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Sample records for accuracy studies quadas

  1. Quality Assessment of Research Articles in Nuclear Medicine Using STARD and QUADAS-2 Tools

    PubMed Central

    Roysri, Krisana; Chotipanich, Chanisa; Laopaiboon, Vallop; Khiewyoo, Jiraporn

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Diagnostic nuclear medicine is being increasingly employed in clinical practice with the advent of new technologies and radiopharmaceuticals. The report of the prevalence of a certain disease is important for assessing the quality of that article. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the quality of published nuclear medicine articles and determine the frequency of reporting the prevalence of studied diseases. Methods: We used Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) and Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) checklists for evaluating the quality of articles published in five nuclear medicine journals with the highest impact factors in 2012. The articles were retrieved from Scopus database and were selected and assessed independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Decision concerning equivocal data was made by consensus between the reviewers. Results: The average STARD score was approximately 17 points, and the highest score was 17.19±2.38 obtained by the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine. QUADAS-2 tool showed that all journals had low bias regarding study population. The Journal of Nuclear Medicine had the highest score in terms of index test, reference standard, and time interval. Lack of clarity regarding the index test, reference standard, and time interval was frequently observed in all journals including Clinical Nuclear Medicine, in which 64% of the studies were unclear regarding the index test. Journal of Nuclear Cardiology had the highest number of articles with appropriate reference standard (83.3%), though it had the lowest frequency of reporting disease prevalence (zero reports). All five journals had the same STARD score, while index test, reference standard, and time interval were very unclear according to QUADAS-2 tool. Unfortunately, data were too limited to determine which journal had the lowest risk of bias. In fact, it is the author's responsibility to provide details of

  2. Does the Reporting Quality of Diagnostic Test Accuracy Studies, as Defined by STARD 2015, Affect Citation?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Chung, Mi Sun; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Ji Eun; Yoon, Hee Mang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate with which diagnostic test accuracy studies that are published in a general radiology journal adhere to the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (STARD) 2015, and to explore the relationship between adherence rate and citation rate while avoiding confounding by journal factors. Materials and Methods All eligible diagnostic test accuracy studies that were published in the Korean Journal of Radiology in 2011–2015 were identified. Five reviewers assessed each article for yes/no compliance with 27 of the 30 STARD 2015 checklist items (items 28, 29, and 30 were excluded). The total STARD score (number of fulfilled STARD items) was calculated. The score of the 15 STARD items that related directly to the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS)-2 was also calculated. The number of times each article was cited (as indicated by the Web of Science) after publication until March 2016 and the article exposure time (time in months between publication and March 2016) were extracted. Results Sixty-three articles were analyzed. The mean (range) total and QUADAS-2-related STARD scores were 20.0 (14.5–25) and 11.4 (7–15), respectively. The mean citation number was 4 (0–21). Citation number did not associate significantly with either STARD score after accounting for exposure time (total score: correlation coefficient = 0.154, p = 0.232; QUADAS-2-related score: correlation coefficient = 0.143, p = 0.266). Conclusion The degree of adherence to STARD 2015 was moderate for this journal, indicating that there is room for improvement. When adjusted for exposure time, the degree of adherence did not affect the citation rate. PMID:27587959

  3. Challenges in diagnostic accuracy studies in primary care: the fecal calprotectin example

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low disease prevalence and lack of uniform reference standards in primary care induce methodological challenges for investigating the diagnostic accuracy of a test. We present a study design that copes with these methodological challenges and discuss the methodological implications of our choices, using a quality assessment tool for diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS-2). Design The study investigates the diagnostic value of fecal calprotectin for detecting inflammatory bowel disease in children presenting with chronic gastrointestinal symptoms in primary care. It is a prospective cohort study including two cohorts of children: one cohort will be recruited in primary care and the other in secondary/tertiary care. Test results of fecal calprotectin will be compared to one of the two reference standards for inflammatory bowel disease: endoscopy with histopathological examination of mucosal biopsies or assessment of clinical symptoms at 1-year follow-up. Discussion According to QUADAS-2 the use of two reference standards and the recruitment of patients in two populations may cause differential verification bias and spectrum bias, respectively. The clinical relevance of this potential bias and methods to adjust for this are presented. This study illustrates the importance of awareness of the different kinds of bias that result from choices in the design phase of a diagnostic study in a low prevalence setting. This approach is exemplary for other diagnostic research in primary care. PMID:24274463

  4. EOS mapping accuracy study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, R. B.; Eppes, T. A.; Ouellette, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were performed to evaluate various image positioning methods for possible use in the earth observatory satellite (EOS) program and other earth resource imaging satellite programs. The primary goal is the generation of geometrically corrected and registered images, positioned with respect to the earth's surface. The EOS sensors which were considered were the thematic mapper, the return beam vidicon camera, and the high resolution pointable imager. The image positioning methods evaluated consisted of various combinations of satellite data and ground control points. It was concluded that EOS attitude control system design must be considered as a part of the image positioning problem for EOS, along with image sensor design and ground image processing system design. Study results show that, with suitable efficiency for ground control point selection and matching activities during data processing, extensive reliance should be placed on use of ground control points for positioning the images obtained from EOS and similar programs.

  5. Accuracy of Electronic Health Record Data for Identifying Stroke Cases in Large-Scale Epidemiological Studies: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group

    PubMed Central

    Woodfield, Rebecca; Grant, Ian; Sudlow, Cathie L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Long-term follow-up of population-based prospective studies is often achieved through linkages to coded regional or national health care data. Our knowledge of the accuracy of such data is incomplete. To inform methods for identifying stroke cases in UK Biobank (a prospective study of 503,000 UK adults recruited in middle-age), we systematically evaluated the accuracy of these data for stroke and its main pathological types (ischaemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage), determining the optimum codes for case identification. Methods We sought studies published from 1990-November 2013, which compared coded data from death certificates, hospital admissions or primary care with a reference standard for stroke or its pathological types. We extracted information on a range of study characteristics and assessed study quality with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2). To assess accuracy, we extracted data on positive predictive values (PPV) and—where available—on sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (NPV). Results 37 of 39 eligible studies assessed accuracy of International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-coded hospital or death certificate data. They varied widely in their settings, methods, reporting, quality, and in the choice and accuracy of codes. Although PPVs for stroke and its pathological types ranged from 6–97%, appropriately selected, stroke-specific codes (rather than broad cerebrovascular codes) consistently produced PPVs >70%, and in several studies >90%. The few studies with data on sensitivity, specificity and NPV showed higher sensitivity of hospital versus death certificate data for stroke, with specificity and NPV consistently >96%. Few studies assessed either primary care data or combinations of data sources. Conclusions Particular stroke-specific codes can yield high PPVs (>90%) for stroke/stroke types. Inclusion of primary care data and combining data sources should

  6. The Effect of Study Design Biases on the Diagnostic Accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Silicone Breast Implant Ruptures: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae W.; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Bellfi, Lillian T.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Background All silicone breast implant recipients are recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration to undergo serial screening to detect implant rupture with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the quality of diagnostic accuracy studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture and conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effect of study design biases on the estimation of MRI diagnostic accuracy measures. Method Studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of MRI and ultrasound in evaluating ruptured silicone breast implants were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases. Two reviewers independently screened potential studies for inclusion and extracted data. Study design biases were assessed using the QUADAS tool and the STARDS checklist. Meta-analyses estimated the influence of biases on diagnostic odds ratios. Results Among 1175 identified articles, 21 met the inclusion criteria. Most studies using MRI (n= 10 of 16) and ultrasound (n=10 of 13) examined symptomatic subjects. Meta-analyses revealed that MRI studies evaluating symptomatic subjects had 14-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using an asymptomatic sample (RDOR 13.8; 95% CI 1.83–104.6) and 2-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using a screening sample (RDOR 1.89; 95% CI 0.05–75.7). Conclusion Many of the published studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture are flawed with methodological biases. These methodological shortcomings may result in overestimated MRI diagnostic accuracy measures and should be interpreted with caution when applying the data to a screening population. PMID:21364405

  7. The accuracy of pain drawing in identifying psychological distress in low back pain—systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic studies

    PubMed Central

    Bertozzi, Lucia; Rosso, Anna; Romeo, Antonio; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Guccione, Andrew A.; Pillastrini, Paolo; Vanti, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to estimate the accuracy of qualitative pain drawings (PDs) in identifying psychological distress in subacute and chronic low back pain (LBP) patients. [Subjects and Methods] Data were obtained from searches of PubMed, EBSCO, Scopus, PsycINFO and ISI Web of Science from their inception to July 2014. Quality assessments of bias and applicability were conducted using the Quality of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2). [Results] The summary estimates were: sensitivity=0.45 (95% CI 0.34, 0.61), specificity=0.66 (95% CI 0.53, 0.82), positive likelihood ratio=1.23 (95% CI 0.93, 1.62), negative likelihood ratio=0.84 (95% CI 0.70, 1.01), and diagnostic odds ratio=1.46 (95% CI 0.79, 2.68). The area under the curve was 78% (CI, 57 to 99%). [Conclusion] The results of this systematic review do not show broad and unqualified support for the accuracy of PDs in detecting psychological distress in subacute and chronic LBP. PMID:26644701

  8. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF PHYSICAL EXAMINATION TESTS OF THE ANKLE/FOOT COMPLEX: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Schwieterman, Braun; Haas, Deniele; Columber, Kirby; Knupp, Darren

    2013-01-01

    Background: Orthopedic special tests of the ankle/foot complex are routinely used during the physical examination process in order to help diagnose ankle/lower leg pathologies. Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of ankle/lower leg special tests. Methods: A search of the current literature was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health Sources, Scopus, and Cochrane Library. Studies were eligible if they included the following: 1) a diagnostic clinical test of musculoskeletal pathology in the ankle/foot complex, 2) description of the clinical test or tests, 3) a report of the diagnostic accuracy of the clinical test (e.g. sensitivity and specificity), and 4) an acceptable reference standard for comparison. The quality of included studies was determined by two independent reviewers using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 (QUADAS-2) tool. Results: Nine diagnostic accuracy studies met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review; analyzing a total of 16 special tests of the ankle/foot complex. After assessment using the QUADAS-2, only one study had low risk of bias and low concerns regarding applicability. Conclusion: Most ankle/lower leg orthopedic special tests are confirmatory in nature and are best utilized at the end of the physical examination. Most of the studies included in this systematic review demonstrate notable biases, which suggest that results and recommendations in this review should be taken as a guide rather than an outright standard. There is need for future research with more stringent study design criteria so that more accurate diagnostic power of ankle/lower leg special tests can be determined. Level of Evidence: 3a PMID:24175128

  9. Air traffic control surveillance accuracy and update rate study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craigie, J. H.; Morrison, D. D.; Zipper, I.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an air traffic control surveillance accuracy and update rate study are presented. The objective of the study was to establish quantitative relationships between the surveillance accuracies, update rates, and the communication load associated with the tactical control of aircraft for conflict resolution. The relationships are established for typical types of aircraft, phases of flight, and types of airspace. Specific cases are analyzed to determine the surveillance accuracies and update rates required to prevent two aircraft from approaching each other too closely.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of the clinical feeding evaluation in detecting aspiration in children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Irene; Conway, Aifric; Henriques, Filipa; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of clinical feeding evaluation (CFE) compared to instrumental assessments in detecting oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) in children. This is important to support clinical decision-making and to provide safe, cost-effective, higher quality care. All published and unpublished studies in all languages assessing the diagnostic accuracy of CFE compared to videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and/or fibre-optic endoscopic examination of swallowing (FEES) in detecting OPA in paediatric populations were sought. Databases were searched from inception to April 2015. Grey literature, citations, and references were also searched. Two independent reviewers extracted and analysed data. Accuracy estimates were calculated. Research reports were translated into English as required. Six studies examining the diagnostic accuracy of CFE using VFSS and/or FEES were eligible for inclusion. Sample sizes, populations studied, and CFE characteristics varied widely. The overall methodological quality of the studies, assessed with QUADAS-2, was considered 'low'. Results suggested that CFEs trialling liquid consistencies might provide better accuracy estimates than CFEs trialling solids exclusively. This systematic review highlights the critical lack of evidence on the accuracy of CFE in detecting OPA in children. Larger well-designed primary diagnostic test accuracy studies in this area are needed to inform dysphagia assessment in paediatrics. PMID:26862075

  11. The methodological quality of three foundational law enforcement drug influence evaluation validation studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A Drug Influence Evaluation (DIE) is a formal assessment of an impaired driving suspect, performed by a trained law enforcement officer who uses circumstantial facts, questioning, searching, and a physical exam to form an unstandardized opinion as to whether a suspect’s driving was impaired by drugs. This paper first identifies the scientific studies commonly cited in American criminal trials as evidence of DIE accuracy, and second, uses the QUADAS tool to investigate whether the methodologies used by these studies allow them to correctly quantify the diagnostic accuracy of the DIEs currently administered by US law enforcement. Results Three studies were selected for analysis. For each study, the QUADAS tool identified biases that distorted reported accuracies. The studies were subject to spectrum bias, selection bias, misclassification bias, verification bias, differential verification bias, incorporation bias, and review bias. The studies quantified DIE performance with prevalence-dependent accuracy statistics that are internally but not externally valid. Conclusion The accuracies reported by these studies do not quantify the accuracy of the DIE process now used by US law enforcement. These studies do not validate current DIE practice. PMID:24188398

  12. Accuracy of ambulatory blood pressure determination: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, J C; Geyssant, A; Auboyer, C; Antoniadis, A; Berruyer, J; Lacour, J R

    1991-09-01

    This study was designed to discriminate, according to their accuracy, between three ambulatory pressurometers (Diasys 200R, Novacor; P IV, Del Mar Avionics; SpaceLab 90202, SpaceLab). The evaluation was performed against invasive arterial reference measurements. Accuracy was assessed by calculating the error on pressure (EOP) as the difference between invasive and non-invasive measurement of arterial blood pressure. For the systolic values, accuracy (mean of EOP differences) and uncertainty (SD of these differences) were -0.9 +/- 9.7, -4.3 +/- 10.1 and -16.7 +/- 10.1 mmHg for, respectively, Diasys, PIV and SpaceLab. For diastolic values, they were, respectively, 5.9 +/- 6.7, 6.8 +/- 8.5 and 9.1 +/- 6.6 mmHg. EOP was then separated in two different types of errors: (i) the error of dispersion appreciated by the index of homogeneity calculated by a Lehmann analysis and leading to a statistical classification (ii) the error due to the drift of EOP with the reference value, this last error being easier to correct. Two different behaviours were observed for the EOP: (i) the drift of EOP of systolic values was significantly larger for the oscillometric (SpaceLab) than for the auscultatory (Diasys and P IV) method, with no difference between Diasys and P IV (ii) the homogeneity index was not statistically different among these three devices. These data suggest that, in case the correction of the drift of EOP is carried out, there is no statistical significant difference in accuracy between these three pressurometers. However, in our experimental conditions, the two ambulatory pressurometers recording the Korotkoff sounds have a better accuracy than the one using the oscillometric approach. PMID:1947731

  13. Precision and Accuracy Studies with Kajaani Fiber Length Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copur, Yalcin; Makkonen, Hannu

    The aim of this study was to test the measurement precision and accuracy of the Kajaani FS-100 giving attention to possible machine error in the measurements. Fiber length of pine pulps produced using polysulfide, kraft, biokraft and soda methods were determined using both FS-100 and FiberLab automated fiber length analyzers. The measured length values were compared for both methods. The measurement precision and accuracy was tested by replicated measurements using rayon stable fibers. Measurements performed on pulp samples showed typical length distributions for both analyzers. Results obtained from Kajaani FS-100 and FiberLab showed a significant correlation. The shorter length measurement with FiberLab was found to be mainly due to the instrument calibration. The measurement repeatability tested for Kajaani FS-100 indicated that the measurements are precise.

  14. Bias due to composite reference standards in diagnostic accuracy studies.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Ian; van Smeden, Maarten; Hadgu, Alula; Libman, Michael; Reitsma, Johannes B; Dendukuri, Nandini

    2016-04-30

    Composite reference standards (CRSs) have been advocated in diagnostic accuracy studies in the absence of a perfect reference standard. The rationale is that combining results of multiple imperfect tests leads to a more accurate reference than any one test in isolation. Focusing on a CRS that classifies subjects as disease positive if at least one component test is positive, we derive algebraic expressions for sensitivity and specificity of this CRS, sensitivity and specificity of a new (index) test compared with this CRS, as well as the CRS-based prevalence. We use as a motivating example the problem of evaluating a new test for Chlamydia trachomatis, an asymptomatic disease for which no gold-standard test exists. As the number of component tests increases, sensitivity of this CRS increases at the expense specificity, unless all tests have perfect specificity. Therefore, such a CRS can lead to significantly biased accuracy estimates of the index test. The bias depends on disease prevalence and accuracy of the CRS. Further, conditional dependence between the CRS and index test can lead to over-estimation of index test accuracy estimates. This commonly-used CRS combines results from multiple imperfect tests in a way that ignores information and therefore is not guaranteed to improve over a single imperfect reference unless each component test has perfect specificity, and the CRS is conditionally independent of the index test. When these conditions are not met, as in the case of C. trachomatis testing, more realistic statistical models should be researched instead of relying on such CRSs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26555849

  15. Meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy studies in mental health

    PubMed Central

    Takwoingi, Yemisi; Riley, Richard D; Deeks, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explain methods for data synthesis of evidence from diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) studies, and to illustrate different types of analyses that may be performed in a DTA systematic review. Methods We described properties of meta-analytic methods for quantitative synthesis of evidence. We used a DTA review comparing the accuracy of three screening questionnaires for bipolar disorder to illustrate application of the methods for each type of analysis. Results The discriminatory ability of a test is commonly expressed in terms of sensitivity (proportion of those with the condition who test positive) and specificity (proportion of those without the condition who test negative). There is a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity, as an increasing threshold for defining test positivity will decrease sensitivity and increase specificity. Methods recommended for meta-analysis of DTA studies --such as the bivariate or hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) model --jointly summarise sensitivity and specificity while taking into account this threshold effect, as well as allowing for between study differences in test performance beyond what would be expected by chance. The bivariate model focuses on estimation of a summary sensitivity and specificity at a common threshold while the HSROC model focuses on the estimation of a summary curve from studies that have used different thresholds. Conclusions Meta-analyses of diagnostic accuracy studies can provide answers to important clinical questions. We hope this article will provide clinicians with sufficient understanding of the terminology and methods to aid interpretation of systematic reviews and facilitate better patient care. PMID:26446042

  16. [Rheocardiographic studies on the accuracy of cardiac stroke volume models].

    PubMed

    Baluev, E P; Parashin, V B

    1984-01-01

    Some results of the studies on the accuracy of detecting pulsating stroke volume from rheocardiograms are discussed. Using a physical model it is shown that resulting values are strongly conditioned by relative positions of electrodes and pulsating volume, its shape, and the geometry of conducting medium. An approximate value of the stroke volume may be derived from the semiempirical formulae coupling relative variations of the resistance and the volume. It may differ from the true magnitude by the factor of 1.5-2. PMID:6503678

  17. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    PubMed

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions. PMID:20530821

  18. Simultaneous nuclear data target accuracy study for innovative fast reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; INL; CEA Cadarache

    2007-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the major outcomes of a study conducted within a Nuclear Energy Agency Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (NEA WPEC) initiative aiming to investigate data needs for future innovative nuclear systems, to quantify them and to propose a strategy to meet them. Within the NEA WPEC Subgroup 26 an uncertainty assessment has been carried out using covariance data recently processed by joint efforts of several US and European Labs. In general, the uncertainty analysis shows that for the wide selection of fast reactor concepts considered, the present integral parameters uncertainties resulting from the assumed uncertainties on nuclear data are probably acceptable in the early phases of design feasibility studies. However, in the successive phase of preliminary conceptual designs and in later design phases of selected reactor and fuel cycle concepts, there will be the need for improved data and methods, in order to reduce margins, both for economic and safety reasons. It is then important to define as soon as possible priority issues, i.e. which are the nuclear data (isotope, reaction type, energy range) that need improvement, in order to quantify target accuracies and to select a strategy to meet the requirements needed (e.g. by some selected new differential measurements and by the use of integral experiments). In this context one should account for the wide range of high accuracy integral experiments already performed and available in national or, better, international data basis, in order to indicate new integral experiments that will be needed to account for new requirements due to innovative design features, and to provide the necessary full integral data base to be used for validation of the design simulation tools.

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Alone and Compared to Urinary Antigen Testing for Detection of Legionella spp.: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Green, Hefziba; Steinmetz, Tali; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease (LD) is based on the isolation of Legionella spp., a 4-fold rise in antibodies, a positive urinary antigen (UA), or direct immunofluorescence tests. PCR is not accepted as a diagnostic tool for LD. This systematic review assesses the diagnostic accuracy of PCR in various clinical samples with a direct comparison versus UA. We included prospective or retrospective cohort and case-control studies. Studies were included if they used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention consensus definition criteria of LD or a similar one, assessed only patients with clinical pneumonia, and reported data for all true-positive, false-positive, true-negative, and false-negative results. Two reviewers abstracted data independently. Risk of bias was assessed using Quadas-2. Summary sensitivity and specificity values were estimated using a bivariate model and reported with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Thirty-eight studies were included. A total of 653 patients had confirmed LD, and 3,593 patients had pneumonia due to other pathogens. The methodological quality of the studies as assessed by the Quadas-2 tool was poor to fair. The summary sensitivity and specificity values for diagnosis of LD in respiratory samples were 97.4% (95% CI, 91.1% to 99.2%) and 98.6% (95% CI, 97.4% to 99.3%), respectively. These results were mainly unchanged by any covariates tested and subgroup analysis. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was much better than that of UA. Compared to UA, PCR in respiratory samples (especially in sputum samples or swabs) revealed a significant advantage in sensitivity and an additional diagnosis of 18% to 30% of LD cases. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was excellent and preferable to that of the UA. Results were independent on the covariate tested. PCR in respiratory samples should be regarded as a valid tool for the diagnosis of LD. PMID:26659202

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Alone and Compared to Urinary Antigen Testing for Detection of Legionella spp.: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Avni, Tomer; Bieber, Amir; Green, Hefziba; Steinmetz, Tali; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2016-02-01

    The diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease (LD) is based on the isolation of Legionella spp., a 4-fold rise in antibodies, a positive urinary antigen (UA), or direct immunofluorescence tests. PCR is not accepted as a diagnostic tool for LD. This systematic review assesses the diagnostic accuracy of PCR in various clinical samples with a direct comparison versus UA. We included prospective or retrospective cohort and case-control studies. Studies were included if they used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention consensus definition criteria of LD or a similar one, assessed only patients with clinical pneumonia, and reported data for all true-positive, false-positive, true-negative, and false-negative results. Two reviewers abstracted data independently. Risk of bias was assessed using Quadas-2. Summary sensitivity and specificity values were estimated using a bivariate model and reported with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Thirty-eight studies were included. A total of 653 patients had confirmed LD, and 3,593 patients had pneumonia due to other pathogens. The methodological quality of the studies as assessed by the Quadas-2 tool was poor to fair. The summary sensitivity and specificity values for diagnosis of LD in respiratory samples were 97.4% (95% CI, 91.1% to 99.2%) and 98.6% (95% CI, 97.4% to 99.3%), respectively. These results were mainly unchanged by any covariates tested and subgroup analysis. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was much better than that of UA. Compared to UA, PCR in respiratory samples (especially in sputum samples or swabs) revealed a significant advantage in sensitivity and an additional diagnosis of 18% to 30% of LD cases. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was excellent and preferable to that of the UA. Results were independent on the covariate tested. PCR in respiratory samples should be regarded as a valid tool for the diagnosis of LD. PMID:26659202

  1. Nonparametric meta-analysis for diagnostic accuracy studies.

    PubMed

    Zapf, Antonia; Hoyer, Annika; Kramer, Katharina; Kuss, Oliver

    2015-12-20

    Summarizing the information of many studies using a meta-analysis becomes more and more important, also in the field of diagnostic studies. The special challenge in meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy studies is that in general sensitivity and specificity are co-primary endpoints. Across the studies both endpoints are correlated, and this correlation has to be considered in the analysis. The standard approach for such a meta-analysis is the bivariate logistic random effects model. An alternative approach is to use marginal beta-binomial distributions for the true positives and the true negatives, linked by copula distributions. In this article, we propose a new, nonparametric approach of analysis, which has greater flexibility with respect to the correlation structure, and always converges. In a simulation study, it becomes apparent that the empirical coverage of all three approaches is in general below the nominal level. Regarding bias, empirical coverage, and mean squared error the nonparametric model is often superior to the standard model, and comparable with the copula model. The three approaches are also applied to two example meta-analyses. PMID:26174020

  2. Alaska national hydrography dataset positional accuracy assessment study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arundel, Samantha; Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Constance, Eric; Mantey, Kim; Vinyard-Houx, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Initial visual assessments Wide range in the quality of fit between features in NHD and these new image sources. No statistical analysis has been performed to actually quantify accuracy Determining absolute accuracy is cost prohibitive (must collect independent, well defined test points) Quantitative analysis of relative positional error is feasible.

  3. Accuracy of clinical tests in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous clinical tests are used in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury but their accuracy is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests for the diagnosis of ACL injury. Methods Study Design: Systematic review. The review protocol was registered through PROSPERO (CRD42012002069). Electronic databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL) were searched up to 19th of June 2013 to identify diagnostic studies comparing the accuracy of clinical tests for ACL injury to an acceptable reference standard (arthroscopy, arthrotomy, or MRI). Risk of bias was appraised using the QUADAS-2 checklist. Index test accuracy was evaluated using a descriptive analysis of paired likelihood ratios and displayed as forest plots. Results A total of 285 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility, from which 14 studies were included in this review. Included studies were deemed to be clinically and statistically heterogeneous, so a meta-analysis was not performed. Nine clinical tests from the history (popping sound at time of injury, giving way, effusion, pain, ability to continue activity) and four from physical examination (anterior draw test, Lachman’s test, prone Lachman’s test and pivot shift test) were investigated for diagnostic accuracy. Inspection of positive and negative likelihood ratios indicated that none of the individual tests provide useful diagnostic information in a clinical setting. Most studies were at risk of bias and reported imprecise estimates of diagnostic accuracy. Conclusion Despite being widely used and accepted in clinical practice, the results of individual history items or physical tests do not meaningfully change the probability of ACL injury. In contrast combinations of tests have higher diagnostic accuracy; however the most accurate combination of clinical tests remains an area for future research. Clinical relevance Clinicians should be aware of the limitations associated

  4. A hyperspectral imager for high radiometric accuracy Earth climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo, Joey; Drake, Ginger; Heuerman, Karl; Kopp, Greg; Lieber, Alex; Smith, Paul; Vermeer, Bill

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate a visible and near-infrared prototype pushbroom hyperspectral imager for Earth climate studies that is capable of using direct solar viewing for on-orbit cross calibration and degradation tracking. Direct calibration to solar spectral irradiances allow the Earth-viewing instrument to achieve required climate-driven absolute radiometric accuracies of <0.2% (1σ). A solar calibration requires viewing scenes having radiances 105 higher than typical Earth scenes. To facilitate this calibration, the instrument features an attenuation system that uses an optimized combination of different precision aperture sizes, neutral density filters, and variable integration timing for Earth and solar viewing. The optical system consists of a three-mirror anastigmat telescope and an Offner spectrometer. The as-built system has a 12.2° cross track field of view with 3 arcmin spatial resolution and covers a 350-1050 nm spectral range with 10 nm resolution. A polarization compensated configuration using the Offner in an out of plane alignment is demonstrated as a viable approach to minimizing polarization sensitivity. The mechanical design takes advantage of relaxed tolerances in the optical design by using rigid, non-adjustable diamond-turned tabs for optical mount locating surfaces. We show that this approach achieves the required optical performance. A prototype spaceflight unit is also demonstrated to prove the applicability of these solar cross calibration methods to on-orbit environments. This unit is evaluated for optical performance prior to and after GEVS shake, thermal vacuum, and lifecycle tests.

  5. Evaluation of a Rapid Point of Care Test for Detecting Acute and Established HIV Infection, and Examining the Role of Study Quality on Diagnostic Accuracy: A Bayesian Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Megan; Vijh, Rohit; Nauche, Bénédicte; Lebouché, Bertrand; Joseph, Lawrence; Pant Pai, Nitika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fourth generation (Ag/Ab combination) point of care HIV tests like the FDA-approved Determine HIV1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test offer the promise of timely detection of acute HIV infection, relevant in the context of HIV control. However, a synthesis of their performance has not yet been done. In this meta-analysis we not only assessed device performance but also evaluated the role of study quality on diagnostic accuracy. Methods Two independent reviewers searched seven databases, including conferences and bibliographies, and independently extracted data from 17 studies. Study quality was assessed with QUADAS-2. Data on sensitivity and specificity (overall, antigen, and antibody) were pooled using a Bayesian hierarchical random effects meta-analysis model. Subgroups were analyzed by blood samples (serum/plasma vs. whole blood) and study designs (case-control vs. cross-sectional). Results The overall specificity of the Determine Combo test was 99.1%, 95% credible interval (CrI) [97.3–99.8]. The overall pooled sensitivity for the device was at 88.5%, 95% [80.1–93.4]. When the components of the test were analyzed separately, the pooled specificities were 99.7%, 95% CrI [96.8–100] and 99.6%, 95% CrI [99.0–99.8], for the antigen and antibody components, respectively. Pooled sensitivity of the antibody component was 97.3%, 95% CrI [60.7–99.9], and pooled sensitivity for the antigen component was found to be 12.3%, 95% (CrI) [1.1–44.2]. No significant differences were found between subgroups by blood sample or study design. However, it was noted that many studies restricted their study sample to p24 antigen or RNA positive specimens, which may have led to underestimation of overall test performance. Detection bias, selection (spectrum) bias, incorporation bias, and verification bias impaired study quality. Conclusions Although the specificity of all test components was high, antigenic sensitivity will merit from an improvement. Besides the accuracy of the

  6. Accuracy of optical dental digitizers: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Vandeweghe, Stefan; Vervack, Valentin; Vanhove, Christian; Dierens, Melissa; Jimbo, Ryo; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, in terms of trueness and precision, of optical dental scanners. An experimental acrylic resin cast was created and digitized using a microcomputed tomography (microCT) scanner, which served as the reference model. Five polyether impressions were made of the acrylic resin cast to create five stone casts. Each dental digitizer (Imetric, Lava ST, Smart Optics, KaVo Everest) made five scans of the acrylic resin cast and one scan of every stone cast. The scans were superimposed and compared using metrology software. Deviations were calculated between the datasets obtained from the dental digitizers and the microCT scanner (= trueness) and between datasets from the same dental digitizer (= precision). With exception of the Smart Optics scanner, there were no significant differences in trueness for the acrylic resin cast. For the stone casts, however, the Lava ST performed better than Imetric, which did better than the KaVo scanner. The Smart Optics scanner demonstrated the highest deviation. All digitizers demonstrated a significantly higher trueness for the acrylic resin cast compared to the plaster cast, except the Lava ST. The Lava ST was significantly more precise compared to the other scanners. Imetric and Smart Optics also demonstrated a higher level of precision compared to the KaVo scanner. All digitizers demonstrated some degree of error. Stone cast copies are less accurate because of difficulties with scanning the rougher surface or dimensional deformations caused during the production process. For complex, large-span reconstructions, a highly accurate scanner should be selected. PMID:25734714

  7. Accuracy Study of a 2-Component Point Doppler Velocimeter (PDV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John; Naylor, Steve; James, Kelly; Ramanath, Senthil

    1997-01-01

    A two-component Point Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) which has recently been developed is described, and a series of velocity measurements which have been obtained to quantify the accuracy of the PDV system are summarized. This PDV system uses molecular iodine vapor cells as frequency discriminating filters to determine the Doppler shift of laser light which is scattered off of seed particles in a flow. The majority of results which have been obtained to date are for the mean velocity of a rotating wheel, although preliminary data are described for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow. Accuracy of the present wheel velocity data is approximately +/- 1 % of full scale, while linearity of a single channel is on the order of +/- 0.5 % (i.e., +/- 0.6 m/sec and +/- 0.3 m/sec, out of 57 m/sec, respectively). The observed linearity of these results is on the order of the accuracy to which the speed of the rotating wheel has been set for individual data readings. The absolute accuracy of the rotating wheel data is shown to be consistent with the level of repeatability of the cell calibrations. The preliminary turbulent pipe flow data show consistent turbulence intensity values, and mean axial velocity profiles generally agree with pitot probe data. However, there is at present an offset error in the radial velocity which is on the order of 5-10 % of the mean axial velocity.

  8. Study of accuracy of precipitation measurements using simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Zoltán; Lajos, Tamás; Morvai, Krisztián

    2013-04-01

    Hungarian Meteorological Service1 Budapest University of Technology and Economics2 Precipitation is one of the the most important meteorological parameters describing the state of the climate and to get correct information from trends, accurate measurements of precipitation is very important. The problem is that the precipitation measurements are affected by systematic errors leading to an underestimation of actual precipitation which errors vary by type of precipitaion and gauge type. It is well known that the wind speed is the most important enviromental factor that contributes to the underestimation of actual precipitation, especially for solid precipitation. To study and correct the errors of precipitation measurements there are two basic possibilities: · Use of results and conclusion of International Precipitation Measurements Intercomparisons; · To build standard reference gauges (DFIR, pit gauge) and make own investigation; In 1999 at the HMS we tried to achieve own investigation and built standard reference gauges But the cost-benefit ratio in case of snow (use of DFIR) was very bad (we had several winters without significant amount of snow, while the state of DFIR was continously falling) Due to the problem mentioned above there was need for new approximation that was the modelling made by Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Fluid Mechanics using the FLUENT 6.2 model. The ANSYS Fluent package is featured fluid dynamics solution for modelling flow and other related physical phenomena. It provides the tools needed to describe atmospheric processes, design and optimize new equipment. The CFD package includes solvers that accurately simulate behaviour of the broad range of flows that from single-phase to multi-phase. The questions we wanted to get answer to are as follows: · How do the different types of gauges deform the airflow around themselves? · Try to give quantitative estimation of wind induced error. · How does the use

  9. Accuracy of urea breath test in Helicobacter pylori infection: Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferwana, Mazen; Abdulmajeed, Imad; Alhajiahmed, Ali; Madani, Wedad; Firwana, Belal; Hasan, Rim; Altayar, Osama; Limburg, Paul J; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Knawy, Bandar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To quantitatively summarize and appraise the available evidence of urea breath test (UBT) use to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with dyspepsia and provide pooled diagnostic accuracy measures. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library and other databases for studies addressing the value of UBT in the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. We included cross-sectional studies that evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of UBT in adult patients with dyspeptic symptoms. Risk of bias was assessed using QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies)-2 tool. Diagnostic accuracy measures were pooled using the random-effects model. Subgroup analysis was conducted by UBT type (13C vs 14C) and by measurement technique (Infrared spectrometry vs Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry). RESULTS: Out of 1380 studies identified, only 23 met the eligibility criteria. Fourteen studies (61%) evaluated 13C UBT and 9 studies (39%) evaluated 14C UBT. There was significant variation in the type of reference standard tests used across studies.Pooled sensitivity was 0.96 (95%CI: 0.95-0.97) andpooled specificity was 0.93 (95%CI: 0.91-0.94). Likelihood ratio for a positive test was 12 and for a negative test was 0.05 with an area under thecurve of 0.985. Meta-analyses were associated with a significant statistical heterogeneity that remained unexplained after subgroup analysis. The included studies had a moderate risk of bias. CONCLUSION: UBT has high diagnostic accuracy for detecting H. pylori infection in patients with dyspepsia. The reliability of diagnostic meta-analytic estimates however is limited by significant heterogeneity. PMID:25632206

  10. Accuracy of administrative data for surveillance of healthcare-associated infections: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van Mourik, Maaike S M; van Duijn, Pleun Joppe; Moons, Karel G M; Bonten, Marc J M; Lee, Grace M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Measuring the incidence of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) is of increasing importance in current healthcare delivery systems. Administrative data algorithms, including (combinations of) diagnosis codes, are commonly used to determine the occurrence of HAI, either to support within-hospital surveillance programmes or as free-standing quality indicators. We conducted a systematic review evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of administrative data for the detection of HAI. Methods Systematic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane for relevant studies (1995–2013). Methodological quality assessment was performed using QUADAS-2 criteria; diagnostic accuracy estimates were stratified by HAI type and key study characteristics. Results 57 studies were included, the majority aiming to detect surgical site or bloodstream infections. Study designs were very diverse regarding the specification of their administrative data algorithm (code selections, follow-up) and definitions of HAI presence. One-third of studies had important methodological limitations including differential or incomplete HAI ascertainment or lack of blinding of assessors. Observed sensitivity and positive predictive values of administrative data algorithms for HAI detection were very heterogeneous and generally modest at best, both for within-hospital algorithms and for formal quality indicators; accuracy was particularly poor for the identification of device-associated HAI such as central line associated bloodstream infections. The large heterogeneity in study designs across the included studies precluded formal calculation of summary diagnostic accuracy estimates in most instances. Conclusions Administrative data had limited and highly variable accuracy for the detection of HAI, and their judicious use for internal surveillance efforts and external quality assessment is recommended. If hospitals and policymakers choose to rely on administrative data for HAI surveillance, continued

  11. Free Mesh Method: fundamental conception, algorithms and accuracy study

    PubMed Central

    YAGAWA, Genki

    2011-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) has been commonly employed in a variety of fields as a computer simulation method to solve such problems as solid, fluid, electro-magnetic phenomena and so on. However, creation of a quality mesh for the problem domain is a prerequisite when using FEM, which becomes a major part of the cost of a simulation. It is natural that the concept of meshless method has evolved. The free mesh method (FMM) is among the typical meshless methods intended for particle-like finite element analysis of problems that are difficult to handle using global mesh generation, especially on parallel processors. FMM is an efficient node-based finite element method that employs a local mesh generation technique and a node-by-node algorithm for the finite element calculations. In this paper, FMM and its variation are reviewed focusing on their fundamental conception, algorithms and accuracy. PMID:21558752

  12. STARD 2015: An Updated List of Essential Items for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy Studies.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, Patrick M; Reitsma, Johannes B; Bruns, David E; Gatsonis, Constantine A; Glasziou, Paul P; Irwig, Les; Lijmer, Jeroen G; Moher, David; Rennie, Drummond; de Vet, Henrica C W; Kressel, Herbert Y; Rifai, Nader; Golub, Robert M; Altman, Douglas G; Hooft, Lotty; Korevaar, Daniël A; Cohen, Jérémie F

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete reporting has been identified as a major source of avoidable waste in biomedical research. Essential information is often not provided in study reports, impeding the identification, critical appraisal, and replication of studies. To improve the quality of reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies, the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (STARD) statement was developed. Here we present STARD 2015, an updated list of 30 essential items that should be included in every report of a diagnostic accuracy study. This update incorporates recent evidence about sources of bias and variability in diagnostic accuracy and is intended to facilitate the use of STARD. As such, STARD 2015 may help to improve completeness and transparency in reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies. PMID:26509226

  13. STARD 2015: An Updated List of Essential Items for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy Studies.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, Patrick M; Reitsma, Johannes B; Bruns, David E; Gatsonis, Constantine A; Glasziou, Paul P; Irwig, Les; Lijmer, Jeroen G; Moher, David; Rennie, Drummond; de Vet, Henrica C W; Kressel, Herbert Y; Rifai, Nader; Golub, Robert M; Altman, Douglas G; Hooft, Lotty; Korevaar, Daniël A; Cohen, Jérémie F

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete reporting has been identified as a major source of avoidable waste in biomedical research. Essential information is often not provided in study reports, impeding the identification, critical appraisal, and replication of studies. To improve the quality of reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies, the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (STARD) statement was developed. Here we present STARD 2015, an updated list of 30 essential items that should be included in every report of a diagnostic accuracy study. This update incorporates recent evidence about sources of bias and variability in diagnostic accuracy and is intended to facilitate the use of STARD. As such, STARD 2015 may help to improve completeness and transparency in reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies. PMID:26510957

  14. Dynamic Development of Complexity and Accuracy: A Case Study in Second Language Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmawati

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of complexity and accuracy in English as a Second Language (ESL) academic writing. Although research into complexity and accuracy development in second language (L2) writing has been well established, few studies have assumed the multidimensionality of these two constructs (Norris & Ortega, 2009) or…

  15. Effects of Varying Feedback Accuracy on Task Acquisition: A Computerized Translational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Jason M.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.; Reed, Derek D.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that the accuracy of instructions influences responding immediately and under later conditions. The purpose of the present study was to extend this literature and use a translational approach to assess the short- and long-term effects of feedback accuracy on the acquisition of a task. Three levels of inaccurate feedback were…

  16. Accuracy of Self-Evaluation in Adults with ADHD: Evidence from a Driving Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knouse, Laura E.; Bagwell, Catherine L.; Barkley, Russell A.; Murphy, Kevin R.

    2005-01-01

    Research on children with ADHD indicates an association with inaccuracy of self-appraisal. This study examines the accuracy of self-evaluations in clinic-referred adults diagnosed with ADHD. Self-assessments and performance measures of driving in naturalistic settings and on a virtual-reality driving simulator are used to assess accuracy of…

  17. Alternative Confidence Interval Methods Used in the Diagnostic Accuracy Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gülhan, Orekıcı Temel

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. It is necessary to decide whether the newly improved methods are better than the standard or reference test or not. To decide whether the new diagnostics test is better than the gold standard test/imperfect standard test, the differences of estimated sensitivity/specificity are calculated with the help of information obtained from samples. However, to generalize this value to the population, it should be given with the confidence intervals. The aim of this study is to evaluate the confidence interval methods developed for the differences between the two dependent sensitivity/specificity values on a clinical application. Materials and Methods. In this study, confidence interval methods like Asymptotic Intervals, Conditional Intervals, Unconditional Interval, Score Intervals, and Nonparametric Methods Based on Relative Effects Intervals are used. Besides, as clinical application, data used in diagnostics study by Dickel et al. (2010) has been taken as a sample. Results. The results belonging to the alternative confidence interval methods for Nickel Sulfate, Potassium Dichromate, and Lanolin Alcohol are given as a table. Conclusion. While preferring the confidence interval methods, the researchers have to consider whether the case to be compared is single ratio or dependent binary ratio differences, the correlation coefficient between the rates in two dependent ratios and the sample sizes. PMID:27478491

  18. Accuracy of musculoskeletal imaging for the diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Sarah Louise; Koduri, Gouri; Hill, Catherine L; Wakefield, Richard J; Hutchings, Andrew; Loy, Clement; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To review the evidence for accuracy of imaging for diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Methods Searches included MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed. Evaluations of diagnostic accuracy of imaging tests for PMR were eligible, excluding reports with <10 PMR cases. Two authors independently extracted study data and three authors assessed methodological quality using modified QUADAS-2 criteria. Results 26 studies of 2370 patients were evaluated: 10 ultrasound scanning studies; 6 MRI studies; 1 USS and MRI study; 7 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) studies; 1 plain radiography and 1 technetium scintigraphy study. In four ultrasound studies, subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis had sensitivity 80% (95% CI 55% to 93%) and specificity 68% (95% CI 60% to 75%), whereas bilateral subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis had sensitivity 66% (95% CI 43% to 87%) and specificity 89% (95% CI 66% to 97%). Sensitivity for ultrasound detection of trochanteric bursitis ranged from 21% to 100%. In four ultrasound studies reporting both subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis and glenohumeral synovitis, detection of subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis was more accurate than that of glenohumeral synovitis (p=0.004). MRI and PET/CT revealed additional areas of inflammation in the spine and pelvis, including focal areas between the vertebrae and anterior to the hip joint, but the number of controls with inflammatory disease was inadequate for precise specificity estimates. Conclusions Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis appears to be the most helpful ultrasound feature for PMR diagnosis, but interpretation is limited by study heterogeneity and methodological issues, including variability in blinding and potential bias due to case–control study designs. Recent MRI and PET/CT case–control studies, with blinded readers, yielded promising data requiring validation within a diagnostic cohort study. PMID:26535139

  19. Eyewitness memory of a supermarket robbery: a case study of accuracy and confidence after 3 months.

    PubMed

    Odinot, Geralda; Wolters, Gezinus; van Koppen, Peter J

    2009-12-01

    In this case study, 14 witnesses of an armed robbery were interviewed after 3 months. Security camera recordings were used to assess memory accuracy. Of all information that could be remembered about 84% was correct. Although accurately recalled information had a higher confidence level on average than inaccurately recalled information, the mean accuracy-confidence correlation was rather modest (0.38). These findings indicate that confidence is not a reliable predictor of accuracy. A higher level of self-reported, post-event thinking about the incident was associated with higher confidence levels, while a higher level of self-reported emotional impact was associated with greater accuracy. A potential source of (mis)information, a reconstruction of the robbery broadcasted on TV, did not alter the original memories of the witnesses. PMID:18719983

  20. The accuracy of the anti-mitochondrial antibody and the M2 subtype test for diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shiling; Zhao, Fengrong; Wang, Qingsong; Chen, Wei-Xian

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMAs) and/or the M2 subtype (AMA-M2) in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). AMA/AMA-M2 data were obtained by searching electronic databases. Studies showing AMA/AMA-M2 results in patients with PBC and control groups with other liver diseases or healthy livers were included. The quality of the involved studies was assessed using the QUADAS tool. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated, and stratified analysis was performed according to possible heterogeneity sources. The pooled AMA (all methods) sensitivity and specificity were 84.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 83.3%-85.6%) and 97.8% (95% CI 97.6%-98.0%), respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 25.201 (95% CI 17.583-36.118) and 0.162 (95% CI 0.131-0.199), respectively. The current evidence suggests that AMA and AMA-M2 show favorable accuracy for the diagnosis of PBC with high specificity and sensitivity. AMA is a better and more comprehensive marker than AMA-M2. The accuracy established in this meta-analysis is based on clinical studies using patient cohorts from different ethnicities. PMID:24501161

  1. Do knowledge, knowledge sources and reasoning skills affect the accuracy of nursing diagnoses? a randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper reports a study about the effect of knowledge sources, such as handbooks, an assessment format and a predefined record structure for diagnostic documentation, as well as the influence of knowledge, disposition toward critical thinking and reasoning skills, on the accuracy of nursing diagnoses. Knowledge sources can support nurses in deriving diagnoses. A nurse’s disposition toward critical thinking and reasoning skills is also thought to influence the accuracy of his or her nursing diagnoses. Method A randomised factorial design was used in 2008–2009 to determine the effect of knowledge sources. We used the following instruments to assess the influence of ready knowledge, disposition, and reasoning skills on the accuracy of diagnoses: (1) a knowledge inventory, (2) the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory, and (3) the Health Science Reasoning Test. Nurses (n = 249) were randomly assigned to one of four factorial groups, and were instructed to derive diagnoses based on an assessment interview with a simulated patient/actor. Results The use of a predefined record structure resulted in a significantly higher accuracy of nursing diagnoses. A regression analysis reveals that almost half of the variance in the accuracy of diagnoses is explained by the use of a predefined record structure, a nurse’s age and the reasoning skills of `deduction’ and `analysis’. Conclusions Improving nurses’ dispositions toward critical thinking and reasoning skills, and the use of a predefined record structure, improves accuracy of nursing diagnoses. PMID:22852577

  2. Study the effect of gray component replacement level on reflectance spectra and color reproduction accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, I.; Shopova, M.; Boeva, R.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is investigation of gray component replacement (GCR) levels on reflectance spectrum for different overprints of the inks and color reproduction accuracy. The most commonly implemented method in practice for generation of achromatic composition is gray component replacement (GCR). The experiments in this study, have been performed in real production conditions with special test form generated by specialized software. The measuring of reflection spectrum of printed colors, gives a complete conception for the effect of different gray component replacement levels on color reproduction accuracy. For better data analyses and modeling of processes, we have calculated (converted) the CIEL*a*b* color coordinates from the reflection spectra data. The assessment of color accuracy by using different GCR amount has been made by calculation of color difference ΔE* ab. In addition for the specific printing conditions we have created ICC profiles with different GCR amounts. A comparison of the color gamuts has been performed. For a first time a methodology is implemented for examination and estimation of effect of GCR levels on color reproduction accuracy by studying a big number of colors in entire visible spectrum. Implementation in practice of the results achieved in this experiment, will lead to improved gray balance and better color accuracy. Another important effect of this research is reduction of financial costs of printing production by decreasing of ink consumption, indirect reduction of emissions during the manufacture of inks and facilitates the process of deinking during the recycling paper.

  3. Accuracy Studies of a Magnetometer-Only Attitude-and-Rate-Determination System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challa, M. (Editor); Wheeler, C. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    A personal computer based system was recently prototyped that uses measurements from a three axis magnetometer (TAM) to estimate the attitude and rates of a spacecraft using no a priori knowledge of the spacecraft's state. Past studies using in-flight data from the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particles Explorer focused on the robustness of the system and demonstrated that attitude and rate estimates could be obtained accurately to 1.5 degrees (deg) and 0.01 deg per second (deg/sec), respectively, despite limitations in the data and in the accuracies of te truth models. This paper studies the accuracy of the Kalman filter in the system using several orbits of in-flight Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) data and attitude and rate truth models obtained from high precision sensors to demonstrate the practical capabilities. This paper shows the following: Using telemetered TAM data, attitude accuracies of 0.2 to 0.4 deg and rate accuracies of 0.002 to 0.005 deg/sec (within ERBS attitude control requirements of 1 deg and 0.0005 deg/sec) can be obtained with minimal tuning of the filter; Replacing the TAM data in the telemetry with simulated TAM data yields corresponding accuracies of 0.1 to 0.2 deg and 0.002 to 0.005 deg/sec, thus demonstrating that the filter's accuracy can be significantly enhanced by further calibrating the TAM. Factors affecting the fillter's accuracy and techniques for tuning the system's Kalman filter are also presented.

  4. Dynamics of Complexity and Accuracy: A Longitudinal Case Study of Advanced Untutored Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Brittany; Kim, Youjin

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal case study follows a dynamic systems approach to investigate an under-studied research area in second language acquisition, the development of complexity and accuracy for an advanced untutored learner of English. Using the analytical tools of dynamic systems theory (Verspoor et al. 2011) within the framework of complexity,…

  5. Prediction accuracy of a sample-size estimation method for ROC studies

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Dev P.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Sample-size estimation is an important consideration when planning a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study. The aim of this work was to assess the prediction accuracy of a sample-size estimation method using the Monte Carlo simulation method. Materials and Methods Two ROC ratings simulators characterized by low reader and high case variabilities (LH) and high reader and low case variabilities (HL) were used to generate pilot data sets in 2 modalities. Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz multiple-reader multiple-case (DBM-MRMC) analysis of the ratings yielded estimates of the modality-reader, modality-case and error variances. These were input to the Hillis-Berbaum (HB) sample-size estimation method, which predicted the number of cases needed to achieve 80% power for 10 readers and an effect size of 0.06 in the pivotal study. Predictions that generalized to readers and cases (random-all), to cases only (random-cases) and to readers only (random-readers) were generated. A prediction-accuracy index defined as the probability that any single prediction yields true power in the range 75% to 90% was used to assess the HB method. Results For random-case generalization the HB-method prediction-accuracy was reasonable, ~ 50% for 5 readers in the pilot study. Prediction-accuracy was generally higher under low reader variability conditions (LH) than under high reader variability conditions (HL). Under ideal conditions (many readers in the pilot study) the DBM-MRMC based HB method overestimated the number of cases. The overestimates could be explained by the observed large variability of the DBM-MRMC modality-reader variance estimates, particularly when reader variability was large (HL). The largest benefit of increasing the number of readers in the pilot study was realized for LH, where 15 readers were enough to yield prediction accuracy > 50% under all generalization conditions, but the benefit was lesser for HL where prediction accuracy was ~ 36% for 15

  6. Experimental studies of high-accuracy RFID localization with channel impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauls, Eric; Zhang, Yimin D.

    2015-05-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) systems present an incredibly cost-effective and easy-to-implement solution to close-range localization. One of the important applications of a passive RFID system is to determine the reader position through multilateration based on the estimated distances between the reader and multiple distributed reference tags obtained from, e.g., the received signal strength indicator (RSSI) readings. In practice, the achievable accuracy of passive RFID reader localization suffers from many factors, such as the distorted RSSI reading due to channel impairments in terms of the susceptibility to reader antenna patterns and multipath propagation. Previous studies have shown that the accuracy of passive RFID localization can be significantly improved by properly modeling and compensating for such channel impairments. The objective of this paper is to report experimental study results that validate the effectiveness of such approaches for high-accuracy RFID localization. We also examine a number of practical issues arising in the underlying problem that limit the accuracy of reader-tag distance measurements and, therefore, the estimated reader localization. These issues include the variations in tag radiation characteristics for similar tags, effects of tag orientations, and reader RSS quantization and measurement errors. As such, this paper reveals valuable insights of the issues and solutions toward achieving high-accuracy passive RFID localization.

  7. Dose calculation accuracies in whole breast radiotherapy treatment planning: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Shogo; Miyabe, Yuki; Tohyama, Naoki; Kumazaki, Yu; Kurooka, Masahiko; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kito, Satoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Ohotomo, Yuko; Ikagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishikura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Miwako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishio, Teiji

    2015-07-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the variation in the doses delivered among institutions due to dose calculation inaccuracies in whole breast radiotherapy. We have developed practical procedures for quality assurance (QA) of radiation treatment planning systems. These QA procedures are designed to be performed easily at any institution and to permit comparisons of results across institutions. The dose calculation accuracy was evaluated across seven institutions using various irradiation conditions. In some conditions, there was a >3 % difference between the calculated dose and the measured dose. The dose calculation accuracy differs among institutions because it is dependent on both the dose calculation algorithm and beam modeling. The QA procedures in this study are useful for verifying the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm and of the beam model before clinical use for whole breast radiotherapy. PMID:25646770

  8. A Study on the Effect of Input Parameters on Springback Prediction Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. S.; Yang, W. H.; Choi, K. Y.; Kim, B. H.

    2011-08-01

    In this study, it is considered the input parameters in springback simulation affect factors to use member part by Taguchi's method into six-sigma tool on the basis of experiment for acquiring much more accurate springback prediction in Pamstamp2G. The best combination of input parameters for higher springback prediction accuracy is determined to the fender part as the one is applied for member part. The cracks and wrinkles in drawing and flanging operation must be removed for predicting the higher springback in accuracy. The compensation of springback on the basis of simulation is carried out. It is concluded that 95% of accuracy for springback prediction in dimension is secured as comparing with tryout panel.

  9. Assessing the Accuracy of a Child's Account of Sexual Abuse: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orbach, Yael; Lamb, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the accuracy of a 13-year-old girl's account of a sexually abusive incident. Information given by the victim was compared with an audiotaped record. Over 50% of information reported by the victim was corroborated by the audio record and 64% was confirmed by more than one source. (Author/CR)

  10. Do Fixation Cues Ensure Fixation Accuracy in Split-Fovea Studies of Word Recognition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Timothy R.; Paterson, Kevin B.; Kurtev, Stoyan; Xu, Mengyun

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have claimed that hemispheric processing is split precisely at the foveal midline and so place great emphasis on the precise location at which words are fixated. These claims are based on experiments in which a variety of fixation procedures were used to ensure fixation accuracy but the effectiveness of these procedures is unclear. We…

  11. Who Should Mark What? A Study of Factors Affecting Marking Accuracy in a Biology Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suto, Irenka; Nadas, Rita; Bell, John

    2011-01-01

    Accurate marking is crucial to the reliability and validity of public examinations, in England and internationally. Factors contributing to accuracy have been conceptualised as affecting either marking task demands or markers' personal expertise. The aim of this empirical study was to develop this conceptualisation through investigating the…

  12. The Accuracy of Surgeons' Provided Estimates for the Duration of Hysterectomies: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Dario R.; Robison, Katina; Raker, Christina A.; Wharton, Gary G.; Frishman, Gary N.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the accuracy of gynecologic surgeons' estimate of operative times for hysterectomies and to compare these with the existing computer-generated estimate at our institution. Design Pilot prospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Academic tertiary women's hospital in the Northeast United States. Participants Thirty gynecologic surgeons including 23 general gynecologists, 4 gynecologic oncologists, and 3 urogynecologists. Intervention Via a 6-question survey, surgeons were asked to predict the operative time for a hysterectomy they were about to perform. The surgeons' predictions were then compared with the time predicted by the scheduling system at our institution and with the actual operative time, to determine accuracy and differences between actual and predicted times. Patient and surgery data were collected to perform a secondary analysis to determine factors that may have significantly affected the prediction. Measurements and Main Results Of 75 hysterectomies analyzed, 36 were performed abdominally, 18 vaginally, and 21 laparoscopically. Accuracy was established if the actual procedure time was within the 15-minute increment predicted by either the surgeons or the scheduling system. The surgeons accurately predicted the duration of 20 hysterectomies (26.7%), whereas the accuracy of the scheduling system was only 9.3%. The scheduling system accuracy was significantly less precise than the surgeons, primarily due to overestimation (p = .01); operative time was overestimated on average 34 minutes. The scheduling system overestimated the time required to a greater extent than the surgeons for nearly all data examined, including patient body mass index, surgical approach, indication for surgery, surgeon experience, uterine size, and previous abdominal surgery. Conclusion Although surgeons' accuracy in predicting operative time was poor, it was significantly better than that of the computerized scheduling

  13. Evaluating radiographers' diagnostic accuracy in screen-reading mammograms: what constitutes a quality study?

    SciTech Connect

    Debono, Josephine C; Poulos, Ann E

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study was to first evaluate the quality of studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of radiographers as mammogram screen-readers and then to develop an adapted tool for determining the quality of screen-reading studies. A literature search was used to identify relevant studies and a quality evaluation tool constructed by combining the criteria for quality of Whiting, Rutjes, Dinnes et al. and Brealey and Westwood. This constructed tool was then applied to the studies and subsequently adapted specifically for use in evaluating quality in studies investigating diagnostic accuracy of screen-readers. Eleven studies were identified and the constructed tool applied to evaluate quality. This evaluation resulted in the identification of quality issues with the studies such as potential for bias, applicability of results, study conduct, reporting of the study and observer characteristics. An assessment of the applicability and relevance of the tool for this area of research resulted in adaptations to the criteria and the development of a tool specifically for evaluating diagnostic accuracy in screen-reading. This tool, with further refinement and rigorous validation can make a significant contribution to promoting well-designed studies in this important area of research and practice.

  14. How does study quality affect the results of a diagnostic meta-analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Marie E; Whiting, Penny F; Kleijnen, Jos

    2005-01-01

    Background The use of systematic literature review to inform evidence based practice in diagnostics is rapidly expanding. Although the primary diagnostic literature is extensive, studies are often of low methodological quality or poorly reported. There has been no rigorously evaluated, evidence based tool to assess the methodological quality of diagnostic studies. The primary objective of this study was to determine the extent to which variations in the quality of primary studies impact the results of a diagnostic meta-analysis and whether this differs with diagnostic test type. A secondary objective was to contribute to the evaluation of QUADAS, an evidence-based tool for the assessment of quality in diagnostic accuracy studies. Methods This study was conducted as part of large systematic review of tests used in the diagnosis and further investigation of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children. All studies included in this review were assessed using QUADAS, an evidence-based tool for the assessment of quality in systematic reviews of diagnostic accuracy studies. The impact of individual components of QUADAS on a summary measure of diagnostic accuracy was investigated using regression analysis. The review divided the diagnosis and further investigation of UTI into the following three clinical stages: diagnosis of UTI, localisation of infection, and further investigation of the UTI. Each stage used different types of diagnostic test, which were considered to involve different quality concerns. Results Many of the studies included in our review were poorly reported. The proportion of QUADAS items fulfilled was similar for studies in different sections of the review. However, as might be expected, the individual items fulfilled differed between the three clinical stages. Regression analysis found that different items showed a strong association with test performance for the different tests evaluated. These differences were observed both within and between the three

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of tests based on radiologic measurements of dogs and cats: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Nelson, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review of diagnostic tests based on radiologic measurements of structures in dogs and cats was done in order to reach generalizable conclusions about the value of making such measurements. Literature search was done using the ISI Web of Knowledge(SM) for studies in the subject category Veterinary sciences. Studies were eligible for inclusion that employed length, angle, area or volume measurements from radiographic, ultrasonographic, CT or MR images of dogs or cats as a diagnostic test for a naturally occurring condition, compared the results of imaging with a reference standard, included at least 10 subjects, and sufficient data that a 2 × 2 table of results could be constructed. Quality of studies was assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. Twenty-six studies were found describing 40 tests that satisfied the inclusion criteria. Tests were radiographic in 22 (55%) instances and ultrasonographic in 18 (45%). Quality of studies was generally low, with a risk of bias in patient selection in 92% studies, performance of the index test in 73% studies, and patient flow in 42% studies. Median (range) number of subjects was 64 (20-305), sensitivity was 77% (38-99%), specificity was 82% (50-99%), positive likelihood ratio was 4.1 (1-103), and negative likelihood ratio was 0.29 (0.01-1). Two studies that compared accuracy of radiographic measurements to subjective image interpretation alone found no difference. Evidence is weak that radiologic measurements of structures in dogs and cats are useful for diagnosis, hence measurements should not be emphasized as a basis for diagnosis in either teaching or clinical imaging reports. PMID:25339347

  16. Studies on dynamic motion compensation and positioning accuracy on star tracker.

    PubMed

    Jun, Zhang; Yuncai, Hao; Li, Wang; Da, Liu

    2015-10-01

    Error from motion is the dominant restriction on the improvement of dynamic performance on a star tracker. As a remarkable motion error, the degree of nonuniformity of the star image velocity field on the detector is studied, and thus a general model for the moving star spot is built. To minimize velocity nonuniformity, a novel general method is proposed to derive the proper motion compensation and location accuracy in cases of both uniform velocity and acceleration. Using this method, a theoretic analysis on the accuracy of time-delayed integration and similar techniques, which are thought of as state-of-the-art approaches to reduce error from motion, is conducted. The simulations and experimental results validate the proposed method. Our method shows a more steady performance than the dynamic binning algorithm. The positional error could be neglected when the smear length is far less than 3.464 times the scale of star spot, which suggests accuracy can be maintained by changing frame-integration time inverse proportional to the velocity on the focal plane. It also shows that the acceleration effect must be compensated to achieve accuracy close to the Cramér-Rao lower bound. PMID:26479618

  17. Conventional Analyses of Data from Dietary Validation Studies May Misestimate Reporting Accuracy: Illustration from a Study of the Effect of Interview Modality on Children’s Reporting Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Albert F.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Hardin, James W.; Nichols, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare two approaches to analyzing energy- and nutrient-converted data from dietary validation (and relative validation) studies—conventional analyses, in which the accuracy of reported items is not ascertained, and reporting-error sensitive analyses, in which reported items are classified as matches (items actually eaten) or intrusions (items not actually eaten), and reported amounts are classified as corresponding or overreported. Design Subjects were observed eating school breakfast and lunch, and interviewed that evening about that day’s intake. For conventional analyses, reference and reported information were converted to energy and macronutrients; then t-tests, correlation coefficients, and report rates (reported/reference) were calculated. For reporting-error sensitive analyses, reported items were classified as matches or intrusions, reported amounts were classified as corresponding or overreported, and correspondence rates (corresponding amount/reference amount) and inflation ratios (overreported amount/reference amount) were calculated. Subjects Sixty-nine fourth-grade children (35 girls) from 10 elementary schools in Georgia (US). Results For energy and each macronutrient, conventional analyses found that reported amounts were significantly less than reference amounts (ps < .021; paired t-tests); correlations between reported and reference amounts exceeded 0.52 (ps < .001); and median report rates ranged from 76% to 95%. Analyses sensitive to reporting errors found median correspondence rates between 67% and 79%, and that median inflation ratios, which ranged from 7% to 17%, differed significantly from 0 (ps < .0001; sign tests). Conclusions Conventional analyses of energy and nutrient data from dietary-reporting validation (and relative validation) studies may overestimate accuracy and mask the complexity of dietary reporting error. PMID:17381899

  18. Accuracy of bite mark analysis from food substances: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, M. Jonathan; Pazhani, Ambiga

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aims and objectives of the study were to compare the accuracy of bite mark analysis from three different food substances-apple, cheese and chocolate using two techniques-the manual docking procedure and computer assisted overlay generation technique and to compare the accuracy of the two techniques for bite mark analysis on food substances. Materials and Methods: The individuals who participated in the study were made to bite on three food substances-apple, cheese, and chocolate. Dentate individuals were included in the study. Edentulous individuals and individuals having a missing anterior tooth were excluded from the study. The dental casts of the individual were applied to the positive cast of the bitten food substance to determine docking or matching. Then, computer generated overlays were compared with bite mark pattern on the foodstuff. Results: The results were tabulated and the comparison of bite mark analysis on the three different food substances was analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA test and the comparison of the two techniques was analyzed by Spearman's Rho correlation coefficient. Conclusion: On comparing the bite marks analysis from the three food substances-apple, cheese and chocolate, the accuracy was found to be greater for chocolate and cheese than apple. PMID:26816463

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) for bladder cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan-Lan; Chen, Jie; Yan, Wei; Zang, Ding; Qin, Qin; Deng, An-Mei

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the accuracy of serum and urinary measurements of cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) for the diagnosis of bladder cancer; however, the results have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall accuracy of CYFRA 21-1 for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. We performed a search for English-language publications reporting on the detection of CYFRA21-1 levels for the diagnosis of bladder cancer through November 2, 2014, using public medical databases, including EMBASE, Web of Science, and Medline. The quality of the studies was assessed by revised QUADAS tools. The performance characteristics were pooled and analyzed using a bivariate model. Publication bias was explored with the Deek's test. Sixteen studies, with a total 1,262 bladder-cancer patients and 1,233 non-bladder-cancer patients, were included in the study. The pooled sensitivities for serum and urine CYFRA 21-1 were 0.42 (95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.33-0.51) and 0.82 (95 % CI, 0.70-0.90), respectively. The corresponding specificities were 0.94 (95 % CI, 0.90-0.96) and 0.80 (95 % CI, 0.73-0.86), respectively. The areas under the summary receiver-operating-characteristic curves for serum and urine CYFRA 21-1 were 0.88 (95 % CI, 0.85-0.91) and 0.87 (95 % CI, 0.84-0.90), respectively. The major design deficiencies of the included studies were participant-selection bias, potential review, and verification bias. Therefore, we concluded that both serum and urine CYFRA 21-1 served as efficient indexes for bladder-cancer diagnosis. Additional, well-designed studies should be performed to rigorously evaluate the diagnostic value of CYFRA 21-1 for bladder cancer. PMID:25854170

  20. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy for salivary gland lesions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert L; Hall, Brian J; Layfield, Lester J

    2011-10-01

    Core needle biopsy (CNB) of salivary gland lesions is a relatively new technique that may offer benefits for diagnosis of the lesions. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify studies published between January 1, 1985, and March 15, 2011. Summary estimates of sensitivity and specificity were obtained by using a summary receiver-operating characteristic (SROC) curve. Study quality was assessed by using the QUADAS survey. We identified 5 studies (277 cases) for inclusion. The area under the SROC for CNB was 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-1.00). Based on histologically verified cases, the sensitivity of CNB is 0.92 (95% CI, 0.77-0.98) and the specificity is 1.00 (95% CI, 0.76-1.00). We conclude that CNB has high accuracy and a low (1.2%) inadequacy rate. CNB is more accurate than fine-needle aspiration, at least in some settings, but the best selection of which test to use for an individual patient and setting remains to be defined. PMID:21917673

  1. Comparative study of dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques using addition silicone impression material.

    PubMed

    Penaflor, C F; Semacio, R C; De Las Alas, L T; Uy, H G

    1998-01-01

    This study compared dimensional accuracy of the single, double with spacer, double with cut-out and double mix impression technique using addition silicone impression material. A typhodont containing Ivorine teeth model with six (6) full-crown tooth preparations were used as the positive control. Two stone replication models for each impression technique were made as test materials. Accuracy of the techniques were assessed by measuring four dimensions on the stone dies poured from the impression of the Ivorine teeth model. Results indicated that most of the measurements for the height, width and diameter slightly decreased and a few increased compared with the Ivorine teeth model. The double with cut-out and double mix technique presents the least difference from the master model as compared to the two latter impression techniques. PMID:10202524

  2. An Initial Study of Airport Arrival Heinz Capacity Benefits Due to Improved Scheduling Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry; Erzberger, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    The long-term growth rate in air-traffic demand leads to future air-traffic densities that are unmanageable by today's air-traffic control system. I n order to accommodate such growth, new technology and operational methods will be needed in the next generation air-traffic control system. One proposal for such a system is the Automated Airspace Concept (AAC). One of the precepts of AAC is to direct aircraft using trajectories that are sent via an air-ground data link. This greatly improves the accuracy in directing aircraft to specific waypoints at specific times. Studies of the Center-TRACON Automation System (CTAS) have shown that increased scheduling accuracy enables increased arrival capacity at CTAS equipped airports.

  3. Accuracy Assessment Study of UNB3m Neutral Atmosphere Model for Global Tropospheric Delay Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Ashraf

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric delay is the second major source of error after the ionospheric delay for satellite navigation systems. The transmitted signal could face a delay caused by the troposphere of over 2m at zenith and 20m at lower satellite elevation angles of 10 degrees and below. Positioning errors of 10m or greater can result from the inaccurate mitigation of the tropospheric delay. Many techniques are available for tropospheric delay mitigation consisting of surface meteorological models and global empirical models. Surface meteorological models need surface meteorological data to give high accuracy mitigation while the global empirical models need not. Several hybrid neutral atmosphere delay models have been developed by (University of New Brunswick, Canada) UNB researchers over the past decade or so. The most widely applicable current version is UNB3m, which uses the Saastamoinen zenith delays, Niell mapping functions, and a look-up table with annual mean and amplitude for temperature, pressure, and water vapour pressure varying with respect to latitude and height. This paper presents an assessment study of the behaviour of the UNB3m model compared with highly accurate IGS-tropospheric estimation for three different (latitude/height) IGS stations. The study was performed over four nonconsecutive weeks on different seasons over one year (October 2014 to July 2015). It can be concluded that using UNB3m model gives tropospheric delay correction accuracy of 0.050m in average for low latitude regions in all seasons. The model's accuracy is about 0.075m for medium latitude regions, while its highest accuracy is about 0.014m for high latitude regions.

  4. A reference dataset for deformable image registration spatial accuracy evaluation using the COPDgene study archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Fuentes, David; Ahmad, Moiz; Wood, Abbie M.; Ludwig, Michelle S.; Guerrero, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Landmark point-pairs provide a strategy to assess deformable image registration (DIR) accuracy in terms of the spatial registration of the underlying anatomy depicted in medical images. In this study, we propose to augment a publicly available database (www.dir-lab.com) of medical images with large sets of manually identified anatomic feature pairs between breath-hold computed tomography (BH-CT) images for DIR spatial accuracy evaluation. Ten BH-CT image pairs were randomly selected from the COPDgene study cases. Each patient had received CT imaging of the entire thorax in the supine position at one-fourth dose normal expiration and maximum effort full dose inspiration. Using dedicated in-house software, an imaging expert manually identified large sets of anatomic feature pairs between images. Estimates of inter- and intra-observer spatial variation in feature localization were determined by repeat measurements of multiple observers over subsets of randomly selected features. 7298 anatomic landmark features were manually paired between the 10 sets of images. Quantity of feature pairs per case ranged from 447 to 1172. Average 3D Euclidean landmark displacements varied substantially among cases, ranging from 12.29 (SD: 6.39) to 30.90 (SD: 14.05) mm. Repeat registration of uniformly sampled subsets of 150 landmarks for each case yielded estimates of observer localization error, which ranged in average from 0.58 (SD: 0.87) to 1.06 (SD: 2.38) mm for each case. The additions to the online web database (www.dir-lab.com) described in this work will broaden the applicability of the reference data, providing a freely available common dataset for targeted critical evaluation of DIR spatial accuracy performance in multiple clinical settings. Estimates of observer variance in feature localization suggest consistent spatial accuracy for all observers across both four-dimensional CT and COPDgene patient cohorts.

  5. Accuracy of dental radiographs for caries detection.

    PubMed

    Keenan, James R; Keenan, Analia Veitz

    2016-06-01

    Data sourcesMedline, Embase, Cochrane Central and grey literature, complemented by cross-referencing from bibliographies. Diagnostic reviews were searched using the Medion database.Study selectionStudies reporting on the accuracy (sensitivity/specificity) of radiographic detection of primary carious lesions under clinical (in vivo) or in vitro conditions were included. The outcome of interest was caries detection using radiographs. The study also assessed the effect of the histologic lesion stage and included articles to assess the differences between primary or permanent teeth, if there had been improvements recently due to technical advances or radiographic methods, or if there are variations within studies (between examiners or applied radiographic techniques).Data extraction and synthesisData extraction was done by one reviewer first, using a piloted electronic spreadsheet and repeated independently by a second reviewer. Consensus was achieved by discussion. Data extraction followed guidelines from the Cochrane Collaboration. Risk of bias was assessed using QUADAS-2. Pooled sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) were calculated using random effects meta-analysis. Analyses were performed separately for occlusal and proximal lesions. Dentine lesions and cavitated lesions were analysed separately.Results947 articles were identified with the searches and 442 were analysed full text. 117 studies (13,375 teeth, 19,108 surfaces) were included. All studies were published in English. 24 studies were in vivo and 93 studies were in vitro. Risk of bias was found to be low in 23 and high in 94 studies. The pooled sensitivity for detecting any kind of occlusal carious lesions was 0.35 (95% CI : 0.31/40) and 0.41 (0.39/0.44) in clinical and in vitro studies respectively while the pooled specificity was 0.78 (0.73/0.83) and 0.70 (0.76/0.84). For the detection of any kind of proximal lesion the sensitivity in the clinical studies was 0.24 (CI 0.21/0/26) and

  6. Accuracy of pleth variability index to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Haitao; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yanfei; Wang, Gang

    2016-06-01

    To systemically evaluate the accuracy of pleth variability index to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. A literature search of PUBMED, OVID, CBM, CNKI and Wanfang Data for clinical studies in which the accuracy of pleth variability index to predict fluid responsiveness was performed (last update 5 April 2015). Related journals were also searched manually. Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality according to the modified QUADAS items. Heterogeneous studies and meta-analysis were conducted by Meta-Disc 1.4 software. A subgroup analysis in the operating room (OR) and in intensive care unit (ICU) was also performed. Differences between subgroups were analyzed using the interaction test. A total of 18 studies involving 665 subjects were included. The pooled area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients was 0.88 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.84-0.91]. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.73 (95 % CI 0.68-0.78) and 0.82 (95 % CI 0.77-0.86), respectively. No heterogeneity was found within studies nor between studies. And there was no significant heterogeneity within each subgroup. No statistical differences were found between OR subgroup and ICU subgroup in the AUC [0.89 (95 % CI 0.85-0.92) versus 0.90 (95 % CI 0.82-0.94); P = 0.97], and in the specificity [0.84 (95 % CI 0.75-0.86) vs. 0.84 (95 % CI 0.75-0.91); P = 1.00]. Sensitivity was higher in the OR subgroup than the ICU subgroup [0.84 (95 % CI 0.78-0.88) vs. 0.56 (95 % CI 0.47-0.64); P = 0.00004]. The pleth variability index has a reasonable ability to predict fluid responsiveness. PMID:26242233

  7. High accuracy differential pressure measurements using fluid-filled catheters - A feasibility study in compliant tubes.

    PubMed

    Rotman, Oren Moshe; Weiss, Dar; Zaretsky, Uri; Shitzer, Avraham; Einav, Shmuel

    2015-09-18

    High accuracy differential pressure measurements are required in various biomedical and medical applications, such as in fluid-dynamic test systems, or in the cath-lab. Differential pressure measurements using fluid-filled catheters are relatively inexpensive, yet may be subjected to common mode pressure errors (CMP), which can significantly reduce the measurement accuracy. Recently, a novel correction method for high accuracy differential pressure measurements was presented, and was shown to effectively remove CMP distortions from measurements acquired in rigid tubes. The purpose of the present study was to test the feasibility of this correction method inside compliant tubes, which effectively simulate arteries. Two tubes with varying compliance were tested under dynamic flow and pressure conditions to cover the physiological range of radial distensibility in coronary arteries. A third, compliant model, with a 70% stenosis severity was additionally tested. Differential pressure measurements were acquired over a 3 cm tube length using a fluid-filled double-lumen catheter, and were corrected using the proposed CMP correction method. Validation of the corrected differential pressure signals was performed by comparison to differential pressure recordings taken via a direct connection to the compliant tubes, and by comparison to predicted differential pressure readings of matching fluid-structure interaction (FSI) computational simulations. The results show excellent agreement between the experimentally acquired and computationally determined differential pressure signals. This validates the application of the CMP correction method in compliant tubes of the physiological range for up to intermediate size stenosis severity of 70%. PMID:26087881

  8. Dimensional Accuracy of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic VPS Impression Materials Using Different Impression Techniques - An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilla, Ajai; Pathipaka, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The dimensional stability of the impression material could have an influence on the accuracy of the final restoration. Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression materials (VPS) are most frequently used as the impression material in fixed prosthodontics. As VPS is hydrophobic when it is poured with gypsum products, manufacturers added intrinsic surfactants and marketed as hydrophilic VPS. These hydrophilic VPS have shown increased wettability with gypsum slurries. VPS are available in different viscosities ranging from very low to very high for usage under different impression techniques. Aim To compare the dimensional accuracy of hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS using monophase, one step and two step putty wash impression techniques. Materials and Methods To test the dimensional accuracy of the impression materials a stainless steel die was fabricated as prescribed by ADA specification no. 19 for elastomeric impression materials. A total of 60 impressions were made. The materials were divided into two groups, Group1 hydrophilic VPS (Aquasil) and Group 2 hydrophobic VPS (Variotime). These were further divided into three subgroups A, B, C for monophase, one-step and two-step putty wash technique with 10 samples in each subgroup. The dimensional accuracy of the impressions was evaluated after 24 hours using vertical profile projector with lens magnification range of 20X-125X illumination. The study was analyzed through one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey HSD test and unpaired t-test for mean comparison between groups. Results Results showed that the three different impression techniques (monophase, 1-step, 2-step putty wash techniques) did cause significant change in dimensional accuracy between hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS impression materials. One-way ANOVA disclosed, mean dimensional change and SD for hydrophilic VPS varied between 0.56% and 0.16%, which were low, suggesting hydrophilic VPS was satisfactory with all three impression techniques. However, mean

  9. A unification of models for meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy studies without a gold standard.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yulun; Chen, Yong; Chu, Haitao

    2015-06-01

    Several statistical methods for meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy studies have been discussed in the presence of a gold standard. However, in practice, the selected reference test may be imperfect due to measurement error, non-existence, invasive nature, or expensive cost of a gold standard. It has been suggested that treating an imperfect reference test as a gold standard can lead to substantial bias in the estimation of diagnostic test accuracy. Recently, two models have been proposed to account for imperfect reference test, namely, a multivariate generalized linear mixed model (MGLMM) and a hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) model. Both models are very flexible in accounting for heterogeneity in accuracies of tests across studies as well as the dependence between tests. In this article, we show that these two models, although with different formulations, are closely related and are equivalent in the absence of study-level covariates. Furthermore, we provide the exact relations between the parameters of these two models and assumptions under which two models can be reduced to equivalent submodels. On the other hand, we show that some submodels of the MGLMM do not have corresponding equivalent submodels of the HSROC model, and vice versa. With three real examples, we illustrate the cases when fitting the MGLMM and HSROC models leads to equivalent submodels and hence identical inference, and the cases when the inferences from two models are slightly different. Our results generalize the important relations between the bivariate generalized linear mixed model and HSROC model when the reference test is a gold standard. PMID:25358907

  10. Accuracy of Nurse-Performed Lung Ultrasound in Patients With Acute Dyspnea: A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Mumoli, Nicola; Vitale, Josè; Giorgi-Pierfranceschi, Matteo; Cresci, Alessandra; Cei, Marco; Basile, Valentina; Brondi, Barbara; Russo, Elisa; Giuntini, Lucia; Masi, Lorenzo; Cocciolo, Massimo; Dentali, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    In clinical practice lung ultrasound (LUS) is becoming an easy and reliable noninvasive tool for the evaluation of dyspnea. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of nurse-performed LUS, in particular, in the diagnosis of acute cardiogenic pulmonary congestion. We prospectively evaluated all the consecutive patients admitted for dyspnea in our Medicine Department between April and July 2014. At admission, serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and LUS was performed by trained nurses blinded to clinical and laboratory data. The accuracy of nurse-performed LUS alone and combined with BNP for the diagnosis of acute cardiogenic dyspnea was calculated. Two hundred twenty-six patients (41.6% men, mean age 78.7 ± 12.7 years) were included in the study. Nurse-performed LUS alone had a sensitivity of 95.3% (95% CI: 92.6-98.1%), a specificity of 88.2% (95% CI: 84.0-92.4%), a positive predictive value of 87.9% (95% CI: 83.7-92.2%) and a negative predictive value of 95.5% (95% CI: 92.7-98.2%). The combination of nurse-performed LUS with BNP level (cut-off 400 pg/mL) resulted in a higher sensitivity (98.9%, 95% CI: 97.4-100%), negative predictive value (98.8%, 95% CI: 97.2-100%), and corresponding negative likelihood ratio (0.01, 95% CI: 0.0, 0.07). Nurse-performed LUS had a good accuracy in the diagnosis of acute cardiogenic dyspnea. Use of this technique in combination with BNP seems to be useful in ruling out cardiogenic dyspnea. Other studies are warranted to confirm our preliminary findings and to establish the role of this tool in other settings. PMID:26945396

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest for dementia: a naturalistic, multicenter phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Carnero-Pardo, Cristobal; Gurpegui, Manuel; Sanchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Frank, Ana; Mola, Santiago; Barquero, M Sagrario; Montoro-Rios, M Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Background Available screening tests for dementia are of limited usefulness because they are influenced by the patient's culture and educational level. The Eurotest, an instrument based on the knowledge and handling of money, was designed to overcome these limitations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest in identifying dementia in customary clinical practice. Methods A cross-sectional, multi-center, naturalistic phase II study was conducted. The Eurotest was administered to consecutive patients, older than 60 years, in general neurology clinics. The patients' condition was classified as dementia or no dementia according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. We calculated sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp) and area under the ROC curves (aROC) with 95% confidence intervals. The influence of social and educational factors on scores was evaluated with multiple linear regression analysis, and the influence of these factors on diagnostic accuracy was evaluated with logistic regression. Results Sixteen neurologists recruited a total of 516 participants: 101 with dementia, 380 without dementia, and 35 who were excluded. Of the 481 participants who took the Eurotest, 38.7% were totally or functionally illiterate and 45.5% had received no formal education. Mean time needed to administer the test was 8.2+/-2.0 minutes. The best cut-off point was 20/21, with Sn = 0.91 (0.84–0.96), Sp = 0.82 (0.77–0.85), and aROC = 0.93 (0.91–0.95). Neither the scores on the Eurotest nor its diagnostic accuracy were influenced by social or educational factors. Conclusion This naturalistic and pragmatic study shows that the Eurotest is a rapid, simple and useful screening instrument, which is free from educational influences, and has appropriate internal and external validity. PMID:16606455

  12. Astra: Interdisciplinary study on enhancement of the end-to-end accuracy for spacecraft tracking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iess, Luciano; Di Benedetto, Mauro; James, Nick; Mercolino, Mattia; Simone, Lorenzo; Tortora, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Navigation of deep-space probes is accomplished through a variety of different radio observables, namely Doppler, ranging and Delta-Differential One-Way Ranging (Delta-DOR). The particular mix of observations used for navigation mainly depends on the available on-board radio system, the mission phase and orbit determination requirements. The accuracy of current ESA and NASA tracking systems is at level of 0.1 mm/s at 60 s integration time for Doppler, 1-5 m for ranging and 6-15 nrad for Delta-DOR measurements in a wide range of operational conditions. The ASTRA study, funded under ESA's General Studies Programme (GSP), addresses the ways to improve the end-to-end accuracy of Doppler, ranging and Delta-DOR systems by roughly a factor of 10. The target accuracies were set to 0.01 mm/s at 60 s integration time for Doppler, 20 cm for ranging and 1 nrad for Delta-DOR. The companies and universities that took part in the study were the University of Rome Sapienza, ALMASpace, BAE Systems and Thales Alenia Space Italy. The analysis of an extensive data set of radio-metric observables and dedicated tests of the ground station allowed consolidating the error budget for each measurement technique. The radio-metric data set comprises X/X, X/Ka and Ka/Ka range and Doppler observables from the Cassini and Rosetta missions. It includes also measurements from the Advanced Media Calibration System (AMCS) developed by JPL for the radio science experiments of the Cassini mission. The error budget for the three radio-metric observables was consolidated by comparing the statistical properties of the data set with the expected error models. The analysis confirmed the contribution from some error sources, but revealed also some discrepancies and ultimately led to improved error models. The error budget reassessment provides adequate information for building guidelines and strategies to effectively improve the navigation accuracies of future deep space missions. We report both on updated

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Noncontrast CT in Detecting Acute Appendicitis: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Bing; Zhong, Baishu; Li, Zhenwei; Zhou, Feng; Hu, Ruying; Feng, Zhan; Xu, Shunliang; Chen, Feng

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of noncontrast CT in detecting acute appendicitis. Prospective studies in which noncontrast CT was performed to evaluate acute appendicitis were found on PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio were assessed. The summary receiver-operating characteristic curve was conducted and the area under the curve was calculated. Seven original studies investigating a total of 845 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.86-0.92) and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.92-0.97), respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio was 12.90 (95% CI: 4.80-34.67), 0.09 (95% CI: 0.04-0.20), and 162.76 (95% CI: 31.05-853.26), respectively. The summary receiver-operating characteristic curve was symmetrical and the area under the curve was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.99). In conclusion, noncontrast CT has high diagnostic accuracy in detecting acute appendicitis, which is adequate for clinical decision making. PMID:26031278

  14. A PILOT STUDY OF THE ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors are often deployed in commercial buildings to obtain CO2 data that are used to automatically modulate rates of outdoor air supply. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements and to save energy by avoiding ventilation rates exceeding design requirements. However, there have been many anecdotal reports of poor CO2 sensor performance in actual commercial building applications. This study evaluated the accuracy of 44 CO2 sensors located in nine commercial buildings to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. CO2 measurement errors varied widely and were sometimes hundreds of parts per million. Despite its small size, this study provides a strong indication that the accuracy of CO2 sensors, as they are applied and maintained in commercial buildings, is frequently less than needed to measure typical values of maximum one-hour-average indoor-outdoor CO2 concentration differences with less than a 20percent error. Thus, we conclude that there is a need for more accurate CO2 sensors and/or better sensor maintenance or calibration procedures.

  15. Sex differences in accuracy and precision when judging time to arrival: data from two Internet studies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff; Sinclair, Kamila

    2011-12-01

    We report two Internet studies that investigated sex differences in the accuracy and precision of judging time to arrival. We used accuracy to mean the ability to match the actual time to arrival and precision to mean the consistency with which each participant made their judgments. Our task was presented as a computer game in which a toy UFO moved obliquely towards the participant through a virtual three-dimensional space on route to a docking station. The UFO disappeared before docking and participants pressed their space bar at the precise moment they thought the UFO would have docked. Study 1 showed it was possible to conduct quantitative studies of spatiotemporal judgments in virtual reality via the Internet and confirmed reports that men are more accurate because women underestimate, but found no difference in precision measured as intra-participant variation. Study 2 repeated Study 1 with five additional presentations of one condition to provide a better measure of precision. Again, men were more accurate than women but there were no sex differences in precision. However, within the coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) literature, of those studies that report sex differences, a majority found that males are both more accurate and more precise than females. Noting that many CAT studies report no sex differences, we discuss appropriate interpretations of such null findings. While acknowledging that CAT performance may be influenced by experience we suggest that the sex difference may have originated among our ancestors with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting and women for gathering. PMID:21125324

  16. Case studies on forecasting for innovative technologies: frequent revisions improve accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Jeffrey C; Robertson, Diane C; Goldstein, Sara M

    2015-02-01

    Health technology forecasting is designed to provide reliable predictions about costs, utilization, diffusion, and other market realities before the technologies enter routine clinical use. In this article we address three questions central to forecasting's usefulness: Are early forecasts sufficiently accurate to help providers acquire the most promising technology and payers to set effective coverage policies? What variables contribute to inaccurate forecasts? How can forecasters manage the variables to improve accuracy? We analyzed forecasts published between 2007 and 2010 by the ECRI Institute on four technologies: single-room proton beam radiation therapy for various cancers; digital breast tomosynthesis imaging technology for breast cancer screening; transcatheter aortic valve replacement for serious heart valve disease; and minimally invasive robot-assisted surgery for various cancers. We then examined revised ECRI forecasts published in 2013 (digital breast tomosynthesis) and 2014 (the other three topics) to identify inaccuracies in the earlier forecasts and explore why they occurred. We found that five of twenty early predictions were inaccurate when compared with the updated forecasts. The inaccuracies pertained to two technologies that had more time-sensitive variables to consider. The case studies suggest that frequent revision of forecasts could improve accuracy, especially for complex technologies whose eventual use is governed by multiple interactive factors. PMID:25646112

  17. Pose estimation with a Kinect for ergonomic studies: evaluation of the accuracy using a virtual mannequin.

    PubMed

    Plantard, Pierre; Auvinet, Edouard; Pierres, Anne-Sophie Le; Multon, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing human poses with a Kinect is a promising method to evaluate potentials risks of musculoskeletal disorders at workstations. In ecological situations, complex 3D poses and constraints imposed by the environment make it difficult to obtain reliable kinematic information. Thus, being able to predict the potential accuracy of the measurement for such complex 3D poses and sensor placements is challenging in classical experimental setups. To tackle this problem, we propose a new evaluation method based on a virtual mannequin. In this study, we apply this method to the evaluation of joint positions (shoulder, elbow, and wrist), joint angles (shoulder and elbow), and the corresponding RULA (a popular ergonomics assessment grid) upper-limb score for a large set of poses and sensor placements. Thanks to this evaluation method, more than 500,000 configurations have been automatically tested, which would be almost impossible to evaluate with classical protocols. The results show that the kinematic information obtained by the Kinect software is generally accurate enough to fill in ergonomic assessment grids. However inaccuracy strongly increases for some specific poses and sensor positions. Using this evaluation method enabled us to report configurations that could lead to these high inaccuracies. As a supplementary material, we provide a software tool to help designers to evaluate the expected accuracy of this sensor for a set of upper-limb configurations. Results obtained with the virtual mannequin are in accordance with those obtained from a real subject for a limited set of poses and sensor placements. PMID:25599426

  18. Impact of contacting study authors to obtain additional data for systematic reviews: diagnostic accuracy studies for hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Seventeen of 172 included studies in a recent systematic review of blood tests for hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis reported diagnostic accuracy results discordant from 2 × 2 tables, and 60 studies reported inadequate data to construct 2 × 2 tables. This study explores the yield of contacting authors of diagnostic accuracy studies and impact on the systematic review findings. Methods Sixty-six corresponding authors were sent letters requesting additional information or clarification of data from 77 studies. Data received from the authors were synthesized with data included in the previous review, and diagnostic accuracy sensitivities, specificities, and positive and likelihood ratios were recalculated. Results Of the 66 authors, 68% were successfully contacted and 42% provided additional data for 29 out of 77 studies (38%). All authors who provided data at all did so by the third emailed request (ten authors provided data after one request). Authors of more recent studies were more likely to be located and provide data compared to authors of older studies. The effects of requests for additional data on the conclusions regarding the utility of blood tests to identify patients with clinically significant fibrosis or cirrhosis were generally small for ten out of 12 tests. Additional data resulted in reclassification (using median likelihood ratio estimates) from less useful to moderately useful or vice versa for the remaining two blood tests and enabled the calculation of an estimate for a third blood test for which previously the data had been insufficient to do so. We did not identify a clear pattern for the directional impact of additional data on estimates of diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions We successfully contacted and received results from 42% of authors who provided data for 38% of included studies. Contacting authors of studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of serum biomarkers for hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in hepatitis C patients

  19. Understanding of accuracy on calculated soil moisture field for the study of land-atmosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorozu, K.; Tanaka, K.; Nakakita, E.; Ikebuchi, S.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the state of soil moisture is effective to enhance climate predictability on inter-seasonal or annual time scales. Thus, the Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP) has been implemented as an environmental modeling research activity. The SiBUC (Simple Biosphere including Urban Canopy) land surface model is one of the participants of the 2nd GSWP, and it uses mosaic approach to incorporate all kind of land-use. In order to estimate the global soil moisture field as accurately as possible and to utilize the products of GSWP2 simulation more efficiently, SiBUC is run with irrigation scheme activated. Integration of one-way uncoupled SiBUC model from 1986 to 1995 have produced global soil moisture field. Both the model and forcing data may contain uncertainty. However, the SiBUC model is one of the few models which can consider irrigation effect. And also, the advantage of the meteorological forcing data provided from GSWP2 is hybridization among reanalysis products, observation data and satellite data. In this sense, it is assumed that GSWP2 products is the most accurate global land surface hydrological data set in available. Thus, these global products should be applied to land-atmosphere interaction study, if possible. To do this, it is important to understand inter-annual or much higher time scale accuracy on calculated soil moisture filed. In this study, calculated soil moisture field are validated with observation of soil moisture in five regions (Illinois:USA, China, India, Mongolia, Russia). The Russian data has two types data: one is located in spring wheat and another is located in winter wheat. These observation data are provided from Global Soil Moisture Data Bank (GSMDB). To understand the time scale accuracy on soil moisture field, three correlation coefficients are calculated between calculated soil moisture and observed soil moisture: inter-annual, inter-seasonal and monthly mean correlation, respectively. As a result, if the median value in

  20. Accuracy in Rietveld quantitative phase analysis: a comparative study of strictly monochromatic Mo and Cu radiations

    PubMed Central

    León-Reina, L.; García-Maté, M.; Álvarez-Pinazo, G.; Santacruz, I.; Vallcorba, O.; De la Torre, A. G.; Aranda, M. A. G.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports 78 Rietveld quantitative phase analyses using Cu Kα1, Mo Kα1 and synchrotron radiations. Synchrotron powder diffraction has been used to validate the most challenging analyses. From the results for three series with increasing contents of an analyte (an inorganic crystalline phase, an organic crystalline phase and a glass), it is inferred that Rietveld analyses from high-energy Mo Kα1 radiation have slightly better accuracies than those obtained from Cu Kα1 radiation. This behaviour has been established from the results of the calibration graphics obtained through the spiking method and also from Kullback–Leibler distance statistic studies. This outcome is explained, in spite of the lower diffraction power for Mo radiation when compared to Cu radiation, as arising because of the larger volume tested with Mo and also because higher energy allows one to record patterns with fewer systematic errors. The limit of detection (LoD) and limit of quantification (LoQ) have also been established for the studied series. For similar recording times, the LoDs in Cu patterns, ∼0.2 wt%, are slightly lower than those derived from Mo patterns, ∼0.3 wt%. The LoQ for a well crystallized inorganic phase using laboratory powder diffraction was established to be close to 0.10 wt% in stable fits with good precision. However, the accuracy of these analyses was poor with relative errors near to 100%. Only contents higher than 1.0 wt% yielded analyses with relative errors lower than 20%. PMID:27275132

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of bedside tests for predicting difficult intubation in Indian population: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Dhanger, Sangeeta; Gupta, Suman Lata; Vinayagam, Stalin; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi; Elakkumanan, Lenin Babu; Badhe, Ashok Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unanticipated difficult intubation can be challenging to anesthesiologists, and various bedside tests have been tried to predict difficult intubation. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of difficult intubation in the Indian population and also to determine the diagnostic accuracy of bedside tests in predicting difficult intubation. Settings and Design: In this study, 200 patients belonging to age group 18–60 years of American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II, scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation were enrolled. Patients with upper airway pathology, neck mass, and cervical spine injury were excluded from the study. Materials and Methods: An attending anesthesiologist conducted preoperative assessment and recorded parameters such as body mass index, modified Mallampati grading, inter-incisor distance, neck circumference, and thyromental distance (NC/TMD). After standard anesthetic induction, laryngoscopy was performed, and intubation difficulty assessed using intubation difficulty scale on the basis of seven variables. Statistical Analysis: The Chi-square test or student t-test was performed when appropriate. The binary multivariate logistic regression (forward-Wald) model was used to determine the independent risk factors. Results: Among the 200 patients, 26 patients had difficult intubation with an incidence of 13%. Among different variables, the Mallampati score and NC/TMD were independently associated with difficult intubation. Receiver operating characteristic curve showed a cut-off point of 3 or 4 for Mallampati score and 5.62 for NC/TMD to predict difficult intubation. Conclusion: The diagnostic accuracy of NC/TM ratio and Mallampatti score were better compared to other bedside tests to predict difficult intubation in Indian population. PMID:26957691

  2. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2006-02-15

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  3. Accuracy and Linearity of Positive Airway Pressure Devices: A Technical Bench Testing Study

    PubMed Central

    Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; López-Escárcega, Elodia; Carrillo-Alduenda, José Luis; Arredondo-del-Bosque, Fernando; Reyes-Zúñiga, Margarita; Castorena-Maldonado, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To analyze the accuracy and linearity of different CPAP devices outside of the manufacturers' own quality control environment. Methods: Accuracy (how well readings agree with the gold standard) and linearity were evaluated by comparing programmed pressure to measured CPAP pressure using an instrument established as the gold standard. Comparisons were made centimeter-by-centimeter (linearity) throughout the entire programming spectrum of each device (from 4 to 20 cm H2O). Results: A total of 108 CPAP devices were tested (1836 measurements); mean use of the devices was 956 hours. Twenty-two of them were new. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) decreased from 0.97 at pressures programmed between 4 and 10 cm H2O, to 0.84 at pressures of 16 to 20 cm H2O. Despite this high ICC, the 95% agreement limit oscillated between −1 and 1 cm H2O. This same behavior was observed in relation to hours of use: the ICC for readings taken on devices with < 2,000 hours of use was 0.99, while that of the 50 measurements made on devices with > 6,000 hours was 0.97 (the agreement limit oscillated between −1.3 and 2.5 cm H2O). “Adequate adjustments” were documented in 97% of measurements when the definition was ± 1 cm H2O of the programmed pressure, but this index of adequate adjustment readings decreased to 85% when the ± 0.5 cm H2O criterion was applied. Conclusions: In general, the CPAP devices were accurate and linear throughout the spectrum of programmable pressures; however, strategies to assure short- and long-term equipment reliability are required in conditions of routine use. Citation: Torre-Bouscoulet L; López-Escárcega E; Carrillo-Alduenda JL; Arredondo-del-Bosque F; Reyes-Zúñiga M; Castorena-Maldonado A. Accuracy and linearity of positive airway pressure devices: a technical bench testing study. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(4):369-373. PMID:20726286

  4. Compensation of kinematic geometric parameters error and comparative study of accuracy testing for robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Liang; Shi, Guangming; Guan, Weibin; Zhong, Yuansheng; Li, Jin

    2014-12-01

    Geometric error is the main error of the industrial robot, and it plays a more significantly important fact than other error facts for robot. The compensation model of kinematic error is proposed in this article. Many methods can be used to test the robot accuracy, therefore, how to compare which method is better one. In this article, a method is used to compare two methods for robot accuracy testing. It used Laser Tracker System (LTS) and Three Coordinate Measuring instrument (TCM) to test the robot accuracy according to standard. According to the compensation result, it gets the better method which can improve the robot accuracy apparently.

  5. The Precision and Accuracy of AIRS Level 1B Radiances for Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearty, Thomas J.; Gaiser, Steve; Pagano, Tom; Aumann, Hartmut

    2004-01-01

    We investigate uncertainties in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances based on in-flight and preflight calibration algorithms and observations. The global coverage and spectra1 resolution ((lamda)/(Delta)(lamda) 1200) of AIRS enable it to produce a data set that can be used as a climate data record over the lifetime of the instrument. Therefore, we examine the effects of the uncertainties in the calibration and the detector stability on future climate studies. The uncertainties of the parameters that go into the AIRS radiometric calibration are propagated to estimate the accuracy of the radiances and any climate data record created from AIRS measurements. The calculated radiance uncertainties are consistent with observations. Algorithm enhancements may be able to reduce the radiance uncertainties by as much as 7%. We find that the orbital variation of the gain contributes a brightness temperature bias of < 0.01 K.

  6. Speed and accuracy of facial expression classification in avoidant personality disorder: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M Zachary; Kim, Kwanguk; Herr, Nathaniel R; Smoski, Moria J; Cheavens, Jennifer S; Lynch, Thomas R; Kosson, David S

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to examine whether individuals with avoidant personality disorder (APD) could be characterized by deficits in the classification of dynamically presented facial emotional expressions. Using a community sample of adults with APD (n = 17) and non-APD controls (n = 16), speed and accuracy of facial emotional expression recognition was investigated in a task that morphs facial expressions from neutral to prototypical expressions (Multi-Morph Facial Affect Recognition Task; Blair, Colledge, Murray, & Mitchell, 2001). Results indicated that individuals with APD were significantly more likely than controls to make errors when classifying fully expressed fear. However, no differences were found between groups in the speed to correctly classify facial emotional expressions. The findings are some of the first to investigate facial emotional processing in a sample of individuals with APD and point to an underlying deficit in processing social cues that may be involved in the maintenance of APD. PMID:22448805

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive markers of liver fibrosis in patients with psoriasis taking methotrexate: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Maybury, C M; Samarasekera, E; Douiri, A; Barker, J N; Smith, C H

    2014-06-01

    People with psoriasis taking methotrexate may be at increased risk of developing liver fibrosis compared with the general population. Noninvasive methods of detecting fibrosis have been widely adopted but their clinical utility is uncertain. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive methods to detect fibrosis compared with liver biopsy (reference standard) in people with psoriasis taking methotrexate. A systematic search using Ovid/Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the Cochrane Library and Clinical Trials Register was performed. Diagnostic cohorts or case-control studies of adults taking or being considered for methotrexate therapy were considered. Study quality was evaluated using the Quality Assessment tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2). Pooled data analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1. Bayesian meta-analysis was conducted using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. Seventeen studies were included. Sensitivity and specificity were 38% and 83% for standard liver function tests (LFTs), 74% and 77% for procollagen-3 N-terminal peptide (P3NP), 60% and 80% for Fibroscan(®) (Echosens, France, www.echosens.com), and 55% and 49% for ultrasound. Confidence in these results is limited owing to low-quality data; old, small studies displayed significant selection bias and significant variation in the prevalence of fibrosis. No studies were identified evaluating recently developed markers. The clinical utility of LFTs, P3NP and liver ultrasound is poor. Therefore if these tests are used in isolation, a significant proportion of patients with liver fibrosis may remain unidentified. Larger prospective studies are required in this population to validate newer non-invasive methods. PMID:24588075

  8. In vivo Study of the Accuracy of Dual-arch Impressions

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Luciana Martinelli Santayana; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Junior, Luiz Henrique Burnett; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated in vivo the accuracy of metal (Smart®) and plastic (Triple Tray®) dual-arch trays used with vinyl polysiloxane (Flexitime®), in the putty/wash viscosity, as well as polyether (Impregum Soft®) in the regular viscosity. Materials and Methods: In one patient, an implant-level transfer was screwed on an implant in the mandibular right first molar, serving as a pattern. Ten impressions were made with each tray and impression material. The impressions were poured with Type IV gypsum. The width and height of the pattern and casts were measured in a profile projector (Nikon). The results were submitted to Student’s t-test for one sample (α = 0.05). Results: For the width distance, the plastic dual-arch trays with vinyl polysiloxane (4.513 mm) and with polyether (4.531 mm) were statistically wider than the pattern (4.489 mm). The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane (4.504 mm) and with polyether (4.500 mm) did not differ statistically from the pattern. For the height distance, only the metal dual-arch tray with polyether (2.253 mm) differed statistically from the pattern (2.310 mm). Conclusion: The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane, in the putty/wash viscosities, reproduced casts with less distortion in comparison with the same technique with the plastic dual-arch tray. The plastic or metal dual-arch trays with polyether reproduced cast with greater distortion. How to cite the article: Santayana de Lima LM, Borges GA, Burnett LH Jr, Spohr AM. In vivo study of the accuracy of dual-arch impressions. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):50-5. PMID:25083032

  9. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  10. Crowdsourcing and the Accuracy of Online Information Regarding Weight Gain in Pregnancy: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Bianca A; Shull, Trevor; Moniz, Michelle H; Kohatsu, Lauren; Plegue, Melissa A; Collins-Thompson, Kevyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Excess weight gain affects nearly half of all pregnancies in the United States and is a strong risk factor for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, including long-term obesity. The Internet is a prominent source of information during pregnancy; however, the accuracy of this online information is unknown. Objective To identify, characterize, and assess the accuracy of frequently accessed webpages containing information about weight gain during pregnancy. Methods A descriptive study was used to identify and search frequently used phrases related to weight gain during pregnancy on the Google search engine. The first 10 webpages of each query were characterized by type and then assessed for accuracy and completeness, as compared to Institute of Medicine guidelines, using crowdsourcing. Results A total of 114 queries were searched, yielding 305 unique webpages. Of these webpages, 181 (59.3%) included information regarding weight gain during pregnancy. Out of 181 webpages, 62 (34.3%) contained no specific recommendations, 48 (26.5%) contained accurate but incomplete recommendations, 41 (22.7%) contained complete and accurate recommendations, and 22 (12.2%) were inaccurate. Webpages were most commonly from for-profit websites (112/181, 61.9%), followed by government (19/181, 10.5%), medical organizations or associations (13/181, 7.2%), and news sites (12/181, 6.6%). The largest proportion of for-profit sites contained no specific recommendations (44/112, 39.3%). Among pages that provided inaccurate information (22/181, 12.2%), 68% (15/22) were from for-profit sites. Conclusions For-profit websites dominate the online space with regard to weight gain during pregnancy and largely contain incomplete, inaccurate, or no specific recommendations. This represents a significant information gap regarding an important risk factor for obesity among mothers and infants. Our findings suggest that greater clinical and public health efforts to disseminate accurate information

  11. Screw Placement Accuracy and Outcomes Following O-Arm-Navigated Atlantoaxial Fusion: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacob D; Jack, Megan M; Harn, Nicholas R; Bertsch, Judson R; Arnold, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Case series of seven patients. Objective C2 stabilization can be challenging due to the complex anatomy of the upper cervical vertebrae. We describe seven cases of C1-C2 fusion using intraoperative navigation to aid in the screw placement at the atlantoaxial (C1-C2) junction. Methods Between 2011 and 2014, seven patients underwent posterior atlantoaxial fusion using intraoperative frameless stereotactic O-arm Surgical Imaging and StealthStation Surgical Navigation System (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States). Outcome measures included screw accuracy, neurologic status, radiation dosing, and surgical complications. Results Four patients had fusion at C1-C2 only, and in the remaining three, fixation extended down to C3 due to anatomical considerations for screw placement recognized on intraoperative imaging. Out of 30 screws placed, all demonstrated minimal divergence from desired placement in either C1 lateral mass, C2 pedicle, or C3 lateral mass. No neurovascular compromise was seen following the use of intraoperative guided screw placement. The average radiation dosing due to intraoperative imaging was 39.0 mGy. All patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All patients went on to solid fusion. Conclusion C1-C2 fusion using computed tomography-guided navigation is a safe and effective way to treat atlantoaxial instability. Intraoperative neuronavigation allows for high accuracy of screw placement, limits complications by sparing injury to the critical structures in the upper cervical spine, and can help surgeons make intraoperative decisions regarding complex pathology. PMID:27190736

  12. Study on Improvement of Accuracy in Inertial Photogrammetry by Combining Images with Inertial Measurement Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Shojiro; Koizumi, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Inertial photogrammetry is defined as photogrammetry that involves using a camera on which an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is mounted. In inertial photogrammetry, the position and inclination of a shooting camera are calculated using the IMU. An IMU is characterized by error growth caused by time accumulation because acceleration is integrated with respect to time. This study examines the procedure to estimate the position of the camera accurately while shooting using the IMU and the structure from motion (SfM) technology, which is applied in many fields, such as computer vision. When neither the coordinates of the position of the camera nor those of feature points are known, SfM provides a similar positional relationship between the position of the camera and feature points. Therefore, the actual length of positional coordinates is not determined. If the actual length of the position of the camera is unknown, the camera acceleration is obtained by calculating the second order differential of the position of the camera, with respect to the shooting time. The authors had determined the actual length by assigning the position of IMU to the SfM-calculated position. Hence, accuracy decreased because of the error growth, which was the characteristic feature of IMU. In order to solve this problem, a new calculation method was proposed. Using this method, the difference between the IMU-calculated acceleration and the camera-calculated acceleration can be obtained using the method of least squares, and the magnification required for calculating the actual dimension from the position of the camera can be obtained. The actual length can be calculated by multiplying all the SfM point groups by the obtained magnification factor. This calculation method suppresses the error growth, which is due to the time accumulation in IMU, and improves the accuracy of inertial photogrammetry.

  13. Model accuracy impact through rescaled observations in hydrological data assimilation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugrul Yilmaz, M.; Crow, Wade T.; Ryu, Dongryeol

    2015-04-01

    Relative magnitudes of signal and noise in soil moisture datasets (e.g. satellite-, model-, station-based) feature significant variability. Optimality of the analysis when assimilating observations into the model depends on the degree that the differences between the signal variances of model and observations are minimized. Rescaling techniques that aim to reduce such differences in general only focus on matching certain statistics of the model and the observations while the impact of their relative accuracy over the optimality of the analysis remains unexplored. In this study the impacts of the relative accuracies of seasonality and anomaly components of modeled and observation-based soil moisture time series on optimality of assimilation analysis is investigated. Experiments using well-controlled synthetic and real datasets are performed. Experiments are performed by rescaling observations to model with varying aggressiveness: i) rescaling the entire observation time-series as one-piece or each month separately; ii) rescaling observation seasonality and anomaly components separately; iii) inserting model seasonality directly into observations while anomaly components are only rescaled. A simple Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) model is selected in both synthetic and real dataset experiments. Observations are assimilated into the API model using Kalman filter. Real dataset experiments use the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM) product based on the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on the Aqua platform (AMSR-E) observations over four USDA-ARS watersheds, while ground-based observations collected over these watersheds are used for validation. Results show that it is favorable to rescale observations more aggressively to a model when the model is more accurate (higher signal to noise ratio than the observations), while rescaling the observations strongly to the model degrades the analysis if the observations are more skillful.

  14. Dual-energy CT for the diagnosis of gout: an accuracy and diagnostic yield study

    PubMed Central

    Bongartz, Tim; Glazebrook, Katrina N; Kavros, Steven J; Murthy, Naveen S; Merry, Stephen P; Franz, Walter B; Michet, Clement J; Veetil, Barath M Akkara; Davis, John M; Mason, Thomas G; Warrington, Kenneth J; Ytterberg, Steven R; Matteson, Eric L; Crowson, Cynthia S; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the accuracy of dual-energy CT (DECT) for diagnosing gout, and to explore whether it can have any impact on clinical decision making beyond the established diagnostic approach using polarising microscopy of synovial fluid (diagnostic yield). Methods Diagnostic single-centre study of 40 patients with active gout, and 41 individuals with other types of joint disease. Sensitivity and specificity of DECT for diagnosing gout was calculated against a combined reference standard (polarising and electron microscopy of synovial fluid). To explore the diagnostic yield of DECT scanning, a third cohort was assembled consisting of patients with inflammatory arthritis and risk factors for gout who had negative synovial fluid polarising microscopy results. Among these patients, the proportion of subjects with DECT findings indicating a diagnosis of gout was assessed. Results The sensitivity and specificity of DECT for diagnosing gout was 0.90 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.97) and 0.83 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.93), respectively. All false negative patients were observed among patients with acute, recent-onset gout. All false positive patients had advanced knee osteoarthritis. DECT in the diagnostic yield cohort revealed evidence of uric acid deposition in 14 out of 30 patients (46.7%). Conclusions DECT provides good diagnostic accuracy for detection of monosodium urate (MSU) deposits in patients with gout. However, sensitivity is lower in patients with recent-onset disease. DECT has a significant impact on clinical decision making when gout is suspected, but polarising microscopy of synovial fluid fails to demonstrate the presence of MSU crystals. PMID:24671771

  15. Summarising and validating test accuracy results across multiple studies for use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Riley, Richard D; Ahmed, Ikhlaaq; Debray, Thomas P A; Willis, Brian H; Noordzij, J Pieter; Higgins, Julian P T; Deeks, Jonathan J

    2015-06-15

    Following a meta-analysis of test accuracy studies, the translation of summary results into clinical practice is potentially problematic. The sensitivity, specificity and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of a test may differ substantially from the average meta-analysis findings, because of heterogeneity. Clinicians thus need more guidance: given the meta-analysis, is a test likely to be useful in new populations, and if so, how should test results inform the probability of existing disease (for a diagnostic test) or future adverse outcome (for a prognostic test)? We propose ways to address this. Firstly, following a meta-analysis, we suggest deriving prediction intervals and probability statements about the potential accuracy of a test in a new population. Secondly, we suggest strategies on how clinicians should derive post-test probabilities (PPV and NPV) in a new population based on existing meta-analysis results and propose a cross-validation approach for examining and comparing their calibration performance. Application is made to two clinical examples. In the first example, the joint probability that both sensitivity and specificity will be >80% in a new population is just 0.19, because of a low sensitivity. However, the summary PPV of 0.97 is high and calibrates well in new populations, with a probability of 0.78 that the true PPV will be at least 0.95. In the second example, post-test probabilities calibrate better when tailored to the prevalence in the new population, with cross-validation revealing a probability of 0.97 that the observed NPV will be within 10% of the predicted NPV. PMID:25800943

  16. Accuracy evaluation of the optical surface monitoring system on EDGE linear accelerator in a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Mancosu, Pietro; Fogliata, Antonella; Stravato, Antonella; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) requires dedicated systems to monitor the patient position during the treatment to avoid target underdosage due to involuntary shift. The optical surface monitoring system (OSMS) is here evaluated in a phantom-based study. The new EDGE linear accelerator from Varian (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) integrates, for cranial lesions, the common cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and kV-MV portal images to the optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), a device able to detect real-time patient׳s face movements in all 6 couch axes (vertical, longitudinal, lateral, rotation along the vertical axis, pitch, and roll). We have evaluated the OSMS imaging capability in checking the phantoms׳ position and monitoring its motion. With this aim, a home-made cranial phantom was developed to evaluate the OSMS accuracy in 4 different experiments: (1) comparison with CBCT in isocenter location, (2) capability to recognize predefined shifts up to 2° or 3cm, (3) evaluation at different couch angles, (4) ability to properly reconstruct the surface when the linac gantry visually block one of the cameras. The OSMS system showed, with a phantom, to be accurate for positioning in respect to the CBCT imaging system with differences of 0.6 ± 0.3mm for linear vector displacement, with a maximum rotational inaccuracy of 0.3°. OSMS presented an accuracy of 0.3mm for displacement up to 1cm and 1°, and 0.5mm for larger displacements. Different couch angles (45° and 90°) induced a mean vector uncertainty < 0.4mm. Coverage of 1 camera produced an uncertainty < 0.5mm. Translations and rotations of a phantom can be accurately detect with the optical surface detector system. PMID:26994827

  17. Screw Placement Accuracy and Outcomes Following O-Arm-Navigated Atlantoaxial Fusion: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jacob D.; Jack, Megan M.; Harn, Nicholas R.; Bertsch, Judson R.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case series of seven patients. Objective C2 stabilization can be challenging due to the complex anatomy of the upper cervical vertebrae. We describe seven cases of C1–C2 fusion using intraoperative navigation to aid in the screw placement at the atlantoaxial (C1–C2) junction. Methods Between 2011 and 2014, seven patients underwent posterior atlantoaxial fusion using intraoperative frameless stereotactic O-arm Surgical Imaging and StealthStation Surgical Navigation System (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States). Outcome measures included screw accuracy, neurologic status, radiation dosing, and surgical complications. Results Four patients had fusion at C1–C2 only, and in the remaining three, fixation extended down to C3 due to anatomical considerations for screw placement recognized on intraoperative imaging. Out of 30 screws placed, all demonstrated minimal divergence from desired placement in either C1 lateral mass, C2 pedicle, or C3 lateral mass. No neurovascular compromise was seen following the use of intraoperative guided screw placement. The average radiation dosing due to intraoperative imaging was 39.0 mGy. All patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All patients went on to solid fusion. Conclusion C1–C2 fusion using computed tomography-guided navigation is a safe and effective way to treat atlantoaxial instability. Intraoperative neuronavigation allows for high accuracy of screw placement, limits complications by sparing injury to the critical structures in the upper cervical spine, and can help surgeons make intraoperative decisions regarding complex pathology. PMID:27190736

  18. Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Describing the Diagnostic Accuracy of History, Physical Exam, Imaging, and Lumbar Puncture with an Exploration of Test Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Hussain, Adnan M.; Ward, Michael J.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Fowler, Susan; Pines, Jesse M.; Sivilotti, Marco L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a rare, but serious etiology of headache. The diagnosis of SAH is especially challenging in alert, neurologically intact patients, as missed or delayed diagnosis can be catastrophic. Objectives To perform a diagnostic accuracy systematic review and meta-analysis of history, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, computed tomography (CT), and clinical decision rules for spontaneous SAH. A secondary objective was to delineate probability of disease thresholds for imaging and lumbar puncture (LP). Methods PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and research meeting abstracts were searched up to June 2015 for studies of emergency department (ED) patients with acute headache clinically concerning for spontaneous SAH. QUADAS-2 was used to assess study quality and, when appropriate, meta-analysis was conducted using random effects models. Outcomes were sensitivity, specificity, positive (LR+) and negative (LR−) likelihood ratios. To identify test- and treatment-thresholds, we employed the Pauker-Kassirer method with Bernstein test-indication curves using the summary estimates of diagnostic accuracy. Results A total of 5,022 publications were identified, of which 122 underwent full text-review; 22 studies were included (average SAH prevalence 7.5%). Diagnostic studies differed in assessment of history and physical exam findings, CT technology, analytical techniques used to identify xanthochromia, and criterion standards for SAH. Study quality by QUADAS-2 was variable; however, most had a relatively low-risk of biases. A history of neck pain (LR+ 4.1 [95% CI 2.2-7.6]) and neck stiffness on physical exam (LR+ 6.6 [4.0-11.0]) were the individual findings most strongly associated with SAH. Combinations of findings may rule out SAH, yet promising clinical decision rules await external validation. Non-contrast cranial CT within 6 hours of headache onset accurately ruled-in (LR+ 230 [6-8700]) and ruled-out SAH (LR− 0

  19. Accuracy and reproducibility of tumor positioning during prolonged and multi-modality animal imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mutian; Huang, Minming; Le, Carl; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Claus, Filip; Kolbert, Katherine S.; Martin, Kyle; Ling, C. Clifton; Koutcher, Jason A.; Humm, John L.

    2008-10-01

    Dedicated small-animal imaging devices, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, are being increasingly used for translational molecular imaging studies. The objective of this work was to determine the positional accuracy and precision with which tumors in situ can be reliably and reproducibly imaged on dedicated small-animal imaging equipment. We designed, fabricated and tested a custom rodent cradle with a stereotactic template to facilitate registration among image sets. To quantify tumor motion during our small-animal imaging protocols, 'gold standard' multi-modality point markers were inserted into tumor masses on the hind limbs of rats. Three types of imaging examination were then performed with the animals continuously anesthetized and immobilized: (i) consecutive microPET and MR images of tumor xenografts in which the animals remained in the same scanner for 2 h duration, (ii) multi-modality imaging studies in which the animals were transported between distant imaging devices and (iii) serial microPET scans in which the animals were repositioned in the same scanner for subsequent images. Our results showed that the animal tumor moved by less than 0.2-0.3 mm over a continuous 2 h microPET or MR imaging session. The process of transporting the animal between instruments introduced additional errors of ~0.2 mm. In serial animal imaging studies, the positioning reproducibility within ~0.8 mm could be obtained.

  20. Effects of sampling and mineral separation on accuracy of detrital zircon studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SláMa, JiřÃ.­; KošLer, Jan

    2012-05-01

    We investigated some of the sampling and mineral separation biases that affect the accuracy of detrital zircon provenance studies. The study has been carried on a natural catchment in the Scottish Highlands that represents a simple two-component source system and on samples of synthetic sediment prepared for this study to test the effects of heavy mineral separation on the resulting zircon age spectra. The results suggest that zircon fertility of the source rocks and physical properties of zircon represent the most important factors affecting the distribution of zircon age populations in the stream sediments. The sample preparation and selection of zircons for analysis may result in preferential loss of information from small zircon grains. Together with the preference for larger crystals during handpicking, it can result in several-fold difference compared to the real age distribution in the sediment sample. These factors appear to be more important for the reproducibility of zircon age spectra than is the number of zircon grains analyzed per sample.

  1. Evaluation of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography for measurement of periodontal defects: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Banodkar, Akshaya Bhupesh; Gaikwad, Rajesh Prabhakar; Gunjikar, Tanay Udayrao; Lobo, Tanya Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) measurements of alveolar bone defects caused due to periodontal disease, by comparing it with actual surgical measurements which is the gold standard. Materials and Methods: Hundred periodontal bone defects in fifteen patients suffering from periodontitis and scheduled for flap surgery were included in the study. On the day of surgery prior to anesthesia, CBCT of the quadrant to be operated was taken. After reflection of the flap, clinical measurements of periodontal defect were made using a reamer and digital vernier caliper. The measurements taken during surgery were then compared to the measurements done with CBCT and subjected to statistical analysis using the Pearson's correlation test. Results: Overall there was a very high correlation of 0.988 between the surgical and CBCT measurements. In case of type of defects the correlation was higher in horizontal defects as compared to vertical defects. Conclusions: CBCT is highly accurate in measurement of periodontal defects and proves to be a very useful tool in periodontal diagnosis and treatment assessment. PMID:26229268

  2. Accuracy and repeatability of Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) for measuring knee laxity in longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Fleming, B C; Peura, G D; Abate, J A; Beynnon, B D

    2001-10-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) can be used to assess temporal changes in anterior-posterior (A-P) knee laxity. However, the accuracy and precision of RSA is dependent on many factors and should be independently evaluated for a particular application. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of RSA for measuring A-P knee laxity. The specific aims were to assess the variation or "noise" inherent to RSA, to determine the reproducibility of RSA for repeated A-P laxity testing, and to assess the accuracy of these measurements. Two experiments were performed. The first experiment utilized three rigid models of the tibiofemoral joint to assess the noise and to compare digitization errors of two independent examiners. No differences were found in the kinematic outputs of the RSA due to examiner, repeated trials, or the model used. In a second experiment, A-P laxity values between the A-P shear load limits of +/-60 N of five cadaver goat knees were measured to assess the error associated with repeated testing. The RSA laxity values were also compared to those obtained from a custom designed linkage system. The mean A-P laxity values with the knee 30 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees of flexion for the ACL-intact goat knee (+/-95% confidence interval) were 0.8 (+/-0.25), 0.9 (+/-0.29), and 0.4 (+/-0.22) mm, respectively. In the ACL-deficient knee, the A-P laxity values increased by an order of magnitude to 8.8 (+/-1.39), 7.6 (+/-1.32), and 3.1 (+/-1.20)mm, respectively. No significant differences were found between the A-P laxity values measured by RSA and the independent measurement technique. A highly significant linear relationship (r(2)=0.83) was also found between these techniques. This study suggests that the RSA method is an accurate and precise means to measure A-P knee laxity for repeated testing over time. PMID:11522316

  3. Is early detection of abused children possible?: a systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of the identification of abused children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early detection of abused children could help decrease mortality and morbidity related to this major public health problem. Several authors have proposed tools to screen for child maltreatment. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence on accuracy of tools proposed to identify abused children before their death and assess if any were adapted to screening. Methods We searched in PUBMED, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, FRANCIS and PASCAL for studies estimating diagnostic accuracy of tools identifying neglect, or physical, psychological or sexual abuse of children, published in English or French from 1961 to April 2012. We extracted selected information about study design, patient populations, assessment methods, and the accuracy parameters. Study quality was assessed using QUADAS criteria. Results A total of 2 280 articles were identified. Thirteen studies were selected, of which seven dealt with physical abuse, four with sexual abuse, one with emotional abuse, and one with any abuse and physical neglect. Study quality was low, even when not considering the lack of gold standard for detection of abused children. In 11 studies, instruments identified abused children only when they had clinical symptoms. Sensitivity of tests varied between 0.26 (95% confidence interval [0.17-0.36]) and 0.97 [0.84-1], and specificity between 0.51 [0.39-0.63] and 1 [0.95-1]. The sensitivity was greater than 90% only for three tests: the absence of scalp swelling to identify children victims of inflicted head injury; a decision tool to identify physically-abused children among those hospitalized in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit; and a parental interview integrating twelve child symptoms to identify sexually-abused children. When the sensitivity was high, the specificity was always smaller than 90%. Conclusions In 2012, there is low-quality evidence on the accuracy of instruments for identifying abused children. Identified tools were not adapted to screening because of

  4. A study of the parameters affecting the accuracy of the total pore blocking method.

    PubMed

    Liekens, Anuschka; Cabooter, Deirdre; Denayer, Joeri; Desmet, Gert

    2010-10-22

    We report on a study wherein we investigate the different factors affecting the accuracy of the total pore blocking method to determine the interstitial volume of reversed-phase packed bed columns. Octane, nonane, decane and dodecane were all found to be suitable blocking agents, whereas heptane already dissolves too well in the applied fully aqueous buffers. The method of moments needs to be used to accurately determine the elution times, and a proper correction for the frit volume is needed. Failing to do so can lead to errors on the observed interstitial volume of the order of 2% or more. It has also been shown that the application of a high flow rate or a high pressure does not force the blocking agent out of the mesopores of the particles. The only potential source of loss of blocking agent is dissolution into the mobile phase (even though this is a buffered fully aqueous solution). This effect however only becomes significant after the elution of 400 geometrical column volumes, i.e., orders more than needed for a regular total pore blocking experiment. PMID:20580009

  5. An experimental study of the accuracy in measurement of modulation transfer function using an edge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Image evaluation is necessary in digital radiography (DR) which is widely used in medical imaging. Among parameters of image evaluation, modulation transfer function (MTF) is the important factor in the field of medical imaging and necessary to obtain detective quantum efficiency (DQE) which represents overall performance of the detector signal-to-noise ratio. However, the accurate measurement of MTF is still not easy because of geometric effect, electric noise, quantum noise, and truncation error. Therefore, in order to improve accuracy of MTF, four experimental methods were tested in this study such as changing the tube current, applying smoothing method in edge spread function (ESF), adjusting line spread function (LSF) range, and changing tube angle. Our results showed that MTF's fluctuation was decreased by high tube current and smoothing method. However, tube current should not exceed detector saturation and smoothing in ESF causes a distortion in ESF and MTF. In addition, decreasing LSF range diminished fluctuation and the number of sampling in MTF and high tube angle generates degradation in MTF. Based on these results, excessively low tube current and the smoothing method should be avoided. Also, optimal range of LSF considering reduction of fluctuation and the number of sampling in MTF was necessary and precise tube angle is essential to obtain an accurate MTF. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that accurate MTF can be acquired.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of loop-mediated isothermal amplification in detection of Clostridium difficile in stool samples: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chen; Yang-Ming, Li; Shan, Luo; Yi-Ming, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. More recently, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has become readily available for the diagnosis of CDI, and many studies have investigated the usefulness of LAMP for rapid and accurate diagnosis of CDI. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of LAMP for CDI remains unclear. In this meta-analysis, our aim was to establish the overall diagnostic accuracy of LAMP in detection of Clostridium difficile (CD) in stool samples. Material and methods A search was done in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases up to February 2014 to identify published studies that evaluated the diagnostic role of LAMP for CD. Methodological quality was assessed according to the quality assessment for studies of diagnostic accuracy (QUADAS) instrument. The sensitivities (SEN), specificities (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were pooled statistically using random effects models. Statistical analysis was performed by employing Meta-Disc 1.4 software. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were used to summarize overall test performance. Funnel plots were used to test the potential publication bias. Result A total of 9 studies met inclusion criteria for the present meta-analysis. The pooled SEN and SPE for diagnosing CD were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.95) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.98–0.99), respectively. The PLR was 47.72 (95% CI: 15.10–150.82), NLR was 0.07 (95% CI: 0.04–0.14) and DOR was 745.19 (95% CI: 229.30−2421.72). The area under the ROC was 0.98. Meta-regression indicated that the total number of samples was a source of heterogeneity for LAMP in detection of CD. The funnel plots suggested no publication bias. Conclusions The LAMP meets the minimum desirable characteristics of a diagnostic test of SEN, SPE and other measures of accuracy in the diagnosis of CD, and it is suitable

  7. Hepatic perfusion in a tumor model using DCE-CT: an accuracy and precision study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Errol E.; Chen, Xiaogang; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2008-08-01

    In the current study we investigate the accuracy and precision of hepatic perfusion measurements based on the Johnson and Wilson model with the adiabatic approximation. VX2 carcinoma cells were implanted into the livers of New Zealand white rabbits. Simultaneous dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and radiolabeled microsphere studies were performed under steady-state normo-, hyper- and hypo-capnia. The hepatic arterial blood flows (HABF) obtained using both techniques were compared with ANOVA. The precision was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV). Under normo-capnia the microsphere HABF were 51.9 ± 4.2, 40.7 ± 4.9 and 99.7 ± 6.0 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 while DCE-CT HABF were 50.0 ± 5.7, 37.1 ± 4.5 and 99.8 ± 6.8 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 in normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. There were no significant differences between HABF measurements obtained with both techniques (P > 0.05). Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between HABF values from both techniques: slope of 0.92 ± 0.05, intercept of 4.62 ± 2.69 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 and R2 = 0.81 ± 0.05 (P < 0.05). The Bland-Altman plot comparing DCE-CT and microsphere HABF measurements gives a mean difference of -0.13 ml min-1 (100 g)-1, which is not significantly different from zero. DCE-CT HABF is precise, with CV of 5.7, 24.9 and 1.4% in the normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. Non-invasive measurement of HABF with DCE-CT is accurate and precise. DCE-CT can be an important extension of CT to assess hepatic function besides morphology in liver diseases.

  8. Alaska Case Study: Scientists Venturing Into Field with Journalists Improves Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekwurzel, B.; Detjen, J.; Hayes, R.; Nurnberger, L.; Pavangadkar, A.; Poulson, D.

    2008-12-01

    Issues such as climate change, stem cell research, public health vaccination, etc., can be fraught with public misunderstanding, myths, as well as deliberate distortions of the fundamental science. Journalists are adept at creating print, radio, and video content that can be both compelling and informative to the public. Yet most scientists have little time or training to devote to developing media content for the public and spend little time with journalists who cover science stories. We conducted a case study to examine whether the time and funding invested in exposing journalists to scientists in the field over several days would improve accuracy of media stories about complex scientific topics. Twelve journalists were selected from the 70 who applied for a four-day environmental journalism fellowship in Alaska. The final group achieved the goal of a broad geographic spectrum of the media outlets (small regional to large national organizations), medium (print, radio, online), and experience (early career to senior producers). Reporters met with a diverse group of scientists. The lessons learned and successful techniques will be presented. Initial results demonstrate that stories were highly accurate and rich with audio or visual content for lay audiences. The journalists have also maintained contact with the scientists, asking for leads on emerging stories and seeking new experts that can assist in their reporting. Science-based institutions should devote more funding to foster direct journalist-scientist interactions in the lab and field. These positive goals can be achieved: (1) more accurate dissemination of science information to the public; (2) a broader portion of the scientific community will become a resource to journalists instead of the same eloquent few in the community; (3) scientists will appreciate the skill and pressures of those who survive the media downsizing and provide media savvy content; and (4) the public may incorporate science evidence

  9. Accuracy of migrant landbird habitat maps produced from LANDSAT TM data: Two case studies in southern Belize

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruce, J.P.; Sader, S.; Robbins, C.S.; Dowell, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    The study investigated the utility of Landsat TM data applied to produce geo-referenced habitat maps for two study areas (Toledo and Stann Creek). Locational and non-site-specific map accuracy was evaluated by stratified random sampling and statistical analysis of satellite classification (SCR) versus air photo interpretation results (PIR) for the overall classification and individual classes. The effect of classification scheme specificity on map accuracy was also assessed. A decision criteria was developed for the minimum acceptable level of map performance (i.e., classification accuracy and scheme specificity). A satellite map was deemed acceptable if it has a useful degree of classification specificity, plus either an adequate overall locational agreement (< 70%) and/or non-site specific agreement (Chi Square goodness of fit test results indicating insufficient evidence to reject the null hypothesis that the overall classification distribution for the SCR and PIR are equal). For the most detailed revised classification, overall locational accuracy ranges from 52% (5 classes) for the Toledo to 63% (9 classes) for the Stann Creek. For the least detailed revised classification, overall locational accuracy ranges from 91% (2 classes) for Toledo to 86% (5 classes) for Stann Creek. Considering both location and non-site-specific accuracy results, the most detailed yet insufficient accurate classification for both sites includes low/medium/tall broadleaf forest, broadleaf forest scrub and herb-dominated openings. For these classifications, the overall locational accuracy is 72% for Toledo (4 classes) and 75% for Stann Creek (7 classes). This level of classification detail is suitable for aiding many analyses of migrant landbird habitat use.

  10. Accuracy of stated energy contents of restaurant foods in a multi-site study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context National recommendations for prevention and treatment of obesity emphasize reducing energy intake. Foods purchased in restaurants provide approximately 35% of daily energy intake, but the accuracy of information on the energy contents of these foods is unknown. Objective To examine the a...

  11. Fast and Confident: Postdicting Eyewitness Identification Accuracy in a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauerland, Melanie; Sporer, Siegfried L.

    2009-01-01

    The combined postdictive value of postdecision confidence, decision time, and Remember-Know-Familiar (RKF) judgments as markers of identification accuracy was evaluated with 10 targets and 720 participants. In a pedestrian area, passers-by were asked for directions. Identifications were made from target-absent or target-present lineups. Fast…

  12. Applying Signal-Detection Theory to the Study of Observer Accuracy and Bias in Behavioral Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Tetreault, Allison; Hovanetz, Alyson; Bellaci, Emily; Miller, Jonathan; Karp, Hilary; Mahmood, Angela; Strobel, Maggie; Mullen, Shelley; Keyl, Alice; Toupard, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and utility of a laboratory model for examining observer accuracy within the framework of signal-detection theory (SDT). Sixty-one individuals collected data on aggression while viewing videotaped segments of simulated teacher-child interactions. The purpose of Experiment 1 was to determine if brief feedback and…

  13. Improvements are needed in reporting of accuracy studies for diagnostic tests used for detection of finfish pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Ian A; Burnley, Timothy; Caraguel, Charles

    2014-12-01

    Indices of test accuracy, such as diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, are important considerations in test selection for a defined purpose (e.g., screening or confirmation) and affect the interpretation of test results. Many biomedical journals recommend that authors clearly and transparently report test accuracy studies following the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) guidelines ( www.stard-statement.org ). This allows readers to evaluate overall study validity and assess potential bias in diagnostic sensitivity and specificity estimates. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the reporting quality of studies evaluating test accuracy for finfish diseases using the 25 items in the STARD checklist. Based on a database search, 11 studies that included estimates of diagnostic accuracy were identified for independent evaluation by three reviewers. For each study, STARD checklist items were scored as "yes," "no," or "not applicable." Only 10 of the 25 items were consistently reported in most (≥80%) papers, and reporting of the other items was highly variable (mostly between 30% and 60%). Three items ("number, training, and expertise of readers and testers"; "time interval between index tests and reference standard"; and "handling of indeterminate results, missing data, and outliers of the index tests") were reported in less than 10% of papers. Two items ("time interval between index tests and reference standard" and "adverse effects from testing") were considered minimally relevant to fish health because test samples usually are collected postmortem. Modification of STARD to fit finfish studies should increase use by authors and thereby improve the overall reporting quality regardless of how the study was designed. Furthermore, the use of STARD may lead to the improved design of future studies. PMID:25252270

  14. Call Accuracy and Distance from the Play: A Study with Brazilian Soccer Referees

    PubMed Central

    DE OLIVEIRA, MARIO CESAR; ORBETELLI, ROGERIO; DE BARROS NETO, TURIBIO LEITE

    2011-01-01

    Refereeing decisions in soccer has always been a controversial issue. In order to better understand this subject, foul calls made by Brazilian soccer referees were evaluated to determine the potential relationship between the distance from the referee to a foul play and the accuracy of the call. Soccer matches supervised by the São Paulo State Football Federation were recorded and 321 foul calls were analyzed. No significant association was found between the referee’s distance from a foul play and accuracy of the call (p = 0.561). However, there was a significant increase in the number of correct calls in the last 15 minutes of the second half compared with the number of correct calls in the first 30 minutes of the same half (p = 0.003). PMID:27182355

  15. Design and Preliminary Accuracy Studies of an MRI-Guided Transrectal Prostate Intervention System

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Csoma, Csaba; Iordachita, Iulian I.; Guion, Peter; Singh, Anurag K.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Whitcomb, Louis L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a novel system for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided transrectal prostate interventions, such as needle biopsy, fiducial marker placement, and therapy delivery. The system utilizes a hybrid tracking method, comprised of passive fiducial tracking for initial registration and subsequent incremental motion measurement along the degrees of freedom using fiber-optical encoders and mechanical scales. Targeting accuracy of the system is evaluated in prostate phantom experiments. Achieved targeting accuracy and procedure times were found to compare favorably with existing systems using passive and active tracking methods. Moreover, the portable design of the system using only standard MRI image sequences and minimal custom scanner interfacing allows the system to be easily used on different MRI scanners. PMID:18044553

  16. Classification Accuracy of MMPI-2 Validity Scales in the Detection of Pain-Related Malingering: A Known-Groups Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, Kevin J.; Etherton, Joseph L.; Greve, Kevin W.; Heinly, Matthew T.; Meyers, John E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of "Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory" 2nd edition (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) validity indicators in the detection of malingering in clinical patients with chronic pain using a hybrid clinical-known groups/simulator design. The sample consisted…

  17. A Cross-National Comparison Study on the Accuracy of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Middle-School Mathematics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Peggy; Zimmerman, Barry

    2007-01-01

    In this cross-national study, the authors compared mathematics self-efficacy beliefs of American (n = 107) and Taiwanese (n = 188) middle-school students for level and calibration (accuracy and bias). Taiwanese students surpassed Americans in math achievement. American students evidenced slightly higher self-efficacy levels for easy math items but…

  18. Accuracy of genomic selection in barley breeding programs: a simulation study based on the real SNP data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of genomic selection (i.e., selection based on genome-wide markers) to phenotypic selection through simulations based on real barley SNPs data (1325 SNPs x 863 breeding lines). We simulated 100 QTL at randomly selected SNPs, which were dropped from t...

  19. Dynamic Patterns in Development of Accuracy and Complexity: A Longitudinal Case Study in the Acquisition of Finnish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoelman, Marianne; Verspoor, Marjolijn

    2010-01-01

    Within a Dynamic System Theory (DST) approach, it is assumed that language is in a constant flux, but that differences in the degree of variability can give insight into the developmental process. This longitudinal case study focuses on intra-individual variability in accuracy rates and complexity measures in Finnish learner language. The study…

  20. Additional studies of forest classification accuracy as influenced by multispectral scanner spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowski, F. E.; Sarno, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    First, an analysis of forest feature signatures was used to help explain the large variation in classification accuracy that can occur among individual forest features for any one case of spatial resolution and the inconsistent changes in classification accuracy that were demonstrated among features as spatial resolution was degraded. Second, the classification rejection threshold was varied in an effort to reduce the large proportion of unclassified resolution elements that previously appeared in the processing of coarse resolution data when a constant rejection threshold was used for all cases of spatial resolution. For the signature analysis, two-channel ellipse plots showing the feature signature distributions for several cases of spatial resolution indicated that the capability of signatures to correctly identify their respective features is dependent on the amount of statistical overlap among signatures. Reductions in signature variance that occur in data of degraded spatial resolution may not necessarily decrease the amount of statistical overlap among signatures having large variance and small mean separations. Features classified by such signatures may thus continue to have similar amounts of misclassified elements in coarser resolution data, and thus, not necessarily improve in classification accuracy.

  1. [Study on the wavelength accuracy of the 2-D slit-array Hadamard spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Chi, Ming-Bo; Hao, Peng; Wu, Yi-Hui

    2013-01-01

    The 2-D slit array mask is a new design of Hadamard spectrometer mask. Having discussed the influence of the inconsistency caused by the machining errors in the size and location between the slits in the same column on the wavelength accuracy of the Hadamard spectrometer, the authors bring up with the way to decrease the influence on the wavelength accuracy of the spectrometer caused by the difference in the height and location vertical to the spectrum between the slits in the same column, and then estimate the spectral shift caused by the relative location shift along the spectrum between the slits in the same column. A model for simulation was built, and the measurement errors in the decoded spectrum generated by one column of the slits on the mask were calculated, when there are inconsistency errors in width and location along the spectrum between the slits in another column. Based on the simulation calculation, we can determine the machining precision of the mask. The research will be meaningful to the design of the 2-D slit array mask using MEMS(micro-electro-mechanism system) technique and the revise of the decoded spectrum, which can provide the spectrometer with a reasonable wavelength accuracy. PMID:23586265

  2. [Study on high accuracy detection of multi-component gas in oil-immerse power transformer].

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Qi-Feng; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Gang

    2013-12-01

    In order to solve the problem of low accuracy and mutual interference in multi-component gas detection, a kind of multi-component gas detection network with high accuracy was designed. A semiconductor laser with narrow bandwidth was utilized as light source and a novel long-path gas cell was also used in this system. By taking the single sine signal to modulate the spectrum of laser and using space division multiplexing (SDM) and time division multiplexing (TDM) technique, the detection of multi-component gas was achieved. The experiments indicate that the linearity relevance coefficient is 0. 99 and the measurement relative error is less than 4%. The system dynamic response time is less than 15 s, by filling a volume of multi-component gas into the gas cell gradually. The system has advantages of high accuracy and quick response, which can be used in the fault gas on-line monitoring for power transformers in real time. PMID:24611396

  3. Recognition Accuracy Using 3D Endoscopic Images for Superficial Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaise, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Fukuma, Yumiko; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Masami; Toba, Takahito; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Yamashita, Satoshi; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Hoteya, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine whether 3D endoscopic images improved recognition accuracy for superficial gastrointestinal cancer compared with 2D images. Methods. We created an image catalog using 2D and 3D images of 20 specimens resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection. The twelve participants were allocated into two groups. Group 1 evaluated only 2D images at first, group 2 evaluated 3D images, and, after an interval of 2 weeks, group 1 next evaluated 3D and group 2 evaluated 2D images. The evaluation items were as follows: (1) diagnostic accuracy of the tumor extent and (2) confidence levels in assessing (a) tumor extent, (b) morphology, (c) microsurface structure, and (d) comprehensive recognition. Results. The use of 3D images resulted in an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in both group 1 (2D: 76.9%, 3D: 78.6%) and group 2 (2D: 79.9%, 3D: 83.6%), with no statistically significant difference. The confidence levels were higher for all items ((a) to (d)) when 3D images were used. With respect to experience, the degree of the improvement showed the following trend: novices > trainees > experts. Conclusions. By conversion into 3D images, there was a significant improvement in the diagnostic confidence level for superficial tumors, and the improvement was greater in individuals with lower endoscopic expertise. PMID:27597863

  4. Recognition Accuracy Using 3D Endoscopic Images for Superficial Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kosuke; Kaise, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Fukuma, Yumiko; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Masami; Toba, Takahito; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Yamashita, Satoshi; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Hoteya, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine whether 3D endoscopic images improved recognition accuracy for superficial gastrointestinal cancer compared with 2D images. Methods. We created an image catalog using 2D and 3D images of 20 specimens resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection. The twelve participants were allocated into two groups. Group 1 evaluated only 2D images at first, group 2 evaluated 3D images, and, after an interval of 2 weeks, group 1 next evaluated 3D and group 2 evaluated 2D images. The evaluation items were as follows: (1) diagnostic accuracy of the tumor extent and (2) confidence levels in assessing (a) tumor extent, (b) morphology, (c) microsurface structure, and (d) comprehensive recognition. Results. The use of 3D images resulted in an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in both group 1 (2D: 76.9%, 3D: 78.6%) and group 2 (2D: 79.9%, 3D: 83.6%), with no statistically significant difference. The confidence levels were higher for all items ((a) to (d)) when 3D images were used. With respect to experience, the degree of the improvement showed the following trend: novices > trainees > experts. Conclusions. By conversion into 3D images, there was a significant improvement in the diagnostic confidence level for superficial tumors, and the improvement was greater in individuals with lower endoscopic expertise. PMID:27597863

  5. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for measuring maturing cartilage: A phantom study

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Jennifer R; Sussman, Marshall S; Moineddin, Rahim; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Rayner, Tammy; Doria, Andrea S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of cartilage tissue-mimicking phantoms and to determine a combination of magnetic resonance imaging parameters to optimize accuracy while minimizing scan time. METHOD: Edge dimensions from 4 rectangular agar phantoms ranging from 10.5 to 14.5 mm in length and 1.25 to 5.5 mm in width were independently measured by two readers using a steel ruler. Coronal T1 spin echo (T1 SE), fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (FSPGR) and multiplanar gradient-recalled echo (GRE MPGR) sequences were used to obtain phantom images on a 1.5-T scanner. RESULTS: Inter- and intra-reader reliability were high for both direct measurements and for magnetic resonance imaging measurements of phantoms. Statistically significant differences were noted between the mean direct measurements and the mean magnetic resonance imaging measurements for phantom 1 when using a GRE MPGR sequence (512x512 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 5:49 min scan time), while borderline differences were noted for T1 SE sequences with the following parameters: 320x320 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 6:11 min scan time; 320x320 pixels, 4-mm slice thickness, 6:11 min scan time; and 512x512 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 9:48 min scan time. Borderline differences were also noted when using a FSPGR sequence with 512x512 pixels, a 1.5-mm slice thickness and a 3:36 min scan time. CONCLUSIONS: FSPGR sequences, regardless of the magnetic resonance imaging parameter combination used, provided accurate measurements. The GRE MPGR sequence using 512x512 pixels, a 1.5-mm slice thickness and a 5:49 min scan time and, to a lesser degree, all tested T1 SE sequences produced suboptimal accuracy when measuring the widest phantom. PMID:27464298

  6. Surgical accuracy of three-dimensional virtual planning: a pilot study of bimaxillary orthognathic procedures including maxillary segmentation.

    PubMed

    Stokbro, K; Aagaard, E; Torkov, P; Bell, R B; Thygesen, T

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the precision and positional accuracy of different orthognathic procedures following virtual surgical planning in 30 patients. To date, no studies of three-dimensional virtual surgical planning have evaluated the influence of segmentation on positional accuracy and transverse expansion. Furthermore, only a few have evaluated the precision and accuracy of genioplasty in placement of the chin segment. The virtual surgical plan was compared with the postsurgical outcome by using three linear and three rotational measurements. The influence of maxillary segmentation was analyzed in both superior and inferior maxillary repositioning. In addition, transverse surgical expansion was compared with the postsurgical expansion obtained. An overall, high degree of linear accuracy between planned and postsurgical outcomes was found, but with a large standard deviation. Rotational difference showed an increase in pitch, mainly affecting the maxilla. Segmentation had no significant influence on maxillary placement. However, a posterior movement was observed in inferior maxillary repositioning. A lack of transverse expansion was observed in the segmented maxilla independent of the degree of expansion. PMID:26250603

  7. Agricultural case studies of classification accuracy, spectral resolution, and model over-fitting.

    PubMed

    Nansen, Christian; Geremias, Leandro Delalibera; Xue, Yingen; Huang, Fangneng; Parra, Jose Roberto

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the relationship between spectral resolution and classification accuracy in analyses of hyperspectral imaging data acquired from crop leaves. The main scope is to discuss and reduce the risk of model over-fitting. Over-fitting of a classification model occurs when too many and/or irrelevant model terms are included (i.e., a large number of spectral bands), and it may lead to low robustness/repeatability when the classification model is applied to independent validation data. We outline a simple way to quantify the level of model over-fitting by comparing the observed classification accuracies with those obtained from explanatory random data. Hyperspectral imaging data were acquired from two crop-insect pest systems: (1) potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli) infestations of individual bell pepper plants (Capsicum annuum) with the acquisition of hyperspectral imaging data under controlled-light conditions (data set 1), and (2) sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis) infestations of individual maize plants (Zea mays) with the acquisition of hyperspectral imaging data from the same plants under two markedly different image-acquisition conditions (data sets 2a and b). For each data set, reflectance data were analyzed based on seven spectral resolutions by dividing 160 spectral bands from 405 to 907 nm into 4, 16, 32, 40, 53, 80, or 160 bands. In the two data sets, similar classification results were obtained with spectral resolutions ranging from 3.1 to 12.6 nm. Thus, the size of the initial input data could be reduced fourfold with only a negligible loss of classification accuracy. In the analysis of data set 1, several validation approaches all demonstrated consistently that insect-induced stress could be accurately detected and that therefore there was little indication of model over-fitting. In the analyses of data set 2, inconsistent validation results were obtained and the observed classification accuracy (81.06%) was only a few percentage

  8. Comparative evaluation of dimensional accuracy of different polyvinyl siloxane putty-wash impression techniques-in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Ramandeep; Railkar, Bhargavi; Musani, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dimensional accuracy when making impressions is crucial to the quality of fixed prosthodontic treatment, and the impression technique is a critical factor affecting this accuracy. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of the casts obtained from one step double mix, two step double mix polyvinyl siloxane putty- wash impression techniques using three different spacer thicknesses (0.5mm, 1mm and 1.5mm), in order to determine the impression technique that displays the maximum linear dimensional accuracy. Materials & Methods: A Mild steel model with 2 abutment preparations was fabricated, and impressions were made 15 times with each technique. All impressions were made with an addition-reaction silicone impression material (Express, 3M ESPE) and customarily made perforated metal trays. The 1-step putty/light-body impressions were made with simultaneous use of putty and light-body materials. The 2-step putty/light-body impressions were made with 0.5-mm, 1mm and 1.5mm-thick metal-prefabricated spacer caps. The accuracy of the 4 different impression techniques was assessed by measuring 7 dimensions (intra- and inter abutment) (20-μm accuracy) on stone casts poured from the impressions of the mild steel model. The data were analyzed by one sample‘t’ test. Results: The stone dies obtained with all the techniques had significantly larger or smaller dimensions as compared to those of the mild steel model (P<0.05). The order for highest to lowest deviation from the mild steel model was: single step putty/light body, 2-step putty/light body with 0.5mm spacer thickness, 2-step putty/light body1.5mm spacer thickness, and 2-step putty/light body with 1mm spacer thickness. Significant differences among all of the groups for both absolute dimensions of the stone dies, and their standard deviations from the master model (P<0.05), were noted. Conclusions: The 2-step putty/light-body impression technique with 1mm spacer thickness was

  9. The effect of a low radiation CT protocol on accuracy of CT guided implant migration measurement: A cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Boettner, Friedrich; Sculco, Peter K; Lipman, Joseph; Saboeiro, Gregory; Renner, Lisa; Faschingbauer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The current study compared the impact of low radiation CT protocols on the accuracy, repeatability, and inter- and intra-observer variability of implant migration studies in total hip arthroplasty. Two total hip replacements were performed in two human cadavers and six tantalum beads were inserted into the femur similar to radiostereometric analysis. Six different 28 mm heads (-3 mm, 0 mm, 2.5 mm, 5.0 mm, 7.5 mm, and 10 mm) were added to simulate five reproducible translations (maximum total point migration) of the center of the head. Three CT scans with varying levels of radiation were performed for each head position. The effective dose (mSv) was 3.8 mSv for Protocol A (standard protocol), 0.7 mSv for Protocol B and 1.6 mSv for Protocol C. Implant migration was measured in a 3-D analysis software (Geomagic Studio 7). The accuracy was 0.16 mm for CT Protocol A, 0.13 mm for Protocol B and 0.14 mm for Protocol C; The repeatability was 0.22 mm for CT Protocol A, 0.18 mm for Protocol B and 0.20 mm for Protocol C; ICC for inter observer reliability was 0.89, intra observer reliability was 0.95. The difference in accuracy between standard protocol A and the two low radiation protocols (B, C) was less than 0.05 mm. The accuracy, inter- and intra-observer reliability of all three CT protocols is comparable to radiostereometric analysis. Reducing the CT radiation exposure to numbers similar to an AP Pelvis radiograph (0.7 mSv protocol B) does not affect the accuracy of implant migration measurements. PMID:26425921

  10. Accuracy Study of the Space-Time CE/SE Method for Computational Aeroacoustics Problems Involving Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    1999-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element(CE/SE) method is used to study the sound-shock interaction problem. The order of accuracy of numerical schemes is investigated. The linear model problem.govemed by the 1-D scalar convection equation, sound-shock interaction problem governed by the 1-D Euler equations, and the 1-D shock-tube problem which involves moving shock waves and contact surfaces are solved to investigate the order of accuracy of numerical schemes. It is concluded that the accuracy of the CE/SE numerical scheme with designed 2nd-order accuracy becomes 1st order when a moving shock wave exists. However, the absolute error in the CE/SE solution downstream of the shock wave is on the same order as that obtained using a fourth-order accurate essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) scheme. No special techniques are used for either high-frequency low-amplitude waves or shock waves.

  11. Accuracy of Probabilistic Linkage Using the Enhanced Matching System for Public Health and Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Robert W.; Shaji, Kunju; Hayward, Andrew C.; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background The Enhanced Matching System (EMS) is a probabilistic record linkage program developed by the tuberculosis section at Public Health England to match data for individuals across two datasets. This paper outlines how EMS works and investigates its accuracy for linkage across public health datasets. Methods EMS is a configurable Microsoft SQL Server database program. To examine the accuracy of EMS, two public health databases were matched using National Health Service (NHS) numbers as a gold standard unique identifier. Probabilistic linkage was then performed on the same two datasets without inclusion of NHS number. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to examine the effect of varying matching process parameters. Results Exact matching using NHS number between two datasets (containing 5931 and 1759 records) identified 1071 matched pairs. EMS probabilistic linkage identified 1068 record pairs. The sensitivity of probabilistic linkage was calculated as 99.5% (95%CI: 98.9, 99.8), specificity 100.0% (95%CI: 99.9, 100.0), positive predictive value 99.8% (95%CI: 99.3, 100.0), and negative predictive value 99.9% (95%CI: 99.8, 100.0). Probabilistic matching was most accurate when including address variables and using the automatically generated threshold for determining links with manual review. Conclusion With the establishment of national electronic datasets across health and social care, EMS enables previously unanswerable research questions to be tackled with confidence in the accuracy of the linkage process. In scenarios where a small sample is being matched into a very large database (such as national records of hospital attendance) then, compared to results presented in this analysis, the positive predictive value or sensitivity may drop according to the prevalence of matches between databases. Despite this possible limitation, probabilistic linkage has great potential to be used where exact matching using a common identifier is not possible, including in

  12. Accuracy studies with carbon clusters at the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaer, J.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Smorra, C.; Nagy, Sz.

    2010-05-01

    Extensive cross-reference measurements of well-known frequency ratios using various sizes of carbon cluster ions 12Cn + (10≤n≤23) were performed to determine the effects limiting the accuracy of mass measurements at the Penning-trap facility TRIGA-TRAP. Two major contributions to the uncertainty of a mass measurement have been identified. Fluctuations of the magnetic field cause an uncertainty in the frequency ratio due to the required calibration by a reference ion of uf(νref)/νref = 6(2) × 10-11/min × Δt. A mass-dependent systematic shift of the frequency ratio of epsilonm(r)/r = -2.2(2) × 10-9 × (m-mref)/u has been found as well. Finally, the nuclide 197Au was used as a cross-check since its mass is already known with an uncertainty of 0.6 keV.

  13. Comparison of accuracy of anterior and superomedial approaches to shoulder injection: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Chernchujit, Bancha; Zonthichai, Nutthapon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to compare the accuracy between the standard anterior technique of shoulder injection and the new superomedial technique modified from Neviaser arthroscopic portal placement. Intra-articular placement, especially at the long head of biceps (LHB) tendon, and needle depth were evaluated. Methods: Fifty-eight patients (ages 57 ± 10 years) requiring shoulder arthroscopy in the beach-chair position were recruited. Needle punctures for both techniques were performed by an experienced sports medicine orthopedist. Patients were anesthetized, and the shoulder placed in the neutral position. A single needle was passed through the skin, with only one redirection allowed per trial. The superomedial technique was performed, then the anterior technique. Posterior-portal arthroscopy determined whether needle placement was inside the joint. The percentage of intra-articular needle placements for each technique defined accuracy. When inside the joint, the needle’s precise location was determined and its depth measured. A marginal χ2 test compared results between techniques. Results: The superomedial technique was significantly more accurate than the anterior technique (84% vs. 55%, p < 0.05). For superomedial versus anterior attempts, the LHB tendon was penetrated in 4% vs. 28% of patients, respectively, and the superior labrum in 35% vs. 0% of patients, respectively; the needle depth was 42 ± 7 vs. 32 ± 7 mm, respectively (all p < 0.05). Conclusions: The superomedial technique was more accurate, penetrating the LHB tendon less frequently than the standard anterior technique. A small-diameter needle was needed to minimize superior labral injury. The superomedial technique required a longer needle to access the shoulder joint. PMID:27163102

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of 2D-Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Fibrosis Severity: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tian’an; Tian, Guo; Zhao, Qiyu; Kong, Dexing; Cheng, Chao; Zhong, Liyun; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the accuracy of shear wave elastography (SWE) in the quantitative diagnosis of liver fibrosis severity. Methods The published literatures were systematically retrieved from PubMed, Embase, Web of science and Scopus up to May 13th, 2016. Included studies reported the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, as well as the diagnostic odds ratio of SWE in populations with liver fibrosis. A bivariate mixed-effects regression model was used, which was estimated by the I2 statistics. The quality of articles was evaluated by quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS). Results Thirteen articles including 2303 patients were qualified for the study. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis are as follows: ≥F1 0.76 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.71–0.81, I2 = 75.33%), 0.92 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.80–0.97, I2 = 79.36%); ≥F2 0.84 (p = 0.35, 95% CI, 0.81–0.86, I2 = 9.55%), 0.83 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.77–0.88, I2 = 86.56%); ≥F3 0.89 (p = 0.56, 95% CI, 0.86–0.92, I2 = 0%), 0.86 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.82–0.90, I2 = 75.73%); F4 0.89 (p = 0.24, 95% CI, 0.84–0.92, I2 = 20.56%), 0.88 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.84–0.92, I2 = 82.75%), respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed no significant changes if any one of the studies was excluded. Publication bias was not detected in this meta-analysis. Conclusions Our study suggests that SWE is a helpful method to appraise liver fibrosis severity. Future studies that validate these findings would be appropriate. PMID:27300569

  15. Tailored selection of study individuals to be sequenced in order to improve the accuracy of genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Peil, Barbara; Kabisch, Maria; Fischer, Christine; Hamann, Ute; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo

    2015-02-01

    The addition of sequence data from own-study individuals to genotypes from external data repositories, for example, the HapMap, has been shown to improve the accuracy of imputed genotypes. Early approaches for reference panel selection favored individuals who best reflect recombination patterns in the study population. By contrast, a maximization of genetic diversity in the reference panel has been recently proposed. We investigate here a novel strategy to select individuals for sequencing that relies on the characterization of the ancestral kernel of the study population. The simulated study scenarios consisted of several combinations of subpopulations from HapMap. HapMap individuals who did not belong to the study population constituted an external reference panel which was complemented with the sequences of study individuals selected according to different strategies. In addition to a random choice, individuals with the largest statistical depth according to the first genetic principal components were selected. In all simulated scenarios the integration of sequences from own-study individuals increased imputation accuracy. The selection of individuals based on the statistical depth resulted in the highest imputation accuracy for European and Asian study scenarios, whereas random selection performed best for an African-study scenario. Present findings indicate that there is no universal 'best strategy' to select individuals for sequencing. We propose to use the methodology described in the manuscript to assess the advantage of focusing on the ancestral kernel under own study characteristics (study size, genetic diversity, availability and properties of external reference panels, frequency of imputed variants…). PMID:25537753

  16. Accuracy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring During Three Closed-Loop Home Studies Under Free-Living Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Thabit, Hood; Leelarathna, Lalantha; Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Elleri, Daniella; Allen, Janet M.; Lubina-Solomon, Alexandra; Walkinshaw, Emma; Stadler, Marietta; Choudhary, Pratik; Mader, Julia K.; Dellweg, Sibylle; Benesch, Carsten; Pieber, Thomas R.; Arnolds, Sabine; Heller, Simon R.; Amiel, Stephanie A.; Dunger, David; Evans, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Closed-loop (CL) systems modulate insulin delivery based on glucose levels measured by a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). Accuracy of the CGM affects CL performance and safety. We evaluated the accuracy of the Freestyle Navigator® II CGM (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) during three unsupervised, randomized, open-label, crossover home CL studies. Materials and Methods: Paired CGM and capillary glucose values (10,597 pairs) were collected from 57 participants with type 1 diabetes (41 adults [mean±SD age, 39±12 years; mean±SD hemoglobin A1c, 7.9±0.8%] recruited at five centers and 16 adolescents [mean±SD age, 15.6±3.6 years; mean±SD hemoglobin A1c, 8.1±0.8%] recruited at two centers). Numerical accuracy was assessed by absolute relative difference (ARD) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15197:2013 15/15% limits, and clinical accuracy was assessed by Clarke error grid analysis. Results: Total duration of sensor use was 2,002 days (48,052 h). Overall sensor accuracy for the capillary glucose range (1.1–27.8 mmol/L) showed mean±SD and median (interquartile range) ARD of 14.2±15.5% and 10.0% (4.5%, 18.4%), respectively. Lowest mean ARD was observed in the hyperglycemic range (9.8±8.8%). Over 95% of pairs were in combined Clarke error grid Zones A and B (A, 80.1%, B, 16.2%). Overall, 70.0% of the sensor readings satisfied ISO criteria. Mean ARD was consistent (12.3%; 95% of the values fall within ±3.7%) and not different between participants (P=0.06) within the euglycemic and hyperglycemic range, when CL is actively modulating insulin delivery. Conclusions: Consistent accuracy of the CGM within the euglycemic–hyperglycemic range using the Freestyle Navigator II was observed and supports its use in home CL studies. Our results may contribute toward establishing normative CGM performance criteria for unsupervised home use of CL. PMID:26241693

  17. Improving diagnostic accuracy using EHR in emergency departments: A simulation-based study.

    PubMed

    Ben-Assuli, Ofir; Sagi, Doron; Leshno, Moshe; Ironi, Avinoah; Ziv, Amitai

    2015-06-01

    It is widely believed that Electronic Health Records (EHR) improve medical decision-making by enabling medical staff to access medical information stored in the system. It remains unclear, however, whether EHR indeed fulfills this claim under the severe time constraints of Emergency Departments (EDs). We assessed whether accessing EHR in an ED actually improves decision-making by clinicians. A simulated ED environment was created at the Israel Center for Medical Simulation (MSR). Four different actors were trained to simulate four specific complaints and behavior and 'consulted' 26 volunteer ED physicians. Each physician treated half of the cases (randomly) with access to EHR, and their medical decisions were compared to those where the physicians had no access to EHR. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy with and without access showed that accessing the EHR led to an increase in the quality of the clinical decisions. Physicians accessing EHR were more highly informed and thus made more accurate decisions. The percentage of correct diagnoses was higher and these physicians were more confident in their diagnoses and made their decisions faster. PMID:25817921

  18. A study of the accuracy of neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerho, Michael F.

    1993-01-01

    Research has been performed to determine the accuracy of neutrally buoyant and near neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air. Theoretical, computational, and experimental results are presented to evaluate the dynamics of bubble trajectories and factors affecting their ability to trace flow-field streamlines. The equation of motion for a single bubble was obtained and evaluated using a computational scheme to determine the factors which affect a bubble's trajectory. A two-dimensional experiment was also conducted to experimentally determine bubble trajectories in the stagnation region of NACA 0012 airfoil at 0 deg angle of attack using a commercially available helium bubble generation system. Physical properties of the experimental bubble trajectories were estimated using the computational scheme. These properties included the density ratio and diameter of the individual bubbles. the helium bubble system was then used to visualize and document the flow field about a 30 deg swept semispan wing with simulated glaze ice. Results were compared to Navier-Stokes calculations and surface oil flow visualization. The theoretical and computational analysis have shown that neutrally buoyant bubbles will trace even the most complex flow patterns. Experimental analysis revealed that the use of bubbles to trace flow patterns should be limited to qualitative measurements unless care is taken to ensure neutral buoyancy. This is due to the difficulty in the production of neutrally buoyant bubbles.

  19. Accuracy of needle implantation in brachytherapy using a medical AR system: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesarg, Stefan; Firle, Evelyn A.; Schwald, Bernd; Seibert, Helmut; Zogal, Pawel; Roeddiger, Sandra

    2004-05-01

    Brachytherapy is the treatment method of choice for patients with a tumor relapse after a radiation therapy with external beams or tumors in regions with sensitive surrounding organs-at-risk, e. g. prostate tumors. The standard needle implantation procedure in brachytherapy uses pre-operatively acquired image data displayed as slices on a monitor beneath the operation table. Since this information allows only a rough orientation for the surgeon, the position of the needles has to be verified repeatedly during the intervention. Within the project Medarpa a transparent display being the core component of a medical Augmented Reality (AR) system has been developed. There, pre-operatively acquired image data is displayed together with the position of the tracked instrument allowing a navigated implantation of the brachytherapy needles. The surgeon is enabled to see the anatomical information as well as the virtual instrument in front of the operation area. Thus, the Medarpa system serves as "window into the patient". This paper deals with the results of first clinical trials of the system. Phantoms have been used for evaluating the achieved accuracy of the needle implantation. This has been done by comparing the output of the system (instrument positions relative to the phantom) with the real positions of the needles measured by means of a verification CT scan.

  20. Accuracy of the unified approach in maternally influenced traits - illustrated by a simulation study in the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The honey bee is an economically important species. With a rapid decline of the honey bee population, it is necessary to implement an improved genetic evaluation methodology. In this study, we investigated the applicability of the unified approach and its impact on the accuracy of estimation of breeding values for maternally influenced traits on a simulated dataset for the honey bee. Due to the limitation to the number of individuals that can be genotyped in a honey bee population, the unified approach can be an efficient strategy to increase the genetic gain and to provide a more accurate estimation of breeding values. We calculated the accuracy of estimated breeding values for two evaluation approaches, the unified approach and the traditional pedigree based approach. We analyzed the effects of different heritabilities as well as genetic correlation between direct and maternal effects on the accuracy of estimation of direct, maternal and overall breeding values (sum of maternal and direct breeding values). The genetic and reproductive biology of the honey bee was accounted for by taking into consideration characteristics such as colony structure, uncertain paternity, overlapping generations and polyandry. In addition, we used a modified numerator relationship matrix and a realistic genome for the honey bee. Results For all values of heritability and correlation, the accuracy of overall estimated breeding values increased significantly with the unified approach. The increase in accuracy was always higher for the case when there was no correlation as compared to the case where a negative correlation existed between maternal and direct effects. Conclusions Our study shows that the unified approach is a useful methodology for genetic evaluation in honey bees, and can contribute immensely to the improvement of traits of apicultural interest such as resistance to Varroa or production and behavioural traits. In particular, the study is of great interest for

  1. In vivo diagnostic accuracy of high resolution microendoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Neil; Perl, Daniel; Lee, Michelle H.; Shah, Brijen; Young, Yuki; Chang, Shannon S.; Shukla, Richa; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Zhou, Elinor; Mitchaml, Josephine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) is a low-cost, “optical biopsy” technology that allows for subcellular imaging. The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo diagnostic accuracy of the HRME for the differentiation of neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps and compare it to that of high-definition white-light endoscopy (WLE) with histopathology as the gold standard. Three endoscopists prospectively detected a total of 171 polyps from 94 patients that were then imaged by HRME and classified in real-time as neoplastic (adenomatous, cancer) or non-neoplastic (normal, hyperplastic, inflammatory). HRME had a significantly higher accuracy (94%), specificity (95%), and positive predictive value (87%) for the determination of neoplastic colorectal polyps compared to WLE (65%, 39%, and 55%, respectively). When looking at small colorectal polyps (less than 10 mm), HRME continued to significantly outperform WLE in terms of accuracy (95% vs. 64%), specificity (98% vs. 40%) and positive predictive value (92% vs. 55%). These trends continued when evaluating diminutive polyps (less than 5 mm) as HRME's accuracy (95%), specificity (98%), and positive predictive value (93%) were all significantly greater than their WLE counterparts (62%, 41%, and 53%, respectively). In conclusion, this in vivo study demonstrates that HRME can be a very effective modality in the differentiation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. A combination of standard white-light colonoscopy for polyp detection and HRME for polyp classification has the potential to truly allow the endoscopist to selectively determine which lesions can be left in situ, which lesions can simply be discarded, and which lesions need formal histopathologic analysis. PMID:24296752

  2. Accuracy of methods for detecting an irregular pulse and suspected atrial fibrillation: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Tim; Lewis, Sarah; Heneghan, Carl; Jones, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulse palpation has been recommended as the first step of screening to detect atrial fibrillation. We aimed to determine and compare the accuracy of different methods for detecting pulse irregularities caused by atrial fibrillation. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS until 16 March 2015. Two reviewers identified eligible studies, extracted data and appraised quality using the QUADAS-2 instrument. Meta-analysis, using the bivariate hierarchical random effects method, determined average operating points for sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative likelihood ratios (PLR, NLR); we constructed summary receiver operating characteristic plots. Results Twenty-one studies investigated 39 interventions (n = 15,129 pulse assessments) for detecting atrial fibrillation. Compared to 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) diagnosed atrial fibrillation, blood pressure monitors (BPMs; seven interventions) and non-12-lead ECGs (20 interventions) had the greatest accuracy for detecting pulse irregularities attributable to atrial fibrillation (BPM: sensitivity 0.98 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92–1.00), specificity 0.92 (95% CI 0.88–0.95), PLR 12.1 (95% CI 8.2–17.8) and NLR 0.02 (95% CI 0.00–0.09); non-12-lead ECG: sensitivity 0.91 (95% CI 0.86–0.94), specificity 0.95 (95% CI 0.92–0.97), PLR 20.1 (95% CI 12–33.7), NLR 0.09 (95% CI 0.06–0.14)). There were similar findings for smartphone applications (six interventions) although these studies were small in size. The sensitivity and specificity of pulse palpation (six interventions) were 0.92 (95% CI 0.85–0.96) and 0.82 (95% CI 0.76–0.88), respectively (PLR 5.2 (95% CI 3.8–7.2), NLR 0.1 (95% CI 0.05–0.18)). Conclusions BPMs and non-12-lead ECG were most accurate for detecting pulse irregularities caused by atrial fibrillation; other technologies may therefore be pragmatic alternatives to pulse palpation for the first step of atrial fibrillation screening

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Renal Mass Biopsy: An Ex Vivo Study of 100 Nephrectomy Specimens.

    PubMed

    von Rundstedt, Friedrich-Carl; Mata, Douglas Alexander; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Roth, Stephan; Degener, Stephan; Dreger, Nici Markus; Goedde, Daniel; Assaid, Ahmed; Kamper, Lars; Haage, Patrick; Stoerkel, Stephan; Lazica, David A

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of renal mass biopsy in an ex vivo model, as well as compared the agreement of the preoperative radiological diagnosis with the final pathologic diagnosis. Two 18-gauge needle-core and 2 vacuum-needle biopsies were performed ex vivo from the tumors of 100 consecutive patients undergoing radical nephrectomy between 2006 and 2010. The median tumor size was 5.5 cm. There was no significant difference with regard to cylinder length or tissue quality between the sampling methods. At least 1 of 4 needle cores contained diagnostic tissue in 88% of patients. Biopsy specimens identified clear cell (54%), papillary (13%), or chromophobe (5%) renal cell carcinoma; urothelial carcinoma (6%); oncocytoma (5%); liposarcoma (1%); metastatic colorectal carcinoma (1%); squamous cell carcinoma (1%); unclassified renal cell neoplasm (1%); and no tumor sampled (12%). The sensitivity of the biopsy for accurately determining the diagnosis was 88% (95% CI: 79% to 93%). The specificity was 100% (95% CI: 17% to 100%). Biopsy grade correlated strongly with final pathology (83.5% agreement). There was no difference in average tumor size in cases with the same versus higher grade on final pathology (5.87 vs 5.97; P = .87). Appraisal of tumor histology by radiology agreed with the pathologic diagnosis in 68% of cases. Provided that the biopsy samples the tumor tissue in a renal mass, pathologic analysis is of great diagnostic value in respect of grade and tumor type and correlates well with excisional pathology. This constitutes strong ground for increasingly used renal mass biopsy in patients considering active surveillance or ablation therapy. PMID:26811388

  4. Screw Placement Accuracy for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Study on 3-D Neuronavigation-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jorge; James, Andrew R.; Alimi, Marjan; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Geannette, Christian; Härtl, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the impact of 3-D navigation for pedicle screw placement accuracy in minimally invasive transverse lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). Methods A retrospective review of 52 patients who had MIS-TLIF assisted with 3D navigation is presented. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scales (VAS), and MacNab scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed using X-rays and thin-slice computed tomography. Result The mean age was 56.5 years, and 172 screws were implanted with 16 pedicle breaches (91.0% accuracy rate). Radiographic fusion rate at a mean follow-up of 15.6 months was 87.23%. No revision surgeries were required. The mean improvement in the VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, and ODI at 11.3 months follow-up was 4.3, 4.5, and 26.8 points, respectively. At last follow-up the mean postoperative disc height gain was 4.92 mm and the mean postoperative disc angle gain was 2.79 degrees. At L5–S1 level, there was a significant correlation between a greater disc space height gain and a lower VAS leg score. Conclusion Our data support that application of 3-D navigation in MIS-TLIF is associated with a high level of accuracy in the pedicle screw placement. PMID:24353961

  5. Comparison of Accuracy of Uncorrected and Corrected Sagittal Tomography in Detection of Mandibular Condyle Erosions: an Exvivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Asieh Zamani; Shirani, Amir Mansour; Hekmatian, Ehsan; Valiani, Ali; Ardestani, Pegah; Vali, Ava

    2010-01-01

    Background: Radiographic examination of TMJ is indicated when there are clinical signs of pathological conditions, mainly bone changes that may influence the diagnosis and treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and to compare the validity and diagnostic accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomographic images in the detection of simulated mandibular condyle erosions. Methods Simulated lesions were created in 10 dry mandibles using a dental round bur. Using uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography techniques, mandibular condyles were imaged by a Cranex Tome X-ray unit before and after creating the lesions. The uncorrected and corrected tomography images were examined by two independent observers for absence or presence of a lesion. The accuracy for detecting mandibular condyle lesions was expressed as sensitivity, specificity, and validity values. Differences between the two radiographic modalities were tested by Wilcoxon for paired data tests. Inter-observer agreement was determined by Cohen's Kappa. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and validity were 45%, 85% and 30% in uncorrected sagittal tomographic images, respectively, and 70%, 92.5% and 60% in corrected sagittal tomographic images, respectively. There was a significant statistical difference between the accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography in detection of mandibular condyle erosions (P = 0.016). The inter-observer agreement was slight for uncorrected sagittal tomography and moderate for corrected sagittal tomography. Conclusion: The accuracy of corrected sagittal tomography is significantly higher than that of uncorrected sagittal tomography. Therefore, corrected sagittal tomography seems to be a better modality in detection of mandibular condyle erosions. PMID:22013461

  6. A 3-D numerical study of pinhole diffraction to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K.A. |; Tejnil, E.; Bokor, J. |

    1995-12-01

    A 3-D electromagnetic field simulation is used to model the propagation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV), 13-nm, light through sub-1500 {Angstrom} dia pinholes in a highly absorptive medium. Deviations of the diffracted wavefront phase from an ideal sphere are studied within 0.1 numerical aperture, to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometersused in at-wavelength testing of nearly diffraction-limited EUV optical systems. Aberration magnitudes are studied for various 3-D pinhole models, including cylindrical and conical pinhole bores.

  7. Accuracy of tablet splitting: Comparison study between hand splitting and tablet cutter

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Walid A.; Alanizi, Abdulaziz S.; Abdelhamid, Magdi M.; Alanizi, Fars K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tablet splitting is often used in pharmacy practice to adjust the administered doses. It is also used as a method of reducing medication costs. Objective To investigate the accuracy of tablet splitting by comparing hand splitting vs. a tablet cutter for a low dose drug tablet. Methods Salbutamol tablets (4 mg) were chosen as low dose tablets. A randomly selected equal number of tablets were split by hand and a tablet cutter, and the remaining tablets were kept whole. Weight variation and drug content were analysed for salbutamol in 0.1 N HCl using a validated spectrophotometric method. The percentages by which each whole tablet’s or half-tablet’s drug content and weight difference from sample mean values were compared with USP specification ranges for drug content. The %RSD was also calculated in order to determine whether the drugs met USP specification for %RSD. The tablets and half tablets were scanned using electron microscopy to show any visual differences arising from splitting. Results 27.5% of samples differed from sample mean values by a percentage that fell outside of USP specification for weight, of which 15% from the tablet cutter and 25% from those split by hand fell outside the specifications. All whole tablets and half tablets met the USP specifications for drug content but the variation of content between the two halves reached 21.3% of total content in case of hand splitting, and 7.13% only for the tablet cutter. The %RSDs for drug content and weight met the USP specification for whole salbutamol tablets and the half tablets which were split by tablet cutter. The halves which were split by hand fell outside the specification for %RSD (drug content = 6.43%, weight = 8.33%). The differences were visually clear in the electron microscope scans. Conclusion Drug content variation in half-tablets appeared to be attributable to weight variation occurring during the splitting process. This could have serious clinical consequences for

  8. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Studies Evaluating Diagnostic Test Accuracy: A Practical Review for Clinical Researchers-Part II. Statistical Methods of Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juneyoung; Kim, Kyung Won; Choi, Sang Hyun; Huh, Jimi; Park, Seong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies differs from the usual meta-analysis of therapeutic/interventional studies in that, it is required to simultaneously analyze a pair of two outcome measures such as sensitivity and specificity, instead of a single outcome. Since sensitivity and specificity are generally inversely correlated and could be affected by a threshold effect, more sophisticated statistical methods are required for the meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy. Hierarchical models including the bivariate model and the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic model are increasingly being accepted as standard methods for meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies. We provide a conceptual review of statistical methods currently used and recommended for meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies. This article could serve as a methodological reference for those who perform systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies. PMID:26576107

  9. A Meta-Analysis of Typhoid Diagnostic Accuracy Studies: A Recommendation to Adopt a Standardized Composite Reference.

    PubMed

    Storey, Helen L; Huang, Ying; Crudder, Chris; Golden, Allison; de los Santos, Tala; Hawkins, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Novel typhoid diagnostics currently under development have the potential to improve clinical care, surveillance, and the disease burden estimates that support vaccine introduction. Blood culture is most often used as the reference method to evaluate the accuracy of new typhoid tests; however, it is recognized to be an imperfect gold standard. If no single gold standard test exists, use of a composite reference standard (CRS) can improve estimation of diagnostic accuracy. Numerous studies have used a CRS to evaluate new typhoid diagnostics; however, there is no consensus on an appropriate CRS. In order to evaluate existing tests for use as a reference test or inclusion in a CRS, we performed a systematic review of the typhoid literature to include all index/reference test combinations observed. We described the landscape of comparisons performed, showed results of a meta-analysis on the accuracy of the more common combinations, and evaluated sources of variability based on study quality. This wide-ranging meta-analysis suggests that no single test has sufficiently good performance but some existing diagnostics may be useful as part of a CRS. Additionally, based on findings from the meta-analysis and a constructed numerical example demonstrating the use of CRS, we proposed necessary criteria and potential components of a typhoid CRS to guide future recommendations. Agreement and adoption by all investigators of a standardized CRS is requisite, and would improve comparison of new diagnostics across independent studies, leading to the identification of a better reference test and improved confidence in prevalence estimates. PMID:26566275

  10. A Meta-Analysis of Typhoid Diagnostic Accuracy Studies: A Recommendation to Adopt a Standardized Composite Reference

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Helen L.; Huang, Ying; Crudder, Chris; Golden, Allison; de los Santos, Tala; Hawkins, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Novel typhoid diagnostics currently under development have the potential to improve clinical care, surveillance, and the disease burden estimates that support vaccine introduction. Blood culture is most often used as the reference method to evaluate the accuracy of new typhoid tests; however, it is recognized to be an imperfect gold standard. If no single gold standard test exists, use of a composite reference standard (CRS) can improve estimation of diagnostic accuracy. Numerous studies have used a CRS to evaluate new typhoid diagnostics; however, there is no consensus on an appropriate CRS. In order to evaluate existing tests for use as a reference test or inclusion in a CRS, we performed a systematic review of the typhoid literature to include all index/reference test combinations observed. We described the landscape of comparisons performed, showed results of a meta-analysis on the accuracy of the more common combinations, and evaluated sources of variability based on study quality. This wide-ranging meta-analysis suggests that no single test has sufficiently good performance but some existing diagnostics may be useful as part of a CRS. Additionally, based on findings from the meta-analysis and a constructed numerical example demonstrating the use of CRS, we proposed necessary criteria and potential components of a typhoid CRS to guide future recommendations. Agreement and adoption by all investigators of a standardized CRS is requisite, and would improve comparison of new diagnostics across independent studies, leading to the identification of a better reference test and improved confidence in prevalence estimates. PMID:26566275

  11. Oral Fluency, Accuracy, and Complexity in Formal Instruction and Study Abroad Learning Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mora, Joan C.; Valls-Ferrer, Margalida

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the differential effects of two learning contexts, formal instruction (FI) at home and a study abroad period (SA), on the oral production skills of advanced-level Catalan-Spanish undergraduate learners of English. Speech samples elicited through an interview at three data collection times over a 2-year period were…

  12. The accuracy of endometrial sampling in women with postmenopausal bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Hanegem, Nehalennia; Prins, Marileen M C; Bongers, Marlies Y; Opmeer, Brent C; Sahota, Daljit Singh; Mol, Ben Willem J; Timmermans, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB) can be the first sign of endometrial cancer. In case of thickened endometrium, endometrial sampling is often used in these women. In this systematic review, we studied the accuracy of endometrial sampling for the diagnoses of endometrial cancer, atypical hyperplasia and endometrial disease (endometrial pathology, including benign polyps). We systematically searched the literature for studies comparing the results of endometrial sampling in women with postmenopausal bleeding with two different reference standards: blind dilatation and curettage (D&C) and hysteroscopy with histology. We assessed the quality of the detected studies by the QUADAS-2 tool. For each included study, we calculated the fraction of women in whom endometrial sampling failed. Furthermore, we extracted numbers of cases of endometrial cancer, atypical hyperplasia and endometrial disease that were identified or missed by endometrial sampling. We detected 12 studies reporting on 1029 women with postmenopausal bleeding: five studies with dilatation and curettage (D&C) and seven studies with hysteroscopy as a reference test. The weighted sensitivity of endometrial sampling with D&C as a reference for the diagnosis of endometrial cancer was 100% (range 100-100%) and 92% (71-100) for the diagnosis of atypical hyperplasia. Only one study reported sensitivity for endometrial disease, which was 76%. When hysteroscopy was used as a reference, weighted sensitivities of endometrial sampling were 90% (range 50-100), 82% (range 56-94) and 39% (21-69) for the diagnosis of endometrial cancer, atypical hyperplasia and endometrial disease, respectively. For all diagnosis studied and the reference test used, specificity was 98-100%. The weighted failure rate of endometrial sampling was 11% (range 1-53%), while insufficient samples were found in 31% (range 7-76%). In these women with insufficient or failed samples, an endometrial (pre) cancer was found in 7% (range 0-18%). In women with

  13. Assessment of the accuracy of ABC/2 variations in traumatic epidural hematoma volume estimation: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tingting; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Background. The traumatic epidural hematoma (tEDH) volume is often used to assist in tEDH treatment planning and outcome prediction. ABC/2 is a well-accepted volume estimation method that can be used for tEDH volume estimation. Previous studies have proposed different variations of ABC/2; however, it is unclear which variation will provide a higher accuracy. Given the promising clinical contribution of accurate tEDH volume estimations, we sought to assess the accuracy of several ABC/2 variations in tEDH volume estimation. Methods. The study group comprised 53 patients with tEDH who had undergone non-contrast head computed tomography scans. For each patient, the tEDH volume was automatically estimated by eight ABC/2 variations (four traditional and four newly derived) with an in-house program, and results were compared to those from manual planimetry. Linear regression, the closest value, percentage deviation, and Bland-Altman plot were adopted to comprehensively assess accuracy. Results. Among all ABC/2 variations assessed, the traditional variations y = 0.5 × A1B1C1 (or A2B2C1) and the newly derived variations y = 0.65 × A1B1C1 (or A2B2C1) achieved higher accuracy than the other variations. No significant differences were observed between the estimated volume values generated by these variations and those of planimetry (p > 0.05). Comparatively, the former performed better than the latter in general, with smaller mean percentage deviations (7.28 ± 5.90% and 6.42 ± 5.74% versus 19.12 ± 6.33% and 21.28 ± 6.80%, respectively) and more values closest to planimetry (18/53 and 18/53 versus 2/53 and 0/53, respectively). Besides, deviations of most cases in the former fell within the range of <10% (71.70% and 84.91%, respectively), whereas deviations of most cases in the latter were in the range of 10–20% and >20% (90.57% and 96.23, respectively). Discussion. In the current study, we adopted an automatic approach to assess the accuracy of several ABC/2 variations

  14. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Targeting the 47-Kilodalton Protein Membrane Gene of Treponema pallidum and PCR Targeting the DNA Polymerase I Gene: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Combescure, Christophe; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ninet, Béatrice; Perneger, Thomas V

    2015-11-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) testing now is recommended as a valid tool for the diagnosis of primary or secondary syphilis. The objectives were to systematically review and determine the optimal specific target gene to be used for Tp-PCR. Comparisons of the performance of the two main targets are tpp47 and polA genes were done using meta-analysis. Three electronic bibliographic databases, representing abstract books from five conferences specialized in infectious diseases from January 1990 to March 2015, were searched. Search keywords included ("syphilis" OR "Treponema pallidum" OR "neurosyphilis") AND ("PCR" OR "PCR" OR "molecular amplification"). We included diagnostic studies assessing the performance of Tp-PCR targeting tpp47 (tpp47-Tp-PCR) or the polA gene (polA-Tp-PCR) in ulcers from early syphilis. All studies were assessed against quality criteria using the QUADAS-2 tool. Of 37 studies identified, 62.2% were judged at low risk of bias or applicability. Most used the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) case definitions for primary or secondary (early) syphilis (89.2%; n = 33); 15 (40.5%) used darkfield microscopy (DFM). We did not find differences in sensitivity and specificity between the two Tp-PCR methods in the subgroup of studies using adequate reference tests. Among studies using DFM as the reference test, sensitivities were 79.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 72.7 to 85.4%) and 71.4% (46.0 to 88.0%) for tpp47-Tp-PCR and polA-Tp-PCR (P = 0.217), respectively; respective specificities were 95.3% (93.5 to 96.6%) and 93.7% (91.8 to 95.2%) (P = 0.304). Our findings suggest that the two Tp-PCR methods have similar accuracy and could be used interchangeably. PMID:26311859

  15. Preliminary study for improving the VIIRS DNB low light calibration accuracy with ground based active light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changyong; Zong, Yuqing; Bai, Yan; Shao, Xi

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the science and user community in the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) low light detection capabilities at night for quantitative applications such as airglow, geophysical retrievals under lunar illumination, light power estimation, search and rescue, energy use, urban expansion and other human activities. Given the growing interest in the use of the DNB data, a pressing need arises for improving the calibration stability and absolute accuracy of the DNB at low radiances. Currently the low light calibration accuracy was estimated at a moderate 15%-100% while the long-term stability has yet to be characterized. This study investigates selected existing night light point sources from Suomi NPP DNB observations and evaluates the feasibility of SI traceable nightlight source at radiance levels near 3 nW·cm-2·sr-1, that potentially can be installed at selected sites for VIIRS DNB calibration/validation. The illumination geometry, surrounding environment, as well as atmospheric effects are also discussed. The uncertainties of the ground based light source are estimated. This study will contribute to the understanding of how the Earth's atmosphere and surface variability contribute to the stability of the DNB measured radiances, and how to separate them from instrument calibration stability. It presents the need for SI traceable active light sources to monitor the calibration stability, radiometric and geolocation accuracy, and point spread functions of the DNB. Finally, it is also hoped to address whether or not active light sources can be used for detecting environmental changes, such as aerosols.

  16. Accuracy of a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system in children with septic shock: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhudesai, Sumant; Kanjani, Amruta; Bhagat, Isha; Ravikumar, Karnam G.; Ramachandran, Bala

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this prospective, observational study was to determine the accuracy of a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in children with septic shock. Subjects and Methods: Children aged 30 days to 18 years admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit with septic shock were included. A real-time CGMS sensor was used to obtain interstitial glucose readings. CGMS readings were compared statistically with simultaneous laboratory blood glucose (BG). Results: Nineteen children were included, and 235 pairs of BG-CGMS readings were obtained. BG and CGMS had a correlation coefficient of 0.61 (P < 0.001) and a median relative absolute difference of 17.29%. On Clarke's error grid analysis, 222 (94.5%) readings were in the clinically acceptable zones (A and B). When BG was < 70, 70–180, and > 180 mg/dL, 44%, 100%, and 76.9% readings were in zones A and B, respectively (P < 0.001). The accuracy of CGMS was not affected by the presence of edema, acidosis, vasopressors, steroids, or renal replacement therapy. On receiver operating characteristics curve analysis, a CGMS reading <97 mg/dL predicted hypoglycemia (sensitivity 85.2%, specificity 75%, area under the curve [AUC] =0.85). A reading > 141 mg/dL predicted hyperglycemia (sensitivity 84.6%, specificity 89.6%, AUC = 0.87). Conclusion: CGMS provides a fairly, accurate estimate of BG in children with septic shock. It is unaffected by a variety of clinical variables. The accuracy over extremes of blood sugar may be a concern. We recommend larger studies to evaluate its use for the early detection of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. PMID:26730114

  17. ACCURACY AND PRECISION OF A METHOD TO STUDY KINEMATICS OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT: COMBINATION OF MOTION DATA AND CT IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Baltali, Evre; Zhao, Kristin D.; Koff, Matthew F.; Keller, Eugene E.; An, Kai-Nan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test the precision and accuracy of a method used to track selected landmarks during motion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A precision phantom device was constructed and relative motions between two rigid bodies on the phantom device were measured using optoelectronic (OE) and electromagnetic (EM) motion tracking devices. The motion recordings were also combined with a 3D CT image for each type of motion tracking system (EM+CT and OE+CT) to mimic methods used in previous studies. In the OE and EM data collections, specific landmarks on the rigid bodies were determined using digitization. In the EM+CT and OE+CT data sets, the landmark locations were obtained from the CT images. 3D linear distances and 3D curvilinear path distances were calculated for the points. The accuracy and precision for all 4 methods were evaluated (EM, OE, EM+CT and OE+CT). In addition, results were compared with and without the CT imaging (EM vs. EM+CT, OE vs. OE+CT). All systems overestimated the actual 3D curvilinear path lengths. All systems also underestimated the actual rotation values. The accuracy of all methods was within 0.5 mm for 3D curvilinear path calculations, 0.05 mm for 3D linear distance calculations, and 0.2° for rotation calculations. In addition, Bland-Altman plots for each configuration of the systems suggest that measurements obtained from either system are repeatable and comparable. PMID:18617178

  18. The Accuracy of a Simple, Low-Cost GPS Data Logger/Receiver to Study Outdoor Human Walking in View of Health and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Abraham, Pierre; Mahé, Guillaume; Sauvaget, Thomas; Leftheriotis, Georges; Le Faucheur, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Accurate and objective measurements of physical activity and lower-extremity function are important in health and disease monitoring, particularly given the current epidemic of chronic diseases and their related functional impairment. Purpose The aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy of a handy (lightweight, small, only one stop/start button) and low-cost (∼$75 with its external antenna) Global Positioning System (GPS) data logger/receiver (the DG100) as a tool to study outdoor human walking in perspective of health and clinical research studies. Methods. Healthy subjects performed two experiments that consisted of different prescribed outdoor walking protocols. Experiment 1. We studied the accuracy of the DG100 for detecting bouts of walking and resting. Experiment 2. We studied the accuracy of the DG100 for estimating distances and speeds of walking. Results Experiment 1. The performance in the detection of bouts, expressed as the percentage of walking and resting bouts that were correctly detected, was 92.4% [95% Confidence Interval: 90.6–94.3]. Experiment 2. The coefficients of variation [95% Confidence Interval] for the accuracy of estimating the distances and speeds of walking were low: 3.1% [2.9–3.3] and 2.8% [2.6–3.1], respectively. Conclusion The DG100 produces acceptable accuracy both in detecting bouts of walking and resting and in estimating distances and speeds of walking during the detected walking bouts. However, before we can confirm that the DG100 can be used to study walking with respect to health and clinical studies, the inter- and intra-DG100 variability should be studied. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00485147 PMID:21931593

  19. A Longitudinal Study of Novice-Level Changes in Fluency and Accuracy in Student Monologues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Robert W., III.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed research concerning the issue fluency, specifically relating to pauses, mean length runs, and fluency rates in Japanese EFL learners, is limited. Furthermore, the issue of tracking fluency gains has often been ignored, misunderstood or minimized in EFL educational research. The present study, which is based on six monologues conducted…

  20. A Longitudinal Study of Complexity, Accuracy and Fluency Variation in Second Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferraris, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents the results of a study on interlanguage variation. The production of four L2 learners of Italian, tested four times at yearly intervals while engaged in four oral tasks, is compared to that of two native speakers, and analysed with quantitative CAF measures. Thus, time, task type, nativeness, as well as group vs. individual…

  1. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. This paper was presented at RSNA 2013 and was carried out at Kanazawa University, JAPAN.

  2. Accuracy of Family History of Hemochromatosis or Iron Overload: The Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Acton, Ronald T.; Barton, James C.; Passmore, Leah V.; Adams, Paul C.; Mclaren, Gordon D.; Leiendecker–Foster, Catherine; Speechley, Mark R.; Harris, Emily L.; Castro, Oswaldo; Reiss, Jacob A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Harrison, Barbara W.; Mclaren, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims The aim of this study was to assess the analytic validity of self-reported family history of hemochromatosis or iron overload. Methods A total of 141 probands, 549 family members, and 641 controls participated in the primary care Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening Study. Participants received a postscreening clinical examination and completed questionnaires about personal and family histories of hemochromatosis or iron overload, arthritis, diabetes, liver disease, and heart disease. We evaluated sensitivities and specificities of proband-reported family history, and concordance of HFE genotype C282Y/C282Y in probands and siblings who reported having hemochromatosis or iron overload. Results The sensitivities of proband-reported family history ranged from 81.4% for hemochromatosis or iron overload to 18.4% for liver disease; specificities for diabetes, liver disease, and heart disease were greater than 94%. Hemochromatosis or iron overload was associated with a positive family history across all racial/ethnic groups in the study (odds ratio, 14.53; 95% confidence intervals, 7.41–28.49; P < .0001) and among Caucasians (odds ratio, 16.98; 95% confidence intervals, 7.53–38.32; P < .0001). There was 100% concordance of HFE genotype C282Y/C282Y in 6 probands and 8 of their siblings who reported having hemochromatosis or iron overload. Conclusions Self-reported family history of hemochromatosis or iron overload can be used to identify individuals whose risk of hemochromatosis or iron overload and associated conditions is increased. These individuals could benefit from further evaluation with iron phenotyping and HFE mutation analysis. PMID:18585964

  3. Improving Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Extensively utilized for numerous mission applications, the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model. In a Monte-Carlo mode, Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is used to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Mars-GRAM has been found to be inexact when used during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3. Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) from the surface to 80 km altitude. Mars-GRAM with the MapYear parameter set to 0 utilizes results from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 at all locations for the entire year. Imprecise atmospheric density and pressure at all altitudes is a consequence of this use of MGCM with tau=3. Density factor values have been determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 as a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem. These factors adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. These density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls and are included in Mars-GRAM Release 1.3. Work currently being done, to derive better multipliers by including variations with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data, will be highlighted in the presentation. The TES limb data utilized in this process has been validated by a comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). This comparison study was undertaken for locations on Mars of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST. The more precise density factors will be included in Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 and thus improve the results of future sensitivity studies done for large

  4. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The poster provides an overview of techniques to improve the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) sensitivity. It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) when used for sensitivity studies for TES MapYear = 0 and large optical depth values such as tau = 3 is less than realistic. A preliminary fix has been made to Mars-GRAM by adding a density factor value that was determined for tau = 0.3, 1 and 3.

  5. Effect of considering the initial parameters on accuracy of experimental studies conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagulova, D.; Nesterenko, A.; Kapilevich, L.; Popova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The presented paper contains the evidences of the necessity to take into account the initial level of physiological parameters while conducting the biomedical research; it is exemplified by certain indicators of cardiorespiratory system. The analysis is based on the employment of data obtained via the multiple surveys of medical and pharmaceutical college students. There has been revealed a negative correlation of changes of the studied parameters of cardiorespiratory system in the repeated measurements compared to their initial level. It is assumed that the dependence of the changes of physiological parameters from the baseline can be caused by the biorhythmic changes inherent for all body systems.

  6. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars- GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars- GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear=0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  7. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM’s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  8. Pilot Study to Determine Accuracy of Posterior Approach Ultrasound for Shoulder Dislocation by Novice Sonographers

    PubMed Central

    Lahham, Shadi; Becker, Brent; Chiem, Alan; Joseph, Linda M.; Anderson, Craig L.; Wilson, Sean P.; Subeh, Mohammad; Trinh, Alex; Viquez, Eric; Fox, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The goal of this study was to investigate the efficacy of diagnosing shoulder dislocation using a single-view, posterior approach point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) performed by undergraduate research students, and to establish the range of measured distance that discriminates dislocated shoulder from normal. Methods We enrolled a prospective, convenience sample of adult patients presenting to the emergency department with acute shoulder pain following injury. Patients underwent ultrasonographic evaluation of possible shoulder dislocation comprising a single transverse view of the posterior shoulder and assessment of the relative positioning of the glenoid fossa and the humeral head. The sonographic measurement of the distance between these two anatomic structures was termed the Glenohumeral Separation Distance (GhSD). A positive GhSD represented a posterior position of the glenoid rim relative to the humeral head and a negative GhSD value represented an anterior position of the glenoid rim relative to the humeral head. We compared ultrasound (US) findings to conventional radiography to determine the optimum GhSD cutoff for the diagnosis of shoulder dislocation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the derived US method were calculated. Results A total of 84 patients were enrolled and 19 (22.6%) demonstrated shoulder dislocation on conventional radiography, all of which were anterior. All confirmed dislocations had a negative measurement of the GhSD, while all patients with normal anatomic position had GhSD>0. This value represents an optimum GhSD cutoff of 0 for the diagnosis of (anterior) shoulder dislocation. This method demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI [82.4–100]), specificity of 100% (95% CI [94.5–100]), positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI [82.4–100]), and negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI [94.5–100]). Conclusion Our study suggests that a single, posterior

  9. Accuracy of ED Bedside Ultrasound for Identification of gallstones: retrospective analysis of 575 studies

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, William; Fox, J. Christian; Potts, Brian; Zlidenny, Alexander; McDonough, JoAnne; Anderson, Craig L.; Larson, Jarrod; Barajas, Graciela; Langdorf, Mark I.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the ability of emergency department (ED) physicians to diagnose cholelithiasis with bedside ultrasound. Methods ED gallbladder ultrasounds recorded over 37 months were compared to radiology ultrasound interpretation. Results Of 1,690 ED gallbladder ultrasound scans performed during this period, radiology ultrasound was performed in 575/1690 (34%) cases. ED physician bedside interpretation was 88% sensitive [95% CI, 84–91] and 87% specific [95% CI, 82–91], while positive predictive value (PPV) was 91% [88–94%] and negative predictive value (NPV) was 83% [78–87%], using radiology interpretation as the criterion reference. Conclusion ED physician ultrasound of the gallbladder for cholelithiasis is both sensitive and specific. PMID:19561694

  10. The Diagnostic Value of Surface Markers in Acute Appendicitis; A Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Gholi Mezerji, Naser Mohammad; Rafeie, Mohammad; Shayan, Zahra; Mosayebi, Ghasem

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic value of blood cells surface markers in patients with acute appendicitis. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 71 patients who underwent appendectomy following a diagnosis of appendicitis were recruited during a one-year period. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with histopathologically confirmed acute appendicitis and subjects with normal appendix. Blood cell surface markers of all patients were measured. Univariate and multivariate analytical methods were applied to identify the most useful markers. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were also used to find the best cut-off point, sensitivity, and specificity. Results: Overall we included 71 patients with mean age of 22.6±10.7 years. Of the 71 cases, 45 (63.4%) had acute appendicitis while 26 (36.6%) were normal. There was no significant difference between two study groups regarding the age (p=0.151) and sex (p=0.142). The initial WBC count was significantly higher in those with acute appendicitis (p=0.033). Maximum and minimum area under the ROC curve in univariate analysis was reported for CD3/RA (0.71) and CD38 (0.533), respectively. Multivariate regression models revealed the percentage of accurate diagnoses based on the combination of γ/δ TCR, CD3/RO, and CD3/RA markers to be 74.65%. Maximum area under the ROC curve (0.79) was also obtained for the same combination. Conclusion: the best blood cell surface markers in the prediction of acute appendicitis were HLA-DR+CD19, a/β TCR, and CD3/RA. The simultaneous use of γ/δ TCR, CD3/RA, and CD3/RO showed the highest diagnostic value in acute appendicitis. PMID:27162905

  11. Updating Mars-GRAM to Increase the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hiliary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). During the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process, it was discovered that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear set to 0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. As a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented from work being done to derive better multipliers by including variation with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data. The addition of these more precise density factors to Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  12. Associations between visual perception accuracy and confidence in a dopaminergic manipulation study.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Christina; Bozikas, Vasilis P; Luedtke, Thies; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Delusions are defined as fixed erroneous beliefs that are based on misinterpretation of events or perception, and cannot be corrected by argumentation to the opposite. Cognitive theories of delusions regard this symptom as resulting from specific distorted thinking styles that lead to biased integration and interpretation of perceived stimuli (i.e., reasoning biases). In previous studies, we were able to show that one of these reasoning biases, overconfidence in errors, can be modulated by drugs that act on the dopamine system, a major neurotransmitter system implicated in the pathogenesis of delusions and other psychotic symptoms. Another processing domain suggested to involve the dopamine system and to be abnormal in psychotic disorders is sensory perception. The present study aimed to investigate whether (lower-order) sensory perception and (higher-order) overconfidence in errors are similarly affected by dopaminergic modulation in healthy subjects. Thirty-four healthy individuals were assessed upon administration of l-dopa, placebo, or haloperidol within a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. Variables of interest were hits and false alarms in an illusory perception paradigm requiring speeded detection of pictures over a noisy background, and subjective confidence ratings for correct and incorrect responses. There was a significant linear increase of false alarm rates from haloperidol to placebo to l-dopa, whereas hit rates were not affected by dopaminergic manipulation. As hypothesized, confidence in error responses was significantly higher with l-dopa compared to placebo. Moreover, confidence in erroneous responses significantly correlated with false alarm rates. These findings suggest that overconfidence in errors and aberrant sensory processing might be both interdependent and related to dopaminergic transmission abnormalities in patients with psychosis. PMID:25932015

  13. Associations between visual perception accuracy and confidence in a dopaminergic manipulation study

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Christina; Bozikas, Vasilis P.; Luedtke, Thies; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Delusions are defined as fixed erroneous beliefs that are based on misinterpretation of events or perception, and cannot be corrected by argumentation to the opposite. Cognitive theories of delusions regard this symptom as resulting from specific distorted thinking styles that lead to biased integration and interpretation of perceived stimuli (i.e., reasoning biases). In previous studies, we were able to show that one of these reasoning biases, overconfidence in errors, can be modulated by drugs that act on the dopamine system, a major neurotransmitter system implicated in the pathogenesis of delusions and other psychotic symptoms. Another processing domain suggested to involve the dopamine system and to be abnormal in psychotic disorders is sensory perception. The present study aimed to investigate whether (lower-order) sensory perception and (higher-order) overconfidence in errors are similarly affected by dopaminergic modulation in healthy subjects. Thirty-four healthy individuals were assessed upon administration of l-dopa, placebo, or haloperidol within a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. Variables of interest were hits and false alarms in an illusory perception paradigm requiring speeded detection of pictures over a noisy background, and subjective confidence ratings for correct and incorrect responses. There was a significant linear increase of false alarm rates from haloperidol to placebo to l-dopa, whereas hit rates were not affected by dopaminergic manipulation. As hypothesized, confidence in error responses was significantly higher with l-dopa compared to placebo. Moreover, confidence in erroneous responses significantly correlated with false alarm rates. These findings suggest that overconfidence in errors and aberrant sensory processing might be both interdependent and related to dopaminergic transmission abnormalities in patients with psychosis. PMID:25932015

  14. Accuracy of navigation-assisted acetabular component positioning studied by computed tomography measurements: methods and results.

    PubMed

    Ybinger, Thomas; Kumpan, W; Hoffart, H E; Muschalik, B; Bullmann, W; Zweymüller, K

    2007-09-01

    The postoperative position of the acetabular component is key for the outcome of total hip arthroplasty. Various aids have been developed to support the surgeon during implant placement. In a prospective study involving 4 centers, the computer-recorded cup alignment of 37 hip systems at the end of navigation-assisted surgery was compared with the cup angles measured on postoperative computerized tomograms. This comparison showed an average difference of 3.5 degrees (SD, 4.4 degrees ) for inclination and 6.5 degrees (SD, 7.3 degrees ) for anteversion angles. The differences in inclination correlated with the thickness of the soft tissue overlying the anterior superior iliac spine (r = 0.44; P = .007), whereas the differences in anteversion showed a correlation with the thickness of the soft tissue overlying the pubic tubercles (r = 0.52; P = .001). In centers experienced in the use of navigational tools, deviations were smaller than in units with little experience in their use. PMID:17826270

  15. Primary aldosteronism caused by unilateral adrenal hyperplasia: rethinking the accuracy of imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Yu; Shen, Sjen-Jung; Chou, Chien-Wen; Yang, Chwen-Yi; Cheng, Hon-Mei

    2006-03-01

    A rare type of aldosteronism, known as unilateral adrenal hyperplasia (UAH), is difficult to diagnose, not only because it fails to conform to the typical common subtypes, but also because imaging results are unreliable. We report 2 Taiwanese patients with UAH. Case 1 was a 44-year-old man with 2 episodes of hypokalemic paralysis. Hypertension and suppressed plasma renin activity (PRA) with elevated plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) were observed. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a right adrenal mass, but adrenal scintigraphy revealed no definite laterality. The patient underwent a laparoscopic right adrenalectomy. Adrenal cortical hyperplasia was discovered from results of the histologic analysis. Case 2 was a 33-year-old woman referred for hypokalemia, hypertension, and a left adrenal mass found on a CT scan. However, MRI revealed normal adrenal glands. The adrenal vein sampling for PAC showed overproduction of PAC from the left adrenal gland. A laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was done. Pathology results revealed micronodular cortical hyperplasia with central hemorrhage. Blood pressure, plasma potassium, aldosterone, and renin activity levels returned to normal after operation in both cases. Both patients have been well for 3 years and 16 months, respectively, after surgery. We review the literature and discuss the limitations of imaging studies. PMID:16599018

  16. Paramedic accuracy in using a decision support algorithm when recognising adult death: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T; Woollard, M

    2003-01-01

    Method: This prospective 16 month cohort study evaluated 188 events of recognition of adult death (ROAD) by paramedics in the period from November 1999 to February 2001. Results: Of 188 ROAD applications, errors were made in 13 cases (6.9%, 95% CI 3.7 to 11.5. Additionally, there was one adverse clinical incident associated with a case in which ROAD was applied (0.5%, 95% CI 0.01 to 2.9%). ECG strips were unavailable for eight cases, although ambulance records indicated a rhythm of asystole for each of these. Assuming this diagnosis was correct, ROAD was used 174 times without errors (93%, 95% CI 88 to 96%). Assuming that it was not, the ROAD protocol was applied without errors in 166 cases (88.3%, 95% CI 82.8 to 92.5%). None of the errors made appeared to be attributable to poor clinical decision making, compromised treatment, or changed patient outcome. The mean on-scene time for ambulance crews using the ROAD policy was 60 minutes. Conclusion: Paramedics can accurately apply a decision support algorithm when recognising adult death. It could be argued that the attendance of a medical practitioner to confirm death is therefore an inappropriate use of such personnel and may result in unnecessarily protracted on-scene times for ambulance crews. Further research is required to confirm this, and to determine the proportion of patients suitable for recognition of adult death who are actually identified as such by paramedics. PMID:12954697

  17. Comparing Accuracy of Cervical Pedicle Screw Placement between a Guidance System and Manual Manipulation: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yu; Bao, Nirong; Zhao, Jianning; Mao, Guangping

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of cervical pedicle screw placement between a three-dimensional guidance system and manual manipulation. Material/Methods Eighteen adult cadavers were randomized into group A (n=9) and group B (n=9). Ninety pedicle screws were placed into the C3-C7 under the guidance of a three-dimensional locator in group A, and 90 screws were inserted by manual manipulation in group B. The cervical spines were scanned using computed tomography (CT). Parallel and angular offsets of the screws were compared between the two placement methods. Results In group A, 90% of the screws were within the pedicles and 10% breached the pedicle cortex. In group B, 55.6% were within the pedicle and 44.4% breached the pedicle cortex. Locator guidance showed significantly lower parallel and angular offsets in axial CT images (P<0.01), and significantly lower angular offset in sagittal CT images (P<0.01) than manual manipulation. Conclusions Locator guidance is superior to manual manipulation in accuracy of cervical screw placement. Locator guidance might provide better safety than manual manipulation in placing cervical screws. PMID:26348197

  18. The accuracy of the Neosono Ultima EZ apex locator using files of different alloys: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Nekoofar, M H; Sadeghi, K; Sadighi Akha, E; Akha, E Sadighi; Namazikhah, M Sadegh

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the precision of one of the new generation of root canal measuring devices, Neosono Ultima EZ, while using files manufactured of different alloys. Fifty-four root canals of extracted teeth were chosen. They were placed in special tubes with roots immersed in 2 percent agar with phosphate buffered saline. The device was used to locate the apex of each canal in wet conditions at the zero digital reading, first using a stainless steel file and then using a nickel-titanium file. These values were compared to the actual lengths obtained by measuring the distance of the coronal reference point to the apical opening with a size 10 file minus 0.5 mm. The accuracy of the device was 94 percent with nickel-titanium files and 91 percent with stainless steel. No significant difference was noted between the results for either file. The accuracy of the Neosono Ultima EZ in wet conditions exceeded 90 percent regardless of the alloy used. PMID:12365847

  19. Acute response in vivo of a fiber-optic sensor for continuous glucose monitoring from canine studies on point accuracy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Chih; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Chiu, Cheng-Yang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute response of Sencil(™), a fiber-optic sensor, in point accuracy for glucose monitoring in vivo on healthy dogs under anesthesia. A total of four dogs with clinically normal glycemia were implanted with one sensor each in the chest region to measure the interstitial glucose concentration during the ovariohysterectomy procedure. The data was acquired every 10 seconds after initiation, and was compared to the concentration of venous plasma glucose sampled during the surgery procedures for accuracy of agreement analysis. In the four trials with a range of 71-297 mg/dL plasma glucose, the collected 21 pairs of ISF readings from the Sencil™ and the plasma reference showed superior dispersion of residue values than the conventional system, and a linear correlation (the Pearson correlation coefficient is 0.9288 and the y-intercept is 14.22 mg/dL). The MAD (17.6 mg/dL) and RMAD (16.16%) of Sencil™ measurements were in the comparable range of the conventional system. The Clarke error grid analysis indicated that 100% of the paired points were in the clinically acceptable zone A (61.9%) and B (38.1%). PMID:22163627

  20. Improving accuracy and usability of growth charts: case study in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Suzana; McSharry, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We evaluate and compare manually collected paper records against electronic records for monitoring the weights of children under the age of 5. Setting Data were collected by 24 community health workers (CHWs) in 2 Rwandan communities, 1 urban and 1 rural. Participants The same CHWs collected paper and electronic records. Paper data contain weight and age for 320 boys and 380 girls. Electronic data contain weight and age for 922 girls and 886 boys. Electronic data were collected over 9 months; most of the data is cross-sectional, with about 330 children with time-series data. Both data sets are compared with the international standard provided by the WHO growth chart. Primary and secondary outcome measures The plan was to collect 2000 individual records for the electronic data set—we finally collected 1878 records. Paper data were collected by the same CHWs, but most data were fragmented and hard to read. We transcribed data only from children for whom we were able to obtain the date of birth, to determine the exact age at the time of measurement. Results Mean absolute error (MAE) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) provide a way to quantify the magnitude of the error in using a given model. Comparing a model, log(weight)=a+b log(age), shows that electronic records provide considerable improvements over paper records, with 40% reduction in both performance metrics. Electronic data improve performance over the WHO model by 10% in MAPE and 7% in MAE. Results are statistically significant using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test at p<0.01. Conclusions This study demonstrates that using modern electronic tools for health data collection is allowing better tracking of health indicators. We have demonstrated that electronic records facilitate development of a country-specific model that is more accurate than the international standard provided by the WHO growth chart. PMID:26817635

  1. The Effect of File Size on the Accuracy of the Raypex 5 Apex Locator: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Shiva; Abolghasemi, Masoomeh

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims Determining the proper length of the root canals is essential for successful endodontic treatment. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of file size on the accuracy of the Raypex 5 electronic apex locator for working length determination of uninstrumented canals. Materials and methods Twenty maxillary central incisors with single straight canals were used. Following access cavity preparation, electronic working length by means of Raypex 5 apex locator and actual working length were determined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measurements and LSD test. Results There was no significant difference between electronic and actual working lengths when a size 15 K-file was used. Conclusion Under the conditions of the present study, a size 15 K-file is a more suitable size for de-termining working length. PMID:23285326

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy of 123I-Meta-Iodobenzylguanidine Myocardial Scintigraphy in Dementia with Lewy Bodies: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Arai, Heii; Arai, Hiroyuki; Arai, Tetsuaki; Asada, Takashi; Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Hanyu, Haruo; Iizuka, Osamu; Iseki, Eizo; Kashihara, Kenichi; Kosaka, Kenji; Maruno, Hirotaka; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Mori, Etsuro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Seigo; Nakashima, Kenji; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Orimo, Satoshi; Samuraki, Miharu; Takahashi, Akira; Taki, Junichi; Tokuda, Takahiko; Urakami, Katsuya; Utsumi, Kumiko; Wada, Kenji; Washimi, Yukihiko; Yamasaki, Junichi; Yamashina, Shouhei; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) needs to be distinguished from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because of important differences in patient management and outcome. Severe cardiac sympathetic degeneration occurs in DLB, but not in AD, offering a potential system for a biological diagnostic marker. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy, in the ante-mortem differentiation of probable DLB from probable AD, of cardiac imaging with the ligand 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) which binds to the noradrenaline reuptake site, in the first multicenter study. Methods We performed a multicenter study in which we used 123I-MIBG scans to assess 133 patients with clinical diagnoses of probable (n = 61) or possible (n = 26) DLB or probable AD (n = 46) established by a consensus panel. Three readers, unaware of the clinical diagnosis, classified the images as either normal or abnormal by visual inspection. The heart-to-mediastinum ratios of 123I-MIBG uptake were also calculated using an automated region-of-interest based system. Results Using the heart-to-mediastinum ratio calculated with the automated system, the sensitivity was 68.9% and the specificity was 89.1% to differentiate probable DLB from probable AD in both early and delayed images. By visual assessment, the sensitivity and specificity were 68.9% and 87.0%, respectively. In a subpopulation of patients with mild dementia (MMSE ≥ 22, n = 47), the sensitivity and specificity were 77.4% and 93.8%, respectively, with the delayed heart-to-mediastinum ratio. Conclusions Our first multicenter study confirmed the high correlation between abnormal cardiac sympathetic activity evaluated with 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy and a clinical diagnosis of probable DLB. The diagnostic accuracy is sufficiently high for this technique to be clinically useful in distinguishing DLB from AD, especially in patients with mild dementia. PMID:25793585

  3. The dimensional accuracy of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials using two different impression techniques: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Nirmala; Nandeeshwar, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study: To evaluate and compare the linear dimensional changes of the three representative polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials and to compare the accuracy of single mix with double mix impression technique. Methodology: A study mold was prepared according to revised American Dental Association specification number 19 for nonaqueous elastic dental impression materials. Three PVS impression materials selected were Elite-HD, Imprint™ II Garant, Aquasil Ultra Heavy. Two impression techniques used were single mix and double mix impression technique. A total of 60 specimens were made and after 24 h the specimens were measured using profile projector. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance analysis and significant differences were separated using Student's Newman–Keul's test. Results: When all the three study group impression materials were compared for double mix technique, the statistically significant difference was found only between Imprint™ II Garantand Elite-HD (P < 0.05). Similarly, using single mix technique, statistically significant difference were found between Elite-HD and Imprint™ II Garant (P < 0.05) and also between Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD (P < 0.05). When the linear dimensional accuracy of all three impression material in double mix impression technique and single mix impression technique were compared with the control group, Imprint™ II Garant showed the values more nearing to the values of master die, followed by Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD respectively. Conclusion: Among the impression materials Imprint™ II Garant showed least dimensional change. Among the impression techniques, double mix impression technique showed the better results. PMID:26929515

  4. A Comparison of Accuracy of Matrix Impression System with Putty Reline Technique and Multiple Mix Technique: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Praveen; Patil, Suneel G; Dheeraj, Bhandari; Reddy, Keshav; Goel, Dinker; Krishna, Gopi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The difficulty in obtaining an acceptable impression increases exponentially as the number of abutments increases. Accuracy of the impression material and the use of a suitable impression technique are of utmost importance in the fabrication of a fixed partial denture. This study compared the accuracy of the matrix impression system with conventional putty reline and multiple mix technique for individual dies by comparing the inter-abutment distance in the casts obtained from the impressions. Materials and Methods: Three groups, 10 impressions each with three impression techniques (matrix impression system, putty reline technique and multiple mix technique) were made of a master die. Typodont teeth were embedded in a maxillary frasaco model base. The left first premolar was removed to create a three-unit fixed partial denture situation and the left canine and second premolar were prepared conservatively, and hatch marks were made on the abutment teeth. The final casts obtained from the impressions were examined under a profile projector and the inter-abutment distance was calculated for all the casts and compared. Results: The results from this study showed that in the mesiodistal dimensions the percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.1 and 0.2, in Group II was 0.9 and 0.3, and Group III was 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. In the labio-palatal dimensions the percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.01 and 0.4, Group II was 1.9 and 1.3, and Group III was 2.2 and 2.0, respectively. In the cervico-incisal dimensions the percentage deviation from the master model in Group I was 1.1 and 0.2, Group II was 3.9 and 1.7, and Group III was 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In the inter-abutment dimension of dies, percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.1, Group II was 0.6, and Group III was 1.0. Conclusion: The matrix impression system showed more accuracy of reproduction for individual dies when compared with putty reline

  5. Relative accuracy of grid references derived from postcode and address in UK epidemiological studies of overhead power lines.

    PubMed

    Swanson, J; Vincent, T J; Bunch, K J

    2014-12-01

    In the UK, the location of an address, necessary for calculating the distance to overhead power lines in epidemiological studies, is available from different sources. We assess the accuracy of each. The grid reference specific to each address, provided by the Ordnance Survey product Address-Point, is generally accurate to a few metres, which will usually be sufficient for calculating magnetic fields from the power lines. The grid reference derived from the postcode rather than the individual address is generally accurate to tens of metres, and may be acceptable for assessing effects that vary in the general proximity of the power line, but is probably not acceptable for assessing magnetic-field effects. PMID:25325707

  6. Dosimetric accuracy of the cone-beam CT-based treatment planning of the Vero system: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Indra; Prasetio, Heru; Kallis, Karoline; Bert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We report an investigation on the accuracy of dose calculation based on the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of the nonbowtie filter kV imaging system of the Vero linear accelerator. Different sets of materials and tube voltages were employed to generate the Hounsfield unit lookup tables (HLUTs) for both CBCT and fan-beam CT (FBCT) systems. The HLUTs were then implemented for the dose calculation in a treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric evaluation was carried out on an in-house-developed cube phantom that consists of water-equivalent slabs and inhomogeneity inserts. Two independent dosimeters positioned in the cube phantom were used in this study for point-dose and two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution measurements. The differences of HLUTs from various materials and tube voltages in both CT systems resulted in differences in dose calculation accuracy. We found that the higher the tube voltage used to obtain CT images, the better the point-dose calculation and the gamma passing rate of the 2D dose distribution agree to the values determined in the TPS. Moreover, the insert materials that are not tissue-equivalent led to higher dose-calculation inaccuracy. There were negligible differences in dosimetric evaluation between the CBCT- and FBCT-based treatment planning if the HLUTs were generated using the tissue-equivalent materials. In this study, the CBCT images of the Vero system from a complex inhomogeneity phantom can be applied for the TPS dose calculation if the system is calibrated using tissue-equivalent materials scanned at high tube voltage (i.e., 120 kV). PMID:27455496

  7. A comparative evaluation of the marginal accuracy of crowns fabricated from four commercially available provisional materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Bhavya Mohandas; Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the primary marginal accuracy of four commercially available provisional materials (Protemp 4, Luxatemp Star, Visalys Temp and DPI tooth moulding powder and liquid) at 2 time intervals (10 and 30 min). Materials and Methods: A customized stainless steel master model containing two interchangeable dies was used for fabrication of provisional crowns. Forty crowns (n = 10) were fabricated, and each crown was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Vertical marginal discrepancies were noted and compared at 10 min since the start of mixing and then at 30 min. Observations and Results: Protemp 4 showed the least vertical marginal discrepancy (71.59 μ), followed by Luxatemp Star (91.93 μ) at 10 min. DPI showed a marginal discrepancy of 95.94 μ while Visalys Temp crowns had vertical marginal discrepancy of 106.81 μ. There was a significant difference in the marginal discrepancy values of Protemp 4 and Visalys Temp. At 30 min, there was a significant difference between the marginal discrepancy of Protemp 4 crowns (83.11 μ) and Visalys Temp crowns (128.97 μ) and between Protemp 4 and DPI (118.88 μ). No significant differences were observed between Protemp 4 and Luxatemp Star. Conclusion: The vertical marginal discrepancy of temporary crowns fabricated from the four commercially available provisional materials ranged from 71 to 106 μ immediately after fabrication (at 10 min from the start of mix) to 83–128 μ (30 min from the start of mix). The time elapsed after mixing had a significant influence on the marginal accuracy of the crowns. PMID:26097348

  8. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Brodén, Cyrus; Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  9. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Noz, Marilyn E.; Zeleznik, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  10. Effect of the impression margin thickness on the linear accuracy of impression and stone dies: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Naveen, Y G; Patil, Raghunath

    2013-03-01

    The space available for impression material in gingival sulcus immediately after the removal of retraction cord has been found to be 0.3-0.4 mm. However after 40 s only 0.2 mm of the retracted space is available. This is of concern when impression of multiple abutments is to be made. Hence a study was planned to determine the minimum width of the retracted sulcus necessary to obtain a good impression. Five metal dies were machined to accurately fit a stainless steel block with a square cavity in the center with spaces, 1 mm deep and of varying widths (0.11-0.3 mm) away from the block. Polyvinyl siloxane impressions were made and poured using a high strength stone. Using traveling microscope, length and widths of abutment, impression and die were measured and compared for linear accuracy and completeness of impression. Results showed 1.5-3 times greater mean distortion and larger coefficient of variance in the 0.11 mm group than in the wider sulcular groups. ANOVA test for distortion also showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). 75 % of impressions in 0.11 mm group were defective compared to less than 25 % of impressions in other width groups. It is not always possible to predictably obtain accurate impressions in sulcus width of 0.11 mm or lesser. Dimensionally accurate and defect free impressions were obtained in sulcus width of 0.15 mm and wider. Hence clinicians must choose retraction methods to obtain a width greater than 0.35 mm. Further immediate loading of the impression material after cord removal may improve accuracy. PMID:24431701

  11. A new automatic blood pressure kit auscultates for accurate reading with a smartphone: A diagnostic accuracy study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongjun; Wang, Bingjian; Zhu, Xinpu; Chu, Guang; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-08-01

    The widely used oscillometric automated blood pressure (BP) monitor was continuously questioned on its accuracy. A novel BP kit named Accutension which adopted Korotkoff auscultation method was then devised. Accutension worked with a miniature microphone, a pressure sensor, and a smartphone. The BP values were automatically displayed on the smartphone screen through the installed App. Data recorded in the phone could be played back and reconfirmed after measurement. They could also be uploaded and saved to the iCloud. The accuracy and consistency of this novel electronic auscultatory sphygmomanometer was preliminarily verified here. Thirty-two subjects were included and 82 qualified readings were obtained. The mean differences ± SD for systolic and diastolic BP readings between Accutension and mercury sphygmomanometer were 0.87 ± 2.86 and -0.94 ± 2.93 mm Hg. Agreements between Accutension and mercury sphygmomanometer were highly significant for systolic (ICC = 0.993, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.989-0.995) and diastolic (ICC = 0.987, 95% CI: 0.979-0.991). In conclusion, Accutension worked accurately based on our pilot study data. The difference was acceptable. ICC and Bland-Altman plot charts showed good agreements with manual measurements. Systolic readings of Accutension were slightly higher than those of manual measurement, while diastolic readings were slightly lower. One possible reason was that Accutension captured the first and the last korotkoff sound more sensitively than human ear during manual measurement and avoided sound missing, so that it might be more accurate than traditional mercury sphygmomanometer. By documenting and analyzing of variant tendency of BP values, Accutension helps management of hypertension and therefore contributes to the mobile heath service. PMID:27512876

  12. Accuracy and stability of measuring GABA, glutamate, and glutamine by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A phantom study at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Michael E.; Lauriat, Tara L.; Shanahan, Meghan; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2011-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the potential to provide valuable information about alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutamine (Gln) in psychiatric and neurological disorders. In order to use this technique effectively, it is important to establish the accuracy and reproducibility of the methodology. In this study, phantoms with known metabolite concentrations were used to compare the accuracy of 2D J-resolved MRS, single-echo 30 ms PRESS, and GABA-edited MEGA-PRESS for measuring all three aforementioned neurochemicals simultaneously. The phantoms included metabolite concentrations above and below the physiological range and scans were performed at baseline, 1 week, and 1 month time-points. For GABA measurement, MEGA-PRESS proved optimal with a measured-to-target correlation of R2 = 0.999, with J-resolved providing R2 = 0.973 for GABA. All three methods proved effective in measuring Glu with R2 = 0.987 (30 ms PRESS), R2 = 0.996 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.910 (MEGA-PRESS). J-resolved and MEGA-PRESS yielded good results for Gln measures with respective R2 = 0.855 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.815 (MEGA-PRESS). The 30 ms PRESS method proved ineffective in measuring GABA and Gln. When measurement stability at in vivo concentration was assessed as a function of varying spectral quality, J-resolved proved the most stable and immune to signal-to-noise and linewidth fluctuation compared to MEGA-PRESS and 30 ms PRESS.

  13. Zagreb Amblyopia Preschool Screening Study: near and distance visual acuity testing increase the diagnostic accuracy of screening for amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Bušić, Mladen; Bjeloš, Mirjana; Petrovečki, Mladen; Kuzmanović Elabjer, Biljana; Bosnar, Damir; Ramić, Senad; Miletić, Daliborka; Andrijašević, Lidija; Kondža Krstonijević, Edita; Jakovljević, Vid; Bišćan Tvrdi, Ana; Predović, Jurica; Kokot, Antonio; Bišćan, Filip; Kovačević Ljubić, Mirna; Motušić Aras, Ranka

    2016-01-01

    Aim To present and evaluate a new screening protocol for amblyopia in preschool children. Methods Zagreb Amblyopia Preschool Screening (ZAPS) study protocol performed screening for amblyopia by near and distance visual acuity (VA) testing of 15 648 children aged 48-54 months attending kindergartens in the City of Zagreb County between September 2011 and June 2014 using Lea Symbols in lines test. If VA in either eye was >0.1 logMAR, the child was re-tested, if failed at re-test, the child was referred to comprehensive eye examination at the Eye Clinic. Results 78.04% of children passed the screening test. Estimated prevalence of amblyopia was 8.08%. Testability, sensitivity, and specificity of the ZAPS study protocol were 99.19%, 100.00%, and 96.68% respectively. Conclusion The ZAPS study used the most discriminative VA test with optotypes in lines as they do not underestimate amblyopia. The estimated prevalence of amblyopia was considerably higher than reported elsewhere. To the best of our knowledge, the ZAPS study protocol reached the highest sensitivity and specificity when evaluating diagnostic accuracy of VA tests for screening. The pass level defined at ≤0.1 logMAR for 4-year-old children, using Lea Symbols in lines missed no amblyopia cases, advocating that both near and distance VA testing should be performed when screening for amblyopia. PMID:26935612

  14. Multinomial tree models for assessing the status of the reference in studies of the accuracy of tools for binary classification

    PubMed Central

    Botella, Juan; Huang, Huiling; Suero, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Studies that evaluate the accuracy of binary classification tools are needed. Such studies provide 2 × 2 cross-classifications of test outcomes and the categories according to an unquestionable reference (or gold standard). However, sometimes a suboptimal reliability reference is employed. Several methods have been proposed to deal with studies where the observations are cross-classified with an imperfect reference. These methods require that the status of the reference, as a gold standard or as an imperfect reference, is known. In this paper a procedure for determining whether it is appropriate to maintain the assumption that the reference is a gold standard or an imperfect reference, is proposed. This procedure fits two nested multinomial tree models, and assesses and compares their absolute and incremental fit. Its implementation requires the availability of the results of several independent studies. These should be carried out using similar designs to provide frequencies of cross-classification between a test and the reference under investigation. The procedure is applied in two examples with real data. PMID:24106484

  15. Interoceptive accuracy and panic.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, L A; Craske, M G

    1999-12-01

    Psychophysiological models of panic hypothesize that panickers focus attention on and become anxious about the physical sensations associated with panic. Attention on internal somatic cues has been labeled interoception. The present study examined the role of physiological arousal and subjective anxiety on interoceptive accuracy. Infrequent panickers and nonanxious participants participated in an initial baseline to examine overall interoceptive accuracy. Next, participants ingested caffeine, about which they received either safety or no safety information. Using a mental heartbeat tracking paradigm, participants' count of their heartbeats during specific time intervals were coded based on polygraph measures. Infrequent panickers were more accurate in the perception of their heartbeats than nonanxious participants. Changes in physiological arousal were not associated with increased accuracy on the heartbeat perception task. However, higher levels of self-reported anxiety were associated with superior performance. PMID:10596462

  16. Millimeter-accuracy GPS landslide monitoring using Precise Point Positioning with Single Receiver Phase Ambiguity (PPP-SRPA) resolution: a case study in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. Q.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) monitoring is essential for establishing the rate and pattern of superficial movements of landslides. This study demonstrates a technique which uses a stand-alone GPS station to conduct millimeter-accuracy landslide monitoring. The Precise Point Positioning with Single Receiver Phase Ambiguity (PPP-SRPA) resolution employed by the GIPSY/OASIS software package (V6.1.2) was applied in this study. Two-years of continuous GPS data collected at a creeping landslide were used to evaluate the accuracy of the PPP-SRPA solutions. The criterion for accuracy was the root-mean-square (RMS) of residuals of the PPP-SRPA solutions with respect to "true" landslide displacements over the two-year period. RMS is often regarded as repeatability or precision in GPS literature. However, when contrasted with a known "true" position or displacement it could be termed RMS accuracy or simply accuracy. This study indicated that the PPP-SRPA resolution can provide an accuracy of 2 to 3 mm horizontally and 8 mm vertically for 24-hour sessions with few outliers (< 1%) in the Puerto Rico region. Horizontal accuracy below 5 mm can be stably achieved with 4-hour or longer sessions if avoiding the collection of data during extreme weather conditions. Vertical accuracy below 10 mm can be achieved with 8-hour or longer sessions. This study indicates that the PPP-SRPA resolution is competitive with the conventional carrier-phase double-difference network resolution for static (longer than 4 hours) landslide monitoring while maintaining many advantages. It is evident that the PPP-SRPA method would become an attractive alternative to the conventional carrier-phase double-difference method for landslide monitoring, notably in remote areas or developing countries.

  17. Pitfalls at the root of facial assessment on photographs: a quantitative study of accuracy in positioning facial landmarks.

    PubMed

    Cummaudo, M; Guerzoni, M; Marasciuolo, L; Gibelli, D; Cigada, A; Obertovà, Z; Ratnayake, M; Poppa, P; Gabriel, P; Ritz-Timme, S; Cattaneo, C

    2013-05-01

    In the last years, facial analysis has gained great interest also for forensic anthropology. The application of facial landmarks may bring about relevant advantages for the analysis of 2D images by measuring distances and extracting quantitative indices. However, this is a complex task which depends upon the variability in positioning facial landmarks. In addition, literature provides only general indications concerning the reliability in positioning facial landmarks on photographic material, and no study is available concerning the specific errors which may be encountered in such an operation. The aim of this study is to analyze the inter- and intra-observer error in defining facial landmarks on photographs by using a software specifically developed for this purpose. Twenty-four operators were requested to define 22 facial landmarks on frontal view photographs and 11 on lateral view images; in addition, three operators repeated the procedure on the same photographs 20 times (at distance of 24 h). In the frontal view, the landmarks with less dispersion were the pupil, cheilion, endocanthion, and stomion (sto), and the landmarks with the highest dispersion were gonion, zygion, frontotemporale, tragion, and selion (se). In the lateral view, the landmarks with the least dispersion were se, pronasale, subnasale, and sto, whereas landmarks with the highest dispersion were gnathion, pogonion, and tragion. Results confirm that few anatomical points can be defined with the highest accuracy and show the importance of the preliminary investigation of reliability in positioning facial landmarks. PMID:23515681

  18. A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Xing; Glick, Stephen J.; Liu, Bob; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta

    2006-04-15

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a 2D plane. Recently, two promising approaches for 3D volumetric breast imaging have been proposed, breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT breast imaging (CTBI). To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy with either breast tomosynthesis or CT breast imaging as compared to digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through a CsI based flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of Mo/Mo 28 kVp for digital mammography, Mo/Rh 28 kVp for BT, and W/Ce 50 kVp for CTBI were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total average glandular dose of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in conventional two-view screening mammography. The same total dose was modeled for both the DM and BT simulations. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum, with the composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissue. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with five observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (A{sub z}) was 0.76 for DM, 0.93 for BT, and 0.94 for CTBI. Results indicated that for the same dose, a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom was detected by the two volumetric breast imaging systems, BT and CTBI, with statistically

  19. A qualitative study into the difficulties experienced by healthcare decision makers when reading a Cochrane diagnostic test accuracy review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cochrane reviews are one of the best known and most trusted sources of evidence-based information in health care. While steps have been taken to make Cochrane intervention reviews accessible to a diverse readership, little is known about the accessibility of the newcomer to the Cochrane library: diagnostic test accuracy reviews (DTARs). The current qualitative study explored how healthcare decision makers, who varied in their knowledge and experience with test accuracy research and systematic reviews, read and made sense of DTARs. Methods A purposive sample of clinicians, researchers and policy makers (n = 21) took part in a series of think-aloud interviews, using as interview material the first three DTARs published in the Cochrane library. Thematic qualitative analysis of the transcripts was carried out to identify patterns in participants’ ‘reading’ and interpretation of the reviews and the difficulties they encountered. Results Participants unfamiliar with the design and methodology of DTARs found the reviews largely inaccessible and experienced a range of difficulties stemming mainly from the mismatch between background knowledge and level of explanation provided in the text. Experience with systematic reviews of interventions did not guarantee better understanding and, in some cases, led to confusion and misinterpretation. These difficulties were further exacerbated by poor layout and presentation, which affected even those with relatively good knowledge of DTARs and had a negative impact not only on their understanding of the reviews but also on their motivation to engage with the text. Comparison between the readings of the three reviews showed that more accessible presentation, such as presenting the results as natural frequencies, significantly increased participants’ understanding. Conclusions The study demonstrates that authors and editors should pay more attention to the presentation as well as the content of Cochrane DTARs

  20. Accuracy of deception judgments.

    PubMed

    Bond, Charles F; DePaulo, Bella M

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the accuracy of deception judgments, synthesizing research results from 206 documents and 24,483 judges. In relevant studies, people attempt to discriminate lies from truths in real time with no special aids or training. In these circumstances, people achieve an average of 54% correct lie-truth judgments, correctly classifying 47% of lies as deceptive and 61% of truths as nondeceptive. Relative to cross-judge differences in accuracy, mean lie-truth discrimination abilities are nontrivial, with a mean accuracy d of roughly .40. This produces an effect that is at roughly the 60th percentile in size, relative to others that have been meta-analyzed by social psychologists. Alternative indexes of lie-truth discrimination accuracy correlate highly with percentage correct, and rates of lie detection vary little from study to study. Our meta-analyses reveal that people are more accurate in judging audible than visible lies, that people appear deceptive when motivated to be believed, and that individuals regard their interaction partners as honest. We propose that people judge others' deceptions more harshly than their own and that this double standard in evaluating deceit can explain much of the accumulated literature. PMID:16859438

  1. Accuracy of ceramic restorations made using an in-office optical scanning technique: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tidehag, P; Ottosson, K; Sjögren, G

    2014-01-01

    The present in vitro study concerns determination of the pre-cementation gap width of all-ceramic crowns made using an in-office digital-impression technique and subsequent computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) production. Two chairside video camera systems were used: the Lava Oral scanner and Cadent's iTero scanner. Digital scans were made of a first molar typodont tooth that was suitably prepared for an all-ceramic crown. The digital impressions were sent via the Internet to commercial dental laboratories, where the crowns were made. Also, an impression of the typodont tooth was made, poured, and scanned in order to evaluate the pre-cementation gap of crowns produced from scanning stone dies. These methods and systems were evaluated by creating replicas of the intermediate space using an addition-cured silicone, and the gap widths were determined using a measuring microscope. Hot-pressed leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were selected as a reference. The mean value for the marginal measuring points of the control was 170 μm, and the values for all the evaluated crowns ranged from 107 to 128 μm. Corresponding figures for the internal measuring points were 141-210 μm and 115-237 μm, respectively. Based on the findings in the present study, an in-office digital-impression technique can be used to fabricate CAD/CAM ceramic single crowns with a marginal and internal accuracy that is on the same level as that of a conventional hot-pressed glass-ceramic crown. In the present study, however, slight differences could be seen between the two types of ceramic crowns studied with respect to the internal fit obtained. PMID:24111810

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic biopsies for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma: a clinicopathologic study of 48 patients.

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Okada, Hiroyuki; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Nose, Soichiro; Miyatani, Katsuya; Yoshino, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to reveal the diagnostic accuracy of initial pathologic assessment of biopsied samples in patients with gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma lesions. A total of 48 patients with follicular lymphoma (Lugano system stage I: n = 30; II1: n = 4; II2: n = 4; IV: n = 10) with gastrointestinal involvement who underwent endoscopic biopsy were enrolled and retrospectively reviewed. Nine (18.8%) of the 48 patients were not appropriately diagnosed as having follicular lymphoma at the initial biopsy. The initial pathological diagnosis included extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (n = 4), necrotic tissue (n = 2), duodenitis (n = 1), or suspected lymphoma of unspecified subtype (n = 2). The reasons for these inappropriate diagnoses were insufficient histopathologic analysis lacking CD10 and BCL2 staining (n = 7) and unsuitable biopsy samples taken from erosions or ulcers that contained scanty lymphoma cells or no lymphoid follicles (n = 2). In conclusion, incomplete histopathologic analysis and unsuitable biopsy samples are pitfalls in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma. PMID:24513028

  3. Evaluation of accuracy of non-linear finite element computations for surgical simulation: study using brain phantom.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wittek, A; Singh, S; Joldes, G; Washio, T; Chinzei, K; Miller, K

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the accuracy of non-linear finite element computations in application to surgical simulation was evaluated by comparing the experiment and modelling of indentation of the human brain phantom. The evaluation was realised by comparing forces acting on the indenter and the deformation of the brain phantom. The deformation of the brain phantom was measured by tracking 3D motions of X-ray opaque markers, placed within the brain phantom using a custom-built bi-plane X-ray image intensifier system. The model was implemented using the ABAQUS(TM) finite element solver. Realistic geometry obtained from magnetic resonance images and specific constitutive properties determined through compression tests were used in the model. The model accurately predicted the indentation force-displacement relations and marker displacements. Good agreement between modelling and experimental results verifies the reliability of the finite element modelling techniques used in this study and confirms the predictive power of these techniques in surgical simulation. PMID:21153973

  4. Cost-Saving Early Diagnosis of Functional Pain in Nonmalignant Pain: A Noninferiority Study of Diagnostic Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Rafael J. A.; Merz, Christian; von Känel, Roland; Egloff, Niklaus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We compared two index screening tests for early diagnosis of functional pain: pressure pain measurement by electronic diagnostic equipment, which is accurate but too specialized for primary health care, versus peg testing, which is cost-saving and more easily manageable but of unknown sensitivity and specificity. Early distinction of functional (altered pain perception; nervous sensitization) from neuropathic or nociceptive pain improves pain management. Methods. Clinicians blinded for the index screening tests assessed the reference standard of this noninferiority diagnostic accuracy study, namely, comprehensive medical history taking with all previous findings and treatment outcomes. All consenting patients referred to a university hospital for nonmalignant musculoskeletal pain participated. The main analysis compared the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of both index screening tests. Results. The area under the ROC curve for peg testing was not inferior to that of electronic equipment: it was at least 95% as large for finger measures (two-sided p = 0.038) and at least equally as large for ear measures (two-sided p = 0.003). Conclusions. Routine diagnostic testing by peg, which is accessible for general practitioners, is at least as accurate as specialized equipment. This may shorten time-to-treatment in general practices, thereby improving the prognosis and quality of life. PMID:27088013

  5. Retrospective study: The diagnostic accuracy of conventional forceps biopsy of gastric epithelial compared to endoscopic submucosal dissection (STROBE compliant).

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Lv, Xueyou; Lin, Yiming; Li, Dejian; Chen, Lihua; Ji, Feng; Li, Youming; Yu, Chaohui

    2016-07-01

    Conventional forceps biopsy (CFB) is the most popular way to screen for gastric epithelial neoplasia (GEN) and adenocarcinoma of gastric epithelium. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy between conventional forceps biopsy and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD).Four hundred forty-four patients who finally undertook ESD in our hospital were enrolled from Jan 1, 2009 to Sep 1, 2015. We retrospectively assessed the characteristics of pathological results of CFB and ESD.The concordance rate between CFB and ESD specimens was 68.92% (306/444). Men showed a lower concordance rate (63.61% vs 79.33%; P = 0.001) and concordance patients were younger (P = 0.048). In multivariate analysis, men significantly had a lower concordance rate (coefficient -0.730, P = 0.002) and a higher rate of pathological upgrade (coefficient -0.648, P = 0.015). Locations of CFB did not influence the concordance rate statistically.The concordance rate was relatively high in our hospital. According to our analysis, old men plus gastric fundus or antrum of CFB were strongly suggested to perform ESD if precancerous lesions were found. And young women with low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia could select regular follow-up. PMID:27472723

  6. Accuracy of cut-off value by measurement of third molar index: Study of a Colombian sample.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Stefano; Aguilar, Lina; Rivera, Marcela; Palacio, Luz Andrea Velandia; Riccomi, Giulia; Bestetti, Fiorella; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to test the accuracy of cut-off value of 0.08 by measurement of third molar index (I3M) in assessing legal adult age of 18 years in a sample of Colombian children and young adults. Digital orthopantomographs of 288 Colombian children and young adults (163 girls and 125 boys), aged between 13 and 22 years, were analysed. Concordance correlation coefficient (ρc) and κ statistics (Cohen's Kappa coefficient) showed that repeatability and reproducibility are high for both intra- and inter-observer error. κ statistics for intra- and inter-observer agreement in decision on adult or minor was 0.913 and 0.877, respectively. Age distribution gradually decreases as I3M increases in both girls and boys. For girls, the sensitivity test was 95.1% (95% CI 87.1%-95%) and specificity was 93.8% (95% CI 87.1%-98.8%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 95.1%. For boys, the sensitivity test was 91.7% (95% CI 85.1%-96.8%) and specificity was 90.6% (95% CI 82.1%-97.8%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 89.7%. The cut-off value of 0.08 is highly useful to determine if a subject is 18 years of age or older or not. PMID:26898677

  7. The ADENOMA Study. Accuracy of Detection using Endocuff Vision™ Optimization of Mucosal Abnormalities: study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bevan, Roisin; Ngu, Wee Sing; Saunders, Brian P.; Tsiamoulos, Zacharias; Bassett, Paul; Hoare, Zoe; Rees, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colonoscopy is the gold standard investigation for the diagnosis of bowel pathology and colorectal cancer screening. Adenoma detection rate is a marker of high quality colonoscopy and a high adenoma detection rate is associated with a lower incidence of interval cancers. Several technological advancements have been explored to improve adenoma detection rate. A new device called Endocuff Vision™ has been shown to improve adenoma detection rate in pilot studies. Methods/Design: This is a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial comparing the adenoma detection rate in patients undergoing Endocuff Vision™-assisted colonoscopy with standard colonoscopy. All patients above 18 years of age referred for screening, surveillance, or diagnostic colonoscopy who are able to consent are invited to the study. Patients with absolute contraindications to colonoscopy, large bowel obstruction or pseudo-obstruction, colon cancer or polyposis syndromes, colonic strictures, severe diverticular segments, active colitis, anticoagulant therapy, or pregnancy are excluded. Patients are randomized according to site, age, sex, and bowel cancer screening status to receive Endocuff Vision™-assisted colonoscopy or standard colonoscopy on the day of procedure. Baseline data, colonoscopy, and polyp data including histology are collected. Nurse assessment of patient comfort and patient comfort questionnaires are completed post procedure. Patients are followed up at 21 days and complete a patient experience questionnaire. This study will take place across seven NHS Hospital Trusts: one in London and six within the Northern Region Endoscopy Group. A maximum of 10 colonoscopists per site will recruit a total of 1772 patients, with a maximum of four bowel screening colonoscopists permitted per site. Discussion: This is the first trial to evaluate the adenoma detection rate of Endocuff Vision™ in all screening, surveillance, and diagnostic patient groups. This timely

  8. A comparative study between evaluation methods for quality control procedures for determining the accuracy of PET/CT registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Min Kyoung; Ko, Hyun Soo; Jung, Woo Young; Ryu, Jae Kwang; Choe, Bo-Young

    2015-08-01

    The Accuracy of registration between positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images is one of the important factors for reliable diagnosis in PET/CT examinations. Although quality control (QC) for checking alignment of PET and CT images should be performed periodically, the procedures have not been fully established. The aim of this study is to determine optimal quality control (QC) procedures that can be performed at the user level to ensure the accuracy of PET/CT registration. Two phantoms were used to carry out this study: the American college of Radiology (ACR)-approved PET phantom and National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) body phantom, containing fillable spheres. All PET/CT images were acquired on a Biograph TruePoint 40 PET/CT scanner using routine protocols. To measure registration error, the spatial coordinates of the estimated centers of the target slice (spheres) was calculated independently for the PET and the CT images in two ways. We compared the images from the ACR-approved PET phantom to that from the NEMA IEC body phantom. Also, we measured the total time required from phantom preparation to image analysis. The first analysis method showed a total difference of 0.636 ± 0.11 mm for the largest hot sphere and 0.198 ± 0.09 mm for the largest cold sphere in the case of the ACR-approved PET phantom. In the NEMA IEC body phantom, the total difference was 3.720 ± 0.97 mm for the largest hot sphere and 4.800 ± 0.85 mm for the largest cold sphere. The second analysis method showed that the differences in the x location at the line profile of the lesion on PET and CT were (1.33, 1.33) mm for a bone lesion, (-1.26, -1.33) mm for an air lesion and (-1.67, -1.60) mm for a hot sphere lesion for the ACR-approved PET phantom. For the NEMA IEC body phantom, the differences in the x location at the line profile of the lesion on PET and CT were (-1.33, 4.00) mm for the air

  9. Evaluation of factors influencing accuracy of principal procedure coding based on ICD-9-CM: an Iranian study.

    PubMed

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of procedural coding and the factors that influence it, 246 records were randomly selected from four teaching hospitals in Kashan, Iran. "Recodes" were assigned blindly and then compared to the original codes. Furthermore, the coders' professional behaviors were carefully observed during the coding process. Coding errors were classified as major or minor. The relations between coding accuracy and possible effective factors were analyzed by chi(2) or Fisher exact tests as well as the odds ratio (OR) and the 95 percent confidence interval for the OR. The results showed that using a tabular index for rechecking codes reduces errors (83 percent vs. 72 percent accuracy). Further, more thorough documentation by the clinician positively affected coding accuracy, though this relation was not significant. Readability of records decreased errors overall (p = .003), including major ones (p = .012). Moreover, records with no abbreviations had fewer major errors (p = .021). In conclusion, not using abbreviations, ensuring more readable documentation, and paying more attention to available information increased coding accuracy and the quality of procedure databases. PMID:19471647

  10. Evaluation of Factors Influencing Accuracy of Principal Procedure Coding Based on ICD-9-CM: An Iranian Study

    PubMed Central

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of procedural coding and the factors that influence it, 246 records were randomly selected from four teaching hospitals in Kashan, Iran. “Recodes” were assigned blindly and then compared to the original codes. Furthermore, the coders' professional behaviors were carefully observed during the coding process. Coding errors were classified as major or minor. The relations between coding accuracy and possible effective factors were analyzed by χ2 or Fisher exact tests as well as the odds ratio (OR) and the 95 percent confidence interval for the OR. The results showed that using a tabular index for rechecking codes reduces errors (83 percent vs. 72 percent accuracy). Further, more thorough documentation by the clinician positively affected coding accuracy, though this relation was not significant. Readability of records decreased errors overall (p = .003), including major ones (p = .012). Moreover, records with no abbreviations had fewer major errors (p = .021). In conclusion, not using abbreviations, ensuring more readable documentation, and paying more attention to available information increased coding accuracy and the quality of procedure databases. PMID:19471647

  11. Comparative accuracy of different risk scores in assessing cardiovascular risk in Indians: A study in patients with first myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Manish; Kasliwal, Ravi R.; Trehan, Naresh

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a number of risk assessment models are available for estimating 10-year risk of cardiovascular (CV) events in patients requiring primary prevention of CV disease, the predictive accuracy of the contemporary risk models has not been adequately evaluated in Indians. Methods 149 patients [mean age 59.4 ± 10.6 years; 123 (82.6%) males] without prior CV disease and presenting with acute myocardial infarction (MI) were included. The four clinically most relevant risk assessment models [Framingham Risk score (RiskFRS), World Health Organization risk prediction charts (RiskWHO), American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association pooled cohort equations (RiskACC/AHA) and the 3rd Joint British Societies' risk calculator (RiskJBS)] were applied to estimate what would have been their predicted 10-year risk of CV events if they had presented just prior to suffering the acute MI. Results RiskWHO provided the lowest risk estimates with 86.6% patients estimated to be having <20% 10-year risk. In comparison, RiskFRS and RiskACC/AHA returned higher risk estimates (61.7% and 69.8% with risk <20%, respectively; p values <0.001 for comparison with RiskWHO). However, the RiskJBS identified the highest proportion of the patients as being at high-risk (only 44.1% at <20% risk, p values 0 < 0.01 for comparison with all the other 3 risk scores). Conclusions This is the first study to show that in Indian patients presenting with acute MI, RiskJBS is likely to identify the largest proportion of the patients as at ‘high-risk’ as compared to RiskWHO, RiskFRS and RiskACC/AHA. However, large-scale prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25634388

  12. The effect of mandibular buccal tilting on the accuracy of posterior mandibular spiral tomographic images: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Maleki, Vida

    2011-01-01

    Background: Accurate measurement of the height and buccolingual thickness of available bone has a significant role in dental implantology. The shadow of ramus on the mandibular second molar region disturbs the sharpness of conventional tomographic images. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of transferring the shadow of ramus from the center of the focal plane, by changing the position of mandible, on the sharpness of the posterior mandibular region. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we used 10 dry human mandibles. Three metal balls were mounted on the midline and mandibular second molar regions bilaterally. Standard panoramic and tomographic images were taken. Then, the mandible was tilted buccaly for 8° – compensating the normal lingual inclination of the mandibular ridge and teeth on this region – and tomographic images were taken again. The height and thickness of bone were measured on the images and then compared with the real amounts measured directly on mandibles. Also, the sharpness of mandibular canals was compared between the two tomographic methods. Findings were analyzed with repeated measured ANOVA test (P<0.05). Results: The height of mandibular bone, on the images of the tilted tomography technique was more accurate compared to standard (P<0.001), but standard tomography had more accuracy in estimating the buccolingual thickness at the half-height point. Regarding the sharpness of mandibular canals, we found no significant differences between two tomographic methods. Conclusion: Buccal tilting is recommended when measuring the bone height is more important, but routine standard tomography is preferred when the thickness is requested. PMID:23372586

  13. A Comparative Study on Diagnostic Accuracy of Colour Coded Digital Images, Direct Digital Images and Conventional Radiographs for Periapical Lesions – An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mubeen; K.R., Vijayalakshmi; Bhuyan, Sanat Kumar; Panigrahi, Rajat G; Priyadarshini, Smita R; Misra, Satyaranjan; Singh, Chandravir

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The identification and radiographic interpretation of periapical bone lesions is important for accurate diagnosis and treatment. The present study was undertaken to study the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of colour coded digital radiographs in terms of presence and size of lesion and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of colour coded digital images with direct digital images and conventional radiographs for assessing periapical lesions. Materials and Methods: Sixty human dry cadaver hemimandibles were obtained and periapical lesions were created in first and second premolar teeth at the junction of cancellous and cortical bone using a micromotor handpiece and carbide burs of sizes 2, 4 and 6. After each successive use of round burs, a conventional, RVG and colour coded image was taken for each specimen. All the images were evaluated by three observers. The diagnostic accuracy for each bur and image mode was calculated statistically. Results: Our results showed good interobserver (kappa > 0.61) agreement for the different radiographic techniques and for the different bur sizes. Conventional Radiography outperformed Digital Radiography in diagnosing periapical lesions made with Size two bur. Both were equally diagnostic for lesions made with larger bur sizes. Colour coding method was least accurate among all the techniques. Conclusion: Conventional radiography traditionally forms the backbone in the diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of periapical lesions. Direct digital imaging is an efficient technique, in diagnostic sense. Colour coding of digital radiography was feasible but less accurate however, this imaging technique, like any other, needs to be studied continuously with the emphasis on safety of patients and diagnostic quality of images. PMID:25584318

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy Study of Intraoperative and Perioperative Serum Intact PTH Level for Successful Parathyroidectomy in 501 Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; Xing, Changying; Shen, Chong; Zeng, Ming; Yang, Guang; Mao, Huijuan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Xiangbao; Cui, Yiyao; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Chun; Ge, Yifei; Jiang, Yao; Yin, Caixia; Zha, Xiaoming; Wang, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is an effective treatment for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT); however, persistent SHPT may occur because of supernumerary and ectopic parathyroids. Here a diagnostic accuracy study of intraoperative and perioperative serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) was performed to predict successful surgery in 501 patients, who received total PTX + autotransplantation without thymectomy. Serum iPTH values before incision (io-iPTH0), 10 and 20 min after removing the last parathyroid (io-iPTH10, io-iPTH20), and the first and fourth day after PTX (D1-iPTH, D4-iPTH) were recoded. Patients whose serum iPTH was >50 pg/mL at the first postoperative week were followed up within six months. Successful PTX was defined if iPTH was <300 pg/mL, on the contrary, persistent SHPT was regarded. There were 86.4% patients underwent successful PTX, 9.8% remained as persistent SHPT and 3.8% were undetermined. Intraoperative serum iPTH demonstrated no significant differences in two subgroups with or without chronic hepatitis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that >88.9% of io-iPTH20% could predict successful PTX (area under the curve [AUC] 0.909, sensitivity 78.6%, specificity 88.5%), thereby avoiding unnecessary exploration to reduce operative complications. D4-iPTH >147.4 pg/mL could predict persistent SHPT (AUC 0.998, sensitivity 100%, specificity 99.5%), so that medical intervention or reoperation start timely. PMID:27231027

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy Study of Intraoperative and Perioperative Serum Intact PTH Level for Successful Parathyroidectomy in 501 Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lina; Xing, Changying; Shen, Chong; Zeng, Ming; Yang, Guang; Mao, Huijuan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Xiangbao; Cui, Yiyao; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Chun; Ge, Yifei; Jiang, Yao; Yin, Caixia; Zha, Xiaoming; Wang, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is an effective treatment for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT); however, persistent SHPT may occur because of supernumerary and ectopic parathyroids. Here a diagnostic accuracy study of intraoperative and perioperative serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) was performed to predict successful surgery in 501 patients, who received total PTX + autotransplantation without thymectomy. Serum iPTH values before incision (io-iPTH0), 10 and 20 min after removing the last parathyroid (io-iPTH10, io-iPTH20), and the first and fourth day after PTX (D1-iPTH, D4-iPTH) were recoded. Patients whose serum iPTH was >50 pg/mL at the first postoperative week were followed up within six months. Successful PTX was defined if iPTH was <300 pg/mL, on the contrary, persistent SHPT was regarded. There were 86.4% patients underwent successful PTX, 9.8% remained as persistent SHPT and 3.8% were undetermined. Intraoperative serum iPTH demonstrated no significant differences in two subgroups with or without chronic hepatitis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that >88.9% of io-iPTH20% could predict successful PTX (area under the curve [AUC] 0.909, sensitivity 78.6%, specificity 88.5%), thereby avoiding unnecessary exploration to reduce operative complications. D4-iPTH >147.4 pg/mL could predict persistent SHPT (AUC 0.998, sensitivity 100%, specificity 99.5%), so that medical intervention or reoperation start timely. PMID:27231027

  16. A high accuracy femto-/picosecond laser damage test facility dedicated to the study of optical thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mangote, B.; Gallais, L.; Zerrad, M.; Lemarchand, F.; Gao, L. H.; Commandre, M.; Lequime, M.

    2012-01-15

    A laser damage test facility delivering pulses from 100 fs to 3 ps and designed to operate at 1030 nm is presented. The different details of its implementation and performances are given. The originality of this system relies the online damage detection system based on Nomarski microscopy and the use of a non-conventional energy detection method based on the utilization of a cooled CCD that offers the possibility to obtain the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) with high accuracy. Applications of this instrument to study thin films under laser irradiation are presented. Particularly the deterministic behavior of the sub-picosecond damage is investigated in the case of fused silica and oxide films. It is demonstrated that the transition of 0-1 damage probability is very sharp and the LIDT is perfectly deterministic at few hundreds of femtoseconds. The damage process in dielectric materials being the results of electronic processes, specific information such as the material bandgap is needed for the interpretation of results and applications of scaling laws. A review of the different approaches for the estimation of the absorption gap of optical dielectric coatings is conducted and the results given by the different methods are compared and discussed. The LIDT and gap of several oxide materials are then measured with the presented instrument: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, HfO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and ZrO{sub 2}. The obtained relation between the LIDT and gap at 1030 nm confirms the linear evolution of the threshold with the bandgap that exists at 800 nm, and our work expands the number of tested materials.

  17. Physical Activity Level Improves the Predictive Accuracy of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score: The ATTICA Study (2002–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N.; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Bougatsas, Dimitrios; Chatzigeorgiou, Michael; Kavouras, Stavros A.; Chrysohoou, Christina; Skoumas, Ioannis; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although physical activity (PA) has long been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), assessment of PA status has never been used as a part of CVD risk prediction tools. The aim of the present work was to examine whether the inclusion of PA status in a CVD risk model improves its predictive accuracy. Methods: Data from the 10-year follow-up (2002–2012) of the n = 2020 participants (aged 18–89 years) of the ATTICA prospective study were used to test the research hypothesis. The HellenicSCORE (that incorporates age, sex, smoking, total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure levels) was calculated to estimate the baseline 10-year CVD risk; assessment of PA status was based on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The estimated CVD risk was tested against the observed 10-year incidence (i.e., development of acute coronary syndromes, stroke, or other CVD according to the World Health Organization [WHO]-International Classification of Diseases [ICD]-10 criteria). Changes in the predictive ability of the nested CVD risk model that contained the HellenicSCORE plus PA assessment were evaluated using Harrell's C and net reclassification index. Results: Both HellenicSCORE and PA status were predictors of future CVD events (P < 0.05). However, the estimating classification bias of the model that included only the HellenicSCORE was significantly reduced when PA assessment was included (Harrel's C = 0.012, P = 0.032); this reduction remained significant even when adjusted for diabetes mellitus and dietary habits (P < 0.05). Conclusions: CVD risk scores seem to be more accurate by incorporating individuals’ PA status; thus, may be more effective tools in primary prevention by efficiently allocating CVD candidates. PMID:27076890

  18. Positional Accuracy Assessment of the Openstreetmap Buildings Layer Through Automatic Homologous Pairs Detection: the Method and a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, M. A.; Minghini, M.; Molinari, M. E.; Zamboni, G.

    2016-06-01

    OpenStreetMap (OSM) is currently the largest openly licensed collection of geospatial data. Being OSM increasingly exploited in a variety of applications, research has placed great attention on the assessment of its quality. This work focuses on assessing the quality of OSM buildings. While most of the studies available in literature are limited to the evaluation of OSM building completeness, this work proposes an original approach to assess the positional accuracy of OSM buildings based on comparison with a reference dataset. The comparison relies on a quasi-automated detection of homologous pairs on the two datasets. Based on the homologous pairs found, warping algorithms like e.g. affine transformations and multi-resolution splines can be applied to the OSM buildings to generate a new version having an optimal local match to the reference layer. A quality assessment of the OSM buildings of Milan Municipality (Northern Italy), having an area of about 180 km2, is then presented. After computing some measures of completeness, the algorithm based on homologous points is run using the building layer of the official vector cartography of Milan Municipality as the reference dataset. Approximately 100000 homologous points are found, which show a systematic translation of about 0.4 m on both the X and Y directions and a mean distance of about 0.8 m between the datasets. Besides its efficiency and high degree of automation, the algorithm generates a warped version of OSM buildings which, having by definition a closest match to the reference buildings, can be eventually integrated in the OSM database.

  19. Accuracy of Intraocular Lens Power Formulas Involving 148 Eyes with Long Axial Lengths: A Retrospective Chart-Review Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Xu, Xian; Miao, Yuyu; Zheng, Gaoxin; Sun, Yong; Xu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to compare the accuracy of intraocular lens power calculation formulas in eyes with long axial lengths from Chinese patients subjected to cataract surgery. Methods. A total of 148 eyes with an axial length of >26 mm from 148 patients who underwent phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation were included. The Haigis, Hoffer Q, Holladay 1, and SRK/T formulas were used to calculate the refractive power of the intraocular lenses and the postoperative estimated power. Results. Overall, the Haigis formula achieved the lowest level of median absolute error 1.025 D (P < 0.01 for Haigis versus each of the other formulas), followed by SRK/T formula (1.040 D). All formulas were least accurate when eyes were with axial length of >33 mm, and median absolute errors were significantly higher for those eyes than eyes with axial length = 26.01-30.00 mm. Absolute error was correlated with axial length for the SRK/T (r = 0.212, P = 0.010) and Hoffer Q (r = 0.223, P = 0.007) formulas. For axial lengths > 33 mm, eyes exhibited a postoperative hyperopic refractive error. Conclusions. The Haigis and SRK/T formulas may be more suitable for calculating intraocular lens power for eyes with axial lengths ranging from 26 to 33 mm. And for axial length over 33 mm, the Haigis formula could be more accurate. PMID:26793392

  20. The Effect of Delayed-JOLs and Sentence Generation on Children's Monitoring Accuracy and Regulation of Idiom Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Loon, Mariëtte H.; de Bruin, Anique B. H.; van Gog, Tamara; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2013-01-01

    When studying verbal materials, both adults and children are often poor at accurately monitoring their level of learning and regulating their subsequent restudy of materials, which leads to suboptimal test performance. The present experiment investigated how monitoring accuracy and regulation of study could be improved when learning idiomatic…

  1. Effects of random study checks and guided notes study cards on middle school special education students' notetaking accuracy and science vocabulary quiz scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles L.

    Federal legislation mandates that all students with disabilities have meaningful access to the general education curriculum and that students with and without disabilities be held equally accountable to the same academic standards (IDEIA, 2004; NCLB, 2001). Many students with disabilities, however, perform poorly in academic content courses, especially at the middle and secondary school levels. Previous research has reported increased notetaking accuracy and quiz scores over lecture content when students completed guided notes compared to taking their own notes. This study evaluated the effects of a pre-quiz review procedure and specially formatted guided notes on middle school special education students' learning of science vocabulary. This study compared the effects of three experimental conditions. (a) Own Notes (ON), (b) Own Notes+Random Study Checks (ON+RSC), and (c) Guided Notes Study Cards+Random Study Checks (GNSC+RSC) on each student's accuracy of notes, next-day quiz scores, and review quiz scores. Each session, the teacher presented 12 science vocabulary terms and definitions during a lecture and students took notes. The students were given 5 minutes to study their notes at the end of each session and were reminded to study their notes at home and in study hall period. In the ON condition students took notes on a sheet of paper with numbered lines from 1 to 12. Just before each next-day quiz in the ON+RSC condition students used write-on response cards to answer two teacher-posed questions over randomly selected vocabulary terms from the previous day's lecture. If the answer on a randomly selected student's response card was correct, that student earned a lottery ticket for inexpensive prizes and a quiz bonus point for herself and each classmate. In the GNSC+RSC condition students took notes on specially formatted guided notes that after the lecture they cut into a set of flashcards that could used for study. The students' mean notetaking accuracy was 75

  2. Urine BLCA-4 exerts potential role in detecting patients with bladder cancers: a pooled analysis of individual studies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiliang; Wu, Yudong; Guo, Zhanjun; Gong, Rui; Tang, Yang; Yang, Kuo; Li, Xiaodong; Guo, Xuemei; Niu, Yuanjie; Zhao, Yan

    2015-11-10

    Epidemiological studies have explored the diagnostic effect of urine BLCA-4 in bladder cancer. However, the results remain controversial. Therefore, we conducted this pooled analyses to determine the overall accuracy of urine BLCA-4 in bladder cancer. A comprehensive electronic and hand search was conducted for related literatures though several databases. QUADAS-2 was used to assess the quality of each included studies. Diagnostic parameters were calculated using Meta-Disc (version 1.4) and Stata (version 12.0) software. Nine published articles with 1,119 subjects were included. The summary estimates were: sensitivity 0.93 (95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.90-0.95), specificity 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95-0.98), positive likelihood ratio 48.16 (95% CI, 11.77-197.01), negative likelihood ratio 0.08 (95% CI, 0.06-0.11), diagnostic odds ratio 534.03 (95% CI, 150.15-1899.31), and the AUC was 0.9607. In conclusion, urine BLCA-4 is a promising marker in diagnosing bladder cancer. PMID:26462026

  3. The Accuracy of Recidivism Risk Assessments for Sexual Offenders: A Meta-Analysis of 118 Prediction Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, R. Karl; Morton-Bourgon, Kelly E.

    2009-01-01

    This review compared the accuracy of various approaches to the prediction of recidivism among sexual offenders. On the basis of a meta-analysis of 536 findings drawn from 118 distinct samples (45,398 sexual offenders, 16 countries), empirically derived actuarial measures were more accurate than unstructured professional judgment for all outcomes…

  4. The effects of relatedness and GxE interaction on prediction accuracies in genomic selection: a study in cassava

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior to implementation of genomic selection, an evaluation of the potential accuracy of prediction can be obtained by cross validation. In this procedure, a population with both phenotypes and genotypes is split into training and validation sets. The prediction model is fitted using the training se...

  5. Real-Word and Nonword Repetition in Italian-Speaking Children with Specific Language Impairment: A Study of Diagnostic Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispaldro, Marco; Leonard, Laurence B.; Deevy, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Using 2 different scoring methods, the authors examined the diagnostic accuracy of both real-word and nonword repetition in identifying Italian-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: A total of 34 children ages 3;11-5;8 (years;months) participated--17 children with SLI and 17 typically developing…

  6. Refining Ovarian Cancer Test accuracy Scores (ROCkeTS): protocol for a prospective longitudinal test accuracy study to validate new risk scores in women with symptoms of suspected ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Sudha; Rick, Caroline; Dowling, Francis; Au, Pui; Rai, Nirmala; Champaneria, Rita; Stobart, Hilary; Neal, Richard; Davenport, Clare; Mallett, Susan; Sutton, Andrew; Kehoe, Sean; Timmerman, Dirk; Bourne, Tom; Van Calster, Ben; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Deeks, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ovarian cancer (OC) is associated with non-specific symptoms such as bloating, making accurate diagnosis challenging: only 1 in 3 women with OC presents through primary care referral. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines recommends sequential testing with CA125 and routine ultrasound in primary care. However, these diagnostic tests have limited sensitivity or specificity. Improving accurate triage in women with vague symptoms is likely to improve mortality by streamlining referral and care pathways. The Refining Ovarian Cancer Test Accuracy Scores (ROCkeTS; HTA 13/13/01) project will derive and validate new tests/risk prediction models that estimate the probability of having OC in women with symptoms. This protocol refers to the prospective study only (phase III). Methods and analysis ROCkeTS comprises four parallel phases. The full ROCkeTS protocol can be found at http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/ROCKETS. Phase III is a prospective test accuracy study. The study will recruit 2450 patients from 15 UK sites. Recruited patients complete symptom and anxiety questionnaires, donate a serum sample and undergo ultrasound scored as per International Ovarian Tumour Analysis (IOTA) criteria. Recruitment is at rapid access clinics, emergency departments and elective clinics. Models to be evaluated include those based on ultrasound derived by the IOTA group and novel models derived from analysis of existing data sets. Estimates of sensitivity, specificity, c-statistic (area under receiver operating curve), positive predictive value and negative predictive value of diagnostic tests are evaluated and a calibration plot for models will be presented. ROCkeTS has received ethical approval from the NHS West Midlands REC (14/WM/1241) and is registered on the controlled trials website (ISRCTN17160843) and the National Institute of Health Research Cancer and Reproductive Health portfolios. PMID:27507231

  7. Value of systematic detection of physical child abuse at emergency rooms: a cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Judith S; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Moons, Karel G M; Russel, Ingrid M B; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; van de Putte, Elise M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of our diagnostic accuracy study Child Abuse Inventory at Emergency Rooms (CHAIN-ER) was to establish whether a widely used checklist accurately detects or excludes physical abuse among children presenting to ERs with physical injury. Design A large multicentre study with a 6-month follow-up. Setting 4 ERs in The Netherlands. Participants 4290 children aged 0–7 years attending the ER because of physical injury. All children were systematically tested with an easy-to-use child abuse checklist (index test). A national expert panel (reference standard) retrospectively assessed all children with positive screens and a 15% random sample of the children with negative screens for physical abuse, using additional information, namely, an injury history taken by a paediatrician, information provided by the general practitioner, youth doctor and social services by structured questionnaires, and 6-month follow-up information. Main outcome measure Physical child abuse. Secondary outcome measure Injury due to neglect and need for help. Results 4253/4290 (99%) parents agreed to follow-up. At a prevalence of 0.07% (3/4253) for inflicted injury by expert panel decision, the positive predictive value of the checklist was 0.03 (95% CI 0.006 to 0.085), and the negative predictive value 1.0 (0.994 to 1.0). There was 100% (93 to 100) agreement about inflicted injury in children, with positive screens between the expert panel and child abuse experts. Conclusions Rare cases of inflicted injury among preschool children presenting at ERs for injury are very likely captured by easy-to-use checklists, but at very high false-positive rates. Subsequent assessment by child abuse experts can be safely restricted to children with positive screens at very low risk of missing cases of inflicted injury. Because of the high false positive rate, we do advise careful prior consideration of cost-effectiveness and clinical and societal implications before de novo implementation

  8. In vitro study of accuracy of cervical pedicle screw insertion using an electronic conductivity device (ATPS part III)

    PubMed Central

    Hitzl, Wolfgang; Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Zenner, Juliane; Resch, Herbert; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Meier, Oliver; Schmidt, Rene; Mayer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of the highly unstable, anteriorly decompressed cervical spine poses biomechanical challenges to current stabilization strategies, including circumferential instrumented fusion, to prevent failure. To avoid secondary posterior surgery, particularly in the elderly population, while increasing primary construct rigidity of anterior-only reconstructions, the authors introduced the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation and plating. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility, its superior biomechanical pull-out characteristics compared with vertebral body screws and the accuracy of inserting ATPS using a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique. Although accuracy was high, showing non-critical breaches in the axial and sagittal plane in 78 and 96%, further research was indicated refining technique and increasing accuracy. In light of first clinical case series, the authors analyzed the impact of using an electronic conductivity device (ECD, PediGuard) on the accuracy of ATPS insertion. As there exist only experiences in thoracolumbar surgery the versatility of the ECD was also assessed for posterior cervical pedicle screw fixation (pCPS). 30 ATPS and 30 pCPS were inserted alternately into the C3–T1 vertebra of five fresh-frozen specimen. Fluoroscopic assistance was only used for the entry point selection, pedicle tract preparation was done using the ECD. Preoperative CT scans were assessed for sclerosis at the pedicle entrance or core, and vertebrae with dense pedicles were excluded. Pre- and postoperative reconstructed CT scans were analyzed for pedicle screw positions according to a previously established grading system. Statistical analysis revealed an astonishingly high accuracy for the ATPS group with no critical screw position (0%) in axial or sagittal plane. In the pCPS group, 88.9% of screws inserted showed non-critical screw position, while 11.1% showed critical pedicle perforations. The usage of an ECD for posterior and

  9. Phase segmentation of X-ray computer tomography rock images using machine learning techniques: an accuracy and performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Swarup; Rühaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Kabdenov, Alen; Freise, Marcus; Wille, Thorsten; Sass, Ingo

    2016-07-01

    Performance and accuracy of machine learning techniques to segment rock grains, matrix and pore voxels from a 3-D volume of X-ray tomographic (XCT) grayscale rock images was evaluated. The segmentation and classification capability of unsupervised (k-means, fuzzy c-means, self-organized maps), supervised (artificial neural networks, least-squares support vector machines) and ensemble classifiers (bragging and boosting) were tested using XCT images of andesite volcanic rock, Berea sandstone, Rotliegend sandstone and a synthetic sample. The averaged porosity obtained for andesite (15.8 ± 2.5 %), Berea sandstone (16.3 ± 2.6 %), Rotliegend sandstone (13.4 ± 7.4 %) and the synthetic sample (48.3 ± 13.3 %) is in very good agreement with the respective laboratory measurement data and varies by a factor of 0.2. The k-means algorithm is the fastest of all machine learning algorithms, whereas a least-squares support vector machine is the most computationally expensive. Metrics entropy, purity, mean square root error, receiver operational characteristic curve and 10 K-fold cross-validation were used to determine the accuracy of unsupervised, supervised and ensemble classifier techniques. In general, the accuracy was found to be largely affected by the feature vector selection scheme. As it is always a trade-off between performance and accuracy, it is difficult to isolate one particular machine learning algorithm which is best suited for the complex phase segmentation problem. Therefore, our investigation provides parameters that can help in selecting the appropriate machine learning techniques for phase segmentation.

  10. Immediate effects of lower cervical spine manipulation on handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy of asymptomatic basketball players: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Kelley M.; Ward, John; Coats, Jesse; Nobert, Jeannique; Amonette, William; Dyess, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to collect preliminary information for a study to determine the immediate effects of a single unilateral chiropractic manipulation to the lower cervical spine on handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy in asymptomatic male recreational basketball players. Methods For this study, 24 asymptomatic male recreational right-handed basketball players (age = 26.3 ± 9.2 years, height = 1.81 ± 0.07 m, body mass = 82.6 ± 10.4 kg [mean ± SD]) underwent baseline dominant handgrip isometric strength and free-throw accuracy testing in an indoor basketball court. They were then equally randomized to receive either (1) diversified left lower cervical spine chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) at C5/C6 or (2) placebo CMT at C5/C6 using an Activator adjusting instrument on zero force setting. Participants then underwent posttesting of isometric handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy. A paired-samples t test was used to make within-group pre to post comparisons and between-group pre to post comparisons. Results No statistically significant difference was shown between either of the 2 basketball performance variables measured in either group. Isometric handgrip strength marginally improved by 0.7 kg (mean) in the CMT group (P = .710). Free-throw accuracy increased by 13.2% in the CMT group (P = .058). The placebo CMT group performed the same or more poorly during their second test session. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study showed that a single lower cervical spine manipulation did not significantly impact basketball performance for this group of healthy asymptomatic participants. A slight increase in free-throw percentage was seen, which deserves further investigation. This pilot study demonstrates that a larger study to evaluate if CMT affects handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy is feasible. PMID:24396315

  11. Prostate intrafraction motion evaluation using kV fluoroscopy during treatment delivery: A feasibility and accuracy study

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Justus; Wu, Qiuwen

    2008-01-01

    Margin reduction for prostate radiotherapy is limited by uncertainty in prostate localization during treatment. We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of measuring prostate intrafraction motion using kV fluoroscopy performed simultaneously with radiotherapy. Three gold coils used for target localization were implanted into the patient’s prostate gland before undergoing hypofractionated online image-guided step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. At each fraction, the patient was aligned using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), after which the IMRT treatment delivery and fluoroscopy were performed simultaneously. In addition, a post-treatment CBCT was acquired with the patient still on the table. To measure the intrafraction motion, we developed an algorithm to register the fluoroscopy images to a reference image derived from the post-treatment CBCT, and we estimated coil motion in three-dimensional (3D) space by combining information from registrations at different gantry angles. We also detected the MV beam turning on and off using MV scatter incident in the same fluoroscopy images, and used this information to synchronize our intrafraction evaluation with the treatment delivery. In addition, we assessed the following: the method to synchronize with treatment delivery, the dose from kV imaging, the accuracy of the localization, and the error propagated into the 3D localization from motion between fluoroscopy acquisitions. With 0.16 mAs∕frame and a bowtie filter implemented, the coils could be localized with the gantry at both 0° and 270° with the MV beam off, and at 270° with the MV beam on when multiple fluoroscopy frames were averaged. The localization in two-dimensions for phantom and patient measurements was performed with submillimeter accuracy. After backprojection into 3D the patient localization error was (−0.04±0.30) mm, (0.09±0.36) mm, and (0.03±0.68) mm in the right

  12. Prostate intrafraction motion evaluation using kV fluoroscopy during treatment delivery: A feasibility and accuracy study

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Justus; Wu Qiuwen

    2008-05-15

    Margin reduction for prostate radiotherapy is limited by uncertainty in prostate localization during treatment. We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of measuring prostate intrafraction motion using kV fluoroscopy performed simultaneously with radiotherapy. Three gold coils used for target localization were implanted into the patient's prostate gland before undergoing hypofractionated online image-guided step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. At each fraction, the patient was aligned using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), after which the IMRT treatment delivery and fluoroscopy were performed simultaneously. In addition, a post-treatment CBCT was acquired with the patient still on the table. To measure the intrafraction motion, we developed an algorithm to register the fluoroscopy images to a reference image derived from the post-treatment CBCT, and we estimated coil motion in three-dimensional (3D) space by combining information from registrations at different gantry angles. We also detected the MV beam turning on and off using MV scatter incident in the same fluoroscopy images, and used this information to synchronize our intrafraction evaluation with the treatment delivery. In addition, we assessed the following: the method to synchronize with treatment delivery, the dose from kV imaging, the accuracy of the localization, and the error propagated into the 3D localization from motion between fluoroscopy acquisitions. With 0.16 mAs/frame and a bowtie filter implemented, the coils could be localized with the gantry at both 0 deg. and 270 deg. with the MV beam off, and at 270 deg. with the MV beam on when multiple fluoroscopy frames were averaged. The localization in two-dimensions for phantom and patient measurements was performed with submillimeter accuracy. After backprojection into 3D the patient localization error was (-0.04{+-}0.30) mm, (0.09{+-}0.36) mm, and (0.03{+-}0.68) mm in the

  13. Accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral potentially malignant disorders: a comparative study with aero-digestive lesions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaobo; Xu, Hao; He, Mingjing; Han, Qi; Wang, Hui; Sun, Chongkui; Li, Jing; Jiang, Lu; Zhou, Yu; Dan, Hongxia; Feng, Xiaodong; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Presently, various studies had investigated the accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) with diverse conclusions. This study aimed to assess its accuracy for OSCC and OPMD and to investigate its applicability in general dental practice. After a comprehensive literature search, a meta-analysis was conducted to calculate the pooled diagnostic indexes of autofluorescence for premalignant lesions (PML) and malignant lesions (ML) of the oral cavity, lung, esophagus, stomach and colorectum and to compute indexes regarding the detection of OSCC aided by algorithms. Besides, a u test was performed. Twenty-four studies detecting OSCC and OPMD in 2761 lesions were included. This demonstrated that the overall accuracy of autofluorescence for OSCC and OPMD was superior to PML and ML of the lung, esophagus and stomach, slightly inferior to the colorectum. Additionally, the sensitivity and specificity for OSCC and OPMD were 0.89 and 0.8, respectively. Furthermore, the specificity could be remarkably improved by additional algorithms. With relatively high accuracy, autofluorescence could be potentially applied as an adjunct for early diagnosis of OSCC and OPMD. Moreover, approaches such as algorithms could enhance its specificity to ensure its efficacy in primary care. PMID:27416981

  14. Accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral potentially malignant disorders: a comparative study with aero-digestive lesions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaobo; Xu, Hao; He, Mingjing; Han, Qi; Wang, Hui; Sun, Chongkui; Li, Jing; Jiang, Lu; Zhou, Yu; Dan, Hongxia; Feng, Xiaodong; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Presently, various studies had investigated the accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) with diverse conclusions. This study aimed to assess its accuracy for OSCC and OPMD and to investigate its applicability in general dental practice. After a comprehensive literature search, a meta-analysis was conducted to calculate the pooled diagnostic indexes of autofluorescence for premalignant lesions (PML) and malignant lesions (ML) of the oral cavity, lung, esophagus, stomach and colorectum and to compute indexes regarding the detection of OSCC aided by algorithms. Besides, a u test was performed. Twenty-four studies detecting OSCC and OPMD in 2761 lesions were included. This demonstrated that the overall accuracy of autofluorescence for OSCC and OPMD was superior to PML and ML of the lung, esophagus and stomach, slightly inferior to the colorectum. Additionally, the sensitivity and specificity for OSCC and OPMD were 0.89 and 0.8, respectively. Furthermore, the specificity could be remarkably improved by additional algorithms. With relatively high accuracy, autofluorescence could be potentially applied as an adjunct for early diagnosis of OSCC and OPMD. Moreover, approaches such as algorithms could enhance its specificity to ensure its efficacy in primary care. PMID:27416981

  15. Study on accuracy and interobserver reliability of the assessment of odontoid fracture union using plain radiographs or CT scans

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Klaus; Zenner, Juliane; Reynolds, Jeremy; Dvorak, Marcel; Acosta, Frank; Forstner, Rosemarie; Mayer, Michael; Tauber, Mark; Auffarth, Alexander; Kathrein, Anton; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    In odontoid fracture research, outcome can be evaluated based on validated questionnaires, based on functional outcome in terms of atlantoaxial and total neck rotation, and based on the treatment-related union rate. Data on clinical and functional outcome are still sparse. In contrast, there is abundant information on union rates, although, frequently the rates differ widely. Odontoid union is the most frequently assessed outcome parameter and therefore it is imperative to investigate the interobserver reliability of fusion assessment using radiographs compared to CT scans. Our objective was to identify the diagnostic accuracy of plain radiographs in detecting union and non-union after odontoid fractures and compare this to CT scans as the standard of reference. Complete sets of biplanar plain radiographs and CT scans of 21 patients treated for odontoid fractures were subjected to interobserver assessment of fusion. Image sets were presented to 18 international observers with a mean experience in fusion assessment of 10.7 years. Patients selected had complete radiographic follow-up at a mean of 63.3 ± 53 months. Mean age of the patients at follow-up was 68.2 years. We calculated interobserver agreement of the diagnostic assessment using radiographs compared to using CT scans, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the radiographic assessment. Agreement on the fusion status using radiographs compared to CT scans ranged between 62 and 90% depending on the observer. Concerning the assessment of non-union and fusion, the mean specificity was 62% and mean sensitivity was 77%. Statistical analysis revealed an agreement of 80–100% in 48% of cases only, between the biplanar radiographs and the reconstructed CT scans. In 50% of patients assessed there was an agreement of less than 80%. The mean sensitivity and specificity values indicate that radiographs are not a reliable measure to indicate odontoid fracture union or non-union. Regarding experience in years

  16. Accuracy of surface registration compared to conventional volumetric registration in patient positioning for head-and-neck radiotherapy: A simulation study using patient data

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngjun; Li, Ruijiang; Na, Yong Hum; Xing, Lei; Lee, Rena

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: 3D optical surface imaging has been applied to patient positioning in radiation therapy (RT). The optical patient positioning system is advantageous over conventional method using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in that it is radiation free, frameless, and is capable of real-time monitoring. While the conventional radiographic method uses volumetric registration, the optical system uses surface matching for patient alignment. The relative accuracy of these two methods has not yet been sufficiently investigated. This study aims to investigate the theoretical accuracy of the surface registration based on a simulation study using patient data. Methods: This study compares the relative accuracy of surface and volumetric registration in head-and-neck RT. The authors examined 26 patient data sets, each consisting of planning CT data acquired before treatment and patient setup CBCT data acquired at the time of treatment. As input data of surface registration, patient’s skin surfaces were created by contouring patient skin from planning CT and treatment CBCT. Surface registration was performed using the iterative closest points algorithm by point–plane closest, which minimizes the normal distance between source points and target surfaces. Six degrees of freedom (three translations and three rotations) were used in both surface and volumetric registrations and the results were compared. The accuracy of each method was estimated by digital phantom tests. Results: Based on the results of 26 patients, the authors found that the average and maximum root-mean-square translation deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations were 2.7 and 5.2 mm, respectively. The residual error of the surface registration was calculated to have an average of 0.9 mm and a maximum of 1.7 mm. Conclusions: Surface registration may lead to results different from those of the conventional volumetric registration. Only limited accuracy can be achieved for patient

  17. Recommended reporting standards for test accuracy studies of infectious diseases of finfish, amphibians, molluscs and crustaceans: the STRADAS-aquatic checklist.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Ian A; Whittington, Richard J; Caraguel, Charles G B; Hick, Paul; Moody, Nicholas J G; Corbeil, Serge; Garver, Kyle A; Warg, Janet V; Arzul, Isabelle; Purcell, Maureen K; Crane, Mark St J; Waltzek, Thomas B; Olesen, Niels J; Gallardo Lagno, Alicia

    2016-02-25

    Complete and transparent reporting of key elements of diagnostic accuracy studies for infectious diseases in cultured and wild aquatic animals benefits end-users of these tests, enabling the rational design of surveillance programs, the assessment of test results from clinical cases and comparisons of diagnostic test performance. Based on deficiencies in the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) guidelines identified in a prior finfish study (Gardner et al. 2014), we adapted the Standards for Reporting of Animal Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-paratuberculosis (STRADAS-paraTB) checklist of 25 reporting items to increase their relevance to finfish, amphibians, molluscs, and crustaceans and provided examples and explanations for each item. The checklist, known as STRADAS-aquatic, was developed and refined by an expert group of 14 transdisciplinary scientists with experience in test evaluation studies using field and experimental samples, in operation of reference laboratories for aquatic animal pathogens, and in development of international aquatic animal health policy. The main changes to the STRADAS-paraTB checklist were to nomenclature related to the species, the addition of guidelines for experimental challenge studies, and the designation of some items as relevant only to experimental studies and ante-mortem tests. We believe that adoption of these guidelines will improve reporting of primary studies of test accuracy for aquatic animal diseases and facilitate assessment of their fitness-for-purpose. Given the importance of diagnostic tests to underpin the Sanitary and Phytosanitary agreement of the World Trade Organization, the principles outlined in this paper should be applied to other World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)-relevant species. PMID:26912041

  18. Recommended reporting standards for test accuracy studies of infectious diseases of finfish, amphibians, molluscs and crustaceans: the STRADAS-aquatic checklist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Ian A; Whittington, Richard J; Caraguel, Charles G B; Hick, Paul; Moody, Nicholas J G; Corbeil, Serge; Garver, Kyle A.; Warg, Janet V; Arzul, Isabelle; Purcell, Maureen; St. J. Crane, Mark; Waltzek, Thomas B.; Olesen, Niels J; Lagno, Alicia Gallardo

    2016-01-01

    Complete and transparent reporting of key elements of diagnostic accuracy studies for infectious diseases in cultured and wild aquatic animals benefits end-users of these tests, enabling the rational design of surveillance programs, the assessment of test results from clinical cases and comparisons of diagnostic test performance. Based on deficiencies in the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) guidelines identified in a prior finfish study (Gardner et al. 2014), we adapted the Standards for Reporting of Animal Diagnostic Accuracy Studies—paratuberculosis (STRADAS-paraTB) checklist of 25 reporting items to increase their relevance to finfish, amphibians, molluscs, and crustaceans and provided examples and explanations for each item. The checklist, known as STRADAS-aquatic, was developed and refined by an expert group of 14 transdisciplinary scientists with experience in test evaluation studies using field and experimental samples, in operation of reference laboratories for aquatic animal pathogens, and in development of international aquatic animal health policy. The main changes to the STRADAS-paraTB checklist were to nomenclature related to the species, the addition of guidelines for experimental challenge studies, and the designation of some items as relevant only to experimental studies and ante-mortem tests. We believe that adoption of these guidelines will improve reporting of primary studies of test accuracy for aquatic animal diseases and facilitate assessment of their fitness-for-purpose. Given the importance of diagnostic tests to underpin the Sanitary and Phytosanitary agreement of the World Trade Organization, the principles outlined in this paper should be applied to other World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)-relevant species.

  19. Added value of cost-utility analysis in simple diagnostic studies of accuracy: 18F-fluoromethylcholine PET/CT in prostate cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Oke; Poulsen, Mads H; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic studies of accuracy targeting sensitivity and specificity are commonly done in a paired design in which all modalities are applied in each patient, whereas cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses are usually assessed either directly alongside to or indirectly by means of stochastic modeling based on larger randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However the conduct of RCTs is hampered in an environment such as ours, in which technology is rapidly evolving. As such, there is a relatively limited number of RCTs. Therefore, we investigated as to which extent paired diagnostic studies of accuracy can be also used to shed light on economic implications when considering a new diagnostic test. We propose a simple decision tree model-based cost-utility analysis of a diagnostic test when compared to the current standard procedure and exemplify this approach with published data from lymph node staging of prostate cancer. Average procedure costs were taken from the Danish Diagnosis Related Groups Tariff in 2013 and life expectancy was estimated for an ideal 60 year old patient based on prostate cancer stage and prostatectomy or radiation and chemotherapy. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were deduced from the literature, and an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was used to compare lymph node dissection with respective histopathological examination (reference standard) and 18F-fluoromethylcholine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT). Lower bounds of sensitivity and specificity of FCH-PET/CT were established at which the replacement of the reference standard by FCH-PET/CT comes with a trade-off between worse effectiveness and lower costs. Compared to the reference standard in a diagnostic accuracy study, any imperfections in accuracy of a diagnostic test imply that replacing the reference standard generates a loss in effectiveness and utility. We conclude that diagnostic studies of accuracy can be put to a more extensive use

  20. [Measurement accuracy of oscillatory and whole body plethysmography determination of airway resistance. Study of a mechanical model].

    PubMed

    Walliser, D; Lenders, H; Gleisberg, F; Schumann, K; Neuerburg, W

    1991-01-01

    The degree of accuracy of the plethysmographic and oscillatory method in determining respiratory resistance has been examined on a mechanical lung model. At this model different levels of the resistance could be reproducibly adjusted and exactly determined with sensitive measuring instruments. The plethysmographic method allows a precise estimation of the resistance. It was found that the absolute variation of the plethysmographically measured values is not greater than 5%. The Ros pointer scale of the Siregnost FD 5 yields systematically incorrect curve diagrams. In the lower range of the resistance the measured values are to high while the measured results of the resistance become progressively to low with an increasing resistance. The reason is the Ros pointer scale which does not show the real component of the impedance at a phase angle of 0 degree. The values of the real component of the respiratory impedance (Rreal) which yields the Siemens standard set show a great coincidence with the lung model resistance (R(aw)). The coincidence could be even improved by use of electronic data processing. With a computer program developed by us it is possible for the first time to indicate and registrate consecutively individual and average values of the real component (Rrealcomp) and the reactance of the respiratory impedance as well as the phase angle between the alternating pressure delta p and the oscillating flow (V). Thereby the accuracy of measurement is improved and the long winded analysis with the "phase diagram" is not necessary anymore. Further experimental and clinical investigation have to show whether the oscillatory method in the way described above will offer new possibilities for the assessment of the pulmonary function. The phase angle and its course during the respiration cycle is in this connection of special importance as a possible new parameter. PMID:1808869

  1. Expected accuracy of tilt measurements on a novel hexapod-based digital zenith camera system: a Monte-Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Christian; Papp, Gábor; Pál, András; Benedek, Judit; Szũcs, Eszter

    2014-08-01

    Digital zenith camera systems (DZCS) are dedicated astronomical-geodetic measurement systems for the observation of the direction of the plumb line. A DZCS key component is a pair of tilt meters for the determination of the instrumental tilt with respect to the plumb line. Highest accuracy (i.e., 0.1 arc-seconds or better) is achieved in practice through observation with precision tilt meters in opposite faces (180° instrumental rotation), and application of rigorous tilt reduction models. A novel concept proposes the development of a hexapod (Stewart platform)-based DZCS. However, hexapod-based total rotations are limited to about 30°-60° in azimuth (equivalent to ±15° to ±30° yaw rotation), which raises the question of the impact of the rotation angle between the two faces on the accuracy of the tilt measurement. The goal of the present study is the investigation of the expected accuracy of tilt measurements to be carried out on future hexapod-based DZCS, with special focus placed on the role of the limited rotation angle. A Monte-Carlo simulation study is carried out in order to derive accuracy estimates for the tilt determination as a function of several input parameters, and the results are validated against analytical error propagation. As the main result of the study, limitation of the instrumental rotation to 60° (30°) deteriorates the tilt accuracy by a factor of about 2 (4) compared to a 180° rotation between the faces. Nonetheless, a tilt accuracy at the 0.1 arc-second level is expected when the rotation is at least 45°, and 0.05 arc-second (about 0.25 microradian) accurate tilt meters are deployed. As such, a hexapod-based DZCS can be expected to allow sufficiently accurate determination of the instrumental tilt. This provides supporting evidence for the feasibility of such a novel instrumentation. The outcomes of our study are not only relevant to the field of DZCS, but also to all other types of instruments where the instrumental tilt

  2. Relative accuracy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  3. Relative Accuracy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  4. Predictive Accuracy of Amyloid Imaging for Progression From Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer Disease With Different Lengths of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Jing; Zheng, Dong-Ming; Guo, Yang; Feng, Juan; Ren, Wei-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the past decade, amyloid deposition has been shown to begin many years before the clinical symptoms of dementia in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer disease (AD). Longitudinal studies with different follow-up durations have suggested that 11C-Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography (11C-PIB-PET) may play a role in stratifying patients with MCI into risk levels for developing AD. However, the predictive accuracy of amyloid imaging for the progression from MCI to AD with different follow-up durations has not yet been systematically evaluated. A formal systematic evaluation of the sensitivity, specificity, and other properties of 11C-PIB-PET was performed. This study aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze published data on the diagnostic performance of 11C-PIB-PET for predicting conversion to AD in patients with MCI and to determine whether long-term follow-up has a positive effect on predictive accuracy. Relevant studies were systematically identified through electronic searches, which were performed in MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), BIOSIS Previews (ISI Web of Knowledge), Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Knowledge), PsycINFO (Ovid SP), and LILACS (Bireme). The methodological quality of each study was assessed by QUADAS-2. Sensitivities and specificities of 11C-PIB-PET in individual studies were calculated, and the studies underwent meta-analysis with a random-effects model. A summary receiver-operating characteristic curve (SROC) was constructed with the Moses-Shapiro-Littenberg method. Pooled estimates of sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (LR+), negative likelihood ratio (LR−), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and the SROC curve of each subgroup were determined. Heterogeneity was tested, and potential sources for heterogeneity were explored by assessing whether certain covariates significantly influenced the relative DOR. Eleven eligible studies consisting of a total of 352 patients with MCI at

  5. SU-E-J-147: Monte Carlo Study of the Precision and Accuracy of Proton CT Reconstructed Relative Stopping Power Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Dedes, G; Asano, Y; Parodi, K; Arbor, N; Dauvergne, D; Testa, E; Letang, J; Rit, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of the intrinsic performances of proton computed tomography (pCT) as a modality for treatment planning in proton therapy. The performance of an ideal pCT scanner is studied as a function of various parameters. Methods: Using GATE/Geant4, we simulated an ideal pCT scanner and scans of several cylindrical phantoms with various tissue equivalent inserts of different sizes. Insert materials were selected in order to be of clinical relevance. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm taking into account the scattering of protons into the phantom. To quantify the performance of the ideal pCT scanner, we study the precision and the accuracy with respect to the theoretical relative stopping power ratios (RSP) values for different beam energies, imaging doses, insert sizes and detector positions. The planning range uncertainty resulting from the reconstructed RSP is also assessed by comparison with the range of the protons in the analytically simulated phantoms. Results: The results indicate that pCT can intrinsically achieve RSP resolution below 1%, for most examined tissues at beam energies below 300 MeV and for imaging doses around 1 mGy. RSP maps accuracy of less than 0.5 % is observed for most tissue types within the studied dose range (0.2–1.5 mGy). Finally, the uncertainty in the proton range due to the accuracy of the reconstructed RSP map is well below 1%. Conclusion: This work explores the intrinsic performance of pCT as an imaging modality for proton treatment planning. The obtained results show that under ideal conditions, 3D RSP maps can be reconstructed with an accuracy better than 1%. Hence, pCT is a promising candidate for reducing the range uncertainties introduced by the use of X-ray CT alongside with a semiempirical calibration to RSP.Supported by the DFG Cluster of Excellence Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  6. Studying the Effect of Adaptive Momentum in Improving the Accuracy of Gradient Descent Back Propagation Algorithm on Classification Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Muhammad Zubair; Nawi, Nazri Mohd.

    Despite being widely used in the practical problems around the world, Gradient Descent Back-propagation algorithm comes with problems like slow convergence and convergence to local minima. Previous researchers have suggested certain modifications to improve the convergence in gradient Descent Back-propagation algorithm such as careful selection of input weights and biases, learning rate, momentum, network topology, activation function and value for 'gain' in the activation function. This research proposed an algorithm for improving the working performance of back-propagation algorithm which is 'Gradient Descent with Adaptive Momentum (GDAM)' by keeping the gain value fixed during all network trials. The performance of GDAM is compared with 'Gradient Descent with fixed Momentum (GDM)' and 'Gradient Descent Method with Adaptive Gain (GDM-AG)'. The learning rate is fixed to 0.4 and maximum epochs are set to 3000 while sigmoid activation function is used for the experimentation. The results show that GDAM is a better approach than previous methods with an accuracy ratio of 1.0 for classification problems like Wine Quality, Mushroom and Thyroid disease.

  7. Hermite finite elements for high accuracy electromagnetic field calculations: A case study of homogeneous and inhomogeneous waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, C. R.; Li, Zehao; Ahheng, C. I.; Albrecht, J. D.; Ram-Mohan, L. R.

    2016-04-01

    Maxwell's vector field equations and their numerical solution represent significant challenges for physical domains with complex geometries. There are several limitations in the presently prevalent approaches to the calculation of field distributions in physical domains, in particular, with the vector finite elements. In order to quantify and resolve issues, we consider the modeling of the field equations for the prototypical examples of waveguides. We employ the finite element method with a new set of Hermite interpolation polynomials derived recently by us using group theoretic considerations. We show that (i) the approach presented here yields better accuracy by several orders of magnitude, with a smoother representation of fields than the vector finite elements for waveguide calculations. (ii) This method does not generate any spurious solutions that plague Lagrange finite elements, even though the C1 -continuous Hermite polynomials are also scalar in nature. (iii) We present solutions for propagating modes in inhomogeneous waveguides satisfying dispersion relations that can be derived directly, and investigate their behavior as the ratio of dielectric constants is varied both theoretically and numerically. Additional comparisons and advantages of the proposed method are detailed in this article. The Hermite interpolation polynomials are shown to provide a robust, accurate, and efficient means of solving Maxwell's equations in a variety of media, potentially offering a computationally inexpensive means of designing devices for optoelectronics and plasmonics of increasing complexity.

  8. Real-Word and Nonword Repetition in Italian-Speaking Children with Specific Language Impairment: A Study of Diagnostic Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Dispaldro, Marco; Leonard, Laurence B.; Deevy, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Using two different scoring methods, we examined the diagnostic accuracy of both real-word and nonword repetition in identifying Italian-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: A total of 34 children aged 3;11 to 5;8 participated – 17 children with SLI and 17 typically developing children matched for age (TD-A children). Children completed real-word and nonword repetition tasks. The capacity of real-word and nonword repetition tasks to discriminate children with SLI from TD-A was examined through binary logistic regression and response operating characteristics curves. Results: Both real-word and nonword repetition showed good (or excellent) sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing children with SLI from their typically developing peers. Conclusions: Nonword repetition appears to be a useful diagnostic indicator for Italian, as in other languages. In addition, real-word repetition also holds promise. The contributions of each type of measure are discussed. PMID:22761319

  9. Cognitive Abilities Underlying Reading Accuracy, Fluency and Spelling Acquisition in Korean Hangul Learners from Grades 1 to 4: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Rin; Uno, Akira

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the cognitive abilities that predict reading and spelling performance in Korean children in Grades 1 to 4, depending on expertise and reading experience. As a result, visual cognition, phonological awareness, naming speed and receptive vocabulary significantly predicted reading accuracy in children in Grades 1 and 2, whereas visual cognition, phonological awareness and rapid naming speed did not predict reading accuracy in children in higher grades. For reading, fluency, phonological awareness, rapid naming speed and receptive vocabulary were crucial abilities in children in Grades 1 to 3, whereas phonological awareness was not a significant predictor in children in Grade 4. In spelling, reading ability and receptive vocabulary were the most important abilities for accurate Hangul spelling. The results suggested that the degree of cognitive abilities required for reading and spelling changed depending on expertise and reading experience. PMID:25997096

  10. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Studies Evaluating Diagnostic Test Accuracy: A Practical Review for Clinical Researchers-Part I. General Guidance and Tips

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Juneyoung; Choi, Sang Hyun; Huh, Jimi

    2015-01-01

    In the field of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA), the use of systematic review and meta-analyses is steadily increasing. By means of objective evaluation of all available primary studies, these two processes generate an evidence-based systematic summary regarding a specific research topic. The methodology for systematic review and meta-analysis in DTA studies differs from that in therapeutic/interventional studies, and its content is still evolving. Here we review the overall process from a practical standpoint, which may serve as a reference for those who implement these methods. PMID:26576106

  11. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Studies Evaluating Diagnostic Test Accuracy: A Practical Review for Clinical Researchers-Part I. General Guidance and Tips.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Juneyoung; Choi, Sang Hyun; Huh, Jimi; Park, Seong Ho

    2015-01-01

    In the field of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA), the use of systematic review and meta-analyses is steadily increasing. By means of objective evaluation of all available primary studies, these two processes generate an evidence-based systematic summary regarding a specific research topic. The methodology for systematic review and meta-analysis in DTA studies differs from that in therapeutic/interventional studies, and its content is still evolving. Here we review the overall process from a practical standpoint, which may serve as a reference for those who implement these methods. PMID:26576106

  12. Accuracy of self-reported intake of signature foods in a school meal intervention study: comparison between control and intervention period.

    PubMed

    Biltoft-Jensen, Anja; Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Andersen, Rikke; Ygil, Karin Hess; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford; Ege, Majken; Christensen, Tue; Sørensen, Louise Bergmann; Stark, Ken D; Tetens, Inge; Thorsen, Anne-Vibeke

    2015-08-28

    Bias in self-reported dietary intake is important when evaluating the effect of dietary interventions, particularly for intervention foods. However, few have investigated this in children, and none have investigated the reporting accuracy of fish intake in children using biomarkers. In a Danish school meal study, 8- to 11-year-old children (n 834) were served the New Nordic Diet (NND) for lunch. The present study examined the accuracy of self-reported intake of signature foods (berries, cabbage, root vegetables, legumes, herbs, potatoes, wild plants, mushrooms, nuts and fish) characterising the NND. Children, assisted by parents, self-reported their diet in a Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children during the intervention and control (packed lunch) periods. The reported fish intake by children was compared with their ranking according to fasting whole-blood EPA and DHA concentration and weight percentage using the Spearman correlations and cross-classification. Direct observation of school lunch intake (n 193) was used to score the accuracy of food-reporting as matches, intrusions, omissions and faults. The reporting of all lunch foods had higher percentage of matches compared with the reporting of signature foods in both periods, and the accuracy was higher during the control period compared with the intervention period. Both Spearman's rank correlations and linear mixed models demonstrated positive associations between EPA+DHA and reported fish intake. The direct observations showed that both reported and real intake of signature foods did increase during the intervention period. In conclusion, the self-reported data represented a true increase in the intake of signature foods and can be used to examine dietary intervention effects. PMID:26189886

  13. Accuracy of bleeding scores for patients presenting with myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis of 9 studies and 13 759 patients

    PubMed Central

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Moretti, Claudio; Omedè, Pierluigi; Montefusco, Antonio; Bach, Richard G.; Alexander, Karen P.; Mehran, Roxana; Ariza-Solé, Albert; Zoccai, Giuseppe Biondi; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Due to its negative impact on prognosis, a clear assessment of bleeding risk for patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains crucial. Different risk scores have been proposed and compared, although with inconsistent results. Aim We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the accuracy of different bleeding risk scores for ACS patients. Material and methods All studies externally validating risk scores for bleeding for patients presenting with ACS were included in the present review. Accuracy of risk scores for external validation cohorts to predict major bleeding in patients with ACS was the primary end point. Sensitivity analysis was performed according to clinical presentation (ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)). Results Nine studies and 13 759 patients were included. CRUSADE, ACUITY, ACTION and GRACE were the scores externally validated. The rate of in-hospital major bleeding was 7.80% (5.5–9.2), 2.05% (1.5–3.0) being related to access and 2.70% (1.7–4.0) needing transfusions. When evaluating all ACS patients, ACTION, CRUSADE and ACUITY performed similarly (AUC 0.75: 0.72–0.79; 0.71: 0.64–0.80 and 0.71: 0.63–0.77 respectively) when compared to GRACE (0.66; 0.64–0.67, all confidence intervals 95%). When appraising only STEMI patients, all the scores performed similarly, while CRUSADE was the only one externally validated for NSTEMI. For ACTION and ACUITY, accuracy increased for radial access patients, while no differences were found for CRUSADE. Conclusions ACTION, CRUSADE and ACUITY perform similarly to predict risk of bleeding in ACS patients. The CRUSADE score is the only one externally validated for NSTEMI, while accuracy of the scores increased with radial access. PMID:26677357

  14. A validation study concerning the effects of interview content, retention interval, and grade on children’s recall accuracy for dietary intake and/or physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Suzanne D.; Hitchcock, David B.; Guinn, Caroline H.; Vaadi, Kate K.; Puryear, Megan P.; Royer, Julie A.; McIver, Kerry L.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.; Wilson, Dawn K.

    2014-01-01

    interactions mentioned. Content effects depended on other factors. Grade effects were mixed. Dietary accuracy was better with same-day than previous-day retention interval. Conclusions Results do not support integrating dietary intake and physical activity in children’s recalls, but do support using shorter rather than longer retention intervals to yield more accurate dietary recalls. Further validation studies need to clarify age effects and identify evidence-based practices to improve children’s accuracy for recalling dietary intake and/or physical activity. PMID:24767807

  15. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring shows high accuracy within 6 hours after sensor calibration: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Yi; Cai, Ye-Hua; Yin, Ning-Ning; Zhou, Jian-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Accurate and timely glucose monitoring is essential in intensive care units. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) has been advocated for many years to improve glycemic management in critically ill patients. In order to determine the effect of calibration time on the accuracy of CGMS, real-time subcutaneous CGMS was used in 18 critically ill patients. CGMS sensor was calibrated with blood glucose measurements by blood gas/glucose analyzer every 12 hours. Venous blood was sampled every 2 to 4 hours, and glucose concentration was measured by standard central laboratory device (CLD) and by blood gas/glucose analyzer. With CLD measurement as reference, relative absolute difference (mean±SD) in CGMS and blood gas/glucose analyzer were 14.4%±12.2% and 6.5%±6.2%, respectively. The percentage of matched points in Clarke error grid zone A was 74.8% in CGMS, and 98.4% in blood gas/glucose analyzer. The relative absolute difference of CGMS obtained within 6 hours after sensor calibration (8.8%±7.2%) was significantly less than that between 6 to 12 hours after calibration (20.1%±13.5%, p<0.0001). The percentage of matched points in Clarke error grid zone A was also significantly higher in data sets within 6 hours after calibration (92.4% versus 57.1%, p<0.0001). In conclusion, real-time subcutaneous CGMS is accurate in glucose monitoring in critically ill patients. CGMS sensor should be calibrated less than 6 hours, no matter what time interval recommended by manufacturer. PMID:23555886

  16. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Targeting the 47-Kilodalton Protein Membrane Gene of Treponema pallidum and PCR Targeting the DNA Polymerase I Gene: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Combescure, Christophe; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ninet, Béatrice; Perneger, Thomas V.

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) testing now is recommended as a valid tool for the diagnosis of primary or secondary syphilis. The objectives were to systematically review and determine the optimal specific target gene to be used for Tp-PCR. Comparisons of the performance of the two main targets are tpp47 and polA genes were done using meta-analysis. Three electronic bibliographic databases, representing abstract books from five conferences specialized in infectious diseases from January 1990 to March 2015, were searched. Search keywords included (“syphilis” OR “Treponema pallidum” OR “neurosyphilis”) AND (“PCR” OR “PCR” OR “molecular amplification”). We included diagnostic studies assessing the performance of Tp-PCR targeting tpp47 (tpp47-Tp-PCR) or the polA gene (polA-Tp-PCR) in ulcers from early syphilis. All studies were assessed against quality criteria using the QUADAS-2 tool. Of 37 studies identified, 62.2% were judged at low risk of bias or applicability. Most used the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) case definitions for primary or secondary (early) syphilis (89.2%; n = 33); 15 (40.5%) used darkfield microscopy (DFM). We did not find differences in sensitivity and specificity between the two Tp-PCR methods in the subgroup of studies using adequate reference tests. Among studies using DFM as the reference test, sensitivities were 79.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 72.7 to 85.4%) and 71.4% (46.0 to 88.0%) for tpp47-Tp-PCR and polA-Tp-PCR (P = 0.217), respectively; respective specificities were 95.3% (93.5 to 96.6%) and 93.7% (91.8 to 95.2%) (P = 0.304). Our findings suggest that the two Tp-PCR methods have similar accuracy and could be used interchangeably. PMID:26311859

  17. The theoretical accuracy of Runge-Kutta time discretizations for the initial boundary value problem: A careful study of the boundary error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Gottlieb, David; Abarbanel, Saul; Don, Wai-Sun

    1993-01-01

    The conventional method of imposing time dependent boundary conditions for Runge-Kutta (RK) time advancement reduces the formal accuracy of the space-time method to first order locally, and second order globally, independently of the spatial operator. This counter intuitive result is analyzed in this paper. Two methods of eliminating this problem are proposed for the linear constant coefficient case: (1) impose the exact boundary condition only at the end of the complete RK cycle, (2) impose consistent intermediate boundary conditions derived from the physical boundary condition and its derivatives. The first method, while retaining the RK accuracy in all cases, results in a scheme with much reduced CFL condition, rendering the RK scheme less attractive. The second method retains the same allowable time step as the periodic problem. However it is a general remedy only for the linear case. For non-linear hyperbolic equations the second method is effective only for for RK schemes of third order accuracy or less. Numerical studies are presented to verify the efficacy of each approach.

  18. Remote real-time monitoring of free flaps via smartphone photography and 3G wireless Internet: a prospective study evidencing diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Engel, Holger; Huang, Jung Ju; Tsao, Chung Kan; Lin, Chia-Yu; Chou, Pan-Yu; Brey, Eric M; Henry, Steven L; Cheng, Ming Huei

    2011-11-01

    This prospective study was designed to compare the accuracy rate between remote smartphone photographic assessments and in-person examinations for free flap monitoring. One hundred and three consecutive free flaps were monitored with in-person examinations and assessed remotely by three surgeons (Team A) via photographs transmitted over smartphone. Four other surgeons used the traditional in-person examinations as Team B. The response time to re-exploration was defined as the interval between when a flap was evaluated as compromised by the nurse/house officer and when the decision was made for re-exploration. The accuracy rate was 98.7% and 94.2% for in-person and smartphone photographic assessments, respectively. The response time of 8 ± 3 min in Team A was statistically shorter than the 180 ± 104 min in Team B (P = 0.01 by the Mann-Whitney test). The remote smartphone photography assessment has a comparable accuracy rate and shorter response time compared with in-person examination for free flap monitoring. PMID:22072583

  19. A pilot study to determine whether using a lightweight, wearable micro-camera improves dietary assessment accuracy and offers information on macronutrients and eating rate.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Claire; Liu, Jindong; Kwasnicki, Richard M; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Preston, Thomas; Frost, Gary

    2016-01-14

    A major limitation in nutritional science is the lack of understanding of the nutritional intake of free-living people. There is an inverse relationship between accuracy of reporting of energy intake by all current nutritional methodologies and body weight. In this pilot study we aim to explore whether using a novel lightweight, wearable micro-camera improves the accuracy of dietary intake assessment. Doubly labelled water (DLW) was used to estimate energy expenditure and intake over a 14-d period, over which time participants (n 6) completed a food diary and wore a micro-camera on 2 of the days. Comparisons were made between the estimated energy intake from the reported food diary alone and together with the images from the micro-camera recordings. There was an average daily deficit of 3912 kJ using food diaries to estimate energy intake compared with estimated energy expenditure from DLW (P=0·0118), representing an under-reporting rate of 34 %. Analysis of food diaries alone showed a significant deficit in estimated daily energy intake compared with estimated intake from food diary analysis with images from the micro-camera recordings (405 kJ). Use of the micro-camera images in conjunction with food diaries improves the accuracy of dietary assessment and provides valuable information on macronutrient intake and eating rate. There is a need to develop this recording technique to remove user and assessor bias. PMID:26537614

  20. Preschoolers Monitor the Relative Accuracy of Informants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasquini, Elisabeth S.; Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Koenig, Melissa; Harris, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    In 2 studies, the sensitivity of 3- and 4-year-olds to the previous accuracy of informants was assessed. Children viewed films in which 2 informants labeled familiar objects with differential accuracy (across the 2 experiments, children were exposed to the following rates of accuracy by the more and less accurate informants, respectively: 100% vs.…

  1. Data accuracy assessment using enterprise architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Närman, Per; Holm, Hannes; Johnson, Pontus; König, Johan; Chenine, Moustafa; Ekstedt, Mathias

    2011-02-01

    Errors in business processes result in poor data accuracy. This article proposes an architecture analysis method which utilises ArchiMate and the Probabilistic Relational Model formalism to model and analyse data accuracy. Since the resources available for architecture analysis are usually quite scarce, the method advocates interviews as the primary data collection technique. A case study demonstrates that the method yields correct data accuracy estimates and is more resource-efficient than a competing sampling-based data accuracy estimation method.

  2. Do Proficiency and Study-Abroad Experience Affect Speech Act Production? Analysis of Appropriateness, Accuracy, and Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the effect of general proficiency and study-abroad experience in production of speech acts among learners of L2 English. Participants were 25 native speakers of English and 64 Japanese college students of English divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 22) had lower proficiency and no study-abroad experience.…

  3. Updating flood maps efficiently using existing hydraulic models, very-high-accuracy elevation data, and a geographic information system; a pilot study on the Nisqually River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Haluska, Tana L.; Kresch, David L.

    2001-01-01

    A method of updating flood inundation maps at a fraction of the expense of using traditional methods was piloted in Washington State as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Urban Geologic and Hydrologic Hazards Initiative. Large savings in expense may be achieved by building upon previous Flood Insurance Studies and automating the process of flood delineation with a Geographic Information System (GIS); increases in accuracy and detail result from the use of very-high-accuracy elevation data and automated delineation; and the resulting digital data sets contain valuable ancillary information such as flood depth, as well as greatly facilitating map storage and utility. The method consists of creating stage-discharge relations from the archived output of the existing hydraulic model, using these relations to create updated flood stages for recalculated flood discharges, and using a GIS to automate the map generation process. Many of the effective flood maps were created in the late 1970?s and early 1980?s, and suffer from a number of well recognized deficiencies such as out-of-date or inaccurate estimates of discharges for selected recurrence intervals, changes in basin characteristics, and relatively low quality elevation data used for flood delineation. FEMA estimates that 45 percent of effective maps are over 10 years old (FEMA, 1997). Consequently, Congress has mandated the updating and periodic review of existing maps, which have cost the Nation almost 3 billion (1997) dollars. The need to update maps and the cost of doing so were the primary motivations for piloting a more cost-effective and efficient updating method. New technologies such as Geographic Information Systems and LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation mapping are key to improving the efficiency of flood map updating, but they also improve the accuracy, detail, and usefulness of the resulting digital flood maps. GISs produce digital maps without manual estimation of inundated areas between

  4. Ground Truth Sampling and LANDSAT Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. W.; Gunther, F. J.; Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that the key factor in any accuracy assessment of remote sensing data is the method used for determining the ground truth, independent of the remote sensing data itself. The sampling and accuracy procedures developed for nuclear power plant siting study are described. The purpose of the sampling procedure was to provide data for developing supervised classifications for two study sites and for assessing the accuracy of that and the other procedures used. The purpose of the accuracy assessment was to allow the comparison of the cost and accuracy of various classification procedures as applied to various data types.

  5. The pectoralis minor length test: a study of the intra-rater reliability and diagnostic accuracy in subjects with and without shoulder symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jeremy S; Valentine, Rachel E

    2007-01-01

    Background Postural abnormality and muscle imbalance are thought to contribute to pain and a loss of normal function in the upper body. A shortened pectoralis minor muscle is commonly identified as part of this imbalance. Clinical tests have been recommended to test for shortening of this muscle. The aim of this study was to evaluate the intra-rater reliability and diagnostic accuracy of the pectoralis minor length test. Methods Measurements were made in 45 subjects with and 45 subjects without shoulder symptoms. Measurements were made with the subjects lying in supine. In this position the linear distance from the treatment table to the posterior aspect of the acromion was measured on two occasions (separated by a minimum of 30 minutes and additional data collection on other subjects to reduce bias) by one rater. The reliability of the measurements was analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), 95% confidence intervals (CI) and standard error of measurement (SEM). The diagnostic accuracy of the test was investigated by determining the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios of the test against a 'gold standard' reference. The assessor remained 'blinded' to data input and the measurements were staggered to reduce examiner bias. Results The pectoralis minor length test was found to have excellent intra-rater reliability for dominant and non-dominant side of the subjects without symptoms, and for the painfree and painful side of the subjects with symptoms. The values calculated for the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios suggest this test performed in the manner investigated in this study and recommended in the literature, lacks diagnostic accuracy. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that although the pectoralis minor length test demonstrates acceptable clinical reliability, its lack of specificity suggests that clinicians using this test to inform the clinical reasoning process with

  6. Multiple Oral Rereading: A Descriptive Study of Its Effects on Reading Speed and Accuracy in Selected First-Grade Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Sandra Brown

    Multiple Oral Rereading (MOR), which involves repeated reading of the same instructional unit, has been found effective in remedial reading instruction. In this study, which was designed to provide basic information about the dynamics of such repetition, 32 first-grade children were selected as subjects on the basis of their ability to read, out…

  7. Accuracy in contouring of small and low contrast lesions: Comparison between diagnostic quality computed tomography scanner and computed tomography simulation scanner-A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Yick Wing; Wong, Wing Kei Rebecca; Yu, Siu Ki; Lam, Wai Wang; Geng Hui

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy in detection of small and low-contrast regions using a high-definition diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner compared with a radiotherapy CT simulation scanner. A custom-made phantom with cylindrical holes of diameters ranging from 2-9 mm was filled with 9 different concentrations of contrast solution. The phantom was scanned using a 16-slice multidetector CT simulation scanner (LightSpeed RT16, General Electric Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) and a 64-slice high-definition diagnostic CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, General Electric Healthcare). The low-contrast regions of interest (ROIs) were delineated automatically upon their full width at half maximum of the CT number profile in Hounsfield units on a treatment planning workstation. Two conformal indexes, CI{sub in}, and CI{sub out}, were calculated to represent the percentage errors of underestimation and overestimation in the automated contours compared with their actual sizes. Summarizing the conformal indexes of different sizes and contrast concentration, the means of CI{sub in} and CI{sub out} for the CT simulation scanner were 33.7% and 60.9%, respectively, and 10.5% and 41.5% were found for the diagnostic CT scanner. The mean differences between the 2 scanners' CI{sub in} and CI{sub out} were shown to be significant with p < 0.001. A descending trend of the index values was observed as the ROI size increases for both scanners, which indicates an improved accuracy when the ROI size increases, whereas no observable trend was found in the contouring accuracy with respect to the contrast levels in this study. Images acquired by the diagnostic CT scanner allow higher accuracy on size estimation compared with the CT simulation scanner in this study. We recommend using a diagnostic CT scanner to scan patients with small lesions (<1 cm in diameter) for radiotherapy treatment planning, especially for those pending for stereotactic radiosurgery in which accurate delineation of small

  8. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  9. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of plain film radiographs between original film and smartphone capture: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Licurse, Mindy Y; Kim, Sung H; Kim, Woojin; Ruutiainen, Alexander T; Cook, Tessa S

    2015-12-01

    The use of mobile devices for medical image capture has become increasingly popular given the widespread use of smartphone cameras. Prior studies have generally compared mobile phone capture images to digitized images. However, many underserved and rural areas without picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) still depend greatly on the use of film radiographs. Additionally, there is a scarcity of specialty-trained or formally licensed radiologists in many of these regions. Subsequently, there is great potential for the use of smartphone capture of plain radiograph films which would allow for increased access to economical and efficient consultation from board-certified radiologists abroad. The present study addresses the ability to diagnose a subset of radiographic findings identified on both the original film radiograph and the captured camera phone image. PMID:25840654

  10. International proficiency study of a consensus L1 PCR assay for the detection and typing of human papillomavirus DNA: evaluation of accuracy and intralaboratory and interlaboratory agreement.

    PubMed

    Kornegay, Janet R; Roger, Michel; Davies, Philip O; Shepard, Amanda P; Guerrero, Nayana A; Lloveras, Belen; Evans, Darren; Coutlée, François

    2003-03-01

    The PGMY L1 consensus primer pair combined with the line blot assay allows the detection of 27 genital human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. We conducted an intralaboratory and interlaboratory agreement study to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of PCR for HPV DNA detection and typing using the PGMY primers and typing amplicons with the line blot (PGMY-LB) assay. A test panel of 109 samples consisting of 29 HPV-negative (10 buffer controls and 19 genital samples) and 80 HPV-positive samples (60 genital samples and 20 controls with small or large amounts of HPV DNA plasmids) were tested blindly in triplicate by three laboratories. Intralaboratory agreement ranged from 86 to 98% for HPV DNA detection. PGMY-LB assay results for samples with a low copy number of HPV DNA were less reproducible. The rate of intralaboratory agreement excluding negative results for HPV typing ranged from 78 to 96%. Interlaboratory reliability for HPV DNA positivity and HPV typing was very good, with levels of agreement of >95% and kappa values of >0.87. Again, low-copy-number samples were more prone to generating discrepant results. The accuracy varied from 91 to 100% for HPV DNA positivity and from 90 to 100% for HPV typing. HPV testing can thus be accomplished reliably with PCR by using a standardized written protocol and quality-controlled reagents. The use of validated HPV DNA detection and typing assays demonstrating excellent interlaboratory agreement will allow investigators to better compare results between epidemiological studies. PMID:12624033

  11. Accuracy of thoracolumbar transpedicular and vertebral body percutaneous screw placement: coupling the Rosa® Spine robot with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance--a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, M; Peltier, J

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of a new robotic device when coupled with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance. Screws (D8-S1) were implanted during two separate cadaver sessions by coupling the Rosa(®) Spine robot with the flat-panel CT device. Of 38 implanted screws, 37 (97.4 %) were fully contained within the pedicle. One screw breached the lateral cortical of one pedicle by <1 mm. The mean ± SD accuracy (relative to pre-operative planning) was 2.05 ± 1.2 mm for the screw head, 1.65 ± 1.11 for the middle of the pedicle and 1.57 ± 1.01 for the screw tip. When coupled with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance, the Rosa(®) Spine robot appears to be accurate in placing pedicle screws within both pedicles and the vertebral body. Large clinical studies are mandatory to confirm this preliminary cadaveric report. PMID:26530846

  12. Experimental and numerical study of the accuracy of flame-speed measurements for methane/air combustion in a slot burner

    SciTech Connect

    Selle, L.; Ferret, B.; Poinsot, T.

    2011-01-15

    Measuring the velocities of premixed laminar flames with precision remains a controversial issue in the combustion community. This paper studies the accuracy of such measurements in two-dimensional slot burners and shows that while methane/air flame speeds can be measured with reasonable accuracy, the method may lack precision for other mixtures such as hydrogen/air. Curvature at the flame tip, strain on the flame sides and local quenching at the flame base can modify local flame speeds and require corrections which are studied using two-dimensional DNS. Numerical simulations also provide stretch, displacement and consumption flame speeds along the flame front. For methane/air flames, DNS show that the local stretch remains small so that the local consumption speed is very close to the unstretched premixed flame speed. The only correction needed to correctly predict flame speeds in this case is due to the finite aspect ratio of the slot used to inject the premixed gases which induces a flow acceleration in the measurement region (this correction can be evaluated from velocity measurement in the slot section or from an analytical solution). The method is applied to methane/air flames with and without water addition and results are compared to experimental data found in the literature. The paper then discusses the limitations of the slot-burner method to measure flame speeds for other mixtures and shows that it is not well adapted to mixtures with a Lewis number far from unity, such as hydrogen/air flames. (author)

  13. Image-Guided Localization Accuracy of Stereoscopic Planar and Volumetric Imaging Methods for Stereotactic Radiation Surgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinkoo; Jin, Jian-Yue; Walls, Nicole; Nurushev, Teamour; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.; Ryu, Samuel

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracies of two image-guided localization systems, ExacTrac and On-Board Imager (OBI), in a stereotactic treatment unit. Methods and Materials: An anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with eight internal metal markers (BBs) was used. The center of one BB was set as plan isocenter. The phantom was set up on a treatment table with various initial setup errors. Then, the errors were corrected using each of the investigated systems. The residual errors were measured with respect to the radiation isocenter using orthogonal portal images with field size 3 x 3 cm{sup 2}. The angular localization discrepancies of the two systems and the correction accuracy of the robotic couch were also studied. A pair of pre- and post-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images was acquired for each angular correction. Then, the correction errors were estimated by using the internal BBs through fiducial marker-based registrations. Results: The isocenter localization errors ({mu} {+-}{sigma}) in the left/right, posterior/anterior, and superior/inferior directions were, respectively, -0.2 {+-} 0.2 mm, -0.8 {+-} 0.2 mm, and -0.8 {+-} 0.4 mm for ExacTrac, and 0.5 {+-} 0.7 mm, 0.6 {+-} 0.5 mm, and 0.0 {+-} 0.5 mm for OBI CBCT. The registration angular discrepancy was 0.1 {+-} 0.2{sup o} between the two systems, and the maximum angle correction error of the robotic couch was 0.2{sup o} about all axes. Conclusion: Both the ExacTrac and the OBI CBCT systems showed approximately 1 mm isocenter localization accuracies. The angular discrepancy of two systems was minimal, and the robotic couch angle correction was accurate. These positioning uncertainties should be taken as a lower bound because the results were based on a rigid dosimetry phantom.

  14. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  15. The impact of early gut microbiota modulation on the risk of child disease: alert to accuracy in probiotic studies.

    PubMed

    Isolauri, E; Salminen, S

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the gut microbiota, and thus also the modification of the gut microbiota by specific probiotics or prebiotics early in life, may have an impact on the risk of disease in the child. Above the impact on gut microecology, probiotic effects have been attributed to restoration to normal of increased intestinal permeability, improvement of the intestine's immunological barrier functions, alleviation of the intestinal inflammatory response, and reduced generation of proinflammatory cytokines characteristic of local and systemic allergic inflammation. Recent demonstrations from experimental and clinical studies suggest that the gut microbiota is also involved in the control of body weight and energy metabolism, affecting the two main causes of obesity: energy acquisition and storage, and contributing to insulin resistance and the inflammatory state characterising obesity. Current research focuses both on characterising specific probiotic strains and on how the food matrix and the dietary content interacts with the most efficient probiotic strains. It is important to characterise each probiotic to species and strain level and to select strains with documented properties, the probiotic potential being strain-specific. As any proof of causality requires clinical intervention studies in humans in different populations, rigorous and detailed documentation will enhance reproducibility and circumvent confusion. PMID:25619446

  16. Improving power and accuracy of genome-wide association studies via a multi-locus mixed linear model methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Bo; Feng, Jian-Ying; Ren, Wen-Long; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Ling; Wen, Yang-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Dunwell, Jim M; Xu, Shizhong; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been widely used in genetic dissection of complex traits. However, common methods are all based on a fixed-SNP-effect mixed linear model (MLM) and single marker analysis, such as efficient mixed model analysis (EMMA). These methods require Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, which often is too conservative when the number of markers is extremely large. To address this concern, we proposed a random-SNP-effect MLM (RMLM) and a multi-locus RMLM (MRMLM) for GWAS. The RMLM simply treats the SNP-effect as random, but it allows a modified Bonferroni correction to be used to calculate the threshold p value for significance tests. The MRMLM is a multi-locus model including markers selected from the RMLM method with a less stringent selection criterion. Due to the multi-locus nature, no multiple test correction is needed. Simulation studies show that the MRMLM is more powerful in QTN detection and more accurate in QTN effect estimation than the RMLM, which in turn is more powerful and accurate than the EMMA. To demonstrate the new methods, we analyzed six flowering time related traits in Arabidopsis thaliana and detected more genes than previous reported using the EMMA. Therefore, the MRMLM provides an alternative for multi-locus GWAS. PMID:26787347

  17. Improving power and accuracy of genome-wide association studies via a multi-locus mixed linear model methodology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Bo; Feng, Jian-Ying; Ren, Wen-Long; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Ling; Wen, Yang-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Dunwell, Jim M.; Xu, Shizhong; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been widely used in genetic dissection of complex traits. However, common methods are all based on a fixed-SNP-effect mixed linear model (MLM) and single marker analysis, such as efficient mixed model analysis (EMMA). These methods require Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, which often is too conservative when the number of markers is extremely large. To address this concern, we proposed a random-SNP-effect MLM (RMLM) and a multi-locus RMLM (MRMLM) for GWAS. The RMLM simply treats the SNP-effect as random, but it allows a modified Bonferroni correction to be used to calculate the threshold p value for significance tests. The MRMLM is a multi-locus model including markers selected from the RMLM method with a less stringent selection criterion. Due to the multi-locus nature, no multiple test correction is needed. Simulation studies show that the MRMLM is more powerful in QTN detection and more accurate in QTN effect estimation than the RMLM, which in turn is more powerful and accurate than the EMMA. To demonstrate the new methods, we analyzed six flowering time related traits in Arabidopsis thaliana and detected more genes than previous reported using the EMMA. Therefore, the MRMLM provides an alternative for multi-locus GWAS. PMID:26787347

  18. Accuracy of erythrogram and serum ferritin for the maternal anemia diagnosis (AMA): a phase 3 diagnostic study on prediction of the therapeutic responsiveness to oral iron in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pregnancy anemia remains as a public health problem, since the official reports in the 70’s. To guide the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy, the haemoglobin concentration is the most used test in spite of its low accuracy, and serum ferritin is the most reliable test, although its cutoff point remains an issue. Methods/design The aim of this protocol is to verify the accuracy of erythrocyte indices and serum ferritin (studied tests) for the diagnosis of functional iron-deficiency in pregnancy using the iron-therapy responsiveness as the gold-standard. This is an ongoing phase III accuracy study initiated in August 2011 and to be concluded in April 2013. The subjects are anemic pregnant women (haemoglobin concentration < 11.0 g/dL) attended at a low-risk prenatal care center in the Northeast of Brazil. The sample size (n 278) was calculated to estimate sensitivity of 90% and 80% of specificity with relative error of 10% and power of 95%. This study has a prospective design with a before-after intervention of 80 mg of daily oral iron during 90 days and will be analyzed as a delayed-type cross-sectional study. Women at the second trimester of pregnancy are being evaluated with clinical and laboratorial examinations at the enrollment and monthly. The ‘responsiveness to therapeutic test with oral iron’ (gold-standard) was defined to an increase of at least 0.55 Z-score in haemoglobin after 4 weeks of treatment and a total dose of 1200 mg of iron. At the study conclusion, sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, likelihood ratios and areas under the ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curves of serum ferritin and erythrocyte indices (red blood cell count, haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, red blood cell distribution width, reticulocyte count) will be tested. The compliance and adverse effects are considered

  19. A programme of studies including assessment of diagnostic accuracy of school hearing screening tests and a cost-effectiveness model of school entry hearing screening programmes.

    PubMed Central

    Fortnum, Heather; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Hyde, Chris; Taylor, Rod S; Ozolins, Mara; Errington, Sam; Zhelev, Zhivko; Pritchard, Clive; Benton, Claire; Moody, Joanne; Cocking, Laura; Watson, Julian; Roberts, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Identification of permanent hearing impairment at the earliest possible age is crucial to maximise the development of speech and language. Universal newborn hearing screening identifies the majority of the 1 in 1000 children born with a hearing impairment, but later onset can occur at any time and there is no optimum time for further screening. A universal but non-standardised school entry screening (SES) programme is in place in many parts of the UK but its value is questioned. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of hearing screening tests and the cost-effectiveness of the SES programme in the UK. DESIGN Systematic review, case-control diagnostic accuracy study, comparison of routinely collected data for services with and without a SES programme, parental questionnaires, observation of practical implementation and cost-effectiveness modelling. SETTING Second- and third-tier audiology services; community. PARTICIPANTS Children aged 4-6 years and their parents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Diagnostic accuracy of two hearing screening devices, referral rate and source, yield, age at referral and cost per quality-adjusted life-year. RESULTS The review of diagnostic accuracy studies concluded that research to date demonstrates marked variability in the design, methodological quality and results. The pure-tone screen (PTS) (Amplivox, Eynsham, UK) and HearCheck (HC) screener (Siemens, Frimley, UK) devices had high sensitivity (PTS ≥ 89%, HC ≥ 83%) and specificity (PTS ≥ 78%, HC ≥ 83%) for identifying hearing impairment. The rate of referral for hearing problems was 36% lower with SES (Nottingham) relative to no SES (Cambridge) [rate ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.59 to 0.69; p < 0.001]. The yield of confirmed cases did not differ between areas with and without SES (rate ratio 0.82, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.06; p = 0.12). The mean age of referral did not differ between areas with and without SES for all referrals but children

  20. The relationship between articulatory control and improved phonemic accuracy in childhood apraxia of speech: A longitudinal case study

    PubMed Central

    Grigos, Maria I.; Kolenda, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Jaw movement patterns were examined longitudinally in a 3-year-old male with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and compared with a typically developing control group. The child with CAS was followed for 8 months, until he began accurately and consistently producing the bilabial phonemes /p/, /b/, and /m/. A movement tracking system was used to study jaw duration, displacement, velocity, and stability. A transcription analysis determined the percentage of phoneme errors and consistency. Results showed phoneme-specific changes which included increases in jaw velocity and stability over time, as well as decreases in duration. Kinematic parameters became more similar to patterns seen in the controls during final sessions where tokens were produced most accurately and consistently. Closing velocity and stability, however, were the only measures to fall within a 95% confidence interval established for the controls across all three target phonemes. These findings suggest that motor processes may differ between children with CAS and their typically developing peers. PMID:20030551

  1. Effect of lateral target motion on image registration accuracy in CT-guided helical tomotherapy: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Medwig, J; Gaede, S; Battista, J J; Yartsev, S

    2010-06-01

    Optimisation of imaging modes for kilovoltage CT (kVCT) used for treatment planning and megavoltage CT (MVCT) image guidance used in ungated helical tomotherapy was investigated for laterally moving targets. Computed tomography images of the QUASAR Respiratory Motion Phantom were acquired without target motion and for lateral motion of the target, with 2-cm peak-to-peak amplitude and a period of 4 s. Reference kVCT images were obtained using a 16-slice CT scanner in standard fast helical CT mode, untagged average CT mode and various post-processed 4D-CT modes (0% phase, average and maximum intensity projection). Three sets of MVCT images with different inter-slice spacings of were obtained on a Hi-Art tomotherapy system with the phantom displaced by a known offset position. Eight radiation therapists performed co-registration of MVCT obtained with 2-, 4- and 6-mm slice spacing and kVCT studies independently for all 15 CT imaging combinations. In the investigated case, the untagged average kVCT and 4-mm slice spacing for the MVCT yielded more accurate registration in the transverse plane. The average residual uncertainty of this combination of imaging procedures was 0.61 +/- 0.16 mm in the longitudinal direction, 0.45 +/- 0.14 mm in the anterior-posterior direction and insignificant in the lateral direction. Manual registration of MVCT-kVCT study pairs is necessary to account for a target in significant lateral motion with respect to bony structures. PMID:20598016

  2. A case-study on the accuracy of mass balances for xenobiotics in full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Majewsky, Marius; Farlin, Julien; Bayerle, Michael; Gallé, Tom

    2013-04-01

    Removal efficiencies of micropollutants in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are usually evaluated from mass balance calculations using a small number of observations drawn from short sampling campaigns. Since micropollutant loads can vary greatly in both influent and effluent and reactor tanks exhibit specific hydraulic residence times, these short-term approaches are particularly prone to yield erroneous removal values. A detailed investigation of micropollutant transit times at full-scale and on how this affects mass balancing results was still lacking. The present study used hydraulic residence time distributions to scrutinize the match of influent loads to effluent loads of 10 polar micropollutants with different influent dynamics in a full-scale WWTP. Prior hydraulic modeling indicated that a load sampled over one day in the effluent is composed of influent load fractions of five preceding days. Results showed that the error of the mass balance can be reduced with increasing influent sampling duration. The approach presented leads to a more reliable estimation of the removal efficiencies of those micropollutants which can be constantly detected in influents, such as pharmaceuticals, but provides no advantage for pesticides due to their sporadic occurrence. The mismatch between sampled influent and effluent loads was identified as a major error source and an explanation was provided for the occurrence of negative mass balances regularly reported. This study indicates that the accurate determination of global removal values is only feasible in full-scale investigations with sampling durations much longer than 1 day. In any case, the uncertainty of these values needs to be reported when used in removal assessment, model selection or validation. PMID:23474799

  3. Oscillation mechanics of the respiratory system in never-smoking patients with silicosis: pathophysiological study and evaluation of diagnostic accuracy

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Paula Morisco; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Jansen, José Manoel; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Silicosis is a chronic and incurable occupational disease that can progress even after the cessation of exposure. Recent studies suggest that the forced oscillation technique may help to clarify the changes in lung mechanics resulting from silicosis as well as the detection of these changes. We investigated the effects of airway obstruction in silicosis on respiratory impedance and evaluated the diagnostic efficacy of the forced oscillation technique in these patients. METHODS: Spirometry was used to classify the airway obstruction, which resulted in four subject categories: controls (n = 21), patients with a normal exam (n = 12), patients with mild obstruction (n = 22), and patients with moderate-to-severe obstruction (n = 12). Resistive data were interpreted using the zero-intercept resistance (R0), the resistance at 4 Hz (Rrs4), and the mean resistance. We also analyzed the mean reactance (Xm) and the dynamic compliance. The total mechanical load was evaluated using the absolute value of the respiratory impedance (Z4Hz). The diagnostic potential was evaluated by investigating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01725971. RESULTS: We observed significant (p<0.0002) increases in R0, Rrs4, Rm, and Z4Hz and significant reductions in Crs,dyn (p<0.0002) and Xm (p<0.0001). R0, Rrs4, Rm, and Z4Hz performed adequately in the diagnosis of mild obstruction (area under the curve>0.80) and highly accurately in the detection of moderate-to-severe obstruction (area under the curve>0.90). CONCLUSIONS: The forced oscillation technique may contribute to the study of the pathophysiology of silicosis and may improve the treatment offered to these patients, thus representing an alternative and/or complementary tool for evaluating respiratory mechanics. PMID:23778400

  4. Accuracy of malaria rapid diagnostic tests in community studies and their impact on treatment of malaria in an area with declining malaria burden in north-eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite some problems related to accuracy and applicability of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), they are currently the best option in areas with limited laboratory services for improving case management through parasitological diagnosis and reducing over-treatment. This study was conducted in areas with declining malaria burden to assess; 1) the accuracy of RDTs when used at different community settings, 2) the impact of using RDTs on anti-malarial dispensing by community-owned resource persons (CORPs) and 3) adherence of CORPs to treatment guidelines by providing treatment based on RDT results. Methods Data were obtained from: 1) a longitudinal study of passive case detection of fevers using CORPs in six villages in Korogwe; and 2) cross-sectional surveys (CSS) in six villages of Korogwe and Muheza districts, north-eastern, Tanzania. Performance of RDTs was compared with microscopy as a gold standard, and factors affecting their accuracy were explored using a multivariate logistic regression model. Results Overall sensitivity and specificity of RDTs in the longitudinal study (of 23,793 febrile cases; 18,154 with microscopy and RDTs results) were 88.6% and 88.2%, respectively. In the CSS, the sensitivity was significantly lower (63.4%; χ2 = 367.7, p < 0.001), while the specificity was significantly higher (94.3%; χ2 = 143.1, p < 0.001) when compared to the longitudinal study. As determinants of sensitivity of RDTs in both studies, parasite density of < 200 asexual parasites/μl was significantly associated with high risk of false negative RDTs (OR≥16.60, p < 0.001), while the risk of false negative test was significantly lower among cases with fever (axillary temperature ≥37.5°C) (OR ≤ 0.63, p ≤ 0.027). The risk of false positive RDT (as a determinant of specificity) was significantly higher in cases with fever compared to afebrile cases (OR≥2.40, p < 0.001). Using RDTs reduced anti-malarials dispensing from 98.9% to 32.1% in cases

  5. High accuracy ab initio studies of electron-densities for the ground state of Be-like atomic systems.

    PubMed

    Komasa, J; Słupski, R; Jankowski, K; Wasilewski, J; Teale, A M

    2013-04-28

    Benchmark results for electron densities in the ground states of Li(-), Be, C(2+), Ne(6+), and Ar(14+) have been generated from very accurate variational wave functions represented in terms of extensive basis sets of exponentially correlated Gaussian functions. For Ne(6+), and Ar(14+), the upper bounds to the energies improve over previous results known from the literature. For the remaining systems our bounds are from 0.1 to 1.1 μhartree higher than the most accurate ones. We present in graphical and, partially, numerical form results both for the radial electron densities and for the difference radial density distributions (DRD) (defined with respect to the Hartree-Fock radial density) that highlight the impact of correlation effects on electron densities. Next, we have employed these DRD distributions in studies of the performance of several broadly used orbital-based quantum-chemical methods in accounting for correlation effects on the density. Our computed benchmark densities for Be have been also applied for testing the possibility of using the mathematically strict result concerning exact atomic electron densities, obtained by Ahlrichs et al. [Phys. Rev. A 23, 2106 (1981)], for the determination of the reliability range of computed densities in the long-range asymptotic region. The results obtained for Be are encouraging. PMID:23635137

  6. High accuracy ab initio studies of electron-densities for the ground state of Be-like atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komasa, J.; Słupski, R.; Jankowski, K.; Wasilewski, J.; Teale, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Benchmark results for electron densities in the ground states of Li-, Be, C2+, Ne6+, and Ar14+ have been generated from very accurate variational wave functions represented in terms of extensive basis sets of exponentially correlated Gaussian functions. For Ne6+, and Ar14+, the upper bounds to the energies improve over previous results known from the literature. For the remaining systems our bounds are from 0.1 to 1.1 μhartree higher than the most accurate ones. We present in graphical and, partially, numerical form results both for the radial electron densities and for the difference radial density distributions (DRD) (defined with respect to the Hartree-Fock radial density) that highlight the impact of correlation effects on electron densities. Next, we have employed these DRD distributions in studies of the performance of several broadly used orbital-based quantum-chemical methods in accounting for correlation effects on the density. Our computed benchmark densities for Be have been also applied for testing the possibility of using the mathematically strict result concerning exact atomic electron densities, obtained by Ahlrichs et al. [Phys. Rev. A 23, 2106 (1981), 10.1103/PhysRevA.23.2106], for the determination of the reliability range of computed densities in the long-range asymptotic region. The results obtained for Be are encouraging.

  7. Manual landmark identification and tracking during the medial rotation test of the shoulder: an accuracy study using three-dimensional ultrasound and motion analysis measures.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, D; Morrissey, M C; Driver, W; King, J B; Woledge, R C

    2008-12-01

    Palpation of movement is a common clinical tool for assessment of movement in patients with musculoskeletal symptoms. The purpose of this study was to measure the accuracy of palpation of shoulder girdle translation during the medial rotation test (MRT) of the shoulder. The translation of the gleno-humeral and scapulo-thoracic joints was measured using both three-dimensional ultrasound and palpation in order to determine the accuracy of translation tracking during the MRT of the shoulder. Two movements of 11 normal subjects (mean age 24 (SD=4), range 19-47 years) were measured. The agreement between measures was good for scapulo-thoracic translation (r=0.83). Gleno-humeral translation was systematically under estimated (p=0.03) although moderate correlation was found (r=0.65). These results indicate that translation of the measured joints can be tracked by palpation and further tests of the efficacy of palpation tracking during musculoskeletal assessment may be warranted. PMID:18359266

  8. Pilot Study to Explore the Accuracy of Current Prediction Equations in Assessing Energy Needs of Patients with Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Little, Rebecca B; Oster, Robert A; Darnell, Betty E; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Nabors, L Burt

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is rare, yet it is the most common brain malignancy and has a poor prognosis. In regard to GBM, there is a dearth of research on resting energy expenditure (REE) and the accuracy of extant prediction equations. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare measured REE (mREE) to commonly used prediction equations in newly diagnosed GBM patients. REE was collected by indirect calorimetry in 20 GBM patients. Calculated REE was derived from Harris-Benedict (again with weight adjusted for obesity), Mifflin-St Jeor, and the 20 kcal/kg body weight ratio method. Paired t-tests and Bland-Altman analyses were used to compare group means, evaluate the bias, and find the limits of agreement. Clinical accuracy was assessed by determining the percentage of patients with predicted REE within ±10% of mREE. Subjects were evenly distributed with regard to gender, primarily Caucasian, and largely overweight or obese and had a mean age of 57 years. All equations overestimated mREE. Mifflin-St Jeor and adjusted Harris-Benedict had the narrowest limits of agreement and accurately predicted 60% and 65% of subjects, respectively. Clinicians should be aware of the discrepancy between commonly used prediction equations and REE. More research is needed to verify these findings and decipher the cause and significance in the GBM population. PMID:27341142

  9. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Does Not Influence the Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff in Perceptual Decision-making: Evidence from Three Independent Studies.

    PubMed

    de Hollander, Gilles; Labruna, Ludovica; Sellaro, Roberta; Trutti, Anne; Colzato, Lorenza S; Ratcliff, Roger; Ivry, Richard B; Forstmann, Birte U

    2016-09-01

    In perceptual decision-making tasks, people balance the speed and accuracy with which they make their decisions by modulating a response threshold. Neuroimaging studies suggest that this speed-accuracy tradeoff is implemented in a corticobasal ganglia network that includes an important contribution from the pre-SMA. To test this hypothesis, we used anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to modulate neural activity in pre-SMA while participants performed a simple perceptual decision-making task. Participants viewed a pattern of moving dots and judged the direction of the global motion. In separate trials, they were cued to either respond quickly or accurately. We used the diffusion decision model to estimate the response threshold parameter, comparing conditions in which participants received sham or anodal tDCS. In three independent experiments, we failed to observe an influence of tDCS on the response threshold. Additional, exploratory analyses showed no influence of tDCS on the duration of nondecision processes or on the efficiency of information processing. Taken together, these findings provide a cautionary note, either concerning the causal role of pre-SMA in decision-making or on the utility of tDCS for modifying response caution in decision-making tasks. PMID:27054398

  10. Study of accuracy in the position determination with SALSA, a γ-scanning system for the characterization of segmented HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Prieto, A.; Quintana, B.; Martìn, S.; Domingo-Pardo, C.

    2016-07-01

    Accurate characterization of the electric response of segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors as a function of the interaction position is one of the current goals of the Nuclear Physics community seeking to perform γ-ray tracking or even imaging with these detectors. For this purpose, scanning devices must be developed to achieve the signal-position association with the highest precision. With a view to studying the accuracy achieved with SALSA, the SAlamanca Lyso-based Scanning Array, here we report a detailed study on the uncertainty sources and their effect in the position determination inside the HPGe detector to be scanned. The optimization performed on the design of SALSA, aimed at minimizing the effect of the uncertainty sources, afforded an intrinsic uncertainty of ∼2 mm for large coaxial detectors and ∼1 mm for planar ones.

  11. Accuracy of Cone-beam Computed Tomography and Periapical Radiography in Endodontically Treated Teeth Evaluation: A Five-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Saidi, Anastasia; Naaman, Alfred; Zogheib, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of two imaging methods in detecting the apical pathology in endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: A clinical examination from a sample of 156 teeth of patients treated by students of masters in endodontics at the Care Center of the Faculty of Dentistry at St. Joseph University, Beirut was done after 5 years of follow-up. Periradicular digital radiographs and a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)scans were taken and analyzed statistically using both the Exact Fisher tests and McNemar tests. Results: The prevalence of lesions was significantly higher with CBCT (34.8%), whereas for digital radiography (13.8%). The CBCT was revealed more precise to identify periapical lesions. As for the clinical success, the rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, CBCT was more reliable in detecting periapical lesions compared with digital periapical radiographs. PMID:25878472

  12. Rapid detection of health-care-associated bloodstream infection in critical care using multipathogen real-time polymerase chain reaction technology: a diagnostic accuracy study and systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Warhurst, Geoffrey; Dunn, Graham; Chadwick, Paul; Blackwood, Bronagh; McAuley, Daniel; Perkins, Gavin D; McMullan, Ronan; Gates, Simon; Bentley, Andrew; Young, Duncan; Carlson, Gordon L; Dark, Paul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is growing interest in the potential utility of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in diagnosing bloodstream infection by detecting pathogen deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in blood samples within a few hours. SeptiFast (Roche Diagnostics GmBH, Mannheim, Germany) is a multipathogen probe-based system targeting ribosomal DNA sequences of bacteria and fungi. It detects and identifies the commonest pathogens causing bloodstream infection. As background to this study, we report a systematic review of Phase III diagnostic accuracy studies of SeptiFast, which reveals uncertainty about its likely clinical utility based on widespread evidence of deficiencies in study design and reporting with a high risk of bias. OBJECTIVE Determine the accuracy of SeptiFast real-time PCR for the detection of health-care-associated bloodstream infection, against standard microbiological culture. DESIGN Prospective multicentre Phase III clinical diagnostic accuracy study using the standards for the reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies criteria. SETTING Critical care departments within NHS hospitals in the north-west of England. PARTICIPANTS Adult patients requiring blood culture (BC) when developing new signs of systemic inflammation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES SeptiFast real-time PCR results at species/genus level compared with microbiological culture in association with independent adjudication of infection. Metrics of diagnostic accuracy were derived including sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values, with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Latent class analysis was used to explore the diagnostic performance of culture as a reference standard. RESULTS Of 1006 new patient episodes of systemic inflammation in 853 patients, 922 (92%) met the inclusion criteria and provided sufficient information for analysis. Index test assay failure occurred on 69 (7%) occasions. Adult patients had been exposed to a median of 8 days (interquartile range 4

  13. Impact of scanning parameters and breathing patterns on image quality and accuracy of tumor motion reconstruction in 4D CBCT: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soyoung; Yan, Guanghua; Lu, Bo; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan G; Sanjiv, Samat S

    2015-01-01

    Four-dimensional, cone-beam CT (4D CBCT) substantially reduces respiration-induced motion blurring artifacts in three-dimension (3D) CBCT. However, the image quality of 4D CBCT is significantly degraded which may affect its accuracy in localizing a mobile tumor for high-precision, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of scanning parameters hereinafter collectively referred to as scanning sequence) and breathing patterns on the image quality and the accuracy of computed tumor trajectory for a commercial 4D CBCT system, in preparation for its clinical implementation. We simulated a series of periodic and aperiodic sinusoidal breathing patterns with a respiratory motion phantom. The aperiodic pattern was created by varying the period or amplitude of individual sinusoidal breathing cycles. 4D CBCT scans of the phantom were acquired with a manufacturer-supplied scanning sequence (4D-S-slow) and two in-house modified scanning sequences (4D-M-slow and 4D-M-fast). While 4D-S-slow used small field of view (FOV), partial rotation (200°), and no imaging filter, 4D-M-slow and 4D-M-fast used medium FOV, full rotation, and the F1 filter. The scanning speed was doubled in 4D-M-fast (100°/min gantry rotation). The image quality of the 4D CBCT scans was evaluated using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and motion blurring ratio (MBR). The trajectory of the moving target was reconstructed by registering each phase of the 4D CBCT with a reference CT. The root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) analysis was used to quantify its accuracy. Significant decrease in CNR and SNR from 3D CBCT to 4D CBCT was observed. The 4D-S-slow and 4D-M-fast scans had comparable image quality, while the 4D-M-slow scans had better performance due to doubled projections. Both CNR and SNR decreased slightly as the breathing period increased, while no dependence on the amplitude was observed. The difference of both CNR and SNR

  14. Diagnostic test accuracy of D-dimer for acute aortic syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis of 22 studies with 5000 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hiroki; Horita, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Yuji; Minegishi, Shintaro; Ota, Erika; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic test accuracy of D-dimer for acute aortic dissection (AAD) has not been evaluated by meta-analysis with the bivariate model methodology. Four databases were electrically searched. We included both case-control and cohort studies that could provide sufficient data concerning both sensitivity and specificity of D-dimer for AAD. Non-English language articles and conference abstract were allowed. Intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcer were regarded as AAD. Based on 22 eligible articles consisting of 1140 AAD subjects and 3860 non-AAD subjects, the diagnostic odds ratio was 28.5 (95% CI 17.6–46.3, I2 = 17.4%) and the area under curve was 0.946 (95% CI 0.903–0.994). Based on 833 AAD subjects and 1994 non-AAD subjects constituting 12 studies that used the cutoff value of 500 ng/ml, the sensitivity was 0.952 (95% CI 0.901–0.978), the specificity was 0.604 (95% CI 0.485–0.712), positive likelihood ratio was 2.4 (95% CI 1.8–3.3), and negative likelihood ratio was 0.079 (95% CI 0.036–0.172). Sensitivity analysis using data of three high-quality studies almost replicated these results. In conclusion, D-dimer has very good overall accuracy. D-dimer <500 ng/ml largely decreases the possibility of AAD. D-dimer >500 ng/ml moderately increases the possibility of AAD. PMID:27230962

  15. Accuracy of a direct drill-guiding system with minimal tolerance of surgical instruments used for implant surgery: a prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE A recently introduced direct drill-guiding implant surgery system features minimal tolerance of surgical instruments in the metal sleeve by using shank-modified drills and a sleeve-incorporated stereolithographic guide template. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this new guided surgery system in partially edentulous patients using geometric analyses. MATERIALS AND METHODS For the study, 21 implants were placed in 11 consecutive patients using the direct drill-guiding implant surgery system. The stereolithographic surgical guide was fabricated using cone-beam computed tomography, digital scanning, computer-aided design and computer-assisted manufacturing, and additive manufacturing processes. After surgery, the positional and angular deviations between planned and placed implants were measured at the abutment level using implant-planning software. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare the deviations (α=.05). RESULTS The mean horizontal deviations were 0.593 mm (SD 0.238) mesiodistally and 0.691 mm (SD 0.344) buccolingually. The mean vertical deviation was 0.925 mm (SD 0.376) occlusogingivally. The vertical deviation was significantly larger than the horizontal deviation (P=.018). The mean angular deviation was 2.024 degrees (SD 0.942) mesiodistally and 2.390 degrees (SD 1.142) buccolingually. CONCLUSION The direct drill-guiding implant surgery system demonstrates high accuracy in placing implants. Use of the drill shank as the guiding component is an effective way for reducing tolerance. PMID:27350855

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, and King Scores for Diagnosis of Esophageal Varices in Liver Cirrhosis: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han; Qi, Xingshun; Peng, Ying; Li, Jing; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Yongguo; Liu, Xu; Sun, Xiaolin; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR), FIB-4, fibrosis index (FI), and King scores might be alternatives to the use of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of esophageal varices (EVs) in liver cirrhosis. This study aimed to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy in predicting the presence and severity of EVs in liver cirrhosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS All patients who were consecutively admitted to our hospital and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between January 2012 and June 2014 were eligible for this retrospective study. Areas under curve (AUCs) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and splenectomy. RESULTS A total of 650 patients with liver cirrhosis were included, and 81.4% of them had moderate-severe EVs. In the overall analysis, the AUCs of these non-invasive scores for predicting moderate-severe EVs and presence of any EVs were 0.506-0.6 and 0.539-0.612, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB, their AUCs for predicting moderate-severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.601-0.664 and 0.596-0.662, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB or splenectomy, their AUCs for predicting moderate-severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.627-0.69 and 0.607-0.692, respectively. CONCLUSIONS APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, and King scores had modest diagnostic accuracy of EVs in liver cirrhosis. They might not be able to replace the utility of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of EVs in liver cirrhosis. PMID:26687574

  17. Accuracy of Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Insertion Technique with Conventional Dual Fluoroscopy Units and a Retrospective Comparative Study Based on Surgeon Experience.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Masayuki; Yasuhara, Takao; Inoue, Takafumi; Takahashi, Yuichi; Kumamoto, Shinji; Hijikata, Yasukazu; Kusumegi, Akira; Sakamoto, Yushi; Ogawa, Koichi; Nishida, Kenki

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective comparative study. Objective To evaluate the accuracy of percutaneous pedicle screw (PPS) placement and intraoperative imaging time using dual fluoroscopy units and their differences between surgeons with more versus less experience. Methods One hundred sixty-one patients who underwent lumbar fusion surgery were divided into two groups, A (n = 74) and B (n = 87), based on the performing surgeon's experience. The accuracy of PPS placement and radiation time for PPS insertion were compared. PPSs were inserted with classic technique under the assistance of dual fluoroscopy units placed in two planes. The breach definition of PPS misplacement was based on postoperative computed tomography (grade I: no breach; grade II: <2 mm; grade III: ≤2 to <4 mm). Results Of 658 PPSs, only 21 screws were misplaced. The breach rates of groups A and B were 3.3% (grade II: 3.4%, grade III: 0%) and 3.1% (grade II: 2.6%, grade III: 0.6%; p = 0.91). One patient in grade III misplacement had a transient symptom of leg numbness. Median radiation exposure time during PPS insertion was 25 seconds and 51 seconds, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusions Without using an expensive imaging support system, the classic technique of PPS insertion using dual fluoroscopy units in the lumbar and sacral spine is fairly accurate and provides good clinical outcomes, even among surgeons lacking experience. PMID:27190733

  18. Accuracy of Carbohydrate Counting in Adults.

    PubMed

    Meade, Lisa T; Rushton, Wanda E

    2016-07-01

    In Brief This study investigates carbohydrate counting accuracy in patients using insulin through a multiple daily injection regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The average accuracy test score for all patients was 59%. The carbohydrate test in this study can be used to emphasize the importance of carbohydrate counting to patients and to provide ongoing education. PMID:27621531

  19. High-resolution terrain and landcover mapping with a lightweight, semi-autonomous, remotely-piloted aircraft (RPA): a case study and accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, C.; Whitehead, K.; Moorman, B.; Brown, O.; Hamilton, T.; Barchyn, T.; Riddell, K.; LeClair, A.

    2012-04-01

    Remotely-piloted aircraft (RPA) have evolved into a viable research tool for a range of Earth science applications. Significant technological advances driven by military and surveillance programs have steadily become mainstream and affordable. Thus, RPA technology has the potential to reinvigorate various aspects of geomorphological research, especially at the landform scale. In this presentation we will report results and experiences using a lightweight, semi-autonomous RPA for high-resolution terrain and landcover mapping. The goal was to test the accuracy of the photogrammetrically-derived terrain model and assess the overall performance of the RPA system for landform characterization. The test site was comprised an area of semi-vegetated sand dunes in the Canadian Prairies. The RPA survey was conducted with a RQ-84Z AreoHawk (Hawkeye UAV Ltd) and a low-cost digital camera. During the survey the RPA acquired images semi-autonomously with the aid of proprietary mission planning software developed by Accuas Inc. A total of 44 GCPs were used in the block adjustment to create the terrain model, while an additional 400 independent GPS check points were used for accuracy assessment. The 1 m resolution terrain model developed with Trimble's INPHO photogrammetric software was compared to the independent check points, yielding a RMS error comparable to airborne LiDAR data. The resulting orthophoto mosaic had a resolution of 0.1 m, revealing a number of geomorphic features beyond the resolution of airborne and QuickBird imagery. Overall, this case study highlights the potential of RPA technology for resolving terrain and landcover attributes at the landform scale. We believe one of the most significant and emerging applications of RPA in geomorphology is their potential to quantify rates of landform erosion/deposition in an affordable and flexible manner, allowing investigators to reduce the gap between recorded and natural morphodynamics.

  20. Accuracy of serial myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with /sup 201/Tl for prediction of graft patency early and late after coronary artery bypass surgery. A controlled prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Pfisterer, M.; Emmenegger, H.; Schmitt, H.E.; Mueller-Brand, J.; Hasse, J.; Graedel, E.; Laver, M.B.; Burckhardt, D.; Burkart, F.

    1982-11-01

    To assess the accuracy of serial myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with /sup 201/Tl to predict graft patency early and late coronary artery bypass surgery, rest and exercise /sup 201/Tl and coronary arteriography were performed preoperatively and 2 weeks and 1 year after operation. The scintigraphic results were compared with graft patency, symptoms, left ventricular function and physical work capacity in a consecutive series of 55 patients with a total of 154 grafts. Serial /sup 201/Tl had an 80% sensitivity, 88% specificity and 86% overall accuracy in detecting or excluding graft occlusion, which was predicted by reversible ischemia as well as persistent new scar segments. Occluded grafts were correctly localized by /sup 201/Tl scintigraphy in 61%. Postoperative apical /sup 201/Tl defects were frequent (two-thirds of cases), and were the result of intraoperative transapical venting of the left ventricle. After coronary bypass graft surgery, ejection fraction at rest was unchanged. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and physical work capacity improved significantly. In the presence of new perfusion defects detected postoperatively, physical work capacity was reduced significantly. New /sup 201/Tl defects in addition to typical or atypical angina provided a high probability of graft occlusion, while in the absence of new /sup 201/Tl defects all grafts were patent in more than 90% of patients, all of whom had no or only atypical chest pain. We conclude that serial /sup 201/Tl imaging after coronary artery bypass surgery is an accurate noninvasive method that can be used routinely to assess graft function, to localize spatially occluded grafts and to identify patients with a high likelihood of graft occlusion who may need invasive studies.

  1. An administrative data validation study of the accuracy of algorithms for identifying rheumatoid arthritis: the influence of the reference standard on algorithm performance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously validated administrative data algorithms to identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using rheumatology clinic records as the reference standard. Here we reassessed the accuracy of the algorithms using primary care records as the reference standard. Methods We performed a retrospective chart abstraction study using a random sample of 7500 adult patients under the care of 83 family physicians contributing to the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD) in Ontario, Canada. Using physician-reported diagnoses as the reference standard, we computed and compared the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for over 100 administrative data algorithms for RA case ascertainment. Results We identified 69 patients with RA for a lifetime RA prevalence of 0.9%. All algorithms had excellent specificity (>97%). However, sensitivity varied (75-90%) among physician billing algorithms. Despite the low prevalence of RA, most algorithms had adequate positive predictive value (PPV; 51-83%). The algorithm of “[1 hospitalization RA diagnosis code] or [3 physician RA diagnosis codes with ≥1 by a specialist over 2 years]” had a sensitivity of 78% (95% CI 69–88), specificity of 100% (95% CI 100–100), PPV of 78% (95% CI 69–88) and NPV of 100% (95% CI 100–100). Conclusions Administrative data algorithms for detecting RA patients achieved a high degree of accuracy amongst the general population. However, results varied slightly from our previous report, which can be attributed to differences in the reference standards with respect to disease prevalence, spectrum of disease, and type of comparator group. PMID:24956925

  2. Physics-based Tests to Identify the Accuracy of Solar Wind Ion Measurements: A Case Study with the Wind Faraday Cups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Szabo, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present techniques for comparing measurements of velocity, temperature, and density with constraints imposed by the plasma physics of magnetized bi-Maxwellian ions. Deviations from these physics-based constraints are interpreted as arising from measurement errors. Two million ion spectra from the Solar Wind Experiment Faraday Cup instruments on the Wind spacecraft are used as a case study. The accuracy of velocity measurements is determined by the fact that differential flow between hydrogen and helium should be aligned with the ambient magnetic field. Modeling the breakdown of field alignment suggests velocity uncertainties are less than 0.16% in magnitude and 3deg in direction. Temperature uncertainty is found by examining the distribution of observed temperature anisotropies in high-beta solar wind intervals where the firehose, mirror, and cyclotron microinstabilities should drive the distribution to isotropy. The presence of a finite anisotropy at high beta suggests overall temperature uncertainties of 8%. Hydrogen and helium number densities are compared with the electron density inferred from observations of the local electron plasma frequency as a function of solar wind speed and year. We find that after accounting for the contribution of minor ions, the results are consistent with a systematic offset between the two instruments of 34%. The temperature and density methods are sensitive to non-Maxwellian features such as heat flux and proton beams and as a result are more suited to slow solar wind where these features are rare. These procedures are of general use in identifying the accuracy of observations from any solar wind ion instrument.

  3. Accuracy of multislice CT angiography for the assessment of in-stent restenoses in the iliac arteries at reduced dose: a phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Perisinakis, K; Manousaki, E; Zourari, K; Tsetis, D; Tzedakis, A; Papadakis, A; Karantanas, A; Damilakis, J

    2011-01-01

    Objective We investigated the potential of low-dose CT angiography for accurate assessment of in-stent restenoses (ISRs) of the iliac artery. Method A Rando anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson Research Labs, Stanford, CA), custom-made wax simulating hyperplastic tissue and a nitinol stent were used to simulate a patient with clinically relevant iliac artery ISRs. The cylindrical lumen was filled with a solution of iodine contrast medium diluted in saline, representing a patient's blood during CT angiography. The phantom was subjected to standard- and low-dose angiographic exposures using a modern multidetector (MD) CT scanner. The percentage of ISR was determined using the profile along a line normal to the lumen axis on reconstructed images of 2 and 5 mm slice thickness. Percentage ISRs derived using the standard- and low-dose protocols were compared. In a preliminary study, seven patients with stents were subjected to standard- and low-dose MDCT angiography during follow-up. The resulting images were assessed and compared by two experienced radiologists. Results The accuracy in measuring the percentage ISR was found to be better than 12% for all simulated stenoses. The differences between percentage ISRs measured on images obtained at 120 kVp/160 mAs and 80 kVp/80 mAs were below 6%. Patient image sets acquired using low-exposure factors were judged to be of satisfactory diagnostic quality. The assessment of ISR did not differ significantly between image sets acquired using the standard factors and those acquired using the low-exposure factors, although the mean reduction in patient effective dose was 48%. Conclusion A reduction in exposure factors during MDCT angiography of the iliac artery is possible without affecting the accuracy in the determination of ISRs. PMID:21325364

  4. Diagnostic yield and accuracy of CT angiography, MR angiography, and digital subtraction angiography for detection of macrovascular causes of intracerebral haemorrhage: prospective, multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Velthuis, Birgitta K; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; Algra, Ale; de Kort, Gérard A P; Witkamp, Theo D; de Ridder, Johanna C M; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Schonewille, Wouter J; de Kort, Paul L M; Dippel, Diederik W; Raaymakers, Theodora W M; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Wermer, Marieke J H; Kerkhoff, Henk; Jellema, Korné; Bronner, Irene M; Remmers, Michel J M; Bienfait, Henri Paul; Witjes, Ron J G M; Greving, Jacoba P; Klijn, Catharina J M

    2015-01-01

    Study question What are the diagnostic yield and accuracy of early computed tomography (CT) angiography followed by magnetic resonance imaging/angiography (MRI/MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage? Methods This prospective diagnostic study enrolled 298 adults (18-70 years) treated in 22 hospitals in the Netherlands over six years. CT angiography was performed within seven days of haemorrhage. If the result was negative, MRI/MRA was performed four to eight weeks later. DSA was performed when the CT angiography or MRI/MRA results were inconclusive or negative. The main outcome was a macrovascular cause, including arteriovenous malformation, aneurysm, dural arteriovenous fistula, and cavernoma. Three blinded neuroradiologists independently evaluated the images for macrovascular causes of haemorrhage. The reference standard was the best available evidence from all findings during one year’s follow-up. Study answer and limitations A macrovascular cause was identified in 69 patients (23%). 291 patients (98%) underwent CT angiography; 214 with a negative result underwent additional MRI/MRA and 97 with a negative result for both CT angiography and MRI/MRA underwent DSA. Early CT angiography detected 51 macrovascular causes (yield 17%, 95% confidence interval 13% to 22%). CT angiography with MRI/MRA identified two additional macrovascular causes (18%, 14% to 23%) and these modalities combined with DSA another 15 (23%, 18% to 28%). This last extensive strategy failed to detect a cavernoma, which was identified on MRI during follow-up (reference strategy). The positive predictive value of CT angiography was 72% (60% to 82%), of additional MRI/MRA was 35% (14% to 62%), and of additional DSA was 100% (75% to 100%). None of the patients experienced complications with CT angiography or MRI/MRA; 0.6% of patients who underwent DSA experienced permanent sequelae. Not all patients with negative CT angiography and

  5. A Multicenter Prospective Study to Investigate the Diagnostic Accuracy of the SeHCAT Test in Measuring Bile Acid Malabsorption: Research Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Janet; Coker, Bola; McMillan, Viktoria; Lewis, Cornelius; Keevil, Stephen; Sherwood, Roy; Vivian, Gill; Logan, Robert; Summers, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is one possible explanation for chronic diarrhea. BAM may be idiopathic, or result from ileal resection or inflammation including Crohn’s disease, or may be secondary to other conditions, including cholecystectomy, peptic ulcer surgery, and chronic pancreatitis. No “gold standard” exists for clinical diagnosis of BAM, but response to treatment with a bile acid sequestrant (BAS) is often accepted as confirmation. The SeHCAT (tauroselcholic [selenium-75] acid) test uses a radiolabeled synthetic bile acid and provides a diagnostic test for BAM, but its performance against “trial of treatment” is unknown. Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19) and 7-alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) also offer potential new biomarkers of BAM. Objective This protocol describes a multicenter prospective study to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of SeHCAT and 2 biomarkers in predicting BAM as assessed by trial of treatment. Methods Participating gastroenterology centers should have a minimum workload of 30 SeHCAT patients per annum. Patients should not be pregnant, on medication that could confound follow-up, or have any severe comorbidity. All eligible patients attending a gastrointestinal appointment will be invited to participate. On attending the SeHCAT test, blood and fecal samples will be collected for analysis of FGF-19 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and for C4 and fractionated bile acids by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. A capsule containing radiolabeled SeHCAT will be administered orally and a scan performed to measure SeHCAT activity. Patients will return on day 7 to undergo a second scan to measure percentage SeHCAT retention. The test result will be concealed from clinicians and patients. BAS will be dispensed to all patients, with a follow-up gastroenterologist appointment at 2 weeks for clinical assessment of treatment response and adherence. Patients responding positively will continue treatment for a

  6. Evaluation of the effect of double reporting on test accuracy in screening and diagnostic imaging studies: A review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Pow, Richard E; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Brennan, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Diagnostic error in radiology is not uncommon, with rates of clinically significant error reported to be as high as 20%. Radiological errors are often multifactorial, however, perceptual factors are thought to be mainly responsible. One way of reducing perceptual error is that of double reporting, which refers to the interpretation of radiological investigations by two observers, with strategies of arbitration and consensus available to settle discordant reports. Independent double reporting, where observers have no knowledge of each other's reports, is generally considered to be the most effective form. The impact of double reporting on diagnostic efficacy has been primarily explored in screening mammography, where it has consistently been shown to improve sensitivity, cancer detection rate and depending on local policy, have a positive influence on recall rates. Subsequently, the adoption of double reporting is reported as standard practice in many national and regional breast cancer-screening programmes. To a lesser extent, the impact of double reporting has also been investigated for neuroradiology, thoracic and gastrointestinal imaging, with small-scale studies in these fields showing promising results. With the widespread implementation of digitisation and the ease of access to images, the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of double reporting for other common radiological investigations requires attention. The review will evaluate the evidence regarding the effect of double interpretation of diagnostic imaging studies on test accuracy. PMID:26996634

  7. Individual Differences in Eyewitness Recall Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, James D.; Herringer, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    Presents study results comparing college students' self-evaluation of recall accuracy to actual recall of detail after viewing a crime scenario. Reports that self-reported ability to remember detail correlates with accuracy in memory of specifics. Concludes that people may have a good indication early in the eyewitness situation of whether they…

  8. Scientific Sources' Perception of Network News Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Barbara; Singletary, Michael

    Recent polls seem to indicate that many Americans rely on television as a credible and primary source of news. To test the accuracy of this news, a study examined three networks' newscasts of science news, the attitudes of the science sources toward reporting in their field, and the factors related to accuracy. The Vanderbilt News Archives Index…

  9. Evaluation of accuracy of casts of multiple internal connection implant prosthesis obtained from different impression materials and techniques: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Malesh; Garg, Pooja; Prithviraj, D R

    2014-04-01

    Movement of impression copings inside the impression material using a direct (open tray) impression technique during clinical and laboratory phases may cause inaccuracy in transferring the 3-dimensional spatial orientation of implants intraorally to the cast. Consequently, the prosthesis may require corrective procedures. This in vitro study evaluated the accuracy of 3 different impression techniques using polyether and vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material to obtain a precise cast for multiple internal connection implants. A reference acrylic resin model with 4 internal connection implants was fabricated. Impressions of the reference model were made using 3 different techniques and 2 different impression materials. The study consisted of 24 specimens divided into 6 groups of 4 each. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone (Kalrock, Kalabhai Karson Pvt Ltd, Mumbai, India). All casts were evaluated for the positional accuracy (mm) of the implant replica heads using a profile projector. These measurements were compared to the measurements calculated on the reference resin model, which served as a control. Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni multiple comparison procedures to evaluate group means. The results revealed significant difference for anterior implant distance between the 2 impression materials (P < .01) and also among the 3 different techniques (P < .05). The lowest mean variation was found with the polyether impression material and the splinted technique. For posterior implants, the results suggested no significant difference between the 2 impression materials (P ≥ .05). Although results were not statistically significant, the polyether impression material showed the lowest mean variation as compared to the VPS impression material. However, there was a significant difference among the 3 different techniques (P < .05). Among the 3 different techniques, the lowest mean variation between 2 posterior

  10. Municipal water consumption forecast accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Thomas M.; Molina, Angel L.

    2010-06-01

    Municipal water consumption planning is an active area of research because of infrastructure construction and maintenance costs, supply constraints, and water quality assurance. In spite of that, relatively few water forecast accuracy assessments have been completed to date, although some internal documentation may exist as part of the proprietary "grey literature." This study utilizes a data set of previously published municipal consumption forecasts to partially fill that gap in the empirical water economics literature. Previously published municipal water econometric forecasts for three public utilities are examined for predictive accuracy against two random walk benchmarks commonly used in regional analyses. Descriptive metrics used to quantify forecast accuracy include root-mean-square error and Theil inequality statistics. Formal statistical assessments are completed using four-pronged error differential regression F tests. Similar to studies for other metropolitan econometric forecasts in areas with similar demographic and labor market characteristics, model predictive performances for the municipal water aggregates in this effort are mixed for each of the municipalities included in the sample. Given the competitiveness of the benchmarks, analysts should employ care when utilizing econometric forecasts of municipal water consumption for planning purposes, comparing them to recent historical observations and trends to insure reliability. Comparative results using data from other markets, including regions facing differing labor and demographic conditions, would also be helpful.

  11. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes a compilation of attitude determination accuracies attained by a number of satellites supported by the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Facility. The compilation is designed to assist future mission planners in choosing and placing attitude hardware and selecting the attitude determination algorithms needed to achieve given accuracy requirements. The major goal of the compilation is to indicate realistic accuracies achievable using a given sensor complement based on mission experience. It is expected that the use of actual spacecraft experience will make the study especially useful for mission design. A general description of factors influencing spacecraft attitude accuracy is presented. These factors include determination algorithms, inertial reference unit characteristics, and error sources that can affect measurement accuracy. Possible techniques for mitigating errors are also included. Brief mission descriptions are presented with the attitude accuracies attained, grouped by the sensor pairs used in attitude determination. The accuracies for inactive missions represent a compendium of missions report results, and those for active missions represent measurements of attitude residuals. Both three-axis and spin stabilized missions are included. Special emphasis is given to high-accuracy sensor pairs, such as two fixed-head star trackers (FHST's) and fine Sun sensor plus FHST. Brief descriptions of sensor design and mode of operation are included. Also included are brief mission descriptions and plots summarizing the attitude accuracy attained using various sensor complements.

  12. Intelligence: The Speed and Accuracy Tradeoff in High Aptitude Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lajoie, Suzanne P.; Shore, Bruce M.

    1986-01-01

    The relative contributions of mental speed and accuracy to Primary Mental Ability (PMA) IQ prediction were studied in 52 high ability grade 10 students. Both speed and accuracy independently predicted IQ, but not speed over and above accuracy. Accuracy was demonstrated to be universally advantageous in IQ performance, but speed varied according to…

  13. Dose reduction and its influence on diagnostic accuracy and radiation risk in digital mammography: an observer performance study using an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    PubMed Central

    Svahn, Tony; Hemdal, Bengt; Ruschin, Mark; Chakraborty, Dev P; Andersson, Ingvar; Tingberg, Anders; Mattsson, Sören

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of dose reduction on diagnostic accuracy and radiation risk in digital mammography. Simulated masses and microcalcifications were positioned in an anthropomorphic breast phantom. Thirty digital images, 14 with lesions, 16 without, were acquired of the phantom using a Mammomat Novation (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) at each of three dose levels. These corresponded to 100%, 50% and 30% of the normally used average glandular dose (AGD; 1.3 mGy for a standard breast). Eight observers interpreted the 90 unprocessed images in a free-response study and the data was analyzed with the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method. Observer performance was assessed using the JAFROC figure of merit (FOM). The benefit of radiation risk reduction was estimated based on several risk models. There was no statistically significant difference in performance, as described by the FOM, between the 100% and the 50% dose levels. However, the FOMs for both the 100% and the 50% dose were significantly different from the corresponding quantity for the 30% dose level (F-statistic = 4.95, p-value = 0.01). A dose reduction of 50% would result in 3-9 fewer breast cancer fatalities per 100,000 women undergoing annual screening from the age of 40 to 49 years. The results of the study indicate a possibility of reducing the dose to the breast to half of the dose level currently used. This has to be confirmed in clinical studies and possible differences depending on lesion type should be further examined. PMID:17704316

  14. A Study of the Accuracy and Precision Among XRF, ICP-MS, and PIXE on Trace Element Analyses of Small Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sahil; Patnaik, Ritish; Kummari, Venkata; Phinney, Lucas; Dhoubhadel, Mangal; Jesseph, Aaron; Hoffmann, William; Verbeck, Guido; Rout, Bibhudutta

    2010-10-01

    The study aimed to compare the viability, precision, and accuracy among three popular instruments - X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS), and Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) - used to analyze the trace elemental composition of small water samples. Ten-milliliter water samples from public tap water sources in seven different localities in India (Bangalore, Kochi, Bhubaneswar, Cuttack, Puri, Hospet, and Pipili) were prepared through filtration and dilution for proper analysis. The project speculates that the ICP-MS will give the most accurate and precise trace elemental analysis, followed by PIXE and XRF. XRF will be seen as a portable and affordable instrument that can analyze samples on-site while ICP-MS is extremely accurate, and expensive option for off-site analyses. PIXE will be deemed to be too expensive and cumbersome for on-site analysis; however, laboratories with a PIXE accelerator can use the instrument to get accurate analyses.

  15. Accuracy study of a new assistance system under the application of Navigated Control® for manual milling on a head phantom.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaxi; Stenzel, Roland; Wenger, Thomas; Lueth, Tim C

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a technical study of a new assistance system to support surgeons in milling on the temporal bone is presented. In particular, the overall accuracy of a new assistance system was investigated experimentally under conditions close to surgical practice. For the experiment, the assistance system has been used with its associated navigation system for ear-nose-throat (ENT) surgery. A specially constructed head phantom allowed the implementation of reproducible experiments. Thereby, N = 10 specimens were milled by three test persons without medical knowledge and the distance between points on the milled surface and the security zone around the planned nerve for each specimen were calculated. The result was as follows: None of the 10 milled specimens overlapped more than 2mm with the security zone, the average distances to the planned surface of the security zone for each specimen were between 0.01mm and 2.23mm, and the corresponding standard deviations varied from 0.41mm to 1.17mm. But it also shows some variation in averages and standard deviations and it was often too little material removed. This deviation is probably caused by the patient registration and the tool calibration. PMID:21097019

  16. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  17. Fit accuracy of metal partial removable dental prosthesis frameworks fabricated by traditional or light curing modeling material technique: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anan, Mohammad Tarek M.; Al-Saadi, Mohannad H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the fit accuracies of metal partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP) frameworks fabricated by the traditional technique (TT) or the light-curing modeling material technique (LCMT). Materials and methods A metal model of a Kennedy class III modification 1 mandibular dental arch with two edentulous spaces of different spans, short and long, was used for the study. Thirty identical working casts were used to produce 15 PRDP frameworks each by TT and by LCMT. Every framework was transferred to a metal master cast to measure the gap between the metal base of the framework and the crest of the alveolar ridge of the cast. Gaps were measured at three points on each side by a USB digital intraoral camera at ×16.5 magnification. Images were transferred to a graphics editing program. A single examiner performed all measurements. The two-tailed t-test was performed at the 5% significance level. Results The mean gap value was significantly smaller in the LCMT group compared to the TT group. The mean value of the short edentulous span was significantly smaller than that of the long edentulous span in the LCMT group, whereas the opposite result was obtained in the TT group. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the fit of the LCMT-fabricated frameworks was better than the fit of the TT-fabricated frameworks. The framework fit can differ according to the span of the edentate ridge and the fabrication technique for the metal framework. PMID:26236129

  18. A pre–postintervention study to evaluate the impact of dose calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Anas; Cavell, Gillian; Hinton, James; Wade, Paul; Whittlesea, Cate

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gentamicin and vancomycin are narrow-therapeutic-index antibiotics with potential for high toxicity requiring dose individualisation and continuous monitoring. Clinical decision support (CDS) tools have been effective in reducing gentamicin and vancomycin dosing errors. Online dose calculators for these drugs were implemented in a London National Health Service hospital. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses. Methods The study used a pre–postintervention design. Data were collected using electronic patient records and paper notes. Random samples of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses administered during the 8 months before implementation of the calculators were assessed retrospectively against hospital guidelines. Following implementation of the calculators, doses were assessed prospectively. Any gentamicin dose not within ±10% and any vancomycin dose not within ±20% of the guideline-recommended dose were considered incorrect. Results The intranet calculator pages were visited 721 times (gentamicin=333; vancomycin=388) during the 2-month period following the calculators’ implementation. Gentamicin dose errors fell from 61.5% (120/195) to 44.2% (95/215), p<0.001. Incorrect vancomycin loading doses fell from 58.1% (90/155) to 32.4% (46/142), p<0.001. Incorrect vancomycin first maintenance doses fell from 55.5% (86/155) to 33.1% (47/142), p<0.001. Loading and first maintenance vancomycin doses were both incorrect in 37.4% (58/155) of patients before and 13.4% (19/142) after calculator implementation, p<0.001. Conclusions This study suggests that gentamicin and vancomycin dose calculators significantly improved the prescribing of initial doses of these agents. Therefore, healthcare organisations should consider using such CDS tools to support the prescribing of these high-risk drugs. PMID:26044758

  19. Accuracy analysis of distributed simulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Guo, Jing

    2010-08-01

    Existed simulation works always emphasize on procedural verification, which put too much focus on the simulation models instead of simulation itself. As a result, researches on improving simulation accuracy are always limited in individual aspects. As accuracy is the key in simulation credibility assessment and fidelity study, it is important to give an all-round discussion of the accuracy of distributed simulation systems themselves. First, the major elements of distributed simulation systems are summarized, which can be used as the specific basis of definition, classification and description of accuracy of distributed simulation systems. In Part 2, the framework of accuracy of distributed simulation systems is presented in a comprehensive way, which makes it more sensible to analyze and assess the uncertainty of distributed simulation systems. The concept of accuracy of distributed simulation systems is divided into 4 other factors and analyzed respectively further more in Part 3. In Part 4, based on the formalized description of framework of accuracy analysis in distributed simulation systems, the practical approach are put forward, which can be applied to study unexpected or inaccurate simulation results. Following this, a real distributed simulation system based on HLA is taken as an example to verify the usefulness of the approach proposed. The results show that the method works well and is applicable in accuracy analysis of distributed simulation systems.

  20. Significant Improvement of Puncture Accuracy and Fluoroscopy Reduction in Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy With Novel Lumbar Location System: Preliminary Report of Prospective Hello Study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guoxin; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhang, Hailong; Wu, Xinbo; Gu, Xin; Gu, Guangfei; Fan, Yunshan; He, Shisheng

    2015-12-01

    Prospective nonrandomized control study.The study aimed to investigate the implication of the HE's Lumbar LOcation (HELLO) system in improving the puncture accuracy and reducing fluoroscopy in percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED).Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy is one of the most popular minimally invasive spine surgeries that heavily depend on repeated fluoroscopy. Increased fluoroscopy will induce higher radiation exposure to surgeons and patients. Accurate puncture in PTED can be achieved by accurate preoperative location and definite trajectory.The HELLO system mainly consists of self-made surface locator and puncture-assisted device. The surface locator was used to identify the exact puncture target and the puncture-assisted device was used to optimize the puncture trajectory. Patients who had single L4/5 or L5/S1 lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and underwent PTED were included the study. Patients receiving the HELLO system were assigned in Group A, and those taking conventional method were assigned in Group B. Study primary endpoint was puncture times and fluoroscopic times, and the secondary endpoint was location time and operation time.A total of 62 patients who received PTED were included in this study. The average age was 45.35 ± 8.70 years in Group A and 46.61 ± 7.84 years in Group B (P = 0.552). There were no significant differences in gender, body mass index, conservative time, and surgical segment between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). The puncture times were 1.19 ± 0.48 in Group A and 6.03 ± 1.87 in Group B (P < 0.001). The fluoroscopic times were 14.03 ± 2.54 in Group A and 25.19 ± 4.28 in Group B (P < 0.001). The preoperative location time was 4.67 ± 1.41 minutes in Group A and 6.98 ± 0.94 minutes in Group B (P < 0.001). The operation time was 79.42 ± 10.15 minutes in Group A and 89.65 ± 14.06 minutes in Group B (P = 0.002). The

  1. Accuracy in Judgments of Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, David A.; West, Tessa V.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Coie, John D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Hubbard, Julie A.; Schwartz, David

    2009-01-01

    Perceivers are both accurate and biased in their understanding of others. Past research has distinguished between three types of accuracy: generalized accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about how a target interacts with others in general; perceiver accuracy, a perceiver’s view of others corresponding with how the perceiver is treated by others in general; and dyadic accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about a target when interacting with that target. Researchers have proposed that there should be more dyadic than other forms of accuracy among well-acquainted individuals because of the pragmatic utility of forecasting the behavior of interaction partners. We examined behavioral aggression among well-acquainted peers. A total of 116 9-year-old boys rated how aggressive their classmates were toward other classmates. Subsequently, 11 groups of 6 boys each interacted in play groups, during which observations of aggression were made. Analyses indicated strong generalized accuracy yet little dyadic and perceiver accuracy. PMID:17575243

  2. Combining pseudo dinucleotide composition with the Z curve method to improve the accuracy of predicting DNA elements: a case study in recombination spots.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chuan; Yuan, Ya-Zhou; Zhang, Fa-Zhan; Hua, Hong-Li; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Labena, Abraham Alemayehu; Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2016-08-16

    Pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC) and Z curve showed excellent performance in the classification issues of nucleotide sequences in bioinformatics. Inspired by the principle of Z curve theory, we improved PseDNC to give the phase-specific PseDNC (psPseDNC). In this study, we used the prediction of recombination spots as a case to illustrate the capability of psPseDNC and also PseDNC fused with Z curve theory based on a novel machine learning method named large margin distribution machine (LDM). We verified that combining the two widely used approaches could generate better performance compared to only using PseDNC with a support vector machine based (SVM-based) model. The best Mathew's correlation coefficient (MCC) achieved by our LDM-based model was 0.7037 through the rigorous jackknife test and improved by ∼6.6%, ∼3.2%, and ∼2.4% compared with three previous studies. Similarly, the accuracy was improved by 3.2% compared with our previous iRSpot-PseDNC web server through an independent data test. These results demonstrate that the joint use of PseDNC and Z curve enhances performance and can extract more information from a biological sequence. To facilitate research in this area, we constructed a user-friendly web server for predicting hot/cold spots, HcsPredictor, which can be freely accessed from . In summary, we provided a united algorithm by integrating Z curve with PseDNC. We hope this united algorithm could be extended to other classification issues in DNA elements. PMID:27410247

  3. Systematic review of discharge coding accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Burns, E.M.; Rigby, E.; Mamidanna, R.; Bottle, A.; Aylin, P.; Ziprin, P.; Faiz, O.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Routinely collected data sets are increasingly used for research, financial reimbursement and health service planning. High quality data are necessary for reliable analysis. This study aims to assess the published accuracy of routinely collected data sets in Great Britain. Methods Systematic searches of the EMBASE, PUBMED, OVID and Cochrane databases were performed from 1989 to present using defined search terms. Included studies were those that compared routinely collected data sets with case or operative note review and those that compared routinely collected data with clinical registries. Results Thirty-two studies were included. Twenty-five studies compared routinely collected data with case or operation notes. Seven studies compared routinely collected data with clinical registries. The overall median accuracy (routinely collected data sets versus case notes) was 83.2% (IQR: 67.3–92.1%). The median diagnostic accuracy was 80.3% (IQR: 63.3–94.1%) with a median procedure accuracy of 84.2% (IQR: 68.7–88.7%). There was considerable variation in accuracy rates between studies (50.5–97.8%). Since the 2002 introduction of Payment by Results, accuracy has improved in some respects, for example primary diagnoses accuracy has improved from 73.8% (IQR: 59.3–92.1%) to 96.0% (IQR: 89.3–96.3), P= 0.020. Conclusion Accuracy rates are improving. Current levels of reported accuracy suggest that routinely collected data are sufficiently robust to support their use for research and managerial decision-making. PMID:21795302

  4. Accuracy of tablet splitting.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, J T; Gurst, A H; Chen, Y

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to determine the accuracy of manually splitting hydrochlorothiazide tablets. Ninety-four healthy volunteers each split ten 25-mg hydrochlorothiazide tablets, which were then weighed using an analytical balance. Demographics, grip and pinch strength, digit circumference, and tablet-splitting experience were documented. Subjects were also surveyed regarding their willingness to pay a premium for commercially available, lower-dose tablets. Of 1752 manually split tablet portions, 41.3% deviated from ideal weight by more than 10% and 12.4% deviated by more than 20%. Gender, age, education, and tablet-splitting experience were not predictive of variability. Most subjects (96.8%) stated a preference for commercially produced, lower-dose tablets, and 77.2% were willing to pay more for them. For drugs with steep dose-response curves or narrow therapeutic windows, the differences we recorded could be clinically relevant. PMID:9469693

  5. Triage tests for identifying atrial fibrillation in primary care: a diagnostic accuracy study comparing single-lead ECG and modified BP monitors

    PubMed Central

    Kearley, Karen; Selwood, Mary; Van den Bruel, Ann; Thompson, Matthew; Mant, David; Hobbs, FD Richard; Fitzmaurice, David; Heneghan, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Objective New electronic devices offer an opportunity within routine primary care settings for improving the detection of atrial fibrillation (AF), which is a common cardiac arrhythmia and a modifiable risk factor for stroke. We aimed to assess the performance of a modified blood pressure (BP) monitor and two single-lead ECG devices, as diagnostic triage tests for the detection of AF. Setting 6 General Practices in the UK. Participants 1000 ambulatory patients aged 75 years and over. Primary and secondary outcome measures Comparative diagnostic accuracy of modified BP monitor and single-lead ECG devices, compared to reference standard of 12-lead ECG, independently interpreted by cardiologists. Results A total of 79 participants (7.9%) had AF diagnosed by 12-lead ECG. All three devices had a high sensitivity (93.9–98.7%) and are useful for ruling out AF. WatchBP is a better triage test than Omron autoanalysis because it is more specific—89.7% (95% CI 87.5% to 91.6%) compared to 78.3% (95% CI 73.0% to 82.9%), respectively. This would translate into a lower follow-on ECG rate of 17% to rule in/rule out AF compared to 29.7% with the Omron text message in the study population. The overall specificity of single-lead ECGs analysed by a cardiologist was 94.6% for Omron and 90.1% for Merlin. Conclusions WatchBP performs better as a triage test for identifying AF in primary care than the single-lead ECG monitors as it does not require expertise for interpretation and its diagnostic performance is comparable to single-lead ECG analysis by cardiologists. It could be used opportunistically to screen elderly patients for undiagnosed AF at regular intervals and/or during BP measurement. PMID:24793250

  6. Surfing the Net for medical information about psychological trauma: An empirical study of the quality and accuracy of trauma-related websites

    PubMed Central

    BREMNER, J. DOUGLAS; QUINN, JOHN; QUINN, WILLIAM; VELEDAR, EMIR

    2011-01-01

    Psychological trauma is a major public-health problem, and trauma victims frequently turn to the Internet for medical information related to trauma. The Internet has many advantages for trauma victims, including low cost, privacy, use of access, and reduced direct social interactions. However, there are no regulations on what is posted on the Internet, or by whom, and little is known about the quality of information currently available related to the topic of psychological trauma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of Internet sites related to the topic of psychological trauma. The top 20 hits for searches on Google, AllTheWeb, and Yahoo were tabulated, using search words of ‘psychological trauma’, ‘stress’, ‘PTSD’, and ‘trauma’. From these searches, a list of 94 unique unsponsored hits that represented accessible websites was generated. Fourteen sites were unrelated or only peripherally related, and eight were related but were not comprehensively evaluated because they represented brochures, online book sales, etc. Seventy-two websites underwent evaluation of the content, design, disclosure, ease of use, and other factors based on published guidelines for medical information sites. Forty-two per cent of sites had inaccurate information, 82% did not provide a source of their information, and 41% did not use a mental-health professional in the development of the content. Ratings of content (e.g. accuracy, reliability, etc.) were 4 (2 SD) on a scale of 1 – 10, with 10 being the best. There were similar ratings for the other variables assessed. These findings suggest that although abundant, websites providing information about psychological trauma are often not useful, and can sometimes provide inaccurate and potentially harmful information to consumers of medical information. PMID:16954059

  7. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for measuring total bone mineral content in the rat: study of accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Casez, J P; Muehlbauer, R C; Lippuner, K; Kelly, T; Fleisch, H; Jaeger, P

    1994-07-01

    Sequential studies of osteopenic bone disease in small animals require the availability of non-invasive, accurate and precise methods to assess bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is currently used in humans for this purpose, can also be applied to small animals by means of adapted software. Precision and accuracy of DXA was evaluated in 10 rats weighing 50-265 g. The rats were anesthetized with a mixture of ketamine-xylazine administrated intraperitoneally. Each rat was scanned six times consecutively in the antero-posterior incidence after repositioning using the rat whole-body software for determination of whole-body BMC and BMD (Hologic QDR 1000, software version 5.52). Scan duration was 10-20 min depending on rat size. After the last measurement, rats were sacrificed and soft tissues were removed by dermestid beetles. Skeletons were then scanned in vitro (ultra high resolution software, version 4.47). Bones were subsequently ashed and dissolved in hydrochloric acid and total body calcium directly assayed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (TBCa[chem]). Total body calcium was also calculated from the DXA whole-body in vivo measurement (TBCa[DXA]) and from the ultra high resolution measurement (TBCa[UH]) under the assumption that calcium accounts for 40.5% of the BMC expressed as hydroxyapatite. Precision error for whole-body BMC and BMD (mean +/- S.D.) was 1.3% and 1.5%, respectively. Simple regression analysis between TBCa[DXA] or TBCa[UH] and TBCa[chem] revealed tight correlations (n = 0.991 and 0.996, respectively), with slopes and intercepts which were significantly different from 1 and 0, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7950505

  8. Accuracy assessment of a marker-free method for registration of CT and stereo images applied in image-guided implantology: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghi, Saeed; Ahmadian, Alireza; Yaghoobee, Siamak

    2014-12-01

    To assess the accuracy of a proposed marker-free registration method as opposed to the conventional marker-based method using an image-guided dental system, and investigating the best configurations of anatomical landmarks for various surgical fields in a phantom study, a CT-compatible dental phantom consisting of implanted targets was used. Two marker-free registration methods were evaluated, first using dental anatomical landmarks and second, using a reference marker tool. Six implanted markers, distributed in the inner space of the phantom were used as the targets; the values of target registration error (TRE) for each target were measured and compared with the marker-based method. Then, the effects of different landmark configurations on TRE values, measured using the Parsiss IV Guided Navigation system (Parsiss, Tehran, Iran), were investigated to find the best landmark arrangement for reaching the minimum registration error in each target region. It was proved that marker-free registration can be as precise as the marker-based method. This has a great impact on image-guided implantology systems whereby the drawbacks of fiducial markers for patient and surgeon are removed. It was also shown that smaller values of TRE could be achieved by using appropriate landmark configurations and moving the center of the landmark set closer to the surgery target. Other common factors would not necessarily decrease the TRE value so the conventional rules accepted in the clinical community about the ways to reduce TRE should be adapted to the selected field of dental surgery. PMID:25441868

  9. Uptake, Accuracy, Safety, and Linkage into Care over Two Years of Promoting Annual Self-Testing for HIV in Blantyre, Malawi: A Community-Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Choko, Augustine T.; MacPherson, Peter; Webb, Emily L.; Willey, Barbara A.; Feasy, Helena; Sambakunsi, Rodrick; Mdolo, Aaron; Makombe, Simon D.; Desmond, Nicola; Hayes, Richard; Maheswaran, Hendramoorthy; Corbett, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Home-based HIV testing and counselling (HTC) achieves high uptake, but is difficult and expensive to implement and sustain. We investigated a novel alternative based on HIV self-testing (HIVST). The aim was to evaluate the uptake of testing, accuracy, linkage into care, and health outcomes when highly convenient and flexible but supported access to HIVST kits was provided to a well-defined and closely monitored population. Methods and Findings Following enumeration of 14 neighbourhoods in urban Blantyre, Malawi, trained resident volunteer-counsellors offered oral HIVST kits (OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test) to adult (≥16 y old) residents (n = 16,660) and reported community events, with all deaths investigated by verbal autopsy. Written and demonstrated instructions, pre- and post-test counselling, and facilitated HIV care assessment were provided, with a request to return kits and a self-completed questionnaire. Accuracy, residency, and a study-imposed requirement to limit HIVST to one test per year were monitored by home visits in a systematic quality assurance (QA) sample. Overall, 14,004 (crude uptake 83.8%, revised to 76.5% to account for population turnover) residents self-tested during months 1–12, with adolescents (16–19 y) most likely to test. 10,614/14,004 (75.8%) participants shared results with volunteer-counsellors. Of 1,257 (11.8%) HIV-positive participants, 26.0% were already on antiretroviral therapy, and 524 (linkage 56.3%) newly accessed care with a median CD4 count of 250 cells/μl (interquartile range 159–426). HIVST uptake in months 13–24 was more rapid (70.9% uptake by 6 mo), with fewer (7.3%, 95% CI 6.8%–7.8%) positive participants. Being “forced to test”, usually by a main partner, was reported by 2.9% (95% CI 2.6%–3.2%) of 10,017 questionnaire respondents in months 1–12, but satisfaction with HIVST (94.4%) remained high. No HIVST-related partner violence or suicides were reported. HIVST and repeat

  10. The Accuracy of IOS Device-based uHear as a Screening Tool for Hearing Loss: A Preliminary Study From the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abri, Rashid; Al-Balushi, Mustafa; Kolethekkat, Arif; Bhargava, Deepa; Al-Alwi, Amna; Al-Bahlani, Hana; Al-Garadi, Manal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine and explore the potential use of uHear as a screening test for determining hearing disability by evaluating its accuracy in a clinical setting and a soundproof booth when compared to the gold standard conventional audiometry.   Methods Seventy Sultan Qaboos University students above the age of 17 years who had normal hearing were recruited for the study. They underwent a hearing test using conventional audiometry in a soundproof room, a self-administered uHear evaluation in a side room resembling a clinic setting, and a self-administered uHear test in a soundproof booth. The mean pure tone average (PTA) of thresholds at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz for all the three test modalities was calculated, compared, and analyzed statistically.   Results There were 36 male and 34 female students in the study. The PTA with conventional audiometry ranged from 1 to 21 dB across left and right ears. The PTA using uHear in the side room for the same participants was 25 dB in the right ear and 28 dB in the left ear (3–54 dB across all ears). The PTA for uHear in the soundproof booth was 18 dB and 17 dB (1–43 dB) in the right and left ears, respectively. Twenty-three percent of participants were reported to have a mild hearing impairment (PTA > 25 dB) using the soundproof uHear test, and this number was 64% for the same test in the side room. For the same group, only 3% of participants were reported to have a moderate hearing impairment (PTA > 40 dB) using the uHear test in a soundproof booth, and 13% in the side room.   Conclusion uHear in any setting lacks specificity in the range of normal hearing and is highly unreliable in giving the exact hearing threshold in clinical settings. However, there is a potential for the use of uHear if it is used to rule out moderate hearing loss, even in a clinical setting, as exemplified by our study. This method needs standardization through further research. PMID:27168926

  11. Measuring Diagnoses: ICD Code Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Kimberly J; Cook, Karon F; Price, Matt D; Wildes, Kimberly Raiford; Hurdle, John F; Ashton, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine potential sources of errors at each step of the described inpatient International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding process. Data Sources/Study Setting The use of disease codes from the ICD has expanded from classifying morbidity and mortality information for statistical purposes to diverse sets of applications in research, health care policy, and health care finance. By describing a brief history of ICD coding, detailing the process for assigning codes, identifying where errors can be introduced into the process, and reviewing methods for examining code accuracy, we help code users more systematically evaluate code accuracy for their particular applications. Study Design/Methods We summarize the inpatient ICD diagnostic coding process from patient admission to diagnostic code assignment. We examine potential sources of errors at each step and offer code users a tool for systematically evaluating code accuracy. Principle Findings Main error sources along the “patient trajectory” include amount and quality of information at admission, communication among patients and providers, the clinician's knowledge and experience with the illness, and the clinician's attention to detail. Main error sources along the “paper trail” include variance in the electronic and written records, coder training and experience, facility quality-control efforts, and unintentional and intentional coder errors, such as misspecification, unbundling, and upcoding. Conclusions By clearly specifying the code assignment process and heightening their awareness of potential error sources, code users can better evaluate the applicability and limitations of codes for their particular situations. ICD codes can then be used in the most appropriate ways. PMID:16178999

  12. Simulation study on potential accuracy gains from dual energy CT tissue segmentation for low-energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Granton, Patrick V.; Reniers, Brigitte; Öllers, Michel C.; Beaulieu, Luc; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-10-01

    This work compares Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for 125I and 103Pd low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources performed in virtual phantoms containing a series of human soft tissues of interest for brachytherapy. The geometries are segmented (tissue type and density assignment) based on simulated single energy computed tomography (SECT) and dual energy (DECT) images, as well as the all-water TG-43 approach. Accuracy is evaluated by comparison to a reference MC dose calculation performed in the same phantoms, where each voxel's material properties are assigned with exactly known values. The objective is to assess potential dose calculation accuracy gains from DECT. A CT imaging simulation package, ImaSim, is used to generate CT images of calibration and dose calculation phantoms at 80, 120, and 140 kVp. From the high and low energy images electron density ρe and atomic number Z are obtained using a DECT algorithm. Following a correction derived from scans of the calibration phantom, accuracy on Z and ρe of ±1% is obtained for all soft tissues with atomic number Z in [6,8] except lung. GEANT4 MC dose calculations based on DECT segmentation agreed with the reference within ±4% for 103Pd, the most sensitive source to tissue misassignments. SECT segmentation with three tissue bins as well as the TG-43 approach showed inferior accuracy with errors of up to 20%. Using seven tissue bins in our SECT segmentation brought errors within ±10% for 103Pd. In general 125I dose calculations showed higher accuracy than 103Pd. Simulated image noise was found to decrease DECT accuracy by 3-4%. Our findings suggest that DECT-based segmentation yields improved accuracy when compared to SECT segmentation with seven tissue bins in LDR brachytherapy dose calculation for the specific case of our non-anthropomorphic phantom. The validity of our conclusions for clinical geometry as well as the importance of image noise in the tissue segmentation procedure deserves further

  13. Simulation study on potential accuracy gains from dual energy CT tissue segmentation for low-energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Granton, Patrick V; Reniers, Brigitte; Ollers, Michel C; Beaulieu, Luc; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-10-01

    This work compares Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for (125)I and (103)Pd low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources performed in virtual phantoms containing a series of human soft tissues of interest for brachytherapy. The geometries are segmented (tissue type and density assignment) based on simulated single energy computed tomography (SECT) and dual energy (DECT) images, as well as the all-water TG-43 approach. Accuracy is evaluated by comparison to a reference MC dose calculation performed in the same phantoms, where each voxel's material properties are assigned with exactly known values. The objective is to assess potential dose calculation accuracy gains from DECT. A CT imaging simulation package, ImaSim, is used to generate CT images of calibration and dose calculation phantoms at 80, 120, and 140 kVp. From the high and low energy images electron density ρ(e) and atomic number Z are obtained using a DECT algorithm. Following a correction derived from scans of the calibration phantom, accuracy on Z and ρ(e) of ±1% is obtained for all soft tissues with atomic number Z ∊ [6,8] except lung. GEANT4 MC dose calculations based on DECT segmentation agreed with the reference within ±4% for (103)Pd, the most sensitive source to tissue misassignments. SECT segmentation with three tissue bins as well as the TG-43 approach showed inferior accuracy with errors of up to 20%. Using seven tissue bins in our SECT segmentation brought errors within ±10% for (103)Pd. In general (125)I dose calculations showed higher accuracy than (103)Pd. Simulated image noise was found to decrease DECT accuracy by 3-4%. Our findings suggest that DECT-based segmentation yields improved accuracy when compared to SECT segmentation with seven tissue bins in LDR brachytherapy dose calculation for the specific case of our non-anthropomorphic phantom. The validity of our conclusions for clinical geometry as well as the importance of image noise in the tissue segmentation procedure deserves

  14. Validity of ICD-9-CM codes for breast, lung and colorectal cancers in three Italian administrative healthcare databases: a diagnostic accuracy study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Iosief; Serraino, Diego; Giovannini, Gianni; Stracci, Fabrizio; Casucci, Paola; Alessandrini, Giuliana; Bidoli, Ettore; Chiari, Rita; Cirocchi, Roberto; De Giorgi, Marcello; Franchini, David; Vitale, Maria Francesca; Fusco, Mario; Montedori, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Administrative healthcare databases are useful tools to study healthcare outcomes and to monitor the health status of a population. Patients with cancer can be identified through disease-specific codes, prescriptions and physician claims, but prior validation is required to achieve an accurate case definition. The objective of this protocol is to assess the accuracy of International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision—Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes for breast, lung and colorectal cancers in identifying patients diagnosed with the relative disease in three Italian administrative databases. Methods and analysis Data from the administrative databases of Umbria Region (910 000 residents), Local Health Unit 3 of Napoli (1 170 000 residents) and Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region (1 227 000 residents) will be considered. In each administrative database, patients with the first occurrence of diagnosis of breast, lung or colorectal cancer between 2012 and 2014 will be identified using the following groups of ICD-9-CM codes in primary position: (1) 233.0 and (2) 174.x for breast cancer; (3) 162.x for lung cancer; (4) 153.x for colon cancer and (5) 154.0–154.1 and 154.8 for rectal cancer. Only incident cases will be considered, that is, excluding cases that have the same diagnosis in the 5 years (2007–2011) before the period of interest. A random sample of cases and non-cases will be selected from each administrative database and the corresponding medical charts will be assessed for validation by pairs of trained, independent reviewers. Case ascertainment within the medical charts will be based on (1) the presence of a primary nodular lesion in the breast, lung or colon–rectum, documented with imaging or endoscopy and (2) a cytological or histological documentation of cancer from a primary or metastatic site. Sensitivity and specificity with 95% CIs will be calculated. Dissemination Study results will be disseminated widely through

  15. Urinary beta-2 microglobulin and alpha-1 microglobulin are useful screening markers for tenofovir-induced kidney tubulopathy in patients with HIV-1 infection: a diagnostic accuracy study.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Shimbo, Takuro; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Takano, Misao; Tanuma, Junko; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Teruya, Katsuji; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi

    2013-10-01

    Kidney tubulopathy is a well-known adverse event of antiretroviral agent tenofovir. A cross-sectional study was conducted to compare the diagnostic accuracy of five tubular markers, with a collection of abnormalities in these markers as the reference standard. The study subjects were patients with HIV-1 infection on ritonavir-boosted darunavir plus tenofovir/emtricitabine with suppressed viral load. Kidney tubular dysfunction (KTD) was predefined as the presence of at least three abnormalities in the following five parameters: β2-microglobulinuria (β2M), α1-microglobulinuria (α1M), high urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), fractional excretion of phosphate (FEIP), and fractional excretion of uric acid (FEUA). Receiver operating characteristic curves and areas under the curves (AUC) were estimated, and the differences between the largest AUC and each of the other AUCs were tested using a nonparametric method. The cutoff value of each tubular marker was determined using raw data of 100% sensitivity with maximal specificity. KTD was diagnosed in 19 of the 190 (10%) patients. The AUCs (95% CIs) of each tubular marker were β2M, 0.970 (0.947-0.992); α1M, 0.968 (0.944-0.992); NAG, 0.901 (0.828-0.974); FEIP, 0.757 (0.607-0.907), and FEUA, 0.762 (0.653-0.872). The AUCs of β2M and α1M were not significantly different, whereas those of the other three markers were smaller. The optimal cutoff values with 100% sensitivity were 1,123 μg/gCr (β2M, specificity 89%), 15.4 mg/gCr (α1M, specificity 87%), 3.58 U/gCr (NAG, specificity 46%), 1.02% (FEIP, specificity 0%), and 3.92% (FEUA, specificity 12%). Urinary β2M and α1M are potentially suitable screening tools for tenofovir-induced KTD. Monitoring either urinary β2M or α1M should be useful in early detection of tenofovir nephrotoxicity. PMID:23467792

  16. A Monte Carlo Comparison of Measures of Relative and Absolute Monitoring Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nietfeld, John L.; Enders, Craig K; Schraw, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Researchers studying monitoring accuracy currently use two different indexes to estimate accuracy: relative accuracy and absolute accuracy. The authors compared the distributional properties of two measures of monitoring accuracy using Monte Carlo procedures that fit within these categories. They manipulated the accuracy of judgments (i.e., chance…

  17. Accuracy and consistency of modern elastomeric pumps.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Robyn S; Missair, Andres; Pham, Phung; Gutierrez, Juan F; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blockade has become a popular method of achieving postoperative analgesia for many surgical procedures. The safety and reliability of infusion pumps are dependent on their flow rate accuracy and consistency. Knowledge of pump rate profiles can help physicians determine which infusion pump is best suited for their clinical applications and specific patient population. Several studies have investigated the accuracy of portable infusion pumps. Using methodology similar to that used by Ilfeld et al, we investigated the accuracy and consistency of several current elastomeric pumps. PMID:25140510

  18. Discrimination in measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Was, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge monitoring predicts academic outcomes in many contexts. However, measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy are often incomplete. In the current study, a measure of students’ ability to discriminate known from unknown information as a component of knowledge monitoring was considered. Undergraduate students’ knowledge monitoring accuracy was assessed and used to predict final exam scores in a specific course. It was found that gamma, a measure commonly used as the measure of knowledge monitoring accuracy, accounted for a small, but significant amount of variance in academic performance whereas the discrimination and bias indexes combined to account for a greater amount of variance in academic performance. PMID:25339979

  19. Reticence, Accuracy and Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2015-12-01

    James Hansen has cautioned the scientific community against "reticence," by which he means a reluctance to speak in public about the threat of climate change. This may contribute to social inaction, with the result that society fails to respond appropriately to threats that are well understood scientifically. Against this, others have warned against the dangers of "crying wolf," suggesting that reticence protects scientific credibility. We argue that both these positions are missing an important point: that reticence is not only a matter of style but also of substance. In previous work, Bysse et al. (2013) showed that scientific projections of key indicators of climate change have been skewed towards the low end of actual events, suggesting a bias in scientific work. More recently, we have shown that scientific efforts to be responsive to contrarian challenges have led scientists to adopt the terminology of a "pause" or "hiatus" in climate warming, despite the lack of evidence to support such a conclusion (Lewandowsky et al., 2015a. 2015b). In the former case, scientific conservatism has led to under-estimation of climate related changes. In the latter case, the use of misleading terminology has perpetuated scientific misunderstanding and hindered effective communication. Scientific communication should embody two equally important goals: 1) accuracy in communicating scientific information and 2) efficacy in expressing what that information means. Scientists should strive to be neither conservative nor adventurous but to be accurate, and to communicate that accurate information effectively.

  20. The Impact of Natural Hydrologic Variability on the Accuracy of Remote Sensing Pond Surface Area Change Detection Studies Within the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrott, J. A.; Macrae, M. L.; Duguay, C. R.

    2009-12-01

    Within the sub-arctic environment, shallow ponds occupy 15-50% of the landscape and strongly contribute to regional hydrological and energy budgets. Given the unique hydrological environment in which they reside, ponds may be good indicators of regional environmental or climatic change. Therefore, accurately delineating and detecting surface area changes within these shallow water features is crucial when understanding the regional impacts of shifting climatic conditions. Recent remote sensing studies have revealed disparate results related to the long-term sustainability of sub-arctic shallow water features. However, many of these studies have not considered the impact of naturally induced hydrologic variability on the accuracy of change detection results. The overall objective of this study was to determine the impact of various environmentally driven hydrologic fluctuations on the ability for remotely sensed images to accurately capture pond surface area and detect change within the sub-arctic. Specifically, this study aimed to determine the influence of (a) inter-seasonal water balance fluctuations (b) antecedent precipitation prior to image acquisition and (c) anomalous annual climate (drought) on the quality of remote sensing studies focused on detecting long-term pond surface area change within the Hudson Bay Lowlands, near Churchill. The objectives were addressed using a combination of methods including climate data, field research, simple water balance modeling and remote sensing imagery. Specifically, a subset of 37 ponds, ranging in size from 918m2 to 34,624m2, were digitized and compared in order to detect surface area change linked to inter-seasonal hydrologic variability (two 1956 air photos), varying antecedent rainfall prior to acquisition dates (2000 and 2001 Landsat 7 images) and normal verses drought conditions (2000 Landsat 7 and 2006 SPOT images). Results from the imagery analyses were linked to climate data and a simple water balance model

  1. MRI-based Preplanning Using CT and MRI Data Fusion in Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With 3D-based Brachytherapy: Feasibility and Accuracy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dolezel, Martin; Odrazka, Karel; Zizka, Jan; Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kohlova, Tereza; Kroulik, Tomas; Spitzer, Dusan; Ryska, Pavel; Tichy, Michal; Kostal, Milan; Jalcova, Lubica

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assisted radiation treatment planning enables enhanced target contouring. The purpose of this study is to analyze the feasibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and MRI data fusion for MRI-based treatment planning in an institution where an MRI scanner is not available in the radiotherapy department. Methods and Materials: The registration inaccuracy of applicators and soft tissue was assessed in 42 applications with CT/MRI data fusion. The absolute positional difference of the center of the applicators was measured in four different planes from the top of the tandem to the cervix. Any inaccuracy of registration of soft tissue in relation to the position of applicators was determined and dose-volume parameters for MRI preplans and for CT/MRI fusion plans with or without target and organs at risk (OAR) adaptation were evaluated. Results: We performed 6,132 measurements in 42 CT/MRI image fusions. Median absolute difference of the center of tandem on CT and MRI was 1.1 mm. Median distance between the center of the right ovoid on CT and MRI was 1.7 and 1.9 mm in the laterolateral and anteroposterior direction, respectively. Corresponding values for the left ovoid were 1.6 and 1.8 mm. Rotation of applicators was 3.1 Degree-Sign . Median absolute difference in position of applicators in relation to soft tissue was 1.93, 1.50, 1.05, and 0.84 mm in the respective transverse planes, and 1.17, 1.28, 1.27, and 1.17 mm in selected angular directions. The dosimetric parameters for organs at risk on CT/MRI fusion plans without OAR adaptation were significantly impaired whereas the target coverage was not influenced. Planning without target adaptation led to overdosing of the target volume, especially high-risk clinical target volume - D{sub 90} 88.2 vs. 83.1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI-based preplanning with consecutive CT/MRI data fusion can be safe and feasible, with an acceptable inaccuracy of soft tissue registration.

  2. Utility of Biomarkers in the Differential Diagnosis of Heart Failure in Older People: Findings from the Heart Failure in Care Homes (HFinCH) Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Mason, James M.; Hancock, Helen C.; Close, Helen; Murphy, Jerry J.; Fuat, Ahmet; de Belder, Mark; Singh, Raj; Teggert, Andrew; Wood, Esther; Brennan, Gill; Hussain, Nehal; Kumar, Nitin; Manshani, Novin; Hodges, David; Wilson, Douglas; Hungin, A. Pali S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The performance of biomarkers for heart failure (HF) in older residents in long-term care is poorly understood and has not differentiated between left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Methods This is the first diagnostic accuracy study in this population to assess the differential diagnostic performance and acceptability of a range of biomarkers against a clinical diagnosis using portable echocardiography. A total of 405 residents, aged 65–100 years (mean 84.2), in 33 UK long-term care facilities were enrolled between April 2009 and June 2010. Results For undifferentiated HF, BNP or NT-proBNP were adequate rule-out tests but would miss one in three cases (BNP: sensitivity 67%, NPV 86%, cut-off 115 pg/ml; NT-proBNP: sensitivity 62%, NPV 87%, cut-off 760 pg/ml). Using higher test cut-offs, both biomarkers were more adequate tests of LVSD, but would still miss one in four cases (BNP: sensitivity 76%, NPV 97%, cut-off 145 pg/ml; NT-proBNP: sensitivity 73%, NPV 97%, cut-off 1000 pg/ml). At these thresholds one third of subjects would test positive and require an echocardiogram. Applying a stricter ‘rule out’ threshold (sensitivity 90%), only one in 10 cases would be missed, but two thirds of subjects would require further investigation. Biomarkers were less useful for HFpEF (BNP: sensitivity 63%, specificity 61%, cut-off 110 pg/ml; NT-proBNP: sensitivity 68%, specificity 56%, cut-off 477 pg/ml). Novel biomarkers (Copeptin, MR-proADM, and MR-proANP) and common signs and symptoms had little diagnostic utility. Conclusions No test, individually or in combination, adequately balanced case finding and rule-out for heart failure in this population; currently, in-situ echocardiography provides the only adequate diagnostic assessment. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN19781227 PMID:23326457

  3. Finite-volume versus streaming-based lattice Boltzmann algorithm for fluid-dynamics simulations: A one-to-one accuracy and performance study.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Kalyan; Mompean, Gilmar; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    A finite-volume (FV) discretization method for the lattice Boltzmann (LB) equation, which combines high accuracy with limited computational cost is presented. In order to assess the performance of the FV method we carry out a systematic comparison, focused on accuracy and computational performances, with the standard streaming lattice Boltzmann equation algorithm. In particular we aim at clarifying whether and in which conditions the proposed algorithm, and more generally any FV algorithm, can be taken as the method of choice in fluid-dynamics LB simulations. For this reason the comparative analysis is further extended to the case of realistic flows, in particular thermally driven flows in turbulent conditions. We report the successful simulation of high-Rayleigh number convective flow performed by a lattice Boltzmann FV-based algorithm with wall grid refinement. PMID:26986438

  4. Finite-volume versus streaming-based lattice Boltzmann algorithm for fluid-dynamics simulations: A one-to-one accuracy and performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Kalyan; Mompean, Gilmar; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    A finite-volume (FV) discretization method for the lattice Boltzmann (LB) equation, which combines high accuracy with limited computational cost is presented. In order to assess the performance of the FV method we carry out a systematic comparison, focused on accuracy and computational performances, with the standard streaming lattice Boltzmann equation algorithm. In particular we aim at clarifying whether and in which conditions the proposed algorithm, and more generally any FV algorithm, can be taken as the method of choice in fluid-dynamics LB simulations. For this reason the comparative analysis is further extended to the case of realistic flows, in particular thermally driven flows in turbulent conditions. We report the successful simulation of high-Rayleigh number convective flow performed by a lattice Boltzmann FV-based algorithm with wall grid refinement.

  5. Short-term solar pressure effect and GM uncertainty on TDRS orbital accuracy: A study of the interaction of modeling error with tracking and orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The TDRS was modeled as a combination of a sun-pointing solar panel and earth-pointing plate. Based on this model, explanations are given for the following orbit determination error characteristics: inherent limits in orbital accuracy, the variation of solar pressure induced orbital error with time of the day of epoch, the insensitivity of range-rate orbits to GM error, and optimum bilateration baseline.

  6. Accuracy of direct digital radiography for detecting occlusal caries in primary teeth compared with conventional radiography and visual inspection: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Dias da Silva, P R; Martins Marques, M; Steagall, W; Medeiros Mendes, F; Lascala, C A

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The diagnosis of caries lesions is still a matter of concern in dentistry. The diagnosis of dental caries by digital radiography has a number of advantages over conventional radiography; however, this method has not been explored fully in the field of paediatric dentistry. This in vitro research evaluated the accuracy of direct digital radiography compared with visual inspection and conventional radiography in the diagnosis of occlusal caries lesions in primary molars. Methods 50 molars were selected and evaluated under standardized conditions by 2 previously calibrated examiners according to 3 diagnostic methods (visual inspection, conventional radiography and direct digital radiography). Direct digital radiographs were obtained with the Dixi3 system (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) and the conventional radiographs with InSight film (Kodak Eastman Co., Rochester, NY). The images were scored and a reference standard was obtained histologically. The interexaminer reliability was calculated using Cohen's kappa test and the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of the methods were calculated. Results Examiner reliability was good. For lesions limited to the enamel, visual inspection showed significantly higher sensitivity and accuracy than both radiographic methods, but no significant difference was found in specificity. For teeth with dentinal caries, no significant differences were found for any parameter when comparing visual and radiographic evaluation. Conclusions Although less accurate than the visual method for detecting caries lesions confined to the enamel, the direct digital radiographic method is as effective as conventional radiographic examination and visual inspection of primary teeth with occlusal caries when the dentine is involved. PMID:20729186

  7. Empathic Embarrassment Accuracy in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Adler, Noga; Dvash, Jonathan; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G

    2015-06-01

    Empathic accuracy refers to the ability of perceivers to accurately share the emotions of protagonists. Using a novel task assessing embarrassment, the current study sought to compare levels of empathic embarrassment accuracy among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with those of matched controls. To assess empathic embarrassment accuracy, we compared the level of embarrassment experienced by protagonists to the embarrassment felt by participants while watching the protagonists. The results show that while the embarrassment ratings of participants and protagonists were highly matched among controls, individuals with ASD failed to exhibit this matching effect. Furthermore, individuals with ASD rated their embarrassment higher than controls when viewing themselves and protagonists on film, but not while performing the task itself. These findings suggest that individuals with ASD tend to have higher ratings of empathic embarrassment, perhaps due to difficulties in emotion regulation that may account for their impaired empathic accuracy and aberrant social behavior. PMID:25732043

  8. Nonverbal self-accuracy in interpersonal interaction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Judith A; Murphy, Nora A; Mast, Marianne Schmid

    2007-12-01

    Four studies measure participants' accuracy in remembering, without forewarning, their own nonverbal behavior after an interpersonal interaction. Self-accuracy for smiling, nodding, gazing, hand gesturing, and self-touching is scored by comparing the participants' recollections with coding based on videotape. Self-accuracy is above chance and of modest magnitude on average. Self-accuracy is greatest for smiling; intermediate for nodding, gazing, and gesturing; and lowest for self-touching. It is higher when participants focus attention away from the self (learning as much as possible about the partner, rearranging the furniture in the room, evaluating the partner, smiling and gazing at the partner) than when participants are more self-focused (getting acquainted, trying to make a good impression on the partner, being evaluated by the partner, engaging in more self-touching). The contributions of cognitive demand and affective state are discussed. PMID:18000102

  9. A prospective observational study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of clinical decision rules for children presenting to emergency departments after head injuries (protocol): the Australasian Paediatric Head Injury Rules Study (APHIRST)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Head injuries in children are responsible for a large number of emergency department visits. Failure to identify a clinically significant intracranial injury in a timely fashion may result in long term neurodisability and death. Whilst cranial computed tomography (CT) provides rapid and definitive identification of intracranial injuries, it is resource intensive and associated with radiation induced cancer. Evidence based head injury clinical decision rules have been derived to aid physicians in identifying patients at risk of having a clinically significant intracranial injury. Three rules have been identified as being of high quality and accuracy: the Canadian Assessment of Tomography for Childhood Head Injury (CATCH) from Canada, the Children’s Head Injury Algorithm for the Prediction of Important Clinical Events (CHALICE) from the UK, and the prediction rule for the identification of children at very low risk of clinically important traumatic brain injury developed by the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) from the USA. This study aims to prospectively validate and compare the performance accuracy of these three clinical decision rules when applied outside the derivation setting. Methods/design This study is a prospective observational study of children aged 0 to less than 18 years presenting to 10 emergency departments within the Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) research network in Australia and New Zealand after head injuries of any severity. Predictor variables identified in CATCH, CHALICE and PECARN clinical decision rules will be collected. Patients will be managed as per the treating clinicians at the participating hospitals. All patients not undergoing cranial CT will receive a follow up call 14 to 90 days after the injury. Outcome data collected will include results of cranial CTs (if performed) and details of admission, intubation, neurosurgery and death. The

  10. Accuracy of 131I Tumor Quantification in Radioimmunotherapy Using SPECT Imaging with an Ultra-High-Energy Collimator: Monte Carlo Study

    PubMed Central

    Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Ljungberg, Michael; Koral, Kenneth F.

    2010-01-01

    Accuracy of 131I tumor quantification after radioimmunotherapy (RIT) was investigated for SPECT imaging with an ultra-highenergy (UHE) collimator designed for imaging 511-keV photons. Methods First, measurements and Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to compare the UHE collimator with a conventionally used, high-energy collimator. On the basis of this comparison, the UHE collimator was selected for this investigation, which was carried out by simulation of spherical tumors in a phantom. Reconstruction was by an expectation–maximization algorithm that included scatter and attenuation correction. Keeping the tumor activity constant, simulations were carried out to assess how volume-of-interest (VOI) counts vary with background activity, radius of rotation (ROR), tumor location, and size. The constant calibration factor for quantification was determined from VOI counts corresponding to a 3.63-cm-radius sphere of known activity. Tight VOIs corresponding to the physical size of the spheres or tumors were used. Results Use of the UHE collimator resulted in a large reduction in 131I penetration, which is especially significant in RIT where background uptake is high. With the UHE collimator, typical patient images showed an improvement in contrast. Considering the desired geometric events, sensitivity was reduced, but only by a factor of 1.6. Simulation results for a 3.63-cm-radius tumor showed that VOI counts vary with background, location, and ROR by less than 3.2%, 3%, and 5.3%, respectively. The variation with tumor size was more significant and was a function of the background. Good quantification accuracy (<6.5% error) was achieved when tumor size was the same as the sphere size used in the calibration, irrespective of the other parameters. For smaller tumors, activities were underestimated by up to −15% for the 2.88-cm-radius sphere, −23% for the 2.29-cm-radius sphere, and −47% for the 1.68-cm-radius sphere. Conclusion Reasonable accuracy can be

  11. The effect of relining on the accuracy and stability of maxillary complete dentures--an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Barco, M T; Moore, B K; Swartz, M L; Boone, M E; Dykema, R W; Phillips, R W

    1979-07-01

    A technique was developed for evaluating in vitro the accuracy or fit of experimental denture bases using a low-viscosity impression material for determining the space between the master die and the processed denture base. These measurements indicated that relining heat-cured maxillary denture bases with autopolymerizing acrylic resin improved their adaptation to the ridges. Interestingly, if no teeth were present in the heat-cured denture base, markedly less distortion occurred after processing. Limited clinical measurements on the stability of maxillary dentures in function showed no statistically significant change in stability after relining, but the trend was toward increased stability with the relined denture. PMID:379306

  12. Landsat classification accuracy assessment procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mead, R. R.; Szajgin, John

    1982-01-01

    A working conference was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 12-14 November, 1980 dealing with Landsat classification Accuracy Assessment Procedures. Thirteen formal presentations were made on three general topics: (1) sampling procedures, (2) statistical analysis techniques, and (3) examples of projects which included accuracy assessment and the associated costs, logistical problems, and value of the accuracy data to the remote sensing specialist and the resource manager. Nearly twenty conference attendees participated in two discussion sessions addressing various issues associated with accuracy assessment. This paper presents an account of the accomplishments of the conference.

  13. Increasing Accuracy in Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacksier, Tracey; Fernandes, Adelino; Matthew, Matt; Lehmann, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Human activity is increasing the concentrations of green house gases (GHG) in the atmosphere which results in temperature increases. High precision is a key requirement of atmospheric measurements to study the global carbon cycle and its effect on climate change. Natural air containing stable isotopes are used in GHG monitoring to calibrate analytical equipment. This presentation will examine the natural air and isotopic mixture preparation process, for both molecular and isotopic concentrations, for a range of components and delta values. The role of precisely characterized source material will be presented. Analysis of individual cylinders within multiple batches will be presented to demonstrate the ability to dynamically fill multiple cylinders containing identical compositions without isotopic fractionation. Additional emphasis will focus on the ability to adjust isotope ratios to more closely bracket sample types without the reliance on combusting naturally occurring materials, thereby improving analytical accuracy.

  14. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  15. Two-dimensional temperature distribution measurement of flames by absorption CT employing CO{sub 2} (Experimental study on the wave number employed and the accuracy of measurement)

    SciTech Connect

    Wakai, Kazunori; Moroto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Shuhei; Bhattacharjee, S.

    1999-07-01

    The authors have developed the algorithm of infrared two-band absorption CT (computed tomography) not only for short optical path where Lambert-Beer law is applicable but also for long optical path where some band model should be applied. The authors have also shown employing CO{sub 2} as an absorption medium, statistical model as a band model and Curtis-Godson model to treat non-uniform temperature fields that when optical path is long and spectrum has steep change, there are suitable wavelengths and widths to keep good accuracy. However, it was done only by computer simulation, and in this report, those results are discussed experimentally. The flat burner was used to compare temperature measured by above method with the temperature measured by sodium D-line reversal method. The results showed good correspondence and it means that the predicted suitable wavelengths and widths are experimentally confirmed. The accuracy, namely, standard deviation of the temperature, at the best wavelength conditions was lower than 20K. Temperature distributions around non-uniform temperature distribution on the flat disk burner and domestic boiler were also measured as applications and the results show that this method is applicable for the measurement of rather complicated two-dimensional temperature distributions.

  16. Study on desirable ionospheric corrections accuracy for network-RTK positioning and its impact on time-to-fix and probability of successful single-epoch ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paziewski, Jacek

    2016-02-01

    The mitigation of ionospheric delay is still of crucial interest in GNSS positioning, especially in precise solutions such as instantaneous RTK positioning. Thus, several effective algorithms and functional models were developed, and also numerous investigations of ionospheric correction properties in RTK positioning have been performed so far. One of the most highly effective approaches in precise relative positioning is the application of the ionosphere-weighted model with network-derived corrections. This contribution investigates the impact of the accuracy of the network ionospheric corrections on time-to-fix in RTK-OTF positioning. Also, an attempt has been made to estimate the desirable accuracy of the network ionospheric corrections, allowing for reliable instantaneous ambiguity resolution. The experiment is based on a multi-baseline GPS RTK positioning supported with network-derived ionospheric corrections for medium length baselines. The results show that in such scenario, the double-differenced ionospheric correction residuals should not exceed ∼1/3 of the L1 wavelength for successful single-epoch ambiguity resolution.

  17. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy between endometrial curettage and pipelle aspiration biopsy in patients treated with progestin for endometrial hyperplasia: a Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group Study (KGOG 2019).

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyoung; Seong, Seok Ju; Lee, Taek Sang; Ki, Kyung-Do; Lim, Myong Cheol; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Kidong; Joo, Won Duk

    2015-10-01

    A prospective multicenter trial has been started in Korea to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of endometrial aspiration biopsy compared with dilatation and curettage in patients treated with progestin for endometrial hyperplasia. For conservative treatment of endometrial hyperplasia, orally administered progestins are most commonly used method with various treatment regimens and more recently, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system also has been used successfully to treat endometrial hyperplasia. However, there is no report about the accuracy of endometrial sampling during hormonal treatment for follow-up evaluation of endometrial hyperplasia. Patients with histologically confirmed endometrial hyperplasia are offered hormonal treatment with any one of the following three options: oral medroxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg/day for 14 days per cycle, continuous oral medroxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg/day or insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system. Histological surveillance is performed at 3 months or 6 months following initial treatment. Endometrial tissues are obtained via endometrial aspiration biopsy using a pipelle and dilatation and curettage. In the case of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, endometrial aspiration biopsy will be done with levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in uterus and then, after the removal of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, dilatation and curettage will be done. The biopsy findings will be compared. The primary endpoint is to compare the pathological outcome of endometrial aspiration with dilatation and curettage. The secondary endpoint is the response rate with three types of progestin treatment at 6 months. PMID:26206899

  18. The impact of accuracy motivation on interpretation, comparison, and correction processes: accuracy x knowledge accessibility effects.

    PubMed

    Stapel, D A; Koomen, W; Zeelenberg, M

    1998-04-01

    Four studies provide evidence for the notion that there may be boundaries to the extent to which accuracy motivation may help perceivers to escape the influence of fortuitously activated information. Specifically, although accuracy motivations may eliminate assimilative accessibility effects, they are less likely to eliminate contrastive accessibility effects. It was found that the occurrence of different types of contrast effects (comparison and correction) was not significantly affected by participants' accuracy motivations. Furthermore, it was found that the mechanisms instigated by accuracy motivations differ from those ignited by correction instructions: Accuracy motivations attenuate assimilation effects because perceivers add target interpretations to the one suggested by primed information. Conversely, it was found that correction instructions yield contrast and prompt respondents to remove the priming event's influence from their reaction to the target. PMID:9569650

  19. Accuracy of numerically produced compensators.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H; Evans, M D; Fallone, B G

    1999-01-01

    A feasibility study is performed to assess the utility of a computer numerically controlled (CNC) mill to produce compensating filters for conventional clinical use and for the delivery of intensity-modulated beams. A computer aided machining (CAM) software is used to assist in the design and construction of such filters. Geometric measurements of stepped and wedged surfaces are made to examine the accuracy of surface milling. Molds are milled and filled with molten alloy to produce filters, and both the molds and filters are examined for consistency and accuracy. Results show that the deviation of the filter surfaces from design does not exceed 1.5%. The effective attenuation coefficient is measured for CadFree, a cadmium-free alloy, in a 6 MV photon beam. The effective attenuation coefficients at the depth of maximum dose (1.5 cm) and at 10 cm in solid water phantom are found to be 0.546 cm-1 and 0.522 cm-1, respectively. Further attenuation measurements are made with Cerrobend to assess the variations of the effective attenuation coefficient with field size and source-surface distance. The ability of the CNC mill to accurately produce surfaces is verified with dose profile measurements in a 6 MV photon beam. The test phantom is composed of a 10 degrees polystyrene wedge and a 30 degrees polystyrene wedge, presenting both a sharp discontinuity and sloped surfaces. Dose profiles, measured at the depth of compensation (10 cm) beneath the test phantom and beneath a flat phantom, are compared to those produced by a commercial treatment planning system. Agreement between measured and predicted profiles is within 2%, indicating the viability of the system for filter production. PMID:10100166

  20. A study of the influence of the data acquisition system sampling rate on the accuracy of measured acceleration loads for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Julia H.

    1992-01-01

    A research effort was initiated at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC), to describe the relationship between the sampling rate and the accuracy of acceleration loads obtained from the data acquisition system of a transport aircraft. An accelerometer was sampled and digitized at a rate of 100 samples per second onboard a NASA Boeing 737 (B-737) flight research aircraft. Numerical techniques were used to reconstruct 2.5 hours of flight data into its original input waveform and then re-sample the waveform into rates of 4, 8, 16, and 32 samples per second. Peak-between-means counting technique and power spectral analysis were used to evaluate each sampling rate using the 32 samples per second data as the comparison. This paper presents the results from these methods and includes in appendix A, the peak-between-means counting results used in a general fatigue analysis for each of the sampling rates.

  1. Accuracy and Reproducibility of HER2 Status in Breast Cancer Using Immunohistochemistry: A Quality Control Study in Tuscany Evaluating the Impact of Updated 2013 ASCO/CAP Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S; Caini, S; Paglierani, M; Saieva, C; Vezzosi, V; Baroni, G; Simoni, A; Palli, D

    2015-04-01

    The correct identification of HER2-positive cases is a key point to provide the most appropriate therapy to breast cancer (BC) patients. We aimed at investigating the reproducibility and accuracy of HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a selected series of 35 invasive BC cases across the pathological anatomy laboratories in Tuscany, Italy. Unstained sections of each BC case were sent to 12 participating laboratories. Pathologists were required to score according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) four-tier scoring system (0, 1+, 2+, 3+). Sixteen and nineteen cases were HER2 non-amplified and amplified respectively on fluorescence in situ hybridization. Among 192 readings of the 16 HER2 non-amplified samples, 153 (79.7%) were coded as 0 or 1+, 39 (20.3%) were 2+, and none was 3+ (false positive rate 0%). Among 228 readings of the 19 HER2 amplified samples, 56 (24.6%) were scored 0 or 1+, 79 (34.6%) were 2+, and 93 (40.8%) were 3+. The average sensitivity was 75.4%, ranging between 47% and 100%, and the overall false negative rate was 24.6%. Participation of pathological anatomy laboratories performing HER2 testing by IHC in external quality assurance programs should be made mandatory, as the system is able to identify laboratories with suboptimal performance that may need technical advice. Updated 2013 ASCO/CAP recommendations should be adopted as the widening of IHC 2+ "equivocal" category would improve overall accuracy of HER2 testing, as more cases would be classified in this category and, consequently, tested with an in situ hybridisation method. PMID:25367072

  2. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  3. Meditation Experience Predicts Introspective Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Kieran C. R.; Zakarauskas, Pierre; Dixon, Matt; Ellamil, Melissa; Thompson, Evan; Christoff, Kalina

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of subjective reports, especially those involving introspection of one's own internal processes, remains unclear, and research has demonstrated large individual differences in introspective accuracy. It has been hypothesized that introspective accuracy may be heightened in persons who engage in meditation practices, due to the highly introspective nature of such practices. We undertook a preliminary exploration of this hypothesis, examining introspective accuracy in a cross-section of meditation practitioners (1–15,000 hrs experience). Introspective accuracy was assessed by comparing subjective reports of tactile sensitivity for each of 20 body regions during a ‘body-scanning’ meditation with averaged, objective measures of tactile sensitivity (mean size of body representation area in primary somatosensory cortex; two-point discrimination threshold) as reported in prior research. Expert meditators showed significantly better introspective accuracy than novices; overall meditation experience also significantly predicted individual introspective accuracy. These results suggest that long-term meditators provide more accurate introspective reports than novices. PMID:23049790

  4. Towards Experimental Accuracy from the First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, O. L.; Lodi, L.; Tennyson, J.; Zobov, N. F.

    2013-06-01

    Producing ab initio ro-vibrational energy levels of small, gas-phase molecules with an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} would constitute a significant step forward in theoretical spectroscopy and would place calculated line positions considerably closer to typical experimental accuracy. Such an accuracy has been recently achieved for the H_3^+ molecular ion for line positions up to 17 000 cm ^{-1}. However, since H_3^+ is a two-electron system, the electronic structure methods used in this study are not applicable to larger molecules. A major breakthrough was reported in ref., where an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} was achieved ab initio for seven water isotopologues. Calculated vibrational and rotational energy levels up to 15 000 cm^{-1} and J=25 resulted in a standard deviation of 0.08 cm^{-1} with respect to accurate reference data. As far as line intensities are concerned, we have already achieved for water a typical accuracy of 1% which supersedes average experimental accuracy. Our results are being actively extended along two major directions. First, there are clear indications that our results for water can be improved to an accuracy of the order of 0.01 cm^{-1} by further, detailed ab initio studies. Such level of accuracy would already be competitive with experimental results in some situations. A second, major, direction of study is the extension of such a 0.1 cm^{-1} accuracy to molecules containg more electrons or more than one non-hydrogen atom, or both. As examples of such developments we will present new results for CO, HCN and H_2S, as well as preliminary results for NH_3 and CH_4. O.L. Polyansky, A. Alijah, N.F. Zobov, I.I. Mizus, R. Ovsyannikov, J. Tennyson, L. Lodi, T. Szidarovszky and A.G. Csaszar, Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. London A, {370}, 5014-5027 (2012). O.L. Polyansky, R.I. Ovsyannikov, A.A. Kyuberis, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and N.F. Zobov, J. Phys. Chem. A, (in press). L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and O.L. Polyansky, J. Chem. Phys. {135}, 034113 (2011).

  5. Accuracy assessment of GOCE-based geopotential models and their use for modelling the gravimetric quasigeoid - A case study for Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godah, Walyeldeen; Szelachowska, Malgorzata; Krynski, Jan

    2014-06-01

    The GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) has significantly upgraded the knowledge on the Earth gravity field. In this contribution the accuracy of height anomalies determined from Global Geopotential Models (GGMs) based on approximately 27 months GOCE satellite gravity gradiometry (SGG) data have been assessed over Poland using three sets of precise GNSS/levelling data. The fits of height anomalies obtained from 4th release GOCE-based GGMs to GNSS/levelling data were discussed and compared with the respective ones of 3rd release GOCE-based GGMs and the EGM08. Furthermore, two highly accurate gravimetric quasigeoid models were developed over the area of Poland using high resolution Faye gravity anomalies. In the first, the GOCE-based GGM was used as a reference geopotential model, and in the second - the EGM08. They were evaluated with GNSS/levelling data and their accuracy performance was assessed. The use of GOCE-based GGMs for recovering the long-wavelength gravity signal in gravimetric quasigeoid modelling was discussed. Misja GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) przyczyniła się do znacznego poprawienia znajomości pola siły ciężkości Ziemi. W artykule przedstawiono wyniki oszacowania dokładności anomalii wysokości, wyznaczonych z globalnych modeli geopotencjału opracowanych na podstawie blisko 27 miesięcy pomiarów z satelitarnej misji gradiometrycznej GOCE. Do oszacowania wykorzystano trzy zbiory dokładnych danych satelitarno-niwelacyjnych z obszaru Polski. Omówiono wyniki wpasowania wartości anomalii wysokości otrzymanych z czwartej wersji globalnych modeli geopotencjału wyznaczonych na podstawie danych misji GOCE do danych satelitarno-niwelacyjnych oraz porównano je z wynikami odpowiedniego wpasowania trzeciej wersji globalnych modeli geopotencjału otrzymanych z GOCE oraz z modelu EGM08. Ponadto, wykorzystując wysokorozdzielczy zbiór grawimetrycznych anomalii Faye'a, wyznaczono dla

  6. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  7. High accuracy broadband infrared spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan

    Mueller matrix spectroscopy or Spectropolarimetry combines conventional spectroscopy with polarimetry, providing more information than can be gleaned from spectroscopy alone. Experimental studies on infrared polarization properties of materials covering a broad spectral range have been scarce due to the lack of available instrumentation. This dissertation aims to fill the gap by the design, development, calibration and testing of a broadband Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectropolarimeter. The instrument operates over the 3-12 mum waveband and offers better overall accuracy compared to the previous generation instruments. Accurate calibration of a broadband spectropolarimeter is a non-trivial task due to the inherent complexity of the measurement process. An improved calibration technique is proposed for the spectropolarimeter and numerical simulations are conducted to study the effectiveness of the proposed technique. Insights into the geometrical structure of the polarimetric measurement matrix is provided to aid further research towards global optimization of Mueller matrix polarimeters. A high performance infrared wire-grid polarizer is characterized using the spectropolarimeter. Mueller matrix spectrum measurements on Penicillin and pine pollen are also presented.

  8. Accuracy of polyp localization at colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Sam A.; Hewett, David G.; Watson, Marcus O.; Kendall, Bradley J.; Hourigan, Luke F.; Holtmann, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Accurate documentation of lesion localization at the time of colonoscopic polypectomy is important for future surveillance, management of complications such as delayed bleeding, and for guiding surgical resection. We aimed to assess the accuracy of endoscopic localization of polyps during colonoscopy and examine variables that may influence this accuracy. Patients and methods: We conducted a prospective observational study in consecutive patients presenting for elective, outpatient colonoscopy. All procedures were performed by Australian certified colonoscopists. The endoscopic location of each polyp was reported by the colonoscopist at the time of resection and prospectively recorded. Magnetic endoscope imaging was used to determine polyp location, and colonoscopists were blinded to this image. Three experienced colonoscopists, blinded to the endoscopist’s assessment of polyp location, independently scored the magnetic endoscope images to obtain a reference standard for polyp location (Cronbach alpha 0.98). The accuracy of colonoscopist polyp localization using this reference standard was assessed, and colonoscopist, procedural and patient variables affecting accuracy were evaluated. Results: A total of 155 patients were enrolled and 282 polyps were resected in 95 patients by 14 colonoscopists. The overall accuracy of polyp localization was 85 % (95 % confidence interval, CI; 60 – 96 %). Accuracy varied significantly (P < 0.001) by colonic segment: caecum 100 %, ascending 77 % (CI;65 – 90), transverse 84 % (CI;75 – 92), descending 56 % (CI;32 – 81), sigmoid 88 % (CI;79 – 97), rectum 96 % (CI;90 – 101). There were significant differences in accuracy between colonoscopists (P < 0.001), and colonoscopist experience was a significant independent predictor of accuracy (OR 3.5, P = 0.028) after adjustment for patient and procedural variables. Conclusions: Accuracy of

  9. Comparing the accuracy of high-dimensional neural network potentials and the systematic molecular fragmentation method: A benchmark study for all-trans alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastegger, Michael; Kauffmann, Clemens; Behler, Jörg; Marquetand, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    Many approaches, which have been developed to express the potential energy of large systems, exploit the locality of the atomic interactions. A prominent example is the fragmentation methods in which the quantum chemical calculations are carried out for overlapping small fragments of a given molecule that are then combined in a second step to yield the system's total energy. Here we compare the accuracy of the systematic molecular fragmentation approach with the performance of high-dimensional neural network (HDNN) potentials introduced by Behler and Parrinello. HDNN potentials are similar in spirit to the fragmentation approach in that the total energy is constructed as a sum of environment-dependent atomic energies, which are derived indirectly from electronic structure calculations. As a benchmark set, we use all-trans alkanes containing up to eleven carbon atoms at the coupled cluster level of theory. These molecules have been chosen because they allow to extrapolate reliable reference energies for very long chains, enabling an assessment of the energies obtained by both methods for alkanes including up to 10 000 carbon atoms. We find that both methods predict high-quality energies with the HDNN potentials yielding smaller errors with respect to the coupled cluster reference.

  10. Comparing the accuracy of high-dimensional neural network potentials and the systematic molecular fragmentation method: A benchmark study for all-trans alkanes.

    PubMed

    Gastegger, Michael; Kauffmann, Clemens; Behler, Jörg; Marquetand, Philipp

    2016-05-21

    Many approaches, which have been developed to express the potential energy of large systems, exploit the locality of the atomic interactions. A prominent example is the fragmentation methods in which the quantum chemical calculations are carried out for overlapping small fragments of a given molecule that are then combined in a second step to yield the system's total energy. Here we compare the accuracy of the systematic molecular fragmentation approach with the performance of high-dimensional neural network (HDNN) potentials introduced by Behler and Parrinello. HDNN potentials are similar in spirit to the fragmentation approach in that the total energy is constructed as a sum of environment-dependent atomic energies, which are derived indirectly from electronic structure calculations. As a benchmark set, we use all-trans alkanes containing up to eleven carbon atoms at the coupled cluster level of theory. These molecules have been chosen because they allow to extrapolate reliable reference energies for very long chains, enabling an assessment of the energies obtained by both methods for alkanes including up to 10 000 carbon atoms. We find that both methods predict high-quality energies with the HDNN potentials yielding smaller errors with respect to the coupled cluster reference. PMID:27208939

  11. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  12. Accuracy assessment system and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Houston, A. G.; Badhwar, G.; Bender, M. J.; Rader, M. L.; Eppler, W. G.; Ahlers, C. W.; White, W. P.; Vela, R. R.; Hsu, E. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The accuracy and reliability of LACIE estimates of wheat production, area, and yield is determined at regular intervals throughout the year by the accuracy assessment subsystem which also investigates the various LACIE error sources, quantifies the errors, and relates then to their causes. Timely feedback of these error evaluations to the LACIE project was the only mechanism by which improvements in the crop estimation system could be made during the short 3 year experiment.

  13. Evaluating LANDSAT wildland classification accuracies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures to evaluate the accuracy of LANDSAT derived wildland cover classifications are described. The evaluation procedures include: (1) implementing a stratified random sample for obtaining unbiased verification data; (2) performing area by area comparisons between verification and LANDSAT data for both heterogeneous and homogeneous fields; (3) providing overall and individual classification accuracies with confidence limits; (4) displaying results within contingency tables for analysis of confusion between classes; and (5) quantifying the amount of information (bits/square kilometer) conveyed in the LANDSAT classification.

  14. The accuracy of automatic tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastrov, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that tracking accuracy changes similarly to the rate of change of the curve of the measurement conversion. The problem that internal noise increases along with the signals processed by the tracking device and that tracking accuracy thus drops were considered. The main prerequisite for solution is consideration of the dependences of the output signal of the tracking device sensor not only on the measured parameter but on the signal itself.

  15. Asymptotic accuracy of two-class discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.K.; Baird, H.S.

    1994-12-31

    Poor quality-e.g. sparse or unrepresentative-training data is widely suspected to be one cause of disappointing accuracy of isolated-character classification in modern OCR machines. We conjecture that, for many trainable classification techniques, it is in fact the dominant factor affecting accuracy. To test this, we have carried out a study of the asymptotic accuracy of three dissimilar classifiers on a difficult two-character recognition problem. We state this problem precisely in terms of high-quality prototype images and an explicit model of the distribution of image defects. So stated, the problem can be represented as a stochastic source of an indefinitely long sequence of simulated images labeled with ground truth. Using this sequence, we were able to train all three classifiers to high and statistically indistinguishable asymptotic accuracies (99.9%). This result suggests that the quality of training data was the dominant factor affecting accuracy. The speed of convergence during training, as well as time/space trade-offs during recognition, differed among the classifiers.

  16. Decreased interoceptive accuracy following social exclusion.

    PubMed

    Durlik, Caroline; Tsakiris, Manos

    2015-04-01

    The need for social affiliation is one of the most important and fundamental human needs. Unsurprisingly, humans display strong negative reactions to social exclusion. In the present study, we investigated the effect of social exclusion on interoceptive accuracy - accuracy in detecting signals arising inside the body - measured with a heartbeat perception task. We manipulated exclusion using Cyberball, a widely used paradigm of a virtual ball-tossing game, with half of the participants being included during the game and the other half of participants being ostracized during the game. Our results indicated that heartbeat perception accuracy decreased in the excluded, but not in the included, participants. We discuss these results in the context of social and physical pain overlap, as well as in relation to internally versus externally oriented attention. PMID:25701592

  17. Vowel Space Characteristics and Vowel Identification Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relation between vowel production characteristics and intelligibility. Method: Acoustic characteristics of 10 vowels produced by 45 men and 48 women from the J. M. Hillenbrand, L. A. Getty, M. J. Clark, and K. Wheeler (1995) study were examined and compared with identification accuracy. Global (mean f0, F1, and F2;…

  18. Observed Consultation: Confidence and Accuracy of Assessors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweed, Mike; Ingham, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Judgments made by the assessors observing consultations are widely used in the assessment of medical students. The aim of this research was to study judgment accuracy and confidence and the relationship between these. Assessors watched recordings of consultations, scoring the students on: a checklist of items; attributes of consultation; a…

  19. Accuracy of subjective and objective handwriting assessment for differentiating Parkinson's disease from tremulous subjects without evidence of dopaminergic deficits (SWEDDs): an FP-CIT-validated study.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, N P S; Wang, L; Gontu, V; Grosset, D G; Bain, P G

    2012-11-01

    Handwriting examinations are commonly performed in the analysis of tremor and Parkinson's disease (PD). We analyzed the accuracy of subjective and objective assessment of handwriting samples for distinguishing 27 PD cases, 22 with tremulous PD, and five with akinetic-rigid PD, from 39 movement-disorder patients with normal presynaptic dopamine imaging (subjects without evidence of dopamine deficiency or SWEDDs; 31 with dystonic tremor (DT), six indeterminate tremor syndrome, one essential tremor, one vascular parkinsonism). All handwriting analysis was performed blind to clinical details. Subjective classification was made as: (1) micrographia, (2) normal, or (3) macrographia. In addition, a range of objective metrices were measured on standardized handwriting specimens. Subjective assessments found micrographia more frequently in PD than SWEDDs (p = 0.0352) and in akinetic-rigid than tremulous PD (p = 0.0259). Macrographia was predominantly seen in patients with dystonic tremor and not other diagnoses (p = 0.007). Micrographia had a mean sensitivity of 55 % and specificity of 84 % for distinguishing PD from SWEDDs and mean sensitivity of 90 % and specificity of 55 % for distinguishing akinetic-rigid PD from tremulous PD. Macrographia had a sensitivity of 26 % and specificity of 96 % for distinguishing DT from all other diagnoses. The best of the objective metrices increased sensitivity for the distinction of SWEDDs from PD with a reduction in specificity. We conclude that micrographia is more indicative of PD than SWEDDs and more characteristic of akinetic-rigid than tremulous PD. In addition, macrographia strongly suggests a diagnosis of dystonic tremor. PMID:22532169

  20. Bias, precision and accuracy in the estimation of cuticular and respiratory water loss: a case study from a highly variable cockroach, Perisphaeria sp.

    PubMed

    Gray, Emilie M; Chown, Steven L

    2008-01-01

    We compared the precision, bias and accuracy of two techniques that were recently proposed to estimate the contributions of cuticular and respiratory water loss to total water loss in insects. We performed measurements of VCO2 and VH2O in normoxia, hyperoxia and anoxia using flow through respirometry on single individuals of the highly variable cockroach Perisphaeria sp. to compare estimates of cuticular and respiratory water loss (CWL and RWL) obtained by the VH2O-VCO2 y-intercept method with those obtained by the hyperoxic switch method. Precision was determined by assessing the repeatability of values obtained whereas bias was assessed by comparing the methods' results to each other and to values for other species found in the literature. We found that CWL was highly repeatable by both methods (R0.88) and resulted in similar values to measures of CWL determined during the closed-phase of discontinuous gas exchange (DGE). Repeatability of RWL was much lower (R=0.40) and significant only in the case of the hyperoxic method. RWL derived from the hyperoxic method is higher (by 0.044 micromol min(-1)) than that obtained from the method traditionally used for measuring water loss during the closed-phase of DGE, suggesting that in the past RWL may have been underestimated. The very low cuticular permeability of this species (3.88 microg cm(-2) h(-1) Torr(-1)) is reasonable given the seasonally hot and dry habitat where it lives. We also tested the hygric hypothesis proposed to account for the evolution of discontinuous gas exchange cycles and found no effect of respiratory pattern on RWL, although the ratio of mean VH2O to VCO2 was higher for continuous patterns compared with discontinuous ones. PMID:17949739

  1. Practical Classification Guidelines for Diabetes in patients treated with insulin: a cross-sectional study of the accuracy of diabetes diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Suzy V; Wienand-Barnett, Sophie; Shepherd, Maggie; King, Sophie M; Fox, Charles; Khunti, Kamlesh; Oram, Richard A; Knight, Bea A; Hattersley, Andrew T; Jones, Angus G; Shields, Beverley M

    2016-01-01

    Background Differentiating between type 1 and type 2 diabetes is fundamental to ensuring appropriate management of patients, but can be challenging, especially when treating with insulin. The 2010 UK Practical Classification Guidelines for Diabetes were developed to help make the differentiation. Aim To assess diagnostic accuracy of the UK guidelines against ‘gold standard’ definitions of type 1 and type 2 diabetes based on measured C-peptide levels. Design and setting In total, 601 adults with insulin-treated diabetes and diabetes duration ≥5 years were recruited in Devon, Northamptonshire, and Leicestershire. Method Baseline information and home urine sample were collected. Urinary C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) measures endogenous insulin production. Gold standard type 1 diabetes was defined as continuous insulin treatment within 3 years of diagnosis and absolute insulin deficiency (UCPCR<0.2 nmol/mmol ≥5 years post-diagnosis); all others classed as having type 2 diabetes. Diagnostic performance of the clinical criteria was assessed and other criteria explored using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results UK guidelines correctly classified 86% of participants. Most misclassifications occurred in patients classed as having type 1 diabetes who had significant endogenous insulin levels (57 out of 601; 9%); most in those diagnosed ≥35 years and treated with insulin from diagnosis, where 37 out of 66 (56%) were misclassified. Time to insulin and age at diagnosis performed best in predicting long-term endogenous insulin production (ROC AUC = 0.904 and 0.871); BMI was a less strong predictor of diabetes type (AUC = 0.824). Conclusion Current UK guidelines provide a pragmatic clinical approach to classification reflecting long-term endogenous insulin production; caution is needed in older patients commencing insulin from diagnosis, where misclassification rates are increased. PMID:27080317

  2. Screening for Depression in the General Population with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D): A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vilagut, Gemma; Forero, Carlos G.; Barbaglia, Gabriela; Alonso, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to collect and meta-analyse the existing evidence regarding the performance of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) for detecting depression in general population and primary care settings. Method Systematic literature search in PubMed and PsychINFO. Eligible studies were: a) validation studies of screening questionnaires with information on the accuracy of the CES-D; b) samples from general populations or primary care settings; c) standardized diagnostic interviews following standard classification systems used as gold standard; and d) English or Spanish language of publication. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and diagnostic odds ratio were estimated for several cut-off points using bivariate mixed effects models for each threshold. The summary receiver operating characteristic curve was estimated with Rutter and Gatsonis mixed effects models; area under the curve was calculated. Quality of the studies was assessed with the QUADAS tool. Causes of heterogeneity were evaluated with the Rutter and Gatsonis mixed effects model including each covariate at a time. Results 28 studies (10,617 participants) met eligibility criteria. The median prevalence of Major Depression was 8.8% (IQ range from 3.8% to 12.6%). The overall area under the curve was 0.87. At the cut-off 16, sensitivity was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.82–0.92), specificity 0.70 (95% CI: 0.65–0.75), and DOR 16.2 (95% CI: 10.49–25.10). Better trade-offs between sensitivity and specificity were observed (Sensitivity = 0.83, Specificity = 0.78, diagnostic odds ratio = 16.64) for cut-off 20. None of the variables assessed as possible sources of heterogeneity was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion The CES-D has acceptable screening accuracy in the general population or primary care settings, but it should not be used as an isolated diagnostic measure of depression. Depending on the test objectives, the cut-off 20 may be more adequate than the value

  3. Audiovisual biofeedback improves motion prediction accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of motion prediction, utilized to overcome the system latency of motion management radiotherapy systems, is hampered by irregularities present in the patients’ respiratory pattern. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been shown to reduce respiratory irregularities. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that AV biofeedback improves the accuracy of motion prediction. Methods: An AV biofeedback system combined with real-time respiratory data acquisition and MR images were implemented in this project. One-dimensional respiratory data from (1) the abdominal wall (30 Hz) and (2) the thoracic diaphragm (5 Hz) were obtained from 15 healthy human subjects across 30 studies. The subjects were required to breathe with and without the guidance of AV biofeedback during each study. The obtained respiratory signals were then implemented in a kernel density estimation prediction algorithm. For each of the 30 studies, five different prediction times ranging from 50 to 1400 ms were tested (150 predictions performed). Prediction error was quantified as the root mean square error (RMSE); the RMSE was calculated from the difference between the real and predicted respiratory data. The statistical significance of the prediction results was determined by the Student's t-test. Results: Prediction accuracy was considerably improved by the implementation of AV biofeedback. Of the 150 respiratory predictions performed, prediction accuracy was improved 69% (103/150) of the time for abdominal wall data, and 78% (117/150) of the time for diaphragm data. The average reduction in RMSE due to AV biofeedback over unguided respiration was 26% (p < 0.001) and 29% (p < 0.001) for abdominal wall and diaphragm respiratory motion, respectively. Conclusions: This study was the first to demonstrate that the reduction of respiratory irregularities due to the implementation of AV biofeedback improves prediction accuracy. This would result in increased efficiency of motion

  4. Investigating the accuracy of parentally reported weights and lengths at 12 months of age as compared to measured weights and lengths in a longitudinal childhood genome study

    PubMed Central

    Hazrati, Sahel; Hourigan, Suchitra K; Waller, Allison; Yui, Yvonne; Gilchrist, Nancy; Huddleston, Kathi; Niederhuber, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity studies rely on parentally reported anthropometrics. However, the accuracy of such data has not been evaluated for 12-month-old children. Moreover, methods to improve the accuracy of reported data have not been assessed in prior studies. Methods A total of 185 children enrolled in a northern Virginia childhood longitudinal cohort genomic study had parentally completed surveys at 12 months. Measured weights and lengths were recorded for the same children from their 12-month paediatrician visit. Weight for length percentiles were calculated using World Health Organization gender-specific growth charts. The agreement between reported and measured values was examined using Pearson's correlation, paired t-test and κ statistics. The interquartile outlier rule was used to detect and remove outliers. Results Parentally reported weight was strongly associated with measured weight at 12 months (r=0.90). There was only a moderate correlation between parentally reported and measured lengths (r=0.52) and calculated weight for length percentiles (r=0.65). After removing outliers from parentally reported data, there was an increase in correlation between parentally reported and measured data for weight (r=0.93), length (r=0.69) and weight for length percentiles (r=0.76). Outliers removed compared to all children included were more likely to have maternal education less than a bachelor's degree (p=0.007). Conclusions After removal of outliers from reported data, there is a strong correlation between calculated reported and measured weight for length percentiles suggesting that this may be an effective method to increase accuracy when conducting large-scale obesity studies in young children where study costs benefit from using parentally reported data. PMID:27491670

  5. Multi-temporal topographic models in fluvial systems: are accuracies enough to change the temporal and spatial scales of our studies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vericat, Damià; Ramos, Ester; Brasington, James; Muñoz, Efrén; Béjar, María; Gibbins, Chris; Batalla, Ramon J.; Tena, Álvaro; Smith, Mark; Wheaton, Joe

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in topography are offering a set of opportunities that deserve a critical evaluation before being successfully applied. Terrestrial Laser Scanning opened a new world by offering the opportunity to obtain topographic models at unprecedented resolutions. The time involved in data acquisition, although has substantially improved by means of fast scanners and new mobile platforms, limited the spatial and temporal scales in which such technique could be applied. Automatic Digital Photogrammetry or Structure from Motion is now offering a new set of opportunities and challenges. This technique possesses the trilogy a geomorphologist is looking to fully understand how landforms change and which are the main causes and consequences: speed, cost and resolution. But, a set of questions arise after all post-processing involved in these novel datasets: are accuracies enough to jump at large spatial scales? Can we repeat topographic surveys and depict small magnitude but relatively high frequent landform deformations overcoming the minimum level of detection of our comparisons? In this paper we present some of the preliminary results obtained in the background of MorphSed (www.morphsed.es). Morphsed is analysing the morpho-sedimentary dynamics of a fluvial system at multiple temporal scales. Multi-event topographic models (DEMs) are obtained by means of Structure from Motion using close range aerial photography obtained in a 12-km channel reach of the wandering Upper River Cinca (Southern Pyrenees, Iberian Peninsula). Topographic channel changes are critically analysed based on the quality of the developed models. DEMs obtained at different periods are compared (DoD). Two general comparisons are performed: (a) comparison of topographic models obtained before and after low magnitude channel changes, and (b) comparison of models acquired before and after major channel disturbances. Special attention is paid to the role of the ground control, data density and

  6. Population screening for coeliac disease in primary care by district nurses using a rapid antibody test: diagnostic accuracy and feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of screening for coeliac disease by rapid detection of IgA antibodies to tissue transglutaminase performed in primary care. Design District nurses screened 6 year old children using rapid antibody testing of finger prick blood. They also collected capillary blood samples for laboratory determination of IgA and IgG antibodies to endomysium and IgA antibodies to tissue transglutaminase. Children with positive rapid test results were directly sent for biopsy of the small intestine. Setting Primary care in Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok county, Hungary. Participants 2690 children (77% of 6 year olds living in the county) and 120 nurses. Main outcome measures Positivity for antibodies to endomysium or transglutaminase in the laboratory and coeliac disease confirmed at biopsy. Results 37 children (1.4%, 95% confidence interval 0.9% to 1.8%) had biopsy confirmed coeliac disease. Only five of these children had been diagnosed clinically before screening. Rapid testing had a 78.1% sensitivity (70.0% to 89.3%) and 100% specificity (88.4% to 100%) for a final diagnosis of coeliac disease by biopsy. Sensitivity was 65.1% (50.2% to 77.6%) and specificity was 100% (99.8% to 100%) compared with combined results of IgA and IgG laboratory tests. Trained laboratory workers detected 30 of the 31 newly diagnosed IgA competent patients with the rapid test kit used blindly. Median time to biopsy after a positive rapid test result was significantly shorter (20 days, range 4-148) than after a positive laboratory result (142 days, 70-256; P<0.001). Children with coeliac disease detected at screening were smaller and had worse health status than their peers but they improved on a gluten-free diet. Conclusions A simple rapid antibody test enabled primary care nurses to detect patients with coeliac disease in the community who were not picked up in clinical care. Extra training is needed to improve sensitivity. PMID:18063612

  7. A Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Detail Reproduction of Four Hydrophilic Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression Materials Tested Under Dry, Moist, and Wet Conditions-An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Nagrath, Rahul; Lahori, Manesh; Agrawal, Manjari

    2014-12-01

    Vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials have application in a wide variety of situations in both fixed and removable prosthodontics. A major limitation of VPS impression materials is their hydrophobicity. There are two aspects of this problem, the wettability of the polymerized impression by dental gypsum materials and the ability of the unpolymerized material to wet intraoral tissues. To address this problem, manufacturers have added surfactants and labelled these new products as "hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane." The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare dimensional accuracy and surface detail reproduction of four hydrophilic VPS impression materials, when used under dry, moist, and wet conditions. A total of 180 samples were made of stainless steel die similar to as described in ADA sp. no. 19. The die was scored with three horizontal and two vertical lines. Impressions were made under dry, moist and wet conditions. Dimensional accuracy was measured by comparing the length of the middle horizontal line in each impression to the same line on the metal die, by using Universal Length Measuring machine. A 2-way ANOVA was performed on the percentage change data for measured lengths of the 4 impression materials under the 3 conditions to evaluate dimensional accuracy. Surface detail was evaluated in two ways: (1) by use of criteria similar to ADA sp. no. 19 for detail reproduction, and (2) by use of a method that categorized the impressions as satisfactory or unsatisfactory based on their surface characteristics: presence of pits, voids, or roughness. Pearson X2 (α = 0.05) was used to compare surface detail reproduction results. Conditions (dry, moist, and wet) did not cause significant adverse effects on the dimensional accuracy of all the four material. With both surface detail analyses, dry, moist, and wet conditions had a significant effect on the detail reproduction of all the four materials (P < 0.05). The study concluded that the

  8. Accuracy in optical overlay metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringoltz, Barak; Marciano, Tal; Yaziv, Tal; DeLeeuw, Yaron; Klein, Dana; Feler, Yoel; Adam, Ido; Gurevich, Evgeni; Sella, Noga; Lindenfeld, Ze'ev; Leviant, Tom; Saltoun, Lilach; Ashwal, Eltsafon; Alumot, Dror; Lamhot, Yuval; Gao, Xindong; Manka, James; Chen, Bryan; Wagner, Mark

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we discuss the mechanism by which process variations determine the overlay accuracy of optical metrology. We start by focusing on scatterometry, and showing that the underlying physics of this mechanism involves interference effects between cavity modes that travel between the upper and lower gratings in the scatterometry target. A direct result is the behavior of accuracy as a function of wavelength, and the existence of relatively well defined spectral regimes in which the overlay accuracy and process robustness degrades (`resonant regimes'). These resonances are separated by wavelength regions in which the overlay accuracy is better and independent of wavelength (we term these `flat regions'). The combination of flat and resonant regions forms a spectral signature which is unique to each overlay alignment and carries certain universal features with respect to different types of process variations. We term this signature the `landscape', and discuss its universality. Next, we show how to characterize overlay performance with a finite set of metrics that are available on the fly, and that are derived from the angular behavior of the signal and the way it flags resonances. These metrics are used to guarantee the selection of accurate recipes and targets for the metrology tool, and for process control with the overlay tool. We end with comments on the similarity of imaging overlay to scatterometry overlay, and on the way that pupil overlay scatterometry and field overlay scatterometry differ from an accuracy perspective.

  9. Current Concept of Geometrical Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görög, Augustín; Görögová, Ingrid

    2014-06-01

    Within the solving VEGA 1/0615/12 research project "Influence of 5-axis grinding parameters on the shank cutteŕs geometric accuracy", the research team will measure and evaluate geometrical accuracy of the produced parts. They will use the contemporary measurement technology (for example the optical 3D scanners). During the past few years, significant changes have occurred in the field of geometrical accuracy. The objective of this contribution is to analyse the current standards in the field of geometric tolerance. It is necessary to bring an overview of the basic concepts and definitions in the field. It will prevent the use of outdated and invalidated terms and definitions in the field. The knowledge presented in the contribution will provide the new perspective of the measurement that will be evaluated according to the current standards.

  10. Matters of Accuracy and Conventionality: Prior Accuracy Guides Children's Evaluations of Others' Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scofield, Jason; Gilpin, Ansley Tullos; Pierucci, Jillian; Morgan, Reed

    2013-01-01

    Studies show that children trust previously reliable sources over previously unreliable ones (e.g., Koenig, Clement, & Harris, 2004). However, it is unclear from these studies whether children rely on accuracy or conventionality to determine the reliability and, ultimately, the trustworthiness of a particular source. In the current study, 3- and…

  11. ACCURACY AND TRACE ORGANIC ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accuracy in trace organic analysis presents a formidable problem to the residue chemist. He is confronted with the analysis of a large number and variety of compounds present in a multiplicity of substrates at levels as low as parts-per-trillion. At these levels, collection, isol...

  12. Improving Speaking Accuracy through Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormer, Jan Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Increased English learner accuracy can be achieved by leading students through six stages of awareness. The first three awareness stages build up students' motivation to improve, and the second three provide learners with crucial input for change. The final result is "sustained language awareness," resulting in ongoing…

  13. The hidden KPI registration accuracy.

    PubMed

    Shorrosh, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Determining the registration accuracy rate is fundamental to improving revenue cycle key performance indicators. A registration quality assurance (QA) process allows errors to be corrected before bills are sent and helps registrars learn from their mistakes. Tools are available to help patient access staff who perform registration QA manually. PMID:21923052

  14. Psychology Textbooks: Examining Their Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steuer, Faye B.; Ham, K. Whitfield, II

    2008-01-01

    Sales figures and recollections of psychologists indicate textbooks play a central role in psychology students' education, yet instructors typically must select texts under time pressure and with incomplete information. Although selection aids are available, none adequately address the accuracy of texts. We describe a technique for sampling…

  15. Bullet trajectory reconstruction - Methods, accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Mattijssen, Erwin J A T; Kerkhoff, Wim

    2016-05-01

    Based on the spatial relation between a primary and secondary bullet defect or on the shape and dimensions of the primary bullet defect, a bullet's trajectory prior to impact can be estimated for a shooting scene reconstruction. The accuracy and precision of the estimated trajectories will vary depending on variables such as, the applied method of reconstruction, the (true) angle of incidence, the properties of the target material and the properties of the bullet upon impact. This study focused on the accuracy and precision of estimated bullet trajectories when different variants of the probing method, ellipse method, and lead-in method are applied on bullet defects resulting from shots at various angles of incidence on drywall, MDF and sheet metal. The results show that in most situations the best performance (accuracy and precision) is seen when the probing method is applied. Only for the lowest angles of incidence the performance was better when either the ellipse or lead-in method was applied. The data provided in this paper can be used to select the appropriate method(s) for reconstruction and to correct for systematic errors (accuracy) and to provide a value of the precision, by means of a confidence interval of the specific measurement. PMID:27044032

  16. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  17. Accuracy of DXA scanning of the thoracic spine: cadaveric studies comparing BMC, areal BMD and geometric estimates of volumetric BMD against ash weight and CT measures of bone volume.

    PubMed

    Sran, Meena M; Khan, Karim M; Keiver, Kathy; Chew, Jason B; McKay, Heather A; Oxland, Thomas R

    2005-12-01

    Biomechanical studies of the thoracic spine often scan cadaveric segments by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to obtain measures of bone mass. Only one study has reported the accuracy of lateral scans of thoracic vertebral bodies. The accuracy of DXA scans of thoracic spine segments and of anterior-posterior (AP) thoracic scans has not been investigated. We have examined the accuracy of AP and lateral thoracic DXA scans by comparison with ash weight, the gold-standard for measuring bone mineral content (BMC). We have also compared three methods of estimating volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) with a novel standard-ash weight (g)/bone volume (cm3) as measured by computed tomography (CT). Twelve T5-T8 spine segments were scanned with DXA (AP and lateral) and CT. The T6 vertebrae were excised, the posterior elements removed and then the vertebral bodies were ashed in a muffle furnace. We proposed a new method of estimating vBMD and compared it with two previously published methods. BMC values from lateral DXA scans displayed the strongest correlation with ash weight (r=0.99) and were on average 12.8% higher (p<0.001). As expected, BMC (AP or lateral) was more strongly correlated with ash weight than areal bone mineral density (aBMD; AP: r=0.54, or lateral: r=0.71) or estimated vBMD. Estimates of vBMD with either of the three methods were strongly and similarly correlated with volumetric BMD calculated by dividing ash weight by CT-derived volume. These data suggest that readily available DXA scanning is an appropriate surrogate measure for thoracic spine bone mineral and that the lateral scan might be the scan method of choice. PMID:15616862

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of stroke volume variation measured with uncalibrated arterial waveform analysis for the prediction of fluid responsiveness in patients with impaired left ventricular function: a prospective, observational study.

    PubMed

    Montenij, L J; Sonneveld, J P C; Nierich, A P; Buhre, W F; de Waal, E E C

    2016-08-01

    Uncalibrated arterial waveform analysis enables dynamic preload assessment in a minimally invasive fashion. Evidence about the validity of the technique in patients with impaired left ventricular function is scarce, while adequate cardiac preload assessment would be of great value in these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of stroke volume variation (SVV) measured with the FloTrac/Vigileo™ system in patients with impaired left ventricular function. In this prospective, observational study, 22 patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 40 % or less undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting were included. Patients were considered fluid responsive if cardiac output increased with 15 % or more after volume loading (7 ml kg(-1) ideal body weight). The following variables were calculated: area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve, ideal cut-off value for SVV, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and overall accuracy. In addition, SVV cut-off points to obtain 90 % true positive and 90 % true negative predictions were determined. ROC analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.70 [0.47; 0.92]. The ideal SVV cut-off value was 10 %, with a corresponding sensitivity and specificity of 56 and 69 % respectively. Overall accuracy was 64 %, positive and negative predictive values were 69 and 56 % respectively. SVV values to obtain more than 90 % true positive and negative predictions were 16 and 6 % respectively. The ability of uncalibrated arterial waveform analysis SVV to predict fluid responsiveness in patients with impaired LVF was low. PMID:26227160

  19. Dissociating Appraisals of Accuracy and Recollection in Autobiographical Remembering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoboria, Alan; Pascal, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of metamemory appraisals implicated in autobiographical remembering have established distinct roles for judgments of occurrence, recollection, and accuracy for past events. In studies involving everyday remembering, measures of recollection and accuracy correlate highly (>.85). Thus although their measures are structurally…

  20. Improving the Accuracy of Daily PM2.5 Distributions Derived from the Fusion of Ground-Level Measurements with Aerosol Optical Depth Observations, a Case Study in North China.

    PubMed

    Lv, Baolei; Hu, Yongtao; Chang, Howard H; Russell, Armistead G; Bai, Yuqi

    2016-05-01

    The accuracy in estimated fine particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5), obtained by fusing of station-based measurements and satellite-based aerosol optical depth (AOD), is often reduced without accounting for the spatial and temporal variations in PM2.5 and missing AOD observations. In this study, a city-specific linear regression model was first developed to fill in missing AOD data. A novel interpolation-based variable, PM2.5 spatial interpolator (PMSI2.5), was also introduced to account for the spatial dependence in PM2.5 across grid cells. A Bayesian hierarchical model was then developed to estimate spatiotemporal relationships between AOD and PM2.5. These methods were evaluated through a city-specific 10-fold cross-validation procedure in a case study in North China in 2014. The cross validation R(2) was 0.61 when PMSI2.5 was included and 0.48 when PMSI2.5 was excluded. The gap-filled AOD values also effectively improved predicted PM2.5 concentrations with an R(2) = 0.78. Daily ground-level PM2.5 concentration fields at a 12 km resolution were predicted with complete spatial and temporal coverage. This study also indicates that model prediction performance should be assessed by accounting for monitor clustering due to the potential misinterpretation of model accuracy in spatial prediction when validation monitors are randomly selected. PMID:27043852

  1. Improved accuracies for satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammeyer, P. C.; Fiala, A. D.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera on an optical telescope which follows the stars can be used to provide high accuracy comparisons between the line of sight to a satellite, over a large range of satellite altitudes, and lines of sight to nearby stars. The CCD camera can be rotated so the motion of the satellite is down columns of the CCD chip, and charge can be moved from row to row of the chip at a rate which matches the motion of the optical image of the satellite across the chip. Measurement of satellite and star images, together with accurate timing of charge motion, provides accurate comparisons of lines of sight. Given lines of sight to stars near the satellite, the satellite line of sight may be determined. Initial experiments with this technique, using an 18 cm telescope, have produced TDRS-4 observations which have an rms error of 0.5 arc second, 100 m at synchronous altitude. Use of a mosaic of CCD chips, each having its own rate of charge motion, in the focal place of a telescope would allow point images of a geosynchronous satellite and of stars to be formed simultaneously in the same telescope. The line of sight of such a satellite could be measured relative to nearby star lines of sight with an accuracy of approximately 0.03 arc second. Development of a star catalog with 0.04 arc second rms accuracy and perhaps ten stars per square degree would allow determination of satellite lines of sight with 0.05 arc second rms absolute accuracy, corresponding to 10 m at synchronous altitude. Multiple station time transfers through a communications satellite can provide accurate distances from the satellite to the ground stations. Such observations can, if calibrated for delays, determine satellite orbits to an accuracy approaching 10 m rms.

  2. MAPPING SPATIAL THEMATIC ACCURACY WITH FUZZY SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thematic map accuracy is not spatially homogenous but variable across a landscape. Properly analyzing and representing spatial pattern and degree of thematic map accuracy would provide valuable information for using thematic maps. However, current thematic map accuracy measures (...

  3. The Relationship between Phonological Awareness and Word Reading Accuracy in Oriya and English: A Study of Oriya-Speaking Fifth-Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Ranjita; Stainthorp, Rhona

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between phonological awareness and reading in Oriya and English. Oriya is the official language of Orissa, an eastern state of India. The writing system is an alphasyllabary. Ninety-nine fifth grade children (mean age 9 years 7 months) were assessed on measures of phonological awareness, word reading and…

  4. An Exploratory Study into Trade-Off Effects of Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency on Young Learners' Oral Task Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sample, Evelyn; Michel, Marije

    2014-01-01

    Studying task repetition for adult and young foreign language learners of English (EFL) has received growing interest in recent literature within the task-based approach (Bygate, 2009; Hawkes, 2012; Mackey, Kanganas, & Oliver, 2007; Pinter, 2007b). Earlier work suggests that second language (L2) learners benefit from repeating the same or a…

  5. Rats' Visual-Spatial Working Memory: New Object Choice Accuracy as a Function of Number of Objects in the Study Array

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jerome; Han, Xue; Matei, Anca; Parameswaran, Varakini; Zuniga, Robert; Hlynka, Myron

    2010-01-01

    When rats had to find new (jackpot) objects for rewards from among previously sampled baited objects, increasing the number of objects in the sample (study) segment of a trial from 3 to 5 and then to 7 (Experiment 1) or from 3 to 6 and 9 (Experiments 2 and 3) or from 6 to 9 and 12 (Experiment 4) did not reduce rats' test segment performance.…

  6. Borderline Ovarian Tumors and Diagnostic Dilemma of Intraoperative Diagnosis: Could Preoperative He4 Assay and ROMA Score Assessment Increase the Frozen Section Accuracy? A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Berretta, Roberto; Di Gangi, Stefania; Guido, Maria; Zanni, Giuliano Carlo; Franceschetti, Ilaria; Quaranta, Michela; Plebani, Mario; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Patrelli, Tito Silvio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the value of a preoperative He4-serum-assay and ROMA-score assessment in improving the accuracy of frozen section histology in the diagnosis of borderline ovarian tumors (BOT). 113 women presenting with a unilateral ovarian mass diagnosed as serous/mucinous BOT at frozen-section-histology (FS) and/or confirmed on final pathology were recruited. Pathologists were informed of the results of preoperative clinical/instrumental assessment of all patients. For Group_A patients, additional information regarding He4, CA125, and ROMA score was available (in Group_B only CA125 was known). The comparison between Group A and Group B in terms of FS accuracy, demonstrated a consensual diagnosis in 62.8% versus 58.6% (P: n.s.), underdiagnosis in 25.6% versus 41.4% (P < 0.05), and overdiagnosis in 11.6% versus 0% (P < 0.01). Low FS diagnostic accuracy was associated with menopausal status (OR: 2.13), laparoscopic approach (OR: 2.18), mucinous histotype (OR: 2.23), low grading (OR: 1.30), and FIGO stage I (OR: 2.53). Ultrasound detection of papillae (OR: 0.29), septa (OR: 0.39), atypical vascularization (OR: 0.34), serum He4 assay (OR: 0.39), and ROMA score assessment (OR: 0.44) decreased the probability of underdiagnosis. A combined preoperative assessment through serum markers and ultrasonographic features may potentially reduce the risk of underdiagnosis of BOTs on FS while likely increasing the concomitant incidence of false-positive events. PMID:25431767

  7. The accuracy with which the 5 times sit-to-stand test, versus gait speed, can identify poor exercise tolerance in patients with COPD: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Llamazares-Herrán, Eduardo; Oliveira-Sousa, Silvana Loana de; Sánchez-Martinez, M Piedad; Escolar-Reina, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    Identifying those patients who underperform in the 6-minute walk test (6MWT <350 m), and the reasons for their poor performance, is a major concern in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.To explore the accuracy and relevance of the 4-m gait-speed (4MGS) test, and the 5-repetition sit-to-stand (5STS) test, as diagnostic markers, and clinical determinants, of poor performance in the 6MWT.We recruited 137 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to participate in our cross-sectional study. Patients completed the 4MGS and 5STS tests, with quantitative (in seconds) and qualitative ordinal data collected; the latter were categorized using a scale of 0 to 4. The following potential covariates and clinical determinants of poor 6MWT were collated: age, quadriceps muscle-strength (QMS), health status, dyspnea, depression, and airflow limitation. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve data (AUC) was used to assess accuracy, with logistic regression used to explore relevance as clinical determinants.The AUCs generated using the 4MGS and 5STS tests were comparable, at 0.719 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.629-0.809) and 0.711 (95% CI 0.613-0.809), respectively. With ordinal data, the 5STS test was most accurate (AUC of 0.732; 95% CI 0.645-0.819); the 4MGS test showed poor discriminatory power (AUC <0.7), although accuracy improved (0.726, 95% CI 0.637-0.816) when covariates were included. Unlike the 4MGS test, the 5STS test provided a significant clinical determinant of a poor 6MWT (odds ratio 1.23, 95% CI 1.05-1.44).The 5STS test reliably predicts a poor 6MWT, especially when using ordinal data. Used alone, the 4MGS test is reliable when measured with continuous data. PMID:27583918

  8. An Accuracy Assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO Version 2/Version 3 Daytime Aerosol Extinction Product Based on a Detailed Multi-Sensor, Multi-Platform Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Redemann, J.; Hoff, R. M.; Rogers, R. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Russell, P. B.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products) since June 2006. CALIOP s level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010). To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. spaceborne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth s Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73) while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm). This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i) CALIOP s low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth s surface; (ii) the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii) potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa) used in CALIOP s extinction retrievals; and (iv) calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction retrieval for our case

  9. Monitoring Pharmacologically Induced Immunosuppression by Immune Repertoire Sequencing to Detect Acute Allograft Rejection in Heart Transplant Patients: A Proof-of-Concept Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Penland, Lolita; Luikart, Helen; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Khush, Kiran K.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains difficult to predict and to measure the efficacy of pharmacological immunosuppression. We hypothesized that measuring the B-cell repertoire would enable assessment of the overall level of immunosuppression after heart transplantation. Methods and Findings In this proof-of-concept study, we implemented a molecular-barcode-based immune repertoire sequencing assay that sensitively and accurately measures the isotype and clonal composition of the circulating B cell repertoire. We used this assay to measure the temporal response of the B cell repertoire to immunosuppression after heart transplantation. We selected a subset of 12 participants from a larger prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01985412) that is ongoing at Stanford Medical Center and for which enrollment started in March 2010. This subset of 12 participants was selected to represent post-heart-transplant events, with and without acute rejection (six participants with moderate-to-severe rejection and six without). We analyzed 130 samples from these patients, with an average follow-up period of 15 mo. Immune repertoire sequencing enables the measurement of a patient’s net state of immunosuppression (correlation with tacrolimus level, r = −0.867, 95% CI −0.968 to −0.523, p = 0.0014), as well as the diagnosis of acute allograft rejection, which is preceded by increased immune activity with a sensitivity of 71.4% (95% CI 30.3% to 94.9%) and a specificity of 82.0% (95% CI 72.1% to 89.1%) (cell-free donor-derived DNA as noninvasive gold standard). To illustrate the potential of immune repertoire sequencing to monitor atypical post-transplant trajectories, we analyzed two more patients, one with chronic infections and one with amyloidosis. A larger, prospective study will be needed to validate the power of immune repertoire sequencing to predict rejection events, as this proof-of-concept study is limited to a small number of patients who were selected based on several

  10. Thermocouple Calibration and Accuracy in a Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Nathal, M. V.; Keller, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    A consolidation of information has been provided that can be used to define procedures for enhancing and maintaining accuracy in temperature measurements in materials testing laboratories. These studies were restricted to type R and K thermocouples (TCs) tested in air. Thermocouple accuracies, as influenced by calibration methods, thermocouple stability, and manufacturer's tolerances were all quantified in terms of statistical confidence intervals. By calibrating specific TCs the benefits in accuracy can be as great as 6 C or 5X better compared to relying on manufacturer's tolerances. The results emphasize strict reliance on the defined testing protocol and on the need to establish recalibration frequencies in order to maintain these levels of accuracy.

  11. Nosocomial enterococcal blood stream infections in the SCOPE Program: antimicrobial resistance, species occurrence, molecular testing results, and laboratory testing accuracy. SCOPE Hospital Study Group.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N; Marshall, S A; Pfaller, M A; Wilke, W W; Hollis, R J; Erwin, M E; Edmond, M B; Wenzel, R P

    1997-10-01

    Characteristics of nosocomial enterococcal blood stream infection (NEBSI) isolates obtained from patients at 41 U.S. hospitals participating in the SCOPE Program were studied. Isolates from 480 episodes of NEBSI were characterized according to species and antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Selected isolates were also identified to species and vancomycin resistance genotype using polymerase chain reaction based methods. Polymerase chain reaction genotyping and ribotyping were used as genetic markers for molecular epidemiologic typing. Enterococci were the third most common cause of nosocomial blood stream infection in this study, accounting for 11.7% of all isolates reported. Enterococcus faecalis was the most common species (59.6%), followed by E. faecium (19.4%). Species identification errors involving E. faecium, E. durans, E. avium, and E. raffinosus were observed. Vancomycin resistance was observed in 36.4% of all participating medical centers and varied from 11.1% of medical centers in the Northwest to 60.9% of medical centers in the Southwest. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci accounted for 20.6% of NEBSI in the Northeast, 11.4% in the Southeast, 11.1% in the Southwest, and 9.5% in the Northwest regions. VanA genotypes predominated in the Northeast and Southwest, whereas vanA and vanB genotypes were equally prevalent in the Northwest and Southeast. Molecular typing studies identified strains that were unique to individual hospitals as well as strains that were prevalent in several different hospitals. NEBSI with vancomycin-resistant enterococci continues to escalate among hospitalized patients in all geographic areas of the USA. PMID:9368085

  12. Marginal accuracy of temporary composite crowns.

    PubMed

    Tjan, A H; Tjan, A H; Grant, B E

    1987-10-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to quantitatively compare the marginal adaptation of temporary crowns made from Protemp material with those made from Scutan, Provisional, and Trim materials. A direct technique was used to make temporary restorations on prepared teeth with an impression as a matrix. Protem, Trim, and Provisional materials produced temporary crowns of comparable accuracy. Crowns made from Scutan material had open margins. PMID:2959770

  13. Phantom study and accuracy evaluation of an image-to-world registration approach used with electro-magnetic tracking system for neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Senhu; Sarment, David

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive neurosurgery needs intraoperative imaging updates and high efficient image guide system to facilitate the procedure. An automatic image guided system utilized with a compact and mobile intraoperative CT imager was introduced in this work. A tracking frame that can be easily attached onto the commercially available skull clamp was designed. With known geometry of fiducial and tracking sensor arranged on this rigid frame that was fabricated through high precision 3D printing, not only was an accurate, fully automatic registration method developed in a simple and less-costly approach, but also it helped in estimating the errors from fiducial localization in image space through image processing, and in patient space through the calibration of tracking frame. Our phantom study shows the fiducial registration error as 0.348+/-0.028mm, comparing the manual registration error as 1.976+/-0.778mm. The system in this study provided a robust and accurate image-to-patient registration without interruption of routine surgical workflow and any user interactions involved through the neurosurgery.

  14. Accuracy of self-reported versus measured weight over adolescence and young adulthood: findings from the national longitudinal study of adolescent health, 1996-2008.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Philippa; Sastry, Narayan; Duffy, Denise; Ailshire, Jennifer

    2014-07-15

    Many studies rely on self-reports to capture population trends and trajectories in weight gain over adulthood, but the validity of self-reports is often considered a limitation. The purpose of this work was to examine long-term trajectories of self-reporting bias in a national sample of American youth. With 3 waves of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1996-2008), we used growth curve models to examine self-reporting bias in trajectories of weight gain across adolescence and early adulthood (ages 13-32 years). We investigated whether self-reporting bias is constant over time, or whether adolescents become more accurate in reporting their weight as they move into young adulthood, and we examined differences in self-reporting bias by sex, race/ethnicity, and attained education. Adolescent girls underreported their weight by 0.86 kg on average, and this rate of underreporting increased over early adulthood. In contrast, we found no evidence that boys underreported their weight either in adolescence or over the early adult years. For young men, self-reports of weight were unbiased estimates of measured weight among all racial/ethnic and educational subpopulations over adolescence and early adulthood. PMID:24944288

  15. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT) has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT) have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the probability of underdosing the tumour periphery increases as the effective field size is decreased. The purpose of this study was to evaluate small lung tumour doses irradiated by intensity-modulated techniques to understand the risk for dose calculation errors in precision radiotherapy such as SLRT. Materials and methods The study was executed with two heterogeneous phantoms with targets of Ø1.5 and Ø4.0 cm. Dose distributions in the simulated tumours delivered by small sliding window apertures (SWAs), IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans were measured with radiochromic film. Calculation algorithms of pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) were used to calculate the corresponding dose distributions. Results Peripheral doses of the tumours were decreased as SWA decreased, which was not modelled by the calculation algorithms. The smallest SWA studied was 2 mm, which reduced the 90% isodose line width by 4.2 mm with the Ø4.0 cm tumour as compared to open field irradiation. PBC was not able to predict the dose accurately as the gamma evaluation failed to meet the criteria of ±3%/±1 mm on average in 61% of the defined volume with the smaller tumour. With AAA the corresponding value was 16%. The dosimetric inaccuracy of AAA was within ±3% with the optimized treatment plans of IMRT and RapidArc. The exception was the clinical RapidArc plan with dose overestimation of 4%. Conclusions Overall, the peripheral doses of the simulated lung tumours were

  16. A high accuracy sun sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, H.

    The High Accuracy Sun Sensor (HASS) is described, concentrating on measurement principle, the CCD detector used, the construction of the sensorhead and the operation of the sensor electronics. Tests on a development model show that the main aim of a 0.01-arcsec rms stability over a 10-minute period is closely approached. Remaining problem areas are associated with the sensor sensitivity to illumination level variations, the shielding of the detector, and the test and calibration equipment.

  17. A computed tomography based study on rotational alignment accuracy of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty using computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    van der Linden-van der Zwaag, Henrica M J; Bos, Janneke; van der Heide, Huub J L; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2011-06-01

    Rotation of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is of high importance in respect of the balancing of the knee and the patellofemoral joint. Though it is shown that computer assisted surgery (CAOS) improves the anteroposterior (AP) alignment in TKA, it is still unknown whether navigation helps in finding the accurate rotation or even improving rotation. Therefore the aim of our study was to evaluate the postoperative femoral component rotation on computed tomography (CT) with the intraoperative data of the navigation system. In 20 navigated TKAs the difference between the intraoperative stored rotation data of the femoral component and the postoperative rotation on CT was measured using the condylar twist angle (CTA). This is the angle between the epicondylar axis and the posterior condylar axis. Statistical analysis consisted of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plot. The mean intraoperative rotation CTA based on CAOS was 3.5° (range 2.4-8.6°). The postoperative CT scan showed a mean CTA of 4.0° (1.7-7.2). The ICC between the two observers was 0.81, and within observers this was 0.84 and 0.82, respectively. However, the ICC of the CAOS CTA versus the postoperative CT CTA was only 0.38. Though CAOS is being used for optimising the position of a TKA, this study shows that the (virtual) individual rotational position of the femoral component using a CAOS system is significantly different from the position on a postoperative CT scan. PMID:20623282

  18. Improved cardiovascular diagnostic accuracy by pocket size imaging device in non-cardiologic outpatients: the NaUSiCa (Naples Ultrasound Stethoscope in Cardiology) study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Miniaturization has evolved in the creation of a pocket-size imaging device which can be utilized as an ultrasound stethoscope. This study assessed the additional diagnostic power of pocket size device by both experts operators and trainees in comparison with physical examination and its appropriateness of use in comparison with standard echo machine in a non-cardiologic population. Three hundred four consecutive non cardiologic outpatients underwent a sequential assessment including physical examination, pocket size imaging device and standard Doppler-echo exam. Pocket size device was used by both expert operators and trainees (who received specific training before the beginning of the study). All the operators were requested to give only visual, qualitative insights on specific issues. All standard Doppler-echo exams were performed by expert operators. One hundred two pocket size device exams were performed by experts and two hundred two by trainees. The time duration of the pocket size device exam was 304 ± 117 sec. Diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities was made in 38.2% of cases by physical examination and in 69.7% of cases by physical examination + pocket size device (additional diagnostic power = 31.5%, p < 0.0001). The overall K between pocket size device and standard Doppler-echo was 0.67 in the pooled population (0.84 by experts and 0.58 by trainees). K was suboptimal for trainees in the eyeball evaluation of ejection fraction, left atrial dilation and right ventricular dilation. Overall sensitivity was 91% and specificity 76%. Sensitivity and specificity were lower in trainees than in experts. In conclusion, pocket size device showed a relevant additional diagnostic value in comparison with physical examination. Sensitivity and specificity were good in experts and suboptimal in trainees. Specificity was particularly influenced by the level of experience. Training programs are needed for pocket size device users. PMID:21110840

  19. Diagnostic accuracy and use of non-mydriatic ocular fundus photography by emergency department physicians: Phase II of the FOTO-ED study

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; Thulasi, Praneetha; Fraser, Clare L.; Keadey, Matthew T.; Ward, Antoinette; Heilpern, Katherine L.; Wright, David W.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Objective During the first phase of the FOTO-ED Study, 13% (44/350;95%CI:9–17%) of patients had an ocular fundus finding, such as papilledema, relevant to their emergency department (ED) management found by non-mydriatic ocular fundus photography reviewed by neuro-opthalmologists. All of these findings were missed by ED physicians (EPs), who only examined 14% of enrolled patients by direct ophthalmoscopy. In the present study, we evaluated the sensitivity of non-mydriatic ocular fundus photography, an alternative to direct ophthalmoscopy, for relevant findings when photographs were made available for use by EPs during routine clinical care. Methods 354 patients presenting to our ED with headache, focal neurologic deficit, visual change, or diastolic blood pressure ≥120 mmHg had non-mydriatic fundus photography obtained (Kowa nonmyd-alpha-D). Photographs were placed on the electronic medical record for EPs review. Identification of relevant findings on photographs by EPs was compared to a reference standard of neuro-ophthalmologist review. Results EPs reviewed photographs of 239 patients (68%). 35 patients (10%;95%CI:7–13%) had relevant findings identified by neuro-ophthalmologist review (6 disc edema, 6 grade III/IV hypertensive retinopathy, 7 isolated hemorrhages, 15 optic disc pallor, and 1 retinal vascular occlusion). EPs identified 16/35 relevant findings (sensitivity:46%;95%CI:29–63%), and also identified 289/319 normal findings (specificity:96%; 95%CI:87–94%). EPs reported that photographs were helpful for 125 patients (35%). Conclusions EPs used non-mydriatic fundus photographs more frequently than they perform direct ophthalmoscopy, and their detection of relevant abnormalities improved. Ocular fundus photography often assisted ED care even when normal. Non-mydriatic ocular fundus photography offers a promising alternative to direct ophthalmoscopy. PMID:23433654

  20. A Diagnostic Accuracy Study of Xpert®MTB/RIF in HIV-Positive Patients with High Clinical Suspicion of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Carriquiry, Gabriela; Otero, Larissa; González-Lagos, Elsa; Zamudio, Carlos; Sánchez, Eduardo; Nabeta, Pamela; Campos, Miguel; Echevarría, Juan; Seas, Carlos; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients remains complex and demands easy to perform and accurate tests. Xpert®MTB/RIF (MTB/RIF) is a molecular TB diagnostic test which is rapid and convenient; the test requires minimal human resources and reports results within two hours. The majority of performance studies of MTB/RIF have been performed in high HIV burden settings, thus TB diagnostic studies among HIV patients in low HIV prevalence settings such as Peru are still needed. Methodology/Principal Findings From April 2010 to May 2011, HIV-positive patients with high clinical suspicion of TB were enrolled from two tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. Detection of TB by MTB/RIF was compared to a composite reference standard Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) and liquid culture. Detection of rifampicin resistance was compared to the LJ proportion method. We included 131 patients, the median CD4 cell count was 154.5 cells/mm3 and 45 (34.4%) had TB. For TB detection among HIV patients, sensitivity of MTB/RIF was 97.8% (95% CI 88.4–99.6) (44/45); specificity was 97.7% (95% CI 91.9–99.4) (84/86); the positive predictive value was 95.7% (95% CI 85.5–98.8) (44/46); and the negative predictive value, 98.8% (95% CI 93.6–99.8) (84/85). MTB/RIF detected 13/14 smear-negative TB cases, outperforming smear microscopy [97.8% (44/45) vs. 68.9% (31/45); p = 0.0002]. For rifampicin resistance detection, sensitivity of MTB/RIF was 100% (95% CI 61.0–100.0) (6/6); specificity was 91.0% (95% CI 76.4–96.9) (30/33); the positive predictive value was 66.7% (95% CI 35.4–87.9) (6/9); and the negative predictive value was 100% (95% CI 88.7 –100.0) (30/30). Conclusions/Significance In HIV patients in our population with a high clinical suspicion of TB, MTB/RIF performed well for TB diagnosis and outperformed smear microscopy. PMID:22970271

  1. A tandem mass spectrometric study of the N-oxides, quinoline N-oxide, carbadox, and olaquindox, carried out at high mass accuracy using electrospray ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiu-Sheng; March, Raymond E.; Metcalfe, Chris D.

    2003-12-01

    A mass spectrometric study of three N-oxides, quinoline N-oxide, and the synthetic antibiotics carbadox and olaquindox, was carried out with a hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer coupled with electrospray (ES) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) sources. The full scan mass spectra of the N-oxides obtained with ES are similar to those obtained with APCI, and the characteristic fragment ions corresponding to [M+H-O]+[radical sign] were observed in the full scan mass spectrum of each N-oxide examined. The protonated molecule of each N-oxide was subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) and accurate mass measurements were made of each fragment ion so as to determine its elemental composition. Fragment ions generated at enhanced cone voltages upstream of the first mass-resolving element were subjected to CID so as to identify the direct product ion-precursor ion relationship. Plausible structures have been proposed for most of the fragment ions observed. Elimination of OH[radical sign] radicals generated from the N-->O functional group is a characteristic fragmentation pathway of the N-oxides. The expulsion of radicals and small stable molecules is accompanied by formation and subsequent contraction of heterocyclic rings.

  2. Influence of the Accuracy of Angiography-Based Reconstructions on Velocity and Wall Shear Stress Computations in Coronary Bifurcations: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Schrauwen, Jelle T. C.; Karanasos, Antonios; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Aben, Jean-Paul; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Wall shear stress (WSS) plays a key role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis in human coronary arteries. Especially sites with low and oscillating WSS near bifurcations have a higher propensity to develop atherosclerosis. WSS computations in coronary bifurcations can be performed in angiography-based 3D reconstructions. It is essential to evaluate how reconstruction errors influence WSS computations in mildly-diseased coronary bifurcations. In mildly-diseased lesions WSS could potentially provide more insight in plaque progression. Materials Methods Four Plexiglas phantom models of coronary bifurcations were imaged with bi-plane angiography. The lumens were segmented by two clinically experienced readers. Based on the segmentations 3D models were generated. This resulted in three models per phantom: one gold-standard from the phantom model itself, and one from each reader. Steady-state and transient simulations were performed with computational fluid dynamics to compute the WSS. A similarity index and a noninferiority test were used to compare the WSS in the phantoms and their reconstructions. The margin for this test was based on the resolution constraints of angiography. Results The reconstruction errors were similar to previously reported data; in seven out of eight reconstructions less than 0.10 mm. WSS in the regions proximal and far distal of the stenosis showed a good agreement. However, the low WSS areas directly distal of the stenosis showed some disagreement between the phantoms and the readers. This was due to small deviations in the reconstruction of the stenosis that caused differences in the resulting jet, and consequently the size and location of the low WSS area. Discussion This study showed that WSS can accurately be computed within angiography-based 3D reconstructions of coronary arteries with early stage atherosclerosis. Qualitatively, there was a good agreement between the phantoms and the readers. Quantitatively, the

  3. Assessment Of Accuracies Of Remote-Sensing Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Don H.; Strong, Laurence L.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of accuracies of classifications of picture elements in map derived by digital processing of Landsat-multispectral-scanner imagery of coastal plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Accuracies of portions of map analyzed with help of statistical sampling procedure called "stratified plurality sampling", in which all picture elements in given cluster classified in stratum to which plurality of them belong.

  4. Task-Based Variability in Children's Singing Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Bryan E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore task-based variability in children's singing accuracy performance. The research questions were: Does children's singing accuracy vary based on the nature of the singing assessment employed? Is there a hierarchy of difficulty and discrimination ability among singing assessment tasks? What is the…

  5. Students' Accuracy of Measurement Estimation: Context, Units, and Logical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Gardner, Grant E.; Taylor, Amy R.; Forrester, Jennifer H.; Andre, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study examined students' accuracy of measurement estimation for linear distances, different units of measure, task context, and the relationship between accuracy estimation and logical thinking. Middle school students completed a series of tasks that included estimating the length of various objects in different contexts and completed a test…

  6. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Deepa; Shetty, Y. Bharath; Miranda, Glynis Anita; Prabhu, M. Bharath; Karkera, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    shown the least vertical marginal discrepancies among the four methods evaluated in this study. PMID:26929488

  7. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography: A Useful Tool for Differential Diagnosis of Thyroid Nodules and Recommending Fine-Needle Aspiration: A Diagnostic Accuracy Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Liu, Chang; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Li, Xiao-Long; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Bo-Ji; Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of combined use of conventional ultrasound (US) and elastography, including conventional strain elastography such as elasticity imaging (EI) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography, and to evaluate their usefulness in recommending fine-needle aspiration (FNA).A total of 556 pathologically proven thyroid nodules were evaluated by US, EI, and ARFI examinations in this study. Three blinded readers scored the likelihood of malignancy for 4 datasets (ie, US alone, US and EI, US and virtual touch tissue imaging [VTI], and US and virtual touch tissue quantification [VTQ]). The diagnostic performances of 4 datasets in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules were evaluated. The decision-making changes for FNA recommendation in the indeterminate nodules or the probably benign nodules on conventional US were evaluated after review of elastography.The diagnostic performance in terms of area under the ROC curve did not show any change after adding EI, VTI, or VTQ for analysis; and no differences were found among different readers; however, the specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) improved significantly after adding VTI or VTQ for analysis in the senior reader. For the indeterminate nodules on US that were pathologically benign, VTQ made correct decision-making changes from FNA biopsy to follow-up in a mean of 82.6% nodules, which was significantly higher than those achieved by EI (46.8%) and VTI (54.4%) (both P < 0.05). With regard to the probably benign nodules on US that were pathologically malignant, EI made the highest correct decision-making change from follow-up to FNA biopsy in a mean of 62.6% nodules (compared with 41.5% on VTQ, P < 0.05).The results indicated that ARFI increases the specificity and PPV in diagnosing thyroid nodules. US combined VTQ might be helpful in reducing unnecessary FNA for indeterminate nodules on US whereas US combined EI is useful to detect the false negative

  8. Positional Accuracy Assessment of Googleearth in Riyadh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Ashraf; Algarni, Dafer

    2014-06-01

    Google Earth is a virtual globe, map and geographical information program that is controlled by Google corporation. It maps the Earth by the superimposition of images obtained from satellite imagery, aerial photography and GIS 3D globe. With millions of users all around the globe, GoogleEarth® has become the ultimate source of spatial data and information for private and public decision-support systems besides many types and forms of social interactions. Many users mostly in developing countries are also using it for surveying applications, the matter that raises questions about the positional accuracy of the Google Earth program. This research presents a small-scale assessment study of the positional accuracy of GoogleEarth® Imagery in Riyadh; capital of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The results show that the RMSE of the GoogleEarth imagery is 2.18 m and 1.51 m for the horizontal and height coordinates respectively.

  9. Do saccharide doped PAGAT dosimeters increase accuracy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, B.; Skyt, P. S.; Holloway, L.; Hill, R.; Sankar, A.; De Deene, Y.

    2015-01-01

    To improve the dosimetric accuracy of normoxic polyacrylamide gelatin (PAGAT) gel dosimeters, the addition of saccharides (glucose and sucrose) has been suggested. An increase in R2-response sensitivity upon irradiation will result in smaller uncertainties in the derived dose if all other uncertainties are conserved. However, temperature variations during the magnetic resonance scanning of polymer gels result in one of the highest contributions to dosimetric uncertainties. The purpose of this project was to study the dose sensitivity against the temperature sensitivity. The overall dose uncertainty of PAGAT gel dosimeters with different concentrations of saccharides (0, 10 and 20%) was investigated. For high concentrations of glucose or sucrose, a clear improvement of the dose sensitivity was observed. For doses up to 6 Gy, the overall dose uncertainty was reduced up to 0.3 Gy for all saccharide loaded gels compared to PAGAT gel. Higher concentrations of glucose and sucrose deteriorate the accuracy of PAGAT dosimeters for doses above 9 Gy.

  10. Accuracy of NHANES periodontal examination protocols.

    PubMed

    Eke, P I; Thornton-Evans, G O; Wei, L; Borgnakke, W S; Dye, B A

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of periodontitis prevalence determined by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) partial-mouth periodontal examination protocols. True periodontitis prevalence was determined in a new convenience sample of 454 adults ≥ 35 years old, by a full-mouth "gold standard" periodontal examination. This actual prevalence was compared with prevalence resulting from analysis of the data according to the protocols of NHANES III and NHANES 2001-2004, respectively. Both NHANES protocols substantially underestimated the prevalence of periodontitis by 50% or more, depending on the periodontitis case definition used, and thus performed below threshold levels for moderate-to-high levels of validity for surveillance. Adding measurements from lingual or interproximal sites to the NHANES 2001-2004 protocol did not improve the accuracy sufficiently to reach acceptable sensitivity thresholds. These findings suggest that NHANES protocols produce high levels of misclassification of periodontitis cases and thus have low validity for surveillance and research. PMID:20858782

  11. Assessment of the Thematic Accuracy of Land Cover Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhle, J.

    2015-08-01

    Several land cover maps are generated from aerial imagery and assessed by different approaches. The test site is an urban area in Europe for which six classes (`building', `hedge and bush', `grass', `road and parking lot', `tree', `wall and car port') had to be derived. Two classification methods were applied (`Decision Tree' and `Support Vector Machine') using only two attributes (height above ground and normalized difference vegetation index) which both are derived from the images. The assessment of the thematic accuracy applied a stratified design and was based on accuracy measures such as user's and producer's accuracy, and kappa coefficient. In addition, confidence intervals were computed for several accuracy measures. The achieved accuracies and confidence intervals are thoroughly analysed and recommendations are derived from the gained experiences. Reliable reference values are obtained using stereovision, false-colour image pairs, and positioning to the checkpoints with 3D coordinates. The influence of the training areas on the results is studied. Cross validation has been tested with a few reference points in order to derive approximate accuracy measures. The two classification methods perform equally for five classes. Trees are classified with a much better accuracy and a smaller confidence interval by means of the decision tree method. Buildings are classified by both methods with an accuracy of 99% (95% CI: 95%-100%) using independent 3D checkpoints. The average width of the confidence interval of six classes was 14% of the user's accuracy.

  12. Piezoresistive position microsensors with ppm-accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrov, Vladimir; Shulev, Assen; Stavreva, Galina; Todorov, Vencislav

    2015-05-01

    In this article, the relation between position accuracy and the number of simultaneously measured values, such as coordinates, has been analyzed. Based on this, a conceptual layout of MEMS devices (microsensors) for multidimensional position monitoring comprising a single anchored and a single actuated part has been developed. Both parts are connected with a plurality of micromechanical flexures, and each flexure includes position detecting cantilevers. Microsensors having detecting cantilevers oriented in X and Y direction have been designed and prototyped. Experimentally measured results at characterization of 1D, 2D and 3D position microsensors are reported as well. Exploiting different flexure layouts, a travel range between 50μm and 1.8mm and sensors' sensitivity in the range between 30μV/μm and 5mV/μm@ 1V DC supply voltage have been demonstrated. A method for accurate calculation of all three Cartesian coordinates, based on measurement of at least three microsensors' signals has also been described. The analyses of experimental results prove the capability of position monitoring with ppm-(part per million) accuracy. The technology for fabrication of MEMS devices with sidewall embedded piezoresistors removes restrictions in strong improvement of their usability for position sensing with a high accuracy. The present study is, also a part of a common strategy for developing a novel MEMS-based platform for simultaneous accurate measurement of various physical values when they are transduced to a change of position.

  13. On the Accuracy of Genomic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Rabier, Charles-Elie; Barre, Philippe; Asp, Torben; Charmet, Gilles; Mangin, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Genomic selection is focused on prediction of breeding values of selection candidates by means of high density of markers. It relies on the assumption that all quantitative trait loci (QTLs) tend to be in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with at least one marker. In this context, we present theoretical results regarding the accuracy of genomic selection, i.e., the correlation between predicted and true breeding values. Typically, for individuals (so-called test individuals), breeding values are predicted by means of markers, using marker effects estimated by fitting a ridge regression model to a set of training individuals. We present a theoretical expression for the accuracy; this expression is suitable for any configurations of LD between QTLs and markers. We also introduce a new accuracy proxy that is free of the QTL parameters and easily computable; it outperforms the proxies suggested in the literature, in particular, those based on an estimated effective number of independent loci (Me). The theoretical formula, the new proxy, and existing proxies were compared for simulated data, and the results point to the validity of our approach. The calculations were also illustrated on a new perennial ryegrass set (367 individuals) genotyped for 24,957 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In this case, most of the proxies studied yielded similar results because of the lack of markers for coverage of the entire genome (2.7 Gb). PMID:27322178

  14. Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) accuracy assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szajgin, John; Pettinger, L.R.; Linden, D.S.; Ohlen, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative accuracy assessment was performed for the vegetation classification map produced as part of the Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) project. This project was a cooperative effort between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center. The objective of the accuracy assessment was to estimate (with a precision of ?10 percent at the 90 percent confidence level) the comission error in each of the eight level II hierarchical vegetation cover types. A stratified two-phase (double) cluster sample was used. Phase I consisted of 160 photointerpreted plots representing clusters of Landsat pixels, and phase II consisted of ground data collection at 80 of the phase I cluster sites. Ground data were used to refine the phase I error estimates by means of a linear regression model. The classified image was stratified by assigning each 15-pixel cluster to the stratum corresponding to the dominant cover type within each cluster. This method is known as stratified plurality sampling. Overall error was estimated to be 36 percent with a standard error of 2 percent. Estimated error for individual vegetation classes ranged from a low of 10 percent ?6 percent for evergreen woodland to 81 percent ?7 percent for cropland and pasture. Total cost of the accuracy assessment was $106,950 for the one-million-hectare study area. The combination of the stratified plurality sampling (SPS) method of sample allocation with double sampling provided the desired estimates within the required precision levels. The overall accuracy results confirmed that highly accurate digital classification of vegetation is difficult to perform in semiarid environments, due largely to the sparse vegetation cover. Nevertheless, these techniques show promise for providing more accurate information than is presently available for many BLM-administered lands.

  15. Comparative diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance elastography versus eight clinical prediction rules for non-invasive diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jeffrey; Ang, Brandon; Haufe, William; Hernandez, Carolyn; Verna, Elizabeth C.; Sirlin, Claude B.; Loomba, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Two-dimensional magnetic resonance elastography (2D-MRE) is an advanced magnetic resonance method with high diagnostic accuracy for predicting advanced fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. However, no prospective, head-to-head comparisons between 2D-MRE and clinical prediction rules (CPRs) have been performed in patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Aim This study compared the diagnostic utility of 2D-MRE against that of eight CPRs (AST:ALT ratio, APRI, BARD, FIB-4, NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Bonacini cirrhosis discriminant score, Lok Index, and NASH CRN model) for predicting advanced fibrosis in a prospective cohort with paired liver biopsy as the gold standard. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of a prospective study of 102 patients (58.8% women) with biopsy-proven NAFLD, 2D-MRE, and clinical research assessment within 90 days of biopsy. ROC analysis was performed to assess the performance of 2D-MRE and CPRs for predicting advanced fibrosis. Results The mean (± SD) age and BMI were 51.3 (±14.0) years and 31.7 (±5.5) kg/m2, respectively. 48, 26, 9, 13, and 6 patients had stage 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 fibrosis, respectively. The area under ROC curve (AUROC) was 0.957 for 2D-MRE and between 0.796 and 0.861 for the CPRs. FIB-4 was the best-performing CPR at predicting advanced fibrosis with AUROC of 0.861. In head-to-head comparisons using the Delong test, 2D-MRE had significantly better AUROC (p < 0.05) than each CPR for predicting advanced fibrosis. Conclusions Compared to CPRs, 2D-MRE provides significantly higher accuracy for advanced fibrosis diagnosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:25873207

  16. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  17. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  18. Dissociating appraisals of accuracy and recollection in autobiographical remembering.

    PubMed

    Scoboria, Alan; Pascal, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies of metamemory appraisals implicated in autobiographical remembering have established distinct roles for judgments of occurrence, recollection, and accuracy for past events. In studies involving everyday remembering, measures of recollection and accuracy correlate highly (>.85). Thus although their measures are structurally distinct, such high correspondence might suggest conceptual redundancy. This article examines whether recollection and accuracy dissociate when studying different types of autobiographical event representations. In Study 1, 278 participants described a believed memory, a nonbelieved memory, and a believed-not-remembered event and rated each on occurrence, recollection, accuracy, and related covariates. In Study 2, 876 individuals described and rated 1 of these events, as well as an event about which they were uncertain about their memory. Confirmatory structural equation modeling indicated that the measurement dissociation between occurrence, recollection and accuracy held across all types of events examined. Relative to believed memories, the relationship between recollection and belief in accuracy was meaningfully lower for the other event types. These findings support the claim that recollection and accuracy arise from distinct underlying mechanisms. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26866659

  19. Accuracy testing of electric groundwater-level measurement tapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jelinski, Jim; Clayton, Christopher S.; Fulford, Janice M.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy tests demonstrated that none of the electric-tape models tested consistently met the suggested USGS accuracy of ±0.01 ft. The test data show that the tape models in the study should give a water-level measurement that is accurate to roughly ±0.05 ft per 100 ft without additional calibration. To meet USGS accuracy guidelines, the electric-tape models tested will need to be individually calibrated. Specific conductance also plays a part in tape accuracy. The probes will not work in water with specific conductance values near zero, and the accuracy of one probe was unreliable in very high conductivity water (10,000 microsiemens per centimeter).

  20. Accuracy and safety of technetium-99m hexakis 2-methoxy-2-isobutyl isonitrile (Sestamibi) myocardial scintigraphy with high dose dipyridamole test in patients with effort angina pectoris: a multicenter study. Italian Group of Nuclear Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Parodi, O; Marcassa, C; Casucci, R; Sambuceti, G; Verna, E; Galli, M; Inglese, E; Marzullo, P; Pirelli, S; Bisi, G

    1991-11-15

    Clinical and physiologic evidence indicates that maximal coronary vasodilation is not achieved in a large number of patients with use of the standard dose of dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg body weight over 4 min). The feasibility, safety and accuracy of technetium-99m hexakis 2-methoxy-2-isobutyl isonitrile (Sestamibi) scintigraphy associated with intravenous high dose dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg over 4 min followed 4 min later by an additional 0.28 mg/kg over 2 min) were evaluated in a multicenter study. Planar myocardial perfusion images were obtained at rest and after dipyridamole in 101 patients with effort chest pain and no prior myocardial infarction. High dose dipyridamole (62 patients) was used when typical chest pain or electrocardiographic (ECG) signs of ischemia, or both, did not occur during or after the standard dose (39 patients). With high dose dipyridamole, 34 patients had pain (18 patients) or ECG signs of ischemia (ST depression greater than or equal to 2 mm) (8 patients), or both (8 patients), whereas the other 28 patients had Sestamibi injection in the absence of symptoms or ECG changes. All patients underwent coronary angiography: 81 had significant coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 50% reduction of lumen diameter) (affecting one vessel in 38, two vessels in 19 and three vessels in 24 patients) and 20 patients had normal coronary arteries. The overall sensitivity, specificity and predictive accuracy of Sestamibi scintigraphy were 81%, 90% and 83%, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1834717

  1. A comparative evaluation of the dimensional accuracy of heat polymerised PMMA denture base cured by different curing cycles and clamped by R S technique and conventional method – An In-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Mandava Ramesh; Rao, C Satyanageswar; Ahmed, Syed Tauqheer; Bharat, J S V; Rao, N Venugopal; Vinod, V

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of heat polymerized PMMA denture base clamped by the conventional method and by R.S technique and cured by a different curing cycle. Materials & Methods: In this study, a total of 40 standardized maxillary record bases were fabricated with seven reference points: Point A - Incisive papilla, Point B & C - Canine region on either side, Point E & G - Midpoint of tuberosities on either side, Point F- Midpoint of the line joining the two tuberosities, Point D- Midpoint between the line joining A and F. Group A: Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by conventional clamping method and cured by long curing cycle. Group A1: Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by R.S tension clamping method and cured by long curing cycle. Group B: Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by conventional clamping method and cured by short curing cycle. Group B1: Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by R.S tension clamping method and cured by short curing cycle. The distances between the reference points i.e. A-B, A-C, A-D, D-F, B-E, C-G, E-F, F-G, B-D, D-G, CD, D-E of all three thermoplastic denture base plates were measured and recorded with the help of a travelling microscope and were used for comparison with the measured and recorded readings of processed acrylic denture bases. The data obtained was analyzed by using the One Way Analysis of Variance. Results: The overall results of the in vitro study indicate that among all the PMMA bases cured by the two clamping systems and the different curing cycle, group A` was the most dimensionally stable, followed by control group A, then followed by B` and B was most unstable. Conclusion: The study concluded that the denture bases fabricated by the R.S Technique using the long curing cycle would produce the most dimensionally stable PMMA denture bases. How to cite the article: Babu MR, Rao CS, Ahmed ST, Bharat JS, Rao NV, Vinod V. A comparative

  2. Accuracy of the river discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung Yang, Han

    2013-04-01

    Discharge values recorded for water conservancy and hydrological analysis is a very important work. Flood control projects, watershed remediation and river environmental planning projects quite need the discharge measurement data. In Taiwan, we have 129 rivers, in accordance with the watershed situation, economic development and other factors, divided into 24 major rivers, 29 minor rivers and 79 ordinary rivers. If each river needs to measure and record these discharge values, it will be enormous work. In addition, the characteristics of Taiwan's rivers contain steep slope, flow rapidly and sediment concentration higher, so it really encounters some difficulties in high flow measurement. When the flood hazards come, to seek a solution for reducing the time, manpower and material resources in river discharge measurement is very important. In this study, the river discharge measurement accuracy is used to determine the tolerance percentage to reduce the number of vertical velocity measurements, thereby reducing the time, manpower and material resources in the river discharge measurement. The velocity data sources used in this study form Yang (1998). Yang (1998) used the Fiber-optic Laser Doppler Velocimetery (FLDV) to obtain different velocity data under different experimental conditions. In this study, we use these data to calculate the mean velocity of each vertical line by three different velocity profile formula (that is, the law of the wall, Chiu's theory, Hu's theory), and then multiplied by each sub-area to obtain the discharge measurement values and compared with the true values (obtained by the direct integration mode) to obtain the accuracy of discharge. The research results show that the discharge measurement values obtained by Chiu's theory are closer to the true value, while the maximum error is the law of the wall. The main reason is that the law of the wall can't describe the maximum velocity occurred in underwater. In addition, the results also show

  3. Evaluating the accuracy of transcribed clinical data.

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, R.; Pennisi, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of data transcribed into a computer-stored record from a handwritten listing of pediatric immunizations. The immunization records of 459 children seen in the UCLA Children's Health Center in March, 1993 were transcribed into a clinical computer system on an ongoing basis. Of these records, 27 (5.9%) were subsequently found to be inaccurate. Reasons for inaccuracy in the transcribed records included incomplete written records, incomplete transcription of written records, and unavailability of immunization records from multiple health-care providers. The utility of a computer-stored clinical record may be adversely affected by unavoidable inaccuracies in transcribed clinical data. PMID:8130478

  4. Insensitivity of the octahedral spherical hohlraum to power imbalance, pointing accuracy, and assemblage accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Wen Yi; Zhao, Yiqing; Zheng, Wudi; Liu, Jie; Lan, Ke

    2014-11-15

    The random radiation asymmetry in the octahedral spherical hohlraum [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 0 10704 (2014)] arising from the power imbalance, pointing accuracy of laser quads, and the assemblage accuracy of capsule is investigated by using the 3-dimensional view factor model. From our study, for the spherical hohlraum, the random radiation asymmetry arising from the power imbalance of the laser quads is about half of that in the cylindrical hohlraum; the random asymmetry arising from the pointing error is about one order lower than that in the cylindrical hohlraum; and the random asymmetry arising from the assemblage error of capsule is about one third of that in the cylindrical hohlraum. Moreover, the random radiation asymmetry in the spherical hohlraum is also less than the amount in the elliptical hohlraum. The results indicate that the spherical hohlraum is more insensitive to the random variations than the cylindrical hohlraum and the elliptical hohlraum. Hence, the spherical hohlraum can relax the requirements to the power imbalance and pointing accuracy of laser facility and the assemblage accuracy of capsule.

  5. Improvement of focus accuracy on processed wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashibata, Satomi; Komine, Nobuhiro; Fukuhara, Kazuya; Koike, Takashi; Kato, Yoshimitsu; Hashimoto, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    As feature size shrinkage in semiconductor device progress, process fluctuation, especially focus strongly affects device performance. Because focus control is an ongoing challenge in optical lithography, various studies have sought for improving focus monitoring and control. Focus errors are due to wafers, exposure tools, reticles, QCs, and so on. Few studies are performed to minimize the measurement errors of auto focus (AF) sensors of exposure tool, especially when processed wafers are exposed. With current focus measurement techniques, the phase shift grating (PSG) focus monitor 1) has been already proposed and its basic principle is that the intensity of the diffraction light of the mask pattern is made asymmetric by arranging a π/2 phase shift area on a reticle. The resist pattern exposed at the defocus position is shifted on the wafer and shifted pattern can be easily measured using an overlay inspection tool. However, it is difficult to measure shifted pattern for the pattern on the processed wafer because of interruptions caused by other patterns in the underlayer. In this paper, we therefore propose "SEM-PSG" technique, where the shift of the PSG resist mark is measured by employing critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) to measure the focus error on the processed wafer. First, we evaluate the accuracy of SEM-PSG technique. Second, by applying the SEM-PSG technique and feeding the results back to the exposure, we evaluate the focus accuracy on processed wafers. By applying SEM-PSG feedback, the focus accuracy on the processed wafer was improved from 40 to 29 nm in 3σ.

  6. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for diagnosing ulcerative early gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyungkil; Bang, Byongwook; Kwon, Kyesook; Shin, Youngwoon

    2016-07-01

    Although endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the first-choice imaging modality for predicting the invasion depth of early gastric cancer (EGC), the prediction accuracy of EUS is significantly decreased when EGC is combined with ulceration.The aim of present study was to compare the accuracy of EUS and conventional endoscopy (CE) for determining the depth of EGC. In addition, the various clinic-pathologic factors affecting the diagnostic accuracy of EUS, with a particular focus on endoscopic ulcer shapes, were evaluated.We retrospectively reviewed data from 236 consecutive patients with ulcerative EGC. All patients underwent EUS for estimating tumor invasion depth, followed by either curative surgery or endoscopic treatment. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS and CE was evaluated by comparing the final histologic result of resected specimen. The correlation between accuracy of EUS and characteristics of EGC (tumor size, histology, location in stomach, tumor invasion depth, and endoscopic ulcer shapes) was analyzed. Endoscopic ulcer shapes were classified into 3 groups: definite ulcer, superficial ulcer, and ill-defined ulcer.The overall accuracy of EUS and CE for predicting the invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was 68.6% and 55.5%, respectively. Of the 236 patients, 36 patients were classified as definite ulcers, 98 were superficial ulcers, and 102 were ill-defined ulcers, In univariate analysis, EUS accuracy was associated with invasion depth (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.034), and endoscopic ulcer shapes (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, there is a significant association between superficial ulcer in CE and EUS accuracy (odds ratio: 2.977; 95% confidence interval: 1.255-7.064; P = 0.013).The accuracy of EUS for determining tumor invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was superior to that of CE. In addition, ulcer shape was an important factor that affected EUS accuracy. PMID:27472672

  7. Protocol for Translabial 3D-Ultrasonography for diagnosing levator defects (TRUDIL): a multicentre cohort study for estimating the diagnostic accuracy of translabial 3D-ultrasonography of the pelvic floor as compared to MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a condition affecting more than half of the women above age 40. The estimated lifetime risk of needing surgical management for POP is 11%. In patients undergoing POP surgery of the anterior vaginal wall, the re-operation rate is 30%. The recurrence risk is especially high in women with a levator ani defect. Such defect is present if there is a partially or completely detachment of the levator ani from the inferior ramus of the symphysis. Detecting levator ani defects is relevant for counseling, and probably also for treatment. Levator ani defects can be imaged with MRI and also with Translabial 3D ultrasonography of the pelvic floor. The primary aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic accuracy of translabial 3D ultrasonography for diagnosing levator defects in women with POP with Magnetic Resonance Imaging as the reference standard. Secondary goals of this study include quantification of the inter-observer agreement about levator ani defects and determining the association between levator defects and recurrent POP after anterior repair. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of adding translabial ultrasonography to the diagnostic work-up in patients with POP will be estimated in a decision analytic model. Methods/Design A multicentre cohort study will be performed in nine Dutch hospitals. 140 consecutive women with a POPQ stage 2 or more anterior vaginal wall prolapse, who are indicated for anterior colporapphy will be included. Patients undergoing additional prolapse procedures will also be included. Prior to surgery, patients will undergo MR imaging and translabial 3D ultrasound examination of the pelvic floor. Patients will be asked to complete validated disease specific quality of life questionnaires before surgery and at six and twelve months after surgery. Pelvic examination will be performed at the same time points. Assuming a sensitivity and specificity of 90% of 3D ultrasound for diagnosing levator defects in a

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Marginal Accuracy of a Cast Fixed Partial Denture Compared to Soldered Fixed Partial Denture Made of Two Different Base Metal Alloys and Casting Techniques: An In vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Jei, J Brintha; Mohan, Jayashree

    2014-03-01

    The periodontal health of abutment teeth and the durability of fixed partial denture depends on the marginal adaptation of the prosthesis. Any discrepancy in the marginal area leads to dissolution of luting agent and plaque accumulation. This study was done with the aim of evaluating the accuracy of marginal fit of four unit crown and bridge made up of Ni-Cr and Cr-Co alloys under induction and centrifugal casting. They were compared to cast fixed partial denture (FPD) and soldered FPD. For the purpose of this study a metal model was fabricated. A total of 40 samples (4-unit crown and bridge) were prepared in which 20 Cr-Co samples and 20 Ni-Cr samples were fabricated. Within these 20 samples of each group 10 samples were prepared by induction casting technique and other 10 samples with centrifugal casting technique. The cast FPD samples obtained were seated on the model and the samples were then measured with travelling microscope having precision of 0.001 cm. Sectioning of samples was done between the two pontics and measurements were made, then the soldering was made with torch soldering unit. The marginal discrepancy of soldered samples was measured and all findings were statistically analysed. The results revealed minimal marginal discrepancy with Cr-Co samples when compared to Ni-Cr samples done under induction casting technique. When compared to cast FPD samples, the soldered group showed reduced marginal discrepancy. PMID:24605006

  9. PHAT: PHoto-z Accuracy Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, H.; Arnouts, S.; Capak, P.; Moustakas, L. A.; Wolf, C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Assef, R. J.; Banerji, M.; Benítez, N.; Brammer, G. B.; Budavári, T.; Carliles, S.; Coe, D.; Dahlen, T.; Feldmann, R.; Gerdes, D.; Gillis, B.; Ilbert, O.; Kotulla, R.; Lahav, O.; Li, I. H.; Miralles, J.-M.; Purger, N.; Schmidt, S.; Singal, J.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Photometric redshifts (photo-z's) have become an essential tool in extragalactic astronomy. Many current and upcoming observing programmes require great accuracy of photo-z's to reach their scientific goals. Aims: Here we introduce PHAT, the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing programme, an international initiative to test and compare different methods of photo-z estimation. Methods: Two different test environments are set up, one (PHAT0) based on simulations to test the basic functionality of the different photo-z codes, and another one (PHAT1) based on data from the GOODS survey including 18-band photometry and ~2000 spectroscopic redshifts. Results: The accuracy of the different methods is expressed and ranked by the global photo-z bias, scatter, and outlier rates. While most methods agree very well on PHAT0 there are differences in the handling of the Lyman-α forest for higher redshifts. Furthermore, different methods produce photo-z scatters that can differ by up to a factor of two even in this idealised case. A larger spread in accuracy is found for PHAT1. Few methods benefit from the addition of mid-IR photometry. The accuracy of the other methods is unaffected or suffers when IRAC data are included. Remaining biases and systematic effects can be explained by shortcomings in the different template sets (especially in the mid-IR) and the use of priors on the one hand and an insufficient training set on the other hand. Some strategies to overcome these problems are identified by comparing the methods in detail. Scatters of 4-8% in Δz/(1+z) were obtained, consistent with other studies. However, somewhat larger outlier rates (>7.5% with Δz/(1+z)>0.15; >4.5% after cleaning) are found for all codes that can only partly be explained by AGN or issues in the photometry or the spec-z catalogue. Some outliers were probably missed in comparisons of photo-z's to other, less complete spectroscopic surveys in the past. There is a general trend that empirical codes produce

  10. Quantifying the prediction accuracy of a 1-D SVAT model at a range of ecosystems in the USA and Australia: evidence towards its use as a tool to study Earth's system interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, G. P.; North, M. R.; Ireland, G.; Srivastava, P. K.; Rendall, D. V.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the validation of the SimSphere SVAT (Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer) model conducted at a range of US and Australian ecosystem types. Specific focus was given to examining the models' ability in predicting shortwave incoming solar radiation (Rg), net radiation (Rnet), latent heat (LE), sensible heat (H), air temperature at 1.3 m (Tair 1.3 m) and air temperature at 50 m (Tair 50 m). Model predictions were compared against corresponding in situ measurements acquired for a total of 72 selected days of the year 2011 obtained from eight sites belonging to the AmeriFlux (USA) and OzFlux (Australia) monitoring networks. Selected sites were representative of a variety of environmental, biome and climatic conditions, to allow for the inclusion of contrasting conditions in the model evaluation. Overall, results showed a good agreement between the model predictions and the in situ measurements, particularly so for the Rg, Rnet, Tair 1.3 m and Tair 50 m parameters. The simulated Rg parameter exhibited a root mean square deviation (RMSD) within 25 % of the observed fluxes for 58 of the 72 selected days, whereas an RMSD within ~ 24 % of the observed fluxes was reported for the Rnet parameter for all days of study (RMSD = 58.69 W m-2). A systematic underestimation of Rg and Rnet (mean bias error (MBE) = -19.48 and -16.46 W m-2) was also found. Simulations for the Tair 1.3 m and Tair 50 m showed good agreement with the in situ observations, exhibiting RMSDs of 3.23 and 3.77 °C (within ~ 15 and ~ 18 % of the observed) for all days of analysis, respectively. Comparable, yet slightly less satisfactory simulation accuracies were exhibited for the H and LE parameters (RMSDs = 38.47 and 55.06 W m-2, ~ 34 and ~ 28 % of the observed). Highest simulation accuracies were obtained for the open woodland savannah and mulga woodland sites for most of the compared parameters. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency index for all parameters ranges from 0.720 to 0.998, suggesting

  11. Dust trajectory sensor: accuracy and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, J; Sternovsky, Z; Grün, E; Auer, S; Duncan, N; Drake, K; Le, H; Horanyi, M; Srama, R

    2011-10-01

    The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Grün, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008)] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Grün, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010)]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1° in direction. PMID:22047326

  12. Dust trajectory sensor: Accuracy and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J.; Sternovsky, Z.; Grün, E.; Auer, S.; Duncan, N.; Drake, K.; Le, H.; Horanyi, M.; Srama, R.

    2011-10-01

    The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Grün, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008), 10.1063/1.2960566] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Grün, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010), 10.1016/j.nima.2010.06.091]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1° in direction.

  13. Approaching chemical accuracy with quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Petruzielo, F R; Toulouse, Julien; Umrigar, C J

    2012-03-28

    A quantum Monte Carlo study of the atomization energies for the G2 set of molecules is presented. Basis size dependence of diffusion Monte Carlo atomization energies is studied with a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction formed from Hartree-Fock orbitals. With the largest basis set, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies for the G2 set is 3.0 kcal/mol. Optimizing the orbitals within variational Monte Carlo improves the agreement between diffusion Monte Carlo and experiment, reducing the mean absolute deviation to 2.1 kcal/mol. Moving beyond a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction, diffusion Monte Carlo with a small complete active space Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction results in near chemical accuracy. In this case, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies is 1.2 kcal/mol. It is shown from calculations on systems containing phosphorus that the accuracy can be further improved by employing a larger active space. PMID:22462844

  14. [True color accuracy in digital forensic photography].

    PubMed

    Ramsthaler, Frank; Birngruber, Christoph G; Kröll, Ann-Katrin; Kettner, Mattias; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2016-01-01

    Forensic photographs not only need to be unaltered and authentic and capture context-relevant images, along with certain minimum requirements for image sharpness and information density, but color accuracy also plays an important role, for instance, in the assessment of injuries or taphonomic stages, or in the identification and evaluation of traces from photos. The perception of color not only varies subjectively from person to person, but as a discrete property of an image, color in digital photos is also to a considerable extent influenced by technical factors such as lighting, acquisition settings, camera, and output medium (print, monitor). For these reasons, consistent color accuracy has so far been limited in digital photography. Because images usually contain a wealth of color information, especially for complex or composite colors or shades of color, and the wavelength-dependent sensitivity to factors such as light and shadow may vary between cameras, the usefulness of issuing general recommendations for camera capture settings is limited. Our results indicate that true image colors can best and most realistically be captured with the SpyderCheckr technical calibration tool for digital cameras tested in this study. Apart from aspects such as the simplicity and quickness of the calibration procedure, a further advantage of the tool is that the results are independent of the camera used and can also be used for the color management of output devices such as monitors and printers. The SpyderCheckr color-code patches allow true colors to be captured more realistically than with a manual white balance tool or an automatic flash. We therefore recommend that the use of a color management tool should be considered for the acquisition of all images that demand high true color accuracy (in particular in the setting of injury documentation). PMID:27386623

  15. Accuracy Assessment of Altimeter Derived Geostrophic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leben, R. R.; Powell, B. S.; Born, G. H.; Guinasso, N. L.

    2002-12-01

    Along track sea surface height anomaly gradients are proportional to cross track geostrophic velocity anomalies allowing satellite altimetry to provide much needed satellite observations of changes in the geostrophic component of surface ocean currents. Often, surface height gradients are computed from altimeter data archives that have been corrected to give the most accurate absolute sea level, a practice that may unnecessarily increase the error in the cross track velocity anomalies and thereby require excessive smoothing to mitigate noise. Because differentiation along track acts as a high-pass filter, many of the path length corrections applied to altimeter data for absolute height accuracy are unnecessary for the corresponding gradient calculations. We report on a study to investigate appropriate altimetric corrections and processing techniques for improving geostrophic velocity accuracy. Accuracy is assessed by comparing cross track current measurements from two moorings placed along the descending TOPEX/POSEIDON ground track number 52 in the Gulf of Mexico to the corresponding altimeter velocity estimates. The buoys are deployed and maintained by the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS) under Interagency Contracts with Texas A&M University. The buoys telemeter observations in near real-time via satellite to the TABS station located at the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) at Texas A&M. Buoy M is located in shelf waters of 57 m depth with a second, Buoy N, 38 km away on the shelf break at 105 m depth. Buoy N has been operational since the beginning of 2002 and has a current meter at 2m depth providing in situ measurements of surface velocities coincident with Jason and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter over flights. This allows one of the first detailed comparisons of shallow water near surface current meter time series to coincident altimetry.

  16. Accuracy of velocities from repeated GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akarsu, V.; Sanli, D. U.; Arslan, E.

    2015-04-01

    Today repeated GPS measurements are still in use, because we cannot always employ GPS permanent stations due to a variety of limitations. One area of study that uses velocities/deformation rates from repeated GPS measurements is the monitoring of crustal motion. This paper discusses the quality of the velocities derived using repeated GPS measurements for the aim of monitoring crustal motion. From a global network of International GNSS Service (IGS) stations, we processed GPS measurements repeated monthly and annually spanning nearly 15 years and estimated GPS velocities for GPS baseline components latitude, longitude and ellipsoidal height. We used web-based GIPSY for the processing. Assuming true deformation rates can only be determined from the solutions of 24 h observation sessions, we evaluated the accuracy of the deformation rates from 8 and 12 h sessions. We used statistical hypothesis testing to assess the velocities derived from short observation sessions. In addition, as an alternative control method we checked the accuracy of GPS solutions from short observation sessions against those of 24 h sessions referring to statistical criteria that measure the accuracy of regression models. Results indicate that the velocities of the vertical component are completely affected when repeated GPS measurements are used. The results also reveal that only about 30% of the 8 h solutions and about 40% of 12 h solutions for the horizontal coordinates are acceptable for velocity estimation. The situation is much worse for the vertical component in which none of the solutions from campaign measurements are acceptable for obtaining reliable deformation rates.

  17. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    LRO definitive and predictive accuracy requirements were easily met in the nominal mission orbit, using the LP150Q lunar gravity model. center dot Accuracy of the LP150Q model is poorer in the extended mission elliptical orbit. center dot Later lunar gravity models, in particular GSFC-GRAIL-270, improve OD accuracy in the extended mission. center dot Implementation of a constrained plane when the orbit is within 45 degrees of the Earth-Moon line improves cross-track accuracy. center dot Prediction accuracy is still challenged during full-Sun periods due to coarse spacecraft area modeling - Implementation of a multi-plate area model with definitive attitude input can eliminate prediction violations. - The FDF is evaluating using analytic and predicted attitude modeling to improve full-Sun prediction accuracy. center dot Comparison of FDF ephemeris file to high-precision ephemeris files provides gross confirmation that overlap compares properly assess orbit accuracy.

  18. Parenting and adolescents' accuracy in perceiving parental values.

    PubMed

    Knafo, Ariel; Schwartz, Shalom H

    2003-01-01

    What determines adolescents' accuracy in perceiving parental values? The current study examined potential predictors including parental value communication, family value agreement, and parenting styles. In the study, 547 Israeli adolescents (aged 16 to 18) of diverse socioeconomic backgrounds participated with their parents. Adolescents reported the values they perceive their parents want them to hold. Parents reported their socialization values. Accuracy in perceiving parents' overall value system correlated positively with parents' actual and perceived value agreement and perceived parental warmth and responsiveness, but negatively with perceived value conflict, indifferent parenting, and autocratic parenting in all gender compositions of parent-child dyads. Other associations varied by dyad type. Findings were similar for predicting accuracy in perceiving two specific values: tradition and hedonism. The article discusses implications for the processes that underlie accurate perception, gender differences, and other potential influences on accuracy in value perception. PMID:12705575