-decorated g-C3N4 nanosheets (AuNP/g-C3N4), synthesized by the wet-chemistry method, were utilized for the labeling of polyclonal anti-PSA detection antibody and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Upon target PSA introduction, the sandwiched immunocomplex could be formed between capture antibody and detection antibody. Followed by the AuNP/g-C3N4, the labeled HRP could catalyze 4-choloro-1-naphthol into benzo-4-chlorohexadienone. The as-generated insoluble product was coated on the electrode surface, thus increasing the Faradaic impedance of Fe(CN)6(4-/3)(-) indicator between the solution and the base electrode. Under the optimal conditions, the impedance increased with the increasing target PSA in the sample, and exhibited a wide linear range from 10pgmL(-1) and 30ngmL(-1) with a detection limit of 5.2pgmL(-1). A repeatability and intermediate precision of <14% was accomplished. The specificity and method accuracy in comparison with commercial PSA ELISA kit for analysis of human serum specimens were relatively satisfactory. PMID:27179136

  2. Optical specification of time-to-passage: Observers' sensitivity to global tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Mowafy, Lyn

    1993-01-01

    Despite its general mathematical formulation, most empirical work on the visual perception of tau (defined as a quantity divided by its temporal derivative) has focused on the case of direct approach, with tau defined as image angle/rate of expansion. Empirical investigators tend to generalize image size analyses to off-axis approaches. However, this generalization is inappropriate for all but a few classes of objects. After mathematically reestablishing the appropriate optical cues specifying time to passage for noncollision cases, we report a series of studies in which we examined observers' sensitivities to this information in both relative- and absolute-judgment paradigms. In general, we found observers' judgments to be accurate and robust.

  3. Multimodal confocal mosaics enable high sensitivity and specificity in screening of in situ squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grados Luyando, Maria del Carmen; Bar, Anna; Snavely, Nicholas; Jacques, Steven; Gareau, Daniel S.

    2014-02-01

    Screening cancer in excision margins with confocal microscopy may potentially save time and cost over the gold standard histopathology (H and E). However, diagnostic accuracy requires sufficient contrast and resolution to reveal pathological traits in a growing set of tumor types. Reflectance mode images structural details due to microscopic refractive index variation. Nuclear contrast with acridine orange fluorescence provides enhanced diagnostic value, but fails for in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), where the cytoplasm is important to visualize. Combination of three modes [eosin (Eo) fluorescence, reflectance (R) and acridine orange (AO) fluorescence] enable imaging of cytoplasm, collagen and nuclei respectively. Toward rapid intra-operative pathological margin assessment to guide staged cancer excisions, multimodal confocal mosaics can image wide surgical margins (~1cm) with sub-cellular resolution and mimic the appearance of conventional H and E. Absorption contrast is achieved by alternating the excitation wavelength: 488nm (AO fluorescence) and 532nm (Eo fluorescence). Superposition and false-coloring of these modes mimics H and E, enabling detection of the carcinoma in situ in the epidermal layer The sum mosaic Eo+R is false-colored pink to mimic eosins' appearance in H and E, while the AO mosaic is false-colored purple to mimic hematoxylins' appearance in H and E. In this study, mosaics of 10 Mohs surgical excisions containing SCC in situ and 5 containing only normal tissue were subdivided for digital presentation equivalent to 4X histology. Of the total 16 SCC in situ multimodal mosaics and 16 normal cases presented, two reviewers made 1 and 2 (respectively) type-2 errors (false positives) but otherwise scored perfectly when using the confocal images to screen for the presence of SCC in situ as compared to the gold standard histopathology. Limitations to precisely mimic H and E included occasional elastin staining by AO. These results suggest that

  4. Post-PET ultrasound improves specificity of 18F-FDG-PET for recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer while maintaining sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kråkenes, Jostein; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Haugland, Hans Kristian; Heinecke, Achim; Akslen, Lars A; Varhaug, Jan Erik; Brauckhoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography (PET) using fluor-18-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) with or without computed tomography (CT) is generally accepted as the most sensitive imaging modality for diagnosing recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in patients with negative whole body scintigraphy with iodine-131 (I-131). Purpose To assess the potential incremental value of ultrasound (US) over 18F-FDG-PET-CT. Material and Methods Fifty-one consecutive patients with suspected recurrent DTC were prospectively evaluated using the following multimodal imaging protocol: (i) US before PET (pre-US) with or without fine needle biopsy (FNB) of suspicious lesions; (ii) single photon emission computed tomography (≥3 GBq I-131) with co-registered CT (SPECT-CT); (iii) 18F-FDG-PET with co-registered contrast-enhanced CT of the neck; (iv) US in correlation with the other imaging modalities (post-US). Postoperative histology, FNB, and long-term follow-up (median, 2.8 years) were taken as composite gold standard. Results Fifty-eight malignant lesions were identified in 34 patients. Forty lesions were located in the neck or upper mediastinum. On receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, 18F-FDG-PET had a limited lesion-based specificity of 59% at a set sensitivity of 90%. Pre-US had poor sensitivity and specificity of 52% and 53%, respectively, increasing to 85% and 94% on post-US, with knowledge of the PET/CT findings (P < 0.05 vs. PET and pre-US). Multimodal imaging changed therapy in 15 out of 51 patients (30%). Conclusion In patients with suspected recurrent DTC, supplemental targeted US in addition to 18F-FDG-PET-CT increases specificity while maintainin sensitivity, as non-malignant FDG uptake in cervical lesions can be confirmed. PMID:25770086

  5. Phloem-specific expression of a melon Aux/IAA in tomato plants alters auxin sensitivity and plant development

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Guy; Betzer, Rotem; Wolf, Shmuel

    2013-01-01

    Phloem sap contains a large repertoire of macromolecules in addition to sugars, amino acids, growth substances and ions. The transcription profile of melon phloem sap contains over 1000 mRNA molecules, most of them associated with signal transduction, transcriptional control, and stress and defense responses. Heterografting experiments have established the long-distance trafficking of numerous mRNA molecules. Interestingly, several trafficking transcripts are involved in the auxin response, including two molecules coding for auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA). To further explore the biological role of the melon Aux/IAA transcript CmF-308 in the vascular tissue, a cassette containing the coding sequence of this gene under a phloem-specific promoter was introduced into tomato plants. The number of lateral roots was significantly higher in transgenic plants expressing CmF-308 under the AtSUC2 promoter than in controls. A similar effect on root development was obtained after transient expression of CmF-308 in source leaves of N. benthamiana plants. An auxin-response assay showed that CmF-308-transgenic roots are more sensitive to auxin than control roots. In addition to the altered root development, phloem-specific expression of CmF-308 resulted in shorter plants, a higher number of lateral shoots and delayed flowering, a phenotype resembling reduced apical dominance. In contrast to the root response, cotyledons of the transgenic plants were less sensitive to auxin than control cotyledons. The reduced auxin sensitivity in the shoot tissue was confirmed by lower relative expression of several Aux/IAA genes in leaves and an increase in the relative expression of a cytokinin-response regulator, TRR8/9b. The accumulated data suggest that expression of Aux/IAA in the phloem modifies auxin sensitivity in a tissue-specific manner, thereby altering plant development. PMID:23986770

  6. Adipocyte-specific blockade of gamma-secretase, but not inhibition of Notch activity, reduces adipose insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sparling, David P.; Yu, Junjie; Kim, KyeongJin; Zhu, Changyu; Brachs, Sebastian; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Pajvani, Utpal B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective As the obesity pandemic continues to expand, novel molecular targets to reduce obesity-related insulin resistance and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) continue to be needed. We have recently shown that obesity is associated with reactivated liver Notch signaling, which, in turn, increases hepatic insulin resistance, opening up therapeutic avenues for Notch inhibitors to be repurposed for T2D. Herein, we tested the systemic effects of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), which prevent endogenous Notch activation, and confirmed these effects through creation and characterization of two different adipocyte-specific Notch loss-of-function mouse models through genetic ablation of the Notch transcriptional effector Rbp-Jk (A-Rbpj) and the obligate γ-secretase component Nicastrin (A-Nicastrin). Methods Glucose homeostasis and both local adipose and systemic insulin sensitivity were examined in GSI-treated, A-Rbpj and A-Nicastrin mice, as well as vehicle-treated or control littermates, with complementary in vitro studies in primary hepatocytes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Results GSI-treatment increases hepatic insulin sensitivity in obese mice but leads to reciprocal lowering of adipose glucose disposal. While A-Rbpj mice show normal body weight, adipose development and mass and unchanged adipose insulin sensitivity as control littermates, A-Nicastrin mice are relatively insulin-resistant, mirroring the GSI effect on adipose insulin action. Conclusions Notch signaling is dispensable for normal adipocyte function, but adipocyte-specific γ-secretase blockade reduces adipose insulin sensitivity, suggesting that specific Notch inhibitors would be preferable to GSIs for application in T2D. PMID:26909319

  7. A novel label-free and reusable electrochemical cytosensor for highly sensitive detection and specific collection of CTCs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huawei; Yang, Juan; Chen, Zhongping; Chen, Xueping; Wang, Li; Hu, Jing; Ji, Feihu; Xie, Guoming; Feng, Wenli

    2016-07-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) contain a great deal of information of tumor phenotype. Therefore, highly sensitive detection and specific enrichment of CTCs are of intense interest. Herein, a label-free electrochemical impedance spectroscopy cytosensor with effective surface recognition between specific epithelial cell adhesion molecules (EpCAM) over-expressed on the cell membrane and EpCAM aptamer was developed for the detection of CTCs. After immobilization of 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) onto the gold electrode, the capture probe can be directionally inserted in MCH interspaces, which can improve the sensitivity of the cytosensor. A wide detection range from 30 to 1×10(6)cellsmL(-1) with a detection limit as low as 10cellsmL(-1) is reached on the condition of acceptable stability and reproducibility. The cytosensor can easily distinguish CTCs from the real blood sample due to the specific combination of EpCAM and EpCAM aptamer. Furthermore, the cytosensor can be reused 8 times and enrich CTCs by Uracil DNA Excision Mix specific cleaving the deoxyuridines (dUs) of the aptamer. The collected CTCs can contribute to further study. Thus, we reported that this cytosensor is a promising technique for the early monitoring and therapy of cancer. PMID:27016910

  8. Sensitive and substrate-specific detection of metabolically active microorganisms in natural microbial consortia using community isotope arrays.

    PubMed

    Tourlousse, Dieter M; Kurisu, Futoshi; Tobino, Tomohiro; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study was to develop and validate a novel fosmid-clone-based metagenome isotope array approach - termed the community isotope array (CIArray) - for sensitive detection and identification of microorganisms assimilating a radiolabeled substrate within complex microbial communities. More specifically, a sample-specific CIArray was used to identify anoxic phenol-degrading microorganisms in activated sludge treating synthetic coke-oven wastewater in a single-sludge predenitrification-nitrification process. Hybridization of the CIArray with DNA from the (14) C-phenol-amended sample indicated that bacteria assimilating (14) C-atoms, presumably directly from phenol, under nitrate-reducing conditions were abundant in the reactor, and taxonomic assignment of the fosmid clone end sequences suggested that they belonged to the Gammaproteobacteria. The specificity of the CIArray was validated by quantification of fosmid-clone-specific DNA in density-resolved DNA fractions from samples incubated with (13) C-phenol, which verified that all CIArray-positive probes stemmed from microorganisms that assimilated isotopically labeled carbon. This also demonstrated that the CIArray was more sensitive than DNA-SIP, as the former enabled positive detection at a phenol concentration that failed to yield a 'heavy' DNA fraction. Finally, two operational taxonomic units distantly related to marine Gammaproteobacteria were identified to account for more than half of 16S rRNA gene clones in the 'heavy' DNA library, corroborating the CIArray-based identification. PMID:23441921

  9. KDR activating mutations in human angiosarcomas are sensitive to specific kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Yoshida, Akihiko; Guo, Tianhuo; Chang, Ning-En; Zhang, Lei; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Qin, Li-Xuan; Brennan, Murray F; Singer, Samuel; Maki, Robert G

    2009-09-15

    Angiosarcomas (AS) represent a heterogeneous group of malignant vascular tumors occurring not only in different anatomic locations but also in distinct clinical settings, such as radiation or associated chronic lymphedema. Although representing only 1% to 2% of soft tissue sarcomas, vascular sarcomas provide unique insight into the general process of tumor angiogenesis. However, no molecular candidates have been identified to guide a specific therapeutic intervention. By expression profiling, AS show distinct up-regulation of vascular-specific receptor tyrosine kinases, including TIE1, KDR, SNRK, TEK, and FLT1. Full sequencing of these five candidate genes identified 10% of patients harboring KDR mutations. A KDR-positive genotype was associated with strong KDR protein expression and was restricted to the breast anatomic site with or without prior exposure to radiation. Transient transfection of KDR mutants into COS-7 cells showed ligand-independent activation of the kinase, which was inhibited by specific KDR inhibitors. These data provide a basis for the activity of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-directed therapy in the treatment of primary and radiation-induced AS. PMID:19723655

  10. Sensitivity analysis of a validated subject-specific finite element model of the human craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Szwedowski, T D; Fialkov, J; Whyne, C M

    2011-01-01

    Developing a more complete understanding of the mechanical response of the craniofacial skeleton (CFS) to physiological loads is fundamental to improving treatment for traumatic injuries, reconstruction due to neoplasia, and deformities. Characterization of the biomechanics of the CFS is challenging due to its highly complex structure and heterogeneity, motivating the utilization of experimentally validated computational models. As such, the objective of this study was to develop, experimentally validate, and parametrically analyse a patient-specific finite element (FE) model of the CFS to elucidate a better understanding of the factors that are of intrinsic importance to the skeletal structural behaviour of the human CFS. An FE model of a cadaveric craniofacial skeleton was created from subject-specific computed tomography data. The model was validated based on bone strain measurements taken under simulated physiological-like loading through the masseter and temporalis muscles (which are responsible for the majority of craniofacial physiologic loading due to mastication). The baseline subject-specific model using locally defined cortical bone thicknesses produced the strongest correlation to the experimental data (r2 = 0.73). Large effects on strain patterns arising from small parametric changes in cortical thickness suggest that the very thin bony structures present in the CFS are crucial to characterizing the local load distribution in the CFS accurately. PMID:21381488

  11. Combination of miR-125b and miR-27a enhances sensitivity and specificity of AFP-based diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Duo; Chen, Liwei; Liu, Xiaoqian; Wang, Xia; Xi, Qing; Luo, Yi; Zhang, Ning; Guo, Hua

    2016-05-01

    Non-invasive biomarkers of early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) could offer immense benefits. Currently available tumor markers for HCC are of not much clinical relevance. In this study, we investigated the potential for using a panel of serum microRNAs (miRNAs) as novel tumor markers in conjunction with serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) for diagnosis of HCC. Serum expression of four miRNAs was assessed in 150 subjects (90 cases of HCC and 60 cases without cancer) by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the potential use of miRNAs for detection of HCC. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. A panel of serum miRNAs (miR-125b, miR-223, miR-27a, and miR-26a) used in conjunction with AFP helped differentiate HCC patients from those in the non-cancer group after adjusting for age and gender, with the area under the curve of 0.870. In addition, the use of miR-125b/miR-27a panel differentiated HBV-related early-stage HCC with a high sensitivity (80.0 %) and specificity (87.2 %) in AFP-negative (-) subjects. A combination of serum miR-125b, miR-223, miR-27a, and miR-26a as a second-line tests could help detect HCC in AFP (-) subjects. The panel of miR-125b/miR-27a/AFP had a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of early-stage HCC as compared to that of a single marker. PMID:26637228

  12. Sensitivity and accuracy of high-throughput metabarcoding methods used to describe aquatic communities for early detection of invasve fish species

    EPA Science Inventory

    For early detection biomonitoring of aquatic invasive species, sensitivity to rare individuals and accurate, high-resolution taxonomic classification are critical to minimize Type I and II detection errors. Given the great expense and effort associated with morphological identifi...

  13. Lysophosphatidylcholine hydrolases of human erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and brain: Sensitive targets of conserved specificity for organophosphorus delayed neurotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, Sarah C.; Holland, Nina T.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Casida, John E.

    2007-10-01

    Brain neuropathy target esterase (NTE), associated with organophosphorus (OP)-induced delayed neuropathy, has the same OP inhibitor sensitivity and specificity profiles assayed in the classical way (paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive hydrolysis of phenyl valerate) or with lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC) as the substrate. Extending our earlier observation with mice, we now examine human erythrocyte, lymphocyte, and brain LysoPC hydrolases as possible sensitive targets for OP delayed neurotoxicants and insecticides. Inhibitor profiling of human erythrocytes and lymphocytes gave the surprising result of essentially the same pattern as with brain. Human erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolases are highly sensitive to OP delayed neurotoxicants, with in vitro IC{sub 50} values of 0.13-85 nM for longer alkyl analogs, and poorly sensitive to the current OP insecticides. In agricultural workers, erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolyzing activities are similar for newborn children and their mothers and do not vary with paraoxonase status but have high intersample variation that limits their use as a biomarker. Mouse erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolase activity is also of low sensitivity in vitro and in vivo to the OP insecticides whereas the delayed neurotoxicant ethyl n-octylphosphonyl fluoride inhibits activity in vivo at 1-3 mg/kg. Overall, inhibition of blood LysoPC hydrolases is as good as inhibition of brain NTE as a predictor of OP inducers of delayed neuropathy. NTE and lysophospholipases (LysoPLAs) both hydrolyze LysoPC, yet they are in distinct enzyme families with no sequence homology and very different catalytic sites. The relative contributions of NTE and LysoPLAs to LysoPC hydrolysis and clearance from erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and brain remain to be defined.

  14. [Usefulness of hyper sensitive PSA assay kits for determination on low range of prostate specific antigen in prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Akimoto, S; Akakura, K; Ohki, T; Shimazaki, J; Kuriyama, M; Kawada, Y

    1995-02-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels after total prostatectomy or radiation therapy to localized prostate cancer and also during endocrine therapy are within normal range. Therefore, it is necessary to use hyper sensitive PSA assay kits for early detection of relapse. The present study was undertaken to evaluate two hyper sensitive assay kits (Delfia kit, lower limit 0.1 ng/ml, Kabi Pharmacia Diagnostics Co. and Markit M kit, 0.5 ng/ml, Dainippon Pharmaceutical Co.) and to compare them with conventional PSA kit (Eiken Chemical Co., 1.0 ng/ml). Total of 291 sera were examined: patients consisted of 10 total prostatectomy+endocrine therapy, 9 radiation therapy+endocrine therapy, 5 radiation therapy alone and 44 endocrine therapy alone. Values of endocrine therapy alone were divided into two groups according to duration after start of treatment; more or less than 5 years. The following results were obtained. 1. In non-relapse patients after total prostatectomy+endocrine therapy and radiation+endocrine therapy, PSA showed under lower limit with hyper sensitive kit. On the contrary, conventional kit indicated more than 1.0 ng/ml. 2. Radiation therapy alone kept PSA in detectable range with hyper sensitive kit in spite of no sign of relapse. 3. In non-relapsed patients under endocrine therapy alone, long duration (more than 5 years after start of treatment) decreased PSA in non detectable values with hyper sensitive kits. In this case, conventional kit still showed PSA as more than 1 ng/ml. 4. Doubling time at relapse was estimated similar with Delfia kit and Markit M kit, and much longer with conventional kit. It is concluded that hyper sensitive kit is more useful to manage patients after therapy than conventional kit. PMID:7534843

  15. A homogenous fluorescence quenching based assay for specific and sensitive detection of influenza virus A hemagglutinin antigen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longyan; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Influenza pandemics cause millions of deaths worldwide. Effective surveillance is required to prevent their spread and facilitate the development of appropriate vaccines. In this study, we report the fabrication of a homogenous fluorescence-quenching-based assay for specific and sensitive detection of influenza virus surface antigen hemagglutinins (HAs). The core of the assay is composed of two nanoprobes namely the glycan-conjugated highly luminescent quantum dots (Gly-QDs), and the HA-specific antibody-modified gold nanoparticle (Ab-Au NPs). When exposed to strain-specific HA, a binding event between the HA and the two nanoprobes takes place, resulting in the formation of a sandwich complex which subsequently brings the two nanoprobes closer together. This causes a decrease in QDs fluorescence intensity due to a non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to Au NPs. A resulting correlation between the targets HA concentrations and fluorescence changes can be observed. Furthermore, by utilizing the specific interaction between HA and glycan with sialic acid residues, the assay is able to distinguish HAs originated from viral subtypes H1 (human) and H5 (avian). The detection limits in solution are found to be low nanomolar and picomolar level for sensing H1-HA and H5-HA, respectively. Slight increase in assay sensitivity was found in terms of detection limit while exposing the assay in the HA spiked in human sera solution. We believe that the developed assay could serve as a feasible and sensitive diagnostic tool for influenza virus detection and discrimination, with further improvement on the architectures. PMID:25884789

  16. A Homogenous Fluorescence Quenching Based Assay for Specific and Sensitive Detection of Influenza Virus A Hemagglutinin Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Longyan; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Influenza pandemics cause millions of deaths worldwide. Effective surveillance is required to prevent their spread and facilitate the development of appropriate vaccines. In this study, we report the fabrication of a homogenous fluorescence-quenching-based assay for specific and sensitive detection of influenza virus surface antigen hemagglutinins (HAs). The core of the assay is composed of two nanoprobes namely the glycan-conjugated highly luminescent quantum dots (Gly-QDs), and the HA-specific antibody-modified gold nanoparticle (Ab-Au NPs). When exposed to strain-specific HA, a binding event between the HA and the two nanoprobes takes place, resulting in the formation of a sandwich complex which subsequently brings the two nanoprobes closer together. This causes a decrease in QDs fluorescence intensity due to a non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to Au NPs. A resulting correlation between the targets HA concentrations and fluorescence changes can be observed. Furthermore, by utilizing the specific interaction between HA and glycan with sialic acid residues, the assay is able to distinguish HAs originated from viral subtypes H1 (human) and H5 (avian). The detection limits in solution are found to be low nanomolar and picomolar level for sensing H1-HA and H5-HA, respectively. Slight increase in assay sensitivity was found in terms of detection limit while exposing the assay in the HA spiked in human sera solution. We believe that the developed assay could serve as a feasible and sensitive diagnostic tool for influenza virus detection and discrimination, with further improvement on the architectures. PMID:25884789

  17. Urinary microRNA-based signature improves accuracy of detection of clinically relevant prostate cancer within the prostate-specific antigen grey zone

    PubMed Central

    SALIDO-GUADARRAMA, ALBERTO IVAN; MORALES-MONTOR, JORGE GUSTAVO; RANGEL-ESCAREÑO, CLAUDIA; LANGLEY, ELIZABETH; PERALTA-ZARAGOZA, OSCAR; COLIN, JOSE LUIS CRUZ; RODRIGUEZ-DORANTES, MAURICIO

    2016-01-01

    At present, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is used as a clinical biomarker for prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis; however, a large number of patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with PSA levels in the ʻgray areaʼ (4–10 ng/ml) are currently subjected to unnecessary biopsy due to overdiagnosis. Certain microRNAs (miRs) have been proven to be useful biomarkers, several of which are detectable in bodily fluids. The present study identified and validated a urinary miR-based signature to enhance the specificity of PCa diagnosis and to reduce the number of patients with benign conditions undergoing biopsy. Seventy-three urine samples from Mexican patients with diagnosis of PCa with a Gleason score ≥7 and 70 patients diagnosed with BPH were collected after digital rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate. miR expression profiles were determined using TaqMan Low Density Array experiments, and normalized Ct values for the miRs were compared between PCa and BPH groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether miR detection in urine is suitable for distinguishing patients with PCa from those with BPH. The identified miR-100/200b signature was significantly correlated with PCa. Using a multivariable logistic regression approach, a base model including the clinical variables age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), the percentage of free PSA and DRE was generated, and a second base model additionally contained the miR-100/200b signature. ROC analysis demonstrated that the combined model significantly outperformed the capacity of PSA (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.01) to discriminate between PCa and BPH patients. In terms of evaluation of the sub-group of patients in the gray zone of PSA levels, the performance of the combined model for predicting PCa cases was significantly superior to PSA level determination (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.009). In addition, decision curve analysis demonstrated that the use of

  18. Sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for fialuridine: initial assessment of pharmacokinetics after single oral doses to healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Bowsher, R R; Compton, J A; Kirkwood, J A; Place, G D; Jones, C D; Mabry, T E; Hyslop, D L; Hatcher, B L; DeSante, K A

    1994-01-01

    Fialuridine (FIAU) is a halogen-substituted analog of thymidine that was undergoing clinical investigation as a drug for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B viral infection. However, clinical trials of FIAU were terminated after adverse events occurred following chronic oral administration. Prior to the termination of clinical trials, a sensitive assay was needed for the measurement of FIAU because of the anticipated low dose administered to patients. We therefore undertook the development of a radioimmunoassay (RIA). A specific antiserum was raised in rabbits following immunization with a 5'-O-hemisuccinate analog of FIAU coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Radiolabeled FIAU was synthesized by a destannylation procedure by using sodium [125I]iodide. We developed a competitive-binding procedure and used precipitation with polyethylene glycol as the method for separating the bound and free forms of FIAU. The RIA is sensitive (0.2 ng/ml), specific (negligible interference from known metabolites and endogenous nucleosides), and reproducible (interassay coefficients of variation range from 5 to 19.7% for serum controls). We used the RIA to assess the pharmacokinetics of FIAU in healthy adult volunteers following administration of a single 5-mg oral dose. The sensitivity of the RIA permitted the detection of a prolonged elimination phase for FIAU in healthy volunteers and dogs, with mean elimination half-lives of 29.3 and 35.3 h, respectively. We conclude the RIA is a valid method for the quantification of FIAU in biological fluids. PMID:7811032

  19. Homogenous 96-Plex PEA Immunoassay Exhibiting High Sensitivity, Specificity, and Excellent Scalability

    PubMed Central

    Holmquist, Göran; Björkesten, Johan; Bucht Thorsen, Stine; Ekman, Daniel; Eriksson, Anna; Rennel Dickens, Emma; Ohlsson, Sandra; Edfeldt, Gabriella; Andersson, Ann-Catrin; Lindstedt, Patrik; Stenvang, Jan; Gullberg, Mats; Fredriksson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Medical research is developing an ever greater need for comprehensive high-quality data generation to realize the promises of personalized health care based on molecular biomarkers. The nucleic acid proximity-based methods proximity ligation and proximity extension assays have, with their dual reporters, shown potential to relieve the shortcomings of antibodies and their inherent cross-reactivity in multiplex protein quantification applications. The aim of the present study was to develop a robust 96-plex immunoassay based on the proximity extension assay (PEA) for improved high throughput detection of protein biomarkers. This was enabled by: (1) a modified design leading to a reduced number of pipetting steps compared to the existing PEA protocol, as well as improved intra-assay precision; (2) a new enzymatic system that uses a hyper-thermostabile enzyme, Pwo, for uniting the two probes allowing for room temperature addition of all reagents and improved the sensitivity; (3) introduction of an inter-plate control and a new normalization procedure leading to improved inter-assay precision (reproducibility). The multiplex proximity extension assay was found to perform well in complex samples, such as serum and plasma, and also in xenografted mice and resuspended dried blood spots, consuming only 1 µL sample per test. All-in-all, the development of the current multiplex technique is a step toward robust high throughput protein marker discovery and research. PMID:24755770

  20. Oligonucleotide-stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters for the specific and sensitive detection of biotin.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Jingjin; Zhao, Shulin

    2016-02-01

    A novel biotin fluorescent probe based on oligonucleotide-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) was synthesized by employing a biotinylated cytosine-rich sequence as a synthesized template. The fluorescence properties of the DNA-AgNCs are related to the modified position of the DNA. When biotin is linked to the middle thymine base of the DNA sequence, the DNA-AgNCs emit the strongest fluorescence. Moreover, the stability of the DNA-AgNCs was affected by avidin through biotin-avidin binding, quenching the fluorescence of the DNA-AgNCs. In contrast, if free biotin is further introduced into this system, the quenching is apparently weakened by competition, leading to the restoration of fluorescence. This phenomenon can be utilized for the detection of biotin. Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery is linearly proportional to the concentration of biotin in the range of 10 nM-1.0 μM with a detection limit of 6.0 nM. This DNA-AgNCs probe with excellent fluorescent properties is sensitive and selective for the detection of biotin and has been applied for the determination of biotin in wheat flour. PMID:26750716

  1. Acid Sensitive Polymeric Micelles Combining Folate and Bioreducible Conjugate for Specific Intracellular siRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanfang; Xia, Xuejun; Dong, Wujun; Wang, Hongliang; Li, Lin; Ma, Panpan; Sheng, Wei; Xu, Xueqing; Liu, Yuling

    2016-05-01

    An efficiently siRNA transporting nanocarrier still remains to be developed. In this study, utilizing the dual stimulus of acid tumor extracellular environment and redox effect of glutathione in the cytosol, a new siRNA transporting system combining triple effects of folate targeting, acid sensitive polymer micelles, and bio-reducible disulfide bond linked siRNA-cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) conjugate is developed to suppress c-myc gene expression of breast cancer (MCF-7 cells) both in vitro and in vivo. Subsequent research demonstrates that the vesicle has particle size of about 100 nm and siRNA entrapment efficiency of approximately 80%. In vitro studies verified over 90% of encapsulated siRNA-CPPs can be released and the vesicle shows higher cellular uptake in response to the tumorous zone. Determination of gene expression at both mRNA and protein levels indicates the constructed vesicle exhibited enhanced cancer cell apoptosis and improved therapeutic efficacy in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26822264

  2. Antibody generation and immunoassay development in diverse formats for pyrimethanil specific and sensitive analysis.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Josep V; Esteve-Turrillas, Francesc A; Agulló, Consuelo; Abad-Somovilla, Antonio; Abad-Fuentes, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Immunochemical techniques are complementary tools to modern analytical requirements. These methods rely on the production of immunoreagents with adequate binding properties. In the present study, a rationally designed and functionalized derivative of pyrimethanil--a modern anilinopyrimidine fungicide--was synthesized in order to generate for the first time high-affinity and selective antibodies to this xenobiotic. A single coupling procedure--based on hapten activation using N,N'-disuccinimidyl carbonate and purification of the active ester--was followed to prepare both immunizing and assay conjugates. Polyclonal antibodies were produced and characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in four alternative formats: one indirect and three direct competitive procedures. The selected immunoassay displayed a limit of detection of 0.024 μg L(-1), far lower than the official maximum residue limits and close to the sensitivity of regular instrumental assays. This ELISA was shown to be robust to buffer changes and tolerant to the presence of little amounts of methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile. Finally, the developed assay was applied to the analysis of pyrimethanil in carrot juice samples, and a limit of quantification of 0.040 mg L(-1) was determined. PMID:23085609

  3. A nanoparticle label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-15

    We present a nanoparticle (NP) label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. This IEB integrates the immunochromatographic strip with the electrochemical detector for transducing quantitative signals. The NP label, made of CdSe@ZnS, serves as a signal-amplifier vehicle. A sandwich immunoreaction was performed on the immunochromatographic strip. The captured NP labels in the test zone were determined by highly sensitive stripping voltammetric measurement of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium) with a disposable-screen-printed electrode, which is embedded underneath the membrane of the test zone. Experimental parameters (e.g., immunoreaction time, the amount of anti-PSA-NP conjugations applied) and electrochemical detection conditions (e.g., preconcentration potential and time) were optimized using this biosensor for PSA detection. The analytical performance of this biosensor was evaluated with serum PSA samples according to the “figure-of-merits” (e.g., dynamic range, reproducibility, and detection limit). The results were validated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and show high consistency. It is found that this biosensor is very sensitive with the detection limit of 0.02 ng/mL PSA and is quite reproducible. This method is rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive than other diagnosis tools for PSA; therefore, this IEB coupled with a portable electrochemical analyzer shows great promise for simple, sensitive, quantitative point-of-care testing of disease-related protein biomarkers.

  4. Sensitivity improved plasmonic gold nanoholes array biosensor by coupling quantum-dots for the detection of specific biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lihong; Cheng, Ke; Wu, Yangqing; Wang, Tian; Shi, Qing; Liu, Dan; Du, Zuliang

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we focused on the large-scale fabrication of gold nanoholes array capable of supporting surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) via the developed nanosphere lithography (NSL) technique, which could be used as high performance biosensor for the detection of specific streptavidin-biotin interactions. Direct UV-vis absorption mode measurement was used to monitor the SPR peak shift. For the better immobilization of biotin, the surface of gold nanoholes array was functionalized with 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTS) and 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES). After the streptavidin binding to the biotin, the SPR peak position showed an 11 nm wavelength shift due to the refractive index change caused by the biotin-streptavidin binding. The sealing treatment was performed by using bovine serum albumin (BSA) to eliminate the influences of nonspecific adsorption for more accurate detection. Interestingly, the detection sensitivity of the gold nanoholes array could be further enhanced by coupling the water-soluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), which showed four-fold improvement in detection sensitivity as compared to the gold nanoholes array biosensor without the coupling of QDs. The mechanisms for the enhancement of detection sensitivity were also discussed. This would provide new capabilities for the highly sensitive measurements of biomolecular binding. PMID:23850779

  5. Sensitivity of Force Specifications to the Errors in Measuring the Interface Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Force-Limited Random Vibration Testing has been applied in the last several years at NASA/GSFC for various programs at the instrument and system level. Different techniques have been developed over the last few decades to estimate the dynamic forces that the test article under consideration will encounter in the operational environment. Some of these techniques are described in the handbook, NASA-HDBK-7004, and the monograph, NASA-RP-1403. A key element in the ability to perform force-limited testing is multi-component force gauges. This paper will show how some measurement and calibration errors in force gauges are compensated for w en tie force specification is calculated. The resulting notches in the acceleration spectrum, when a random vibration test is performed, are the same as the notches produced during an uncompensated test that has no measurement errors. The paper will also present the results of tests that were used to validate this compensation. Knowing that the force specification can compensate for some measurement errors allows tests to continue after force gauge failures or allows dummy gauges to be used in places that are inaccessible.

  6. Sensitivity of snow density and specific surface area measured by microtomography to different image processing algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenmuller, Pascal; Matzl, Margret; Chambon, Guillaume; Schneebeli, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Microtomography can measure the X-ray attenuation coefficient in a 3-D volume of snow with a spatial resolution of a few microns. In order to extract quantitative characteristics of the microstructure, such as the specific surface area (SSA), from these data, the greyscale image first needs to be segmented into a binary image of ice and air. Different numerical algorithms can then be used to compute the surface area of the binary image. In this paper, we report on the effect of commonly used segmentation and surface area computation techniques on the evaluation of density and specific surface area. The evaluation is based on a set of 38 X-ray tomographies of different snow samples without impregnation, scanned with an effective voxel size of 10 and 18 μm. We found that different surface area computation methods can induce relative variations up to 5 % in the density and SSA values. Regarding segmentation, similar results were obtained by sequential and energy-based approaches, provided the associated parameters were correctly chosen. The voxel size also appears to affect the values of density and SSA, but because images with the higher resolution also show the higher noise level, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on this effect of resolution.

  7. Modeling Analysis of Signal Sensitivity and Specificity by Vibrio fischeri LuxR Variants

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Deanna M.; Stabb, Eric V.; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    The LuxR protein of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri belongs to a family of transcriptional activators that underlie pheromone-mediated signaling by responding to acyl-homoserine lactones (-HSLs) or related molecules. V. fischeri produces two acyl-HSLs, N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-HSL (3OC6-HSL) and N-octanoyl-HSL (C8-HSL), each of which interact with LuxR to facilitate its binding to a “lux box” DNA sequence, thereby enabling LuxR to activate transcription of the lux operon responsible for bioluminescence. We have investigated the HSL sensitivity of four different variants of V. fischeri LuxR: two derived from wild-type strains ES114 and MJ1, and two derivatives of LuxRMJ1 generated by directed evolution. For each LuxR variant, we measured the bioluminescence induced by combinations of C8-HSL and 3OC6-HSL. We fit these data to a model in which the two HSLs compete with each other to form multimeric LuxR complexes that directly interact with lux to activate bioluminescence. The model reproduces the observed effects of HSL combinations on the bioluminescence responses directed by LuxR variants, including competition and non-monotonic responses to C8-HSL and 3OC6-HSL. The analysis yields robust estimates for the underlying dissociation constants and cooperativities (Hill coefficients) of the LuxR-HSL complexes and their affinities for the lux box. It also reveals significant differences in the affinities of LuxRMJ1 and LuxRES114 for 3OC6-HSL. Further, LuxRMJ1 and LuxRES114 differed sharply from LuxRs retrieved by directed evolution in the cooperativity of LuxR-HSL complex formation and the affinity of these complexes for lux. These results show how computational modeling of in vivo experimental data can provide insight into the mechanistic consequences of directed evolution. PMID:25962099

  8. An Inexpensive, Fast and Sensitive Quantitative Lateral Flow Magneto-Immunoassay for Total Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Jacqueline M.; Wraith, Patrick; Kiely, Janice; Persad, Raj; Hurley, Katrina; Hawkins, Peter; Luxton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We describe the detection characteristics of a device the Resonant Coil Magnetometer (RCM) to quantify paramagnetic particles (PMPs) in immunochromatographic (lateral flow) assays. Lateral flow assays were developed using PMPs for the measurement of total prostate specific antigen (PSA) in serum samples. A detection limit of 0.8 ng/mL was achieved for total PSA using the RCM and is at clinically significant concentrations. Comparison of data obtained in a pilot study from the analysis of serum samples with commercially available immunoassays shows good agreement. The development of a quantitative magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format for total PSA suggests the potential of the RCM to operate with many immunoassay formats. The RCM has the potential to be modified to quantify multiple analytes in this format. This research shows promise for the development of an inexpensive device capable of quantifying multiple analytes at the point-of-care using a magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format. PMID:25587419

  9. Differential Sensitivity of Glioma- versus Lung Cancer-specific EGFR mutations to EGFR Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Vivanco, Igor; Robins, H. Ian; Rohle, Daniel; Campos, Carl; Grommes, Christian; Nghiemphu, Phioanh Leia; Kubek, Sara; Oldrini, Barbara; Chheda, Milan G.; Yannuzzi, Nicolas; Tao, Hui; Zhu, Shaojun; Iwanami, Akio; Kuga, Daisuke; Dang, Julie; Pedraza, Alicia; Brennan, Cameron W.; Heguy, Adriana; Liau, Linda M.; Lieberman, Frank; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R.; Reardon, David A.; Drappatz, Jan; Wen, Patrick Y.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Fine, Howard A.; Horvath, Steve; Wu, Nian; Lassman, Andrew B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Yong, William H.; Kuhn, John G.; Mischel, Paul S.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in glioblastoma (GBM) occurs through mutations or deletions in the extracellular (EC) domain. Unlike lung cancers with EGFR kinase domain (KD) mutations, GBMs respond poorly to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Using RNAi, we show that GBM cells carrying EGFR EC mutations display EGFR addiction. In contrast to KD mutants found in lung cancer, glioma-specific EGFR EC mutants are poorly inhibited by EGFR inhibitors that target the active kinase conformation (e.g., erlotinib). Inhibitors which bind to the inactive EGFR conformation, on the other hand, potently inhibit EGFR EC mutants and induce cell death in EGFR mutant GBM cells. Our results provide first evidence for single kinase addiction in GBM, and suggest that the disappointing clinical activity of first-generation EGFR inhibitors in GBM versus lung cancer may be attributed to the different conformational requirements of mutant EGFR in these two cancer types. PMID:22588883

  10. Nanostructured disposable impedimetric sensors as tools for specific biomolecular interactions: sensitive recognition of concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Oscar A; Lamas-Ardisana, Pedro J; Jubete, Elena; Ochoteco, Estibalitz; Loinaz, Iraida; Cabañero, Germán; García, Isabel; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-04-15

    The development of sensors to detect specific weak biological interactions is still today a challenging topic. Characteristics of carbohydrate-protein (lectin) interactions include high specificity and low affinity. This work describes the development of nanostructured impedimetric sensors for the detection of concanavalin A (Con A) binding to immobilized thiolated carbohydrate derivatives (D-mannose or D-glucose) onto screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) modified with gold nanoparticles. Thiolated D-galactose derivative was employed as negative control to evaluate the selectivity of the proposed methodology. After binding the thiolated carbohydrate to the nanostructured SPCEs, different functionalized thiols were employed to form mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAM). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was employed as a technique to evaluate the binding of Con A to selected carbohydrates through the increase of electron transfer resistance of the ferri/ferrocyanide redox probe at the differently SAM modified electrodes. Different variables of the assay protocol were studied in order to optimize the sensor performance. Selective Con A determinations were only achieved by the formation of mixed SAMs with adequate functionalized thiols. Important differences were obtained depending on the chain lengths and functional groups of these thiols. For the 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate mixed SAMs, the electron transfer resistance varied linearly with the Con A concentration in the 2.2-40.0 μg mL(-1) range for D-mannose and D-glucose modified sensors. Low detection limits (0.099 and 0.078 pmol) and good reproducibility (6.9 and 6.1%, n=10) were obtained for the D-glucose and D-mannose modified sensors, respectively, without any amplification strategy. PMID:21417434

  11. A highly sensitive and specific method for the screening detection of genetically modified organisms based on digital PCR without pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Zhu, Pengyu; Wang, Chenguang; Huang, Kunlun; Du, Zhixin; Tian, Wenying; Wang, Qin; Wang, Huiyu; Xu, Wentao; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    Digital PCR has developed rapidly since it was first reported in the 1990 s. It was recently reported that an improved method facilitated the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). However, to use this improved method, the samples must be pretreated, which could introduce inaccuracy into the results. In our study, we explored a pretreatment-free digital PCR detection method for the screening for GMOs. We chose the CaMV35s promoter and the NOS terminator as the templates in our assay. To determine the specificity of our method, 9 events of GMOs were collected, including MON810, MON863, TC1507, MIR604, MIR162, GA21, T25, NK603 and Bt176. Moreover, the sensitivity, intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility of our detection method were assessed. The results showed that the limit of detection of our method was 0.1%, which was lower than the labeling threshold level of the EU. The specificity and stability among the 9 events were consistent, respectively. The intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility were both good. Finally, the perfect fitness for the detection of eight double-blind samples indicated the good practicability of our method. In conclusion, the method in our study would allow more sensitive, specific and stable screening detection of the GMO content of international trading products. PMID:26239916

  12. A highly sensitive and specific method for the screening detection of genetically modified organisms based on digital PCR without pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Zhu, Pengyu; Wang, Chenguang; Huang, Kunlun; Du, Zhixin; Tian, Wenying; Wang, Qin; Wang, Huiyu; Xu, Wentao; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    Digital PCR has developed rapidly since it was first reported in the 1990s. It was recently reported that an improved method facilitated the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). However, to use this improved method, the samples must be pretreated, which could introduce inaccuracy into the results. In our study, we explored a pretreatment-free digital PCR detection method for the screening for GMOs. We chose the CaMV35s promoter and the NOS terminator as the templates in our assay. To determine the specificity of our method, 9 events of GMOs were collected, including MON810, MON863, TC1507, MIR604, MIR162, GA21, T25, NK603 and Bt176. Moreover, the sensitivity, intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility of our detection method were assessed. The results showed that the limit of detection of our method was 0.1%, which was lower than the labeling threshold level of the EU. The specificity and stability among the 9 events were consistent, respectively. The intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory reproducibility were both good. Finally, the perfect fitness for the detection of eight double-blind samples indicated the good practicability of our method. In conclusion, the method in our study would allow more sensitive, specific and stable screening detection of the GMO content of international trading products. PMID:26239916

  13. Detection of Echinococcus multilocularis by MC-PCR: evaluation of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity without gold standard

    PubMed Central

    Wahlström, Helene; Comin, Arianna; Isaksson, Mats; Deplazes, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A semi-automated magnetic capture probe-based DNA extraction and real-time PCR method (MC-PCR), allowing for a more efficient large-scale surveillance of Echinococcus multilocularis occurrence, has been developed. The test sensitivity has previously been evaluated using the sedimentation and counting technique (SCT) as a gold standard. However, as the sensitivity of the SCT is not 1, test characteristics of the MC-PCR was also evaluated using latent class analysis, a methodology not requiring a gold standard. Materials and methods Test results, MC-PCR and SCT, from a previous evaluation of the MC-PCR using 177 foxes shot in the spring (n=108) and autumn 2012 (n=69) in high prevalence areas in Switzerland were used. Latent class analysis was used to estimate the test characteristics of the MC-PCR. Although it is not the primary aim of this study, estimates of the test characteristics of the SCT were also obtained. Results and discussion This study showed that the sensitivity of the MC-PCR was 0.88 [95% posterior credible interval (PCI) 0.80–0.93], which was not significantly different than the SCT, 0.83 (95% PCI 0.76–0.88), which is currently considered as the gold standard. The specificity of both tests was high, 0.98 (95% PCI 0.94–0.99) for the MC-PCR and 0.99 (95% PCI 0.99–1) for the SCT. In a previous study, using fox scats from a low prevalence area, the specificity of the MC-PCR was higher, 0.999% (95% PCI 0.997–1). One reason for the lower estimate of the specificity in this study could be that the MC-PCR detects DNA from infected but non-infectious rodents eaten by foxes. When using MC-PCR in low prevalence areas or areas free from the parasite, a positive result in the MC-PCR should be regarded as a true positive. Conclusion The sensitivity of the MC-PCR (0.88) was comparable to the sensitivity of SCT (0.83). PMID:26968153

  14. Fatty acid specificity of hormone-sensitive lipase. Implication in the selective hydrolysis of triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Raclot, T; Holm, C; Langin, D

    2001-12-01

    The selective mobilization of fatty acids from white fat cells depends on their molecular structure, in particular the degree of unsaturation. The present study was designed to examine if the release of fatty acids by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in vitro i) is influenced by the amount of unsaturation, ii) depends on the temperature, and iii) could explain the selective pattern of fatty acid mobilization and notably the preferential mobilization of certain highly unsaturated fatty acids. Recombinant rat and human HSL were incubated with a lipid emulsion. The hydrolysis of 35 individual fatty acids, ranging in chain length from 12 to 24 carbon atoms and in unsaturation from 0 to 6 double bonds was measured. Fatty acid composition of in vitro released NEFA was compared with that of fat cell triacylglycerols (TAG), the ratio % NEFA/% TAG being defined as the relative hydrolysis. The relative hydrolysis of individual fatty acids differed widely, ranging from 0.44 (24:1n-9) to 1.49 (18:1n-7) with rat HSL, and from 0.38 (24:1n-9) to 1.67 (18:1n-7) with human HSL. No major difference was observed between rat and human HSL. The relative release was dependent on the number of double bonds according to chain length. The amount of fatty acid released by recombinant rat HSL was decreased but remained robust at 4 degrees C compared with 37 degrees C, and the relative hydrolysis of some individual fatty acids was affected. The relative hydrolysis of fatty acids moderately, weakly, and highly mobilized by adipose tissue in vivo was similar and close to unity in vitro. We conclude that i) the release of fatty acids by HSL is only slightly affected by their degree of unsaturation, ii) the ability of HSL to efficiently and selectively release fatty acids at low temperature could reflect a cold adaptability for poikilotherms or hibernators when endogenous lipids are needed, and iii) the selectivity of fatty acid hydrolysis by HSL does not fully account for the selective pattern of

  15. microRNA160 dictates stage-specific auxin and cytokinin sensitivities and directs soybean nodule development.

    PubMed

    Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Schreier, Spencer John; Damodaran, Suresh; Adhikari, Sajag; Subramanian, Senthil

    2015-10-01

    Legume nodules result from coordinated interactions between the plant and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. The phytohormone cytokinin promotes nodule formation, and recent findings suggest that the phytohormone auxin inhibits nodule formation. Here we show that microRNA160 (miR160) is a key signaling element that determines the auxin/cytokinin balance during nodule development in soybean (Glycine max). miR160 appears to promote auxin activity by suppressing the levels of the ARF10/16/17 family of repressor ARF transcription factors. Using quantitative PCR assays and a fluorescence miRNA sensor, we show that miR160 levels are relatively low early during nodule formation and high in mature nodules. We had previously shown that ectopic expression of miR160 in soybean roots led to a severe reduction in nodule formation, coupled with enhanced sensitivity to auxin and reduced sensitivity to cytokinin. Here we show that exogenous cytokinin restores nodule formation in miR160 over-expressing roots. Therefore, low miR160 levels early during nodule development favor cytokinin activity required for nodule formation. Suppression of miR160 levels using a short tandem target mimic (STTM160) resulted in reduced sensitivity to auxin and enhanced sensitivity to cytokinin. In contrast to miR160 over-expressing roots, STTM160 roots had increased nodule formation, but nodule maturation was significantly delayed. Exogenous auxin partially restored proper nodule formation and maturation in STTM160 roots, suggesting that high miR160 activity later during nodule development favors auxin activity and promotes nodule maturation. Therefore, miR160 dictates developmental stage-specific sensitivities to auxin and cytokinin to direct proper nodule formation and maturation in soybean. PMID:26287653

  16. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Sex Differences in Symptoms Reported on the 13‐Item Acute Coronary Syndrome Checklist

    PubMed Central

    DeVon, Holli A.; Rosenfeld, Anne; Steffen, Alana D.; Daya, Mohamud

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical symptoms are part of the risk stratification approaches used in the emergency department (ED) to evaluate patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of 13 symptoms for a discharge diagnosis of ACS in women and men. Methods and Results The sample included 736 patients admitted to 4 EDs with symptoms suggestive of ACS. Symptoms were assessed with the 13‐item validated ACS Symptom Checklist. Mixed‐effects logistic regression models were used to estimate sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of each symptom for a diagnosis of ACS, adjusting for age, obesity, diabetes, and functional status. Patients were predominantly male (63%) and Caucasian (70.5%), with a mean age of 59.7±14.2 years. Chest pressure, chest discomfort, and chest pain demonstrated the highest sensitivity for ACS in both women (66%, 66%, and 67%) and men (63%, 69%, and 72%). Six symptoms were specific for a non‐ACS diagnosis in both women and men. The predictive value of shoulder (odds ratio [OR]=2.53; 95% CI=1.29 to 4.96) and arm pain (OR 2.15; 95% CI=1.10 to 4.20) in women was nearly twice that of men (OR=1.11; 95% CI=0.67 to 1.85 and OR=1.21; 95% CI=0.74 to 1.99). Shortness of breath (OR=0.49; 95% CI=0.30 to 0.79) predicted a non‐ACS diagnosis in men. Conclusions There were more similarities than differences in symptom predictors of ACS for women and men. PMID:24695650

  17. A Novel Line Immunoassay Based on Recombinant Virulence Factors Enables Highly Specific and Sensitive Serologic Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Formichella, Luca; Romberg, Laura; Bolz, Christian; Vieth, Michael; Geppert, Michael; Göttner, Gereon; Nölting, Christina; Walter, Dirk; Schepp, Wolfgang; Schneider, Arne; Ulm, Kurt; Wolf, Petra; Busch, Dirk H.; Soutschek, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes half of the world's population, and infection can lead to ulcers, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Serology is the only test applicable for large-scale, population-based screening, but current tests are hampered by a lack of sensitivity and/or specificity. Also, no serologic test allows the differentiation of type I and type II strains, which is important for predicting the clinical outcome. H. pylori virulence factors have been associated with disease, but direct assessment of virulence factors requires invasive methods to obtain gastric biopsy specimens. Our work aimed at the development of a highly sensitive and specific, noninvasive serologic test to detect immune responses to important H. pylori virulence factors. This line immunoassay system (recomLine) is based on recombinant proteins. For this assay, six highly immunogenic virulence factors (CagA, VacA, GroEL, gGT, HcpC, and UreA) were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and immobilized to nitrocellulose membranes to detect serological immune responses in patient's sera. For the validation of the line assay, a cohort of 500 patients was screened, of which 290 (58.0%) were H. pylori negative and 210 (42.0%) were positive by histology. The assay showed sensitivity and specificity of 97.6% and 96.2%, respectively, compared to histology. In direct comparison to lysate blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the recomLine assay had increased discriminatory power. For the assessment of individual risk for gastrointestinal disease, the test must be validated in a larger and defined patient cohort. Taking the data together, the recomLine assay provides a valuable tool for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. PMID:24006137

  18. Mining for sensitive and reliable species-specific primers for PCR for detection of Cronobacter sakazakii by a bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    Qiming, Chen; Tingting, Tao; Xiaomei, Bie; Yingjian, Lu; Fengxia, Lu; Ligong, Zhai; Zhaoxin, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Although several studies have reported PCR assays for distinguishing Cronobacter sakazakii from other species in the genus, reports regarding assay sensitivity and specificity, as well as applications for food testing, are lacking. Hence, the objective of this study was to develop a sensitive and reliable PCR-based method for detection of C. sakazakii by screening for specific target genes. The genome sequence of C. sakazakii in the GenBank database was compared with that of other organisms using BLAST. Thirty-eight DNA fragments unique to C. sakazakii were identified, and primers targeting these sequences were designed. Finally, 3 primer sets (CS14, CS21, and CS38) were found to be specific for C. sakazakii by PCR verification. The detection limit of PCR assays using the 3 pairs of primers was 1.35 pg/μL, 135 fg/μL, and 135 fg/μL, respectively, for genomic DNA, and 5.5×10(5), 5.5×10(3), 5.5×10(3) cfu/mL, respectively, using pure cultures of the bacteria, compared with 13.5 pg/μLand 5.5×10(5) cfu/mLfor primer set SpeCronsaka, which has been previously described. Cronobacter sakazakii were detected in artificially contaminated powdered infant formula (PIF) by PCR using primer sets CS21 and CS38 after 8h of enrichment. The detection limit was 5.5×10(-1) cfu/10g of PIF. Thus, the PCR assay can be used for rapid and sensitive detection of C. sakazakii in PIF. PMID:26074237

  19. Sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver variability of survey thoracic radiography for the detection of heart base masses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Guglielmini, Carlo; Baron Toaldo, Marco; Quinci, Manuela; Romito, Giovanni; Luciani, Alessia; Cipone, Mario; Drigo, Michele; Diana, Alessia

    2016-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver variability of survey thoracic radiography (STR) for the detection of heart base masses (HBMs) in dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case-control study. ANIMALS 30 dogs with an HBM and 120 breed-matched control dogs (60 healthy dogs and 60 dogs with heart disease and no HBM). PROCEDURES In a blinded manner, 2 observers (designated as A and B) evaluated STR views from each dog for a mass-like opacity cranial to the heart, tracheal deviation, cardiomegaly, findings suggestive of pericardial effusion or right-sided congestive heart failure, and soft tissue opacities suggestive of pulmonary metastases. Investigators subsequently provided a final interpretation of each dog's HBM status (definitely affected, equivocal, or definitely not affected). RESULTS Considering equivocal interpretation as negative or positive for an HBM, the sensitivity of STR for diagnosis of an HBM was 40.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.5% to 57.5%) and 56.7% (95% CI, 38.9% to 74.4%), respectively, for observer A and 63% (95% CI, 46.1% to 80.6%) and 80.0% (95% CI, 65.7% to 94.3%), respectively, for observer B. The corresponding specificity was 96.7% (95% CI, 93.5% to 99.9%) and 92.5% (95% CI, 87.8% to 97.2%), respectively, for observer A and 99.2% (95% CI, 97.5% to 100%) and 92.5% (95% CI, 87.8% to 97.2%), respectively, for observer B. The presence of a mass-like opacity cranial to the heart or tracheal deviation, or both, was significantly associated with a true diagnosis of HBM. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that STR is a highly specific but not a highly sensitive predictor of HBM in dogs. PMID:27270062

  20. Whole exome sequencing is an efficient, sensitive and specific method of mutation detection in osteogenesis imperfecta and Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Marshall, Mhairi S; Gardiner, Brooke; Coucke, Paul J; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart L; Summers, Kim M; Symoens, Sofie; West, Jennifer A; West, Malcolm J; Paul Wordsworth, B; Zankl, Andreas; Leo, Paul J; Brown, Matthew A; Duncan, Emma L

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Marfan syndrome (MFS) are common Mendelian disorders. Both conditions are usually diagnosed clinically, as genetic testing is expensive due to the size and number of potentially causative genes and mutations. However, genetic testing may benefit patients, at-risk family members and individuals with borderline phenotypes, as well as improving genetic counseling and allowing critical differential diagnoses. We assessed whether whole exome sequencing (WES) is a sensitive method for mutation detection in OI and MFS. WES was performed on genomic DNA from 13 participants with OI and 10 participants with MFS who had known mutations, with exome capture followed by massive parallel sequencing of multiplexed samples. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small indels were called using Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and annotated with ANNOVAR. CREST, exomeCopy and exomeDepth were used for large deletion detection. Results were compared with the previous data. Specificity was calculated by screening WES data from a control population of 487 individuals for mutations in COL1A1, COL1A2 and FBN1. The target capture of five exome capture platforms was compared. All 13 mutations in the OI cohort and 9/10 in the MFS cohort were detected (sensitivity=95.6%) including non-synonymous SNPs, small indels (<10 bp), and a large UTR5/exon 1 deletion. One mutation was not detected by GATK due to strand bias. Specificity was 99.5%. Capture platforms and analysis programs differed considerably in their ability to detect mutations. Consumable costs for WES were low. WES is an efficient, sensitive, specific and cost-effective method for mutation detection in patients with OI and MFS. Careful selection of platform and analysis programs is necessary to maximize success. PMID:24501682

  1. Specific inactivation of sensitized lymphocytes in vitro using antigens labelled with astatine-211

    PubMed Central

    Smit, J. A.; Myburgh, J. A.; Neirinckx, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    This is a study of the use of astatine-211 as an alternative to iodine isotopes in radioactive antigen suicide experiments. The theoretical advantages of 211At are that it is a high energy (5·87 MeV), short half-life (7·2 hr)α-emitter with a short path length of 60 μm. Its destructive effect, measured in terms of degree of ionization per micron is 300 times that of 125I and 131I. Streptokinase (SK), tuberculin (PPD) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) were labelled electrolytically with 211At (3–9% incorporation). These antigens were not destroyed by the labelling technique or by self-irradiation during radioactive decay. Autoradiography showed that only a small fraction of lymphocytes bound 211At-labelled SK and PPD whilst most lymphocytes bound 211At-labelled PHA. Lymphocytes exposed for 40 min to 0·35–1·40 μCi of labelled antigens lost 35–83% of their ability to transform upon subsequent exposure to the unlabelled antigens. The inhibition was specific in that responsiveness to unrelated antigens was retained. These results extend our previous findings with the use of 211At in in vivo antigen suicide experiments. ImagesFig. 1(a)Fig. 1(b) PMID:4716099

  2. A specific and sensitive method for the detection of Colletotrichum musae in banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Peeran Mohammed; Prema, Ranjitham; Nagendran, Krishnan; Gandhi, Kathikeyan; Raguchander, Thiruvengadam; Prabakar, Kuppusamy

    2013-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Banana anthracnose incited by Colletotrichum musae (Berk & Curt.) Arx. is a serious disease both in field and in postharvest marketing stage. Molecular methods are most suitable for the early detection of infection. AIM: The latent infection of C. musae makes it very difficult to detect the infected fruit lot, hence aim is to detect the latent infection using molecular approach. METHODS: The molecular variability generated from fourteen isolates of C. musae by RAPD-PCR technique was utilized to determine the phylogentic relationship and develop SCAR markers. RESULTS: The genetic similarity coefficient within each group and variation between the groups were observed. Decamer OPA-01 generated a RAPD polymorphic profile that distinguished C. musae from the other organism. Cloning and sequencing of the specific band yielded 588bp sequences, to which forward CM-SCAR-FP and reverse CM-SCAR-RP were designed. The SCAR primer pair amplified a single SCAR of 490bp from each of the 14 isolates of C. musae, and was able to detect the pathogen in as low as 30ng of DNA from infected fruit peel tissue. CONCLUSION: The developed SCAR markers can aid the detection process every quickly and accurately which will help exporters. PMID:23402827

  3. Cathepsin B-sensitive polymers for compartment-specific degradation and nucleic acid release

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David S.H.; Johnson, Russell N.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2011-01-01

    Degradable cationic polymers are desirable for in vivo nucleic acid delivery because they offer significantly decreased toxicity over non-degradable counterparts. Peptide linkers provide chemical stability and high specificity for particular endopeptidases but have not been extensively studied for nucleic acid delivery applications. In this work, enzymatically degradable peptide-HPMA copolymers were synthesized by RAFT polymerization of HPMA with methacrylated peptide macromonomers, resulting in polymers with low polydispersity and near quantitative incorporation of peptides. Three peptide-HPMA copolymers were evaluated: (i) pHCathK10, containing peptides composed of the linker phe-lys-phe-leu (FKFL), a substrate of the endosomal/lysosomal endopeptidase cathepsin B, connected to oligo-(l)-lysine for nucleic acid binding, (ii) pHCath(d)K10, containing the FKFL linker with oligo-(d)-lysine, and (iii) pH(d)Cath(d)K10, containing all (d) amino acids. Cathepsin B degraded copolymers pHCathK10 and pHCath(d)K10 within one hour while no degradation of pH(d)Cath(d)K10 was observed. Polyplexes formed with pHCathK10 copolymers show DNA release by 4 hrs of treatment with cathepsin B; comparatively, polyplexes formed with pHCath(d)K10 and pH(d)Cath(d)K10 show no DNA release within 8 hrs. Transfection efficiency in HeLa and NIH/3T3 cells were comparable between the copolymers but pHCathK10 was less toxic. This work demonstrates the successful application of peptide linkers for degradable cationic polymers and DNA release. PMID:22036879

  4. Anion-specific effects on the behavior of pH-sensitive polybasic brushes.

    PubMed

    Willott, Joshua D; Murdoch, Timothy J; Humphreys, Ben A; Edmondson, Steve; Wanless, Erica J; Webber, Grant B

    2015-03-31

    The anion-specific solvation and conformational behavior of weakly basic poly(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (poly(DMA)), poly(2-diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (poly(DEA)), and poly(2-diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate (poly(DPA)) brushes, with correspondingly increasing inherent hydrophobicity, have been investigated using in situ ellipsometric and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements. In the osmotic brush regime, as the initial low concentration of salt is increased, the brushes osmotically swell by the uptake of solvent as they become charged and the attractive hydrophobic inter- and intrachain interactions are overcome. With increased ionic strength, the brushes move into the salted brush regime where they desolvate and collapse as their electrostatic charge is screened. Here, as the brushes collapse, they transition to more uniform and rigid conformations, which dissipate less energy, than similarly solvated brushes at lower ionic strength. Significantly, in these distinct regimes brush behavior is not only ionic strength dependent but is also influenced by the nature of the added salt based on its position in the well-known Hofmeister or lyotropic series, with potassium acetate, nitrate, and thiocyanate investigated. The strongly kosmotropic acetate anions display low affinity for the hydrophobic polymers, and largely unscreened electrosteric repulsions allow the brushes to remain highly solvated at higher acetate concentrations. The mildly chaotropic nitrate and strongly chaotropic thiocyanate anions exhibit a polymer hydrophobicity-dependent affinity for the brushes. Increasing thiocyanate concentration causes the brushes to collapse at lower ionic strength than for the other two anions. This study of weak polybasic brushes demonstrates the importance of all ion, solvent, and polymer interactions. PMID:25768282

  5. Reinforcement Sensitivity and Risk for Psychopathology Following Exposure to Violence: A Vulnerability-Specificity Model in Latino Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gudiño, Omar G.; Nadeem, Erum; Kataoka, Sheryl H.; Lau, Anna S.

    2013-01-01

    Urban Latino youth are exposed to high rates of violence, which increases risk for diverse forms of psychopathology. To current study aims to increase specificity in predicting responses by testing the hypothesis that youths’ reinforcement sensitivity–behavioral inhibition (BIS) and behavioral approach (BAS)–is associated with specific clinical outcomes and increases risk for the development of such problems following exposure to violence. Utilizing a short-term longitudinal design, Latino youth (N=168) provided reports of BIS/BAS and emotional/behavioral problems at Time 1, exposure to violence between Time 1 and Time 2, and clinical symptoms at Time 2. Results suggested that reinforcement sensitivity moderated the relation between violence exposure and psychopathology, such that increasing levels of BIS were associated with elevated risk for internalizing and posttraumatic stress symptoms following exposure to violence whereas BAS increased risk for externalizing problems. The importance of building on existing knowledge to understand minority youth psychopathology is discussed. PMID:22080366

  6. Development of an ELISA for sensitive and specific detection of IgA autoantibodies against BP180 in pemphigoid diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pemphigoids are rare diseases associated with IgG, IgE and IgA autoantibodies against collagen XVII/BP180. An entity of the pemphigoid group is the lamina lucida-type of linear IgA disease (IgA pemphigoid) characterized by IgA autoantibodies against BP180. While for the detection of IgG and IgE autoantibodies specific to collagen XVII several ELISA systems have been established, no quantitative immunoassay has been yet developed for IgA autoantibodies. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop an ELISA to detect IgA autoantibodies against collagen XVII in the sera of patients with pemphigoids. Methods We expressed a soluble recombinant form of the collagen XVII ectodomain in mammalian cells. Reactivity of IgA autoantibodies from patients with IgA pemphigoid was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis. ELISA test conditions were determined by chessboard titration experiments. The sensitivity, specificity and the cut-off were determined by receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Results The optimized assay was carried out using sera from patients with IgA pemphigoid (n = 30) and healthy donors (n = 105). By receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, an area under the curve of 0.993 was calculated, indicating an excellent discriminatory capacity. Thus, a sensitivity and specificity of 83.3% and 100%, respectively, was determined for a cut-off point of 0.48. As additional control groups, sera from patients with bullous pemphigoid (n = 31) and dermatitis herpetiformis (n = 50), a disease associated with IgA autoantibodies against epidermal transglutaminase, were tested. In 26% of bullous pemphigoid patients, IgA autoantibodies recognized the ectodomain of collagen XVII. One of 50 (2%) of dermatitis herpetiformis patients sera slightly topped the cut-off value. Conclusions We developed the first ELISA for the specific and sensitive detection of serum IgA autoantibodies specific to collagen XVII in patients

  7. Region-Specific Sensitivity of Anemophilous Pollen Deposition to Temperature and Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Donders, Timme H.; Hagemans, Kimberley; Dekker, Stefan C.; de Weger, Letty A.; de Klerk, Pim; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Understanding relations between climate and pollen production is important for several societal and ecological challenges, importantly pollen forecasting for pollinosis treatment, forensic studies, global change biology, and high-resolution palaeoecological studies of past vegetation and climate fluctuations. For these purposes, we investigate the role of climate variables on annual-scale variations in pollen influx, test the regional consistency of observed patterns, and evaluate the potential to reconstruct high-frequency signals from sediment archives. A 43-year pollen-trap record from the Netherlands is used to investigate relations between annual pollen influx, climate variables (monthly and seasonal temperature and precipitation values), and the North Atlantic Oscillation climate index. Spearman rank correlation analysis shows that specifically in Alnus, Betula, Corylus, Fraxinus, Quercus and Plantago both temperature in the year prior to (T-1), as well as in the growing season (T), are highly significant factors (TApril rs between 0.30 [P<0.05[ and 0.58 [P<0.0001]; TJuli-1 rs between 0.32 [P<0.05[ and 0.56 [P<0.0001]) in the annual pollen influx of wind-pollinated plants. Total annual pollen prediction models based on multiple climate variables yield R2 between 0.38 and 0.62 (P<0.0001). The effect of precipitation is minimal. A second trapping station in the SE Netherlands, shows consistent trends and annual variability, suggesting the climate factors are regionally relevant. Summer temperature is thought to influence the formation of reproductive structures, while temperature during the flowering season influences pollen release. This study provides a first predictive model for seasonal pollen forecasting, and also aides forensic studies. Furthermore, variations in pollen accumulation rates from a sub-fossil peat deposit are comparable with the pollen trap data. This suggests that high frequency variability pollen records from natural archives reflect

  8. Region-specific sensitivity of anemophilous pollen deposition to temperature and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Donders, Timme H; Hagemans, Kimberley; Dekker, Stefan C; de Weger, Letty A; de Klerk, Pim; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Understanding relations between climate and pollen production is important for several societal and ecological challenges, importantly pollen forecasting for pollinosis treatment, forensic studies, global change biology, and high-resolution palaeoecological studies of past vegetation and climate fluctuations. For these purposes, we investigate the role of climate variables on annual-scale variations in pollen influx, test the regional consistency of observed patterns, and evaluate the potential to reconstruct high-frequency signals from sediment archives. A 43-year pollen-trap record from the Netherlands is used to investigate relations between annual pollen influx, climate variables (monthly and seasonal temperature and precipitation values), and the North Atlantic Oscillation climate index. Spearman rank correlation analysis shows that specifically in Alnus, Betula, Corylus, Fraxinus, Quercus and Plantago both temperature in the year prior to (T-1), as well as in the growing season (T), are highly significant factors (TApril rs between 0.30 [P<0.05[ and 0.58 [P<0.0001]; TJuli-1 rs between 0.32 [P<0.05[ and 0.56 [P<0.0001]) in the annual pollen influx of wind-pollinated plants. Total annual pollen prediction models based on multiple climate variables yield R2 between 0.38 and 0.62 (P<0.0001). The effect of precipitation is minimal. A second trapping station in the SE Netherlands, shows consistent trends and annual variability, suggesting the climate factors are regionally relevant. Summer temperature is thought to influence the formation of reproductive structures, while temperature during the flowering season influences pollen release. This study provides a first predictive model for seasonal pollen forecasting, and also aides forensic studies. Furthermore, variations in pollen accumulation rates from a sub-fossil peat deposit are comparable with the pollen trap data. This suggests that high frequency variability pollen records from natural archives reflect

  9. A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of berberine, palmatine, coptisine, epiberberine and jatrorrhizine from Coptidis Rhizoma in rat plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sen; Pang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Yuanxiong; Liu, Li; Liang, Yan; Liu, Xiaodong; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guangji; Wang, Xinting

    2007-11-01

    A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) method has been developed and validated for the identification and quantification of five protoberberine alkaloids, which are berberine, palmatine, coptisine, epiberberine and jatrorrhizine, in rat plasma using tetrahydroberberine as an internal standard. Following solid-phase extraction, the analytes were separated by linear gradient elution on a Shim-pack ODS (4.6 [mu]m, 150 mm × 2.0 mm i.d.) column and analyzed in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode with a positive electrospray ionization (ESI) interface using the respective [M]+ and [M + H]+ ions, [M]+ = 336 for berberine; 320 for coptisine; 336 for epiberberine; 338 for jatrorrhizine; 352 for palmatine and [M + H]+ = 340 for the internal standard. The method was validated over the concentration range of 0.31-20 ng mL-1 for all the five protoberberine alkaloids. Within-batch and between-batch precisions (R.S.D.%) were all within 15% and accuracy (%Er) ranged from -5 to 5%. The lower limits of quantification were 0.31 ng mL-1 for all analytes. The extraction recoveries were on average 80.8% for berberine, 67E0% for coptisine, 66.2% for epiberberine, 71.8% for jatrorrhizine and 73E2% for palmatine. The validated method was used to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the five protoberberine alkaloids in rat plasma after oral administration of Coptidis Rhizoma extract.

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms underlie maturational stage-specific glucocorticoid sensitivities of dendritic cells in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yun; Bender, Ingrid K; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Shin, Soon Cheon; Jewell, Christine M; Cidlowski, John A; Schleimer, Robert P; Lu, Nick Z

    2013-02-28

    Although glucocorticoids are a profoundly important class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, their actions in dendritic cells (DCs) are not well understood. We found that dexamethasone, a potent glucocorticoid, selectively induced apoptosis in mature, but not in immature, DCs in healthy mice, in mice with experimental airway inflammation, and in vitro in bone marrow–derived DCs. Distinct glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms expressed in immature and mature DCs probably contribute to the DC maturational stage-specific glucocorticoid sensitivity. The GR-D isoforms were the predominant isoforms in immature DCs, whereas the proapoptotic GR-A isoform was the main isoform in mature DCs. Ectopic expression of the GR-A isoform in immature DCs increased glucocorticoid sensitivity and RU486, a selective GR antagonist, inhibited the glucocorticoid sensitivity of mature DCs. Furthermore, the distinct expression pattern of GR isoforms in immature and mature murine DCs was also observed in human monocyte–derived DCs. These studies suggest that glucocorticoids may spare immature DCs and suppress mature DCs and inflammation via differential expression of GR translational isoforms. PMID:23297131

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms underlie maturational stage-specific glucocorticoid sensitivities of dendritic cells in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yun; Bender, Ingrid K.; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K.; Shin, Soon Cheon; Jewell, Christine M.; Cidlowski, John A.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Although glucocorticoids are a profoundly important class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, their actions in dendritic cells (DCs) are not well understood. We found that dexamethasone, a potent glucocorticoid, selectively induced apoptosis in mature, but not in immature, DCs in healthy mice, in mice with experimental airway inflammation, and in vitro in bone marrow–derived DCs. Distinct glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms expressed in immature and mature DCs probably contribute to the DC maturational stage-specific glucocorticoid sensitivity. The GR-D isoforms were the predominant isoforms in immature DCs, whereas the proapoptotic GR-A isoform was the main isoform in mature DCs. Ectopic expression of the GR-A isoform in immature DCs increased glucocorticoid sensitivity and RU486, a selective GR antagonist, inhibited the glucocorticoid sensitivity of mature DCs. Furthermore, the distinct expression pattern of GR isoforms in immature and mature murine DCs was also observed in human monocyte–derived DCs. These studies suggest that glucocorticoids may spare immature DCs and suppress mature DCs and inflammation via differential expression of GR translational isoforms. PMID:23297131

  12. Sensitive and specific multiresidue methods for the determination of pesticides of various classes in clinical and forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Lacassie, E; Marquet, P; Gaulier, J M; Dreyfuss, M F; Lachâtre, G

    2001-09-15

    Original and sensitive multiresidue methods are presented for the detection and quantitation, in human biological matrices, of 61 pesticides of toxicological significance in human. These methods involved rapid solid-phase extraction using new polymeric support (HLB and MCX) OASIS cartridges. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for volatile (organophosphate, organochlorine, phtalimide, uracil) pesticides and liquid chromatography-ionspray-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for thermolabile and polar pesticides (carbamates, benzimidazoles). Acquisition was performed in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Extraction recovery varied owing to the nature of pesticides, but was satisfactory for all. Limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantitation (LOQs) ranged, respectively, from 2.5 to 20 and from 5 to 50ng/ml. An excellent linearity was observed from LOQs up to 1000ng/ml for all the pesticides studied. The proposed procedures yielded reproducible results with good inter-assay accuracy and precision. A few cases of intoxication are presented to demonstrate the diagnostic interest of these methods: in two cases were determined lethal concentrations of endosulfan and carbofuran; in four other cases, the procedures helped diagnose intoxication with, respectively, parathion-ethyl, the association of bromacil and strychnine, bifenthrin and aldicarb. PMID:11516896

  13. Sensitive and specific detection of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli using recombinant anti-intimin antibody by immunofluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Andressa; Luz, Daniela E; Andrade, Fernanda B; Moraes, Claudia T P; Maranhão, Andrea Q; Piazza, Roxane M F

    2013-12-01

    The main and common virulence factor expressed by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) is intimin, a 94-kDa outer membrane protein, which is a product of the eae gene, and, thus, an excellent target for the detection of these pathogens. Among the methods for detection of virulence factor expression, immunoassays can be considered the first alternative to either animal use or in vitro culture cells assays, for which polyclonal and/or monoclonal antibodies are raised. In the present work, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of an intimin recombinant antibody (scFv-intimin) using immunofluorescence assay. The scFv-intimin detected typical EPEC, atypical EPEC, and EHEC isolates (100% sensitivity) with no detection of eae- isolates (100% specificity). Thus, immunofluorescence is an effective and rapid method, and scFv-intimin, an excellent tool for the diagnosis of diarrhea caused by EPEC and EHEC and also can be employed in case-control epidemiological surveys. PMID:24095642

  14. Comparison of six commercial ELISA kits for their specificity and sensitivity in detecting different major peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Jayasena, Shyamali; Smits, Mieke; Fiechter, Daniëlle; de Jong, Aard; Nordlee, Julie; Baumert, Joe; Taylor, Steve L; Pieters, Raymond H; Koppelman, Stef J

    2015-02-18

    Six commercial peanut enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits were assessed for their ability to recover peanut from the standard reference material 2387 peanut butter and also for their specificity in detecting four major peanut allergens, Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, and Ara h 6. The percentage recovery of peanut from peanut butter differed across different kits as well as at different sample concentrations. The highest recovery was observed with the Romer and R-Biopharm kits, while four other kits were found to underestimate the protein content of the reference peanut butter samples. Five of the kits were most sensitive in detecting Ara h 3 followed by Ara h 1, while hardly recognizing Ara h 2 and Ara h 6. The other kit showed the highest sensitivity to Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, while Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 were poorly recognized. Although Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are known to be heat stable and more potent allergens, antisera specific to any of these four peanut proteins/allergens may serve as good markers for the detection of peanut residues. PMID:25651402

  15. An evaluation, comparison, and accurate benchmarking of several publicly available MS/MS search algorithms: Sensitivity and Specificity analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Kapp, Eugene; Schutz, Frederick; Connolly, Lisa M.; Chakel, John A.; Meza, Jose E.; Miller, Christine A.; Fenyo, David; Eng, Jimmy K.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Omenn, Gilbert; Simpson, Richard

    2005-08-01

    MS/MS and associated database search algorithms are essential proteomic tools for identifying peptides. Due to their widespread use, it is now time to perform a systematic analysis of the various algorithms currently in use. Using blood specimens used in the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project, we have evaluated five search algorithms with respect to their sensitivity and specificity, and have also accurately benchmarked them based on specified false-positive (FP) rates. Spectrum Mill and SEQUEST performed well in terms of sensitivity, but were inferior to MASCOT, X-Tandem, and Sonar in terms of specificity. Overall, MASCOT, a probabilistic search algorithm, correctly identified most peptides based on a specified FP rate. The rescoring algorithm, Peptide Prophet, enhanced the overall performance of the SEQUEST algorithm, as well as provided predictable FP error rates. Ideally, score thresholds should be calculated for each peptide spectrum or minimally, derived from a reversed-sequence search as demonstrated in this study based on a validated data set. The availability of open-source search algorithms, such as X-Tandem, makes it feasible to further improve the validation process (manual or automatic) on the basis of ''consensus scoring'', i.e., the use of multiple (at least two) search algorithms to reduce the number of FPs. complement.

  16. Assessment of sensitivity and specificity of immunohistochemical staining of p53 in lung and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Melhem, M. F.; Law, J. C.; el-Ashmawy, L.; Johnson, J. T.; Landreneau, R. J.; Srivastava, S.; Whiteside, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-two primary carcinomas of the lung and 17 carcinomas of the head and neck (HN) were systematically analyzed for p53 mutations in the highly conserved regions of the gene (exons 5-8). Frozen sections of the same tumors were stained immunohistochemically to assess the sensitivity and specificity of p53 expression as determined by the presence or absence of the protein. On the basis of histology, the lung tumors studied were divided into adenocarcinomas (AC; n = 15), squamous-cell carcinomas (SCC; n = 12), and large-cell carcinomas (LCC; n = 5). All the HN cancers were SCC. Mutations in the p53 gene were detected by direct sequencing of amplified polymerase chain reaction products in six AC of the lungs (40%), three SCC of the lungs (25%), and one LCC (20%), with an overall mutation frequency of 31%. Nine AC (60%) of the lungs, five SCC (42%), and four LCC (80%) were p53-positive by immunohistochemistry. Among HN cancers, p53 mutations were detected in seven tumors (41%). Nine HN tumors (53%) were positive for p53. Negative staining, despite the presence of p53 mutations, was confined to nonsense mutations with truncated p53 and to single-base mutations not causing any change in the amino acid. Although immunohistochemical staining for mutated p53 is sensitive and simple to perform as a screening method, it is not as specific for evaluation of p53 mutations in lung and HN cancers. Images Figure 1 PMID:7747811

  17. Sensitivity and Specificity Improvement in Abdominal Obesity Diagnosis Using Cluster Analysis during Waist Circumference Cut-Off Point Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Añez, Roberto; Toledo, Alexandra; Bello, Luis; Apruzzese, Vanessa; González, Robys; Chacín, Maricarmen; Cabrera, Mayela; Cano, Clímaco; Velasco, Manuel; López-Miranda, José

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of metabolic phenotypes during the construction of ROC curves for waist circumference (WC) cutpoint selection. Materials and Methods. A total of 1,902 subjects of both genders were selected from the Maracaibo City Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence Study database. Two-Step Cluster Analysis (TSCA) was applied to select metabolically healthy and sick men and women. ROC curves were constructed to determine WC cutoff points by gender. Results. Through TSCA, metabolic phenotype predictive variables were selected: HOMA2-IR and HOMA2-βcell for women and HOMA2-IR, HOMA2-βcell, and TAG for men. Subjects were classified as healthy normal weight, metabolically obese normal weight, healthy and metabolically disturbed overweight, and healthy and metabolically disturbed obese. Final WC cutpoints were 91.50 cm for women (93.4% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity) and 98.15 cm for men (96% sensitivity, 99.5% specificity). Conclusions. TSCA in the selection of the groups used in ROC curves construction proved to be an important tool, aiding in the detection of MOWN and MHO which cannot be identified with WC alone. The resulting WC cutpoints were <91.00 cm for women and <98.00 cm for men. Furthermore, anthropometry is insufficient to determine healthiness, and, biochemical analysis is needed to properly filter subjects during classification. PMID:25945356

  18. Specificity and sensitivity of SPECT myocardial perfusion studies at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Limassol General Hospital in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumna, S.; Yiannakkaras, Ch; Avraamides, P.; Demetriadou, O.

    2011-09-01

    The aim is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) performed at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Limassol General Hospital in Cyprus. Through a retrospective analysis, patient results obtained by MPI were compared to results obtained by Invasive Angiography. We analyzed data from 96 patients that underwent both MPI and Angiography during the years 2009-2010, with a maximum time interval of ± 9 months between the two types of medical exams. For 51 patients, the indication was the detection of CAD. For 45 patients, the indication was to assess viability and/or ischemia after MI, PCI or CABG. Out of 84 patients with CAD confirmed by angiography, 80 patients resulted in abnormal MPI (sensitivity of 95% and positive predictive value of 98%). Out of 12 patients with normal coronaries, 10 patients resulted in normal MPI (specificity of 83% and negative predictive value of 71%).In conclusion, for the patients with abnormal MPI and confirmed CAD, MPI was a useful aid for further therapy management.

  19. Diagnostic value of paraclinical tests in multiple sclerosis: relative sensitivities and specificities for reclassification according to the Poser committee criteria.

    PubMed Central

    Beer, S; Rösler, K M; Hess, C W

    1995-01-01

    The yield of paraclinical tests was evaluated in a prospective study of 189 consecutive patients referred for suspected multiple sclerosis (142 patients with multiple sclerosis, 47 non-multiple sclerosis patients on discharge). Patients were first classified according to the Poser criteria by the clinical findings. Subsequently, the results of paraclinical tests (cranial MRI, visually evoked potentials (VEPs), somatosensory evoked potentials by tibial nerve stimulation (SSEPs), motor evoked potentials (MEPs), and analysis of CSF for oligoclonal banding and IgG-index (CSF)) were taken into account. The percentage of reclassified patients (reclassification sensitivity, RS) was always lower than the percentage of abnormal results (diagnostic sensitivity, DS), and the divergence of RS v DS differed between the tests (60% v 84% in MRI, 31% v 77% in CSF, 29% v 37% in VEPs, 20% v 68% in MEPs, and 12% v 46% in SSEPs respectively). False reclassifications of non-multiple sclerosis patients to multiple sclerosis would have occurred with all tests (MRI: six of 47 patients, (reclassification specificity 88%); CSF: one (98%); VEPs: two (96%); MEPs: two (96%); SSEPs: four (91%); P < 0.05). Although MRI had superior diagnostic capacity, 57 of the 142 patients with multiple sclerosis were not reclassified by the MRI result, 12 of whom were reclassified by CSF and 18 by one of the evoked potential (EP) studies. Of the 98 patients not reclassified by CSF, 53 were reclassified by MRI and 39 by EPs. The results suggest that for the evaluation of paraclinical tests in suspected multiple sclerosis, comparison of diagnostic sensitivities is inappropriate. In general, a cranial MRI contributes most to the diagnosis; however, due to its comparatively low specificity and its considerable number of negative results, EP or CSF studies are often useful to establish the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:7629529

  20. Preparation and characterization of a novel pH-sensitive coated microsphere for duodenum-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Zhu, Xi; Wang, Yang; Jin, Yun; Xu, Xuefan; Fan, Tingting; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a duodenum-specific drug delivery system on the basis of a pH-sensitive coating and a mucoadhesive inner core for eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the ulcer duodenum. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate maleate (HPMCAM) was used as the pH-sensitive material, which dissolves around pH 3.0. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with furazolidone (FZD-ad-MS) were prepared by the emulsification-solvent evaporation method using Carbopol 971NP as the mucoadhesive polymer. The prepared pH-sensitive coated mucoadhesive microspheres (AM-coated-MS) were characterized in regards to particle size, drug loading efficiency, morphological change, drug stability, drug release and in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The particle size was 160.97 ± 47.24 μm and 336.44 ± 129.34 μm, and the drug content was 42.33 ± 3.43% and 10.96 ± 1.29% for FZD-ad-MS and AM-coated-MS, respectively. The morphological changes in different pH media were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). HPMCAM coating improved the stability of the FZD-ad-MS and these particles were expected to remain intact until their arrival in the duodenum. The drug release was extremely suppressed at pH 1.2 for AM-coated-MS, but increased at pH 4.0 after regeneration of FZD-ad-MS. In addition, FZD-ad-MS exhibited excellent anti-H. pylori activity in vitro. Thus, the HPMCAM-coated microspheres developed in this study hold great promise for use as a duodenum-specific drug delivery system for H. pylori clearance. PMID:22644851

  1. Sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting serum antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in fallow deer.

    PubMed

    Prieto, José M; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Abendaño, Naiara; Fitzgerald, Liam E; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramon A; Alonso-Hearn, Marta

    2014-08-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the diagnostic test most commonly used in efforts to control paratuberculosis in domestic ruminants. However, commercial ELISAs have not been validated for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in wild animals. In this study, we compared the sensitivities and specificities of five ELISAs using individual serum samples collected from 41 fallow deer with or without histopathological lesions consistent with paratuberculosis. Two target antigenic preparations were selected, an ethanol-treated protoplasmic preparation obtained from a fallow deer M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolate (ELISAs A and B) and a paratuberculosis protoplasmic antigen (PPA3) (ELISAs C and D). Fallow deer antibodies bound to the immobilized antigens were detected by using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-fallow deer IgG antibody (ELISAs A and C) or HRP-conjugated protein G (ELISAs B and D). A commercially available assay, ELISA-E, which was designed to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in cattle, sheep, and goats, was also tested. Although ELISAs A, C, and E had the same sensitivity (72%), ELISAs A and C were more specific (100%) for detecting fallow deer with lesions consistent with paratuberculosis at necropsy than was the ELISA-E (87.5%). In addition, the ELISA-A was particularly sensitive for detecting fallow deer in the latent stages of infection (62.5%). The antibody responses detected with the ELISA-A correlated with both the severity of enteric lesions and the presence of acid-fast bacteria in gut tissue samples. In summary, our study shows that the ELISA-A can be a cost-effective diagnostic tool for preventing the spread of paratuberculosis among fallow deer populations. PMID:24872517

  2. Sensitive and Specific Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Serum Antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Fallow Deer

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, José M.; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Abendaño, Naiara; Fitzgerald, Liam E.; Garrido, Joseba M.; Juste, Ramon A.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the diagnostic test most commonly used in efforts to control paratuberculosis in domestic ruminants. However, commercial ELISAs have not been validated for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in wild animals. In this study, we compared the sensitivities and specificities of five ELISAs using individual serum samples collected from 41 fallow deer with or without histopathological lesions consistent with paratuberculosis. Two target antigenic preparations were selected, an ethanol-treated protoplasmic preparation obtained from a fallow deer M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolate (ELISAs A and B) and a paratuberculosis protoplasmic antigen (PPA3) (ELISAs C and D). Fallow deer antibodies bound to the immobilized antigens were detected by using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-fallow deer IgG antibody (ELISAs A and C) or HRP-conjugated protein G (ELISAs B and D). A commercially available assay, ELISA-E, which was designed to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in cattle, sheep, and goats, was also tested. Although ELISAs A, C, and E had the same sensitivity (72%), ELISAs A and C were more specific (100%) for detecting fallow deer with lesions consistent with paratuberculosis at necropsy than was the ELISA-E (87.5%). In addition, the ELISA-A was particularly sensitive for detecting fallow deer in the latent stages of infection (62.5%). The antibody responses detected with the ELISA-A correlated with both the severity of enteric lesions and the presence of acid-fast bacteria in gut tissue samples. In summary, our study shows that the ELISA-A can be a cost-effective diagnostic tool for preventing the spread of paratuberculosis among fallow deer populations. PMID:24872517

  3. Predictive Accuracy of Exercise Stress Testing the Healthy Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Linda S.

    1981-01-01

    Exercise stress testing provides information on the aerobic capacity, heart rate, and blood pressure responses to graded exercises of a healthy adult. The reliability of exercise tests as a diagnostic procedure is discussed in relation to sensitivity and specificity and predictive accuracy. (JN)

  4. Specimen-specific predictions of contact stress under physiological loading in the human hip: validation and sensitivity studies

    PubMed Central

    Henak, Corinne R.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Maas, Steve A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Hip osteoarthritis may be initiated and advanced by abnormal cartilage contact mechanics, and finite element (FE) modeling provides an approach with the potential to allow the study of this process. Previous FE models of the human hip have been limited by single specimen validation and the use of quasi-linear or linear elastic constitutive models of articular cartilage. The effects of the latter assumptions on model predictions are unknown, partially because data for the instantaneous behavior of healthy human hip cartilage are unavailable. The aims of this study were to develop and validate a series of specimen-specific FE models, to characterize the regional instantaneous response of healthy human hip cartilage in compression, and to assess the effects of material nonlinearity, inhomogeneity and specimen-specific material coefficients on FE predictions of cartilage contact stress and contact area. Five cadaveric specimens underwent experimental loading, cartilage material characterization and specimen-specific FE modeling. Cartilage in the FE models was represented by average neo-Hookean, average Veronda Westmann and specimen- and region-specific Veronda Westmann hyperelastic constitutive models. Experimental measurements and FE predictions compared well for all three cartilage representations, which was reflected in average RMS errors in contact stress of less than 25%. The instantaneous material behavior of healthy human hip cartilage varied spatially, with stiffer acetabular cartilage than femoral cartilage and stiffer cartilage in lateral regions than in medial regions. The Veronda Westmann constitutive model with average material coefficients accurately predicted peak contact stress, average contact stress, contact area and contact patterns. The use of subject- and region-specific material coefficients did not increase the accuracy of FE model predictions. The neo-Hookean constitutive model underpredicted peak contact stress in areas of high stress. The

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder Running Head: DSM-5 ASD

    PubMed Central

    McPartland, James C.; Reichow, Brian; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the potential impact of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method This study focused on a sample of 977 participants evaluated during the DSM-IV field trial; 657 carried a clinical diagnosis of an ASD, and 276 were diagnosed with a non-autistic disorder. Sensitivity and specificity for proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria were evaluated using field trial symptom checklists as follows: (a) individual field trial checklist items (e.g., nonverbal communication), (b) checklist items grouped together as described by a single DSM-5 symptom (e.g., nonverbal and verbal communication), (c) individual DSM-5 criterion (e.g., social-communicative impairment), and (d) overall diagnostic criteria. Results When applying proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for ASD, 60.6% (95% confidence interval: 57–64%) of cases with a clinical diagnosis of an ASD met revised DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for ASD. Overall specificity was high, with 94.9% (95% confidence interval: 92–97%) of individuals accurately excluded from the spectrum. Sensitivity varied by diagnostic subgroup (Autistic Disorder =.76; Asperger’s Disorder = .25; PDD-NOS = .28) and cognitive ability (IQ < 70 = .70; IQ ≥ 70 = .46). Conclusions Proposed DSM-5 criteria substantially alter the composition of the autism spectrum. Revised criteria improve specificity, but exclude a substantial portion of cognitively able individuals and those with ASDs other than Autistic Disorder. A more stringent diagnostic rubric holds significant public health ramifications regarding service eligibility and compatibility of historical and future research. PMID:22449643

  6. HLH beta core fragment immunoreactivity in the urine of ovulating women: a sensitive and specific immunometric assay for its detection.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, G; Birken, S; O'Connor, J; Schlatterer, J; Maydelman, Y; Canfield, R

    1995-12-01

    Recently, we isolated an hLH beta core fragment (hLHβcf) from human pituitaries. This molecule is homologous to the hCG beta core fragment (hCGβcf), which may be a marker of normal pregnancy, Down syndrome, and certain cancers. We now report antibodies to the hLHβcf, four of which have been applied in sensitive immunoradiometric assays for urinary measurements. One of the antibodies recognizes an epitope on the hLHβcf, which is not present on the hCGβcf, hLH, or hLHβ. This specific hLHβcf antibody acts cooperatively with other newly-developed antibodies reported here to produce an assay with a sensitivity of 1 fmol/ml of hLHβcf. The specificity of these new IRMA systems will make it possible to measure the hLHβcf in urine in the presence of hLH, hLH beta, or the hCGβcf. Although the hLHβcf used to develop specific antibodies was purified from pituitaries, the assays developed recognize this metabolite in urine. Measurements of heterodimeric hLH as compared to hLHβcf in the urine of cycling women indicated that the concentration of hLHβcf rose as high as 6-7 times the concentration of hLH starting a day after the midcycle surge. The new measuring systems allow the precise quantitation of this hLH metabolite in urine. PMID:21153216

  7. A sensitive and specific histopathologic prognostic marker for H3F3A K27M mutant pediatric glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Venneti, Sriram; Santi, Mariarita; Felicella, Michelle Madden; Yarilin, Dmitry; Phillips, Joanna J; Sullivan, Lisa M; Martinez, Daniel; Perry, Arie; Lewis, Peter W; Thompson, Craig B; Judkins, Alexander R

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (GBM) are highly aggressive and lethal tumors. Recent sequencing studies have shown that ~30 % of pediatric GBM and ~80 % of diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas show K27M mutations in the H3F3A gene, a variant encoding histone H3.3. H3F3A K27M mutations lead to global reduction in H3K27me3. Our goal was to develop biomarkers for the histopathologic detection of these tumors. Therefore, we evaluated the utility of measuring H3K27me3 global reduction as a histopathologic and prognostic biomarker and tested an antibody directed specifically against the H3.3 K27M mutation in 290 samples. The study cohort included 203 pediatric (including 38 pediatric high-grade astrocytomas) and 38 adult brain tumors of various subtypes and grades and 49 non-neoplastic reactive brain tissues. Detection of H3.3 K27M by immunohistochemistry showed 100 % sensitivity and specificity and was superior to global reduction in H3K27me3 as a biomarker in diagnosing H3F3A K27M mutations. Moreover, cases that stained positive for H3.3 K27M showed a significantly poor prognosis compared to corresponding negative tumors. These results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of H3.3 K27M is a sensitive and specific surrogate for the H3F3A K27M mutation and defines a prognostically poor subset of pediatric GBM. PMID:25200322

  8. Notch3-specific inhibition using siRNA knockdown or GSI sensitizes paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Haeyoun; Jeong, Ju-Yeon; Song, Ji-Ye; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Gwangil; Huh, Jin Hyung; Kwon, Ah-Young; Jung, Sang Geun; An, Hee Jung

    2016-07-01

    Notch signaling plays an important role in ovarian cancer chemoresistance, which is responsible for recurrence. Gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI) is a broad-spectrum Notch inhibitor, but it has serious side effects. The efficacy of Notch3-specific inhibition in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancers was assessed in this study, which has not yet been evaluated relative to GSI. To analyze the effect of Notch3-specific inhibition on paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancers, we compared cell viability, apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, cell cycle, and spheroid formation after treatment with either Notch3 siRNA or GSI in paclitaxel-resistant SKpac cells and parental SKOV3 cells. Expression levels of survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis-related proteins were measured and compared between groups. Notch3 was significantly overexpressed in chemoresistant cancer tissues and cell lines relative to chemosensitive group. In paclitaxel-resistant cancer cells, Notch inhibition significantly reduced viability, migration, and angiogenesis and increased apoptosis, thereby boosting sensitivity to paclitaxel. Spheroid formation was also significantly reduced. Both Notch3 siRNA-treated cells and GSI-treated cells arrested in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Proteins of cell survival, cyclin D1 and cyclin D3 were reduced, whereas p21 and p27 were elevated. Both GSI and Notch3 siRNA treatment reduced expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (BCL-W, BCL2, and BCL-XL) and increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bak, Bim, Bid, and Bax). These results indicate that Notch3-specific inhibition sensitizes paclitaxel-resistant cancer cells to paclitaxel treatment, with an efficacy comparable to that of GSI. This approach would be likely to avoid the side effects of broad-spectrum GSI treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26207830

  9. Specific repression of mutant K-RAS by 10-23 DNAzyme: Sensitizing cancer cell to anti-cancer therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.-H.; Wang, T.-H.; Au, L.-C.

    2009-01-09

    Point mutations of the Ras family are frequently found in human cancers at a prevalence rate of 30%. The most common mutation K-Ras(G12V), required for tumor proliferation, survival, and metastasis due to its constitutively active GTPase activity, has provided an ideal target for cancer therapy. 10-23 DNAzyme, an oligodeoxyribonucleotide-based ribonuclease consisting of a 15-nucleotide catalytical domain flanked by two target-specific complementary arms, has been shown to effectively cleave the target mRNA at purine-pyrimidine dinucleotide. Taking advantage of this specific property, 10-23 DNAzyme was designed to cleave mRNA of K-Ras(G12V)(GGU {yields} GUU) at the GU dinucleotide while left the wild-type (WT) K-Ras mRNA intact. The K-Ras(G12V)-specific 10-23 DNAzyme was able to reduce K-Ras(G12V) at both mRNA and protein levels in SW480 cell carrying homozygous K-Ras(G12V). No effect was observed on the WT K-Ras in HEK cells. Although K-Ras(G12V)-specific DNAzymes alone did not inhibit proliferation of SW480 or HEK cells, pre-treatment of this DNAzyme sensitized the K-Ras(G12V) mutant cells to anti-cancer agents such as doxorubicin and radiation. These results offer a potential of using allele-specific 10-23 DNAzyme in combination with other cancer therapies to achieve better effectiveness on cancer treatment.

  10. Rapid and Sensitive Multiplex Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei-Specific Antibodies in Melioidosis Patients Based on a Protein Microarray Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Christian; Dunachie, Susanna J.; Müller, Elke; Kohler, Anne; Jenjaroen, Kemajittra; Teparrukkul, Prapit; Baier, Vico; Ehricht, Ralf; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Background The environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the infectious disease melioidosis with a high case-fatality rate in tropical and subtropical regions. Direct pathogen detection can be difficult, and therefore an indirect serological test which might aid early diagnosis is desirable. However, current tests for antibodies against B. pseudomallei, including the reference indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA), lack sensitivity, specificity and standardization. Consequently, serological tests currently do not play a role in the diagnosis of melioidosis in endemic areas. Recently, a number of promising diagnostic antigens have been identified, but a standardized, easy-to-perform clinical laboratory test for sensitive multiplex detection of antibodies against B. pseudomallei is still lacking. Methods and Principal Findings In this study, we developed and validated a protein microarray which can be used in a standard 96-well format. Our array contains 20 recombinant and purified B. pseudomallei proteins, previously identified as serodiagnostic candidates in melioidosis. In total, we analyzed 196 sera and plasmas from melioidosis patients from northeast Thailand and 210 negative controls from melioidosis-endemic and non-endemic regions. Our protein array clearly discriminated between sera from melioidosis patients and controls with a specificity of 97%. Importantly, the array showed a higher sensitivity than did the IHA in melioidosis patients upon admission (cut-off IHA titer ≥1:160: IHA 57.3%, protein array: 86.7%; p = 0.0001). Testing of sera from single patients at 0, 12 and 52 weeks post-admission revealed that protein antigens induce either a short- or long-term antibody response. Conclusions Our protein array provides a standardized, rapid, easy-to-perform test for the detection of B. pseudomallei-specific antibody patterns. Thus, this system has the potential to improve the serodiagnosis of melioidosis in clinical settings. Moreover, our

  11. Grader agreement, and sensitivity and specificity of digital photography in a community optometry-based diabetic eye screening program

    PubMed Central

    Sellahewa, Luckni; Simpson, Craig; Maharajan, Prema; Duffy, John; Idris, Iskandar

    2014-01-01

    Background Digital retinal photography with mydriasis is the preferred modality for diabetes eye screening. The purpose of this study was to evaluate agreement in grading levels between primary and secondary graders and to calculate their sensitivity and specificity for identifying sight-threatening disease in an optometry-based retinopathy screening program. Methods This was a retrospective study using data from 8,977 patients registered in the North Nottinghamshire retinal screening program. In all cases, the ophthalmology diagnosis was used as the arbitrator and considered to be the gold standard. Kappa statistics were used to evaluate the level of agreement between graders. Results Agreement between primary and secondary graders was 51.4% and 79.7% for detecting no retinopathy (R0) and background retinopathy (R1), respectively. For preproliferative (R2) and proliferative retinopathy (R3) at primary grading, agreement between the primary and secondary grader was 100%. Where there was disagreement between the primary and secondary grader for R1, only 2.6% (n=41) were upgraded by an ophthalmologist. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting R3 was 78.2% and 98.1%, respectively. None of the patients upgraded from any level of retinopathy to R3 required photocoagulation therapy. The observed kappa between the primary and secondary grader was 0.3223 (95% confidence interval 0.2937–0.3509), ie, fair agreement, and between the primary grader and ophthalmology for R3 was 0.5667 (95% confidence interval 0.4557–0.6123), ie, moderate agreement. Conclusion These data provide information on the safety of a community optometry-based retinal screening program for screening as a primary and as a secondary grader. The level of agreement between the primary and secondary grader at a higher level of retinopathy (R2 and R3) was 100%. Sensitivity and specificity for R3 were 78.2% and 98.1%, respectively. None of the false-negative results required photocoagulation therapy

  12. Sensitive and visual detection of sequence-specific DNA-binding protein via a gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li-Juan; Jin, Pei-Yan; Chu, Xia; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2010-07-15

    A novel exonuclease III (Exo III) protection-based colorimetric biosensing strategy was developed for rapid, sensitive, and visual detection of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. This strategy relied on the protection of DNA-cross-linked gold nanoparticle (AuNP) aggregates from Exo III-mediated digestion by specific interactions of target proteins with their binding sequences. Interestingly, we disclosed a new finding that binding of target proteins to their binding sequences in the aggregated AuNP network rendered a stable and long-period protection of DNA. Unlike conventional fluorescence assays merely based on temporal protection of DNA from Exo III digestion, the stable protection afforded a static color transition indicator for DNA-protein interactions with no time-dependent monitoring required in the assay. Therefore, it furnished the developed strategy with improved technical robustness and operational convenience. Furthermore, we introduced thioctic acid as a stable anchor for tethering DNA on AuNPs. This DNA-tethering protocol circumvented the interferences from thiol compounds in common enzymatic systems. The Exo III protection-based colorimetric biosensor was demonstrated using a model target of TATA binding protein, a key transcriptional factor involving in various transcriptional regulatory networks. The results revealed that the method allowed a specific, simple, and quantitative assay of the target protein with a linear response range from 0 to 120 nM and a detection limit of 10 nM. PMID:20565105

  13. Development of a sensitive and specific indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on a baculovirus recombinant antigen for detection of specific antibodies against Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    López, Lissett; Venteo, Angel; Aguirre, Enara; García, Marga; Rodríguez, Majosé; Amusátegui, Inmaculada; Tesouro, Miguel A; Vela, Carmen; Sainz, Angel; Rueda, Paloma

    2007-11-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on baculovirus recombinant P30 protein of Ehrlichia canis and the 1BH4 anticanine IgG monoclonal antibody was developed and evaluated by examining a panel of 98 positive and 157 negative sera using the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test as the reference technique. The P30-based ELISA appeared to be sensitive and specific (77.55% and 95.54%, respectively) when qualitative results (positive/negative) were compared with those of the IFA test; the coefficient of correlation (R) between the 2 tests was 0.833. Furthermore, it was possible to establish a mathematical formula for use in comparing the results of both techniques. These results indicate that recombinant P30 antigen-based ELISA is a suitable alternative of the IFA test for simple, consistent, and rapid serodiagnosis of canine ehrlichiosis. Moreover, the use of this recombinant protein as antigen offers a great advantage for antigen preparation in comparison with other techniques in which the whole E. canis organism is used as antigen. PMID:17998551

  14. Sensitive solid-phase detection of donor-specific antibodies as an aid highly relevant to improving allograft outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schlaf, Gerald; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Altermann, Wolfgang W

    2014-04-01

    Transplant recipients who have had sensitizing events such as pregnancies, blood transfusions and previous transplants often develop antibodies directed against human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-molecules of the donor tissue. These pre-formed donor-specific antibodies (DSA) represent a high risk of organ failure as a consequence of antibody-mediated hyper-acute or acute allograft rejection. As a first assay to detect DSA, the complement-dependent lymphocytotoxicity assay (CDC) was established more than 40 years ago. However, this assay is characterized by several drawbacks such as a low sensitivity and a high susceptibility to various artificial factors generally not leading to valid and reliable outcomes under several circumstances that are reviewed in this article. Furthermore, only those antibodies that exert complement-fixing activity are detected. As a consequence, novel procedures that act independently of the complement system and that do not represent functional assays were generated in the format of solid phase assays (SPAs) (bead- or ELISA-based). In this article, we review the pros and cons of these sensitive SPA in comparison with the detection of DSA through the use of the traditional methods such as CDC and flow cytometric analyses. Potential drawbacks of the alternative methodological approaches comprising high background reactivity, susceptibility to environmental factors and the possible influence of subjective operators' errors concerning the interpretation of the results are summarized and critically discussed for each method. We provide a forecast on the future role of SPAs reliably excluding highly deleterious DSA, thus leading to an improved graft survival. PMID:24170304

  15. Sensitive, site-specific, and stable vibrational probe of local protein environments: 4-azidomethyl-L-phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Bazewicz, Christopher G; Liskov, Melanie T; Hines, Kevin J; Brewer, Scott H

    2013-08-01

    We have synthesized the unnatural amino acid (UAA), 4-azidomethyl-L-phenylalanine (pN₃CH₂Phe), to serve as an effective vibrational reporter of local protein environments. The position, extinction coefficient, and sensitivity to local environment of the azide asymmetric stretch vibration of pN₃CH₂Phe are compared to the vibrational reporters: 4-cyano-L-phenylalanine (pCNPhe) and 4-azido-L-phenylalanine (pN₃Phe). This UAA was genetically incorporated in a site-specific manner utilizing an engineered, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase in response to an amber codon with high efficiency and fidelity into two distinct sites in superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). This allowed for the dependence of the azide asymmetric stretch vibration of pN₃CH₂Phe to different protein environments to be measured. The photostability of pN₃CH₂Phe was also measured relative to the photoreactive UAA, pN₃Phe. PMID:23865850

  16. Production of dumbbell probe through hairpin cleavage-ligation and increasing RCA sensitivity and specificity by circle to circle amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Tang, Suming; Hu, Tianyu; Zhao, Guojie; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    Dumbbell probe (DP) attracts increasing interests in rolling circle amplification (RCA). A universal DP production method through cleavage-ligation of hairpin was proposed and optimized. The production is characterized by restriction endonuclease (RE)-induced cleavage ends ligation. It has the advantage of phosphorylation-free, splint-free and purification-free. To optimize designing, we found that the position of RE cleavage sequence in the stem and the primer position in the loop affected the formation and amplification of DP obviously. Both sticky and blunt ends cleaved by RE produce DP efficiently. Moreover, we introduced this DP into circle to circle (C2C) RCA based on the same cleavage-ligation principle, and acquired high sensitivity. By combining a two-ligation design and the C2C strategy, specificity for detecting let-7 family members was increased extremely. Furthermore, coreaction of different steps facilitated convenient formation and amplification process of DP. PMID:27385060

  17. Design of Peptide Substrate for Sensitively and Specifically Detecting Two Aβ-Degrading Enzymes: Neprilysin and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Ting; Chen, Chao-Long; Lin, Lilian Tsai-Wei; Lo, Chun-Hsien; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chen, Rita P.-Y.; Wang, Steven S.-S.

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of neprilysin (NEP) to reduce Aβ accumulation in the brain is a promising strategy for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This report describes the design and synthesis of a quenched fluorogenic peptide substrate qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC (with the sequence VHHQKAAC), which has a fluorophore, Alexa-350, linked to the side-chain of its C-terminal cysteine and a quencher, Dabcyl, linked to its N-terminus. This peptide emitted strong fluorescence upon cleavage. Our results showed that qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC is more sensitive to NEP than the previously reported peptide substrates, so that concentrations of NEP as low as 0.03 nM could be detected at peptide concentration of 2 μM. Moreover, qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC had superior enzymatic specificity for both NEP and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), but was inert with other Aβ-degrading enzymes. This peptide, used in conjunction with a previously reported peptide substrate qf-Aβ(1–7)C [which is sensitive to NEP and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE)], could be used for high-throughput screening of compounds that only upregulate NEP. The experimental results of cell-based activity assays using both qf-Aβ(1–7)C and qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC as the substrates confirm that somatostatin treatment most likely upregulates IDE, but not NEP, in neuroblastoma cells. PMID:27096746

  18. Exosomes derived from alcohol-treated hepatocytes horizontally transfer liver specific miRNA-122 and sensitize monocytes to LPS.

    PubMed

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Bala, Shashi; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte damage and inflammation in monocytes/macrophages are central to the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate all of these processes. MiRNA-122 is abundantly expressed in hepatocytes while monocytes/macrophages have low levels. The role of exosomes in AH and possible cross talk between hepatocyte-derived exosomes and immune cells is not explored yet. Here, we show that the number of exosomes significantly increases in the sera of healthy individuals after alcohol binge drinking and in mice after binge or chronic alcohol consumption. Exosomes isolated from sera after alcohol consumption or from in vitro ethanol-treated hepatocytes contained miRNA-122. Exosomes derived from ethanol-treated Huh7.5 cells were taken up by the recipients THP1 monocytes and horizontally transferred a mature form of liver-specific miRNA-122. In vivo, liver mononuclear cells and Kupffer cells from alcohol-fed mice had increased miRNA-122 levels. In monocytes, miRNA-122 transferred via exosomes inhibited the HO-1 pathway and sensitized to LPS stimulation and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, inflammatory effects of exosomes from ethanol-treated hepatocytes were prevented by using RNA interference via exosome-mediated delivery of a miRNA-122 inhibitor. These results demonstrate that first, exosomes mediate communication between hepatocytes and monocytes/macrophages and second, hepatocyte-derived miRNA-122 can reprogram monocytes inducing sensitization to LPS. PMID:25973575

  19. Sensitive and specific detection of mosaic chromosomal abnormalities using the Parent-of-Origin-based Detection (POD) method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mosaic somatic alterations are present in all multi-cellular organisms, but the physiological effects of low-level mosaicism are largely unknown. Most mosaic alterations remain undetectable with current analytical approaches, although the presence of such alterations is increasingly implicated as causative for disease. Results Here, we present the Parent-of-Origin-based Detection (POD) method for chromosomal abnormality detection in trio-based SNP microarray data. Our software implementation, triPOD, was benchmarked using a simulated dataset, outperformed comparable software for sensitivity of abnormality detection, and displayed substantial improvement in the detection of low-level mosaicism while maintaining comparable specificity. Examples of low-level mosaic abnormalities from a large autism dataset demonstrate the benefits of the increased sensitivity provided by triPOD. The triPOD analyses showed robustness across multiple types of Illumina microarray chips. Two large, clinically-relevant datasets were characterized and compared. Conclusions Our method and software provide a significant advancement in the ability to detect low-level mosaic abnormalities, thereby opening new avenues for research into the implications of mosaicism in pathogenic and non-pathogenic processes. PMID:23724825

  20. Exosomes derived from alcohol-treated hepatocytes horizontally transfer liver specific miRNA-122 and sensitize monocytes to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Bala, Shashi; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte damage and inflammation in monocytes/macrophages are central to the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate all of these processes. MiRNA-122 is abundantly expressed in hepatocytes while monocytes/macrophages have low levels. The role of exosomes in AH and possible cross talk between hepatocyte-derived exosomes and immune cells is not explored yet. Here, we show that the number of exosomes significantly increases in the sera of healthy individuals after alcohol binge drinking and in mice after binge or chronic alcohol consumption. Exosomes isolated from sera after alcohol consumption or from in vitro ethanol-treated hepatocytes contained miRNA-122. Exosomes derived from ethanol-treated Huh7.5 cells were taken up by the recipients THP1 monocytes and horizontally transferred a mature form of liver-specific miRNA-122. In vivo, liver mononuclear cells and Kupffer cells from alcohol-fed mice had increased miRNA-122 levels. In monocytes, miRNA-122 transferred via exosomes inhibited the HO-1 pathway and sensitized to LPS stimulation and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, inflammatory effects of exosomes from ethanol-treated hepatocytes were prevented by using RNA interference via exosome-mediated delivery of a miRNA-122 inhibitor. These results demonstrate that first, exosomes mediate communication between hepatocytes and monocytes/macrophages and second, hepatocyte-derived miRNA-122 can reprogram monocytes inducing sensitization to LPS. PMID:25973575

  1. The Procambium Specification Gene Oshox1 Promotes Polar Auxin Transport Capacity and Reduces Its Sensitivity toward Inhibition1

    PubMed Central

    Scarpella, Enrico; Boot, Kees J.M.; Rueb, Saskia; Meijer, Annemarie H.

    2002-01-01

    The auxin-inducible homeobox gene Oshox1 of rice (Oryza sativa) is a positive regulator of procambial cell fate commitment, and its overexpression reduces the sensitivity of polar auxin transport (PAT) to the PAT inhibitor 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Here, we show that wild-type rice leaves formed under conditions of PAT inhibition display vein hypertrophy, reduced distance between longitudinal veins, and increased distance between transverse veins, providing experimental evidence for a role of PAT in vascular patterning in a monocot species. Furthermore, we show that Oshox1 overexpression confers insensitivity to these PAT inhibitor-induced vascular-patterning defects. Finally, we show that in the absence of any overt phenotypical change, Oshox1 overexpression specifically reduces the affinity of the NPA-binding protein toward NPA and enhances PAT and its sensitivity toward auxin. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that Oshox1 promotes fate commitment of procambial cells by increasing their auxin conductivity properties and stabilizing this state against modulations of PAT by an endogenous NPA-like molecule. PMID:12428000

  2. Fluorescence confocal mosaicing microscopy of basal cell carcinomas ex vivo: demonstration of rapid surgical pathology with high sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Karen, Julie K.; Dusza, Stephen W.; Tudisco, Marie; Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2009-02-01

    Mohs surgery, for the precise removal of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), consists of a series of excisions guided by the surgeon's examination of the frozen histology of the previous excision. The histology reveals atypical nuclear morphology, identifying cancer. The preparation of frozen histology is accurate but labor-intensive and slow. Nuclear pathology can be achieved by staining with acridine orange (1 mM, 20 s) BCCs in Mohs surgical skin excisions within 5-9 minutes, compared to 20-45 for frozen histology. For clinical utility, images must have high contrast and high resolution. We report tumor contrast of 10-100 fold over the background dermis and submicron (diffraction limited) resolution over a cm field of view. BCCs were detected with an overall sensitivity of 96.6%, specificity of 89.2%, positive predictive value of 93.0% and negative predictive value of 94.7%. The technique was therefore accurate for normal tissue as well as tumor. We conclude that fluorescence confocal mosaicing serves as a sensitive and rapid pathological tool. Beyond Mohs surgery, this technology may be extended to suit other pathological needs with the development of new contrast agents. The technique reported here accurately detects all subtypes of BCC in skin excisions, including the large nodular, small micronodular, and tiny sclerodermaform tumors. However, this technique may be applicable to imaging tissue that is larger, more irregular and of various mechanical compliances with further engineering of the tissue mounting and staging mechanisms.

  3. Sex-Specific Differences in Agonistic Behaviour, Sound Production and Auditory Sensitivity in the Callichthyid Armoured Catfish Megalechis thoracata

    PubMed Central

    Hadjiaghai, Oliwia; Ladich, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on sex-specific differences in sound production, acoustic behaviour and hearing abilities in fishes are rare. Representatives of numerous catfish families are known to produce sounds in agonistic contexts (intraspecific aggression and interspecific disturbance situations) using their pectoral fins. The present study investigates differences in agonistic behaviour, sound production and hearing abilities in males and females of a callichthyid catfish. Methodology/Principal Findings Eight males and nine females of the armoured catfish Megalechis thoracata were investigated. Agonistic behaviour displayed during male-male and female-female dyadic contests and sounds emitted were recorded, sound characteristics analysed and hearing thresholds measured using the auditory evoked potential (AEP) recording technique. Male pectoral spines were on average 1.7-fold longer than those of same-sized females. Visual and acoustic threat displays differed between sexes. Males produced low-frequency harmonic barks at longer distances and thumps at close distances, whereas females emitted broad-band pulsed crackles when close to each other. Female aggressive sounds were significantly shorter than those of males (167 ms versus 219 to 240 ms) and of higher dominant frequency (562 Hz versus 132 to 403 Hz). Sound duration and sound level were positively correlated with body and pectoral spine length, but dominant frequency was inversely correlated only to spine length. Both sexes showed a similar U-shaped hearing curve with lowest thresholds between 0.2 and 1 kHz and a drop in sensitivity above 1 kHz. The main energies of sounds were located at the most sensitive frequencies. Conclusions/Significance Current data demonstrate that both male and female M. thoracata produce aggressive sounds, but the behavioural contexts and sound characteristics differ between sexes. Sexes do not differ in hearing, but it remains to be clarified if this is a general pattern among fish. This

  4. Criterion-based Screening for Sexually Transmitted Infection: Sensitivity, Specificity, and Predictive Values of Commonly Used Questions

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patricia; Jacobson, Janet; Turok, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Practice protocols that mandate prescreening for sexually transmitted infection prior to insertion of an intrauterine device for contraception can pose obstacles for women seeking this highly effective method of birth control. Some practices screen for presumed risk factors for sexually transmitted infection in order to identify those who may be infected or those in whom laboratory testing should be obtained. The value of such criterion-based screening is unclear. Methods Data from a prospective observational trial of offering the copper intrauterine device for emergency contraception were used to assess the value of several screening questions in predicting the presence of sexually transmitted infection. Criteria evaluated were age under 25 years, history of a sexually transmitted infection, and having 2 or more sexual partners in the previous 3 months. The sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio of both positive and negative test results and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for 3 separate questions as well as for combinations of these 3 questions. Results There were 197 women who received a copper intrauterine device for emergency contraception at the same time they were tested for sexually transmitted infection. In this sample, there were 8 cases of Chlamydia trachomatis identified and no cases of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The sensitivity of individual and combined questions in identifying those who were infected ranged from 0% to 88%; specificity ranged from 37% to 97%. The positive predictive values for single or combined screening questions were in the range of 4% to 6%. Likelihood ratios for both positive and negative test results did not change posttest likelihood of disease in any appreciable way. Discussion Standard screening questions used to identify sexually transmitted infection risk could presume infection in large numbers of uninfected women and are of little value in identifying the women who are truly

  5. Sensitive and Specific Immunohistochemical Diagnosis of Human Alveolar Echinococcosis with the Monoclonal Antibody Em2G11

    PubMed Central

    Tappe, Dennis; Stark, Lorenz; Grüner, Beate; Buttenschoen, Klaus; Hillenbrand, Andreas; Juchems, Markus; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Kern, Petra; Seitz, Hanns M.; Möller, Peter; Rausch, Robert L.; Deplazes, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is caused by the metacestode stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. Differential diagnosis with cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by E. granulosus and AE is challenging. We aimed at improving diagnosis of AE on paraffin sections of infected human tissue by immunohistochemical testing of a specific antibody. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analysed 96 paraffin archived specimens, including 6 cutting needle biopsies and 3 fine needle aspirates, from patients with suspected AE or CE with the monoclonal antibody (mAb) Em2G11 specific for the Em2 antigen of E. multilocularis metacestodes. In human tissue, staining with mAb Em2G11 is highly specific for E. multilocularis metacestodes while no staining is detected in CE lesions. In addition, the antibody detects small particles of E. multilocularis (spems) of less than 1 µm outside the main lesion in necrotic tissue, liver sinusoids and lymphatic tissue most probably caused by shedding of parasitic material. The conventional histological diagnosis based on haematoxylin and eosin and PAS stainings were in accordance with the immunohistological diagnosis using mAb Em2G11 in 90 of 96 samples. In 6 samples conventional subtype diagnosis of echinococcosis had to be adjusted when revised by immunohistology with mAb Em2G11. Conclusions/Significance Immunohistochemistry with the mAb Em2G11 is a new, highly specific and sensitive diagnostic tool for AE. The staining of small particles of E. multilocularis (spems) outside the main lesion including immunocompetent tissue, such as lymph nodes, suggests a systemic effect on the host. PMID:23145198

  6. Detection of acute kidney injury in premature asphyxiated neonates by serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (sNGAL) – sensitivity and specificity of a potential new biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Pejović, Biljana; Erić-Marinković, Jelena; Pejović, Marija; Kotur-Stevuljević, Jelena; Peco-Antić, Amira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). In recent years, every effort is made for early detection of AKI. Our hypothesis was that serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (sNGAL) may be a reliable screening test for early diagnosis of AKI in premature neonates after perinatal asphyxia. Therefore, our aim was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of sNGAL for AKI in premature asphyxiated neonates. Materials and methods AKI was defined in the third day of life (DOL 3) as a serum creatinine (sCr) increase ≥ 26.5 μmol/L from baseline (the lowest previous sCr). According to the increase of sCr, AKI patients were divided in AKIN1 (sCr increase up to 1.9 baseline) and AKIN2 (sCr increase from 2.0 to 2.9 baseline). sNGAL levels were measured on DOL 1, 3 and 7. Results AKI was diagnosed in 73 (0.676) of 108 enrolled premature asphyxiated neonates. Sixty one patients (0.836) were classified in AKIN1 and 12 patients (0.164) in AKIN2. sNGAL reached the maximal concentrations on DOL 1 within 4 hours after admission to NICU, being higher in AKI compared with no-AKI group (160.8 ± 113.1 vs. 87.1 ± 81.6; P < 0.001) as well as in AKIN2 compared with AKIN1 group (222.8 ± 112.9 vs. 147.8 ± 109.9; P < 0.001). The best areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) for prediction of AKI were 0.72 [95% (0.62-0.80) P < 0.001] on DOL1 at 2h and 0.72 [95% (0.63-0.80) P < 0.001] at 4th hour after admission respectively. The corresponding sNGAL cutoff concentrations were 84.87 ng/mL (sensitivity 69.0% and specificity 71.9%) and 89.43 ng/mL (sensitivity 65.7% and specificity 74.3%). Conclusions In premature asphyxiated neonates sNGAL measured within the first 4 hours of DOL 1 is predictive of the occurrence and severity of AKI. Therefore, plasma levels of NGAL may be used for early diagnosis of AKI in these patients. PMID:26525750

  7. Genes specifically modulated in sensitized skins allow the detection of sensitizers in a reconstructed human skin model. Development of the SENS-IS assay.

    PubMed

    Cottrez, Françoise; Boitel, Elodie; Auriault, Claude; Aeby, Pierre; Groux, Hervé

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of genes modulated during the sensitization process either on mice (LLNA) or human (blisters) combined with data mining has allowed the definition of a comprehensive panel of sensitization biomarkers. This set of genes includes already identified markers such as the ARE family and others not yet associated with the sensitization process (the so-called SENS-IS gene subset). The expression of this set of genes has been measured on reconstituted human epidermis models (Episkin) exposed to various sensitizers and non-sensitizers. Fine analysis of their expression pattern indicates that it is the number of modulated genes rather than the intensity of up-regulation that correlates best with the sensitization potential of a chemical. Moreover, sensitizers that are weak inductors of ARE genes tend to be relevant modulators of the SENS-IS subset. By combining the expression data obtained with both gene subsets, it is now possible to identify a wide variety of sensitizers on a test system (in vitro reconstructed human epidermis) that is very similar to the in vivo situation and compatible with a large variety of test substance characteristics. PMID:25724174

  8. Patient-specific spine models. Part 1: Finite element analysis of the lumbar intervertebral disc--a material sensitivity study.

    PubMed

    Fagan, M J; Julian, S; Siddall, D J; Mohsen, A M

    2002-01-01

    If patient-specific finite element models of the spine could be developed, they would offer enormous opportunities in the diagnosis and management of back problems. Several generic models have been developed in the past, but there has been very little detailed examination of the sensitivity of these models' characteristics to the input parameters. This relationship must be thoroughly understood if representative patient-specific models are to be realized and used with confidence. In particular, the performance of the intervertebral discs are central to any spine model and need detailed investigation first. A generic non-linear model of an intervertebral disc was developed and subjected to compressive, flexion and torsional loading regimes. The effects of both material and geometric non-linearities were investigated for the three loading schemes and the results compared with experimental data. The basic material properties of the fibres, annulus and nucleus were then varied and the effects on the stiffness, annulus bulge and annulus stresses analysed. The results showed that the non-linear geometry assumption had a significant effect on the compression characteristics, whereas the non-linear material option did not. In contrast, the material non-linearity was more important for the flexural and torsional loading schemes. Thus, the inclusion of non-linear material and geometry analysis options in finite element models of intervertebral discs is necessary to predict in vivo load-deflection characteristics accurately. When the influence of the material properties was examined in detail, it was found that the fibre properties did not have a significant effect on the compressive stiffness of the disc but did affect the flexural and torsional stiffnesses by up to +/-20 per cent. All loading modes were sensitive to the annulus properties with stiffnesses varying by up to +/-16 per cent. The model also revealed that for a particular compressive deformation or flexural or

  9. Interoceptive accuracy and panic.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, L A; Craske, M G

    1999-12-01

    Psychophysiological models of panic hypothesize that panickers focus attention on and become anxious about the physical sensations associated with panic. Attention on internal somatic cues has been labeled interoception. The present study examined the role of physiological arousal and subjective anxiety on interoceptive accuracy. Infrequent panickers and nonanxious participants participated in an initial baseline to examine overall interoceptive accuracy. Next, participants ingested caffeine, about which they received either safety or no safety information. Using a mental heartbeat tracking paradigm, participants' count of their heartbeats during specific time intervals were coded based on polygraph measures. Infrequent panickers were more accurate in the perception of their heartbeats than nonanxious participants. Changes in physiological arousal were not associated with increased accuracy on the heartbeat perception task. However, higher levels of self-reported anxiety were associated with superior performance. PMID:10596462

  10. A sensitive and specific PCR assay for the detection of Baylisascaris schroederi eggs in giant panda feces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, De-Sheng; Zhou, Xuan; Xie, Yue; Liang, Yi-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Yu, Hua; Chen, Shi-Jie; Yan, Yu-Bo; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Shu-Xian; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-10-01

    Baylisascaris schroederi is one of the most common intestinal nematodes in giant pandas. It can cause severe baylisascariasis which is highly infectious in its natural hosts. A rapid and reliable diagnosis of parasite infections is crucial to protect giant pandas, as well as for environmental monitoring and disease surveillance. Here, we established a specific PCR assay for B. schroederi detection which was targeting a 331-bp long fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene. Fifty fresh fecal samples collected from captive giant pandas were tested by the established PCR assay and the traditional flotation technique. DNA extracted from a single B. schroederi egg could be successfully amplified, while no cross-reactivity was found with DNA from Ancylostoma caninum eggs. The detection rate of the PCR assay was 68%, which was higher than that of the traditional egg flotation (46%). Our findings demonstrated that the PCR assay is sensitive and specific for the detection and identification of B. schroederi eggs. Therefore, it could become a useful tool for the investigation of B. schroederi infections in giant pandas. PMID:23688803

  11. Smad2 and Smad3 have differential sensitivity in relaying TGFβ signaling and inversely regulate early lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Liu, Xu; Ren, Xudong; Tian, Yue; Chen, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiangjie; Du, Yanhua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Yujiang; Liu, Zhongliang; Fan, Beibei; Zhang, Quanbin; Jin, Guohua; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) related signaling is one of the most important signaling pathways regulating early developmental events. Smad2 and Smad3 are structurally similar and it is mostly considered that they are equally important in mediating TGFβ signals. Here, we show that Smad3 is an insensitive TGFβ transducer as compared with Smad2. Smad3 preferentially localizes within the nucleus and is thus sequestered from membrane signaling. The ability of Smad3 in oligomerization with Smad4 upon agonist stimulation is also impaired given its unique linker region. Smad2 mediated TGFβ signaling plays a crucial role in epiblast development and patterning of three germ layers. However, signaling unrelated nuclear localized Smad3 is dispensable for TGFβ signaling-mediated epiblast specification, but important for early neural development, an event blocked by TGFβ/Smad2 signaling. Both Smad2 and Smad3 bind to the conserved Smads binding element (SBE), but they show nonoverlapped target gene binding specificity and differential transcriptional activity. We conclude that Smad2 and Smad3 possess differential sensitivities in relaying TGFβ signaling and have distinct roles in regulating early developmental events. PMID:26905010

  12. Smad2 and Smad3 have differential sensitivity in relaying TGFβ signaling and inversely regulate early lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Liu, Xu; Ren, Xudong; Tian, Yue; Chen, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiangjie; Du, Yanhua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Yujiang; Liu, Zhongliang; Fan, Beibei; Zhang, Quanbin; Jin, Guohua; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) related signaling is one of the most important signaling pathways regulating early developmental events. Smad2 and Smad3 are structurally similar and it is mostly considered that they are equally important in mediating TGFβ signals. Here, we show that Smad3 is an insensitive TGFβ transducer as compared with Smad2. Smad3 preferentially localizes within the nucleus and is thus sequestered from membrane signaling. The ability of Smad3 in oligomerization with Smad4 upon agonist stimulation is also impaired given its unique linker region. Smad2 mediated TGFβ signaling plays a crucial role in epiblast development and patterning of three germ layers. However, signaling unrelated nuclear localized Smad3 is dispensable for TGFβ signaling-mediated epiblast specification, but important for early neural development, an event blocked by TGFβ/Smad2 signaling. Both Smad2 and Smad3 bind to the conserved Smads binding element (SBE), but they show nonoverlapped target gene binding specificity and differential transcriptional activity. We conclude that Smad2 and Smad3 possess differential sensitivities in relaying TGFβ signaling and have distinct roles in regulating early developmental events. PMID:26905010

  13. Generating and using patient-specific whole-body models for organ dose estimates in CT with increased accuracy: feasibility and validation.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A; Saltybaeva, Natalia; Kolditz, Daniel; Hupfer, Martin; Beister, Marcel; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    The estimation of patient dose using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations based on the available patient CT images is limited to the length of the scan. Software tools for dose estimation based on standard computational phantoms overcome this problem; however, they are limited with respect to taking individual patient anatomy into account. The purpose of this study was to generate whole-body patient models in order to take scattered radiation and over-scanning effects into account. Thorax examinations were performed on three physical anthropomorphic phantoms at tube voltages of 80 kV and 120 kV; absorbed dose was measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Whole-body voxel models were built as a combination of the acquired CT images appended by data taken from widely used anthropomorphic voxel phantoms. MC simulations were performed both for the CT image volumes alone and for the whole-body models. Measured and calculated dose distributions were compared for each TLD chip position; additionally, organ doses were determined. MC simulations based only on CT data underestimated dose by 8%-15% on average depending on patient size with highest underestimation values of 37% for the adult phantom at the caudal border of the image volume. The use of whole-body models substantially reduced these errors; measured and simulated results consistently agreed to better than 10%. This study demonstrates that combined whole-body models can provide three-dimensional dose distributions with improved accuracy. Using the presented concept should be of high interest for research studies which demand high accuracy, e.g. for dose optimization efforts. PMID:25288527

  14. A breast-specific, negligible-dose scatter correction technique for dedicated cone-beam breast CT: a physics-based approach to improve Hounsfield Unit accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Burkett, George, Jr.; Boone, John M.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a method to correct the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and to achieve consistent Hounsfield Unit (HU) values of breast tissues for a dedicated breast CT (bCT) system. The use of a beam passing array (BPA) composed of parallel-holes has been previously proposed for scatter correction in various imaging applications. In this study, we first verified the efficacy and accuracy using BPA to measure the scatter signal on a cone-beam bCT system. A systematic scatter correction approach was then developed by modeling the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) in projection images acquired with and without BPA. To quantitatively evaluate the improved accuracy of HU values, different breast tissue-equivalent phantoms were scanned and radially averaged HU profiles through reconstructed planes were evaluated. The dependency of the correction method on object size and number of projections was studied. A simplified application of the proposed method on five clinical patient scans was performed to demonstrate efficacy. For the typical 10-18 cm breast diameters seen in the bCT application, the proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact and reduce the variation of HU values of breast equivalent material from 150 to 40 HU. The measured HU values of 100% glandular tissue, 50/50 glandular/adipose tissue, and 100% adipose tissue were approximately 46, -35, and -94, respectively. It was found that only six BPA projections were necessary to accurately implement this method, and the additional dose requirement is less than 1% of the exam dose. The proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and retain consistent HU values of breast tissues.

  15. Specific and Sensitive Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in Soil on the Basis of PCR Amplification of fliC Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, J.; Heuer, H.; van Elsas, J. D.; Smalla, K.

    2003-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the causative agent of bacterial wilt in many important crops. A specific and sensitive PCR detection method that uses primers targeting the gene coding for the flagella subunit, fliC, was established. Based on the first fliC gene sequence of R. solanacearum strain K60 available at GenBank, the Ral_fliC PCR primer system was designed; this system yielded a single 724-bp product with the DNAs of all of the R. solanacearum strains tested. However, R. pickettii and four environmental Ralstonia isolates also yielded amplicons. The Ral_fliC PCR products obtained with 12 strains (R. solanacearum, R. pickettii, and environmental isolates) were sequenced. By sequence alignment, Rsol_fliC primers specific for R. solanacearum were designed. With this primer system, a specific 400-bp PCR product was obtained from all 82 strains of R. solanacearum tested. Six strains of R. pickettii and several closely related environmental isolates yielded no PCR product; however, a product was obtained with one Pseudomonas syzygii strain. A GC-clamped 400-bp fliC product could be separated in denaturing gradient gels and allowed us to distinguish P. syzygii from R. solanacearum. The Rsol_fliC PCR system was applied to detect R. solanacearum in soil. PCR amplification, followed by Southern blot hybridization, allowed us to detect about one target DNA molecule per PCR, which is equivalent to 103 CFU g of bulk soil−1. The system was applied to survey soils from different geographic origins for the presence of R. solanacearum. PMID:14660373

  16. Development and Validation of a Sensitive and Specific LC-MS-MS Method for the Determination of Acotiamide in Rat Plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Huang, Rui; Wang, Zhi; Qu, Haijun; Sun, Meijuan; Zhao, Zhenhuan

    2016-07-01

    Acotiamide is a new prokinetic drug that is used to treat functional dyspepsia (FD). A sensitive and specific LC-MS-MS method has been developed and validated for the analysis of acotiamide in rat plasma. The assay involved a simple protein precipitation (PPT) step with methanol-acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) and a gradient elution using a mobile phase consisting of water containing 0.1% formic acid and methanol containing 0.1% formic acid. The analytes were chromatographed on a reverse-phase Agilent Zorbax XDB C18 column (2.1 mm × 50 mm, 3.5 μm) with a flow rate of 0.50 mL/min. The analytes were monitored by tandem-mass spectrometry with positive electrospray ionization. The precursor-product transitions (m/z) in the positive ion mode were 451.4 → 271.3 and 386.2 → 122.2 for acotiamide and buspirone (internal standard, IS), respectively. The assay was shown to be linear over the range of 0.10-200 ng/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.10 ng/mL. The method was shown to be reproducible and reliable with the inter- and intra-batch accuracy and precision were within ±15%. The assay has been successfully used for pharmacokinetic evaluation of acotiamide after intravenous and oral administration of 10 mg/kg acotiamide in rats. The oral absolute bioavailability (F) of acotiamide in rats was estimated to be 38.4 ± 13.5% with an elimination half-life (t1/2) value of 9.11 ± 0.40 h. PMID:26980723

  17. Improved Tumor-Specific Drug Accumulation by Polymer Therapeutics with pH-Sensitive Drug Release Overcomes Chemotherapy Resistance.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Anne-Kathrin; Lucas, Henrike; Schindler, Lucie; Chytil, Petr; Etrych, Tomáš; Mäder, Karsten; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The success of chemotherapy is limited by poor selectivity of active drugs combined with occurrence of tumor resistance. New star-like structured N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-based drug delivery systems containing doxorubicin attached via a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond were designed and investigated for their ability to overcome chemotherapy resistance. These conjugates combine two strategies to achieve a high drug concentration selectively at the tumor site: (I) high accumulation by passive tumor targeting based on enhanced permeability and retention effect and (II) pH-sensitive site-specific drug release due to an acidic tumor microenvironment. Mice bearing doxorubicin-resistant xenograft tumors were treated with doxorubicin, PBS, poly HPMA (pHPMA) precursor or pHPMA-doxorubicin conjugate at different equivalent doses of 5 mg/kg bodyweight doxorubicin up to a 7-fold total dose using different treatment schedules. Intratumoral drug accumulation was analyzed by fluorescence imaging utilizing intrinsic fluorescence of doxorubicin. Free doxorubicin induced significant toxicity but hardly any tumor-inhibiting effects. Administering at least a 3-fold dose of pHPMA-doxorubicin conjugate was necessary to induce a transient response, whereas doses of about 5- to 6-fold induced strong regressions. Tumors completely disappeared in some cases. The onset of response was differential delayed depending on the tumor model, which could be ascribed to distinct characteristics of the microenvironment. Further fluorescence imaging-based analyses regarding underlying mechanisms of the delayed response revealed a related switch to a more supporting intratumoral microenvironment for effective drug release. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that the concept of tumor site-restricted high-dose chemotherapy is able to overcome therapy resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 998-1007. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26939698

  18. Tackling reproducibility in microcantilever biosensors: a statistical approach for sensitive and specific end-point detection of immunoreactions.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Priscila M; Tamayo, Javier; Ruz, José J; Puertas, Sara; Polo, Ester; Grazu, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Calleja, Montserrat

    2013-02-21

    In the last decade, microcantilever biosensors have shown enormous potential for highly sensitive label-free detection of nucleic acid and proteins. Despite the enormous advances, the promise of applications of this technology in the biomedical field has been frustrated because of its low reproducibility. Here we tackle the reproducibility issue in microcantilever biosensors and provide the guidelines to minimize the deviations in the biosensor response between different assays. We use as a model system the label-free end-point detection of horseradish peroxidase. We choose the end-point detection mode because of its suitability for implementation in the clinical field that requires simplicity and point-of-care capability. Our study comprises the analysis of 1012 cantilevers with different antibody surface densities, two blocking strategies based on polyethylene-glycol (PEG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) and stringent controls. The study reveals that the performance of the assay critically depends on both antibody surface density and blocking strategies. We find that the optimal conditions involve antibody surface densities near but below saturation and blocking with PEG. We find that the surface stress induced by the antibody-antigen binding is significantly correlated with the surface stress generated during the antibody attachment and blocking steps. The statistical correlation is harnessed to identify immobilization failure or success, and thus enhancing the specificity and sensitivity of the assay. This procedure enables achieving rates of true positives and true negatives of 90% and 91% respectively. The detection limit is of 10 ng mL(-1) (250 pM) that is similar to the detection limit obtained in our enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and at least two orders of magnitude smaller than that achieved with well-established label-free biosensors such as a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. PMID:23223515

  19. Accuracy of Rapid Urease Test in Diagnosing Helicobacter pylori Infection in Patients using NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Foroutan, Mojgan; Loloei, Behnam; Irvani, Shahrokh; Azargashb, Ezanollah

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim: This study aimed to determine the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the results of rapid urease test (RUT). Patients and Methods: The study evaluated 210 consecutive patients for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. They were divided into case and control groups based on history of NSAID use (n=70 each). Two biopsy specimens were collected from antrum and corpus of stomach during endoscopy and sent for rapid urease testing and histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy rate of RUT test were compared against histology. Results: The average age was 55.2±12.9 and 43.3±12.1 years in the case and control groups, respectively. Among NSAID users, RUT sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate were all 100%. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate of RUT in patients without history of NSAID use were 97.37, 98.57 and 98.14%, respectively. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate of RUT were 98.57, 99.29, and 99.04%, respectively. Conclusion: Our study shows that sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate of RUT are not affected by NSAID use. Rapid urease test remains a reliable test for diagnosis of H. pylori in patients on NSAIDs. PMID:20339181

  20. Task shifting in primary eye care: how sensitive and specific are common signs and symptoms to predict conditions requiring referral to specialist eye personnel?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The inclusion of primary eye care (PEC) in the scope of services provided by general primary health care (PHC) workers is a ‘task shifting’ strategy to help increase access to eye care in Africa. PEC training, in theory, teaches PHC workers to recognize specific symptoms and signs and to treat or refer according to these. We tested the sensitivity of these symptoms and signs at identifying significant eye pathology. Methods Specialized eye care personnel in three African countries evaluated specific symptoms and signs, using a torch alone, in patients who presented to eye clinics. Following this, they conducted a more thorough examination necessary to make a definite diagnosis and manage the patient. The sensitivities and specificities of the symptoms and signs for identifying eyes with conditions requiring referral or threatening sight were calculated. Results Sensitivities of individual symptoms and signs to detect sight threatening pathology ranged from 6.0% to 55.1%; specificities ranged from 8.6 to 98.9. Using a combination of symptoms or signs increased the sensitivity to 80.8 but specificity was 53.2. Conclusions In this study, the sensitivity and specificity of commonly used symptoms and signs were too low to be useful in guiding PHC workers to accurately identify and refer patients with eye complaints. This raises the question of whether this task shifting strategy is likely to contribute to reducing visual loss or to providing an acceptable quality service. PMID:25860992

  1. Sensitive and Specific Biomimetic Lipid Coated Microfluidics to Isolate Viable Circulating Tumor Cells and Microemboli for Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Yang; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Yang, Chih-Tsung; Wu, Liang-Chun; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Here we presented a simple and effective membrane mimetic microfluidic device with antibody conjugated supported lipid bilayer (SLB) “smart coating” to capture viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) directly from whole blood of all stage clinical cancer patients. The non-covalently bound SLB was able to promote dynamic clustering of lipid-tethered antibodies to CTC antigens and minimized non-specific blood cells retention through its non-fouling nature. A gentle flow further flushed away loosely-bound blood cells to achieve high purity of CTCs, and a stream of air foam injected disintegrate the SLB assemblies to release intact and viable CTCs from the chip. Human blood spiked cancer cell line test showed the ~95% overall efficiency to recover both CTCs and CTMs. Live/dead assay showed that at least 86% of recovered cells maintain viability. By using 2 mL of peripheral blood, the CTCs and CTMs counts of 63 healthy and colorectal cancer donors were positively correlated with the cancer progression. In summary, a simple and effective strategy utilizing biomimetic principle was developed to retrieve viable CTCs for enumeration, molecular analysis, as well as ex vivo culture over weeks. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity, it is the first time to show the high detection rates and quantity of CTCs in non-metastatic cancer patients. This work offers the values in both early cancer detection and prognosis of CTC and provides an accurate non-invasive strategy for routine clinical investigation on CTCs. PMID:26938471

  2. Guar gum succinate-sodium alginate beads as a pH-sensitive carrier for colon-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Seeli, D Sathya; Dhivya, S; Selvamurugan, N; Prabaharan, M

    2016-10-01

    Guar gum succinate - sodium alginate (GGS-SA) beads cross-linked with barium ions were prepared and characterized as a pH sensitive carrier for colon-specific drug delivery. The structure of GGS-SA beads was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) studies revealed that the drug loaded GGS-SA beads prepared using 2:2 (w/v) weight percent of GGS and SA had a diameter about 1.4mm and roughly spherical in shape. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the peaks corresponding to GGS and SA at 13.5°, 17.5°, 20.2° and 13.5°, 22°, 24.1°, respectively were destroyed in GGS-SA beads which show that these beads are more amorphous in nature. Swelling studies demonstrated the pH-dependent swelling behavior of GGS-SA beads. The beads showed higher swelling degrees in pH 7.4 than that in pH 1.2 due to the existence of anionic groups in the polymer chains. The drug release study showed that the amount of model drug, ibuprofen, released from the GGS-SA beads was higher in pH 7.4 than that in pH 1.2 due to the pH-dependent swelling behavior of the beads. MTT assay revealed that GGS-SA beads at a concentration range of 0-30μg/ml had no cytotoxic effect on the cultured mouse mesenchymal stem cells (C3H10T1/2). These results suggest that GGS-SA beads can be used as effective colon-specific drug delivery system with pH-dependent drug release ability. PMID:27212216

  3. Hepatocyte-Specific Disruption of CD36 Attenuates Fatty Liver and Improves Insulin Sensitivity in HFD-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Camella G; Tran, Jennifer L; Erion, Derek M; Vera, Nicholas B; Febbraio, Maria; Weiss, Ethan J

    2016-02-01

    CD36/FAT (fatty acid translocase) is associated with human and murine nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but it has been unclear whether it is simply a marker or whether it directly contributes to disease pathogenesis. Mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2L mice) have increased circulating free fatty acids (FAs), dramatically increased hepatic CD36 expression and profound fatty liver. To investigate the role of elevated CD36 in the development of fatty liver, we studied two models of hepatic steatosis, a genetic model (JAK2L mice) and a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced steatosis model. We deleted Cd36 specifically in hepatocytes of JAK2L mice to generate double knockouts and from wild-type mice to generate CD36L single-knockout mice. Hepatic Cd36 disruption in JAK2L livers significantly improved steatosis by lowering triglyceride, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol ester content. The largest differences in liver triglycerides were in species comprised of oleic acid (C18:1). Reduction in liver lipids correlated with an improvement in the inflammatory markers that were elevated in JAK2L mice, namely aspartate aminotransferase and alanine transaminase. Cd36 deletion in mice on HFD (CD36L-HFD) reduced liver lipid content and decreased hepatic 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-FA uptake as compared with CON-HFD. Additionally, CD36L-HFD mice had improved whole-body insulin sensitivity and reduced liver and serum inflammatory markers. Therefore, CD36 directly contributes to development of fatty liver under conditions of elevated free FAs by modulating the rate of FA uptake by hepatocytes. In HFD-fed animals, disruption of hepatic Cd36 protects against associated systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:26650570

  4. Sensitive and Specific Biomimetic Lipid Coated Microfluidics to Isolate Viable Circulating Tumor Cells and Microemboli for Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Yang; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Yang, Chih-Tsung; Wu, Liang-Chun; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Here we presented a simple and effective membrane mimetic microfluidic device with antibody conjugated supported lipid bilayer (SLB) "smart coating" to capture viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) directly from whole blood of all stage clinical cancer patients. The non-covalently bound SLB was able to promote dynamic clustering of lipid-tethered antibodies to CTC antigens and minimized non-specific blood cells retention through its non-fouling nature. A gentle flow further flushed away loosely-bound blood cells to achieve high purity of CTCs, and a stream of air foam injected disintegrate the SLB assemblies to release intact and viable CTCs from the chip. Human blood spiked cancer cell line test showed the ~95% overall efficiency to recover both CTCs and CTMs. Live/dead assay showed that at least 86% of recovered cells maintain viability. By using 2 mL of peripheral blood, the CTCs and CTMs counts of 63 healthy and colorectal cancer donors were positively correlated with the cancer progression. In summary, a simple and effective strategy utilizing biomimetic principle was developed to retrieve viable CTCs for enumeration, molecular analysis, as well as ex vivo culture over weeks. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity, it is the first time to show the high detection rates and quantity of CTCs in non-metastatic cancer patients. This work offers the values in both early cancer detection and prognosis of CTC and provides an accurate non-invasive strategy for routine clinical investigation on CTCs. PMID:26938471

  5. Assessment of clinical analytical sensitivity and specificity of next-generation sequencing for detection of simple and complex mutations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Detecting mutations in disease genes by full gene sequence analysis is common in clinical diagnostic laboratories. Sanger dideoxy terminator sequencing allows for rapid development and implementation of sequencing assays in the clinical laboratory, but it has limited throughput, and due to cost constraints, only allows analysis of one or at most a few genes in a patient. Next-generation sequencing (NGS), on the other hand, has evolved rapidly, although to date it has mainly been used for large-scale genome sequencing projects and is beginning to be used in the clinical diagnostic testing. One advantage of NGS is that many genes can be analyzed easily at the same time, allowing for mutation detection when there are many possible causative genes for a specific phenotype. In addition, regions of a gene typically not tested for mutations, like deep intronic and promoter mutations, can also be detected. Results Here we use 20 previously characterized Sanger-sequenced positive controls in disease-causing genes to demonstrate the utility of NGS in a clinical setting using standard PCR based amplification to assess the analytical sensitivity and specificity of the technology for detecting all previously characterized changes (mutations and benign SNPs). The positive controls chosen for validation range from simple substitution mutations to complex deletion and insertion mutations occurring in autosomal dominant and recessive disorders. The NGS data was 100% concordant with the Sanger sequencing data identifying all 119 previously identified changes in the 20 samples. Conclusions We have demonstrated that NGS technology is ready to be deployed in clinical laboratories. However, NGS and associated technologies are evolving, and clinical laboratories will need to invest significantly in staff and infrastructure to build the necessary foundation for success. PMID:23418865

  6. Hair Ethyl Glucuronide is Highly Sensitive and Specific for Detecting Moderate-to-Heavy Drinking in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Scott H.; Koch, David G.; Willner, Ira R.; Randall, Patrick K.; Reuben, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Hair ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is a promising biomarker of moderate-to-heavy alcohol consumption and may have utility in detecting and monitoring alcohol use in clinical populations where alcohol use is of particular importance. This study evaluated the relationship between hair EtG and drinking in patients with liver disease. Methods: The subjects (n = 200) were patients with liver disease who presented for care at a university medical center. Alcohol use during the 3 months preceding participation in the study was assessed, and a sample of hair was obtained for EtG testing. Classification of drinking status (any drinking or averaging at least 28 g per day) by hair EtG was evaluated, as well as the effects of liver disease severity and demographic and hair care factors. Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for detecting an average of 28 g or more per day during the prior 90 days was 0.93. The corresponding sensitivity and specificity of hair EtG ≥8 pg/mg for averaging at least 28 g of ethanol per day were 92 and 87%, respectively. Cirrhosis and gender may have a modest influence on the relationship between drinking and hair EtG. Conclusion: Hair EtG was highly accurate in differentiating subjects with liver disease averaging at least 28 g of ethanol per day from abstainers and lighter drinkers. PMID:23015609

  7. siRNA delivered by EGFR-specific scFv sensitizes EGFR-TKI-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Liu, Li; Wang, Yuan; Li, Fakai; Zhang, Jian; Ye, Mingxiang; Zhao, Hu; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Mi; Zhao, Jing; Yan, Bo; Yang, Angang; Feng, Huasong; Zhang, Rui; Ren, Xinling

    2016-01-01

    The overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is closely associated with a poor outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and EGFR is an ideal biomarker for the targeted therapy of NSCLC. Although patients with EGFR-activating mutations respond to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), they eventually acquire resistance, which typically results from a secondary EGFR mutation or the activation of other signaling pathways. Novel approaches to overcome or prevent EGFR-TKI resistance are clinically important. In this study, we developed an EGFR-scFv-arginine nonamer peptide fusion protein, s-9R, as an siRNA carrier. Here, we show that s-9R effectively and specifically delivers EGFR-siRNAs, KRAS-siRNA and MET-siRNA into NSCLC cells and silences the expression of target genes. The sensitivity of NSCLC cells to gefitinib was restored after treatment with the s-9R/siRNA complex, and the apoptosis rates of the treated cells were significantly higher than those of the control groups. Furthermore, the co-administration of s-9R/siRNA and gefitinib successfully suppressed the progression of H1975 xenograft tumors and extended the life span of tumor-bearing nude mice. Collectively, the results of this study provide not only a new scFv derivative for delivering siRNA into EGFR-overexpressing, TKI-resistant NSCLC cells but also a novel method for overcoming TKI resistance. PMID:26524539

  8. Quantitative wound healing studies using a portable, low cost, handheld near-infrared optical scanner: preliminary sensitivity and specificity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jiali; Rodriguez, Suset; Jayachandran, Maanasa; Solis, Elizabeth; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Perez-Clavijo, Francesco; Wigley, Stephen; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-03-01

    Lower extremity ulcers are devastating complications that are still un-recognized. To date, clinicians employ visual inspection of the wound site during its standard 4-week of healing process via monitoring of surface granulation. A novel ultra-portable near-infrared optical scanner (NIROS) has been developed at the Optical Imaging Laboratory that can perform non-contact 2D area imaging of the wound site. From preliminary studies it was observed that the nonhealing wounds had a greater absorption contrast with respect to the normal site, unlike in the healing wounds. Currently, non-contact near-infrared (NIR) imaging studies were carried out on 22 lower extremity wounds at two podiatric clinics, and the sensitivity and specificity of the scanner evaluated. A quantitative optical biometric was developed that differentiates healing from non-healing wounds, based on the threshold values obtained during ROC analysis. In addition, optical images of the wound obtained from weekly imaging studies are also assessed to determine the ability of the device to predict wound healing consistently on a periodic basis. This can potentially impact early intervention in the treatment of lower extremity ulcers when an objective and quantitative wound healing approach is developed. Lastly, the incorporation of MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) to automate the process of image acquisition, image processing and image analysis realizes the potential of NIROS to perform non-contact and real-time imaging on lower extremity wounds.

  9. Sensitive and site-specific identification of carboxymethylated and carboxyethylated peptides in tryptic digests of proteins and human plasma.

    PubMed

    Greifenhagen, Uta; Nguyen, Viet Duc; Moschner, Johann; Giannis, Athanassios; Frolov, Andrej; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Glycation refers to a nonenzymatic post-translational modification formed by the reaction of amino groups and reducing sugars. Consecutive oxidation and degradation can produce advanced glycation end products (AGEs), such as N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) and N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML). Although CEL and CML are considered to be markers of arteriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and aging, the modified proteins and the exact modification sites are mostly unknown due to their low frequency and a lack of enrichment strategies. Here, we report characteristic fragmentation patterns of CML- and CEL-containing peptides and two modification-specific reporter ions for each modification (CML, m/z 142.1 and 187.1; CEL, m/z 156.1 and 201.1). The protocol allowed sensitive and selective precursor ion scans to detect the modified peptides in complex sample mixtures. The corresponding m/z values identified eight CEL/CML-modification sites in glycated human serum albumin (HSA) by targeted nano-RPC-MS/MS. The same strategy revealed 21 CML sites in 17 different proteins, including modified lysine residues 88 and 396 of human serum albumin, in a pooled plasma sample that was obtained from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25423611

  10. Cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte/molecular beacon complex for sensitive, sequence-specific, real-time DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuli; Duan, Xinrui; Liu, Libin; An, Lingling; Feng, Fude; Wang, Shu

    2008-11-01

    A new fluorescence method has been developed for DNA detection at room temperature in a sensitive, selective, economical, and real-time manner that interfaces the superiority of a molecular beacon in mismatch discrimination with the light-harvesting property of water-soluble conjugated polyelectrolytes. The probe solution contains a cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte (PFP-NMe3+), a molecular beacon with a five base pairs double-stranded stem labeled at the 5'-terminus with fluorescein (DNA P-Fl), and ethidium bromide (EB, a specific intercalator of dsDNA). The electrostatic interactions between DNA P-Fl and PFP-NMe3+ keep them in close proximity, facilitating the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PFP-NMe3+ to fluorescein. Upon adding a complementary strand to the probe solution, the conformation of DNA P-Fl transits into dsDNA followed by the intercalation of EB into the grooves. Two-step FRET, from PFP-NMe3+ to DNA P-Fl (FRET-1), followed by FRET from DNA P-Fl to EB (FRET-2) takes place. In view of the observed fluorescein or EB emission changes, DNA can be detected in aqueous solution. Because the base mismatch in target DNA inhibits the transition of DNA P-Fl from the stem-loop to duplex structure, single nucleotide mismatch can be clearly detected. PMID:18834161

  11. pH-sensitive nanocargo based on smart polymer functionalized graphene oxide for site-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Thangavelu; Abdi, Syed Izhar Haider; Park, Soo-Young

    2013-04-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized covalently with pH-sensitive poly(2-(diethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDEA) by surface-initiated in situ atom transfer radical polymerization. The structure of the PDEA-grafted GO (GO-PDEA) were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and atomic force microscopy. The grafted PDEA endowed the GO sheets with good solubility and stability in physiological solutions. Simple physisorption by π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions on GO-PDEA can be used to load camptothecin (CPT), a widely used water-insoluble cancer drug. The loaded CPT was released only at the lower (acidic) pH normally found in a tumor environment but not in basic and neutral pH. GO-PDEA did not show practical toxicity to N2a cancer cells but the GO-PDEA-CPT complex exhibited high potency in killing N2a cancer cells in vitro. These results suggest that the GO-PDEA nanocargo carrier might be a promising material for site-specific anticancer drug delivery and controlled release. PMID:23454895

  12. Comparison of specificity and sensitivity of immunochemical and molecular techniques for determination of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Kokosková, B; Mráz, I; Fousek, J

    2010-05-01

    Detection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm), causing bacterial canker of tomato, was verified using PTA-ELISA and IFAS with PAbs of Neogen Europe Ltd. (UK), and with published and also laboratory-generated PCR primers from the Cmm tomatinase gene. The specificity of this technique was determined with 15 plant-pathogenic and 4 common, saprophytic bacteria. With IFAS, crossreactions were found for Pantoea dispersa, P. agglomerans and Rahnella aquatilis, and with PTA-ELISA for Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens, Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Dickeya sp. Cross-reactions with subspecies other than michiganensis were also found using both methods. Molecular methods were optimized by verification of annealing temperatures and times for both primers. Conditions were finally adjusted to 30 s at 65 degrees C for Dreier's and 10 s at 69 degrees C for our primer set. After this optimization, both primer pairs produced positive reaction only with Cmm. By means of PTA-ELISA and IFAS, Cmm strains were detected at a concentration up to 10(5) CFU/mL and 10(3) CFU/mL, respectively. The PCR test with bacterial cell suspensions reached a sensitivity of 10(3) CFU/mL with our designed primers and 104 CFU/mL with Dreier's primer pair. PMID:20526836

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in HIV-Infected Women: Need for Screening by a Sensitive and Specific Test

    PubMed Central

    Bhattar, Sonali; Chadha, Sanjim; Tripathi, Reva; Kaur, Ravinder; Sardana, Kabir

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive tract infection (RTIs)/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are recognized as a major public health problem, particularly due to their relationship with HIV infection. Early detection and treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis infection (CTI) among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women may impact heterosexual HIV transmission. A total of 120 participants were enrolled: 30 HIV seropositive women with symptoms of RTIs, 30 HIV seropositive women without symptoms of RTIs, 30 HIV seronegative women with symptoms of RTIs, and 30 HIV seronegative women without symptoms of RTIs. One endocervical swab was collected from all participants and CTI was detected by real-time PCR (COBAS TaqMan CT Test, v2.0). CTI was detected in 4 (6.67%) HIV-infected women and in 1 (1.67%) HIV-uninfected woman (OR 4.214; 95% CI 0.457–38.865). Vaginal discharge was present in almost half of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women; lower abdominal pain was present in 11 (18.3%) of HIV-infected and in 9 (15%) of HIV-uninfected women. This study showed that CTI is more prevalent among HIV-infected females as compared to HIV-uninfected females. As the use of real-time PCR is not feasible in most hospitals, efforts should be made to develop a simple, sensitive, and specific test to identify women with CTI for prevention of sequelae and HIV transmission. PMID:24382941

  14. Sensitive, Site-Specific, and Stable Vibrational Probe of Local Protein Environments: 4-Azidomethyl-L-Phenylalanine

    PubMed Central

    Bazewicz, Christopher G.; Liskov, Melanie T.; Hines, Kevin J.; Brewer, Scott H.

    2013-01-01

    We have synthesized the unnatural amino acid (UAA), 4-azidomethyl-Lphenylalanine (pN3CH2Phe), to serve as an effective vibrational reporter of local protein environments. The position, extinction coefficient, and sensitivity to local environment of the azide asymmetric stretch vibration of pN3CH2Phe are compared to the vibrational reporters: 4-cyano-L-phenylalanine (pCNPhe) and 4-azido-L-phenylalanine (pN3Phe). This UAA was genetically incorporated in a site-specific manner utilizing an engineered, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase in response to an amber codon with high efficiency and fidelity into two distinct sites in superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). This allowed for the dependence of the azide asymmetric stretch vibration of pN3CH2Phe to different protein environments to be measured. The photo-stability of pN3CH2Phe was also measured relative to the photoreactive UAA, pN3Phe. PMID:23865850

  15. Preschoolers Monitor the Relative Accuracy of Informants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasquini, Elisabeth S.; Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Koenig, Melissa; Harris, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    In 2 studies, the sensitivity of 3- and 4-year-olds to the previous accuracy of informants was assessed. Children viewed films in which 2 informants labeled familiar objects with differential accuracy (across the 2 experiments, children were exposed to the following rates of accuracy by the more and less accurate informants, respectively: 100% vs.…

  16. ELISA-PLA: A novel hybrid platform for the rapid, highly sensitive and specific quantification of proteins and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qing-He; Tao, Tao; Xie, Li-Qi; Lu, Hao-Jie

    2016-06-15

    Detection of low-abundance proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) remains a great challenge. A conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is not sensitive enough to detect low-abundance PTMs and suffers from nonspecific detection. Herein, a rapid, highly sensitive and specific platform integrating ELISA with a proximity ligation assay (PLA), termed ELISA-PLA, was developed. Using ELISA-PLA, the specificity was improved by the simultaneous and proximate recognition of targets through multiple probes, and the sensitivity was significantly improved by rolling circle amplification (RCA). For GFP, the limit of detection (LOD) was decreased by two orders of magnitude compared to that of ELISA. Using site-specific phospho-antibody and pan-specific phospho-antibody, ELISA-PLA was successfully applied to quantify the phosphorylation dynamics of ERK1/2 and the overall tyrosine phosphorylation level of ERK1/2, respectively. ELISA-PLA was also used to quantify the O-GlcNAcylation of AKT, c-Fos, CREB and STAT3, which is faster and more sensitive than the conventional immunoprecipitation and western blotting (IP-WB) method. As a result, the sample consumption of ELISA-PLA was reduced 40-fold compared to IP-WB. Therefore, ELISA-PLA could be a promising platform for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of proteins and PTMs. PMID:26866564

  17. Patch-Clamp Study of Hepatitis C p7 Channels Reveals Genotype-Specific Sensitivity to Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Breitinger, Ulrike; Farag, Noha S; Ali, Nourhan K M; Breitinger, Hans-Georg A

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis C is a major worldwide disease and health hazard, affecting ∼3% of the world population. The p7 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an intracellular ion channel and pH regulator that is involved in the viral replication cycle. It is targeted by various classical ion channel blockers. Here, we generated p7 constructs corresponding to HCV genotypes 1a, 2a, 3a, and 4a for recombinant expression in HEK293 cells, and studied p7 channels using patch-clamp recording techniques. The pH50 values for recombinant p7 channels were between 6.0 and 6.5, as expected for proton-activated channels, and current-voltage dependence did not show any differences between genotypes. Inhibition of p7-mediated currents by amantadine, however, exhibited significant, genotype-specific variation. The IC50 values of p7-1a and p7-4a were 0.7 ± 0.1 nM and 3.2 ± 1.2 nM, whereas p7-2a and p7-3a had 50- to 1000-fold lower sensitivity, with IC50 values of 2402 ± 334 nM and 344 ± 64 nM, respectively. The IC50 values for rimantadine were low across all genotypes, ranging from 0.7 ± 0.1 nM, 1.6 ± 0.6 nM, and 3.0 ± 0.8 nM for p7-1a, p7-3a, and p7-4a, respectively, to 24 ± 4 nM for p7-2a. Results from patch-clamp recordings agreed well with cellular assays of p7 activity, namely, measurements of intracellular pH and hemadsorption assays, which confirmed the much reduced amantadine sensitivity of genotypes 2a and 3a. Thus, our results establish patch-clamp studies of recombinant viroporins as a valid analytical tool that can provide quantitative information about viroporin channel properties, complementing established techniques. PMID:27276260

  18. Meditation Experience Predicts Introspective Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Kieran C. R.; Zakarauskas, Pierre; Dixon, Matt; Ellamil, Melissa; Thompson, Evan; Christoff, Kalina

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of subjective reports, especially those involving introspection of one's own internal processes, remains unclear, and research has demonstrated large individual differences in introspective accuracy. It has been hypothesized that introspective accuracy may be heightened in persons who engage in meditation practices, due to the highly introspective nature of such practices. We undertook a preliminary exploration of this hypothesis, examining introspective accuracy in a cross-section of meditation practitioners (1–15,000 hrs experience). Introspective accuracy was assessed by comparing subjective reports of tactile sensitivity for each of 20 body regions during a ‘body-scanning’ meditation with averaged, objective measures of tactile sensitivity (mean size of body representation area in primary somatosensory cortex; two-point discrimination threshold) as reported in prior research. Expert meditators showed significantly better introspective accuracy than novices; overall meditation experience also significantly predicted individual introspective accuracy. These results suggest that long-term meditators provide more accurate introspective reports than novices. PMID:23049790

  19. Transcutaneous oxygen tension measurements following peripheral transluminal angioplasty procedure has more specificity and sensitivity than ankle brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, M; Bernal, F L; Felices, J M; Achel, G D; Canteras, M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the superiority of transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) before, during and after peripheral transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in comparison with ankle brachial index (ABI) in patients with diabetes. Methods: 40 consecutive patients with diabetes treated by PTA where included. This study shows results before, during and after PTA and their progression for 8 weeks. Results: The TcPO2 increased from 28.11 ± 8.1 to 48.03 ± 8.4 mmHg, 8 weeks after PTA (p < 0.001). The ABI increased from 0.48 ± 0.38 to 0.77 ± 0.39 after PTA (p < 0.001). After PTA, the stenosis of the vessel decreased from 58.33 ± 20.07% to 21.87 ± 13.57% (p < 0.001). TcPO2 was determined in all the patients, but ABI could not be determined in all patients. Furthermore, we determined patients with “false negatives” with an improvement in ABI and “false positives” in 12.5% of patients. Additionally, in this study, we monitored TcPO2 while performing PTA, revealing variations in each phase of the radiological procedure. Conclusion: The increase in TcPO2 measurements following PTA procedure has more specificity and sensitivity than does ABI. The use of TcPO2 may represent a more accurate alternative than traditional methods (ABI) used in assessing PTA results. The TcPO2 also allows the radiologist to assess changes in tissue oxygenation during PTA, allowing changes to the procedure and subsequent treatment. Advances in knowledge: This is the first time that a graph is shown with TcPO2 results during PTA performance in many patients. PMID:25431933

  20. Semi-Metric Topology of the Human Connectome: Sensitivity and Specificity to Autism and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Simas, Tiago; Chattopadhyay, Shayanti; Hagan, Cindy; Kundu, Prantik; Patel, Ameera; Holt, Rosemary; Floris, Dorothea; Graham, Julia; Ooi, Cinly; Tait, Roger; Spencer, Michael; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Sahakian, Barbara; Bullmore, Ed; Goodyer, Ian; Suckling, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The human functional connectome is a graphical representation, consisting of nodes connected by edges, of the inter-relationships of blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) time-series measured by MRI from regions encompassing the cerebral cortices and, often, the cerebellum. Semi-metric analysis of the weighted, undirected connectome distinguishes an edge as either direct (metric), such that there is no alternative path that is accumulatively stronger, or indirect (semi-metric), where one or more alternative paths exist that have greater strength than the direct edge. The sensitivity and specificity of this method of analysis is illustrated by two case-control analyses with independent, matched groups of adolescents with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Results Significance differences in the global percentage of semi-metric edges was observed in both groups, with increases in ASC and decreases in MDD relative to controls. Furthermore, MDD was associated with regional differences in left frontal and temporal lobes, the right limbic system and cerebellum. In contrast, ASC had a broadly increased percentage of semi-metric edges with a more generalised distribution of effects and some areas of reduction. In summary, MDD was characterised by localised, large reductions in the percentage of semi-metric edges, whilst ASC is characterised by more generalised, subtle increases. These differences were corroborated in greater detail by inspection of the semi-metric backbone for each group; that is, the sub-graph of semi-metric edges present in >90% of participants, and by nodal degree differences in the semi-metric connectome. Conclusion These encouraging results, in what we believe is the first application of semi-metric analysis to neuroimaging data, raise confidence in the methodology as potentially capable of detection and characterisation of a range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:26308854

  1. Sensitivity and specificity of QTc dispersion for identification of risk of cardiac death in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Darbar, D.; Luck, J.; Davidson, N.; Pringle, T.; Main, G.; McNeill, G.; Struthers, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether QTc dispersion, which is easily obtained from a standard electrocardiogram, can predict those patients with peripheral vascular disease who will subsequently suffer a cardiac death, despite having no cardiac symptoms or signs. DESIGN: Patients with peripheral vascular disease were followed up for five years after they had had coronary angiography, radionuclide ventriculography, and their QTc dispersion calculated from their 12 lead electrocardiogram. SUBJECTS: 49 such patients were then divided into three groups: survivors (34), cardiac death (12), and non-cardiac death (3). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Survival. RESULTS: The mean (SD; range) ejection fractions were similar in all three groups: survivors 45.9 (11.0; 27.0-52.0), cardiac death 44.0 (7.90; 28.5-59.0), and non-cardiac death 45.3 (4.55; 39.0-50.0). QTc dispersion was significantly prolonged in the cardiac death group compared with in the survivors (86.3(23.9; 41.0-139) v 56.5 (25.4; 25.0-164); P = 0.002). A QTc dispersion > or = 60 ms had a 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in predicting cardiac death, QTc dispersion in patients with diffuse coronary artery disease was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than in those with no disease or disease affecting one, two, or three vessels. CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong link between QTc dispersion and cardiac death in patients with peripheral vascular disease. QTc dispersion may therefore be a cheap and non-invasive way of assessing the risk of cardiac death in patients with peripheral vascular disease. PMID:8611874

  2. Sensitivity and specificity of culture and PCR of smegma samples of bulls experimentally infected with Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Cobo, E R; Favetto, P H; Lane, V M; Friend, A; VanHooser, K; Mitchell, J; BonDurant, R H

    2007-10-01

    The sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of different testing schemes were estimated for detecting Tritrichomonas foetus (T. foetus) in smegma samples from experimentally infected bulls. Culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on smegma samples were evaluated alone and in parallel testing. Mature dairy bulls (n=79) were intrapreputially inoculated with T. foetus (n=19); Campylobacter (C.) fetus venerealis (n=13); both T. foetus and C. fetus venerealis (n=11); Tetratrichomonas spp. (n=9); C. fetus fetus (n=8); or were not inoculated (n=19). For each bull, smegma samples were collected for 6 week post-inoculation and tested for T. foetus by In Pouch TF culture and PCR. Most T. foetus-inoculated bulls became infected, according to culture (86.7%), PCR (90.0%), and both tests together (93.3%). In T. foetus-inoculated bulls, both tests combined in parallel on a single sample had a Se (78.3%) and Sp (98.5%) similar to two cultures (Se 76.0%, Sp 98.5%) or two PCR (Se 78.0%, Sp 96.7%) sampled on consecutive weeks. The PCR on three consecutive weekly samples (Se 85.0%, Sp 95.4%) and both tests applied in parallel on three consecutive weekly samples (Se 87.5%, Sp 95.6%) were similar to the current gold-standard of six weekly cultures (Se 86.7% and Sp 97.5%). Both tests used in parallel six times had the highest Se (93.3%), with similar Sp (92.5%). Tetratrichomonas spp. were only sporadically detected by culture or PCR. In conclusion, we have proposed alternative strategies for T. foetus diagnostics (for the AI industry), including a combination of tests and repeat testing strategies that may reduce time and cost for bull surveillance. PMID:17681370

  3. Comparing the Predictive Value of Task Performance and Task-Specific Sensitivity During Physical Function Testing Among People With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Timothy H; Edwards, Robert R; Finan, Patrick H; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Smith, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional cohort. Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of pain and mobility restriction. Past research has advocated the use of brief, functional tasks to evaluate these restrictions, such as the six-minute-walk test and the timed up-and-go test. Typically, only task performance (ie, walking distance, completion time) is used to inform clinical practice. Recent research, however, suggests that individual variance in how people feel while completing these tasks (ie, task sensitivity) might also have important clinical value. Objective To compare the predictive value of task performance and task-specific sensitivity in determining OA-related physical function (measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) and pain-related interference (measured by the Multidimensional Pain Inventory). Methods One hundred eight participants with chronic knee OA completed the six-minute-walk test and the timed up-and-go test, and reported levels of discomfort and affective response (mood) associated with each test. Results In separate regression models, both task performance and task-specific sensitivity predicted OA-related physical function and pain-related interference. A final regression model including all significant predictors showed that task-specific sensitivity (specifically, post-six-minute-walk discomfort) emerged as a unique predictor of both outcomes. Conclusion These findings highlight the value of a novel clinical assessment strategy for patients with knee OA. While clinicians commonly focus on how patients perform on standardized functional tasks, these results highlight the value of also considering levels of posttask sensitivity. Measures of task-specific sensitivity relate to Maitland's concept of pain irritability, which may be a useful framework for future research on sensitizing factors and pain-related disability. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(5):346-356. Epub 21 Mar 2016. doi:10

  4. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Predictive Values of Pediatric Metabolic Syndrome Components in Relation to Adult Metabolic Syndrome: The Princeton LRC Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Terry T-K; Nansel, Tonja R.; Belsheim, Allen R.; Morrison, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To estimate the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of pediatric metabolic syndrome (MetS) components (obesity, fasting glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and blood pressure) at various cutoffs in relation to adult MetS. Study design Data from the NHLBI Lipid Research Clinics (LRC) Princeton Prevalence Study (1973–76) and the Princeton Follow-up Study (PFS, 2000-4) were used to calculate sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for each component at a given cutoff, as well as for aggregates of components. Results Individual pediatric components alone showed low to moderate sensitivity, high specificity, and moderate predictive values in relation to adult MetS. When all five pediatric MetS components were considered, the presence of at least one abnormality had higher sensitivity for adult MetS than individual components alone. When multiple abnormalities were mandatory for MetS, positive predictive value was high and sensitivity was low. Childhood body mass alone showed neither high sensitivity nor high positive predictive value for adult MetS. Conclusions Considering multiple metabolic variables in childhood can improve the predictive utility for adult MetS, compared to each component or body mass alone. MetS variables may be useful for identifying some at risk children for prevention interventions. PMID:18206687

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of histology for diagnoses of four common pathogens and detection of nontarget pathogens in adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in fresh water.

    PubMed

    Kent, Michael L; Benda, Susan; St-Hilaire, Sophie; Schreck, Carl B

    2013-05-01

    Histology is often underutilized in aquatic animal disease screening and diagnostics. The agreement between histological classifications of infection and results using diagnostic testing from the American Fisheries Society's Blue Book was conducted with 4 common salmon pathogens: Aeromonas salmonicida, Renibacterium salmoninarum, Ceratomyxa shasta, and Nanophyetus salmincola. Adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in Oregon were evaluated, and agreement between tests was calculated. Live and dead (both pre- and postspawning) salmon were collected from the Willamette River, Oregon, its tributaries, the Willamette Hatchery, and after holding in cool, pathogen-free water during maturation at Oregon State University. Sensitivity and specificity of histology compared to Blue Book methods for all fish, live fish only, and dead (pre- and postspawned combined) fish only were, respectively, as follows: A. salmonicida (n = 105): specificity 87.5%, 87.5%, 87.5% and sensitivity 38.6%, 14.8%, 60.0%; R. salmoninarum (n = 111): specificity 91.9%, 85.7%, 97.7% and sensitivity 16.0%, 7.1%, 27.2%; C. shasta (n = 136): specificity 56.0%, 63.3%, 28.6% and sensitivity 83.3%, 86.2%, 71.4%; N. salmincola (n = 228): specificity 68.2%, 66.7%, not possible to calculate for dead fish and sensitivity 83.5%, 80.5%, 87.3%. The specificity was good for bacterial pathogens. This was not the case for C. shasta, likely due to detection of presporogenic forms only by histology. Sensitivity of histology for bacterial pathogens was low with the exception of dead fish with A. salmonicida. Kappa analysis for agreement between Blue Book and histology methods was poor to moderate. However, histological observations revealed the presence of other pathogens that would not be detected by other methods. PMID:23536613

  6. Silicon photonic crystal microarrays for high throughput label-free detection of lung cancer cell line lysates with sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Gemmill, Robert M.; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-03-01

    Detection of biomolecules on microarrays based on label-free on-chip optical biosensors is very attractive since this format avoids complex chemistries caused by steric hindrance of labels. Application areas include the detection of cancers and allergens, and food-borne pathogens to name a few. We have demonstrated photonic crystal microcavity biosensors with high sensitivity down to 1pM concentrations (67pg/ml). High sensitivities were achieved by slow light engineering which reduced the radiation loss and increased the stored energy in the photonic crystal microcavity resonance mode. Resonances with high quality factor Q~26,760 in liquid ambient, coupled with larger optical mode volumes allowed enhanced interaction with the analyte biomolecules which resulted in sensitivities down to 10 cells per micro-liter to lung cancer cell lysates. The specificity of detection was ensured by multiplexed detections from multiple photonic crystal microcavities arrayed on the arms of a multimode interference power splitter. Specific binding interactions and control experiments were performed simultaneously at the same instant of time with the same 60 microliter sample volume. Specificity is further ensured by sandwich assay methods in the multiplexed experiment. Sandwich assay based amplification increased the sensitivity further resulting in the detection of lung cancer cell lysates down to concentrations of 2 cells per micro-liter. The miniaturization enabled by photonic crystal biosensors coupled with waveguide interconnected layout thus offers the potential of high throughput proteomics with high sensitivity and specificity.

  7. High-accuracy measurements of N2O concentration and site-specific nitrogen isotopes in small or high concentration samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M. R.; Arata, C.; Huang, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) gas is among the major contributors to global warming and ozone depletion in stratosphere. Quantitative estimate of N­2O production in various pathways and N­2O fluxes across different reservoirs is the key to understanding the role of N­2O in the global change. To achieve this goal, accurate and concurrent measurement of both N2O concentration ([N2O]) and its site-specific isotopic composition (SP-δ15N), namely δ15Nα and δ15Nβ, is desired. Recent developments in Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) have enabled high precision measurements of [N2O] and SP-δ15N of a continuous gas flow. However, many N­­2O samples are discrete with limited volume (< 500 ml), and/or high [N2O] (> 2 ppm), and are not suitable for direct measurements by CRDS. Here we present results of a Small Sample Isotope Module 2 (SSIM2) which is coupled to and automatically coordinated with a Picarro isotopic N2O CRDS analyzer to handle and measure high concentration and/or small volume samples. The SSIM2 requires 20 ml of sample per analysis, and transfers the sample to the CRDS for high precision measurement. When the sample injection is < 20 ml, a zero gas is optionally filled to make up the volume. We used the SSIM2 to dilute high [N2O] samples and < 20 ml samples, and tested the effect of dilution on the measured SP-δ15N. In addition, we employed and tested a newly developed double injection method for samples adequate for two 20 ml injections. After the SSIM2 and the CRDS cavity was primed with the first injection, the second injection, which has negligible dilution of the sample, can be accurately measured for both [N2O] and SP-δ15N. Results of these experiments indicate that the precision of SSIM2-CRDS is similar to that of the continuous measurements using the CRDS alone, and that dilution has minimal effect on SP-δ15N, as along as the [N2O] is > 300 ppb after dilution. Overall, the precision of SP-δ15N measured using the SSIM2 is < 0.5 ‰.

  8. The combination of health anxiety and somatic symptoms: Specificity to anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns among patients in primary care.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Thomas A; Kelley, Lance P; Griggs, Jackson O

    2016-05-30

    Prior research has found that health anxiety is related to poor patient outcomes in primary care settings. Health anxiety is characterized by at least two presentations: with either severe or no/mild somatic symptoms. Preliminary data indicate that anxiety sensitivity may be important for understanding the presentation of health anxiety with severe somatic symptoms. We further examined whether the combination of health anxiety and somatic symptoms was related to anxiety sensitivity. Participants were adults presenting for treatment at a community health center (N=538). As predicted, the interactive effect between health anxiety and somatic symptoms was associated with anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns. Health anxiety shared a stronger association with anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns when coupled with severe, relative to mild, somatic symptoms. Contrary to predictions, the interactive effect was not associated with the other dimensions of anxiety sensitivity. We discuss the potential relevancy of anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns to the combined presentation of health anxiety and severe somatic symptoms, as well as how this dimension of anxiety sensitivity could be treated in primary care settings. PMID:27137971

  9. Meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy studies in mental health

    PubMed Central

    Takwoingi, Yemisi; Riley, Richard D; Deeks, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explain methods for data synthesis of evidence from diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) studies, and to illustrate different types of analyses that may be performed in a DTA systematic review. Methods We described properties of meta-analytic methods for quantitative synthesis of evidence. We used a DTA review comparing the accuracy of three screening questionnaires for bipolar disorder to illustrate application of the methods for each type of analysis. Results The discriminatory ability of a test is commonly expressed in terms of sensitivity (proportion of those with the condition who test positive) and specificity (proportion of those without the condition who test negative). There is a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity, as an increasing threshold for defining test positivity will decrease sensitivity and increase specificity. Methods recommended for meta-analysis of DTA studies --such as the bivariate or hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) model --jointly summarise sensitivity and specificity while taking into account this threshold effect, as well as allowing for between study differences in test performance beyond what would be expected by chance. The bivariate model focuses on estimation of a summary sensitivity and specificity at a common threshold while the HSROC model focuses on the estimation of a summary curve from studies that have used different thresholds. Conclusions Meta-analyses of diagnostic accuracy studies can provide answers to important clinical questions. We hope this article will provide clinicians with sufficient understanding of the terminology and methods to aid interpretation of systematic reviews and facilitate better patient care. PMID:26446042

  10. A New Diagnostic system for Ultra Sensitive and Specific Detection and Quantitation of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus”, the Bacterium Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, an ultra sensitive and quantitative diagnostic system for “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” was developed. This system adapts a nested PCR and Taq-Man PCR in a single closed tube. The procedure involves two steps of PCR using the species specific outer and inner primer pairs. Differ...

  11. The Witch Weed Is Able To Detect a Wide Range of Chemicals from Plants through Its Sensitive and Specific Receptors: The Strigolactone Story Updated.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Striga is a very noxious weed because of the molecular versatility of its protein receptors to strigolactone and its derivatives. Striga in fact parasitizes host plants and this triggers its seeds production. At molecular level, this is attained by strigolactone detection by a set of receptors with broad specificity and high sensitivity. PMID:26581190

  12. Reliability, Validity, and Sensitivity to Change of Turkish Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale in Patients with Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karapolat, Hale; Eyigor, Sibel; Kirazli, Yesim; Celebisoy, Nese; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and sensitivity to change of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) in people with peripheral vestibular disorder. Thirty-three patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular disease were included in the study. Patients were…

  13. Extraction and Refinement Strategy for Detection of Autism in 18-Month-Olds: A Guarantee of Higher Sensitivity and Specificity in the Process of Mass Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honda, Hideo; Shimizu, Yasuo; Nitto, Yukari; Imai, Miho; Ozawa, Takeshi; Iwasa, Mitsuaki; Shiga, Keiko; Hira, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    Background: For early detection of autism, it is difficult to maintain an efficient level of sensitivity and specificity based on observational data from a single screening. The Extraction and Refinement (E&R) Strategy utilizes a public children's health surveillance program to produce maximum efficacy in early detection of autism. In the…

  14. Sensitive and specific detection of classical scrapie prions in the brain of goats by real-time quaking-induced conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) is a rapid, specific, and sensitive prion seeding activity detection assay that uses recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen) to detect sub-infectious levels of the abnormal isoforms of the prion protein (PrPSc). Although RT-QuIC has been successfully us...

  15. Do We Know Who Will Drop out?: A Review of the Predictors of Dropping out of High School--Precision, Sensitivity, and Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Alex J.; Sprott, Ryan; Taff, Sherry A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the literature on the most accurate indicators of students at risk of dropping out of high school. We used Relative Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis to compare the sensitivity and specificity of 110 dropout flags across 36 studies. Our results indicate that 1) ROC analysis provides a means to compare…

  16. Influence of different length linker containing DHEA-7-CMO-enzyme conjugates on sensitivity and specificity of DHEA-17-CMO-antibody.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K; Kariya, Kiran P; Singh, Rita; Kumar, Dinesh; Pandit, Deepa; Ujawane, Pragati; Kumari, Poonam; Pandey, Bhavana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of spacers in enzyme conjugates is known to exert an influence on the assay parameters of steroid enzyme immunoassays. We have introduced 3 to 10 atomic length linkers between enzyme and steroid moieties and studied their effects on sensitivity and specificity of dehydroepiandrosterone enzyme immunoassays. Dehydroepiandrosterone-17-carboxymethyloxime-bovine serum albumin (DHEA-17-CMO-BSA) was used as an immunogen to raise the antiserum in New Zealand white rabbits. Five enzyme conjugates were prepared using DHEA-7-CMO as carboxylic derivative of DHEA and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as label. These were DHEA-7-CMO-HRP, DHEA-7-CMO-urea-HRP (DHEA-7-CMO-U-HRP), DHEA-7-CMO-ehylenediamine-HRP (DHEA-7-CMO-EDA-HRP), DHEA-7-CMO-carbohydrazide-HRP (DHEA-7-CMO-CH-HRP), and DHEA-7-CMO-adipic acid dihydrazide-HRP (DHEA-7-CMO-ADH-HRP). The influence of different atomic length linkers on sensitivity and specificity were studied with reference to label without linker. The results of the present investigation revealed that with incorporation of linkers, the sensitivity improves, whereas specificity only marginally improves. These differential behaviors of various linkers toward the sensitivity and specificity of assays might be due to the difference in the magnitude of overall forces of attraction between the antibody and the enzyme conjugates. PMID:21728820

  17. Highly broad-specific and sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for screening sulfonamides: Assay optimization and application to milk samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A broad-specific and sensitive immunoassay for the detection of sulfonamides was developed by optimizing the conditions of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in regard to different monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), assay format, immunoreagents, and several physicochemical factors (pH, salt, de...

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in assessment of Meniscal and ACL tear: Correlation with arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yaqoob, Jamal; Alam, Muhammad Shahbaz; Khalid, Nadeem

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in injuries related to anterior cruciate ligament and menisci and compare its effectiveness with that of arthroscopy. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Radiology & Medical Imaging of Dallah Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from September 2012 to March 2014. Fifty four patients (including 30 men and 24 women) with internal derangement of knee referred from the orthopedic consulting clinics underwent MR imaging followed by arthroscopic evaluation. The presence of meniscal and ligamentous abnormality on the imaging was documented by two trained radiologist. Findings were later compared with arthroscopic findings. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MR imaging for menisci and ACL injury were calculated: 100% sensitivity, 88.4% specificity, 90% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, and 94.4% accuracy were noted for medial meniscal injury. Similarly, MR had sensitivity of 85.7%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 85.7%, negative predictive value of 95%, and accuracy of 92.5% for lateral meniscal injuries. Likewise, anterior cruciate ligament had 91.6% sensitivity, 95.2% specificity, 84.6% positive predictive value, 97.5% negative predictive value, and 94.4% accuracy. Conclusion: MRI is extremely helpful in identifying meniscal and anterior cruciate ligaments tears. MR imaging has high negative predictive value making it better choice as screening tool compared to diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation in most patients with soft tissue trauma to knee. PMID:26101472

  19. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 Alleviates Food Allergic Manifestations in Sensitized Mice by Reducing IL-13 Expression Specifically in the Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Zuercher, Adrian W.; Weiss, Marietta; Holvoet, Sébastien; Moser, Mireille; Moussu, Hélène; van Overtvelt, Laurence; Horiot, Stéphane; Moingeon, Philippe; Nutten, Sophie; Prioult, Guénolée; Singh, Anurag; Mercenier, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Utilizing a food allergy murine model, we have investigated the intrinsic antiallergic potential of the Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 strain. Methods. BALB/c mice were sensitized at weekly intervals with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) by the oral route for 7 weeks. In this model, an oral challenge with a high dose of OVA at the end of the sensitization period leads to clinical symptoms. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 was given to mice via the drinking water during sensitization (prevention phase) or after sensitization (management phase). Results. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 administration to sensitized mice strikingly reduced allergic manifestations in the management phase upon challenge, when compared to control mice. No preventive effect was observed with the strain. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased relative expression levels of the Th-2 cytokine, IL-13, and associated chemokines CCL11 (eotaxin-1) and CCL17 (TARC) in the ileum. No effect was observed in the jejunum. Conclusion/Significance. These results taken together designate Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 as a candidate probiotic strain appropriate in the management of allergic symptoms. PMID:21961022

  20. A retrospective evaluation of species-specific sensitivity for neurological signs in toxicological studies: Is the dog more sensitive than the non-human primate?

    PubMed

    Backes, Kathrin; Lorenz, Helga; Laplanche, Loic; Hudzik, Thomas J; Potschka, Heidrun; Hempel, Katja

    2016-01-22

    Selection of the appropriate non-rodent species in preclinical programs is crucial for good translatability and human safety. There is no data available in the literature which provides exact comparison of dog and non-human primate (NHP) sensitivity regarding neurological signs in toxicological studies. We performed a retrospective analysis of 174 toxicity studies with 15 neuroscience substances. Neurological signs in dogs and NHPs were evaluated in correlation to exposure data. Overall incidence of substance induced convulsions was similar in both species and no gender differences were observed. The reported liability of beagles to spontaneous convulsions was not confirmed in our studies. The symptom tremor showed the best inter-species translatability. The current toxicological study design does not include exposure assessment at the time-point of neurological signs, therefore, we propose to include additional toxicokinetic samples. Our analysis revealed factors including housing, handling, and behavior, which prevents direct species comparison. In addition only one non-rodent species is routinely tested in development programs, therefore data for both species is rare. We however, had sufficient data which enabled comparison for one compound. In the spirit of 3Rs further examples should be evaluated. PMID:26732424

  1. Evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diagnosing brucellosis in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Gorsich, Erin E; Bengis, Roy G; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Jolles, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    Brucellosis is a disease of veterinary and public health importance worldwide. In sub-Saharan Africa, where the bacterium Brucella abortus has been identified in several free-ranging wildlife species, successful disease control may be dependent on accurate detection in wildlife reservoirs, including African buffalo (Syncerus caffer). We estimated the sensitivity and specificity of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (IDEXX Brucellosis Serum Ab test, IDEXX Laboratories, Westbrook, Maine, USA) for B. abortus based on a data set of 571 serum samples from 258 buffalo in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. We defined a pseudogold standard test result as those buffalo that were consistently positive or negative on two additional serologic tests, namely, the rose bengal test (RBT) and the complement fixation test (CFT). The ELISA's cutoff value was selected using receiver operating characteristics analysis, the pseudogold standard, and a threshold criterion that maximizes the total sensitivity and specificity. Then, we estimated the sensitivity and specificity of all three tests using Bayesian inference and latent class analysis. The ELISA had an estimated sensitivity of 0.928 (95% Bayesian posterior credibility interval [95% BCI] = 0.869-0.974) and specificity of 0.870 (95% BCI = 0.836-0.900). Compared with the ELISA, the RBT had a higher estimated sensitivity of 0.986 (95% BCI = 0.928-0.999), and both the RBT and CFT had higher specificities, estimated to be 0.992 (95% BCI = 0.971-0.996) and 0.998 (95% BCI = 0.992-0.999), respectively. Therefore, no single serologic test perfectly detected the antibody. However, after adjustment of cutoff values for South African conditions, the IDEXX Brucellosis Serum Ab Test may be a valuable additional screening test for brucellosis in Kruger National Park's African buffalo. PMID:25397998

  2. 64 slice-coronary computed tomography sensitivity and specificity in the evaluation of coronary artery bypass graft stenosis: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Umberto; Iannaccone, Mario; d'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Barbero, Cristina; Mohamed, Abdirashid; Annone, Umberto; Benedetto, Sara; Celentani, Dario; Gagliardi, Marco; Moretti, Claudio; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-08-01

    A non-invasive approach to define grafts patency and stenosis in the follow-up of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients may be an interesting alternative to coronary angiography. 64-slice-coronary computed tomography is nowadays a diffused non-invasive method that permits an accurate evaluation of coronary stenosis, due to a high temporal and spatial resolution. However, its sensitivity and specificity in CABG evaluation has to be clearly defined, since published studies used different protocols and scanners. We collected all studies investigating patients with stable symptoms and previous CABG and reporting the comparison between diagnostic performances of invasive coronary angiography and 64-slice-coronary computed tomography. As a result, sensitivity and specificity of 64-slice-coronary computed tomography for CABG occlusion were 0.99 (95% CI 0.97-1.00) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99-1.00) with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.99. 64-slice-coronary computed tomography sensitivity and specificity for the presence of any CABG stenosis >50% were 0.98 (95% CI: 0.97-0.99) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.96-0.98), while AUC was 0.99. At meta-regression, neither the age nor the time from graft implantation had effect on sensitivity and specificity of 64-slice-coronary computed tomography detection of significant CABG stenosis or occlusion. In conclusion 64-slice-coronary computed tomography confirmed its high sensitivity and specificity in CABG stenosis or occlusion evaluation. PMID:27140337

  3. Laboratory evaluation on the sensitivity and specificity of a novel and rapid detection method for malaria diagnosis based on magneto-optical technology (MOT)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study describes the laboratory evaluation of a novel diagnostic platform for malaria. The Magneto Optical Test (MOT) is based on the bio-physical detection of haemozoin in clinical samples. Having an assay time of around one minute, it offers the potential of high throughput screening. Methods Blood samples of confirmed malaria patients from different regions of Africa, patients with other diseases and healthy non-endemic controls were used in the present study. The samples were analysed with two reference tests, i.e. an histidine rich protein-2 based rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and a conventional Pan-Plasmodium PCR, and the MOT as index test. Data were entered in 2 × 2 tables and analysed for sensitivity and specificity. The agreement between microscopy, RDT and PCR and the MOT assay was determined by calculating Kappa values with a 95% confidence interval. Results The observed sensitivity/specificity of the MOT test in comparison with clinical description, RDT or PCR ranged from 77.2 - 78.8% (sensitivity) and from 72.5 - 74.6% (specificity). In general, the agreement between MOT and the other assays is around 0.5 indicating a moderate agreement between the reference and the index test. However, when RDT and PCR are compared to each other, an almost perfect agreement can be observed (k = 0.97) with a sensitivity and specificity of >95%. Conclusions Although MOT sensitivity and specificity are currently not yet at a competing level compared to other diagnostic test, such as PCR and RDTs, it has a potential to rapidly screen patients for malaria in endemic as well as non-endemic countries. PMID:20642834

  4. Sound-induced enhancement of low-intensity vision: Multisensory influences on human sensory-specific cortices and thalamic bodies relate to perceptual enhancement of visual detection sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Noesselt, Toemme; Tyll, Sascha; Boehler, Carsten Nicolas; Budinger, Eike; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Driver, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Combining information across modalities can affect sensory performance. We studied how co-occurring sounds modulate behavioral visual detection sensitivity (d’), and neural responses, for visual stimuli of higher or lower intensity. Co-occurrence of a sound enhanced human detection sensitivity for lower- but not higher-intensity visual targets. fMRI linked this to boosts in activity-levels for sensory-specific visual and auditory cortex, plus multisensory superior temporal sulcus (STS), specifically for a lower-intensity visual event when paired with a sound. Thalamic structures in visual and auditory pathways, the lateral and medial geniculate bodies respectively (LGB, MGB) showed a similar pattern. Subject-by-subject psychophysical benefits correlated with corresponding fMRI-signals in visual, auditory and multisensory regions. We also analysed differential ‘coupling’ patterns of LGB and MGB with other regions in the different experimental conditions. Effective-connectivity analyses showed enhanced coupling of sensory-specific thalamic bodies with the affected cortical sites during enhanced detection of lower-intensity visual events paired with sounds. Coupling strength between visual and auditory thalamus with cortical regions, including STS, co-varied parametrically with the psychophysical benefit for this specific multisensory context. Our results indicate that multisensory enhancement of detection sensitivity for low-contrast visual stimuli by co-occurring sounds reflects a brain network involving not only established multisensory STS and sensory-specific cortex, but also visual and auditory thalamus. PMID:20943902

  5. Pre-study feasibility and identifying sensitivity analyses for protocol pre-specification in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Girman, Cynthia J; Faries, Douglas; Ryan, Patrick; Rotelli, Matt; Belger, Mark; Binkowitz, Bruce; O'Neill, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The use of healthcare databases for comparative effectiveness research (CER) is increasing exponentially despite its challenges. Researchers must understand their data source and whether outcomes, exposures and confounding factors are captured sufficiently to address the research question. They must also assess whether bias and confounding can be adequately minimized. Many study design characteristics may impact on the results; however, minimal if any sensitivity analyses are typically conducted, and those performed are post hoc. We propose pre-study steps for CER feasibility assessment and to identify sensitivity analyses that might be most important to pre-specify to help ensure that CER produces valid interpretable results. PMID:24969153

  6. A Highly Sensitive and Selective Competition Assay for the Detection of Cysteine Using Mercury-Specific DNA, Hg2+ and Sybr Green I

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Gao, Shuli; Liu, Quanwen; Pan, Dun; Wang, Lihua; Ren, Shuzhen; Ding, Min; Chen, Jingwen; Liu, Gang

    2011-01-01

    We here report a rapid, sensitive, selective and label-free fluorescence detection method for cysteine (Cys). The conformation of mercury-specific DNA (MSD) changes from a random coil form to a hairpin structure in the presence of Hg2+ due to the formation of a thymine-Hg2+-thymine (T-Hg2+-T) complex. Cys can selectively coordinate with Hg2+ and extract it from the thymine-Hg2+-thymine complex. The hairpin structure dehybridizes and the fluorescence intensity of Sybr Green I (SG) decreases upon addition of Cys because SG efficiently discriminates mercury-specific DNA and mercury-specific DNA/Hg2+ complex. The detection can be finished within 5 min with high sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, we can obtain variable dynamic ranges for Cys by changing the concentration of MSD/Hg2+. PMID:22346638

  7. Accuracy of abdominal auscultation for bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Breum, Birger Michael; Rud, Bo; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the accuracy and inter-observer variation of bowel sound assessment in patients with clinically suspected bowel obstruction. METHODS: Bowel sounds were recorded in patients with suspected bowel obstruction using a Littmann® Electronic Stethoscope. The recordings were processed to yield 25-s sound sequences in random order on PCs. Observers, recruited from doctors within the department, classified the sound sequences as either normal or pathological. The reference tests for bowel obstruction were intraoperative and endoscopic findings and clinical follow up. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each observer and compared between junior and senior doctors. Interobserver variation was measured using the Kappa statistic. RESULTS: Bowel sound sequences from 98 patients were assessed by 53 (33 junior and 20 senior) doctors. Laparotomy was performed in 47 patients, 35 of whom had bowel obstruction. Two patients underwent colorectal stenting due to large bowel obstruction. The median sensitivity and specificity was 0.42 (range: 0.19-0.64) and 0.78 (range: 0.35-0.98), respectively. There was no significant difference in accuracy between junior and senior doctors. The median frequency with which doctors classified bowel sounds as abnormal did not differ significantly between patients with and without bowel obstruction (26% vs 23%, P = 0.08). The 53 doctors made up 1378 unique pairs and the median Kappa value was 0.29 (range: -0.15-0.66). CONCLUSION: Accuracy and inter-observer agreement was generally low. Clinical decisions in patients with possible bowel obstruction should not be based on auscultatory assessment of bowel sounds. PMID:26379407

  8. Bias due to composite reference standards in diagnostic accuracy studies.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Ian; van Smeden, Maarten; Hadgu, Alula; Libman, Michael; Reitsma, Johannes B; Dendukuri, Nandini

    2016-04-30

    Composite reference standards (CRSs) have been advocated in diagnostic accuracy studies in the absence of a perfect reference standard. The rationale is that combining results of multiple imperfect tests leads to a more accurate reference than any one test in isolation. Focusing on a CRS that classifies subjects as disease positive if at least one component test is positive, we derive algebraic expressions for sensitivity and specificity of this CRS, sensitivity and specificity of a new (index) test compared with this CRS, as well as the CRS-based prevalence. We use as a motivating example the problem of evaluating a new test for Chlamydia trachomatis, an asymptomatic disease for which no gold-standard test exists. As the number of component tests increases, sensitivity of this CRS increases at the expense specificity, unless all tests have perfect specificity. Therefore, such a CRS can lead to significantly biased accuracy estimates of the index test. The bias depends on disease prevalence and accuracy of the CRS. Further, conditional dependence between the CRS and index test can lead to over-estimation of index test accuracy estimates. This commonly-used CRS combines results from multiple imperfect tests in a way that ignores information and therefore is not guaranteed to improve over a single imperfect reference unless each component test has perfect specificity, and the CRS is conditionally independent of the index test. When these conditions are not met, as in the case of C. trachomatis testing, more realistic statistical models should be researched instead of relying on such CRSs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26555849

  9. STRAIN-SPECIFIC SENSITIVITY TO INDUCTION OF MURINE LUNG TUMORS FOLLOWING IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO 3-METHYLCHOLANTHRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously demonstrated that different strains of fetal mice were more sensitive to lung tumor induction by 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) than were adults. Offspring from either a D2 x B6D2F1 backcross or from parental Balb/c mice exhibited a similar high incidence of lung tumors ...

  10. Evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of in vivo erythrocyte micronucleus and transgenic rodent gene mutation tests to detect rodent carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takeshi; Hamada, Shuichi; Masumura, Kenichi; Wakata, Akihiro; Maniwa, Jiro; Takasawa, Hironao; Yasunaga, Katsuaki; Hashizume, Tsuneo; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-05-01

    Sensitivity and/or specificity of the in vivo erythrocyte micronucleus (MN) and transgenic rodent mutation (TGR) tests to detect rodent carcinogens and non-carcinogens were investigated. The Carcinogenicity and Genotoxicity eXperience (CGX) dataset created by Kirkland et al. was used for the carcinogenicity and in vitro genotoxicity data, i.e., Ames and chromosome aberration (CA) tests. Broad literature surveys were conducted to gather in vivo MN or TGR test data to add to the CGX dataset. Genotoxicity data in vitro were also updated slightly. Data on 379 chemicals (293 carcinogens and 86 non-carcinogens) were available for the in vivo MN test; sensitivity, specificity or concordances were calculated as 41.0%, 60.5% or 45.4%, respectively. For the TGR test, data on 80 chemicals (76 carcinogens and 4 non-carcinogens) were available; sensitivity was calculated as 72.4%. Based on the recent guidance on genotoxicity testing strategies, performance (sensitivity/specificity) of the following combinations was calculated; Ames+in vivo MN (68.7%/45.3%), Ames+TGR (83.8%/not calculated (nc)), Ames+in vitro CA+in vivo MN (80.8%/21.3%), Ames+in vitro CA+TGR (89.1%/nc), Ames+in vivo MN+TGR (87.5%/nc), Ames+in vitro CA+in vivo MN+TGR (89.3%/nc). Relatively good balance in performance was shown by the Ames+in vivo MN in comparison with Ames+in vitro CA (74.3%/37.5%). Ames+TGR and Ames+in vivo MN+TGR gave even higher sensitivity, but the specificity could not be calculated (too few TGR data on non-carcinogens). This indicates that in vivo MN and TGR tests are both useful as in vivo tests to detect rodent carcinogens. PMID:27169373

  11. Co-delivery of hydrophobic paclitaxel and hydrophilic AURKA specific siRNA by redox-sensitive micelles for effective treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tingjie; Wang, Lei; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping; Huo, Meirong

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a novel redox-sensitive micellar system constructed from a hyaluronic acid-based amphiphilic conjugate (HA-ss-(OA-g-bPEI), HSOP) was successfully developed for tumor-targeted co-delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) and AURKA specific siRNA (si-AURKA). HSOP exhibited excellent loading capacities for both PTX and siRNA with adjustable dosing ratios and desirable redox-sensitivity independently verified by morphological changes of micelles alongside in vitro release of both drugs in different reducing environments. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy analysis confirmed that HSOP micelles were capable of simultaneously delivering PTX and siRNA into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via HA-receptor mediated endocytosis followed by rapid transport of cargoes into the cytosol. Successful delivery and transport amplified the synergistic effects between the drugs while leading to substantially greater antitumor efficacy when compared with single drug-loaded micelles and non-sensitive co-loaded micelles. In vivo investigation demonstrated that HSOP micelles could effectively accumulate in tumor sites and possessed the greatest antitumor efficacy over non-sensitive co-delivery control and redox-sensitive single-drug controls. These findings indicated that redox-sensitive HSOP co-delivery system holds great promise for combined drug/gene treatment for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:25996409

  12. The Sensitivity and Specificity of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assay for Tuberculosis Diagnosis in Adults with Chronic Cough in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Nliwasa, Marriott; MacPherson, Peter; Chisala, Palesa; Kamdolozi, Mercy; Khundi, McEwen; Kaswaswa, Kruger; Mwapasa, Mphatso; Msefula, Chisomo; Sohn, Hojoon; Flach, Clare; Corbett, Elizabeth L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current tuberculosis diagnostics lack sensitivity, and are expensive. Highly accurate, rapid and cheaper diagnostic tests are required for point of care use in low resource settings with high HIV prevalence. Objective To investigate the sensitivity and specificity, and cost of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for tuberculosis diagnosis in adults with chronic cough compared to Xpert® MTB/RIF, fluorescence smear microscopy. Methods Between October 2013 and March 2014, consecutive adults at a primary care clinic were screened for cough, offered HIV testing and assessed for tuberculosis using LAMP, Xpert® MTB/RIF and fluorescence smear microscopy. Sensitivity and specificity (with culture as reference standard), and costs were estimated. Results Of 273 adults recruited, 44.3% (121/273) were HIV-positive and 19.4% (53/273) had bacteriogically confirmed tuberculosis. The sensitivity of LAMP compared to culture was 65.0% (95% CI: 48.3% to 79.4%) with 100% (95% CI: 98.0% to 100%) specificity. The sensitivity of Xpert® MTB/RIF (77.5%, 95% CI: 61.5% to 89.2%) was similar to that of LAMP, p = 0.132. The sensitivity of concentrated fluorescence smear microscopy with routine double reading (87.5%, 95% CI: 73.2% to 95.8%) was higher than that of LAMP, p = 0.020. All three tests had high specificity. The lowest cost per test of LAMP was at batch size of 14 samples (US$ 9.98); this was lower than Xpert® MTB/RIF (US$ 13.38) but higher than fluorescence smear microscopy (US$ 0.65). Conclusion The sensitivity of LAMP was similar to Xpert® MTB/RIF but lower than fluorescence smear microscopy; all three tests had high specificity. These findings support the Malawi policy that recommends a combination of fluorescence smear microscopy and Xpert® MTB/RIF prioritised for people living with HIV, already found to be smear-negative, or being considered for retreatment of tuberculosis. PMID:27171380

  13. Joint estimation of multiple disease-specific sensitivities and specificities via crossed random effects models for correlated reader-based diagnostic data: application of data cloning.

    PubMed

    Withanage, Niroshan; de Leon, Alexander R; Rudnisky, Christopher J

    2015-12-20

    We present a model for describing correlated binocular data from reader-based diagnostic studies, where the same group of readers evaluates the presence or absence of certain diseases on binocular organs (e.g., fellow eyes) of patients. Multiple random effects are incorporated to meaningfully delineate various associations in the data including crossed random effects to account for reader-specific variability and to incorporate cross correlations. To overcome the computational complexity involved in the evaluation and maximization of the marginal likelihood, we adopt the data cloning approach, which calculates maximum likelihood estimates under the Bayesian paradigm. The bias and efficiency of the estimates are assessed in two simulation studies. We apply our model to data from a diabetic retinopathy study. PMID:26179660

  14. Assessment of activity in Sarcoidosis. Sensitivity and specificity of 67Gallium scintigraphy, serum ACE levels, chest roentgenography, and blood lymphocyte subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Klech, H.; Kohn, H.; Kummer, F.; Mostbeck, A.

    1982-12-01

    The value of different factors are examined to assess activity in 60 patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis. In patients with active sarcoidosis (n . 35), /sup 67/Ga scans proved to be the most sensitive method (94 percent sensitivity), followed by serum angiotensin I converting enzyme (S-ACE) levels, chest x-ray films, and lymphocyte assays. In patients with peripheral pulmonary lesions, chest x-ray films failed in 32 percent of cases to document activity (68 percent sensitivity) whereas /sup 67/Ga scans and S-ACE levels remained to give reliable results. Despite poor specificity, negative /sup 67/Ga scans together with normal ACE levels have a high predictive value for exclusion of active sarcoidosis. In patients with peripheral pulmonary lesions, chest roentgenography is of doubtful value for staging lung involvement and assessment of activity including monitoring and control of therapy.

  15. Nanoelectronic three-dimensional (3D) nanotip sensing array for real-time, sensitive, label-free sequence specific detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Yang, Lu; Koochak, Zahra; Harris, James S; Davis, Ronald W

    2016-02-01

    The improvements in our ability to sequence and genotype DNA have opened up numerous avenues in the understanding of human biology and medicine with various applications, especially in medical diagnostics. But the realization of a label free, real time, high-throughput and low cost biosensing platforms to detect molecular interactions with a high level of sensitivity has been yet stunted due to two factors: one, slow binding kinetics caused by the lack of probe molecules on the sensors and two, limited mass transport due to the planar structure (two-dimensional) of the current biosensors. Here we present a novel three-dimensional (3D), highly sensitive, real-time, inexpensive and label-free nanotip array as a rapid and direct platform to sequence-specific DNA screening. Our nanotip sensors are designed to have a nano sized thin film as their sensing area (~ 20 nm), sandwiched between two sensing electrodes. The tip is then conjugated to a DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the sequence of interest, which is electrochemically detected in real-time via impedance changes upon the formation of a double-stranded helix at the sensor interface. This 3D configuration is specifically designed to improve the biomolecular hit rate and the detection speed. We demonstrate that our nanotip array effectively detects oligonucleotides in a sequence-specific and highly sensitive manner, yielding concentration-dependent impedance change measurements with a target concentration as low as 10 pM and discrimination against even a single mismatch. Notably, our nanotip sensors achieve this accurate, sensitive detection without relying on signal indicators or enhancing molecules like fluorophores. It can also easily be scaled for highly multiplxed detection with up to 5000 sensors/square centimeter, and integrated into microfluidic devices. The versatile, rapid, and sensitive performance of the nanotip array makes it an excellent candidate for point-of-care diagnostics, and high

  16. Nanoelectronic three-dimensional (3D) nanotip sensing array for real-time, sensitive, label-free sequence specific detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; koochak, Zahra; Harris, James S.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    The improvements in our ability to sequence and genotype DNA have opened up numerous avenues in the understanding of human biology and medicine with various applications, especially in medical diagnostics. But the realization of a label free, real time, high-throughput and low cost biosensing platforms to detect molecular interactions with a high level of sensitivity has been yet stunted due to two factors: one, slow binding kinetics caused by the lack of probe molecules on the sensors and two, limited mass transport due to the planar structure (two-dimensional) of the current biosensors. Here we present a novel three-dimensional (3D), highly sensitive, real-time, inexpensive and label-free nanotip array as a rapid and direct platform to sequence-specific DNA screening. Our nanotip sensors are designed to have a nano sized thin film as their sensing area (~ 20 nm), sandwiched between two sensing electrodes. The tip is then conjugated to a DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the sequence of interest, which is electrochemically detected in real-time via impedance changes upon the formation of a double-stranded helix at the sensor interface. This 3D configuration is specifically designed to improve the biomolecular hit rate and the detection speed. We demonstrate that our nanotip array effectively detects oligonucleotides in a sequence-specific and highly sensitive manner, yielding concentration-dependent impedance change measurements with a target concentration as low as 10 pM and discrimination against even a single mismatch. Notably, our nanotip sensors achieve this accurate, sensitive detection without relying on signal indicators or enhancing molecules like fluorophores. It can also easily be scaled for highly multiplxed detection with up to 5000 sensors/square centimeter, and integrated into microfluidic devices. The versatile, rapid, and sensitive performance of the nanotip array makes it an excellent candidate for point-of-care diagnostics, and high

  17. A sensitive, specific and reproducible real-time polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection in field-collected anophelines.

    PubMed

    Bickersmith, Sara A; Lainhart, William; Moreno, Marta; Chu, Virginia M; Vinetz, Joseph M; Conn, Jan E

    2015-06-01

    We describe a simple method for detection of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection in anophelines using a triplex TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay (18S rRNA). We tested the assay on Anopheles darlingi and Anopheles stephensi colony mosquitoes fed with Plasmodium-infected blood meals and in duplicate on field collected An. darlingi. We compared the real-time PCR results of colony-infected and field collected An. darlingi, separately, to a conventional PCR method. We determined that a cytochrome b-PCR method was only 3.33% as sensitive and 93.38% as specific as our real-time PCR assay with field-collected samples. We demonstrate that this assay is sensitive, specific and reproducible. PMID:26061150

  18. Development of a highly specific and sensitive cadmium and lead microbial biosensor using synthetic CadC-T7 genetic circuitry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Lim, Ji Won; Jeong, Haeyoung; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Taesung; Lee, Sang Jun

    2016-05-15

    Multiple copies of a cadC homolog encoding a heavy metal-responsive transcription factor were found in the genome of a bacterium isolated from ocean sediment, and the heavy metal responses of the encoded proteins were characterized using a fluorescence reporter assay. Each CadC regulator exhibited distinct specificity in response to heavy metal ions, indicating their potential use as modular heavy metal biosensors. Next, we constructed CadC-controlled T7 RNA transcription systems for intracellular signal amplification, i.e., higher sensitivity. Flow cytometry revealed that cadmium and lead ions could be recognized specifically by CadC-T7 biosensors, which could be combined with a microfluidic platform to generate heavy metal biosensor devices with increased sensitivity. Our results demonstrate the successful development of synthetic CadC-T7 genetic circuitry for use in improved heavy metal biosensor microfluidic devices. PMID:26773374

  19. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-01-01

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients’ samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAFV600E and BRAFV600K mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method. PMID:26690267

  20. Differential sensitivity in embryonic stages of the zebrafish (Danio rerio): The role of toxicokinetics for stage-specific susceptibility for azinphos-methyl lethal effects.

    PubMed

    Massei, Riccardo; Vogs, Carolina; Renner, Patrick; Altenburger, Rolf; Scholz, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    The occasionally observed differential chemical sensitivity in embryonic life stages of fish is still poorly understood and could represent an important issue for understanding the time course of toxicity and the toxic modes of action of chemicals. In this study we analyzed the toxicity of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor azinphos-methyl (APM) in different life-stages of zebrafish embryos. To this end, the LC50 of three 48h-exposure windows were determined (12μM for 0-48, no mortality observed for 24-72 and 72-120hpf up to a concentration of 79μM). We hypothesized that the differential sensitivity of the stage-specific embryos may be related to differences in uptake of the compound and/or internal concentrations. Therefore, internal concentrations were determined using HPLC. Similar levels and time courses of internal concentrations for all three exposure windows were observed. Bioconcentration amounted to a factor of about 30. Short-term exposure windows for a concentration 4-fold above the calculated LC50 (47μM) identified the period of 0-4hpf as the most sensitive time window for APM toxicity. Our results indicate that the differential sensitivity of APM in the embryos is not related to differences in internal concentrations but related to a stage specific mechanisms of toxicity. PMID:26210375

  1. Specific Epiblast Loss and Hypoblast Impairment in Cattle Embryos Sensitized to Survival Signalling by Ubiquitous Overexpression of the Proapoptotic Gene BAD

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Jessica; Berg, Debra K.; Smith, Craig S.; Wells, David N.; Pfeffer, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    Early embryonic lethality is common, particularly in dairy cattle. We made cattle embryos more sensitive to environmental stressors by raising the threshold of embryo survival signaling required to overcome the deleterious effects of overexpressing the proapoptotic protein BAD. Two primary fibroblast cell lines expressing BAD and exhibiting increased sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis were used to generate transgenic Day13/14 BAD embryos. Transgenic embryos were normal in terms of retrieval rates, average embryo length or expression levels of the trophectoderm marker ASCL2. However both lines of BAD-tg embryos lost the embryonic disc and thus the entire epiblast lineage at significantly greater frequencies than either co-transferrred IVP controls or LacZ-tg embryos. Embryos without epiblast still contained the second ICM-derived lineage, the hypopblast, albeit frequently in an impaired state, as shown by reduced expression of the hypoblast markers GATA4 and FIBRONECTIN. This indicates a gradient of sensitivity (epiblast > hypoblast > TE) to BAD overexpression. We postulate that the greater sensitivity of specifically the epiblast lineage that we have seen in our transgenic model, reflects an inherent greater susceptibility of this lineage to environmental stress and may underlie the epiblast-specific death seen in phantom pregnancies. PMID:24806443

  2. [Comparative research into sensitivity and specificity of immune-enzyme analysis with chemiluminescence and colorimetric detection for detecting antigens and antibodies to avian influenza viruses and newcastle disease].

    PubMed

    Vitkova, O N; Kapustina, T P; Mikhailova, V V; Safonov, G A; Vlasova, N N; Belousova, R V

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to demonstrate the results of the development of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent tests with chemiluminescence detection and colorimetric detection of specific viral antigens and antibodies for identifying the avian influenza and the Newcastle disease viruses: high sensitivity and specificity of the immuno- chemiluminescence assay, which are 10-50 times higher than those of the ELISA colorimetric method. The high effectiveness of the results and the automation of the process of laboratory testing (using a luminometer) allow these methods to be recommended for including in primary screening tests for these infectious diseases. PMID:27024917

  3. Highly sensitive method for specific, brief, and economical detection of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis by the synthesis of a new hydrazide derivative.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weitao; Zhou, Ayi; Liu, Zhiguo; Shen, Jiayi; Zhou, Xuan; Ye, Weijian; Zhu, Zhongxin; Zhu, Xinliang; Lin, Jianjun; Jin, Litai

    2015-02-01

    A new hydrazide derivative was synthesized and used for the first time as a specific, brief, and economical probe to selectively visualize glycoproteins in 1-D and 2-D sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with high sensitivity. The detection limit of the newly developed staining method is 2- and 4-fold higher than that of the widely used Pro-Q Emerald 300 and 488 stains, respectively. PMID:25565298

  4. Bayesian Estimation of Sensitivity and Specificity of Rose Bengal, Complement Fixation, and Indirect ELISA Tests for the Diagnosis of Bovine Brucellosis in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Getachew, T.; Getachew, G.; Getenet, M.; Fasil, A.

    2016-01-01

    Test evaluation in the absence of a gold standard test was conducted for the diagnosis and screening of bovine brucellosis using three commercially available tests including RBPT, CFT, and I-ELISA in National Animal Health Diagnostic and Investigation Center (NAHDIC) Ethiopia. A total of 278 sera samples from five dairy herds were collected and tested. Each serum sample was subjected to the three t