Science.gov

Sample records for accuracy surface finish

  1. Surface finishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzler, J. A.; Hefferman, J. T.; Fehrenkamp, L. G.; Lee, W. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A surface of an article adapted for relative motion with a fluid environment is finished by coating the surface with a fluid adhesive, covering the adhesive with a sheet of flexible film material under tension on the film material whereby the tensioned film material is bonded to the surface by the adhesive.

  2. Surface finishing. [for aircraft wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzler, J. A.; Heffernan, J. T.; Fehrenkamp, L. G.; Lee, W. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A surface of an article adapted for relative motion with a fluid environment is finished by coating the surface with a fluid adhesive. The adhesive is covered with a sheet of flexible film material under tension, and the adhesive is set while maintaining tension on the film material.

  3. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  4. NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Team project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kokas, J.; DeSantis, C.; Wenger, G.

    1996-04-01

    The NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Consortium is just about at the end of the five year program. Dozens of projects related to surface finishes and PWB solder-ability were performed by the team throughout the program, and many of them are listed in this paper. They are listed with a cross reference to where and when a technical paper was presented describing the results of the research. However, due to time and space constraints, this paper can summarize the details of only three of the major research projects accomplished by the team. The first project described is an ``Evaluation of PWB Surface Finishes.`` It describes the solderability, reliability, and wire bondability of numerous surface finishes. The second project outlined is an ``Evaluation of PWB Solderability Test Methods.`` The third project outlined is the ``Development and Evaluation of Organic Solderability Preservatives.``

  5. Optimizing parameters for magnetorheological finishing supersmooth surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haobo; Feng, Zhijing; Wang, Yingwei

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a reasonable approach to this issue, i.e., computer controlled magnetorheological finishing (MRF). In MRF, magnetically stiffened magnetorheological (MR) abrasive fluid flows through a preset converging gap that is formed by a workpiece surface and a moving rigid wall, to create precise material removal and polishing. Tsinghua University recently completed a project with MRF technology, in which a 66 mm diameter, f/5 parabolic mirror was polished to the shape accuracy of λ/17 RMS (λ=632.8nm) and the surface roughness of 1.22 nm Ra. This was done on a home made novel aspheric computer controlled manufacturing system. It is a three-axis, self-rotating wheel machine, the polishing tool is driven with one motor through a belt. This paper presents the manufacturing and testing processes, including establish the mathematics model of MRF optics on the basis of Preston equation, profiler test and relative coefficients, i.e., pressure between workpiece and tool, velocity of MR fluid in polishing spot, tolerance control of geometrical parameters such as radius of curvature and conic constant also been analyzed in the paper. Experiments were carried out on the features of MRF. The results indicated that the required convergent speed, surface roughness could be achieved with high efficiency.

  6. Effect of Burnishing Parameters on Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsat, Uddhav; Ahuja, Basant; Dhuttargaon, Mukund

    2016-06-01

    Burnishing is cold working process in which hard balls are pressed against the surface, resulting in improved surface finish. The surface gets compressed and then plasticized. This is a highly finishing process which is becoming more popular. Surface quality of the product improves its aesthetic appearance. The product made up of aluminum material is subjected to burnishing process during which kerosene is used as a lubricant. In this study factors affecting burnishing process such as burnishing force, speed, feed, work piece diameter and ball diameter are considered as input parameters while surface finish is considered as an output parameter In this study, experiments are designed using 25 factorial design in order to analyze the relationship between input and output parameters. The ANOVA technique and F-test are used for further analysis.

  7. APPROACHING ZERO DISCHARGE IN SURFACE FINISHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides guidance to surface finishing manufacturers on control technologies and process changes for approaching zero discharge (AZD). AZD is a key theme underlying the Strategic Goals Program (SGP). The SGP is a cooperative effort between the EPA nd the American El...

  8. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Finish of surface joints. 18.33 Section 18.33... Requirements § 18.33 Finish of surface joints. Flat surfaces between bolt holes that form any part of a flame... § 18.31(a)(6). All metal surfaces forming a flame-arresting path shall be finished during...

  9. The surface finish of light-cured composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, S K; Henderson, L J

    1993-01-01

    A necessity for any dental restorative material is its ability to take and maintain a smooth surface finish. Composite resin restorative materials with fillers and matrix of differing hardness are difficult to finish and polish. The use of aluminum trioxide discs is a popular and acceptable method of finishing composite restorative materials where the material is accessible. Burs and stones are used for finishing and polishing inaccessible areas. This study was undertaken to compare the surface finish of composite resin restorative material when finished with white stones, superfine diamond burs and aluminum trioxide discs. The finished surface was measured with a profilometer and the roughness average value used to compare the surfaces. The aluminum trioxide discs gave the best and most consistent results. It was possible to attain similar results with the superfine diamond bur. However, the results were highly variable. None of the methods used achieved the smoothness of composite resin cured against a transparent matrix.

  10. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-arresting path shall be plane to within a maximum deviation of one-half the maximum clearance specified in § 18.31(a)(6). All metal surfaces forming a flame-arresting path shall be finished during...

  11. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-arresting path shall be plane to within a maximum deviation of one-half the maximum clearance specified in § 18.31(a)(6). All metal surfaces forming a flame-arresting path shall be finished during...

  12. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-arresting path shall be plane to within a maximum deviation of one-half the maximum clearance specified in § 18.31(a)(6). All metal surfaces forming a flame-arresting path shall be finished during...

  13. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-arresting path shall be plane to within a maximum deviation of one-half the maximum clearance specified in § 18.31(a)(6). All metal surfaces forming a flame-arresting path shall be finished during...

  14. Portable flooring protects finished surfaces, is easily moved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmody, R. J.

    1964-01-01

    To protect curved, finished surface and provide support for workmen, portable flooring has been made from rigid plastic foam blocks, faced with aluminum strips. Held together by nylon webbing, the flooring can be rolled up for easy carrying.

  15. Large planer for finishing smooth, flat surfaces of large pieces ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Large planer for finishing smooth, flat surfaces of large pieces of metal; in operating condition and used for public demonstrations. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 5, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  16. Solder flow over fine line PWB surface finishes

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has stimulated the development of alternative printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes to enhance the solderability of standard copper and solder-coated surfaces. These new finishes are based on either metallic or organic chemistries. As part of an ongoing solderability study, Sandia National Laboratories has investigated the solder flow behavior of two azole-based organic solderability preservations, immersion Au, immersion Ag, electroless Pd, and electroless Pd/Ni on fine line copper features. The coated substrates were solder tested in the as-fabricated and environmentally-stressed conditions. Samples were processed through an inerted reflow machine. The azole-based coatings generally provided the most effective protection after aging. Thin Pd over Cu yielded the best wetting results of the metallic coatings, with complete dissolution of the Pd overcoat and wetting of the underlying Cu by the flowing solder. Limited wetting was measured on the thicker Pd and Pd over Ni finishes, which were not completely dissolved by the molten solder. The immersion Au and Ag finishes yielded the lowest wetted lengths, respectively. These general differences in solderability were directly attributed to the type of surface finish which the solder came in contact with. The effects of circuit geometry, surface finish, stressing, and solder processing conditions are discussed.

  17. Enhancing Surface Finish of Additively Manufactured Titanium and Cobalt Chrome Elements Using Laser Based Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gora, Wojciech S.; Tian, Yingtao; Cabo, Aldara Pan; Ardron, Marcus; Maier, Robert R. J.; Prangnell, Philip; Weston, Nicholas J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers the possibility of creating a complex free form object as a single element, which is not possible using traditional mechanical machining. Unfortunately the typically rough surface finish of additively manufactured parts is unsuitable for many applications. As a result AM parts must be post-processed; typically mechanically machined and/or and polished using either chemical or mechanical techniques (both of which have their limitations). Laser based polishing is based on remelting of a very thin surface layer and it offers potential as a highly repeatable, higher speed process capable of selective area polishing, and without any waste problems (no abrasives or liquids). In this paper an in-depth investigation of CW laser polishing of titanium and cobalt chrome AM elements is presented. The impact of different scanning strategies, laser parameters and initial surface condition on the achieved surface finish is evaluated.

  18. MicroFinish Topographer: surface finish metrology for large and small optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Robert E.

    2011-09-01

    The MicroFinish Topographer (MFT) is the result of an interest in directly measuring the surface roughness of large optics without the need for using replicas that may degrade the measurement data and that contaminate the surface. Once the MFT proved itself on large optics it was immediately suggested that a similar device should be designed for small optics. All this really took was turning the original MFT upside down and placing small specimens on a holder. This one device tests samples from 10 mm diameter to 10 m with phase measuring interferometry that does not need vibration isolation. Further, the MFT form factor makes it ideal for use in doing on-machine surface finish metrology.

  19. Influence of surface finish on the cleanability of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Frank, J F; Chmielewski, R

    2001-08-01

    Stainless steel for fabricating food processing equipment is available with various surface finishes. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of surface finish on cleanability. Nine samples of stainless steel, type 304, from various manufacturers including no finish (hot rolled and pickled), #4 finish, 2B mechanical polished, and electropolished were tested. Cleanability was assessed by using coupon samples soiled with either cultured milk inoculated with spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus or by growth of a Pseudomonas sp. biofilm. Samples were cleaned by immersion in a turbulent bath of 1.28% sodium hydroxide at 66 degrees C for 3 min followed by a sterile water rinse, neutralizing in 0.1% phosphoric acid for 30 s, rinsing in phosphate buffer, sanitizing in 100 ppm hypochlorite, neutralizing in sodium thiosulfate, and drying. To determine residual milk soil, coupon samples were covered with PM indicator agar and incubated for 25 h at 58 degrees C. Other coupons were subjected to an additional 10 soiling or cleaning cycles, and the residual protein was measured by using epifluorescent microscopy and image analysis. Results indicate that the spore count was more precise for measuring initial cleanability of the finished samples, and the protein residue determination was useful for determining the effect of repeated cleaning. Data on the removal of milk soil suggest that stainless steel should be purchased based on measures of surface defects rather than finish type. Surface defects, as determined using a surface roughness gauge, produced a correlation of 0.82 with spore counts. Data also indicated that biofilm was more difficult to remove than milk-based soil. PMID:11510656

  20. Effect of panel alignment and surface finish on bond strength

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.; Baker, W.E.

    1991-10-01

    The flexural strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of panel alignment and bond surface finish. Bond strength was shown to be highly dependent on both parameters with only a narrow range of values yielding a high strength bond. This study was performed for the heavy water-containing acrylic vessel for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector.

  1. Corrective finishing of a micro-aspheric mold made of tungsten carbide to 50  nm accuracy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiang

    2015-06-20

    The increasing demand on the optical performance of micro-aspheric glass lenses used for consumer, medical, as well as industrial applications places a high requirement on the surface quality of the molds used for replicating these lenses. However, it is difficult, almost impossible to generate a supersmooth surface with extremely high form accuracy by using the current cutting or grinding techniques. Therefore, this paper presents a corrective polishing process to finish micro-aspheric molds made of tungsten carbide by applying the vibration-assisted polishing method, aiming to obtain tens-of-nanometer form accuracy and subnanometer surface roughness. A polishing system which provides precise position, angle, and force control in 5 degrees of freedom (DOF)is employed for the experiments, and a tilting angle control method is introduced for the ease of the precisely controlling polishing force so as to keep the material removal rate stable. Then a dwell time algorithm is proposed by considering the scanning path of the polishing tool and the tilting angle of the workpiece. The experimental results show that after corrective polishing, the form accuracy of a micro-aspheric mold with high numerical aperture (NA) is successfully improved from 230 nm peak-to-valley (PV) to under 50 nm PV, while the surface roughness is reduced from 7.2 nm root-mean-square (rms) to 0.5 nm rms. PMID:26193027

  2. Towards Arbitrary Accuracy Inviscid Surface Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Hixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions are currently limited to third order accuracy in time for non-moving surfaces and actually reduce to first order in time when the surfaces move. For steady-state calculations it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is required for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady phenomena. A surprisingly simple technique is shown here that can be used to correct the normal pressure derivatives of the flow at a surface on a Cartesian grid so that arbitrarily high order time accuracy is achieved in idealized cases. This work demonstrates that nonlinear high order time accuracy at a solid surface is possible and desirable, but it also shows that the current practice of only correcting the pressure is inadequate.

  3. Deburring and surface finishing: The past ten years and projections for the next ten years

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1990-09-01

    The 1970s were a decade of significant growth in deburring and surface finishing. In the 1980s progress was made in robotic finishing, burr formation models, surface finish measurement, new processes, equipment and tooling. The centers of burr and surface related research changed. The decade of the 1990s will bring greater competition, environmental restrictions, more processes, more automation, and better characterization and simulation of processes.

  4. The topographic development and areal parametric characterization of a stratified surface polished by mass finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Karl; Blunt, Liam; Fleming, Leigh

    2015-09-01

    Mass finishing is amongst the most widely used finishing processes in modern manufacturing, in applications from deburring to edge radiusing and polishing. Processing objectives are varied, ranging from the cosmetic to the functionally critical. One such critical application is the hydraulically smooth polishing of aero engine component gas-washed surfaces. In this, and many other applications the drive to improve process control and finish tolerance is ever present. Considering its widespread use mass finishing has seen limited research activity, particularly with respect to surface characterization. The objectives of the current paper are to; characterise the mass finished stratified surface and its development process using areal surface parameters, provide guidance on the optimal parameters and sampling method to characterise this surface type for a given application, and detail the spatial variation in surface topography due to coupon edge shadowing. Blasted and peened square plate coupons in titanium alloy are wet (vibro) mass finished iteratively with increasing duration. Measurement fields are precisely relocated between iterations by fixturing and an image superimposition alignment technique. Surface topography development is detailed with ‘log of process duration’ plots of the ‘areal parameters for scale-limited stratified functional surfaces’, (the Sk family). Characteristic features of the Smr2 plot are seen to map out the processing of peak, core and dale regions in turn. These surface process regions also become apparent in the ‘log of process duration’ plot for Sq, where lower core and dale regions are well modelled by logarithmic functions. Surface finish (Ra or Sa) with mass finishing duration is currently predicted with an exponential model. This model is shown to be limited for the current surface type at a critical range of surface finishes. Statistical analysis provides a group of areal parameters including; Vvc, Sq, and Sdq

  5. Surface Fatigue Lives of Case-Carburized Gears With an Improved Surface Finish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, T. L.; Alanou, M. P.; Evans, H. P.; Snidle, R. W.; Krantz, T. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Previous research provides qualitative evidence that an improved surface finish can increase the surface fatigue lives of gears. To quantify the influence of surface roughness on life, a set of AISI 93 10 steel gears was provided with a nearmirror finish by superfinishing. The effects of the superfinishing on the quality of the gear tooth surfaces were determined using data from metrology, profilometry, and interferometric microscope inspections. The superfinishing reduced the roughness average by about a factor of 5. The superfinished gears were subjected to surface fatigue testing at 1.71 -GPa (248-ksi) Hertz contact stress, and the data were compared with the NASA Glenn gear fatigue data base. The lives of gears with superfinished teeth were about four times greater compared with the lives of gears with ground teeth but with otherwise similar quality.

  6. Nanometric Finishing on Biomedical Implants by Abrasive Flow Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kavithaa Thirumalai; Balashanmugam, Natchimuthu; Shashi Kumar, Panaghra Veeraiah

    2016-01-01

    Abrasive flow finishing (AFF) is a non-conventional finishing technique that offers better accuracy, efficiency, consistency, economy in finishing of complex/difficult to machine materials/components and provides the possibility of effective automation as aspired by the manufacturing sector. The present study describes the finishing of a hip joint made of ASTM grade Co-Cr alloy by Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM) process. The major input parameters of the AFF process were optimized for achieving nanometric finishing of the component. The roughness average (Ra) values were recorded during experimentation using surface roughness tester and the results are discussed in detail. The surface finished hip joints were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and residual stress analysis using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The discussion lays emphasis on the significance, efficacy and versatile nature of the AFF process in finishing of bio-medical implants.

  7. 77 FR 12227 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... contaminants in uncovered finished water reservoirs; and potential assessment approaches to determine the... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 141 and 142 Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs; Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of...

  8. Study of microstructure of surface layers of low-carbon steel after turning and ultrasonic finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Zh. G.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Perevalova, O. B.; Klimenov, V. A.; Uvarkin, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    Profilometry and optical and transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the microstructure of surface layers of a low-carbon ferrite-pearlite steel subjected to turning and ultrasonic finishing. It is shown that turning peaks and valleys have different microstructures, which stipulates manifestation of technological hereditary when processing surfaces of machined parts. Ultrasonic finishing causes the severe plastic deformation of the surface layer, which favors the elimination of a technological heredity that is acquired during turning.

  9. An evaluation of wear of human enamel opposed by ceramics of different surface finishes

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Gauri; Dugal, Ramandeep; Buhranpurwala, Murtuza

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Surface of porcelain restoration is a matter of clinical concern because of its abrasive action on the opposing enamel. Purpose: This study comparatively evaluated wear of enamel when opposed by three different surface finishes of ceramic. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 metal-ceramic discs (10 mm × 2 mm) with different surface finishes were fabricated. They were divided into four groups of autoglazed ceramic surface, over glazed ceramic surface, ceramic surface polished with Shofu polishing kit and ceramic surface polished with DFS polishing wheels and paste. Each group comprised of 15 discs. Sixty human teeth samples were prepared from freshly extracted, unrestored, caries free, nonattrited maxillary first premolars. Each tooth sample was weighed before wear testing using AT200 Mettler Toledo electronic analytical balance of 0.0001 g accuracy. Occlusal surfaces of these teeth were then abraded against the substrates in a wear machine for a total of 10,000 cycles. Each tooth sample was weighed after 5000 cycles and after the total of 10,000 cycles, respectively, using the same balance. Differences in weight of tooth samples before and after wear testing were evaluated statistically using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's correction for multiple group comparisons. Results: The values obtained for percentage weight loss after 10,000 cycles for over glazed ceramic surface were marginally higher than values obtained for autoglazed surface. It was observed that values obtained for percentage weight loss by polished ceramic after 10,000 cycles were statistically less as compared to the values obtained with autoglazed and over glazed ceramic surface (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between the values obtained by polished ceramic surfaces of two different groups. Conclusion: Enamel wear produced by polished porcelain is substantially less than autoglazed and over glazed porcelain. No significant

  10. New mirror-finish surface-grinding technology for the fabrication of optical device endfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Torahiko; Mitsuhashi, Masashige; Ueda, Tetsuji; Toyohara, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Koji

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a mirror-finish slicing technology, and a spherical mirror-finish surface grinding technology. The former technology uses a thin metal bond micro-grain blade to which an electrolytic dressing is applied, for use with optical waveguide device endfaces. The latter technology uses a concave surface of metal bond micro-grain grinding wheel with electrolytic dressing, which produces convex spherical ferrule endfaces for Physical Control optical fiber connectors. They successfully produce mirror-finish endfaces of 0.06 micrometers Rmax directly, without the need for lapping. Endfaces produced with these technologies have sufficiently high optical light transmission characteristics.

  11. An improved evaluation of surface finish with a three dimensional tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    GRANDADAM; PREBET; RIOUT

    1980-01-01

    The design and programming of an automated three dimensional surface finish tester is described. The device produces a three dimensional image of the microscopic texture of the examined surface. The surface finish tester presents the following advantages over conventional profilometry: (1) more complete exploration of surface texture by successive probe sweeps; (2) automation of measuring and calculating; (3) more accurate representation of the derived parameters; (4) analysis of the degree of homogeneity of the surface; (5) three dimensional graphic representation accurately depicting the state of the surface; (6) detection of local imperfections; and (7) detection of scoring that occurred during machining.

  12. Effect of Plasma Surface Finish on Wettability and Mechanical Properties of SAC305 Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Koike, Junichi; Yoon, Jeong-Won; Yoo, Sehoon

    2016-09-01

    The wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, and mechanical reliability of Sn-Ag-Cu solder on a plasma-coated printed circuit board (PCB) substrate were evaluated under multiple heat-treatments. Conventional organic solderability preservative (OSP) finished PCBs were used as a reference. The plasma process created a dense and highly cross-linked polymer coating on the Cu substrates. The plasma finished samples had higher wetting forces and shorter zero-cross times than those with OSP surface finish. The OSP sample was degraded after sequential multiple heat treatments and reflow processes, whereas the solderability of the plasma finished sample was retained after multiple heat treatments. After the soldering process, similar microstructures were observed at the interfaces of the two solder joints, where the development of intermetallic compounds was observed. From ball shear tests, it was found that the shear force for the plasma substrate was consistently higher than that for the OSP substrate. Deterioration of the OSP surface finish was observed after multiple heat treatments. Overall, the plasma surface finish was superior to the conventional OSP finish with respect to wettability and joint reliability, indicating that it is a suitable material for the fabrication of complex electronic devices.

  13. SURFACE FINISHES ON STAINLESS STEEL REDUCE BACTERIAL ATTACHMENT AND EARLY BIOFILM FORMATION: SCANNING ELECTRON AND ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three common finishing treatments of stainless steel that are used for equipment during poultry processing were tested for resistance to bacterial contamination. Methods were developed to measure attached bacteria and to identify factors that make surface finishes susceptible or ...

  14. Surface accuracy analysis of large deployable antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yaqiong; Li, Tuanjie; Wang, Zuowei; Deng, Hanqing

    2014-11-01

    This paper performs an analysis to the systematic surface figure error influenced by three factors including errors of faceted paraboloids, fabrication imperfection and random thermal strains in orbit. Firstly, the computational formulas for root-mean-square surface deviations caused by these factors are presented respectively. The stochastic finite element method is applied to derive the computational formulas of fabrication imperfection and random thermal strains, by which the sensitivity of surface accuracy to component imperfection can be revealed. Then the Monte Carlo simulation method is introduced to obtain the surface figure by sampling test on random errors. Finally, the analytical method is applied to the research on the surface figure error of AstroMesh deployable reflector. The results show that the deviations between the root-mean-square surface errors calculated by the proposed formulas with less consuming time and those by the Monte Carlo simulation method are less than 2%, which indicates that the proposed method is efficient and receivable enough to analyze systematic surface figure error of a large deployable antenna. Moreover, further investigations on the relationship between surface RMS deviation and the antenna parameters including aperture and the number of subdivisions are presented in the end.

  15. Effects of surface finish and mechanical training on Ni-Ti sheets for elastocaloric cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Tušek, Jaka; Sanna, Simone; Eriksen, Dan; Mishin, Oleg V.; Bahl, Christian R. H.; Pryds, Nini

    2016-06-01

    Elastocaloric cooling has emerged as a promising alternative to vapor compression in recent years. Although the technology has the potential to be more efficient than current technologies, there are many technical challenges that must be overcome to realize devices with high performance and acceptable durability. We study the effects of surface finish and training techniques on dog bone shaped polycrystalline samples of NiTi. The fatigue life of several samples with four different surface finishes was measured and it was shown that a smooth surface, especially at the edges, greatly improved fatigue life. The effects of training both on the structure of the materials and the thermal response to an applied strain was studied. The load profile for the first few cycles was shown to change the thermal response to strain, the structure of the material at failure while the final structure of the material was weakly influenced by the surface finish.

  16. A Tooth Surface Finishing Method with a New Tool of a Vitrified Cubic Boron Nitride Wheel for Involute Internal Spline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Sadao; Morita, Tetuya; Ariura, Yasutsune

    For highly accurate and highly efficient tooth surface finishing, a vitrified cubic boron nitride (CBN) wheel or an electro-deposited CBN wheel exhibits superior performance. Honing by an involute spline tooth meshing is effective due to the generating motion. However, a lack of wheel rigidity and an inadequate feed motion of the wheel tend to reduce the finishing performance. As a result, it is difficult to keep the tooth surface smooth. In this study, the finishing with a vitrified CBN wheel is carried out using a new honing tool. The finishing performance is compared with that obtained using an electro-deposited wheel, and the finishing is carried out by braking an internal spline axis. The influence of different feed methods is investigated on the roughness of the finished tooth surface. The finishing using a vitrified CBN wheel and braking an internal spline axis shows superior performance.

  17. A comparison of several surface finish measurement methods as applied to ground ceramic and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Riester, L.

    1996-01-01

    Surface finish is one of the most common measures of surface quality of ground ceramics and metal parts and a wide variety of methods and parameters have been developed to measure it. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the surface roughness parameters obtained on the same two specimens from three different types of measuring instruments: a traditional mechanical stylus system, a non-contact laser scanning system, and the atomic force microscope (two different AFM systems were compared). The same surface-ground silicon nitride and Inconel 625 alloy specimens were used for all measurements in this investigation. Significant differences in arithmetic average roughness, root-mean-square roughness, and peak-to-valley roughness were obtained when comparing data from the various topography measuring instruments. Non-contact methods agreed better with the others on the metal specimen than on the ceramic specimen. Reasons for these differences include the effective dimensions and geometry of the probe with respect to the surface topography; the reflectivity of the surface, and the type of filtering scheme Results of this investigation emphasize the importance of rigorously specifying the manner of surface roughness measurement when either reporting roughness data or when requesting that roughness data be provided.

  18. Study of the influence of reference system in surface finishing parameters evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, A.; Fernández, R.; Pindado, S.; Núñez, P.

    2012-04-01

    In the present paper the influence of the reference system with regard to the characterization of the surface finishing is analyzed. The effect of the reference system's choice on the most representative surface finishing parameters (e.g. roughness average Ra and root mean square values Rq) is studied. The study can also be applied to their equivalent parameters in waviness and primary profiles. Based on ISO and ASME standards, three different types of regression lines (central, mean and orthogonal) are theoretically and experimentally analyzed, identifying the validity and applicability fields of each one depending on profile's geometry.

  19. Effect of Blade-surface Finish on Performance of a Single-stage Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Jason J; Serovy, George, K

    1951-01-01

    A set of modified NACA 5509-34 rotor and stator blades was investigated with rough-machine, hand-filed, and highly polished surface finishes over a range of weight flows at six equivalent tip speeds from 672 to 1092 feet per second to determine the effect of blade-surface finish on the performance of a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Surface-finish effects decreased with increasing compressor speed and with decreasing flow at a given speed. In general, finishing blade surfaces below the roughness that may be considered aerodynamically smooth on the basis of an admissible-roughness formula will have no effect on compressor performance.

  20. Surface roughness of flowable and packable composite resin materials after finishing with abrasive discs.

    PubMed

    Uçtaşli, M B; Bala, O; Güllü, A

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness of flowable (Admira Flow, Filtek Flow, Tetric Flow) and packable (Admira, Filtek P60, Tetric HB) composite resin restorative materials finishing with Sof-Lex discs by means of average surface roughness (Ra) measurement using a surface profilometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For each test group five specimens were prepared and roughness was measured in five different positions using a profilometer with a traversing distance of 4 mm and a cut-off value of 0.8 mm. The radius of the tracing diamond tip was 5 microm and measuring force and speed was 4 mN and 0.5 mm/s, respectively. The surface roughness of each individual disk was taken as the arithmetic mean of the Ra values measured in five different positions. Additionally, one specimen of each test group after finishing was observed under SEM with the magnification of x800 and x2500. Before finishing with Sof-Lex discs, flowable composite materials showed a smoother surface than packable composites restoratives (P < 0.05). However, after the finishing procedures similar surface textures were observed both from packable and flowable composites (P > 0.05).

  1. Mathematical modeling of surface roughness in magnetic abrasive finishing of BK7 optical glass.

    PubMed

    Pashmforoush, Farzad; Rahimi, Abdolreza; Kazemi, Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) is one of the advanced machining processes efficiently used to finish hard-to-machine materials. Simulation and modeling of the process is of particular importance to understand the mechanics of material removal and consequently achieve a high-quality surface with a minimum of surface defects. Hence, in this paper, we performed a numerical-experimental study to mathematically model the surface roughness during the MAF of BK7 optical glass. For this purpose, the initial roughness profile was estimated using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and a Gaussian filter. We obtained the final surface profile based on the material removal mechanisms and the corresponding chipping depth values evaluated by finite element analysis. We then validated experimentally the simulation results in terms of the arithmetic average surface roughness (R(a ). The comparison between the obtained results demonstrates that the theoretical and experimental findings are in good agreement when predicting the parameters' effect on surface roughness behavior. PMID:26479596

  2. Impact of surface finishes on the flexural strength and fracture toughness of In-Ceram Zirconia.

    PubMed

    Manawi, Manal; Ozcan, Mutlu; Madina, Manal; Cura, Cenk; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Dental restorations made of zirconia are usually selectively adjusted chairside to eliminate occlusal or internal interferences that can impair the mechanical properties of ceramic framework material. Effects of polishing procedures on zirconia after chipping or simply glazing the monolithic zirconia restorations are not known. This study evaluated the effects of different surface treatment procedures--namely, glazing or grinding, finishing, and polishing regimens--on the flexural strength and fracture toughness of a zirconia core material. Forty zirconia specimens were prepared and divided into two main groups (n = 20) according to the type of surface treatment (glazed or ground, finished, and polished). Each group was further divided into two subgroups (n = 10) according to type of mechanical test (flexural strength and fracture toughness). The roughness measurements were performed before mechanical testing. Qualitative evaluation of representative specimens of each subgroup was performed using SEM. The surface roughness mean (μm; ± standard deviations) recorded for the glazed specimens (0.94 ± 0.2) was significantly lower than that of the finished and polished group (3.01 ± 0.1) (P < 0.05). The glazed zirconia showed significantly higher flexural strength (385.4 ± 45.4 MPa) and fracture toughness (6.07 ± 1 MPa.m½) values than the ground, finished, polished zirconia (302.4 ± 47.6 MPa and 2.14 ± 0.5 MPa.m½) (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001 for flexural strength and fracture toughness, respectively). A smooth topographic pattern after glazing could not be obtained after finishing and polishing. Grinding, finishing, and polishing markedly decreased the flexural strength and fracture toughness of zirconia compared to the glazed groups. PMID:22414507

  3. Effect of processing parameters on surface finish for fused deposition machinable wax patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a study on the effect of material processing parameters used in layer-by-layer material construction on the surface finish of a model to be used as an investment casting pattern. The data presented relate specifically to fused deposition modeling using a machinable wax.

  4. Prepolishing and finishing of optical surfaces using fluid jet polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messelink, Wilhelmus A. C. M.; Waeger, Reto; Wons, Torsten; Meeder, Mark; Heiniger, Kurt C.; Faehnle, Oliver W.

    2005-09-01

    The footprint of the Fluid Jet Polishing process is determined by the shape of the nozzle as well as by the orientation of the slurry beam with respect to the local surface normal. Besides, no tool wear occurs and the footprint remains constant during the manufacturing process allowing shape corrections in a deterministic way. To that aim, FJP has been implemented on a CNC machine and applied for both shaping of previously polished aspheres and polishing of fine ground a-spheres. In this paper, results will be presented showing the application of FJP as a sub-aperture shape correction method. Besides, experimental data will be reported demonstrating FJP's capability of polishing previously fine ground surfaces. The wear rate depends on the sharpness of the abrasives and their kinetic energy. It can thus be adjusted by various parameters, among others the applied pressure, slurry concentration and abrasive sizes. In this paper, an additional process parameter is identified allowing the application of the same polishing compound for wear rates ranging from nanometers to micrometers. This large wear range is achieved by mixing a well controlled amount of gas into the slurry flow allowing the abrasives to travel at higher speeds.

  5. Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on composite resin surfaces after different finishing and polishing techniques.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C A; Eskelson, E; Cavalli, V; Liporoni, P C S; Jorge, A O C; do Rego, M A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on the surface of three composite resins (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; nanohybrid, Vit-1-escence, Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA; and microhybrid, Esthet X, Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA) following different finishing and polishing techniques. Sixty standardized samples (6 × 3 mm) of each composite were produced and randomly divided into three finishing and polishing treatments (n=20): 1) control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, 2) Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique (3M ESPE, and 3) carbide bur finishing and Astrobrush polishing technique (Ultradent). Half the samples of each group were incubated in human saliva for 1 hour, and all the samples were subjected to S mutans (ATCC 35688) biofilm development. The mean log of CFU/mL present in the S mutans biofilm was calculated, and data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p<0.05). Human saliva incubation promoted a significant increase of bacterial adherence on all three of the composites' surfaces, regardless of the polishing treatment performed (p<0.05). Of the three, the nanofilled composite (Filtek Z350) had the lowest bacterial adherence with each of the finishing and polishing techniques despite the presence or absence of human saliva (p<0.05). Mylar matrix strips (control group) promoted the lowest bacterial adhesion on the surface of the microhybrid and nanofilled composites in the absence of human saliva. PMID:21740238

  6. Effect finishing and polishing procedures on the surface roughness of IPS Empress 2 ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Rodrigo; Elossais, André Afif; Lima, Darlon Martins; Reis, José Mauricio Santos Nunes; Campos, Edson Alves; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the surface roughness of IPS Empress 2 ceramic when treated with different finishing/polishing protocols. Materials and methods. Sixteen specimens of IPS Empress 2 ceramic were made from wax patterns obtained using a stainless steel split mold. The specimens were glazed (Stage 0–S0, control) and divided into two groups. The specimens in Group 1 (G1) were finished/polished with a KG Sorensen diamond point (S1), followed by KG Sorensen siliconized points (S2) and final polishing with diamond polish paste (S3). In Group 2 (G2), the specimens were finished/polished using a Shofu diamond point (S1), as well as Shofu siliconized points (S2) and final polishing was performed using Porcelize paste (S3). After glazing (S0) and following each polishing procedure (S1, S2 or S3), the surface roughness was measured using TALYSURF Series 2. The average surface roughness results were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Tukey post-hoc tests (α = 0.01) Results. All of the polishing procedures yielded higher surface roughness values when compared to the control group (S0). S3 yielded lower surface roughness values when compared to S1 and S2. Conclusions. The proposed treatments negatively affected the surface roughness of the glazed IPS Empress 2 ceramic. PMID:22724660

  7. Pb-free surface-finishing on electronic components' terminals for Pb-free soldering assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tanimoto, Morimasa; Matsuda, Akira; Uno, Takeo; Kurihara, Masaaki; Shiga, Shoji

    1999-11-01

    Pb-free solderable surface finishing is essential to implement Pb-free solder assembly in order to meet with the growing demand of environmental consciousness to eliminate Pb from electronic products. Two types of widely applicable Pb-free surface finishing technologies are developed. One is the multilayer-system including Pd with Ni undercoat. Heat-resistance of Pd enables whole-surface-plating on to leadframe before IC-assembling process. The other is the double-layer-system with low-melting-point-materials, for example, thicker Sn underlayer and thinner Sn-Bi alloy overlayer, dilutes Sn-Bi alloy's defects of harmful reactivity along with substrate metal and mechanical brittleness with keeping its advantages of solder-wettability and no whisker.

  8. Evaluation of the surface roughness in dental ceramics submitted to different finishing and polishing methods.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alex C; Oliveira, Mario C S; Lima, Emilena M C X; Rambob, Isabel; Leite, Mariana

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic restorations have been widely used in dentistry. These restorations often require intraoral adjustment with diamond burs after their cementation causing increasing roughness of the ceramic surface. Consequently some finishing and polishing methods have been used to minimize this occurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the roughness of the ceramic surfaces submitted to different finishing and polishing methods. 144 specimens of VITAVM(®)7, VM(®)9 and VM(®)13 (VITA Zahnfabrik) ceramics were fabricated and submitted to grinding using diamond burs. They were then divided into 15 groups (five of each ceramic type). Groups 1, 6 and 11-positive control (Glaze); Groups 2, 7 and 12-negative control (no polishing); Groups 3, 8 and 13-polished with abrasive rubbers (Edenta), felt disc and diamond polishing past; Groups 4, 9 and 14-polished with abrasive rubbers (Shofu), felt disc and diamond polishing past; Groups 5, 10 and 15-polished with aluminum oxide discs (Sof-Lex, 3M-ESPE), felt disc and diamond polishing paste. The roughness of the samples surfaces were measured using the rugosimeter Surfcorder SE 1700 and the data were submitted to statistical analysis using ANOVA and Tukey test at a level of significance of 5 %. There was statistically significance difference between the positive control groups and the other groups in all the ceramic types. Mechanical finishing and polishing methods were not able to provide a surface as smooth as the glazed surface for the tested ceramics. To assist dental practitioners to select the best finishing and polishing methods for the final adjustment of the ceramic restorations.

  9. Evaluation of the surface roughness in dental ceramics submitted to different finishing and polishing methods.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alex C; Oliveira, Mario C S; Lima, Emilena M C X; Rambob, Isabel; Leite, Mariana

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic restorations have been widely used in dentistry. These restorations often require intraoral adjustment with diamond burs after their cementation causing increasing roughness of the ceramic surface. Consequently some finishing and polishing methods have been used to minimize this occurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the roughness of the ceramic surfaces submitted to different finishing and polishing methods. 144 specimens of VITAVM(®)7, VM(®)9 and VM(®)13 (VITA Zahnfabrik) ceramics were fabricated and submitted to grinding using diamond burs. They were then divided into 15 groups (five of each ceramic type). Groups 1, 6 and 11-positive control (Glaze); Groups 2, 7 and 12-negative control (no polishing); Groups 3, 8 and 13-polished with abrasive rubbers (Edenta), felt disc and diamond polishing past; Groups 4, 9 and 14-polished with abrasive rubbers (Shofu), felt disc and diamond polishing past; Groups 5, 10 and 15-polished with aluminum oxide discs (Sof-Lex, 3M-ESPE), felt disc and diamond polishing paste. The roughness of the samples surfaces were measured using the rugosimeter Surfcorder SE 1700 and the data were submitted to statistical analysis using ANOVA and Tukey test at a level of significance of 5 %. There was statistically significance difference between the positive control groups and the other groups in all the ceramic types. Mechanical finishing and polishing methods were not able to provide a surface as smooth as the glazed surface for the tested ceramics. To assist dental practitioners to select the best finishing and polishing methods for the final adjustment of the ceramic restorations. PMID:24431749

  10. New vibration-assisted magnetic abrasive polishing (VAMAP) method for microstructured surface finishing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiang; Kum, Chun Wai; Au, Ka Hing; Tan, Zhi'En Eddie; Wu, Hu; Liu, Kui

    2016-06-13

    In order to polish microstructured surface without deteriorating its profile, we propose a new vibration-assisted magnetic abrasive polishing (VAMAP) method. In this method, magnetic force guarantees that the magnetic abrasives can well contact the microstructured surface and access the corners of microstructures while vibration produces a relative movement between microstructures and magnetic abrasives. As the vibration direction is parallel to the microstructures, the profile of the microstructures will not be deteriorated. The relation between vibration and magnetic force was analyzed and the feasibility of this method was experimentally verified. The results show that after polishing, the surface finish around microstructures was significantly improved while the profile of microstructures was well maintained.

  11. The Fabrication of Low Density, Small Cell Polystyrene Foam Parts with High Quality Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, J. R.; Gobby, P. L.; Hollis, R. V.; Manzanares, R.; Moore, J. E.; Gomez, V. M.; Elliott, N. E.; Foreman, L. R.

    1997-11-01

    Foams are frequently used in Inertial Confinement Fusion and other high energy density physics experiments when low density starting materials are desired in targets. Small cell size, low density, structural integrity and fabricability are most often the desired properties of the foam materials. We report in this paper a technique we have used to produce rigid polystyrene foam parts with cell sizes of 2-3 microns, densities down to 30 mg/cc and machined surfaces of 2-3 microns, rms. This feat is accomplished by backfilling a larger foam piece with a low melting point surfactant or wax, machining the desired parts from the backfilled part, and subsequently leaching the surfactant (or wax) from the finished part. An average 2 percent shrinkage is observed when the parts are leached, but the parts show no resulting distortion. Density checks of the finished parts indicate the surfactant (wax) is essentially entirely removed by the leaching process.

  12. A novel magnetic field-assisted polishing method using magnetic compound slurry and its performance in mirror surface finishing of miniature V-grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youliang; Wu, Yongbo; Mitsuyoshi, Nomura

    2016-05-01

    A novel magnetic field-assisted polishing technique was proposed for finishing 3D structured surface using a magnetic compound (MC) slurry. The MC slurry was prepared by blending carbonyl-iron-particles, abrasive grains and α-cellulose into a magnetic fluid which contains nano-scale magnetite particles. An experimental setup was constructed firstly by installing an oscillation worktable and a unit onto a polishing machine. Then, experimental investigations were conducted on oxygen-free copper workpiece with parallel distributed linear V-grooves to clarify the influence of the polishing time and abrasive impact angle on the grooves surface qualities. It was found that (1) the groove form accuracy, i.e. the form retention rate η varied with the polishing locations. Although the form retention rate η deteriorated during the polishing process, the final η was greater than 99.4%; (2) the effective impact angle θm affected the material removal and form accuracy seriously. An increase of the absolute value θm resulted with an increase of material removal rate and a decrease of the form accuracy; (3) the work-surface roughness decreased more than 6 times compared with the original surface after MC slurry polishing. These results confirmed the performance of the proposed new magnetic field-assisted polishing method in the finishing of 3D-structured surface.

  13. Mechanism of Improvement Effect of Ultrasonically Activated Coolant on Finished Surface Roughness in Cylindrical Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Haruhisa; Kajiwara, Kunio; Shimizu, Shinji; Ohmori, Shigetoshi

    The use of an ultrasonically activated coolant improves the roughness of a ground surface compared with that of an ordinary coolant. By evaluating the change in working surface conditions, it has been clarified that the ultrasonically activated coolant suppresses loading and wheel wear, and maintains a good the working surface condition. The flushing effect of the ultrasonically activated coolant, promoted by giant vibration acceleration, prevents the deposition and welding of chips on the working surface. Since the density of kinetic energy in the coolant stream increases, the activation helps the coolant to overcome the airflow due to wheel rotation and to reach the grinding point efficiently. This promotes the cooling and lubricating effects of coolant, and then protects the cutting edges from crushing, falling off and dulling. On the basis of the results, it can be said that the effects of coolant activation suppress the generation of scratches, and consequently improve the finished surface roughness.

  14. Role of surface finishing on pitting corrosion of a duplex stainless steel in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah-Rousset, N. Ben; Chaouachi, M. A.; Chellouf, A.

    1996-04-01

    Localized corrosion of duplex UNS S32550 stainless steel in seawater was investigated in the laboratory and in field trials for several surface finish conditions: polished, ground, and sandblasted. Electrochemical data obtained by polarization curves showed that the smoother, polished surface had better characteristics (higher pitting and protection potentials) than the ground or sandblasted surfaces. However, despite its high degree of roughness, the sandblasted surface was the most resistant in field conditions, exhibiting the lowest number of sites attacked. Internal compressive stresses created by sandblasting seem also to have an “unsensitizing” effect on sensitized zones that exist in cast steel (due to repairs of mold defects), reducing its susceptibility to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Such stresses are not generated in polished or ground surfaces, and localized MIC attack can occur.

  15. Evaluation of surface finish and polish of eight provisional restorative materials using acrylic bur and abrasive disk with and without pumice.

    PubMed

    Maalhagh-Fard, Ahmad; Wagner, Warren C; Pink, Frank E; Neme, Ann Marie

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two finishing techniques and pumice polishing on the surface roughness of eight different provisional materials. Provisional materials included polymethylmethacrylate-based Alike, Snap, Trim and Jetand composite-based provisional materials Temphase, Protemp 3 Garant, Luxatemp and Integrity. Baseline surface roughness was measured by a profilometer, then the provisional materials were finished using extra fine acrylic burs or medium abrasive disks. The surface roughness of each sample was measured following finishing using a profilometer as previously stated. Each surface was then polished with pumice and the surface roughness was measured again. The data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons (alpha = 0.05). The results indicated that with composite provisional materials, the unfinished surfaces are smoother than with bur or abrasive-disk finished surfaces. Pumice application did not smooth the surface finish for all materials. The different types of provisional materials required different finishing techniques to produce the smoothest finishes.

  16. The effects of surface finish and grain size on the strength of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    You, Y. H.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, J. G.; Kim, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of surface treatment and microstructure, especially abnormal grain growth, on the strength of sintered SiC were studied. The surfaces of sintered SiC were treated with 400, 800 and 1200 grit diamond wheels. Grain growth was induced by increasing the sintering times at 2050 C. The beta to alpha transformation occurred during the sintering of beta-phase starting materials and was often accompanied by abnormal grain growth. The overall strength distributions were established using Weibull statistics. The strength of the sintered SiC is limited by extrinsic surface flaws in normal-sintered specimens. The finer the surface finish and grain size, the higher the strength. But the strength of abnormal sintering specimens is limited by the abnormally grown large tabular grains. The Weibull modulus increases with decreasing grain size and decreasing grit size for grinding.

  17. Surface accuracy measurement sensor for deployable reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, R. B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The breadboard surface accuracy measurement sensor is an optical angle sensor which provides continuous line of sight position measurements of infrared source targets placed strategically about the antenna surface. Measurements of target coordinates define the surface figure relative to a reference frame on the antenna. Sensor operation, tests and test results to date are described.

  18. Finish ion beam treatment of the longrange cylindrical products outer surface in automatic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Volkov, N. V.; Valikov, R. A.; Yashin, A. S.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Yanin, S. N.; Asainov, O. Kh; Yurev, Yu N.

    2016-04-01

    The results of using of ion-beam technologies methods for finish treatment of metal products are presented. The experiments were performed at the installation ILUR-03, which allows the operation of cleaning, polishing and surface layers doping of the material of unlimited length cylindrical samples by radial Ar+ ions beam with energy up to 5 keV. The tubes from zirconium alloy E110 up to 500 mm length were used as samples for investigation. It is shown that selected automatic treatment modes reduce the surface roughness over the entire length of the samples and increase uniformity of the surface layer without observable effect on the bulk properties of material. Treatment promotes the formation of oxide films with improved defensive properties.

  19. Magnetorheological Finishing for Imprinting Continuous Phase Plate Structure onto Optical Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Dixit, S N; Genin, F Y; Brocious, W F

    2004-01-05

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) techniques have been developed to manufacture continuous phase plates (CPP's) and custom phase corrective structures on polished fused silica surfaces. These phase structures are important for laser applications requiring precise manipulation and control of beam-shape, energy distribution, and wavefront profile. The MRF's unique deterministic-sub-aperture polishing characteristics make it possible to imprint complex topographical information onto optical surfaces at spatial scale-lengths approaching 1 mm. In this study, we present the results of experiments and model calculations that explore imprinting two-dimensional sinusoidal structures. Results show how the MRF removal function impacts and limits imprint fidelity and what must be done to arrive at a high quality surface. We also present several examples of this imprinting technology for fabrication of phase correction plates and CPPs for use at high fluences.

  20. The Effect of Composition on the Surface Finish of PS400: A New High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Stanford, malcolm K.; Thomas, Fransua; Edmonds, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    A new composite, multi-constituent, solid lubricant coating, NASA PS400, developed for high temperature tribological applications, exhibits a smoother surface finish after grinding and polishing than its predecessors PS200 and PS300. In this paper, the baseline composition of PS400 is modified to investigate each individual constituent s role on the achievable surface finish through a series of coating deposition, grinding, and polishing experiments. Furthermore, to explore the limits of compositional tailoring for improved tribological performance, several PS400 coatings were doped with additional solid lubricants (graphite, MoS2 and BN) and tribologically tested. The test results clearly showed that, compared to PS300 coatings, PS400 achieves a smoother surface finish via a reduced lubricant content. Coatings prepared with higher than the baseline level (10 wt%) of lubricants exhibited higher final surface roughness than the earlier generation PS300 coatings. Reducing or eliminating the one or both lubricants (fluorides or silver) did not further improve the surface finish suggesting that the current composition of PS400 is near optimal with respect to surface finish. Lastly, attempts to improve the poor initial room temperature tribological behavior of PS400 via the addition of traditional solid lubricants were unsuccessful. Based upon this work and earlier results it is expected that future research will concentrate on developing methods to produce a lubricious glaze on the rubbing surface during break in to ensure that low friction and wear are rapidly achieved.

  1. Evaluation of the Bondability of the Epoxy-Enhanced Sn-58Bi Solder with ENIG and ENEPIG Surface Finishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Woo-Ram; Kim, Yongil; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2015-11-01

    The effect of different surface finishes, electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) and electroless nickel electroless palladium immersion gold (ENEPIG), on the mechanical properties of Sn-58Bi bumps made with solder paste enhanced with epoxy were investigated. The microstructure and fracture surfaces were observed with scanning electron microscopy, and the compositions of the IMC and solder were measured using energy dispersive spectrometry and an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). To evaluate the mechanical properties, low-speed shear tests and board-level drop tests were performed. The result of the shear tests showed that the bonding strength of the epoxy-enhanced Sn-58Bi solder bumps was higher than that of Sn-58Bi solder for all surface finishes, because of the epoxy surrounding the solder, and the fracture surfaces of epoxy-enhanced Sn-58Bi indicated ductile fracture in the solder joint. However, the result of the drop tests showed that samples with the ENIG and ENEPIG surface finishes had lower drop numbers compared to the sample without these surface finishes. The lower performance resulted from insufficient ejection of epoxy from the ENIG and ENEPIG surface finishes during reflow, which reduced the interfacial bonding area.

  2. Accuracy assessment of NLCD 2006 land cover and impervious surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickham, James D.; Stehman, Stephen V.; Gass, Leila; Dewitz, Jon; Fry, Joyce A.; Wade, Timothy G.

    2013-01-01

    Release of NLCD 2006 provides the first wall-to-wall land-cover change database for the conterminous United States from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data. Accuracy assessment of NLCD 2006 focused on four primary products: 2001 land cover, 2006 land cover, land-cover change between 2001 and 2006, and impervious surface change between 2001 and 2006. The accuracy assessment was conducted by selecting a stratified random sample of pixels with the reference classification interpreted from multi-temporal high resolution digital imagery. The NLCD Level II (16 classes) overall accuracies for the 2001 and 2006 land cover were 79% and 78%, respectively, with Level II user's accuracies exceeding 80% for water, high density urban, all upland forest classes, shrubland, and cropland for both dates. Level I (8 classes) accuracies were 85% for NLCD 2001 and 84% for NLCD 2006. The high overall and user's accuracies for the individual dates translated into high user's accuracies for the 2001–2006 change reporting themes water gain and loss, forest loss, urban gain, and the no-change reporting themes for water, urban, forest, and agriculture. The main factor limiting higher accuracies for the change reporting themes appeared to be difficulty in distinguishing the context of grass. We discuss the need for more research on land-cover change accuracy assessment.

  3. Surface Roughness, Microhardness, and Microleakage of a Silorane-Based Composite Resin after Immediate or Delayed Finishing/Polishing

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Fernanda Carvalho Rezende; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Silveira, Rodrigo Richard; Pereira, Carolina Nemésio Barros; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira; Magalhães, Claudia Silami

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study evaluated the effect of immediate or delayed finishing/polishing using different systems on the surface roughness, hardness, and microleakage of a silorane-based composite. Material and Methods. Specimens were made with silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE) and assigned to the treatments: control (light-cured); aluminum oxide discs (Sof-Lex, 3M ESPE); diamond-impregnated silicone tips (Astropol, Ivoclar Vivadent); aluminum oxide-impregnated silicone tips (Enhance, Dentsply). Half of the specimens were finished/polished immediately and the rest after 7 days. Surface roughness (Ra, μm; n = 20) and Vickers microhardness (50 g; 45 s; n = 10) were measured. Cavities were prepared in bovine incisors and filled with Filtek P90. The fillings received immediate or delayed finishing/polishing (n = 10) and were subjected to dye penetration test (0.5% basic fuchsin, 24 h). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Scheffe, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests (p < 0.05). Results. The finishing/polishing system significantly influenced roughness and microhardness (p < 0.0001). For enamel, microleakage was not affected by the finishing/polishing system (p = 0.309). For dentin, Sof-Lex discs and Astropol points promoted greater microleakage than Enhance points (p = 0.033). Conclusion. Considering roughness, microhardness, and microleakage together, immediate finishing/polishing of a silorane-based composite using aluminum oxide discs may be recommended. PMID:26977150

  4. Structural and Electronic Properties of Gold Contacts on CdZnTe with Different Surface Finishes for Radiation Detector Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tari, S.; Aqariden, F.; Chang, Y.; Ciani, A.; Grein, C.; Li, Jin; Kioussis, N.

    2014-08-01

    State-of-the-art room-temperature, high-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray semiconductor detectors can be fabricated from CdZnTe (CZT) crystals. The structural and electronic properties of the CZT surface, especially the contact interfaces, can have a substantial effect on radiation detector performance, for example leakage current, signal-to-noise ratio, and energy resolution, especially for soft x-rays and large pixilated arrays. Atomically smooth and defect-free surfaces are desirable for high-performance CZT-based detectors; chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP) is typically performed to produce such surfaces. The electrical behavior of the metal/CZT interface varies substantially with surface preparation before contact deposition, and with choice of metal and deposition technique. We report a systematic study of the structural and electronic properties of gold (Au) contacts on CZT prepared with different surface finishes. We observed subsurface damage under Au contacts on CMP-finished CZT and abrupt interfaces for Au on chemically-polished (CP) CZT. Schottky barrier formation was observed for Au contacts, irrespective of surface finish, and less charge trapping and low surface resistance were observed for CP-finished surfaces. Pre-deposition surface treatment produced interfaces free from oxide layers.

  5. Three-dimensional evaluation of surface roughness of resin composites after finishing and polishing

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Veena S; Sainudeen, Shan; Padmanabhan, Prabeesh; Vijayashankar, L V; Sujathan, Unu; Pillai, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to investigate the effects of finishing and polishing procedures on four novel resin composites using three-dimensional optical profilometer. Materials and Methods: Four composites classified according to their filler size, were selected: Filtek™ Z350 XT/Nanofill (3M™ ESPE™), Esthet-X HD/Hybrid (Dentsply Caulk), Te Econom/Microfill (Ivoclar Vivadent®), Tetric EvoCeram® /Nanohybrid (Ivoclar Vivadent®). Composite specimens were made in Plexiglass mold and polished with Soflex (3M ESPE), Enhance + Pogo (Dentsply Caulk). Both the systems were used according to the manufacturers’ instructions, and the polished surfaces were assessed with an optical profilometer. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal-Wallis test and further pairwise comparison were performed by Mann-Whitney test. Results: The smoothest surfaces for all the resin composites tested were obtained from the Mylar strip; statistically significant differences were observed among them (P = 0.001). The order of composites was ranked from the lowest to highest surface roughness; Filtek Z350 XT < Te Econom < Tetric EvoCeram < Esthet XHD. Pairwise multiple comparison with Mann-Whitney test showed Filtek Z350 to have the smoothest surface and the least with Teric EvoCeram. Among the polishing systems, Soflex showed the smoothest surface and was significantly different from Pogo (P = 0.046). Conclusions: The effectiveness of the polishing systems seems to be dependent on the material used, treatment modality and also on the filler particle size. PMID:26957802

  6. Imprinting continuously varying topographical structure onto large-aperture optical surfaces using magnetorheological finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Dixit, S; Campbell, J H; Golini, D; Hachkowski, M R; Nelson, A

    2007-03-07

    Over the past four years we have advanced Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) techniques and tools to imprint complex continuously varying topographical structures onto large-aperture (430 x 430 mm) optical surfaces. These optics, known as continuous phase plates (CPPs), are important for high-power laser applications requiring precise manipulation and control of beam-shape, energy distribution, and wavefront profile. MRF's unique deterministic-sub-aperture polishing characteristics make it possible to imprint complex topographical information onto optical surfaces at spatial scale-lengths approaching 1 mm and surface peak-to-valleys as high as 22 {micro}m. During this discussion, we will present the evolution of the MRF imprinting technology and the MRF tools designed to manufacture large-aperture 430 x 430 mm CPPs. Our results will show how the MRF removal function impacts and limits imprint fidelity and what must be done to arrive at a high-quality surface. We also present several examples of this imprinting technology for fabrication of phase correction plates and CPPs for use in high-power laser applications.

  7. The Surface Finish of Thermally Aged Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composites Using E-glass as a Surface Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, M. L.; Fox, B. L.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigated the effect of woven E-glass mass (25 g/m2, 50 g/m2, 85 g/m2, 135 g/m2) on the painted surface finish of various thermoset (EPIKOTETM RIM935, EPIKOTETM 04434, Ultratec LpTM ES300, Ultratec LpTM SPV6035) carbon fibre composite laminates, before and after aging at 95 °C for 168 h. The as-moulded laminate surfaces were evaluated using surface profilometry techniques and the painted and aged surfaces were evaluated using a wave-scan distinctness of image (DOI) instrument. It was found that the 25 g/m2 E-glass surface layer assisted with reducing the roughness of the as-moulded surfaces and the long-term waviness of the painted surfaces due to the increase in resin-richness at the surface. The EPIKOTETM 04434 resin system that contained diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) epoxy had the least change in long-term waviness with thermal aging due to the rigid fluorene-based backbone in comparison to the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) systems.

  8. Accuracy of land surface elevation from CALIPSO mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-03-01

    We assess the accuracy of land surface elevation retrieved from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission through comparisons with the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset (NED), Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and the altimetry product from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System onboard the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). The vertical accuracy of the CALIPSO-derived land surface elevation was tested against these three datasets for about 16 million lidar shots over the continental United States. The results show that the CALIPSO-derived elevation was highly correlated with the elevation result from the NED, SRTM, and ICESat datasets. The overall absolute vertical accuracies of the CALIPSO-derived land surface elevation expressed as the root mean square error (RMSE) are 5.58 and 5.90 m when compared with the SRTM and NED results, respectively. Lower accuracy of the CALIPSO-derived land surface elevation was achieved by comparison with the ICESat results (8.35-m RMSE), primarily due to the several kilometers distance between the CALIPSO and ICESat ground footprints. The results show that the variability in terrain, vegetation, canopy, and footprint size can all influence comparisons between the CALIPSO-derived elevation and the results obtained from NED, SRTM, and ICESat datasets.

  9. Coating and surface finishing definition for the Solar Orbiter/METIS inverted external occulter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, Federico; Romoli, Marco; Vives, Sebastien; Baccani, Cristian; Escolle, Clement; Pancrazzi, Maurizio; Focardi, Mauro; Da Deppo, Vania; Moses, John D.; Fineschi, Silvano

    2014-07-01

    The METIS coronagraph aboard the Solar Orbiter mission will undergo extreme environmental conditions (e.g., a thermal excursion of about 350 degrees throughout the various mission phases), due to the peculiar spacecraft trajectory that will reach a perihelion of 0.28 AUs. METIS is characterized by an innovative design for the occultation system that allows to halve the thermal load inside the instrument while guaranteeing the stray light reduction that is required for a solar coronagraph. The Inverted External Occulter (IEO) concept revolutionizes the classical scheme, by exchanging the usual positions of the entrance aperture (that is now the outermost element of the instrument facing the Sun) with the actual occulter (that is a spherical mirror inside the coronagraph boom). The chosen material for the IEO manufacturing is Titanium, as a trade o_ between light weight, strength and low thermal expansion coefficient. A 2 years long test campaign has been run to define the IEO geometry, and its results are addressed in previous dedicated papers. This work describes the results of a further campaign aimed at defining the IEO surface and edge finishing, the support flange geometry and the Titanium coating. Various edge finishing were installed on a prototype of the instrument occulting system and their performance in stray light reduction were compared. The support flange geometry was designed in order to reduce the overall weight, to control the thermal load and to accentuate its stray light suppression performance. The coating is a particularly delicate issue. A black coating is necessary in order to assess the stray light issues, typically critical for visible coronagraphs. Black coating of Titanium is not a standard process, thus several space qualified black coatings were experimented on Titanium and characterized. The impact of the IEO coatings was evaluated, the reflectivity and the BRDFs were measured and are addressed in the paper.

  10. Leg lesions and cleanliness of finishing bulls kept in housing systems with different lying area surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schulze Westerath, H; Gygax, L; Mayer, C; Wechsler, B

    2007-07-01

    The influence of the quality of different lying surfaces on lesions and swellings at the joints as well as on the cleanliness of finishing bulls throughout the fattening period was studied. On 17 farms (623 bulls), pens with fully slatted concrete floors (CONCRETE), with rubber coated slats (RUBBER), with cubicles (CUBICLES, provided with five different types of soft lying mat) and with a littered lying area (STRAW) were compared. Bulls kept on STRAW developed the smallest lesion scores at the joints. In CUBICLES, there was a huge variability in the lesion scores depending on the type of lying mat, ranging from values comparable to STRAW up to and greater than the values for CONCRETE. The highest lesion scores at the carpal joints were found on CONCRETE, with intermediate values on RUBBER and in CUBICLES. At the tarsal joints, lesion scores were similar on CONCRETE and RUBBER and in the same range or worse on most mats in the CUBICLES. Swelling scores were highest on CONCRETE and intermediate on RUBBER and in CUBICLES compared to STRAW. In general, there was a steady increase in the lesion scores of the leg joints throughout the fattening period on CONCRETE, RUBBER and STRAW, whereas on some of the mats in CUBICLES these scores were at a high level from early on in the fattening period. Animals in all the housing systems were clean over the whole fattening period. Littering the lying area in CUBICLES affected neither the lesion scores nor the swelling scores at the joints nor animal cleanliness. In conclusion, both rubber coated slats and cubicles provided with soft lying mats were favourable with regard to the levels of lesions and swellings of the leg joints of finishing bulls compared to concrete slats. However, these levels were even lower in pens with a straw bedded lying area.

  11. Printed Circuit Board Surface Finish and Effects of Chloride Contamination, Electric Field, and Humidity on Corrosion Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conseil-Gudla, Hélène; Jellesen, Morten S.; Ambat, Rajan

    2016-10-01

    Corrosion reliability is a serious issue today for electronic devices, components, and printed circuit boards (PCBs) due to factors such as miniaturization, globalized manufacturing practices which can lead to process-related residues, and global usage effects such as bias voltage and unpredictable user environments. The investigation reported in this paper focuses on understanding the synergistic effect of such parameters, namely contamination, humidity, PCB surface finish, pitch distance, and potential bias on leakage current under different humidity levels, and electrochemical migration probability under condensing conditions. Leakage currents were measured on interdigitated comb test patterns with three different types of surface finish typically used in the electronics industry, namely gold, copper, and tin. Susceptibility to electrochemical migration was studied under droplet conditions. The level of base leakage current (BLC) was similar for the different surface finishes and NaCl contamination levels up to relative humidity (RH) of 65%. A significant increase in leakage current was found for comb patterns contaminated with NaCl above 70% to 75% RH, close to the deliquescent RH of NaCl. Droplet tests on Cu comb patterns with varying pitch size showed that the initial BLC before dendrite formation increased with increasing NaCl contamination level, whereas electrochemical migration and the frequency of dendrite formation increased with bias voltage. The effect of different surface finishes on leakage current under humid conditions was not very prominent.

  12. The influence of finishing/polishing time and cooling system on surface roughness and microhardness of two different types of composite resin restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kaminedi, Raja Rajeswari; Penumatsa, Narendra Varma; Priya, Tulasi; Baroudi, Kusai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of finishing time and polishing time on surface roughness and microhardness of nanofilled and hybrid resin composites. Materials and Methods: Hundred disk composite specimens from micro hybrid composite and nanohybrid composite were prepared, 50 for each type of composite. The specimens were divided into five groups according to the time of finishing and polishing (immediate, 15 min, 24 h and dry). Composite under the Mylar strip without finishing and polishing was taken as the control group. Surface roughness was measured with environmental scanning electronic microscope (ESEM) and microhardness was determined using Vickers Microhardness Tester. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey's post hoc test. Results: Smooth surface with low hardness was obtained for the group under Mylar strip without finishing and polishing. The highest roughness was recorded for delayed finishing and polishing for both composites. Immediate finishing and polishing increased the surface hardness more than that in the control group in both types of composites. Dry finishing reduced the hardness significantly for micro hybrid composite, but resulted in the highest surface hardness for nanofilled composite. Conclusion: Immediate finishing and polishing under coolant resulted in the best surface smoothness and hardness values in micro hybrid composite; however, immediate dry finishing and polishing gave the best smoothness and hardness values in nanohybrid composite. PMID:25558457

  13. Comparison of Roller Burnishing Method with Other Hole Surface Finishing Processes Applied on AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, Adnan

    2011-08-01

    Component surface quality and selection of the optimum material are the main factors determining the performance of components used in machine manufacturing. The level of hole surface quality can be evaluated by the measurements regarding surface roughness, micro-hardness, and cylindricity. In this study, data had been obtained for different hole drilling methods. The characteristics of materials obtained after applications were compared for different hole-finishing processes to identify best hole drilling method. AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel material was used. Surface finishing of holes were performed using drilling, turning, reaming, grinding, honing, and roller burnishing methods. The results of the study show that the roller burnishing method gives the best results for mechanical, metallurgical properties, and hole surface quality of the material. On the other hand, the worst characteristics were obtained in the drilling method.

  14. Effect of substrate surface finish on the lubrication and failure mechanisms of molybdenum disulfide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed (burnished) MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes - polished, sanded, and sandblasted - as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrate was rough, flat plateaus were created during 'run-in' and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and a deposit site for wear debris. In moist air, the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic-colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X-ray diffraction to consist primarily of alpha-iron and MoO3 powders. In dry argon, the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of the MoS2 film from the contact region by transverse flow. Analysis of the wear debris on the wear track at failure showed it consisted mainly of alpha-iron and some residual MoS2. No molybdenum oxides were found.

  15. Effect of Substrate Surface Finish on the Lubrication and Failure Mechanisms of Molybdenum Disulfide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed (burnished) MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes - polished, sanded, and sandblasted - as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrates were rough, flat plateaus were created during 'run in' and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and a deposit site for wear debris. In moist air, the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X ray diffraction to consist primarily of alpha iron and MoO3 powders. In dry argon, the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of the MoS2 film from the contact region by transverse flow. Analysis of the wear debris on the wear track at failure showed it consisted mainly of alpha iron and some residual MoS2. No molybdenum oxides were found.

  16. Fatigue performance of metastable β titanium alloys: Effects of microstructure and surface finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocan, Marcin; Wagner, Lothar; Rack, H. J.

    2005-12-01

    This investigation examined the role of microstructure and surface finish on the high cycle fatigue (HCF) performance of TIMETAL LCB (Ti-6.8Mo-4.5Fe-1.5Al). The as-received microstructure of LCB consisted of elongated β grains with a semicontinuous grain boundary α layer. In contrast, a fine equiaxed β + spheroidized α LCB microstructure was achieved by hot swaging and solution (recrystallization) anneal. The latter modification of the prior β grain structure, together with the size, morphology, and distribution of the primary α phase, resulted in a significant enhancement in the tensile and HCF properties. Furthermore, prestraining (PS), as would be expected during the fabrication of an automotive coil spring, and prior to aging for 30 min at temperatures between 500 and 550 °C, led to additional increases in tensile strength. In contrast, the HCF performance was always reduced when PS prior to aging was included in the overall processing procedure. Finally, shot-peening and roller-burnishing both resulted in an increased fatigue life in the finite life regimen; however, significant reductions in the 107 cycle fatigue strengths were observed when these procedures were used. These observations have been explained by including the effect of process-induced residual tensile stresses in the fatigue analysis, resulting in subsurface fatigue crack nucleation.

  17. An Overview of Surface Finishes and Their Role in Printed Circuit Board Solderability and Solder Joint Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.

    1998-10-15

    A overview has been presented on the topic of alternative surface finishes for package I/Os and circuit board features. Aspects of processability and solder joint reliability were described for the following coatings: baseline hot-dipped, plated, and plated-and-fused 100Sn and Sn-Pb coatings; Ni/Au; Pd, Ni/Pd, and Ni/Pd/Au finishes; and the recently marketed immersion Ag coatings. The Ni/Au coatings appear to provide the all-around best option in terms of solderability protection and wire bondability. Nickel/Pal ftishes offer a slightly reduced level of performance in these areas that is most likely due to variable Pd surface conditions. It is necessmy to minimize dissolved Au or Pd contents in the solder material to prevent solder joint embrittlement. Ancillary aspects that included thickness measurement techniques; the importance of finish compatibility with conformal coatings and conductive adhesives; and the need for alternative finishes for the processing of non-Pb bearing solders were discussed.

  18. Deterministic magnetorheological finishing of optical aspheric mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ci; Dai, Yifan; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Li, Shengyi; Shi, Feng

    2009-05-01

    A new method magnetorheological finishing (MRF) used for deterministical finishing of optical aspheric mirrors is applied to overcome some disadvantages including low finishing efficiency, long iterative time and unstable convergence in the process of conventional polishing. Based on the introduction of the basic principle of MRF, the key techniques to implement deterministical MRF are also discussed. To demonstrate it, a 200 mm diameter K9 class concave asphere with a vertex radius of 640mm was figured on MRF polish tool developed by ourselves. Through one process about two hours, the surface accuracy peak-to-valley (PV) is improved from initial 0.216λ to final 0.179λ and root-mean-square (RMS) is improved from 0.027λ to 0.017λ (λ = 0.6328um ). High-precision and high-efficiency convergence of optical aspheric surface error shows that MRF is an advanced optical manufacturing method that owns high convergence ratio of surface figure, high precision of optical surfacing, stabile and controllable finishing process. Therefore, utilizing MRF to finish optical aspheric mirrors determinately is credible and stabile; its advantages can be also used for finishing optical elements on varieties of types such as plane mirrors and spherical mirrors.

  19. Laser damage initiation and growth of antireflection coated S-FAP crystal surfaces prepared by pitch lap and magnetorheological finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C J; Menapace, J A; Schaffers, K I; Bibeau, C; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

    2005-10-31

    Antireflection (AR) coatings typically damage at the interface between the substrate and coating. Therefore the substrate finishing technology can have an impact on the laser resistance of the coating. For this study, AR coatings were deposited on Yb:S-FAP [Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F] crystals that received a final polish by both conventional pitch lap finishing as well as magnetorheological finishing (MRF). SEM images of the damage morphology reveals laser damage originates at scratches and at substrate coating interfacial absorbing defects. Previous damage stability tests on multilayer mirror coatings and bare surfaces revealed damage growth can occur at fluences below the initiation fluence. The results from this study suggest the opposite trend for AR coatings. Investigation of unstable HR and uncoated surface damage morphologies reveals significant radial cracking that is not apparent with AR damage due to AR delamination from the coated surface with few apparent cracks at the damage boundary. Damage stability tests show that coated Yb:S-FAP crystals can operate at 1057 nm at fluences around 20 J/cm{sup 2} at 10 ns; almost twice the initiation damage threshold.

  20. Effects of Aging Treatment on Mechanical Properties of Sn-58Bi Epoxy Solder on ENEPIG-Surface-Finished PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoo; Myung, Woo-Ram; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical properties of Sn-58Bi epoxy solder were evaluated by low-speed shear testing as functions of aging time and temperature. To determine the effects of epoxy, the interfacial reaction and mechanical properties of both Sn-58Bi and Sn-58Bi epoxy solder were investigated after aging treatment. The chemical composition and growth kinetics of the intermetallic compound (IMC) formed at the interface between Sn-58Bi solder and electroless nickel electroless palladium immersion gold (ENEPIG) surface finish were analyzed. Sn-58Bi solder paste was applied by stencil-printing on flame retardant-4 substrate, then reflowed. Reflowed samples were aged at 85°C, 95°C, 105°C, and 115°C for up to 1000 h. (Ni,Pd)3Sn4 IMC formed between Sn-58Bi solder and ENEPIG surface finish after reflow. Ni3Sn4 and Ni3P IMCs formed at the interface between (Ni,Pd)3Sn4 IMC and ENEPIG surface finish after aging at 115°C for 300 h. The overall IMC growth rate of Sn-58Bi solder joint was higher than that of Sn-58Bi epoxy solder joint during aging. The shear strength of Sn-58Bi epoxy solder was about 2.4 times higher than that of Sn-58Bi solder due to the blocking effect of epoxy, and the shear strength decreased with increasing aging time.

  1. Effects of Aging Treatment on Mechanical Properties of Sn-58Bi Epoxy Solder on ENEPIG-Surface-Finished PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoo; Myung, Woo-Ram; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2016-11-01

    The mechanical properties of Sn-58Bi epoxy solder were evaluated by low-speed shear testing as functions of aging time and temperature. To determine the effects of epoxy, the interfacial reaction and mechanical properties of both Sn-58Bi and Sn-58Bi epoxy solder were investigated after aging treatment. The chemical composition and growth kinetics of the intermetallic compound (IMC) formed at the interface between Sn-58Bi solder and electroless nickel electroless palladium immersion gold (ENEPIG) surface finish were analyzed. Sn-58Bi solder paste was applied by stencil-printing on flame retardant-4 substrate, then reflowed. Reflowed samples were aged at 85°C, 95°C, 105°C, and 115°C for up to 1000 h. (Ni,Pd)3Sn4 IMC formed between Sn-58Bi solder and ENEPIG surface finish after reflow. Ni3Sn4 and Ni3P IMCs formed at the interface between (Ni,Pd)3Sn4 IMC and ENEPIG surface finish after aging at 115°C for 300 h. The overall IMC growth rate of Sn-58Bi solder joint was higher than that of Sn-58Bi epoxy solder joint during aging. The shear strength of Sn-58Bi epoxy solder was about 2.4 times higher than that of Sn-58Bi solder due to the blocking effect of epoxy, and the shear strength decreased with increasing aging time.

  2. Inkjet-printed gold nanoparticulate patterns for surface finish in electronic package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seonhee; Cho, Hyejin; Kang, Seongkoo; Oh, Sungil; Kim, Donghoon

    2011-11-01

    Gold (Au) pads for surface finish in electronic package were developed by the inkjet printing method. The Au ink for printing was prepared by Au nanoparticles (NPs) coated with capping molecules of dodecylamine (C12H25NH2). The microstructures of the inkjet-printed Au films were characterized after sintering in various gas flows. The film sintered in air showed that bonding between NPs was not enough for further grain growth due to the incomplete decomposition of the capping layer. The film sintered under nitrogen (N2) had NPs existing on the surface and the bottom which did not participate in sintering. When the film was sintered under N2-bubbled through formic acid (FA/N2), a large portion of the pores were observed to make a holey pancake-like structure of the film. The microstructures of the inkjet-printed Au film became denser with grain growth when Au NPs were sintered under mixed gas flows of FA/N2 and N2. The resistivity of film was 4.79 μΩ cm, about twice the bulk value. Organic analysis showed that about 0.43% of residual organics was left in the film. Therefore, this Au film was chosen for solder ball shear test because the microstructure was denser compared to the films sintered under other gasses such as N2 or FA/N2 and less organic residue was found from organic analyses. Even though the film sintered under N2 showed the best electrical property (4.35 μΩ cm), it was not adopted in the shear test because NPs remaining on the bottom of the film could lead to the poor adhesion between the film and substrate and show low shear strength. The shear force was 8.04 newton (N) on average and the strength was 64 MPa. This shear strength is good enough to substitute the inkjet-printed Au nanoparticulate film for electroplating in electronic package.

  3. Effects of different surface finishing procedures on the change in surface roughness and color of a polymer infiltrated ceramic network material

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Merve; Türker, Nurullah; Barutcigil, Kubilay

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) materials, also called hybrid ceramics, are new materials in dental market. The manufacturer of the PICN material VITA Enamic suggests 3 different finishing procedures for this new material. In the present study, surface roughness and color differences caused from different finishing procedures of VITA Enamic were investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS 120 specimens were prepared in dimensions 2 × 10 × 12 mm from VITA Enamic hybrid ceramic blocks with 'high translucency' and 'translucency 2M2' shades. The specimens were divided into 8 groups. For each group, different finishing procedures suggested by the manufacturer were performed. Surface roughness values were determined by a tactile portable profilometer. Color changes were evaluated using a clinical spectrophotometer. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc comparison. The significance level was set at α=0.05. RESULTS The roughest surfaces were observed in Glaze Groups. Their surface roughness values were similar to that of the control group. Clinical Kit and Technical Kit groups did not show a statistically significant difference regarding surface roughness (P>.05). The largest color difference regarding ΔE00 was observed in Clinical Kit finishing groups. There were also statistically significant color changes between the groups (P<.05). However, all the groups showed clinically acceptable color change (ΔE00<2.25) except Clinical Kit Groups (ΔE00>2.25). CONCLUSION Within the limitations of the present study, it may be suggested that finishing the VITA Enamic restorations by Technical Kit instead of Glaze and Clinical Kit gives better clinical performance in regard to surface roughness and shade matching. PMID:26949483

  4. Adherence of Candida albicans to denture base acrylics and silicone-based resilient liner materials with different surface finishes.

    PubMed

    Nevzatoğlu, Erdem U; Ozcan, Mutlu; Kulak-Ozkan, Yasemin; Kadir, Tanju

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness and Candida albicans adherence on denture base acrylic resins and silicone-based resilient liners with different surface finishes. Four commercial denture base acrylic resins (three heat polymerized and one room temperature polymerized) and five silicone-based liner materials (two heat polymerized and three room temperature polymerized) (10 x 10 x 2 mm) were tested in this study. The materials were processed against glass or plaster or finished with a tungsten carbide bur. Surface roughness measurements were made using a profilometer with an optical scanner probe. All specimens were ultrasonically cleaned in water for 15 s, autoclave sterilized, and contaminated with C. albicans solution for adherence assay evaluation. The materials processed against the glass surface showed significantly lower surface roughness values (0.11 +/- 0.1-1.66 +/- 1.1 microm) than those of the materials processed against the dental plaster (2.61 +/- 0.2-6.12 +/- 2.8 microm) or roughening with a bur (1.48 +/- 0.2-7.05 +/- 1.2 microm; p < 0.05, one- or two-way analysis of variance). Also, the materials processed against the glass surface showed lower C. albicans adhesion (mean ranks 120.36) than those of the materials processed against the dental plaster (mean ranks 139.77) or roughening with a bur (mean ranks 143.06), but the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney). In all types of surface finishes, C. albicans adhesion on denture base acrylics was significantly less (mean ranks 90.18-90.40) than those of silicone liners (mean ranks 119.38-205.18; p < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis).

  5. Formaldehyde and TVOC emission behaviors according to finishing treatment with surface materials using 20 L chamber and FLEC.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Wook; Kim, Sumin; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Park, Jin Chul

    2010-05-15

    Formaldehyde and TVOC are emitted from wood-based panels that are made using wood particles, wood fiber, wood chips and formaldehyde-based resins. This study examined the formaldehyde and TVOC emission behavior of medium density fiberboard (MDF) overlaid with three types of uncoated lignocellulosic surface materials (oak decorative veneer, low pressure melamine impregnated paper and high pressure melamine impregnated paper) and four types of coated surface materials (coated paper, two types of finishing foils, and PVC) using the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) method and a 20 L small chamber method. The uncoated lignocellulosic surface materials exhibited lower formaldehyde and TVOC emission levels. The coated surface materials did not show reduced TVOC emissions but the formaldehyde emission was reduced in the 20 L small chamber test. In the FLEC test, both the uncoated lignocellulosic surface materials and coated surface materials showed lower TVOC and formaldehyde emissions from MDF.

  6. History of magnetorheological finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel C.

    2011-06-01

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic method for producing complex optics with figure accuracy <50 nm and surface roughness <1 nm. MRF was invented at the Luikov Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer in Minsk, Belarus in the late 1980s by a team led by William Kordonski. When the Soviet Union opened up, New York businessman Lowell Mintz was invited to Minsk in 1990 to explore possibilities for technology transfer. Mintz was told of the potential for MRF, but did not understand whether it had value. Mintz was referred to Harvey Pollicove at the Center for Optics Manufacturing of the University of Rochester. As a result of their conversation, they sent Prof. Steve Jacobs to visit Minsk and evaluate MRF. From Jacobs' positive findings, and with support from Lowell Mintz, Kordonski and his colleagues were invited in 1993 to work at the Center for Optics Manufacturing with Jacobs and Don Golini to refine MRF technology. A "preprototype" finishing machine was operating by 1994. Prof. Greg Forbes and doctoral student Paul Dumas developed algorithms for deterministic control of MRF. In 1996, Golini recognized the commercial potential of MRF, secured investment capital from Lowell Mintz, and founded QED Technologies. The first commercial MRF machine was unveiled in 1998. It was followed by more advanced models and by groundbreaking subaperture stitching interferometers for metrology. In 2006, QED was acquired by and became a division of Cabot Microelectronics. This paper recounts the history of the development of MRF and the founding of QED Technologies.

  7. Investigation Into the Accuracy of 3D Surface Roughness Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumermanis, M.; Rudzitis, J.; Mozga, N.; Ancans, A.; Grislis, A.

    2014-04-01

    The existing standards for surface roughness cover only two dimensions, while in reality this is three-dimensional (3D). In particular, the 3D surface roughness parameters are important for solving the contact surface mechanics problems as related to the accuracy of 3D surface roughness characteristics. One of the most important factors for determination of 3D characteristics is the number of data points (NDP) on the x- and y-axes (i.e. in cut-off length). The NDP has a profound effect on the accuracy of measurement results, measuring time and volume of the output data (especially along the y-axis, where the NDP is identical to the number of parallel profiles). At a too small NDP the results will be incorrect and with too broad scatter, while a too large NDP - though not enlarging the range of basic information - considerably increases the measuring time. Therefore, the aim of the work was to find the optimal NDP for such surface processing methods as grinding, spark erosion and shot methods of surface treatment. Eksistējošie virsmas raupjuma standarti apskata virsmas raupjumu tikai divās dimensijās. Tomēr reālais virsmas raupjums pēc savas dabas ir trīsdimensiju (3D) objekts. Līdz ar to virsmas raupjums ir jāraksturo ar 3D parametriem. Un no šo parametru noteikšanas precizitātes ir atkarīgi tālākie virsmas aprēķini, piemēram, virsmu kontaktēšanās process. Viens no svarīgākajiem faktoriem, raksturojot virsmas raupjumu 3D, pielietojot kontakta tipa mēriekārtas, ir datu punktu skaits pa abām mērīšanas asīm x un y. Ar datu punktu skaitu mēs saprotam to skaitu mērīšanas bāzes garumā. Datu punktu skaits būtiski ietekmē sagaidāmo mērījumu rezultātu precizitāti, mērīšanai nepieciešamo laiku un izejas datu faila izmērus (sevišķi y-ass virzienā, kur katrs datu punkts ir paralēls profils). Datu punktu skaitam ir jābūt optimālam. Pārāk mazs punktu skaits noved pie neprecīziem rezultātiem un lielas to izkliedes, savuk

  8. Surface accuracy measurement sensor test on a 50-meter antenna surface model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, R. B.; Burcher, E. E.; Stump, C. W.; Saunders, C. G.; Brooks, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Surface Accuracy Measurement Sensor (SAMS) is a telescope with a focal plane photo electric detector that senses the lateral position of light source targets in its field of view. After extensive laboratory testing the engineering breadboard sensor system was installed and tested on a 30 degree segment of a 50-meter diameter, mesh surface, antenna model. Test results correlated well with the laboratory tests and indicated accuracies of approximately 0.59 arc seconds at 21 meters range. Test results are presented and recommendations given for sensor improvements.

  9. Experimental evaluation of inlet turbulence, wall boundary layer, surface finish, and fillet radius on small axial turbine state performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozak, A. A.; Brockett, W. D.; Haas, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation are presented which establish the effects of surface finish, fillet radius, inlet boundary layer thickness, and free-stream inlet turbulence level on the aerodynamic performance of a small axial flow turbine stator. The principal objective was to help understand why large turbine efficiency is not maintained when a large turbine is scaled to a smaller size and to provide the turbine designer with the performance compromises expected for a small scale design. A comprehensive test matrix was used to gain an understanding of the effects of each variable over the full range of all the other variables.

  10. Evaluation of the Effect of Surface Finish on High-Cycle Fatigue of SLM-IN718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, D. M.

    2016-01-01

    The surface finish of parts produced by additive manufacturing processes is much rougher than the surface finish generated by machining processes, and a rougher surface can reduce the fatigue strength of a part. This paper discusses an effort to quantify that reduction of strength in high-cycle fatigue for selective laser melt (SLM) coupons. A high-cycle fatigue (HCF) knockdown factor was estimated for Inconel 718, manufactured with the SLM process. This factor is the percentage reduction from the maximum stress in fatigue for low-stress ground (LSG) specimens to the maximum stress of those left with the original surface condition at the same fatigue life. Specimens were provided by a number of vendors, free to use their "best practice"; only one heat treat condition was considered; and several test temperatures were characterized, including room temperature, 800F, 1000F, and 1200F. The 1000F data had a large variance, and was omitted from consideration in this document. A first method used linear approximations extracted from the graphs, and only where data was available for both. A recommended knockdown factor of the as-built surface condition (average roughness of approximately 245 micro-inches/inch) versus low-stress ground condition (roughness no more than 4 micro-inches/inch) was established at approximately 1/3 or 33%. This is to say that for the as-built surface condition, a maximum stress of 2/3 of the stress for LSG can be expected to produce a similar life in the as-built surface condition. In this first evaluation, the knockdown factor did not appear to be a function of temperature. A second approach, the "KP method", incorporated the surface finish measure into a new parameter termed the pseudo-stress intensity factor, Kp, which was formulated to be similar to the fracture mechanics stress intensity factor. Using Kp, the variance seemed to be reduced across all sources, and knockdown factors were estimated using Kp over the range where data occurred. A

  11. Accuracy Assessment of Response Surface Approximations for Supersonic Turbine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papila, Nilay; Papila, Melih; Shyy, Wei; Haftka, Raphael T.; FitzCoy, Norman

    2001-01-01

    There is a growing trend to employ CFD tools to supply the necessary information for design optimization of fluid dynamics components/systems. Such results are prone to uncertainties due to reasons including discretization. errors, incomplete convergence of computational procedures, and errors associated with physical models such as turbulence closures. Based on this type of information, gradient-based optimization algorithms often suffer from the noisy calculations, which can seriously compromise the outcome. Similar problems arise from the experimental measurements. Global optimization techniques, such as those based on the response surface (RS) concept are becoming popular in part because they can overcome some of these barriers. However, there are also fundamental issues related to such global optimization technique such as RS. For example, in high dimensional design spaces, typically only a small number of function evaluations are available due to computational and experimental costs. On the other hand, complex features of the design variables do not allow one to model the global characteristics of the design space with simple quadratic polynomials. Consequently a main challenge is to reduce the size of the region where we fit the RS, or make it more accurate in the regions where the optimum is likely to reside. Response Surface techniques using either polynomials or and Neural Network (NN) methods offer designers alternatives to conduct design optimization. The RS technique employs statistical and numerical techniques to establish the relationship between design variables and objective/constraint functions, typically using polynomials. In this study, we aim at addressing issues related to the following questions: (1) How to identify outliers associated with a given RS representation and improve the RS model via appropriate treatments? (2) How to focus on selected design data so that RS can give better performance in regions critical to design optimization? (3

  12. Formation Mechanism of Finished Surface in Ultrahigh-Speed Grinding with cubic Boron Nitride (cBN) Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Yoshio; Sato, Ryunosuke; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Ohsawa, Yoshiteru; Fredj, Nabil Ben

    In this paper, we describe the formation mechanism of a finished surface in ultrahigh-speed grinding under a peripheral wheel speed higher than 200m/s. Grinding experiments using a grinding machine tool equipped with an active magnetic bearing spindle have been conducted over a range of grinding speeds from 60 to 300m/s. Moreover, grinding tests for producing some individual grooves using a grinding tool with multiple cBN grit have been carried out to clarify the effects of grinding speed on the side swelling formed along both sides of the grinding grooves. From the results of these experiments, we have confirmed that the roughness of the ground surface decreases with an increase in grinding speed, and this decrease is mainly due to the reduction of the swelling ratio with increasing grinding speed.

  13. Drop Reliability of Epoxy-contained Sn-58 wt.%Bi Solder Joint with ENIG and ENEPIG Surface Finish Under Temperature and Humidity Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Woo-Ram; Kim, Yongil; Kim, Kyung-Yeol; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2016-07-01

    The influence of two kinds of surface finish, namely electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) and electroless nickel electroless palladium immersion gold (ENEPIG), on the interfacial reactions and drop reliability of epoxy-enhanced Sn-58 wt.%Bi solder has been investigated after temperature-humidity storage tests. The chemical composition and morphology of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Also, the mechanical reliability of solder joints was evaluated using board-level drop tests. The Sn-Bi epoxy solder/ENEPIG joint exhibited higher IMC growth rate than the Sn-Bi epoxy solder/ENIG joint. After 500 h at 85°C/85% RH storage condition, new IMCs were formed on the Ni3Sn4 layer in samples with both surface finishes. The results of board-level drop tests showed that the number of drops was higher for the ENIG than the ENEPIG surface finish. Solder joint fracture occurred along the interface between the solder and IMC layer for the ENIG surface finish. However, with the ENEPIG surface finish, the crack propagated between the IMCs.

  14. NON-POLLUTING METAL SURFACE FINISHING PRETREATMENT AND PRETREATMENT/CONVERSION COATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Picklex, a proprietary formulation, is an alterantive to conventional metal surface pretreatments and is claimed not to produce waste or lower production or lower performance. A laboratory program was designed to evaluate Picklex in common, large scale, polluting surface finishin...

  15. Effect of surface finishing on early-stage corrosion of a carbon steel studied by electrochemical and atomic force microscope characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the early-stage corrosion of a carbon steel with various surface roughness, which was created by different levels of surface finishing treatment, was characterized by an atomic force microscope and electrochemical measurements. It is found that the resulting surface roughness is at nano-meter scale. As the surface roughness increases, the corrosion activity of the steel is increased. The early-stage corrosion of the steel is featured with two stages of dissolution. While the first stage involves a rapid dissolution and increasing surface roughness of the steel, stage two is in an equilibrium state to have an approximately constant corrosion rate and surface roughness. Generally, the corrosion rate of the steel decreases when the surface finish of the specimen becomes finer. Local preferential corrosion occurs at surface irregularities, resulting in the deepening and widening of the features such as scratches with time.

  16. Effect of tooth brushing and thermal cycling on a surface change of ceromers finished with different methods.

    PubMed

    Cho, L-R; Yi, Y-J; Heo, S-J

    2002-09-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of tooth brushing and thermal cycling on the surface lustre and surface roughness of three ceromer systems treated with different surface finishing methods. The ceromers studied were: (1). Artglass, (2). Targis, (3). Sculpture and (4). the control group, Z 100. Half of the Targis and Sculpture groups were polished and the rest were coated with staining and glazing solution, respectively. All specimens were subjected to thermocycling 10000 times. Tooth brushing abrasion tests were performed in a customized tooth-brushing machine with 500 g weight applied on a back-and-forth cycle for 20000 repetitions. The lustre determined by measuring the light reflection area and the average roughness was compared between groups and between pre- and post-test values. All materials showed a lower lustre and rougher surface after thermocycling and tooth brushing (P < 0.05). All ceromer specimens, except glazed Sculpture, showed a higher lustre and similar roughness to the control group. The post-brushing results revealed that glazed Sculpture presented discretely fallen out glaze coatings and had maximum change. However, stained Targis showed minimum change (P < 0.05) and polished Targis presented more changes than that of the staining treatment. It is therefore concluded that the glaze coatings for Sculpture don't exhibit long-term durability, while stain coatings for Targis acted like a protective layer.

  17. Determination of angular accuracy of the Maket Ani surface array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagyozyan, G. V.; Chilingarian, A. A.; Hovsepyan, G. G.; Martirosyan, H. S.; Ter-Antonyan, S. V.

    The methods of EAS incident angles estimation along with the angular resolution determination are described. Based on a data sample collected by the MAKET-ANI array, the angular resolution and its dependence on the showers arrival direction is studied. We use classical methods of Moon and Sun shadow detection as well as new software methods for experimental determination of MAKET ANI angular resolution. It is shown that zenith and azimuthal angles' accuracy is approximately 1.5o and 5o respectively.

  18. Recent developments in finishing of deep concave, aspheric, and plano surfaces utilizing the UltraForm 5-axes computer controlled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambrick, Scott; Bechtold, Mike; DeFisher, Scott; Mohring, David; Meisenzahl, Joe

    2009-05-01

    OptiPro Systems has developed a robust 5-axes computer controlled platform, for implementation of the sub-aperture UltraForm Finishing (UFF) process specifically focused on finishing AlON, spinel and transparent polycrystalline alumina (PCA) steep concave, convex and ogive shaped infrared domes and aspheres. Traditional manufacturing of optical components typically involves a three-stage process: grinding, lapping and polishing. The lapping and polishing stages are focused at reducing the surface roughness while preserving the integrity of the form acquired during grinding. Polishing of non spherical and irregular shapes is nearly impossible using traditional full aperture techniques. However, finishing these non-spherical and irregular shapes is possible using UltraForm Finishing. A brief description of the evolution of the UltraForm hardware and processes will be presented, with the current hardware developments. A review of the results with regard to form/figure and roughness improvements on glass, AlON and transparent PCA will be presented using a variety of grinding and finishing abrasives. Differences in the abrasive materials, some bound, and others loose in a slurry have a large impact on the process cycle time and resultant surface roughness.

  19. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon polymer films on titanium for preventing cell adhesion: a surface finishing for temporarily used orthopaedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, B.; Testrich, H.; Rebl, H.; Walschus, U.; Schlosser, M.; Zietz, C.; Staehlke, S.; Nebe, J. B.; Weltmann, K. D.; Meichsner, J.; Polak, M.

    2016-06-01

    The design of a titanium implant surface should ideally support its later application in clinical use. Temporarily used implants have to fulfil requirements different from permanent implants: they should ensure the mechanical stabilization of the bone stock but in trauma surgery they should not be integrated into the bone because they will be removed after fracture healing. Finishing of the implant surface by a plasma-fluorocarbon-polymer (PFP) coating is a possible approach for preventing cell adhesion of osteoblasts. Two different low pressure gas-discharge plasma processes, microwave (MW 2.45 GHz) and capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF 13.56 MHz) plasma, were applied for the deposition of the PFP film using a mixture of the precursor octafluoropropane (C3F8) and hydrogen (H2). The thin films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements. Cell culture experiments show that cell adhesion and spreading of MG-63 osteoblasts were clearly reduced or nonexistent on these surfaces, also after 24 h of storage in the cell culture medium. In vivo data demonstrated that the local inflammatory tissue response for the PFP films deposited in MW and RF plasma were comparable to uncoated controls.

  20. In situ ellipsometry of surface layer of non-metallic transparent materials during its finish processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Oleksandr Y.; Poperenko, Leonid V.

    2006-10-01

    For modern technology applications it is important to develop non-contact methods of control of the modification of dielectric materials surface layer. The aim of the work is to determine the level of roughness changes in the surface layer of non-metallic material, optical glass BK-7, and to control it by in situ ellipsometry. The probing light spot was formed at a second (lower) reflective surface of the plate being studied during its mechanical processing at direct observation of these changes. The fine mechanical polishing was carried out for 2 hours by using the grinding-polishing machine installed directly on the sample table of ellipsometer LEF-3M. The angle of light incidence was close to 70 degree. The ellipsometric parameters, were determined within the mechanically processed area. For this purpose, the probing light beam passed two times through the sample and then returned to the initial (air) medium, where its polarization state was studied. The polarized beam falls on lower plate surface polished by conventional technology using grinding-polishing CeO 2-based instrument "Aquapol" (grain size 1 micron). The time dependences of the ellipsometric parameters during the surface layer treatment were studied. In these dependences the tendency of changes of ellipsometric parameters indicates the surface roughness enhancement.

  1. Evaluation of the Effect of Surface Finish on High-Cycle Fatigue for SLM-IN718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    A high-cycle fatigue (HCF) knockdown factor was estimated for Inconel 718, manufactured with the selective laser melt (SLM) process. This factor is the reduction at a common fatigue life from the maximum stress in fatigue for low-stress ground (LSG) specimens to the maximum stress of those left with the original surface condition. Various vendors provided specimens. To reduce the number of degrees-of-freedom, only one heat treat condition was evaluated. Testing temperatures included room temperature, 800F, 1000F, and 1200F. The two surface conditions were compared at constant lives, where data was available. The recommended knockdown factor of the as-built surface condition (average roughness of approximately 245 micro-inches/inch) versus low-stress ground condition (roughness <= 4 micro-inches/inch) is approximately 1/3 or 33%. This is to say that for the as-built surface condition, a maximum stress of 2/3 of the stress for LSG can be expected to produce the same life in the as built surface condition. As an alternative method, the surface finish was incorporated into a new parameter with the maximum stress. The new parameter was formulated to be similar to the fracture mechanics stress intensity factor, and it was named the pseudo stress intensity factor, Kp. Using Kp, the variance seemed acceptable across all sources, and the knockdown factor was estimated over the range of data identified by Kp where data occurred. A plot of the results suggests that the knockdown factor is a function of temperature, and that for low lives the knockdown is greater than the knockdown observed above about one million cycles, where it stabilizes. One data point at room temperature was clearly different, and the sparsity of data in the higher life region reduces the value of these results. The method does appear to provide useful results, and further characterization of the method is suggested.

  2. Accuracy of functional surfaces on comparatively modeled protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieling; Dundas, Joe; Kachalo, Sema; Ouyang, Zheng; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein functional surfaces are important for predicting protein function, understanding enzyme mechanism, and docking small compounds to proteins. As the rapid speed of accumulation of protein sequence information far exceeds that of structures, constructing accurate models of protein functional surfaces and identify their key elements become increasingly important. A promising approach is to build comparative models from sequences using known structural templates such as those obtained from structural genome projects. Here we assess how well this approach works in modeling binding surfaces. By systematically building three-dimensional comparative models of proteins using Modeller, we determine how well functional surfaces can be accurately reproduced. We use an alpha shape based pocket algorithm to compute all pockets on the modeled structures, and conduct a large-scale computation of similarity measurements (pocket RMSD and fraction of functional atoms captured) for 26,590 modeled enzyme protein structures. Overall, we find that when the sequence fragment of the binding surfaces has more than 45% identity to that of the tempalte protein, the modeled surfaces have on average an RMSD of 0.5 Å, and contain 48% or more of the binding surface atoms, with nearly all of the important atoms in the signatures of binding pockets captured. PMID:21541664

  3. Metallurgical, manufacturing and surface finish requirements for high purity stainless steel system components.

    PubMed

    Mangan, D

    1991-01-01

    The stainless steel piping systems that distribute water for injection (WFI) and other critical fluids in pharmaceutical and biotechnology plants will be the subject of this paper. We will confine our focus to the two major components of such systems--tubing and fittings. It should be noted that the discussions here can certainly be applied in the selection of other components such as valves, filter housings, pumps, and tanks used in these industries. The purpose of this paper will be to guide user choices with regard to raw material selection, surface preparation, and surface analysis within the context of system requirements. A suggested material specification for stainless steel tubing and fittings will also be presented. PMID:1770409

  4. Biomaterial-associated infection: locating the finish line in the race for the surface.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Jutte, Paul C; van den Dungen, Jan J A M; Zaat, Sebastian A J; Schultz, Marcus J; Grainger, David W

    2012-09-26

    Biomaterial-associated infections occur on both permanent implants and temporary devices for restoration or support of human functions. Despite increasing use of biomaterials in an aging society, comparatively few biomaterials have been designed that effectively reduce the incidence of biomaterial-associated infections. This review provides design guidelines for infection-reducing strategies based on the concept that the fate of biomaterial implants or devices is a competition between host tissue cell integration and bacterial colonization at their surfaces.

  5. Space processing applications of ion beam technology. [surface finishing, welding, milling and film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Ion thruster engines for spacecraft propulsion can serve as ion beam sources for potential space processing applications. The advantages of space vacuum environments and the possible gravity effects on thruster ion beam materials operations such as thin film growth, ion milling, and surface texturing were investigated. The direct gravity effect on sputter deposition and vapor deposition processes are discussed as well as techniques for cold and warm welding.

  6. Finishing Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2011-05-01

    As we finish this publishing cycle, I'd like to thank all the readers who sent in video clips. If you have a YouTube clip that you use in class, please send the link and a brief description to driendeau@dist113.org.

  7. NCMS PWB program report surface finishes team task WBS No. 3.1.1: Phase 1, Etching Studies: Chemical etching of copper for improved solderability

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.O.; Guilinger, T.R.; Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1995-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with consortium members of the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) to develop fundamental generic technology in the area of printed wiring board materials and surface finishes. Improved solderability of copper substrates is an important component of the Sandia-NCMS program. We are investigating the effects of surface roughness on the wettability and solderability behavior of several different types of copper board finishes. In this paper, we present roughness and solderability characterizations for a variety of chemically-etched copper substrates. Initial testing on six chemical etches demonstrate that surface roughness can be greatly enhanced through chemical etching. Noticeable improvements in solder wettability were observed to accompany increases in roughness. A number of different algorithms and measures of roughness were used to gain insight into surface morphologies that lead to improved solderability.

  8. Surface Accuracy Measurement Sensor for Deployable Reflector Antennas (SAMS DRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Specifications, system configurations, and concept tests for surface measurement sensors for deployable reflector antennas are presented. Two approaches toward the optical measurement of remote target displacements are discussed: optical ranging, in which the basic measurement is target-to-sensor range; and in particular, optical angular sensing, in which the principle measurements are of target angular displacements lateral to the line of sight. Four representative space antennas are examined.

  9. Solar absorption characteristics of several coatings and surface finishes. [for solar energy collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Solar absorption characteristics are established for several films potentially favorable for use as receiving surfaces in solar energy collectors. Included in the investigation were chemically produced black films, black electrodeposits, and anodized coatings. It was found that black nickel exhibited the best combination of selective optical properties of any of the coatings studied. A serious drawback to black nickel was its high susceptibility to degradation in the presence of high moisture environments. Electroplated black chrome generally exhibited high solar absorptivities, but the emissivity varied considerably and was also relatively high under some conditions. The black chrome had the greatest moisture resistance of any of the coatings tested. Black oxide coatings on copper and steel substrates showed the best combination of selective optical properties of any of the chemical conversion films studied.

  10. Ion beam technology applications study. [ion impact, implantation, and surface finishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Zafran, S.; Komatsu, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Specific perceptions and possible ion beam technology applications were obtained as a result of a literature search and contact interviews with various institutions and individuals which took place over a 5-month period. The use of broad beam electron bombardment ion sources is assessed for materials deposition, removal, and alteration. Special techniques examined include: (1) cleaning, cutting, and texturing for surface treatment; (2) crosslinking of polymers, stress relief in deposited layers, and the creation of defect states in crystalline material by ion impact; and (3) ion implantation during epitaxial growth and the deposition of neutral materials sputtered by the ion beam. The aspects, advantages, and disadvantages of ion beam technology and the competitive role of alternative technologies are discussed.

  11. CAPSULE REPORT - MANAGING CYANIDE IN METAL FINISHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to surface finishing manufacturers, metal finishing decision maker and regulators on management practices and control technologies for managing cyanide in the workplace. This information can benefit key industry stakeholder gro...

  12. Experimental Investigation of the Heat-Transfer Rate to a Series of 20 deg Cones of Various Surface Finishes at a Mach Number of 4.95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jim J.

    1959-01-01

    The heat-transfer rates were measured on a series of cones of various surface finishes at a Mach number of 4.95 and Reynolds numbers per foot varying from 20 x 10(exp 6) to 100 x 10(exp 6). The range of surface finish was from a very smooth polish to smooth machining with no polish (65 micro inches rms). Some laminar boundary-layer data were obtained, since transition was not artificially tripped. Emphasis, however, is centered on the turbulent boundary layer. The results indicated that the turbulent heat-transfer rate for the highest roughness tested was only slightly greater than that for the smoothest surface. The laminar-sublayer thickness was calculated to be about half the roughness height for the roughest model at the highest value of unit Reynolds number tested.

  13. Effects of a range of machined and ground surface finishes on the simulated reactor helium corrosion of several candidate structural materials. [Inconel MA 754

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.D.

    1981-02-01

    This report discusses the corrosion behavior of several candidate reactor structural alloys in a simulated advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) environment over a range of lathe-machined and centerless-ground surface finishes. The helium environment contained 50 Pa H/sub 2//5 Pa CO/5 Pa CH/sub 4//<0.05 Pa H/sub 2/O (500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2//50 ..mu..atm CO/50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4//<0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O) at 900/sup 0/C for a total exposure of 3000 h. The test alloys included two vacuum-cast superalloys (IN 100 and IN 713LC); a centrifugally cast austenitic alloy (HK 40); three wrought high-temperature alloys (Alloy 800H, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 617); and a nickel-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy (Inconel MA 754). Surface finish variations did not affect the simulated advanced-HTGR corrosion behavior of these materials. Under these conditions, the availability of reactant gaseous impurities controls the kinetics of the observed gas-metal interactions. Variations in the near-surface activities and mobilities of reactive solute elements, such as chromium, which might be expected to be affected by changes in surface finish, do not seem to greatly influence corrosion in this simulated advanced HTGR environment. 18 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Optimization of the Ni(P) Thickness for an Ultrathin Ni(P)-Based Surface Finish in Soldering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. E.; Wang, S. J.; Fan, C. W.; Wu, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the Ni(P) thickness δ Ni(P) on the interfacial reaction between an Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu solder and an Au/Pd(P)/Ni(P)/Cu pad (thickness: 0.05/0.05/0.1-0.3/20 μm) and the resulting mechanical properties were investigated using scanning electron microscopy equipped with an electron backscatter diffraction system, a focused ion beam system, electron probe microanalysis, and high-speed ball shear (HSBS) testing. Regardless of δ Ni(P), all of the Au/Pd(P)/Ni(P) surface finishes examined were completely exhausted in one reflow, exposing the Cu pad underneath the solder. Cu6Sn5 dissolved with various Ni contents, termed (Cu,Ni)6Sn5, was the dominant intermetallic compound (IMC) species at the solder/Cu interface. Additionally, Ni2SnP and Ni3P IMCs might form with the (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 in the thick Ni(P) case, i.e., δ Ni(P) = 0.3 μm, and the two IMCs (Ni2SnP and Ni3P) were gradually eliminated from the interface after multiple reflows. A mass balance analysis indicated that the growth of the Ni-containing IMCs, rather than the dissolution of the metallization pad, played a key role in the Ni(P) exhaustion. The HSBS test results indicated that the mechanical strength of the solder joints was also δ Ni(P) dependent. The combined results of the interfacial reaction and the mechanical evaluation provided the optimal δ Ni(P) value for soldering applications.

  15. Concentration Data for Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Ground Water, Surface Water, and Finished Water of Selected Community Water Systems in the United States, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Kingsbury, James A.; Hopple, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2001 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems (CWSs) in the United States. As used for SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well prior to water treatment (for ground water) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water), and finished water is the water that is treated and ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished water is collected before entering the distribution system. SWQA studies are conducted in two phases, and the objectives of SWQA studies are twofold: (1) to determine the occurrence and, for rivers, seasonal changes in concentrations of a broad list of anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) in aquifers and rivers that have some of the largest withdrawals for drinking-water supply (phase 1), and (2) for those AOCs found to occur most frequently in source water, characterize the extent to which these compounds are present in finished water (phase 2). These objectives were met for SWQA studies by collecting ground-water and surface-water (source) samples and analyzing these samples for 258 AOCs during phase 1. Samples from a subset of wells and surface-water sites located in areas with substantial agricultural production in the watershed were analyzed for 19 additional AOCs, for a total of 277 compounds analyzed for SWQA studies. The 277 compounds were classified according to the following 13 primary use or source groups: (1) disinfection by-products; (2) fumigant-related compounds; (3) fungicides; (4) gasoline hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and oxygenate degradates; (5) herbicides and herbicide degradates; (6) insecticides and insecticide degradates; (7) manufacturing additives; (8) organic synthesis compounds; (9) pavement- and

  16. Enamel and Dentin Surface Finishing Influence on the Roughness and Microshear Bond Strength of a Lithium Silicate Glass-Ceramic for Laminate Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Bravo, Ruth Peggy; Pavelski, Thiago Vinícius; Garcia, Paula Pontes; Correr, Gisele Maria; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the influence of cavity surface finishing with diamond burs of different grit mounted on high-speed turbine and ultrasound on the roughness and microshear bond strength (MBS) of a lithium silicate glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Methods. Enamel and dentin specimens were divided into seven groups, according to the type of surface finishing: 1200-grit sandpaper (control), two different brands of medium-grit and fine-grit diamond burs in a high-speed turbine; medium-grit and fine-grit CVD (chemical vapor deposition) tips in an ultrasonic device. Roughness parameters (n = 5) and MSBS to a glass-ceramic (n = 10) were determined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). Results. Control group showed lower mean roughness readings and groups that used medium-grit diamond burs showed the highest mean roughness values. Regarding MSBS, there was no statistical difference when comparing the groups gritted with the same brand of medium- and fine-grit burs and tips. Conclusions. Cavity surface finishing influenced the roughness parameters and MSBS of a glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Medium-grit diamond burs in high-speed turbine showed the highest mean roughness values. Fine-grit CVD tips in ultrasound presented the highest MSBS values for both enamel and dentin. PMID:27347507

  17. Enamel and Dentin Surface Finishing Influence on the Roughness and Microshear Bond Strength of a Lithium Silicate Glass-Ceramic for Laminate Veneers.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Bravo, Ruth Peggy; Pavelski, Thiago Vinícius; Garcia, Paula Pontes; Correr, Gisele Maria; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the influence of cavity surface finishing with diamond burs of different grit mounted on high-speed turbine and ultrasound on the roughness and microshear bond strength (MBS) of a lithium silicate glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Methods. Enamel and dentin specimens were divided into seven groups, according to the type of surface finishing: 1200-grit sandpaper (control), two different brands of medium-grit and fine-grit diamond burs in a high-speed turbine; medium-grit and fine-grit CVD (chemical vapor deposition) tips in an ultrasonic device. Roughness parameters (n = 5) and MSBS to a glass-ceramic (n = 10) were determined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). Results. Control group showed lower mean roughness readings and groups that used medium-grit diamond burs showed the highest mean roughness values. Regarding MSBS, there was no statistical difference when comparing the groups gritted with the same brand of medium- and fine-grit burs and tips. Conclusions. Cavity surface finishing influenced the roughness parameters and MSBS of a glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Medium-grit diamond burs in high-speed turbine showed the highest mean roughness values. Fine-grit CVD tips in ultrasound presented the highest MSBS values for both enamel and dentin.

  18. Concentration data for anthropogenic organic compounds in groundwater, surface water, and finished water of selected community water systems in the United States, 2002-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Kingsbury, James A.; Hopple, Jessica A.; Delzer, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2001 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems in the United States. As used in SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well before water treatment (for groundwater) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water), and finished water is the water that has been treated and is ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished-water samples are collected before the water enters the distribution system. The primary objective of SWQAs is to determine the occurrence of more than 250 anthropogenic organic compounds in source water used by community water systems, many of which currently are unregulated in drinking water by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A secondary objective is to understand recurrence patterns in source water and determine if these patterns also occur in finished water before distribution. SWQA studies were conducted in two phases for most studies completed by 2005, and in one phase for most studies completed since 2005. Analytical results are reported for a total of 295 different anthropogenic organic compounds monitored in source-water and finished-water samples collected during 2002-10. The 295 compounds were classified according to the following 13 primary use or source groups: (1) disinfection by-products; (2) fumigant-related compounds; (3) fungicides; (4) gasoline hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and oxygenate degradates; (5) herbicides and herbicide degradates; (6) insecticides and insecticide degradates; (7) manufacturing additives; (8) organic synthesis compounds; (9) pavement- and combustion-derived compounds; (10) personal-care and domestic-use products; (11) plant- or animal-derived biochemicals; (12) refrigerants and

  19. Accuracy assessment of a surface electromyogram decomposition system in human first dorsal interosseus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaogang; Rymer, William Z.; Suresh, Nina L.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of a surface electromyogram (sEMG) motor unit (MU) decomposition algorithm during low levels of muscle contraction. Approach. A two-source method was used to verify the accuracy of the sEMG decomposition system, by utilizing simultaneous intramuscular and surface EMG recordings from the human first dorsal interosseous muscle recorded during isometric trapezoidal force contractions. Spike trains from each recording type were decomposed independently utilizing two different algorithms, EMGlab and dEMG decomposition algorithms. The degree of agreement of the decomposed spike timings was assessed for three different segments of the EMG signals, corresponding to specified regions in the force task. A regression analysis was performed to examine whether certain properties of the sEMG and force signal can predict the decomposition accuracy. Main results. The average accuracy of successful decomposition among the 119 MUs that were common to both intramuscular and surface records was approximately 95%, and the accuracy was comparable between the different segments of the sEMG signals (i.e., force ramp-up versus steady state force versus combined). The regression function between the accuracy and properties of sEMG and force signals revealed that the signal-to-noise ratio of the action potential and stability in the action potential records were significant predictors of the surface decomposition accuracy. Significance. The outcomes of our study confirm the accuracy of the sEMG decomposition algorithm during low muscle contraction levels and provide confidence in the overall validity of the surface dEMG decomposition algorithm.

  20. Surface accuracy measurement of a deployable mesh reflector by planar near-field scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chujo, Wataru; Ito, Takeo; Hori, Yoshiaki; Teshirogi, Tasuku

    1988-06-01

    Using a near-field antenna measurement facility, it is possible to simultaneously evaluate the surface accuracy of a reflector antenna as well as the far-field pattern of the antenna for a short time. The surface errors of a 2-m deployable mesh reflector for satellite use were measured by a planar near-field system. As a result, the influence of periodic structures, due to the antenna ribs, has been clearly observed. Also, the surface accuracy obtained with the near-field scanning technique has coincided well with that obtained by an optical measurement technique.

  1. Uav Aerial Survey: Accuracy Estimation for Automatically Generated Dense Digital Surface Model and Orthothoto Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altyntsev, M. A.; Arbuzov, S. A.; Popov, R. A.; Tsoi, G. V.; Gromov, M. O.

    2016-06-01

    A dense digital surface model is one of the products generated by using UAV aerial survey data. Today more and more specialized software are supplied with modules for generating such kind of models. The procedure for dense digital model generation can be completely or partly automated. Due to the lack of reliable criterion of accuracy estimation it is rather complicated to judge the generation validity of such models. One of such criterion can be mobile laser scanning data as a source for the detailed accuracy estimation of the dense digital surface model generation. These data may be also used to estimate the accuracy of digital orthophoto plans created by using UAV aerial survey data. The results of accuracy estimation for both kinds of products are presented in the paper.

  2. A statistical study of the surface accuracy of a planar truss beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, W. Scott; Fichter, W. B.

    1990-01-01

    Surface error statistics for single-layer and double-layer planar truss beams with random member-length errors were calculated using a Monte-Carlo technique in conjunction with finite-element analysis. Surface error was calculated in terms of the normal distance from a regression line to the surface nodes of the distorted beam. Results for both single-layer and double-layer beams indicate that a minimum root-mean-square surface error can be achieved by optimizing the depth-to-length ratio of a truss beam. The statically indeterminate double-layer beams can provide greater surface accuracy, though at the expense of significantly greater complexity.

  3. Computer-aided high-accuracy testing of reflective surface with reverse Hartmann test.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daodang; Zhang, Sen; Wu, Rengmao; Huang, Chih Yu; Cheng, Hsiang-Nan; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-08-22

    The deflectometry provides a feasible way for surface testing with a high dynamic range, and the calibration is a key issue in the testing. A computer-aided testing method based on reverse Hartmann test, a fringe-illumination deflectometry, is proposed for high-accuracy testing of reflective surfaces. The virtual "null" testing of surface error is achieved based on ray tracing of the modeled test system. Due to the off-axis configuration in the test system, it places ultra-high requirement on the calibration of system geometry. The system modeling error can introduce significant residual systematic error in the testing results, especially in the cases of convex surface and small working distance. A calibration method based on the computer-aided reverse optimization with iterative ray tracing is proposed for the high-accuracy testing of reflective surface. Both the computer simulation and experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed measurement method, and good measurement accuracy has been achieved. The proposed method can achieve the measurement accuracy comparable to the interferometric method, even with the large system geometry calibration error, providing a feasible way to address the uncertainty on the calibration of system geometry. PMID:27557245

  4. Computer-aided high-accuracy testing of reflective surface with reverse Hartmann test.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daodang; Zhang, Sen; Wu, Rengmao; Huang, Chih Yu; Cheng, Hsiang-Nan; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-08-22

    The deflectometry provides a feasible way for surface testing with a high dynamic range, and the calibration is a key issue in the testing. A computer-aided testing method based on reverse Hartmann test, a fringe-illumination deflectometry, is proposed for high-accuracy testing of reflective surfaces. The virtual "null" testing of surface error is achieved based on ray tracing of the modeled test system. Due to the off-axis configuration in the test system, it places ultra-high requirement on the calibration of system geometry. The system modeling error can introduce significant residual systematic error in the testing results, especially in the cases of convex surface and small working distance. A calibration method based on the computer-aided reverse optimization with iterative ray tracing is proposed for the high-accuracy testing of reflective surface. Both the computer simulation and experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed measurement method, and good measurement accuracy has been achieved. The proposed method can achieve the measurement accuracy comparable to the interferometric method, even with the large system geometry calibration error, providing a feasible way to address the uncertainty on the calibration of system geometry.

  5. Assessment of the influence of surface finishing and weld joints on the corrosion/oxidation behaviour of stainless steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Muñoz, F. J.; Soler-Crespo, L.; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to gain some insight into the influence of the surface finishing in the oxidation/corrosion behaviour of 316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Specimens of both materials with different surface states were prepared (as-received, grinded, grinded and polished, and electrolitically polished) and oxidation tests were carried out at 775 and 825 K from 100 to 2000 h for two different oxygen concentrations and for H 2/H 2O molar ratios of 3 and 0.03. The general conclusion for these tests is that the effect of surface finishing on the corrosion/protection processes is not significant under the tested conditions. In addition the behaviour of weld joints, T91-T91 Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and T91-316L have been also studied under similar conditions. The conclusions are that, whereas T91-T91 welded joint shows the same corrosion properties as the parent materials for the conditions tested, AISI 316L-T91 welded joint, present an important dissolution over seam area that it associated to the electrode 309S used for the fabrication process.

  6. Synthetic rubber surface as an alternative to concrete to improve welfare and performance of finishing beef cattle reared on fully slatted flooring.

    PubMed

    Brscic, M; Ricci, R; Prevedello, P; Lonardi, C; De Nardi, R; Contiero, B; Gottardo, F; Cozzi, G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a fully slatted concrete floor (concrete slatted (CS)) with the same floor on which synthetic rubber slats were placed on the concrete slats (rubber slatted (RS)) as housing solution for finishing beef cattle. The present study involved five commercial beef cattle farms in which the floor of at least three pens was kept as fully slatted, and in an equal number of pens a rubber cover was placed on the floor, tightly matching the gap profile of the concrete slats to allow the drainage of manure. A total of 326 finishing beef bulls were used (153 on CS and 173 on RS), and regardless of the floor treatment animals were housed in groups of 6 to 12 bulls/pen with a space allowance of 3.1 ± 0.2 m2/bull. Bulls had similar initial live weights (422.3 kg on CS and 425.0 kg on RS), but bulls on RS were heavier at the end of the finishing period with a higher average daily gain than bulls kept on CS (1.53 v. 1.46 kg/day; P<0.05). The proportion of bulls treated for locomotor problems was lower in RS pens compared with CS. Rubber covering prevented the occurrence of bursitis, but it increased the odds for hoof overgrowth at end of the finishing period. Hoof overgrowth detected in vivo in bulls on RS was confirmed at the slaughterhouse by the longer dorsal wall and diagonal lengths of the hoof as well as by a more acute toe angle. Compared with bulls on CS, bulls on RS showed less inactivity and resting time, increased social interactions, decreased abnormal lying down and unsuccessful attempts to lie down, as well as shortened the time for lying down. Bulls in RS pens were dirtier compared with those in CS pens, likely due to the draining gaps being reduced to 11.6 ± 1.2% of the total pen surface compared with the 16.9 ± 1.7% in CS pens. This study gave further evidence about the positive effects of the RS floor on growth performance and welfare of finishing beef cattle, although compromising cleanliness and hoof overgrowth.

  7. Assembly accuracy analysis for small components with a planar surface in large-scale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Huang, Peng; Li, Jiangxiong; Ke, Yinglin; Yang, Bingru; Maropoulos, Paul G.

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale mechanical products, such as aircraft and rockets, consist of large numbers of small components, which introduce additional difficulty for assembly accuracy and error estimation. Planar surfaces as key product characteristics are usually utilised for positioning small components in the assembly process. This paper focuses on assembly accuracy analysis of small components with planar surfaces in large-scale volume products. To evaluate the accuracy of the assembly system, an error propagation model for measurement error and fixture error is proposed, based on the assumption that all errors are normally distributed. In this model, the general coordinate vector is adopted to represent the position of the components. The error transmission functions are simplified into a linear model, and the coordinates of the reference points are composed by theoretical value and random error. The installation of a Head-Up Display is taken as an example to analyse the assembly error of small components based on the propagation model. The result shows that the final coordination accuracy is mainly determined by measurement error of the planar surface in small components. To reduce the uncertainty of the plane measurement, an evaluation index of measurement strategy is presented. This index reflects the distribution of the sampling point set and can be calculated by an inertia moment matrix. Finally, a practical application is introduced for validating the evaluation index.

  8. Accuracy of surface tension measurement from drop shapes: the role of image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalantarian, Ali; Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2013-11-01

    Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA) has been extensively used for surface tension measurement. In essence, ADSA works by matching a theoretical profile of the drop to the extracted experimental profile, taking surface tension as an adjustable parameter. Of the three main building blocks of ADSA, i.e. edge detection, the numerical integration of the Laplace equation for generating theoretical curves and the optimization procedure, only edge detection (that extracts the drop profile line from the drop image) needs extensive study. For the purpose of this article, the numerical integration of the Laplace equation for generating theoretical curves and the optimization procedure will only require a minor effort. It is the aim of this paper to investigate how far the surface tension accuracy of drop shape techniques can be pushed by fine tuning and optimizing edge detection strategies for a given drop image. Two different aspects of edge detection are pursued here: sub-pixel resolution and pixel resolution. The effect of two sub-pixel resolution strategies, i.e. spline and sigmoid, on the accuracy of surface tension measurement is investigated. It is found that the number of pixel points in the fitting procedure of the sub-pixel resolution techniques is crucial, and its value should be determined based on the contrast of the image, i.e. the gray level difference between the drop and the background. On the pixel resolution side, two suitable and reliable edge detectors, i.e. Canny and SUSAN, are explored, and the effect of user-specified parameters of the edge detector on the accuracy of surface tension measurement is scrutinized. Based on the contrast of the image, an optimum value of the user-specified parameter of the edge detector, SUSAN, is suggested. Overall, an accuracy of 0.01mJ/m(2) is achievable for the surface tension determination by careful fine tuning of edge detection algorithms.

  9. Effect of two different finishing systems on surface roughness of feldspathic and fluorapatite porcelains in ceramo-metal restorations: Comparative in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anmol, Cherry; Soni, Sumeet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of present study was to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate and compare the effect of two ceramic finishing systems and diamond polishing paste on surface texture of two ceramic materials. Methodology: The 40 test specimens were randomly divided into two main groups (Group I and Group II). Which were subsequently veneered with feldspathic porcelain and fluorapatite leucite porcelain systems respectively. The samples in Test group I and Test group II were subjected to different abrasion and finishing systems (Soft Lex and White silicon and grey rubber respectively). The surface roughness of all the four groups was assessed qualitatively using the scanning Electron Microscope and profilometer. Results: The surface roughness of Feldspathic and fluorapetite porcelain increased after abrasion and finishing as compared to auto-glazed porcelin. The surface roughness was more in grey rubber disc group (Gp Ib) as compared to the soft lex disc groups. After polishing with the diamond paste, there was reduction in the surface roughness of both the disc groups. The Mean Ra values of the Feldspathic porcelain at three intervals were 0.52 ± 0.06, 0.54 ± 0.06, 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.50 ± 0.04, 1.25 ± 0.10, 0.45 ± 0.6 respectively for grey rubber disc and soft lex groups. The Mean Ra values of Fluorapetite porcelain at three intervals were 0.40 ± 0.06, 0.52 ± 0.06, 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.41 ± 0.04, 1.17 ± 0.09, 0.39 ± 0.07 respectively for grey rubber disc and soft lex groups. Discussion and Conclusion: The surface roughness was less in the polished samples as compared to the auto-glazed porcelain. The findings were more reinforcing in the soft lex group as compared to the white/grey rubber disc group. Between the two porcelain systems, the Fluorapatite leucite porcelain specimens exhibited better surface smoothness than feldspathic porcelain. PMID:24818090

  10. Reconstruction Accuracy Assessment of Surface and Underwater 3D Motion Analysis: A New Approach.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Kelly; de Jesus, Karla; Figueiredo, Pedro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge; Machado, Leandro José

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed accuracy of surface and underwater 3D reconstruction of a calibration volume with and without homography. A calibration volume (6000 × 2000 × 2500 mm) with 236 markers (64 above and 88 underwater control points--with 8 common points at water surface--and 92 validation points) was positioned on a 25 m swimming pool and recorded with two surface and four underwater cameras. Planar homography estimation for each calibration plane was computed to perform image rectification. Direct linear transformation algorithm for 3D reconstruction was applied, using 1600000 different combinations of 32 and 44 points out of the 64 and 88 control points for surface and underwater markers (resp.). Root Mean Square (RMS) error with homography of control and validations points was lower than without it for surface and underwater cameras (P ≤ 0.03). With homography, RMS errors of control and validation points were similar between surface and underwater cameras (P ≥ 0.47). Without homography, RMS error of control points was greater for underwater than surface cameras (P ≤ 0.04) and the opposite was observed for validation points (P ≤ 0.04). It is recommended that future studies using 3D reconstruction should include homography to improve swimming movement analysis accuracy.

  11. A 45-m telescope with a surface accuracy of 65 μm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, N.; Tsuboi, M.

    1994-05-01

    The Nobeyama 45-m telescope has been upgraded for higher frequency and higher sensitivity observations. The surface accuracy of the antenna was improved from 0.2 mm rms to 65 μm rms using a radio holography method at the prime focus. Pointing accuracy was also improved by replacing a large Gregorian subreflector cabin with a smaller cassegrain subreflector in 1985 to reduce wind loading effects, and by installation of a new master collimator with multi-pole resolvers which were calibrated to an accuracy of 0.4 arcsec rms in 1988. Four SIS receivers using Nb/AlOx/Nb array junctions are now available on the telescope for 40, 80, 100, and 150-GHz bands. These receivers achieved quite low noise and wide-band tunability. The 2×2 multi-beam receiver for 115 GHz is very powerful for mapping observations.

  12. Manipulating Mechanics and Chemistry in Precision Optics Finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-05-30

    Deterministic processing is critical to modern precision optics finishing. Put simply, determinism is the ability to predict an outcome before carrying out an activity. With the availability of computer numerically controlled (CNC) equipment and sophisticated software algorithms, it is now possible to grind and polish optics from a variety of materials to surface shape accuracies of ~20 nm peak-to-valley (p-v), with surface roughness values (measured on white light interferometers over 250 um x 350 um areas) to sub-nm root-mean-square (rms) levels. In the grinding phase the capability now exists to estimate removal rates, surface roughness, and the depth of subsurface damage (SSD) for a previously unprocessed material, knowing its Young's modulus, hardness, and fracture toughness. An understanding of how chemistry aids in the abrasive-driven removal of material from the surface during polishing is also critical, Recent polishing process research reveals the importance of chemistry, specifically slurry pH, for preventing particle agglomeration in order to achieve smooth surface finishes with conventional pad or pitch laps. New sub-aperture polishing processes like magnetorheoogical finishing (MRF) can smooth and shape flat, spherical, aspheric and free-form surfaces within a few process iterations. Difficult to finish optical materials like soft polymer polymethyl methacrylate, microstructured polycrystalline zinc sulfide, and water soluble single-crystal potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) can be finished with MRF. The key is the systematic alteration of MR fluid chemistry and mechanics (i.e. the abrasive) to match the unique physical properties of each workpiece.

  13. Effect of Cryogenic Treatment on Tool Life of HSS Tool (S400) and Surface Finish of the Material in Turning of SS304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, A. V.; Prasad, S. V. Satya; Suryam, L. V.; Kesava Rao, Y.; Kesava, D.

    2016-09-01

    Tool steels are the most widely used components for the single point cutting tool in the turning process. Therefore the characterization of the properties of these tool materials has a great significance when turning is carried out. Alteration and improvement of the properties of these tool steels will enhance the machining process. The present work explores the effect of cryogenic treatment done on a single point cutting tool (HSS) which helps in machining different tool materials with a better surface finish and increased tool life. Turning operation is done on commercial grade material SS304 by using both cryogenically treated and non-treated HSS tool bits at three different speeds (180, 300 & 530 rpm) with the time interval of 3 minutes until the nose fracture is observed. The graphs were plotted between the tool wear and time interval for each speed comparing both the tool lives and it is found that the cryogenically treated tool has sustained for more time than non-cryogenically treated tool at any given speeds standing with more tool life. Also the forces generated during the operation were observed by tool force dynamometer and found to be more in NTT than CTT and even the surface finish of the work piece got enhanced when CT tool is used at any given speeds.

  14. Investigation of crystal surface finish and geometry on single LYSO scintillator detector performance for depth-of-interaction measurement with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bircher, Chad; Shao, Yiping

    2012-11-01

    Depth of Interaction (DOI) information can improve quality of reconstructed images acquired from Positron Emission Tomography (PET), especially in high resolution and compact scanners dedicated for breast, brain, or small animal imaging applications. Additionally, clinical scanners with time of flight capability can also benefit from DOI information. One of the most promising methods of determining DOI in a crystal involves reading the signal from two ends of a scintillation crystal, and calculating the signal ratio between the two detectors. This method is known to deliver a better DOI resolution with rough crystals compared to highly polished crystals. However, what is still not well studied is how much of a tradeoff is involved between spatial, energy, temporal, and DOI resolutions as a function of the crystal surface treatment and geometry with the use of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as the photo detectors. This study investigates the effects of different crystal surface finishes and geometries on energy, timing and DOI resolutions at different crystal depths. The results show that for LYSO scintillators of 1.5×1.5×20 mm3 and 2×2×20 mm3 with their surfaces finished from 0.5 to 30 μm roughness, almost the same energy and coincidence timing resolutions were maintained, around 15% and 2.4 ns, respectively across different crystal depths, while the DOI resolutions were steadily improved from worse than 5 mm to better than 2 mm. They demonstrate that crystal roughness, with proper surface preparing, does not have a significant effect on the energy and coincidence timing resolutions in the crystals examined, and there does not appear to be a tradeoff between improving DOI resolution and degrading other detector performances. These results will be valuable to guide the selection of crystal surface conditions for developing a DOI measurable PET detector with a full array of LYSO scintillators coupled to SiPM arrays.

  15. Machining Error Compensation Based on 3D Surface Model Modified by Measured Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Go; Aritoshi, Masatoshi; Tomita, Tomoki; Shirase, Keiichi

    Recently, a demand for precision machining of dies and molds with complex shapes has been increasing. Although CNC machine tools are utilized widely for machining, still machining error compensation is required to meet the increasing demand of machining accuracy. However, the machining error compensation is an operation which takes huge amount of skill, time and cost. This paper deals with a new method of the machining error compensation. The 3D surface data of the machined part is modified according to the machining error measured by CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine). A compensated NC program is generated from the modified 3D surface data for the machining error compensation.

  16. COMPARISON OF SCANNING ELECTRON AND ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY OF SURFACE FINISHES ON STAINLESS STEEL THAT REDUCE BACTERIAL ATTACHMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria adhere to food products and processing surfaces that can cross-contaminate other products and work surfaces (Arnold, 1998). Using materials for food processing surfaces that are resistant to bacterial contamination could enhance food safety. Stainless steel, although sus...

  17. Finishing of additively manufactured titanium alloy by shape adaptive grinding (SAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Charlton, Phillip; Jain, Samyak; Graziano, Arthur A.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, rapid prototyping of titanium alloy components for medical and aeronautics application has become viable thanks to advances in technologies such as electron beam melting (EBM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). However, for many applications the high surface roughness generated by additive manufacturing techniques demands a post-finishing operation to improve the surface quality prior to usage. In this paper, the novel shape adaptive grinding process has been applied to finishing titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) additively manufactured by EBM and SLS. It is shown that the micro-structured surface layer resulting from the melting process can be removed, and the surface can then be smoothed down to less than 10 nm Ra (starting from 4-5 μm Ra) using only three different diamond grit sizes. This paper also demonstrates application of the technology to freeform shapes, and documents the dimensional accuracy of finished artifacts.

  18. Accuracy of the surface electromyography RMS processing for the diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Berni, Kelly Cristina dos Santos; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Pires, Paulo Fernandes; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2015-08-01

    Due to the multifactor etiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), the precise diagnosis remains a matter of debate and validated diagnostic tools are needed. The aim was to determine the accuracy of surface electromyography (sEMG) activity, assessed in the amplitude domain by the root mean square (RMS), in the diagnosis of TMD. One hundred twenty-three volunteers were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and distributed into two groups: women with myogenous TMD (n=80) and women without TMD (n=43). The volunteers were then submitted to sEMG evaluation of the anterior temporalis, masseter and suprahyoid muscles at rest and during maximum voluntary teeth clenching (MVC) on parafilm. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the muscle activity were analyzed. Differences between groups were found in all muscles analyzed at rest as well as in the masseter and suprahyoid muscles during MVC on parafilm. Moderate accuracy (AUC: 0.74-0.84) of the RMS sEMG was found in all muscles regarding the diagnosis of TMD at rest and in the suprahyoid muscles during MVC on parafilm. Moreover, sensitivity ranging from 71.3% to 80% and specificity from 60.5% to 76.6%. In contrast, RMS sEMG did not exhibit acceptable degrees of accuracy in the other masticatory muscles during MVC on parafilm. It was concluded that the RMS sEMG is a complementary tool for clinical diagnosis of the myogenous TMD.

  19. Accuracy and precision of stream reach water surface slopes estimated in the field and from maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isaak, D.J.; Hubert, W.A.; Krueger, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of five tools used to measure stream water surface slope (WSS) were evaluated. Water surface slopes estimated in the field with a clinometer or from topographic maps used in conjunction with a map wheel or geographic information system (GIS) were significantly higher than WSS estimated in the field with a surveying level (biases of 34, 41, and 53%, respectively). Accuracy of WSS estimates obtained with an Abney level did not differ from surveying level estimates, but conclusions regarding the accuracy of Abney levels and clinometers were weakened by intratool variability. The surveying level estimated WSS most precisely (coefficient of variation [CV] = 0.26%), followed by the GIS (CV = 1.87%), map wheel (CV = 6.18%), Abney level (CV = 13.68%), and clinometer (CV = 21.57%). Estimates of WSS measured in the field with an Abney level and estimated for the same reaches with a GIS used in conjunction with l:24,000-scale topographic maps were significantly correlated (r = 0.86), but there was a tendency for the GIS to overestimate WSS. Detailed accounts of the methods used to measure WSS and recommendations regarding the measurement of WSS are provided.

  20. Convergence and accuracy of kernel-based continuum surface tension models

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.W.; Kothe, D.B.; Puckett, E.G.

    1998-12-01

    Numerical models for flows of immiscible fluids bounded by topologically complex interfaces possessing surface tension inevitably start with an Eulerian formulation. Here the interface is represented as a color function that abruptly varies from one constant value to another through the interface. This transition region, where the color function varies, is a thin O(h) band along the interface where surface tension forces are applied in continuum surface tension models. Although these models have been widely used since the introduction of the popular CSF method [BKZ92], properties such as absolute accuracy and uniform convergence are often not exhibited in interfacial flow simulations. These properties are necessary if surface tension-driven flows are to be reliably modeled, especially in three dimensions. Accuracy and convergence remain elusive because of difficulties in estimating first and second order spatial derivatives of color functions with abrupt transition regions. These derivatives are needed to approximate interface topology such as the unit normal and mean curvature. Modeling challenges are also presented when formulating the actual surface tension force and its local variation using numerical delta functions. In the following they introduce and incorporate kernels and convolution theory into continuum surface tension models. Here they convolve the discontinuous color function into a mollified function that can support accurate first and second order spatial derivatives. Design requirements for the convolution kernel and a new hybrid mix of convolution and discretization are discussed. The resulting improved estimates for interface topology, numerical delta functions, and surface force distribution are evidenced in an equilibrium static drop simulation where numerically-induced artificial parasitic currents are greatly mitigated.

  1. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule-Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-04-18

    The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide-and-conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction-type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre-exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude).

  2. 3D Surface Reconstruction of Plant Seeds by Volume Carving: Performance and Accuracies

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, Johanna; Geiger, Felix; Fischbach, Andreas; Jahnke, Siegfried; Scharr, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method for 3D reconstruction of plant seed surfaces, focusing on small seeds with diameters as small as 200 μm. The method considers robotized systems allowing single seed handling in order to rotate a single seed in front of a camera. Even though such systems feature high position repeatability, at sub-millimeter object scales, camera pose variations have to be compensated. We do this by robustly estimating the tool center point from each acquired image. 3D reconstruction can then be performed by a simple shape-from-silhouette approach. In experiments we investigate runtimes, theoretically achievable accuracy, experimentally achieved accuracy, and show as a proof of principle that the proposed method is well sufficient for 3D seed phenotyping purposes. PMID:27375628

  3. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule–Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide‐and‐conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction‐type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre‐exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  4. First fully ab initio potential energy surface of methane with a spectroscopic accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2016-09-01

    Full 9-dimensional ab initio potential energy surfaces for the methane molecule are constructed using extended electronic structure coupled-cluster calculations with various series of basis sets following increasing X cardinal numbers: cc-pVXZ (X = 3, 4, 5, 6), aug-cc-ACVXZ (X = 3, 4, 5), and cc-pCVXZ-F12 (X = 3, 4). High-order dynamic electron correlations including triple and quadrupole excitations as well as relativistic and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer breakdown corrections were accounted for. Analytical potential functions are parametrized as non-polynomial expansions in internal coordinates in irreducible tensor representation. Vibrational energy levels are reported using global variational nuclear motion calculations with exact kinetic energy operator and a full account of the tetrahedral symmetry of CH4. Our best ab initio surface including above-mentioned contributions provides the rms (obs.-calc.) errors of less than 0.11 cm-1 for vibrational band centers below 4700 cm-1, and ˜0.3 cm-1 for all 229 assigned experimentally determined vibrational levels up to the Icosad range <7900 cm-1 without empirically adjusted parameters. These results improve the accuracy of ab initio methane vibrational predictions by more than an order of magnitude with respect to previous works. This is an unprecedented accuracy of first-principles calculations of a five-atomic molecule for such a large data set. New ab initio potential results in significantly better band center predictions even in comparison with best available empirically corrected potential energy surfaces. The issues related to the basis set extrapolation and an additivity of various corrections at this level of accuracy are discussed.

  5. Simulated studies of wear and friction in total hip prosthesis components with various ball sizes and surface finishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swikert, M. A.; Johnson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a newly designed total hip joint simulator. The apparatus closely simulates the complex motions and loads of the human hip in normal walking. The wear and friction of presently used appliance configurations and materials were determined. A surface treatment of the metal femoral ball specimens was applied to influence wear. The results of the investigation indicate that wear can be reduced by mechanical treatment of metal femoral ball surfaces. A metallographic examination and surface roughness measurements were made.

  6. Properties of M40J Carbon/PMR-II-50 Composites Fabricated with Desized and Surface Treated Fibers. Characterization of M40J Desized and Finished Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Gosau, Jan M.; Shin, E. Eugene; McCorkle, Linda S.; Sutter, James K.; OMalley, Michelle; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    To increase performance and durability of high temperature composites for potential rocket engine components, it is necessary to optimize wetting and interfacial bonding between high modulus carbon fibers and high temperature polyimide resins. It has been previously demonstrated that the electro-oxidative shear treatments used by fiber manufacturers are not effective on higher modulus fibers that have fewer edge and defect sites in the surface crystallites. In addition, sizings commercially supplied on most carbon fibers are not compatible with polyimides. This study was an extension of prior work characterizing the surface chemistry and energy of high modulus carbon fibers (M40J and M60J, Torray) with typical fluorinated polyimide resins, such as PMR-II-50. A continuous desizing system which utilizes environmentally friendly chemical- mechanical processes was developed for tow level fiber and the processes were optimized based on weight loss behavior, surface elemental composition (XPS) and morphology (FE-SEM) analyses, and residual tow strength of the fiber, and the similar approaches have been applied on carbon fabrics. Both desized and further treated with a reactive finish were investigated for the composite reinforcement. The effects of desizing and/or subsequent surface retreatment on carbon fiber on composite properties and performance including fiber-matrix interfacial mechanical properties, thermal properties and blistering onset behavior will be discussed in this presentation.

  7. On the accuracy of surface hopping dynamics in condensed phase non-adiabatic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Reichman, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We perform extensive benchmark comparisons of surface hopping dynamics with numerically exact calculations for the spin-boson model over a wide range of energetic and coupling parameters as well as temperature. We find that deviations from golden-rule scaling in the Marcus regime are generally small and depend sensitively on the energetic bias between electronic states. Fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) is found to be surprisingly accurate over a large swath of parameter space. The inclusion of decoherence corrections via the augmented FSSH algorithm improves the accuracy of dynamical behavior compared to exact simulations, but the effects are generally not dramatic, at least for the case of an environment modeled with the commonly used Debye spectral density.

  8. Accuracy evaluation of the optical surface monitoring system on EDGE linear accelerator in a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Mancosu, Pietro; Fogliata, Antonella; Stravato, Antonella; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) requires dedicated systems to monitor the patient position during the treatment to avoid target underdosage due to involuntary shift. The optical surface monitoring system (OSMS) is here evaluated in a phantom-based study. The new EDGE linear accelerator from Varian (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) integrates, for cranial lesions, the common cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and kV-MV portal images to the optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), a device able to detect real-time patient׳s face movements in all 6 couch axes (vertical, longitudinal, lateral, rotation along the vertical axis, pitch, and roll). We have evaluated the OSMS imaging capability in checking the phantoms׳ position and monitoring its motion. With this aim, a home-made cranial phantom was developed to evaluate the OSMS accuracy in 4 different experiments: (1) comparison with CBCT in isocenter location, (2) capability to recognize predefined shifts up to 2° or 3cm, (3) evaluation at different couch angles, (4) ability to properly reconstruct the surface when the linac gantry visually block one of the cameras. The OSMS system showed, with a phantom, to be accurate for positioning in respect to the CBCT imaging system with differences of 0.6 ± 0.3mm for linear vector displacement, with a maximum rotational inaccuracy of 0.3°. OSMS presented an accuracy of 0.3mm for displacement up to 1cm and 1°, and 0.5mm for larger displacements. Different couch angles (45° and 90°) induced a mean vector uncertainty < 0.4mm. Coverage of 1 camera produced an uncertainty < 0.5mm. Translations and rotations of a phantom can be accurately detect with the optical surface detector system.

  9. Effect of Traffic Position Accuracy for Conducting Safe Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept proposes many revolutionary operational concepts and technologies, such as display of traffic information and movements, airport moving maps (AMM), and proactive alerts of runway incursions and surface traffic conflicts, to deliver an overall increase in system capacity and safety. A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center to evaluate the ability to conduct safe and efficient airport surface operations while utilizing an AMM displaying traffic of various position accuracies as well as the effect of traffic position accuracy on airport conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capability. Nominal scenarios and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The data suggest that all traffic should be shown on the airport moving map, whether qualified or unqualified, and conflict detection and resolution technologies provide significant safety benefits. Despite the presence of traffic information on the map, collisions or near collisions still occurred; when indications or alerts were generated in these same scenarios, the incidences were averted.

  10. Effects of pH, surface finish and thermal treatment on the corrosion of AlFeNi aluminum alloy. Characterization of oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabhan, D.; Kapusta, B.; Billaud, P.; Colas, K.; Hamon, D.; Dacheux, N.

    2015-02-01

    The aluminum alloy AlFeNi used as fuel cladding for the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) may undergo corrosion in the reactor environment. In order to qualify the corrosion behavior of the fuel elements of the JHR in accidental conditions, several specimens of AlFeNi have been corroded at 250 °C for different durations (9-34 days) in distilled water at various pH (4.9, 5.2 and 5.6) chosen to simulate that currently considered for the JHR. On all specimens, the only crystalline corrosion product formed is boehmite (AlOOH). The corrosion film is composed of three oxide layers which show through thickness chemical composition variations. The iron-nickel precipitates pre-existing in the metal matrix are present in the inner and intermediate oxide layers though oxidized. For long corrosion times, some of the iron and nickel particles are released in the water and some precipitation is observed at the surface of the oxide layer. The effect of surface finish (as received or polished) and thermal treatment (annealed and not annealed) on the oxide growth rate has also been investigated. For durations over 25 days, pH = 5.6 appears to be more favorable than pH = 5.2 and 4.9 in terms of oxide thickness and weight gain limitation. This effect of pH is however reduced on unpolished specimens. The effect of surface finish on the corrosion behavior as measured by optical microscopy appears to be strong, especially for pH = 4.9 where polished samples exhibited an accelerated evolution of the oxide thickness and of the mass gain. This could be due to the combined effect of a strong acid solution (pH = 4.9) and of the local microstructural changes formed at the interface through polishing. The effect of thermal treatment on the behavior of unpolished AlFeNi specimens during corrosion tests in the conditions investigated was found to be small. In this study, microstructural and chemical analyses were performed on the corroded specimens in order to get a better understanding of the

  11. Fluorophosphonate-functionalised titanium via a pre-adsorbed alkane phosphonic acid: a novel dual action surface finish for bone regenerative applications.

    PubMed

    Ayre, Wayne Nishio; Scott, Tom; Hallam, Keith; Blom, Ashley W; Denyer, Stephen; Bone, Heather K; Mansell, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    Enhancing vitamin D-induced human osteoblast (hOB) maturation at bone biomaterial surfaces is likely to improve prosthesis integration with resultant reductions in the need for revision arthroplasty consequent to aseptic loosening. Biomaterials that are less appealing to microorganisms implicated in implant failures through infection are also highly desirable. However, finding surfaces that enhance hOB maturation to active vitamin D yet deter bacteria remain elusive. In addressing this, we have sought to bio-functionalise titanium (Ti) with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and related, phosphatase-resistant, LPA analogues. The impetus for this follows our discovery that LPA co-operates with active vitamin D3 metabolites to secure hOB maturation in vitro including cells grown upon Ti. LPA has also been found, by others, to inhibit virulence factor production and biofilm formation of the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Collectively, selected LPA species might offer potential dual-action surface finishes for contemporary bone biomaterials. In attaching a phosphatase-resistant LPA analogue to Ti we took advantage of the affinity of alkane phosphonic acids for TiO2. Herein, we provide evidence for the facile development of a dual-action Ti surface for potential orthopaedic and dental applications. Successful conjugation of an LPA analogue (3S)1-fluoro-3-hydroxy-4-(oleoyloxy)butyl-1-phosphonate (FHBP) to the Ti surface was supported through physiochemical characterisation using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. hOB maturation to active vitamin D3 was enhanced for cells grown on FHBP-Ti whilst these same surfaces exhibited clear antiadherent properties towards a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus.

  12. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials. Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE) and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM). These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05. Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001). Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction. PMID:27252761

  13. Effect of Coating Surface Finishing on Fatigue Behavior of C450 Steel CAPVD Coated with (Ti,Cr)N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poursaiedi, E.; Salarvand, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of the surface quality of a custom 450 stainless steel substrate coated with a (Ti,Cr)N nanolayer by cathodic arc physical vapor deposition on fatigue performance in air and in a 3.5% NaCl solution. Scanning electron microscopy was used to locate crack origin sites and characterize the coating. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the phase formation and measurement of residual stress in the coating. The results showed that the determined in plane residual stress is compressive, with amount of - 2.8 ± 0.4 GPa. Chemical mechanical polishing was used to decrease the coating surface roughness (R a from 0.35 to 0.07 µm). This significantly decreased the area having a high stress concentration and delayed the appearance of micro-cracks in the coating during fatigue testing. The results showed that when the material is tested under axial loading at a maximum alternating stress of 555 to 930 MPa, the fatigue strength of coated specimens with polished surfaces increased 10.6% in air and 26.7% in NaCl solution over the coated specimens with normal surfaces. Post-treatment of the coating increased the fatigue strength 3.5% in air and 10.1% in NaCl solution over the uncoated specimens and the weakness of CAPVD coating was eliminated in the field of fatigue.

  14. Effect of Coating Surface Finishing on Fatigue Behavior of C450 Steel CAPVD Coated with (Ti,Cr)N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poursaiedi, E.; Salarvand, A.

    2016-08-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of the surface quality of a custom 450 stainless steel substrate coated with a (Ti,Cr)N nanolayer by cathodic arc physical vapor deposition on fatigue performance in air and in a 3.5% NaCl solution. Scanning electron microscopy was used to locate crack origin sites and characterize the coating. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the phase formation and measurement of residual stress in the coating. The results showed that the determined in plane residual stress is compressive, with amount of - 2.8 ± 0.4 GPa. Chemical mechanical polishing was used to decrease the coating surface roughness ( R a from 0.35 to 0.07 µm). This significantly decreased the area having a high stress concentration and delayed the appearance of micro-cracks in the coating during fatigue testing. The results showed that when the material is tested under axial loading at a maximum alternating stress of 555 to 930 MPa, the fatigue strength of coated specimens with polished surfaces increased 10.6% in air and 26.7% in NaCl solution over the coated specimens with normal surfaces. Post-treatment of the coating increased the fatigue strength 3.5% in air and 10.1% in NaCl solution over the uncoated specimens and the weakness of CAPVD coating was eliminated in the field of fatigue.

  15. Effects of machining accuracy on frequency response properties of thick-screen frequency selective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chunyi; Gao, Jinsong; Xin, Chen

    2012-10-01

    Electromagnetic theory shows that a thick-screen frequency selective surface (FSS) has many advantages in its frequency response characteristics. In addition, it can be used to make a stealth radome. Therefore, we research in detail how machining accuracy affects the frequency response properties of the FSS in the gigahertz range. Specifically, by using the least squares method applied to machining data, the effects of different machining precision in the samples can be calculated thus obtaining frequency response curves which were verified by testing in the near-field in a microwave dark room. The results show that decreasing roughness and flatness variation leads to an increase in the bandwidth and that an increase in spacing error leads to the center frequency drifting lower. Finally, an increase in aperture error leads to an increase in bandwidth. Therefore, the conclusion is that machining accuracy should be controlled and that a spatial error less than 0.05 mm is required in order to avoid unwanted center frequency drift and a transmittance decrease.

  16. Effects of Regional Topography and Spacecraft Observation Geometry on Surface Soil Moisture Estimation Accuracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Akbar, R.; West, R. D.; Colliander, A.; Kim, S.; Dunbar, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active-Passive Mission (SMAP), launched in January 2015, provides near-daily global surface soil moisture estimates via combined Active Radar and Passive Radiometer observations at various spatial resolutions. The goal of this mission is to enhance our understanding of global carbon and water cycles. This presentation will focus on a comprehensive assessment of the SMAP high resolution radar backscatter data (formally the L1C_S0_HiRes data product) obtained over a 3 km Woody Savanna region in north-central California during a 2.5 month period starting late May 2015. The effects of spacecraft observation geometry (fore- and aft-looks as well as ascending and descending obits) along with regional topography on soil moisture estimation abilities will be examined. Furthermore surface soil moisture retrievals, obtained through utilization of different combinations of observation geometries, will be compared to an existing network of in situsensors. Current electromagnetic scattering and emission models do not properly account for surface topography, therefore physical forward model predictions and observations have unaccounted mismatch errors which also affect soil moisture estimation accuracies. The goal of this study is to quantify these soil moisture prediction errors and highlight the need for new and complete Electromagnetic modeling efforts.

  17. Accuracy assessment of human trunk surface 3D reconstructions from an optical digitising system.

    PubMed

    Pazos, V; Cheriet, F; Song, L; Labelle, H; Dansereau, J

    2005-01-01

    The lack of reliable techniques to follow up scoliotic deformity from the external asymmetry of the trunk leads to a general use of X-rays and indices of spinal deformity. Young adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis need intensive follow-ups for many years and, consequently, they are repeatedly exposed to ionising radiation, which is hazardous to their long-term health. Furthermore, treatments attempt to improve both spinal and surface deformities, but internal indices do not describe the external asymmetry. The purpose of this study was to assess a commercial, optical 3D digitising system for the 3D reconstruction of the entire trunk for clinical assessment of external asymmetry. The resulting surface is a textured, high-density polygonal mesh. The accuracy assessment was based on repeated reconstructions of a manikin with markers fixed on it. The average normal distance between the reconstructed surfaces and the reference data (markers measured with CMM) was 1.1 +/- 0.9 mm. PMID:15742714

  18. Post Processing Methods used to Improve Surface Finish of Products which are Manufactured by Additive Manufacturing Technologies: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, N. N.; Mulay, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes open the possibility to go directly from Computer-Aided Design (CAD) to a physical prototype. These prototypes are used as test models before it is finalized as well as sometimes as a final product. Additive Manufacturing has many advantages over the traditional process used to develop a product such as allowing early customer involvement in product development, complex shape generation and also save time as well as money. Additive manufacturing also possess some special challenges that are usually worth overcoming such as Poor Surface quality, Physical Properties and use of specific raw material for manufacturing. To improve the surface quality several attempts had been made by controlling various process parameters of Additive manufacturing and also applying different post processing techniques on components manufactured by Additive manufacturing. The main objective of this work is to document an extensive literature review in the general area of post processing techniques which are used in Additive manufacturing.

  19. Effect of Weight Percentage and Cutting Parameter on Surface Finish of SiC Reinforced Aluminium Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadadevaramath, R. S.; Kotresh, M. C.; Srinivasan, D.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, aluminium alloy of series 1100 is selected as a matrix material and SiC of 45 microns as reinforcement. The composites are synthesized by 2 stage stir casting route, by varying a weight % of reinforcement from 6 % and 10%. The surface roughness of prepared composite were examined after plain turning operation. The machining parameters like speed, feed, DOC, SiC Wt. % are varied at 3 different levels. In order to minimize the time, cost and material a taguchi L9 orthogonal array was used for experiment. From the studies it was observed that the roughness value will increase with the increasing in reinforcement percentage.

  20. Accuracy Analysis of a Robotic Radionuclide Inspection and Mapping System for Surface Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Mauer, Georg F.; Kawa, Chris

    2008-01-15

    The mapping of localized regions of radionuclide contamination in a building can be a time consuming and costly task. Humans moving hand-held radiation detectors over the target areas are subject to fatigue. A contamination map based on manual surveys can contain significant operator-induced inaccuracies. A Fanuc M16i light industrial robot has been configured for installation on a mobile aerial work platform, such as a tall forklift. When positioned in front of a wall or floor surface, the robot can map the radiation levels over a surface area of up to 3 m by 3 m. The robot's end effector is a commercial alpha-beta radiation sensor, augmented with range and collision avoidance sensors to ensure operational safety as well as to maintain a constant gap between surface and radiation sensors. The accuracy and repeatability of the robotically conducted contamination surveys is directly influenced by the sensors and other hardware employed. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of various non-contact sensors for gap measurement, and the means to compensate for predicted systematic errors that arise during the area survey scans. The range sensor should maintain a constant gap between the radiation counter and the surface being inspected. The inspection robot scans the wall surface horizontally, moving down at predefined vertical intervals after each scan in a meandering pattern. A number of non-contact range sensors can be employed for the measurement of the gap between the robot end effector and the wall. The nominal gap width was specified as 10 mm, with variations during a single scan not to exceed {+-} 2 mm. Unfinished masonry or concrete walls typically exhibit irregularities, such as holes, gaps, or indentations in mortar joints. These irregularities can be sufficiently large to indicate a change of the wall contour. The responses of different sensor types to the wall irregularities vary, depending on their underlying principles of operation. We explored

  1. Surface accuracy and radiation pattern characteristics of mesh deployable refector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Miyoshi; Ebisui, Takashi; Okamato, Teruki; Orikasa, Teruaki; Sugimoto, Toshio; Iso, Akio

    To facilitate the growth of mobile satellite communications, both an increase in the Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power (EIRP) of satellites and improved frequency reuse are required to achiveve compact size, low cost terminal usage, and high channel capacity. High gain and low sidelobe antenna technology are very important for high EIRP and frequency reuse, respectively. These requirements are expected to be met by using a large deployable mesh reflector antenna, which is the key technology for future multibeam moble communications systems. In this paper, surface accruracy and related electrical characteristics are studied using a TETRUS-(Tetra Trigonal Prism Truss) type deployable mesh reflector antenna. Surface accuracy and related electrical characteristics of reflector antennas becaue any distortion of the ideal paraboloidal configuration causes antenna patterns to deteriorate, thereby reducing reflector aperture efficiency and increasing sidelobe and grating lobe levels. The sidelobe and grating lobe characteristics are especially important in frequency reuse. First, we show the problem with the radiation pattern characteristics of TETUS antenna. We then propose a new antenna configuration called the 'HYBRID TETRUS' that improves these characteristics. The mechanical performances of two partial deployable models are also described. Mechanical testing results reveal agreement between the calculated and measured values and high rigidities.

  2. Imprinting high-gradient topographical structures onto optical surfaces using magnetorheological finishing: manufacturing corrective optical elements for high-power laser applications.

    PubMed

    Menapace, Joseph A; Ehrmann, Paul E; Bayramian, Andrew J; Bullington, Amber; Di Nicola, Jean-Michel G; Haefner, Constantin; Jarboe, Jeffrey; Marshall, Christopher; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Smith, Cal

    2016-07-01

    Corrective optical elements form an important part of high-precision optical systems. We have developed a method to manufacture high-gradient corrective optical elements for high-power laser systems using deterministic magnetorheological finishing (MRF) imprinting technology. Several process factors need to be considered for polishing ultraprecise topographical structures onto optical surfaces using MRF. They include proper selection of MRF removal function and wheel sizes, detailed MRF tool and interferometry alignment, and optimized MRF polishing schedules. Dependable interferometry also is a key factor in high-gradient component manufacture. A wavefront attenuating cell, which enables reliable measurement of gradients beyond what is attainable using conventional interferometry, is discussed. The results of MRF imprinting a 23 μm deep structure containing gradients over 1.6 μm / mm onto a fused-silica window are presented as an example of the technique's capabilities. This high-gradient element serves as a thermal correction plate in the high-repetition-rate advanced petawatt laser system currently being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. PMID:27409216

  3. Imprinting high-gradient topographical structures onto optical surfaces using magnetorheological finishing: Manufacturing corrective optical elements for high-power laser applications

    DOE PAGES

    Menapace, Joseph A.; Ehrmann, Paul E.; Bayramian, Andrew J.; Bullington, Amber; Di Nicola, Jean -Michel G.; Haefner, Constantin; Jarboe, Jeffrey; Marshall, Christopher; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Smith, Cal

    2016-03-15

    Corrective optical elements form an important part of high-precision optical systems. We have developed a method to manufacture high-gradient corrective optical elements for high-power laser systems using deterministic magnetorheological finishing (MRF) imprinting technology. Several process factors need to be considered for polishing ultraprecise topographical structures onto optical surfaces using MRF. They include proper selection of MRF removal function and wheel sizes, detailed MRF tool and interferometry alignment, and optimized MRF polishing schedules. Dependable interferometry also is a key factor in high-gradient component manufacture. A wavefront attenuating cell, which enables reliable measurement of gradients beyond what is attainable using conventional interferometry,more » is discussed. The results of MRF imprinting a 23 μm deep structure containing gradients over 1.6 μm / mm onto a fused-silica window are presented as an example of the technique’s capabilities. As a result, this high-gradient element serves as a thermal correction plate in the high-repetition-rate advanced petawatt laser system currently being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  4. A TECHNIQUE FOR ASSESSING THE ACCURACY OF SUB-PIXEL IMPERVIOUS SURFACE ESTIMATES DERIVED FROM LANDSAT TM IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a technique for assessing the accuracy of sub-pixel derived estimates of impervious surface extracted from LANDSAT TM imagery. We utilized spatially coincident
    sub-pixel derived impervious surface estimates, high-resolution planimetric GIS data, vector--to-
    r...

  5. The scalpel finishing technique: a tooth-friendly way to finish dental composites in anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Kup, Elaine; Tirlet, Gil; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Optimal results can be obtained on direct restorations by the application of layering procedures that combine the accurate morphological insertion of restorative materials with the knowledge of the optical and mechanical properties of both composite resin and natural hard dental tissue. Even if the finishing procedures on restorations, such as margination (the trimming of margins), are minimized by anatomical layering techniques, finishing can still be highly complicated due to a number of pre-finishing sequences using specific instruments proposed in the literature, which include finishing burs and abrasive discs. Finishing procedures performed with a scalpel on polymerized direct composite restorations can improve the quality of the final sculptured surface by developing natural contours and characteristics and by removing the excess restorative material at the tooth-structure margin. Enhanced movement control and fine fingertip perception of the surface texture while moving the scalpel blade allow the operator to detect and cut the excess composite material during the margination procedure and to refine the final anatomy. Avoiding the use of finishing burs during finishing procedures on direct composite restorations may save adjacent enamel surfaces from abrasive damage. The composite surface and margins may also benefit from using the scalpel finishing technique, considering the potential risk of excess removal and surface crazing that the improper use of finishing burs could cause to composite material. The purpose of this article is to propose and describe the scalpel finishing technique step by step, as well as to briefly discuss the advantages of its application within the limits of a clinical case report.

  6. The scalpel finishing technique: a tooth-friendly way to finish dental composites in anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Kup, Elaine; Tirlet, Gil; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Optimal results can be obtained on direct restorations by the application of layering procedures that combine the accurate morphological insertion of restorative materials with the knowledge of the optical and mechanical properties of both composite resin and natural hard dental tissue. Even if the finishing procedures on restorations, such as margination (the trimming of margins), are minimized by anatomical layering techniques, finishing can still be highly complicated due to a number of pre-finishing sequences using specific instruments proposed in the literature, which include finishing burs and abrasive discs. Finishing procedures performed with a scalpel on polymerized direct composite restorations can improve the quality of the final sculptured surface by developing natural contours and characteristics and by removing the excess restorative material at the tooth-structure margin. Enhanced movement control and fine fingertip perception of the surface texture while moving the scalpel blade allow the operator to detect and cut the excess composite material during the margination procedure and to refine the final anatomy. Avoiding the use of finishing burs during finishing procedures on direct composite restorations may save adjacent enamel surfaces from abrasive damage. The composite surface and margins may also benefit from using the scalpel finishing technique, considering the potential risk of excess removal and surface crazing that the improper use of finishing burs could cause to composite material. The purpose of this article is to propose and describe the scalpel finishing technique step by step, as well as to briefly discuss the advantages of its application within the limits of a clinical case report. PMID:25874271

  7. Statistical downscaling of precipitation using local regression and high accuracy surface modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Na; Yue, Tianxiang; Zhou, Xun; Zhao, Mingwei; Liu, Yu; Du, Zhengping; Zhang, Lili

    2016-03-01

    Downscaling precipitation is required in local scale climate impact studies. In this paper, a statistical downscaling scheme was presented with a combination of geographically weighted regression (GWR) model and a recently developed method, high accuracy surface modeling method (HASM). This proposed method was compared with another downscaling method using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) database and ground-based data from 732 stations across China for the period 1976-2005. The residual which was produced by GWR was modified by comparing different interpolators including HASM, Kriging, inverse distance weighted method (IDW), and Spline. The spatial downscaling from 1° to 1-km grids for period 1976-2005 and future scenarios was achieved by using the proposed downscaling method. The prediction accuracy was assessed at two separate validation sites throughout China and Jiangxi Province on both annual and seasonal scales, with the root mean square error (RMSE), mean relative error (MRE), and mean absolute error (MAE). The results indicate that the developed model in this study outperforms the method that builds transfer function using the gauge values. There is a large improvement in the results when using a residual correction with meteorological station observations. In comparison with other three classical interpolators, HASM shows better performance in modifying the residual produced by local regression method. The success of the developed technique lies in the effective use of the datasets and the modification process of the residual by using HASM. The results from the future climate scenarios show that precipitation exhibits overall increasing trend from T1 (2011-2040) to T2 (2041-2070) and T2 to T3 (2071-2100) in RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. The most significant increase occurs in RCP8.5 from T2 to T3, while the lowest increase is found in RCP2.6 from T2 to T3, increased by 47.11 and 2.12 mm, respectively.

  8. Influence of alginate impression materials and storage time on surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo D; Moreti, Ana F F; Martinelli, Julia; Berger, Sandrine B; Meneghel, Luciana L; Caixeta, Rodrigo V; Sinhoreti, Mário A C

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models obtained from molds prepared using different alginate impression materials (Cavex ColorChange, Hydrogum 5, or Jeltrate Plus) and with different storage times (1, 3, and 5 days) to models from molds that were filled immediately with no storage time. The molds were prepared over a matrix containing 50-μm line, (ISO 1563 standard) under pressure with a perforated metal tray. The molds were removed 2 minutes after loss of sticky consistency and either filled immediately or stored in closed jars at 100% relative humidity and 37°C for 1, 3, or 5 days. The molds were filled with dental plaster (Durone IV). Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy were evaluated using optical microscopy on the 50-μm wide line, which was 25 mm in length, according to ISO 1563 standard. The dimensional accuracy results (%) were subjected to analysis of variance. The 50-μm wide line (ISO 1563 standard) was completely reproduced by all alginate impression materials regardless of the storage time. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean dimensional accuracy values of stone models made from molds composed of different alginate impression materials and with different storage times (p = 0.989). In conclusion, storing the mold for five days prior to filling did not change the surface detail reproduction or dimensional accuracy of the alginates examined in this study.

  9. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models: influence of disinfectant solutions and alginate impression materials.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Borsato, Thaís Teixeira; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Gonini-Jr, Alcides; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models obtained from molds disinfected with 2% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate or 0.2% peracetic acid to models produced using molds which were not disinfected, with 3 alginate materials (Cavex ColorChange, Hydrogum 5 and Jeltrate Plus). The molds were prepared over matrix containing 20-, 50-, and 75-µm lines, performed under pressure with perforated metal tray. The molds were removed following gelation and either disinfected (using one of the solutions by spraying followed by storage in closed jars for 15 min) or not disinfected. The samples were divided into 12 groups (n=5). Molds were filled with dental gypsum Durone IV and 1 h after the start of the stone mixing the models were separated from the tray. Surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy were evaluated using optical microscopy on the 50-µm line with 25 mm in length, in accordance with the ISO 1563 standard. The dimensional accuracy results (%) were subjected to ANOVA. The 50 µm-line was completely reproduced by all alginate impression materials regardless of the disinfection procedure. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean values of dimensional accuracy in combinations between disinfectant procedure and alginate impression material (p=0.2130) or for independent factors. The disinfectant solutions and alginate materials used in this study are no factors of choice regarding the surface detail reproduction and dimensional accuracy of stone models.

  10. Evaluation of factors affecting the accuracy of impressions using quantitative surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, I K; DeLong, R; Pintado, M R; Malik, R

    1995-01-01

    Impression material goes from a plastic to an elastic state during setting. Movement of the impression and excessive seating pressure during this transition can cause distortion in the impressions. The purpose of this study is to determine if the impression distortion is related to movement during setting or to distortion of the putty phase in the two-step impressioning technique. A master model of a maxillary quadrant of teeth was impressed using four different procedures: 1) one-step technique without movement (1S-NM); 2) one-step technique with movement (1S-M); 3) two-step technique without movement (2S-NM); and 4) two-step technique with movement (2S-M). An artificial oral environment and surface analysis technique of the Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics were used to produce the impressions and measure their accuracy. A digitized image of the first premolar of the master model was aligned with a digitized image of the first premolar of each epoxy model using AnSur. The root mean squared difference (RMS) between the aligned images is a measure of the distortion. The corresponding RMS values for the different methods were: 1S-NM = 23.7 +/- 9.21; 1S-M = 20.4 +/- 3.9; 2S-NM = 20.5 +/- 7.7; 2S-M = 21.3 +/- 4.4. Statistical analysis using a two-way analysis of variance showed no difference at the 0.05 level of significance. Pairwise comparison using the Tukey method showed that neither technique (one-step vs two-step) nor movement is a significant factor. These results showed that low seating pressure will not cause any greater distortions in the two-step impression technique than in the one-step technique, and minor movement during the setting of the impression material will no cause distortion.

  11. Rovibrational spectra of ammonia. I. Unprecedented accuracy of a potential energy surface used with nonadiabatic corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we build upon our previous work on the theoretical spectroscopy of ammonia, NH3. Compared to our 2008 study, we include more physics in our rovibrational calculations and more experimental data in the refinement procedure, and these enable us to produce a potential energy surface (PES) of unprecedented accuracy. We call this the HSL-2 PES. The additional physics we include is a second-order correction for the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and we find it to be critical for improved results. By including experimental data for higher rotational levels in the refinement procedure, we were able to greatly reduce our systematic errors for the rotational dependence of our predictions. These additions together lead to a significantly improved total angular momentum (J) dependence in our computed rovibrational energies. The root-mean-square error between our predictions using the HSL-2 PES and the reliable energy levels from the HITRAN database for J = 0-6 and J = 7/8 for 14NH3 is only 0.015 cm-1 and 0.020/0.023 cm-1, respectively. The root-mean-square errors for the characteristic inversion splittings are approximately 1/3 smaller than those for energy levels. The root-mean-square error for the 6002 J = 0-8 transition energies is 0.020 cm-1. Overall, for J = 0-8, the spectroscopic data computed with HSL-2 is roughly an order of magnitude more accurate relative to our previous best ammonia PES (denoted HSL-1). These impressive numbers are eclipsed only by the root-mean-square error between our predictions for purely rotational transition energies of 15NH3 and the highly accurate Cologne database (CDMS): 0.00034 cm-1 (10 MHz), in other words, 2 orders of magnitude smaller. In addition, we identify a deficiency in the 15NH3 energy levels determined from a model of the experimental data .

  12. Rovibrational spectra of ammonia. I. Unprecedented accuracy of a potential energy surface used with nonadiabatic corrections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2011-01-28

    In this work, we build upon our previous work on the theoretical spectroscopy of ammonia, NH(3). Compared to our 2008 study, we include more physics in our rovibrational calculations and more experimental data in the refinement procedure, and these enable us to produce a potential energy surface (PES) of unprecedented accuracy. We call this the HSL-2 PES. The additional physics we include is a second-order correction for the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and we find it to be critical for improved results. By including experimental data for higher rotational levels in the refinement procedure, we were able to greatly reduce our systematic errors for the rotational dependence of our predictions. These additions together lead to a significantly improved total angular momentum (J) dependence in our computed rovibrational energies. The root-mean-square error between our predictions using the HSL-2 PES and the reliable energy levels from the HITRAN database for J = 0-6 and J = 7∕8 for (14)NH(3) is only 0.015 cm(-1) and 0.020∕0.023 cm(-1), respectively. The root-mean-square errors for the characteristic inversion splittings are approximately 1∕3 smaller than those for energy levels. The root-mean-square error for the 6002 J = 0-8 transition energies is 0.020 cm(-1). Overall, for J = 0-8, the spectroscopic data computed with HSL-2 is roughly an order of magnitude more accurate relative to our previous best ammonia PES (denoted HSL-1). These impressive numbers are eclipsed only by the root-mean-square error between our predictions for purely rotational transition energies of (15)NH(3) and the highly accurate Cologne database (CDMS): 0.00034 cm(-1) (10 MHz), in other words, 2 orders of magnitude smaller. In addition, we identify a deficiency in the (15)NH(3) energy levels determined from a model of the experimental data. PMID:21280738

  13. Toward Magnetorheological Finishing of Magnetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-10-24

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a precision finishing process traditionally limited to processing only nonmagnetic materials, e.g., optical glasses, ceramics, polymers, and metals. Here we demonstrate that MRF can be used for material removal from magnetic material surfaces. Our approach is to place an MRF spot on machined surfaces of magnetic WC-Co materials. The resulting surface roughness is comparable to that produced on nonmagnetic materials. This spotting technique may be used to evaluate the depth of subsurface damage, or deformed layer, induced by earlier manufacturing steps, such as grinding and lapping.

  14. Increased accuracy of ligand sensing by receptor diffusion on cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Endres, Robert G.

    2010-10-01

    The physical limit with which a cell senses external ligand concentration corresponds to the perfect absorber, where all ligand particles are absorbed and overcounting of same ligand particles does not occur. Here, we analyze how the lateral diffusion of receptors on the cell membrane affects the accuracy of sensing ligand concentration. Specifically, we connect our modeling to neurotransmission in neural synapses where the diffusion of glutamate receptors is already known to refresh synaptic connections. We find that receptor diffusion indeed increases the accuracy of sensing for both the glutamate α -Amino-3-hydroxy-5-Methyl-4-isoxazolePropionic Acid (AMPA) and N -Methyl-D-aspartic Acid (NMDA) receptor, although the NMDA receptor is overall much noisier. We propose that the difference in accuracy of sensing of the two receptors can be linked to their different roles in neurotransmission. Specifically, the high accuracy in sensing glutamate is essential for the AMPA receptor to start membrane depolarization, while the NMDA receptor is believed to work in a second stage as a coincidence detector, involved in long-term potentiation and memory.

  15. Comparative Accuracy Evaluation of Fine-Scale Global and Local Digital Surface Models: The Tshwane Case Study I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breytenbach, A.

    2016-10-01

    Conducted in the City of Tshwane, South Africa, this study set about to test the accuracy of DSMs derived from different remotely sensed data locally. VHR digital mapping camera stereo-pairs, tri-stereo imagery collected by a Pléiades satellite and data detected from the Tandem-X InSAR satellite configuration were fundamental in the construction of seamless DSM products at different postings, namely 2 m, 4 m and 12 m. The three DSMs were sampled against independent control points originating from validated airborne LiDAR data. The reference surfaces were derived from the same dense point cloud at grid resolutions corresponding to those of the samples. The absolute and relative positional accuracies were computed using well-known DEM error metrics and accuracy statistics. Overall vertical accuracies were also assessed and compared across seven slope classes and nine primary land cover classes. Although all three DSMs displayed significantly more vertical errors where solid waterbodies, dense natural and/or alien woody vegetation and, in a lesser degree, urban residential areas with significant canopy cover were encountered, all three surpassed their expected positional accuracies overall.

  16. A SUB-PIXEL ACCURACY ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK FOR DETERMINING LANDSAT TM DERIVED IMPERVIOUS SURFACE ESTIMATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The amount of impervious surface in a watershed is a landscape indicator integrating a number of concurrent interactions that influence a watershed's hydrology. Remote sensing data and techniques are viable tools to assess anthropogenic impervious surfaces. However a fundamental ...

  17. Evaluation of the Accuracy of a 3D Surface Imaging System for Patient Setup in Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gopan, Olga; Wu Qiuwen

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging system (AlignRT) registration algorithms for head-and-neck cancer patient setup during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients, each undergoing six repeated weekly helical computed tomography (CT) scans during treatment course (total 77 CTs including planning CT), were included in the study. Patient surface images used in AlignRT registration were not captured by the 3D cameras; instead, they were derived from skin contours from these CTs, thereby eliminating issues with immobilization masks. The results from surface registrations in AlignRT based on CT skin contours were compared to those based on bony anatomy registrations in Pinnacle{sup 3}, which was considered the gold standard. Both rigid and nonrigid types of setup errors were analyzed, and the effect of tumor shrinkage was investigated. Results: The maximum registration errors in AlignRT were 0.2 Degree-Sign for rotations and 0.7 mm for translations in all directions. The rigid alignment accuracy in the head region when applied to actual patient data was 1.1 Degree-Sign , 0.8 Degree-Sign , and 2.2 Degree-Sign in rotation and 4.5, 2.7, and 2.4 mm in translation along the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axes at 90% confidence level. The accuracy was affected by the patient's weight loss during treatment course, which was patient specific. Selectively choosing surface regions improved registration accuracy. The discrepancy for nonrigid registration was much larger at 1.9 Degree-Sign , 2.4 Degree-Sign , and 4.5 Degree-Sign and 10.1, 11.9, and 6.9 mm at 90% confidence level. Conclusions: The 3D surface imaging system is capable of detecting rigid setup errors with good accuracy for head-and-neck cancer. Further investigations are needed to improve the accuracy in detecting nonrigid setup errors.

  18. Recent advances in electronic structure theory and their influence on the accuracy of ab initio potential energy surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in electronic structure theory and the availability of high speed vector processors have substantially increased the accuracy of ab initio potential energy surfaces. The recently developed atomic natural orbital approach for basis set contraction has reduced both the basis set incompleteness and superposition errors in molecular calculations. Furthermore, full CI calculations can often be used to calibrate a CASSCF/MRCI approach that quantitatively accounts for the valence correlation energy. These computational advances also provide a vehicle for systematically improving the calculations and for estimating the residual error in the calculations. Calculations on selected diatomic and triatomic systems will be used to illustrate the accuracy that currently can be achieved for molecular systems. In particular, the F + H2 yields HF + H potential energy hypersurface is used to illustrate the impact of these computational advances on the calculation of potential energy surfaces.

  19. Recent advances in electronic structure theory and their influence on the accuracy of ab initio potential energy surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in electronic structure theory and the availability of high speed vector processors have substantially increased the accuracy of ab initio potential energy surfaces. The recently developed atomic natural orbital approach for basis set contraction has reduced both the basis set incompleteness and superposition errors in molecular calculations. Furthermore, full CI calculations can often be used to calibrate a CASSCF/MRCI approach that quantitatively accounts for the valence correlation energy. These computational advances also provide a vehicle for systematically improving the calculations and for estimating the residual error in the calculations. Calculations on selected diatomic and triatomic systems will be used to illustrate the accuracy that currently can be achieved for molecular systems. In particular, the F+H2 yields HF+H potential energy hypersurface is used to illustrate the impact of these computational advances on the calculation of potential energy surfaces.

  20. Correlation between average tissue depth data and quantitative accuracy of forensic craniofacial reconstructions measured by geometric surface comparison method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Joon; Wilkinson, Caroline M; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik; Lee, Sang-Mi

    2015-05-01

    Accuracy is the most important factor supporting the reliability of forensic facial reconstruction (FFR) comparing to the corresponding actual face. A number of methods have been employed to evaluate objective accuracy of FFR. Recently, it has been attempted that the degree of resemblance between computer-generated FFR and actual face is measured by geometric surface comparison method. In this study, three FFRs were produced employing live adult Korean subjects and three-dimensional computerized modeling software. The deviations of the facial surfaces between the FFR and the head scan CT of the corresponding subject were analyzed in reverse modeling software. The results were compared with those from a previous study which applied the same methodology as this study except average facial soft tissue depth dataset. Three FFRs of this study that applied updated dataset demonstrated lesser deviation errors between the facial surfaces of the FFR and corresponding subject than those from the previous study. The results proposed that appropriate average tissue depth data are important to increase quantitative accuracy of FFR. PMID:25739646

  1. Assessment of the accuracy of plasma shape reconstruction by the Cauchy condition surface method in JT-60SA

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Urano, H.; Ide, S.

    2015-07-15

    For the purpose of stable plasma equilibrium control and detailed analysis, it is essential to reconstruct an accurate plasma boundary on the poloidal cross section in tokamak devices. The Cauchy condition surface (CCS) method is a numerical approach for calculating the spatial distribution of the magnetic flux outside a hypothetical surface and reconstructing the plasma boundary from the magnetic measurements located outside the plasma. The accuracy of the plasma shape reconstruction has been assessed by comparing the CCS method and an equilibrium calculation in JT-60SA with a high elongation and triangularity of plasma shape. The CCS, on which both Dirichlet and Neumann conditions are unknown, is defined as a hypothetical surface located inside the real plasma region. The accuracy of the plasma shape reconstruction is sensitive to the CCS free parameters such as the number of unknown parameters and the shape in JT-60SA. It is found that the optimum number of unknown parameters and the size of the CCS that minimizes errors in the reconstructed plasma shape are in proportion to the plasma size. Furthermore, it is shown that the accuracy of the plasma shape reconstruction is greatly improved using the optimum number of unknown parameters and shape of the CCS, and the reachable reconstruction errors in plasma shape and locations of strike points are within the target ranges in JT-60SA.

  2. Correlation between average tissue depth data and quantitative accuracy of forensic craniofacial reconstructions measured by geometric surface comparison method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Joon; Wilkinson, Caroline M; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik; Lee, Sang-Mi

    2015-05-01

    Accuracy is the most important factor supporting the reliability of forensic facial reconstruction (FFR) comparing to the corresponding actual face. A number of methods have been employed to evaluate objective accuracy of FFR. Recently, it has been attempted that the degree of resemblance between computer-generated FFR and actual face is measured by geometric surface comparison method. In this study, three FFRs were produced employing live adult Korean subjects and three-dimensional computerized modeling software. The deviations of the facial surfaces between the FFR and the head scan CT of the corresponding subject were analyzed in reverse modeling software. The results were compared with those from a previous study which applied the same methodology as this study except average facial soft tissue depth dataset. Three FFRs of this study that applied updated dataset demonstrated lesser deviation errors between the facial surfaces of the FFR and corresponding subject than those from the previous study. The results proposed that appropriate average tissue depth data are important to increase quantitative accuracy of FFR.

  3. [Effect of impression contamination on the accuracy of plaster model surface].

    PubMed

    Pasiek, S

    1990-01-01

    Macroscopic and microscopic examination of plaster models obtained from impressions with alginate mass Kromopan Super and silicone mass Dentaflex Pasta confirmed that leaving of saliva and blood on the surface of impressions causes uneven surface of plaster models. For ensuring sufficiently even surface of the model the impression should be cleaned immediately after its obtaining with water and a brush, or later on by immersion in 2% Na2SO4 solution. PMID:2103030

  4. Comparative evaluation of dimension and surface detail accuracy of models produced by three different rapid prototype techniques.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, K; Anandapandian, Ponsekar Abraham; Sharma, Sumeet Kumar; Vasantha Kumar, M

    2012-03-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) is a technology that produces physical models by selectively solidifying ultra violet (UV) sensitive liquid resin using a laser beam. These models can be formed using various techniques. A study was undertaken to compare the dimensional accuracy and surface details of three prototype models with a 3D STL (standard template library) image. In this study the STL file was used to produce three different rapid prototype models namely; model 1-fused deposition model (FDM) using ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), model 2-Polyjet using a clear resin and model 3-a 3 dimensional printing using a composite material. Measurements were made at various anatomical points. For surface detail reproductions the models were subjected to scanning electron microscopy analysis. The dimensions of the model created by Polyjet were closest to the 3D STL virtual image followed by the 3DP model and FDM. SEM analysis showed uniform smooth surface on Polyjet model with adequate surface details.

  5. Satellite and Skin Layer Effects on the Accuracy of Sea Surface Temperature Measurements from the GOES Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, Gary A.; Bates, John J.; Scott, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    The latest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have facilitated significant improvements in our ability to measure sea surface temperature (SST) from geostationary satellites. Nonetheless, difficulties associated with sensor calibration and oceanic near-surface temperature gradients affect the accuracy of the measurements and our ability to estimate and interpret the diurnal cycle of the bulk SST. Overall, measurements of SST from the GOES Imagers on the GOES 8-10 satellites are shown to have very small bias (less than 0.02 K) and rms differences of between 0.6 and 0.9 K relative to buoy observations. Separate consideration of individual measurement times, however, demonstrates systematic bias variations of over 0.6 K with measurement hour. These bias variations significantly affect both the amplitude and shape of estimates of the diurnal SST cycle. Modeled estimates of the temperature difference across the oceanic cool skin and diurnal thermocline show that bias variations up to 0.3 K can result from variability in the near-surface layer. Oceanic near-surface layer and known "satellite midnight" calibration effects, however, explain only a portion of the observed bias variations, suggesting other possible calibration concerns. Methods of explicitly incorporating skin layer and diurnal thermocline effects in satellite bulk SST measurements were explored in an effort to further improve the measurement accuracy. While the approaches contain more complete physics, they do not yet significantly improve the accuracy of bulk SST measurements due to remaining uncertainties in the temperature difference across the near-surface layer.

  6. AN ACCURACY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPLE MID-ATLANTIC SUB-PIXEL IMPERVIOUS SURFACE MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic impervious surfaces have an important relationship with non-point source pollution (NPS) in urban watersheds. The amount of impervious surface area in a watershed is a key indicator of landscape change. As a single variable, it serves to integrate a number of conc...

  7. Research on the use of particles coming from almond husk as fillers for vinyl plastisols to manufacture hollow pieces with similar surface finishing than wood by using a rotational moulding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo Amoros, Jose Enrique

    PVC pastes or plasticized PVC offer great possibilities in the industrial field in which this research work has been developed since they show great relevance in plastic processing. On one hand, it is important to study these materials from different points of view: quality improvement, wide range of performance, high versatility, low costs,.... On the other hand, most of the industrial fields that usually employ these polymeric materials are characterized by developing products on which aesthetic considerations and surface finishing acquire special relevance. These industrial fields include all those on which new designs require complex shapes and new and novelty surface finishing such as interior design (furniture, wood products,...) toys industry, houseware, shoe industry,.... The main aim of this work is to improve the use of PVC plastisols in these industrial fields by optimizing formulations with new additives (low toxicity plasticizers) and fillers (lignocellulosic wastes) to obtain new materials that minimize damages to environment. In this work, we have developed new plastisol formulations based on the use of low toxicity plasticizers to obtain more ecological plastisols. We have used a biodegradable plasticizer DINCH which is a derivative of a dicarboxilate as substitute of traditional plasticizers based on phthalates. As we are working with relatively new plasticizers (specially at industrial level) we have performed a whole study of its properties by using different experimental analysis techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamical-mechanical analysis (DMA) and espectrofotometric techniques (visible and infrared). Furthermore a complete mechanical characterization has been carried out to analyze the most important parameters that influence on materials properties such as processing parameters (temperature and time) and plastisol formulations (mainly plasticizer content). We have also performed a

  8. Effects of random distortions on the surface accuracy of a large antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, C. R.; Staton, L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of random reflector distortions or irregularities on a reflector's radiation pattern are discussed. The importance of such surface deviations with respect to a radiometric reflector antenna is addressed.

  9. Improving the Accuracy of Satellite Sea Surface Temperature Measurements by Explicitly Accounting for the Bulk-Skin Temperature Difference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, Gary A.; Emery, William J.; Castro, Sandra L.; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this research was to determine whether the accuracy of satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) could be improved by explicitly accounting for the complex temperature gradients at the surface of the ocean associated with the cool skin and diurnal warm layers. To achieve this goal, work was performed in two different major areas. The first centered on the development and deployment of low-cost infrared radiometers to enable the direct validation of satellite measurements of skin temperature. The second involved a modeling and data analysis effort whereby modeled near-surface temperature profiles were integrated into the retrieval of bulk SST estimates from existing satellite data. Under the first work area, two different seagoing infrared radiometers were designed and fabricated and the first of these was deployed on research ships during two major experiments. Analyses of these data contributed significantly to the Ph.D. thesis of one graduate student and these results are currently being converted into a journal publication. The results of the second portion of work demonstrated that, with presently available models and heat flux estimates, accuracy improvements in SST retrievals associated with better physical treatment of the near-surface layer were partially balanced by uncertainties in the models and extra required input data. While no significant accuracy improvement was observed in this experiment, the results are very encouraging for future applications where improved models and coincident environmental data will be available. These results are included in a manuscript undergoing final review with the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology.

  10. Urolithiasis in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Maes, D G D; Vrielinck, J; Millet, S; Janssens, G P J; Deprez, P

    2004-11-01

    Urolithiasis in sows and neonatal pigs is well-known, but information on its occurrence and impact in finishing pigs is sparse. This study reports three outbreaks of urolithiasis in finishing pigs. In one herd, no symptoms were observed, whereas in the other herds the presence of calculi caused obstruction of the urinary tract resulting in death. Using infra-red spectroscopy, the predominant mineral-type found in the uroliths was calcium carbonate (calcite). Only small amounts of calcium oxalate (< 1%) could be detected. A high urinary pH, small abnormalities in the mineral composition of the feed and insufficient drinking water were the most important risk factors identified. To prevent urolithiasis, it is important to ensure adequate water intake, to provide a balanced mineral diet, and to avoid urinary tract infections.

  11. High-Accuracy Surface Figure Measurement of Silicon Mirrors at 80 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Davila, Pamela; Robinson, F. David

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the equipment, experimental methods, and first results at a new facility for interferometric measurement of cryogenically-cooled spherical mirrors at the Goddard Space Flight Center Optics Branch. The procedure, using standard phase-shifting interferometry, has an standard combined uncertainty of 3.6 nm rms in its representation of the two-dimensional surface figure error at 80, and an uncertainty of plus or minus 1 nm in the rms statistic itself. The first mirror tested was a concave spherical silicon foam-core mirror, with a clear aperture of 120 mm. The optic surface was measured at room temperature using standard absolute techniques; and then the change in surface figure error from room temperature to 80 K was measured. The mirror was cooled within a cryostat. and its surface figure error measured through a fused-silica window. The facility and techniques will be used to measure the surface figure error at 20K of prototype lightweight silicon carbide and Cesic mirrors developed by Galileo Avionica (Italy) for the European Space Agency (ESA).

  12. Translation of Land Surface Model Accuracy and Uncertainty into Coupled Land-Atmosphere Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A.; Kumar, Sujay; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Zhou, Shuija

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) Interactions playa critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface heat and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry (2006) and wet (2007) land surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through the use of a new optimization and uncertainty estimation module in NASA's Land Information System (US-OPT/UE), whereby parameter sets are calibrated in the Noah land surface model and classified according to a land cover and soil type mapping of the observation sites to the full model domain. The impact of calibrated parameters on the a) spinup of the land surface used as initial conditions, and b) heat and moisture states and fluxes of the coupled WRF Simulations are then assessed in terms of ambient weather and land-atmosphere coupling along with measures of uncertainty propagation into the forecasts. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, average) is investigated. Finally, tradeoffs of computational tractability and scientific validity, and the potential for combining this approach with satellite remote sensing data are also discussed.

  13. Advanced cleaning by mass finishing

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.W.

    1983-10-01

    This paper describes a testing program that examined the effectiveness of vibratory finishing for removing a variety of radioactively contaminated soils. The vibratory finishing process was studied by measuring the radiation levels of the test material, the lining of the vibratory finishing tub, and the media. Many soils including corrosion products, scale, oil, grease and paint were removed by the vibratory finishing process. The results of this program indicate that vibratory finishing should be an effective cleaning process for a variety of manufacturing operations.

  14. Assessing the accuracy of contact angle measurements for sessile drops on liquid-repellent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-11-15

    Gravity-induced sagging can amplify variations in goniometric measurements of the contact angles of sessile drops on super-liquid-repellent surfaces. The very large value of the effective contact angle leads to increased optical noise in the drop profile near the solid-liquid free surface and the progressive failure of simple geometric approximations. We demonstrate a systematic approach to determining the effective contact angle of drops on super-repellent surfaces. We use a perturbation solution of the Bashforth-Adams equation to estimate the contact angles of sessile drops of water, ethylene glycol, and diiodomethane on an omniphobic surface using direct measurements of the maximum drop width and height. The results and analysis can be represented in terms of a dimensionless Bond number that depends on the maximum drop width and the capillary length of the liquid to quantify the extent of gravity-induced sagging. Finally, we illustrate the inherent sensitivity of goniometric contact angle measurement techniques to drop dimensions as the apparent contact angle approaches 180°. PMID:21923173

  15. Integration of magnetorheological finishing (MRF) technology for ultraprecision optical manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Ashley M. H.; Chan, Norman S. W.; Louie, Derek C. H.; Li, Li-Man

    2003-05-01

    Magneto-rheological-finishing (MRF) technology is capable of substantially improving the surface figure of spherical lens to about 1/20 wavelength. Nonetheless, since MRF technology is an ultra-fine polishing process, in which only less than a few microns of material will be removed per cycle, time for making an aspheric surface from a best-fit sphere can be very significant. The situation can be worse if the surface profile is considerably deviated from its best-fit spherical surface. This is not desirable for actual production, and thus a manufacturing cell is proposed to enhance the efficiency of the high precision lens manufacturing process. On the other hand, MRF was suggested to be an alternative for lapping of surface of ceramic lens mould insert. Rather than using the abrasive particles in typical lapping process, the magnetized slurry in MRF is moved past the rotating surface of mould insert locally under the computer-control process so as to achieve the desired surface form accuracy.

  16. Maintaining the Accuracy of a Sea Surface Height Climate Data Record from Multi-mission Altimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Yang, X.; Mitchum, G. T.; Ricko, M.; Desai, S.; Brown, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The determination of the rate of change of mean sea level (MSL) has undeniable societal significance. The measurement of geocentric sea level change from satellite altimetry requires an extreme stability of the altimeter measurement system since the signal being measured is at the level of a few mm/yr. Many of the obstacles previously impeding the measurement and validation of estimates of GMSL from satellite altimetry have been overcome (Fu and Haines, 2012). Nonetheless, measuring sea level rates at the precision required for climate science continues to be challenging for at least two reasons: (1) the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) realizations are determined using space geodetic data over finite time spans, and must be periodically updated; (2) the dynamic nature of the Earth engenders global and regional variations in the geopotential which if not properly modeled ultimately cause errors in the computed sea level. Recent developments in Precise Orbit Determinations (POD) due to in particular to revisions to the terrestrial reference frame (i.e. updates to ITRF2008, and the expected availability of ITRF2013) and the development of improved time variable gravity (TVG) models continue to provide improvements to the accuracy and stability of the POD that directly affect mean sea level estimates. Long-term and reliable MSL estimates that rely on data from multiple altimeter missions require the highest possible orbit accuracy and consistency in the use of applied geophysical models in POD computations. The stringent GMSL accuracy requirements are particularly essential for closure of the mass budget over the relative short time period where measurements from Jason-1&2, GRACE, and Argo are coincident. In this presentation we describe the development, utility, and the accuracy maintenance of the MEaSURE's TPJAOS V3.0 sea surface height Climate Data Record (http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/dataset/MERGED_TP_J1_OSTM_OST_ALL). We provide an assessment of recent

  17. Assessing the accuracy and repeatability of automated photogrammetrically generated digital surface models from unmanned aerial system imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavis, Christopher

    Using commercial digital cameras in conjunction with Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to generate 3-D Digital Surface Models (DSMs) and orthomosaics is emerging as a cost-effective alternative to Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR). Powerful software applications such as Pix4D and APS can automate the generation of DSM and orthomosaic products from a handful of inputs. However, the accuracy of these models is relatively untested. The objectives of this study were to generate multiple DSM and orthomosaic pairs of the same area using Pix4D and APS from flights of imagery collected with a lightweight UAS. The accuracy of each individual DSM was assessed in addition to the consistency of the method to model one location over a period of time. Finally, this study determined if the DSMs automatically generated using lightweight UAS and commercial digital cameras could be used for detecting changes in elevation and at what scale. Accuracy was determined by comparing DSMs to a series of reference points collected with survey grade GPS. Other GPS points were also used as control points to georeference the products within Pix4D and APS. The effectiveness of the products for change detection was assessed through image differencing and observance of artificially induced, known elevation changes. The vertical accuracy with the optimal data and model is ≈ 25 cm and the highest consistency over repeat flights is a standard deviation of ≈ 5 cm. Elevation change detection based on such UAS imagery and DSM models should be viable for detecting infrastructure change in urban or suburban environments with little dense canopy vegetation.

  18. Improving the Accuracy of Satellite Sea Surface Temperature Measurements by Explicitly Accounting for the Bulk-Skin Temperature Difference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Sandra L.; Emery, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this research was to determine whether the accuracy of satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) could be improved by explicitly accounting for the complex temperature gradients at the surface of the ocean associated with the cool skin and diurnal warm layers. To achieve this goal, work centered on the development and deployment of low-cost infrared radiometers to enable the direct validation of satellite measurements of skin temperature. During this one year grant, design and construction of an improved infrared radiometer was completed and testing was initiated. In addition, development of an improved parametric model for the bulk-skin temperature difference was completed using data from the previous version of the radiometer. This model will comprise a key component of an improved procedure for estimating the bulk SST from satellites. The results comprised a significant portion of the Ph.D. thesis completed by one graduate student and they are currently being converted into a journal publication.

  19. The effect of inhomogeneities on the distance to the last scattering surface and the accuracy of the CMB analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bolejko, Krzysztof

    2011-02-01

    The standard analysis of the CMB data assumes that the distance to the last scattering surface can be calculated using the distance-redshift relation as in the Friedmann model. However, in the inhomogeneous universe, even if (δρ) = 0, the distance relation is not the same as in the unperturbed universe. This can be of serious consequences as a change of distance affects the mapping of CMB temperature fluctuations into the angular power spectrum C{sub l}. In addition, if the change of distance is relatively uniform no new temperature fluctuations are generated. It is therefore a different effect than the lensing or ISW effects which introduce additional CMB anisotropies. This paper shows that the accuracy of the CMB analysis can be impaired by the accuracy of calculation of the distance within the cosmological models. Since this effect has not been fully explored before, to test how the inhomogeneities affect the distance-redshift relation, several methods are examined: the Dyer-Roeder relation, lensing approximation, and non-linear Swiss-Cheese model. In all cases, the distance to the last scattering surface is different than when homogeneity is assumed. The difference can be as low as 1% and as high as 80%. An usual change of the distance is around 20–30%. Since the distance to the last scattering surface is set by the position of the CMB peaks, in order to have a good fit, the distance needs to be adjusted. After correcting the distance, the cosmological parameters change. Therefore, a not properly estimated distance to the last scattering surface can be a major source of systematics. This paper shows that if inhomogeneities are taken into account when calculating the distance then models with positive spatial curvature and with Ω{sub Λ} ∼ 0.8−0.9 are preferred.

  20. Clinical Evaluation of a Laser Surface Scanning System in 120 Patients for Improving Daily Setup Accuracy in Fractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Torsten; Habl, Gregor; Uhl, Matthias; Schubert, Kai; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Debus, Jürgen; Herfarth, Klaus; Karger, Christian P.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical suitability of a specific optical surface imaging system to detect setup errors in fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The setup correction accuracy of a 3-dimensional laser imaging system was analyzed for 6 different tumor locations with 20 patients each. For each patient, the setup corrections of the megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) images of a TomoTherapy unit (TomoTherapy, Madison, WI) were compared with those of the laser system for the first 10 fractions. For the laser system, the reference surface either was obtained from the DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) surface structure delineated on the planning computed tomography images or was acquired with the system itself at the first fraction after the MVCT-based setup correction. Data analysis was performed for both reference types. Results: By use of the DICOM reference image, systematic shifts between 3 and 9 mm were found, depending on the tumor location. For the optical reference, no clinically relevant systematic shifts were found. MVCT-based setup corrections were detected with high accuracy, and only small movements were observed during treatment. Conclusions: Using a reference image acquired with the laser system itself after MVCT-based setup correction appears more reliable than importing the DICOM reference surface. After generation of the optical reference, the laser system may be used to derive setup corrections over a certain number of fractions, but additional radiologic imaging may still be necessary on a regular basis (eg, weekly) or if the corrections of the optical system appear implausibly large. Nevertheless, such a combined application may help to reduce the imaging dose for the patient.

  1. Glucose sensing using near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: gold surfaces, 10-day stability, and improved accuracy.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Douglas A; Yonzon, Chanda Ranjit; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lyandres, Olga; Shah, Nilam C; Glucksberg, Matthew R; Walsh, Joseph T; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2005-07-01

    This research presents the achievement of significant milestones toward the development of a minimally invasive, continuously monitoring, glucose-sensing platform based on the optical quantitation of glucose in interstitial fluid. We expand our initial successes in the measurement of glucose by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), demonstrating substantial improvements not only in the quality and optical properties of the substrate system itself but also in the robustness of the measurement methodology and the amenability of the technique to compact, diode laser-based instrumentation. Herein, we compare the long-term stability of gold to silver film over nanosphere (AuFON, AgFON) substrates functionalized with a partitioning self-assembled monolayer (SAM) using both electrochemical and SERS measurements. AuFONs were found to be stable for a period of at least 11 days. The switch to AuFONs not only provides a more stable surface for SAM formation but also yields better chemometric results, with improved calibration and validation over a range of 0.5-44 mM (10-800 mg/dL). Measured values for glucose concentrations in phosphate-buffered saline (pH approximately 7.4) based on 160 independent SERS measurements on AuFONs have a root-mean-square error of prediction of 2.7 mM (49.5 mg/dL), with 91% of the values falling within an extended A-B range on an expanded Clarke error grid. Furthermore, AuFONs exhibit surface plasmon resonances at longer wavelengths than similar AgFONs, which make them more efficient for SERS at near-infrared wavelengths, enabling the use of low-power diode lasers in future devices.

  2. Acidic magnetorheological finishing of infrared polycrystalline materials

    DOE PAGES

    Salzman, S.; Romanofsky, H. J.; West, G.; Marshall, K. L.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2016-10-12

    Here, chemical-vapor–deposited (CVD) ZnS is an example of a polycrystalline material that is difficult to polish smoothly via the magnetorheological–finishing (MRF) technique. When MRF-polished, the internal infrastructure of the material tends to manifest on the surface as millimeter-sized “pebbles,” and the surface roughness observed is considerably high. The fluid’s parameters important to developing a magnetorheological (MR) fluid that is capable of polishing CVD ZnS smoothly were previously discussed and presented. These parameters were acidic pH (~4.5) and low viscosity (~47 cP). MRF with such a unique MR fluid was shown to reduce surface artifacts in the form of pebbles; however,more » surface microroughness was still relatively high because of the absence of a polishing abrasive in the formulation. In this study, we examine the effect of two polishing abrasives—alumina and nanodiamond—on the surface finish of several CVD ZnS substrates, and on other important IR polycrystalline materials that were finished with acidic MR fluids containing these two polishing abrasives. Surface microroughness results obtained were as low as ~28 nm peak-to-valley and ~6-nm root mean square.« less

  3. The effect of sub-surface volume scattering on the accuracy of ice-sheet altimeter retracking algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA and ESA retracking algorithms are compared with an algorithm based upon a combined surface and volume (S/V) scattering model. First, the S/V, NASA, and ESA algorithms were used to retrack over 400,000 altimeter return waveforms from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. The surface elevations from the S/V algorithm were compared with the elevations produced by the NASA and ESA algorithms to determine the relative accuracy of these algorithms when subsurface volume-scattering occurs. The results show that the NASA algorithm produced surface elevations within 35 to 50 cm of the S/V algorithm, while the performance of the ESA algorithm was slightly worse. Next, by analyzing several thousand satellite crossover points from the Antarctic data set, we determined the retracking algorithm that produced the most repeatable surface elevations. The elevations derived from the S/V algorithm had the smallest RMS error for the region of the East Antarctic plateau examined here. The ESA algorithm produced erroneous estimates of elevation change when seasonal variations were present; it measured 0.7 to 1.6-m change in elevation over a 6-month period on the East Antarctic plateau where accumulation rates are only 10 cm/year.

  4. Advanced cleaning by mass finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, M. W.

    1983-10-01

    The effectiveness of vibratory finishing for removing a variety of radioactively contaminated soils was investigated by measuring the radiation levels of the test material, the lining of the vibratory finishing tub, and the media. Many soils including corrosion products, scale, oil, grease and paint were removed from steels, aluminum, polyvinyl chloride, plexiglass, glass and flexible materials such as rubber. Zinc, copper, and lead were not cleaned. Results indicate that vibratory finishing should be an effective cleaning process or a variety of manufacturing operations.

  5. Effects of Inner Surface Roughness and Asymmetric Pipe Flow on Accuracy of Profile Factor for Ultrasonic Flow Meter

    SciTech Connect

    Michitsugu Mori; Kenichi Tezuka; Yasushi Takeda

    2006-07-01

    Flow profile factors (PFs), which adjust measurements to real flow rates, also strongly depend on flow profiles. To determine profile factors for actual power plants, manufactures of flowmeters usually conduct factory calibration tests under ambient flow conditions. Indeed, flow measurements with high accuracy for reactor feedwater require them to conduct calibration tests under real conditions, such as liquid conditions and piping layouts. On the contrary, as nuclear power plants are highly aging, readings of flowmeters for reactor feedwater systems drift due to the changes of flow profiles. The causes of those deviations are affected by the change of wall roughness of inner surface of pipings. We have conducted experiments to quantify the effects of flow patterns on the PFs due to pipe roughness and asymmetric flow, and the results of our experiments have shown the effects of elbows and pipe inner roughness, which strongly affect to the creation of the flow patterns. Those changes of flow patterns lead to large errors in measurements with transit time (time-of-flight: TOF) ultrasonic flow meters. In those experiments, changes of pipe roughness result in the changes of PFs with certain errors. Therefore, we must take into account those effects in order to measure the flow rates of feedwater with better accuracy in actual power plants. (authors)

  6. Influence of Amplitude Cancellation on the Accuracy of Determining the Onset of Muscle Activity from the Surface Electromyogram

    PubMed Central

    Jesunathadas, Mark; Aidoor, Sameer S.; Keenan, Kevin G.; Farina, Dario; Enoka, Roger M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify the influence of amplitude cancellation on the accuracy of detecting the onset of muscle activity based on an analysis of simulated surface electromyographic (EMG) signals. EMG activity of a generic lower limb muscle was simulated during the stance phase of human gait. Surface EMG signals were generated with and without amplitude cancellation by summing simulated motor unit potentials either before (cancellation EMG) or after (no-cancellation EMG) the potentials had been rectified. The two sets of EMG signals were compared at forces of 30 and 80% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and with various low-pass filter cut-off frequencies. Onset time was determined both visually and by an algorithm that identified when the mean amplitude of the signal within a sliding window exceeded a specified standard deviation (SD) above the baseline mean. Onset error was greater for the no-cancellation conditions when determined automatically and by visual inspection. However, the differences in onset error between the two cancellation conditions appear to be clinically insignificant. Therefore, amplitude cancellation does not appear to limit the ability to detect the onset of muscle activity from the surface EMG. PMID:22330887

  7. Dynamic sea surface topography, gravity and improved orbit accuracies from the direct evaluation of SEASAT altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Lerch, F.; Koblinsky, C. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Robbins, J. W.; Williamson, R. G.; Patel, G. B.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous solution of dynamic ocean topography, gravity and orbits using satellite altimeter data is described. A GEM-T1 based gravitational model called PGS-3337 that incorporates Seasat altimetry, surface gravimetry and satellite tracking data has been determined complete to degree and order 50. The altimeter data is utilized as a dynamic observation of the satellite's height above the sea surface with a degree 10 model of dynamic topography being recovered simultaneously with the orbit parameters, gravity and tidal terms in this model. PGS-3337 has a geoid uncertainty of 60 cm root-mean-square (RMS) globally, with the uncertainty over the altimeter tracked ocean being in the 25 cm range. Doppler determined orbits for Seasat, show large improvements, with the sub-30 cm radial accuracies being achieved. When altimeter data is used in orbit determination, radial orbital accuracies of 20 cm are achieved. The RMS of fit to the altimeter data directly gives 30 cm fits for Seasat when using PGS-3337 and its geoid and dynamic topography model. This performance level is two to three times better than that achieved with earlier Goddard earth models (GEM) using the dynamic topography from long-term oceanographic averages. The recovered dynamic topography reveals the global long wavelength circulation of the oceans with a resolution of 1500 km. The power in the dynamic topography recovery is now found to be closer to that of oceanographic studies than for previous satellite solutions. This is attributed primarily to the improved modeling of the geoid which has occurred. Study of the altimeter residuals reveals regions where tidal models are poor and sea state effects are major limitations.

  8. Vibratory finishing as a decontamination process

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.W.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; Allen, R.P.

    1980-10-01

    The major objective of this research is to develop vibratory finishing into a large-scale decontamination technique that can economicaly remove transuranic and other surface contamination from large volumes of waste produced by the operation and decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities. The successful development and widespread application of this decontamination technique would substantially reduce the volume of waste requiring expensive geologic disposal. Other benefits include exposure reduction for decontamination personnel and reduced risk of environmental contamination. Laboratory-scale studies showed that vibratory finishing can rapidly reduce the contamination level of transuranic-contaminated stainless steel and Plexiglas to well below the 10-nCi/g limit. The capability of vibratory finishing as a decontamination process was demonstrated on a large scale. The first decontamination demonstration was conducted at the Hanford N-Reactor, where a vibratory finisher was installed to reduce personnel exposure during the summer outage. Items decontaminated included fuel spacers, process-tube end caps, process-tube inserts, pump parts, ball-channel inspection tools and miscellaneous hand tools. A second demonstration is currently being conducted in the decontamination facility at the Hanford 231-Z Building. During this demonstration, transuranic-contaminated material from decommissioned plutonium facilities is being decontaminated to <10 nCi/g to minimize the volume of material that will require geologic disposal. Items that are being decontaminated include entire glove boxes, process-hood structural material and panels, process tanks, process-tank shields, pumps, valves and hand tools used during the decommissioning work.

  9. Assessing the Accuracy of Sentinel-3 SLSTR Sea-Surface Temperature Retrievals Using High Accuracy Infrared Radiiometers on Ships of Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, P. J.; Izaguirre, M. A.; Szcszodrak, M.; Williams, E.; Reynolds, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The assessment of errors and uncertainties in satellite-derived SSTs can be achieved by comparisons with independent measurements of skin SST of high accuracy. Such validation measurements are provided by well-calibrated infrared radiometers mounted on ships. The second generation of Marine-Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometers (M-AERIs) have recently been developed and two are now deployed on cruise ships of Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines that operate in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea. In addition, two Infrared SST Autonomous Radiometers (ISARs) are mounted alternately on a vehicle transporter of NYK Lines that crosses the Pacific Ocean between Japan and the USA. Both M-AERIs and ISARs are self-calibrating radiometers having two internal blackbody cavities to provide at-sea calibration of the measured radiances, and the accuracy of the internal calibration is periodically determined by measurements of a NIST-traceable blackbody cavity in the laboratory. This provides SI-traceability for the at-sea measurements. It is anticipated that these sensors will be deployed during the next several years and will be available for the validation of the SLSTRs on Sentinel-3a and -3b.

  10. Accuracy of surface registration compared to conventional volumetric registration in patient positioning for head-and-neck radiotherapy: A simulation study using patient data

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngjun; Li, Ruijiang; Na, Yong Hum; Xing, Lei; Lee, Rena

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: 3D optical surface imaging has been applied to patient positioning in radiation therapy (RT). The optical patient positioning system is advantageous over conventional method using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in that it is radiation free, frameless, and is capable of real-time monitoring. While the conventional radiographic method uses volumetric registration, the optical system uses surface matching for patient alignment. The relative accuracy of these two methods has not yet been sufficiently investigated. This study aims to investigate the theoretical accuracy of the surface registration based on a simulation study using patient data. Methods: This study compares the relative accuracy of surface and volumetric registration in head-and-neck RT. The authors examined 26 patient data sets, each consisting of planning CT data acquired before treatment and patient setup CBCT data acquired at the time of treatment. As input data of surface registration, patient’s skin surfaces were created by contouring patient skin from planning CT and treatment CBCT. Surface registration was performed using the iterative closest points algorithm by point–plane closest, which minimizes the normal distance between source points and target surfaces. Six degrees of freedom (three translations and three rotations) were used in both surface and volumetric registrations and the results were compared. The accuracy of each method was estimated by digital phantom tests. Results: Based on the results of 26 patients, the authors found that the average and maximum root-mean-square translation deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations were 2.7 and 5.2 mm, respectively. The residual error of the surface registration was calculated to have an average of 0.9 mm and a maximum of 1.7 mm. Conclusions: Surface registration may lead to results different from those of the conventional volumetric registration. Only limited accuracy can be achieved for patient

  11. The effects of the accuracy of the atmospheric forcings on the prediction of the sea surface transport in coastal areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucco, Andrea; Quattrocchi, Giovanni; Satta, Andrea; Antognarelli, Fabio; della Valle, Antonio; De Biasio, Francesco; Cadau, Enrico; Zecchetto, Stefano; Umgiesser, Georg

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the Italian flagship project RITMARE (http://www.ritmare.it/en/) an Operational Oceanography Systems (OOS hereafter) based on high resolution 3D hydrodynamic model has been developed for the Oristano Gulf (Sardinia, Italy), with the aim of making short term predictions of water currents and pollutant transport. Atmospheric data provided by the SKIRON meteorological model system (http://forecast.uoa.gr/) were used to make the predictions. In order to asses the quality of the wind field adopted to force the hydrodynamic model, a coastal wind measuring system (WMS hereafter) was developed. The WMS is composed by five three-components anemometers located along the Gulf coasts, which provide hourly and operationally wind measurements. These data are then used operationally to derive high resolution wind fields over the entire Gulf and surrounding coastal areas. The modelled wind data have been compared with the measured ones and the meteorological model accuracy estimated. A set of lagrangian buoys were deployed within the Gulf to measure the sea surface transport due to the main local wind regimes. The OOS were used to reproduce the paths followed by each lagrangian buoy using as forcing conditions both the wind fields measured by the local WMS and the predicted ones. Therefore the effects of the atmospheric forcing quality on predicting the surface hydrodynamics at coastal scale were determined.

  12. Improving accuracy in coronary lumen segmentation via explicit calcium exclusion, learning-based ray detection and surface optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugauer, Felix; Zhang, Jingdan; Zheng, Yefeng; Hornegger, Joachim; Kelm, B. Michael

    2014-03-01

    Invasive cardiac angiography (catheterization) is still the standard in clinical practice for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD) but it involves a high amount of risk and cost. New generations of CT scanners can acquire high-quality images of coronary arteries which allow for an accurate identification and delineation of stenoses. Recently, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has been applied to coronary blood flow using geometric lumen models extracted from CT angiography (CTA). The computed pressure drop at stenoses proved to be indicative for ischemia-causing lesions, leading to non-invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) derived from CTA. Since the diagnostic value of non-invasive procedures for diagnosing CAD relies on an accurate extraction of the lumen, a precise segmentation of the coronary arteries is crucial. As manual segmentation is tedious, time-consuming and subjective, automatic procedures are desirable. We present a novel fully-automatic method to accurately segment the lumen of coronary arteries in the presence of calcified and non-calcified plaque. Our segmentation framework is based on three main steps: boundary detection, calcium exclusion and surface optimization. A learning-based boundary detector enables a robust lumen contour detection via dense ray-casting. The exclusion of calcified plaque is assured through a novel calcium exclusion technique which allows us to accurately capture stenoses of diseased arteries. The boundary detection results are incorporated into a closed set formulation whose minimization yields an optimized lumen surface. On standardized tests with clinical data, a segmentation accuracy is achieved which is comparable to clinical experts and superior to current automatic methods.

  13. The Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) Crystal with Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Fang; Xu, Min; Wang, Chao; Li, Xiaoyuan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Yunfei; Wang, Baorui; Tang, Guangping; Yue, Xiaobin

    2016-02-01

    The cubic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with sharp horns that display the size distribution between 100 and 200 nm are utilized to substitute the magnetic sensitive medium (carbonyl iron powders, CIPs) and abrasives (CeO2/diamond) simultaneously which are widely employed in conventional magnetorheological finishing fluid. The removal rate of this novel fluid is extremely low compared with the value of conventional one even though the spot of the former is much bigger. This surprising phenomenon is generated due to the small size and low saturation magnetization ( M s) of Fe3O4 and corresponding weak shear stress under external magnetic field according to material removal rate model of magnetorheological finishing (MRF). Different from conventional D-shaped finishing spot, the low M s also results in a shuttle-like spot because the magnetic controllability is weak and particles in the fringe of spot are loose. The surface texture as well as figure accuracy and PSD1 (power spectrum density) of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) is greatly improved after MRF, which clearly prove the feasibility of substituting CIP and abrasive with Fe3O4 in our novel MRF design.

  14. The Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) Crystal with Fe3O4 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fang; Xu, Min; Wang, Chao; Li, Xiaoyuan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Yunfei; Wang, Baorui; Tang, Guangping; Yue, Xiaobin

    2016-12-01

    The cubic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with sharp horns that display the size distribution between 100 and 200 nm are utilized to substitute the magnetic sensitive medium (carbonyl iron powders, CIPs) and abrasives (CeO2/diamond) simultaneously which are widely employed in conventional magnetorheological finishing fluid. The removal rate of this novel fluid is extremely low compared with the value of conventional one even though the spot of the former is much bigger. This surprising phenomenon is generated due to the small size and low saturation magnetization (M s) of Fe3O4 and corresponding weak shear stress under external magnetic field according to material removal rate model of magnetorheological finishing (MRF). Different from conventional D-shaped finishing spot, the low M s also results in a shuttle-like spot because the magnetic controllability is weak and particles in the fringe of spot are loose. The surface texture as well as figure accuracy and PSD1 (power spectrum density) of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) is greatly improved after MRF, which clearly prove the feasibility of substituting CIP and abrasive with Fe3O4 in our novel MRF design. PMID:26858161

  15. An assessment of the near-surface accuracy of the international geomagnetic reference field 1980 model of the main geomagnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Zunde, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The new International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model of the main geomagnetic field for 1980 is based heavily on measurements from the MAGSAT satellite survey. Assessment of the accuracy of the new model, as a description of the main field near the Earth's surface, is important because the accuracy of models derived from satellite data can be adversely affected by the magnetic field of electric currents in the ionosphere and the auroral zones. Until now, statements about its accuracy have been based on the 6 published assessments of the 2 proposed models from which it was derived. However, those assessments were either regional in scope or were based mainly on preliminary or extrapolated data. Here we assess the near-surface accuracy of the new model by comparing it with values for 1980 derived from annual means from 69 magnetic observatories, and by comparing it with WC80, a model derived from near-surface data. The comparison with observatory-derived data shows that the new model describes the field at the 69 observatories about as accurately as would a model derived solely from near-surface data. The comparison with WC80 shows that the 2 models agree closely in their description of D and I near the surface. These comparisons support the proposition that the new IGRF 1980 main-field model is a generally accurate description of the main field near the Earth's surface in 1980. ?? 1985.

  16. NICE3 Textile Finishing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    This new energy-saving approach to fabric finishing can help our domestic textile industry compete in an increasingly competitive global market. Learn how this new technology can lower your maintenance costs and increase your productivity.

  17. The Accuracy of Conformation of a Generic Surface Mesh for the Analysis of Facial Soft Tissue Changes

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Man Yan; Almukhtar, Anas; Keeling, Andrew; Hsung, Tai-Chiu; Ju, Xiangyang; McDonald, James; Ayoub, Ashraf; Khambay, Balvinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Three dimensional analysis of the face is required for the assessment of complex changes following surgery, pathological conditions and to monitor facial growth. The most suitable method may be “dense surface correspondence”. Materials and Methods This method utilizes a generic facial mesh and “conformation process” to establish anatomical correspondences between two facial images. The aim of this study was to validate the use of conformed meshes to measure simulated maxillary and mandibular surgical movements. The “simulation” was performed by deforming the actual soft tissues of the participant during image acquisition. The study was conducted on 20 volunteers and used 77 facial landmarks pre-marked over six anatomical regions; left cheek, right cheek, left upper lip, philtrum, right upper lip and chin region. Each volunteer was imaged at rest and after performing 5 different simulated surgical procedures using 3D stereophotogrammetry. The simulated surgical movement was determined by measuring the Euclidean distances and the mean absolute x, y and z distances of the landmarks making up the six regions following digitization. A generic mesh was then conformed to each of the aligned six facial 3D images. The same six regions were selected on the aligned conformed simulated meshes and the surgical movement determined by determining the Euclidean distances and the mean absolute x, y and z distances of the mesh points making up the six regions were determined. Results In all cases the mean Euclidian distance between the simulated movement and conformed region was less than 0.7mm. For the x, y and z directions the majority of differences in the mean absolute distances were less than 1.0mm except in the x-direction for the left and right cheek regions, which was above 2.0mm. Conclusions This concludes that the conformation process has an acceptable level of accuracy and is a valid method of measuring facial change between two images i.e. pre- and

  18. Subaperture approaches to finishing and testing astronomical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Gregory W.; Tricard, Marc

    2004-07-01

    We describe the application of both stitching interferometry and magneto-rheological finishing (MRF) to the surface metrology and final figure correction of large optics. These particular subaperture technologies help to address the need for flexible systems that improve both overall manufacturing time and cost effectiveness. MRF can achieve high volumetric removal rates with a small-footprint tool that is perfectly conformable and highly stable. This tool is therefore well suited to finishing large optics (including aspheres) and correcting mid-spatial frequency errors. The system does not need vacuum, reduces microroughness to below one nm rms on most materials, and is able to meet the figure tolerance specs for astronomical optics. Such a technology is ideally complemented by a system for the stitching of interferometric subaperture data. Stitching inherently enables the testing of larger apertures with higher resolution and, thanks to the inbuilt calibration, even to higher accuracy in many situations. Moreover, given the low-order character of the dominant residual uncertainties in the stitched full-aperture data, such an approach is well suited to adaptive mirrors because the actuators correct precisely these deformations. While this approach enables the non-null testing of parts with greater aspheric departure and can lead to a significantly reduced non-common air path in the testing of long-radius concave parts, it is especially effective for convex optics. That is, stitching is particularly well suited to the testing of secondary mirrors and, alongside the testing of the off-axis primary segments, these are clearly critical challenges for extremely large telescope (ELT) projects.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of the Efficiency of Four Ceramic Finishing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, Prasad; Razak, P Abdul; Francis, P G; Issac, Johnson K; Shanoj, R P; Sasikumar, T P

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effect of four different finishing systems and diamond paste on ceramic roughness with the objectives of evaluating the roughness of ceramic surface of prepared specimens after abrasion, finishing and polishing. Materials & Methods: A total of 50 test specimens were fabricated in the form of discs of diameter 13mm and 0.6mm thickness. Test specimens were then randomly distributed into five groups of 10 and coded. All the test specimens were then abraded with 125μm diamond in unidirectional motion to create surface roughness that will simulate occlusal or incisal correction. The values were recorded and the specimens were then finished using the various finishing systems. multiple range tests by Duncan's procedure. One way Anova was used to calculate the p-value Results:After fini shing, the Ra,Rq,Rz and Rt values showed a tendency to decline to levels much inferior to the values obtained after the preparation of the specimens. Ra values of group III specimens were slightly higher and the increase was significant. The highest Rt value [5.29] obtained after polishing is below the lowest roughness values [7.42] obtained after finishing the specimens. Conclusions: Finishing and polishing procedures have a significant role in reducing the roughness of ceramics.Following abrasion with diamond point to simulate clinical adjustment the roughness values doubled when compared to the initial reading.Ra, Rq,Rz and Rt values suggest that Sof lex is the most efficient of all the systems tested followed by auto glazing.After the final diamond paste polishing, sof lex group specimens showed the best finish and auto glazed specimens showed a value almost as equal to the so flex group. How to cite this article: Aravind P, Razak PA, Francis PG, Issac JK, Shanoj RP, Sasikumar TP. Comparative Evaluation of the Efficiency of Four Ceramics Finishing Systems. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):59-64. PMID:24324306

  20. Cost-benefits of a mobile, trailer-contained, vibratory finishing decontamination facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, R.F.; McCoy, M.W.

    1982-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the cost-benefits of a vibratory finishing process, developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which has been used successfully to remove a variety of transuranic (TRU) contaminants from surfaces of metallic and nonmetallic wastes. Once TRU contaminants are removed, the metallic and nonmetallic materials can be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW). Otherwise, these materials would be disposed of in geologic repositories. This study provides an economic evaluation of the vibratory finishing process as a possible method for use in decontaminating and decommissioning retired facilities at Hanford and oher sites. Specifically, the economic evaluation focuses on a scoping design for a mobile, trailer-contained facility, which could be used in the field in conjunction with decontamination and decommissioning operations. The capital cost of the mobile facility is estimated to be about $1.09 million including contingency and working capital. Annual operating costs, including disposal costs, are estimated to be $440,000 for processing about 6340 ft/sup 3//yr of pre-sectioned, TRU-contaminated material. Combining the operating cost and the capital cost, annualized at a discount rate of 10%, the total annual cost estimate is $602,000. The unit cost for vibratory finishing is estimated to be about $11/ft/sup 3/ of original reference glove box volume (Abrams et at. 1980). All costs are in first quarter 1981 dollars. Although not directly comparable, the unit cost for the vibratory finishing process is very favorable when considered beside typical, substantially higher, unit costs for processing and geologically disposing of TUR-contaminated materials. The probable accuracy of this study cost estimate is about +- 30%. It is therefore recommended that a detailed cost estimate be prepared if a mobile facility is designed.

  1. Potential of EnMAP spaceborne imaging spectroscopy for the prediction of common surface soil properties and expected accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrillat, Sabine; Foerster, Saskia; Steinberg, Andreas; Stevens, Antoine; Segl, Karl

    2016-04-01

    There is a renewed awareness of the finite nature of the world's soil resources, growing concern about soil security, and significant uncertainties about the carrying capacity of the planet. As a consequence, soil scientists are being challenged to provide regular assessments of soil conditions from local through to global scales. However, only a few countries have the necessary survey and monitoring programs to meet these new needs and existing global data sets are out-of-date. A particular issue is the clear demand for a new area-wide regional to global coverage with accurate, up-to-date, and spatially referenced soil information as expressed by the modeling scientific community, farmers and land users, and policy and decision makers. Soil spectroscopy from remote sensing observations based on studies from the laboratory scale to the airborne scale has been shown to be a proven method for the quantitative prediction of key soil surface properties in local areas for exposed soils in appropriate surface conditions such as low vegetation cover and low water content. With the upcoming launch of the next generation of hyperspectral satellite sensors in the next 3 to 5 years (EnMAP, HISUI, PRISMA, SHALOM), a great potential for the global mapping and monitoring of soil properties is appearing. Nevertheless, the capabilities to extend the soil properties current spectral modeling from local to regional scales are still to be demonstrated using robust methods. In particular, three central questions are at the forefront of research nowadays: a) methodological developments toward improved algorithms and operational tools for the extraction of soil properties, b) up scaling from the laboratory into space domain, and c) demonstration of the potential of upcoming satellite systems and expected accuracy of soil maps. In this study, airborne imaging spectroscopy data from several test sites are used to simulate EnMAP satellite images at 30 m scale. Then, different soil

  2. Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z. ); Church, E.L. . Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

    1989-08-01

    Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of radiotherapy setup accuracy for head and neck cancer using a 3-D surface imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H.-L.; Park, E.-T.; Kim, J.-Y.; Kwak, K.-S.; Kim, C.-J.; Ahn, K.-J.; Suh, T.-S.; Lee, Y.-K.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, J.-K.; Lim, S.; Choi, Y.-M.; Park, S.-K.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the accuracy of a three-dimensional surface imaging system (3-D SIS) in comparison to a 3-laser system by analyzing the setup errors obtained from a RANDO Phantom and head and neck cancer patients. The 3-D SIS used for the evaluation of the setup errors was a C-RAD Sentinel. In the phantom study, the OBI setup errors without the thermoplastic mask of the 3-laser system vs. the 3-D SIS were measured. Furthermore, the setup errors with the thermoplastic mask of the 3-laser system vs. the 3-D SIS were measured. After comparison of the CBCT, setup correction about 1 mm was performed in a few cases. The probability of the error without the thermoplastic mask exceeding 1 mm in the 3-laser system vs. the 3-D SIS was 75.00% vs. 35.00% on the X-axis, 80.00% vs. 40.00% on the Y-axis, and 80.00% vs. 65.00% on the Z-axis. Moreover, the probability of the error with the thermoplastic mask exceeding 1 mm in the 3-laser system vs. the 3-D SIS was 70.00% vs. 15.00% on the X-axis, 75.00% vs. 25.00% on the Y-axis, and 70.00% vs. 35.00% on the Z-axis. These results showed that the 3-D SIS has a lower probability of setup error than the 3-laser system for the phantom. For the patients, the setup errors of the 3-laser system vs. the 3-D SIS were measured. The probability of the error exceeding more than 1 mm in the 3-laser system vs. the 3-D SIS was shown to be 81.82% vs. 36.36% on the X-axis, 81.82% vs. 45.45% on the Y-axis, and 86.36% vs. 72.73% on the Z-axis. As a result, the 3-D SIS also exhibited a lower probability of setup error for the cancer patients. Therefore, this study confirmed that the 3-D SIS is a promising method for setup verification.

  4. Quantifying the Accuracy of a Quad-Rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle as a Platform for Atmospheric Pressure, Temperature and Humidity Measurements near the Surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Miniature multi-rotor unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can be used to directly sample the lower atmosphere over land and over the ocean in the vicinity of ships or shorelines. These UAVs are generally inexpensive and easy to operate. The author used the InstantEye quad-rotor UAV, manufactured by Physical Sciences Inc., as a test platform for meteorological measurements. In this case, the atmospheric sensor was the RS-92 radiosonde manufactured by Vaisala Inc. The author will present quantitative results of several experiments performed over land at Camp Roberts, California in which the InstantEye with radiosonde sensors was flown alongside a calibrated meteorological tower, thus allowing the accuracy of the UAV measurements to be quantified. Measurements near the surface were most strongly affected by turbulent fluctuations during sunny, low wind days over a dry surface. The rotor wash (1) provides sensor aeration which counteracts radiation contamination effects (2) creates a dynamic pressure effect in lowest 1.5 m and (3) moves air from a different level (1 - 2 m). Horizontal motion of the UAV had little effect on the measurements. The accuracy of the mean temperature measurements in the surface layer during unstable conditions was estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3 C, if samples are taken for at least one minute, except in the lowest 1.5 m above the surface, where rotor wash effects brought hot surface air to the sensors, degrading the accuracy. Above the turbulent surface layer, the temperature measurements approached a 0.1 C accuracy.

  5. Simulation of Magnetic Field Assisted Finishing (MFAF) Process Utilizing Smart MR Polishing Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Anwesa; Das, Manas

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field assisted finishing process is an advanced finishing process. This process is capable of producing nanometer level surface finish. In this process magnetic field is applied to control the finishing forces using magnetorheological polishing medium. In the current study, permanent magnet is used to provide the required magnetic field in the finishing zone. The working gap between the workpiece and the magnet is filled with MR fluid which is used as the polishing brush to remove surface undulations from the top surface of the workpiece. In this paper, the distribution of magnetic flux density on the workpiece surface and behaviour of MR polishing medium during finishing are analyzed using commercial finite element packages (Ansys Maxwell® and Comsol®). The role of magnetic force in the indentation of abrasive particles on the workpiece surface is studied. A two-dimensional simulation study of the steady, laminar, and incompressible MR fluid flow behaviour during finishing process is carried out. The material removal and surface roughness modelling of the finishing process are also presented. The indentation force by a single active abrasive particle on the workpiece surface is modelled during simulation. The velocity profile of MR fluid with and without application of magnetic field is plotted. It shows non-Newtonian property without application of magnetic field. After that the total material displacement due to one abrasive particle is plotted. The simulated roughness profile is in a good agreement with the experimental results. The conducted study will help in understanding the fluid behavior and the mechanism of finishing during finishing process. Also, the modelling and simulation of the process will help in achieving better finishing performance.

  6. Nano-accuracy measurements and the surface profiler by use of Monolithic Hollow Penta-Prism for precision mirror testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shinan; Wayne, Lewis; Idir, Mourad

    2014-09-01

    We developed a Monolithic Hollow Penta-Prism Long Trace Profiler-NOM (MHPP-LTP-NOM) to attain nano-accuracy in testing plane- and near-plane-mirrors. A new developed Monolithic Hollow Penta-Prism (MHPP) combined with the advantages of PPLTP and autocollimator ELCOMAT of the Nano-Optic-Measuring Machine (NOM) is used to enhance the accuracy and stability of our measurements. Our precise system-alignment method by using a newly developed CCD position-monitor system (PMS) assured significant thermal stability and, along with our optimized noise-reduction analytic method, ensured nano-accuracy measurements. Herein we report our tests results; all errors are about 60 nrad rms or less in tests of plane- and near-plane- mirrors.

  7. Dimensioning, Tolerancing, and Machine Finishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, George C.

    Intended for use with the vocational education student interested in technical drawing, this guide provides answers to questions relating to dimensioning and tolerancing machine drawings. It also gives examples of standard dimensioning practices, tolerancing applications, and finish applications. The problems and examples presented are based on…

  8. Concrete Finisher Program. Apprenticeship Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Apprenticeship and Industry Training.

    This document presents information about the apprenticeship training program of Alberta, Canada, in general and the concrete finishing program in particular. The first part of the document discusses the following items: Alberta's apprenticeship and industry training system; the apprenticeship and industry training committee structure; local…

  9. Accuracy and consistency of grass pollen identification by human analysts using electron micrographs of surface ornamentation1

    PubMed Central

    Mander, Luke; Baker, Sarah J.; Belcher, Claire M.; Haselhorst, Derek S.; Rodriguez, Jacklyn; Thorn, Jessica L.; Tiwari, Shivangi; Urrego, Dunia H.; Wesseln, Cassandra J.; Punyasena, Surangi W.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Humans frequently identify pollen grains at a taxonomic rank above species. Grass pollen is a classic case of this situation, which has led to the development of computational methods for identifying grass pollen species. This paper aims to provide context for these computational methods by quantifying the accuracy and consistency of human identification. • Methods: We measured the ability of nine human analysts to identify 12 species of grass pollen using scanning electron microscopy images. These are the same images that were used in computational identifications. We have measured the coverage, accuracy, and consistency of each analyst, and investigated their ability to recognize duplicate images. • Results: Coverage ranged from 87.5% to 100%. Mean identification accuracy ranged from 46.67% to 87.5%. The identification consistency of each analyst ranged from 32.5% to 87.5%, and each of the nine analysts produced considerably different identification schemes. The proportion of duplicate image pairs that were missed ranged from 6.25% to 58.33%. • Discussion: The identification errors made by each analyst, which result in a decline in accuracy and consistency, are likely related to psychological factors such as the limited capacity of human memory, fatigue and boredom, recency effects, and positivity bias. PMID:25202649

  10. Scanning Optical Head with Nontilted Reference Beam: Assuring Nanoradian Accuracy for a New Generation Surface Profiler in the Large-Slope Testing Range

    DOE PAGES

    Qian, Shinan

    2011-01-01

    Nmore » anoradian Surface Profilers (NSPs) are required for state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation optics and high-precision optical measurements.ano-radian accuracy must be maintained in the large-angle test range. However, the beams' notable lateral motions during tests of most operating profilers, combined with the insufficiencies of their optical components, generate significant errors of ∼ 1  μ rad rms in the measurements. The solution to nano-radian accuracy for the new generation of surface profilers in this range is to apply a scanning optical head, combined with nontilted reference beam. I describe here my comparison of different scan modes and discuss some test results.« less

  11. Accuracy of recent potential energy surfaces for the He -N2 interaction. I. Virial and bulk transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dham, Ashok K.; McCourt, Frederick R. W.; Dickinson, Alan S.

    2007-08-01

    A new exchange-Coulomb semiempirical model potential energy surface for the He -N2 interaction has been developed. Together with two recent high-level ab initio potential energy surfaces, it has been tested for the reliability of its predictions of second-virial coefficients and bulk transport phenomena in binary mixtures of He and N2. The agreement with the relevant available measurements is generally within experimental uncertainty for the exchange-Coulomb surface and the ab initio surface of Patel et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 909 (2003)], but with slightly poorer agreement for the earlier ab initio surface of Hu and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 104, 2541 (1996)].

  12. SU-E-J-217: Accuracy Comparison Between Surface and Volumetric Registrations for Patient Setup of Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y; Li, R; Na, Y; Jenkins, C; Xing, L; Lee, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Optical surface imaging has been applied to radiation therapy patient setup. This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the surface registration of the optical surface imaging compared with that of the conventional method of volumetric registration for patient setup in head and neck radiation therapy. Methods: Clinical datasets of planning CT and treatment Cone Beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare the surface and volumetric registrations in radiation therapy patient setup. The Iterative Closest Points based on point-plane closest method was implemented for surface registration. We employed 3D Slicer for rigid volumetric registration of planning CT and treatment CBCT. 6 parameters of registration results (3 rotations and 3 translations) were obtained by the two registration methods, and the results were compared. Digital simulation tests in ideal cases were also performed to validate each registration method. Results: Digital simulation tests showed that both of the registration methods were accurate and robust enough to compare the registration results. In experiments with the actual clinical data, the results showed considerable deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations. The average root mean squared translational error was 2.7 mm and the maximum translational error was 5.2 mm. Conclusion: The deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations was considerable. Special caution should be taken in using an optical surface imaging. To ensure the accuracy of optical surface imaging in radiation therapy patient setup, additional measures are required. This research was supported in part by the KIST institutional program (2E24551), the Industrial Strategic technology development program (10035495) funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE, KOREA), and the Radiation Safety Research Programs (1305033) through the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission, and the NIH (R01EB016777)

  13. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  14. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  15. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  16. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  17. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  18. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  19. 16 CFR 1509.8 - Construction and finishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.8 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood surfaces of non-full-size baby cribs shall be smooth and free from splinters. (b) All wood parts of non-full-size baby cribs shall be free from splits, cracks, or other defects that might lead to...

  20. 16 CFR 1509.8 - Construction and finishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.8 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood surfaces of non-full-size baby cribs shall be smooth and free from splinters. (b) All wood parts of non-full-size baby cribs shall be free from splits, cracks, or other defects that might lead to...

  1. Planialtimetric Accuracy Evaluation of Digital Surface Model (dsm) and Digital Terrain Model (dtm) Obtained from Aerial Survey with LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, C. B. M.; Barros, R. S.; Rabaco, L. M. L.

    2012-07-01

    It's noticed a significant increase in the development of orbital and airborne sensors that enable the extraction of three-dimensional data. Consequently, it's important the increment of studies about the quality of altimetric values derived from these sensors to verify if the improvements implemented in the acquisition of data may influence the results. In this context, as part of a larger project that aims to evaluate the accuracy of various sensors, this work aims to analysis the planialtimetric accuracy of DSM and DTM generated from an aerial survey with LIDAR, using as reference for the planimetric analysis of the orthophotos obtained. The project was developed for an area of São Sebastião city, located in the basin of the North Coast of São Paulo state. The area's relief is very steep, with a predominance of dense forest vegetation, typical of the Atlantic Forest. All points have been established in the field, with the use of GNSS of one frequency (L1) through static relative positioning, acquiring a minimum of 1,500 epochs, for a distance less than 20 km to the base. In this work it's considered the Brazilian standard specifications for classification of cartographic bases (PEC). The Brazilian company responsible for the aerial survey (LACTEC) gave the following products for analysis: point clouds in raw format (x, y, z) using orthometric heights; point clouds (first and last pulse) for each range of flight to verify systematic errors; DTM uniformly spaced, filtering small natural obstacles, buildings and vegetation, in Geotiff format; DSM also uniformly spaced, in Geotiff format; and the mosaic of georeferenced digital images. The analysis realized on products from the LIDAR indicated their adoption to the scales 1:2,000 (Class A for the orthophotos and Class B for the DTM) and 1:5,000 (class C for the DSM). There were no indications of trends in the results. The average error was 0.01 m. It's important that new areas with different topographic

  2. Calculation of Rotation-Vibration Energy Levels of the Water Molecule with Near-Experimental Accuracy Based on an ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, Oleg L.; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Zobov, Nikolai F.

    2013-10-01

    A recently computed, high-accuracy ab initio Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential energy surface (PES) for the water molecule is combined with relativistic, adiabatic, quantum electrodynamics, and, crucially, nonadiabatic corrections. Calculations of ro-vibrational levels are presented for several water isotopologues and shown to have unprecedented accuracy. A purely ab initio calculation reproduces some 200 known band origins associated with seven isotopologues of water with a standard deviation (σ) of about 0.35 cm-1. Introducing three semiempirical scaling parameters, two affecting the BO PES and one controlling nonadiabatic effects, reduces σ below 0.1 cm-1. Introducing one further rotational nonadiabatic parameter gives σ better than 0.1 cm-1 for all observed ro-vibrational energy levels up to J = 25. We conjecture that the energy levels of closed-shell molecules with roughly the same number of electrons as water, such as NH3, CH4, and H3O+, could be calculated to this accuracy using an analogous procedure. This means that near-ab initio calculations are capable of predicting transition frequencies with an accuracy only about a factor of 5 worse than high resolution experiments.

  3. Accuracy Assessment of Three-dimensional Surface Reconstructions of In vivo Teeth from Cone-beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yan-Hui; Hu, Hong-Cheng; Lu, Song-He; Wu, Yu-Wei; Li, Wei-Ran; Tang, Zhi-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: The accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been particularly important in dentistry, which will affect the effectiveness of diagnosis, treatment plan, and outcome in clinical practice. The aims of this study were to assess the linear, volumetric, and geometric accuracy of 3D reconstructions from CBCT and to investigate the influence of voxel size and CBCT system on the reconstructions results. Methods: Fifty teeth from 18 orthodontic patients were assigned to three groups as NewTom VG 0.15 mm group (NewTom VG; voxel size: 0.15 mm; n = 17), NewTom VG 0.30 mm group (NewTom VG; voxel size: 0.30 mm; n = 16), and VATECH DCTPRO 0.30 mm group (VATECH DCTPRO; voxel size: 0.30 mm; n = 17). The 3D reconstruction models of the teeth were segmented from CBCT data manually using Mimics 18.0 (Materialise Dental, Leuven, Belgium), and the extracted teeth were scanned by 3Shape optical scanner (3Shape A/S, Denmark). Linear and volumetric deviations were separately assessed by comparing the length and volume of the 3D reconstruction model with physical measurement by paired t-test. Geometric deviations were assessed by the root mean square value of the imposed 3D reconstruction and optical models by one-sample t-test. To assess the influence of voxel size and CBCT system on 3D reconstruction, analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used (α = 0.05). Results: The linear, volumetric, and geometric deviations were −0.03 ± 0.48 mm, −5.4 ± 2.8%, and 0.117 ± 0.018 mm for NewTom VG 0.15 mm group; −0.45 ± 0.42 mm, −4.5 ± 3.4%, and 0.116 ± 0.014 mm for NewTom VG 0.30 mm group; and −0.93 ± 0.40 mm, −4.8 ± 5.1%, and 0.194 ± 0.117 mm for VATECH DCTPRO 0.30 mm group, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between groups in terms of linear measurement (P < 0.001), but no significant difference in terms of volumetric measurement (P = 0.774). No statistically significant difference were

  4. Evaluation of Different Disinfactants on Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Quality of Type IV Gypsum Casts Retrieved from Elastomeric Impression Materials

    PubMed Central

    Pal, P K; Kamble, Suresh S; Chaurasia, Ranjitkumar Rampratap; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Tiwari, Samarth; Bansal, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study was done to evaluate the dimensional stability and surface quality of Type IV gypsum casts retrieved from disinfected elastomeric impression materials. Materials and Methods: In an in vitro study contaminated impression material with known bacterial species was disinfected with disinfectants followed by culturing the swab sample to assess reduction in level of bacterial colony. Changes in surface detail reproduction of impression were assessed fallowing disinfection. Results: All the three disinfectants used in the study produced a 100% reduction in colony forming units of the test organisms. Conclusion: All the three disinfectants produced complete disinfection, and didn’t cause any deterioration in surface detail reproduction. How to cite the article: Pal PK, Kamble SS, Chaurasia RR, Chaurasia VR, Tiwari S, Bansal D. Evaluation of dimensional stability and surface quality of type IV gypsum casts retrieved from disinfected elastomeric impression materials. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):77-81. PMID:25083038

  5. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3-Dimensional Surface Imaging System for Guidance in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Before the start of treatment, each patient underwent a breath-hold CT scan for planning purposes. During treatment, dose delivery was preceded by setup verification using CBCT of the left breast. 3D surfaces were captured by a surface imaging system concurrently with the CBCT scan. Retrospectively, surface registrations were performed for CBCT to CT and for a captured 3D surface to CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Results: Good correlation between setup errors was found: R{sup 2}=0.70, 0.90, 0.82 in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Systematic errors were {<=}0.17 cm in all directions. Random errors were {<=}0.15 cm. The limits of agreement were -0.34-0.48, -0.42-0.39, and -0.52-0.23 cm in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. ROC analysis showed that a threshold between 0.4 and 0.8 cm corresponds to promising true positive rates (0.78-0.95) and false positive rates (0.12-0.28). Conclusions: The results support the application of 3D surface imaging for image guidance in DIBH-RT after BCS.

  6. Generating High-Accuracy Peptide-Binding Data in High Throughput with Yeast Surface Display and SORTCERY.

    PubMed

    Reich, Lothar Luther; Dutta, Sanjib; Keating, Amy E

    2016-01-01

    Library methods are widely used to study protein-protein interactions, and high-throughput screening or selection followed by sequencing can identify a large number of peptide ligands for a protein target. In this chapter, we describe a procedure called "SORTCERY" that can rank the affinities of library members for a target with high accuracy. SORTCERY follows a three-step protocol. First, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is used to sort a library of yeast-displayed peptide ligands according to their affinities for a target. Second, all sorted pools are deep sequenced. Third, the resulting data are analyzed to create a ranking. We demonstrate an application of SORTCERY to the problem of ranking peptide ligands for the anti-apoptotic regulator Bcl-xL. PMID:27094295

  7. Impact of Calibrated Land Surface Model Parameters on the Accuracy and Uncertainty of Land-Atmosphere Coupling in WRF Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Ken; Zhou, Shujia

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry (2006) and wet (2007) land surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through the use of a new optimization and uncertainty estimation module in NASA's Land Information System (LIS-OPT/UE), whereby parameter sets are calibrated in the Noah land surface model and classified according to a land cover and soil type mapping of the observation sites to the full model domain. The impact of calibrated parameters on the a) spinup of the land surface used as initial conditions, and b) heat and moisture states and fluxes of the coupled WRF simulations are then assessed in terms of ambient weather and land-atmosphere coupling along with measures of uncertainty propagation into the forecasts. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, average) is investigated. Finally, tradeoffs of computational tractability and scientific validity, and the potential for combining this approach with satellite remote sensing data are also discussed.

  8. A practical method for determining the accuracy of computer-generated holograms for off-axis aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shijie; Liu, Bingcai; Tian, Ailing; Guo, Zhongda; Yang, Pengfei; Zhang, Jin

    2016-02-01

    To design a computer-generated hologram (CGH) to measure off-axis aspheric surfaces with high precision, two different design methods are introduced: ray tracing and simulation using the Zemax software program. With ray tracing, after the discrete phase distribution is computed, a B-spline is used to obtain the phase function, and surface intersection is a useful method for determining the CGH fringe positions. In Zemax, the dummy glass method is an effective method for simulating CGH tests. Furthermore, the phase function can also be obtained from the Zernike Fringe Phase. The phase distributions and CGH fringe positions obtained from the two results were compared, and the two methods were determined to be in agreement. Finally, experimental outcomes were determined using the CGH test and autocollimation. The test result (PV=0.309λ, RMS=0.044λ) is the same as that determined by autocollimation (PV=0.330λ, RMS=0.044λ). Further analysis showed that the surface shape distribution and Zernike Fringe polynomial coefficient match well, indicating that the two design methods are correct and consistent and that the CGH test can measure off-axis aspheric surfaces with high precision.

  9. Noninvasive localization of electromagnetic epileptic activity. II. Demonstration of sublobar accuracy in patients with simultaneous surface and depth recordings.

    PubMed

    Lantz, G; Grave de Peralta Menendez, R; Gonzalez Andino, S; Michel, C M

    2001-01-01

    Seven patients with complex partial epileptic seizures undergoing invasive video/EEG-monitoring were investigated with a combination of 10 subdural strip electrode contacts (subtemporal + lateral temporal), and 22 extracranial recording sites. In each patient spikes with different intracranial distributions were identified, and for those with similar distributions the extracranial activity was averaged. A new inverse solution method called EPIFOCUS (Grave et al. 2001, this issue) was used to reconstruct the sources of both single and averaged spikes in a standard 3D-MRI, and a statistical analysis was performed in order to demonstrate location differences between spikes with different intracranial distributions. The results revealed significantly more anterior and ventral source locations for subtemporal compared to lateral temporal spikes. Within the subtemporal group, medial spikes had more mesial and dorsal locations compared to lateral ones. In the lateral temporal group, more anterior and ventral locations were obtained for anterior compared to posterior spikes. The results demonstrate the applicability of EPIFOCUS in the localization of sources in the temporal lobe with sublobar accuracy. This possibility may become important in the future, for instance in identifying cases where amygdalo-hippocampectomy or other limited temporal lobe resections may replace the standard en bloc resections.

  10. Estimating river discharge from the Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission: Estimated accuracy of approaches based on Manning’s equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, E.; Durand, M. T.; Moller, D.; Biancamaria, S.; Andreadis, K.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Alsdorf, D.; Mognard, N. M.

    2009-12-01

    Freshwater is vital for life on Earth; however, its distribution and variability is poorly understood. This is due, in part, to physical, political, and economic constraints on the placement and maintenance of observation stations. In addition, most in situ observations are fundamentally one-dimensional in nature, thereby missing the complexities of, for example, floodplain flow. The upcoming Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission will provide global swath satellite coverage of surface water. In particular, SWOT will measure water surface elevations (WSE), water surface slope, and the areal extent of lakes, wetlands, reservoirs, floodplains, and rivers globally (between 78° N and 78° S latitude). Measurements at each location will be made at least twice in a 22-day repeat period. Ultimately, SWOT should provide enough information from which to estimate instantaneous river discharge for moderately large rivers (at least 100 m wide). Although multiple algorithms of varying complexity are being developed for river discharge estimation, a simple approach is the application of Manning’s equation. SWOT will directly measure water surface slope to an accuracy (1σ) of 1 cm/km, averaged over 10 km reaches. In addition, SWOT will measure WSE, related to changes in river depth, to an accuracy (1σ) of 10 cm, when averaged over river reaches of 1 km2 area. The impact of these errors, as well as potential errors in variables that will need to be estimated from SWOT or provided from ancillary sources (river width, Manning’s roughness, initial river depth), on discharge estimates are evaluated using a collection of reach-averaged channel properties of rivers in New Zealand, the Amazon, and the United States. Because estimated errors in river width, Manning’s roughness, and initial river depth are likely to change as retrieval algorithms improve, a range of potential errors are evaluated, and maximum allowable errors that would allow a goal of 20% maximum discharge

  11. Accuracy of near-surface aerosol extinction determined from columnar aerosol optical depth measurements in Reno, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela; Arnott, W. Patrick; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present work is a detailed analysis of aerosol columnar optical depth as a tool to determine near-surface aerosol extinction in Reno, Nevada, USA, during the summer of 2012. Ground and columnar aerosol optical properties were obtained by use of in situ Photoacoustic and Integrated Nephelometer and Cimel CE-318 Sun photometer instruments, respectively. Both techniques showed that seasonal weather changes and fire plumes had enormous influence on local aerosol optics. The apparent optical height followed the shape but not magnitude of the development of the convective boundary layer when fire conditions were not present. Back trajectory analysis demonstrated that a local flow known as the Washoe Zephyr circulation often induced aerosol transport from Northern California over the Sierra Nevada Mountains that increased the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm during afternoons when compared with mornings. Aerosol fine mode fraction indicated that afternoon aerosols in June and July and fire plumes in August were dominated by submicron particles, suggesting upwind urban plume biogenically enhanced evolution toward substantial secondary aerosol formation. This fine particle optical depth was inferred to be beyond the surface, thereby complicating use of remote sensing measurements for near-ground aerosol extinction measurements. It is likely that coarse mode depletes fine mode aerosol near the surface by coagulation and condensation of precursor gases.

  12. Experimental analysis of accuracy in the identification of motor unit spike trains from high-density surface EMG.

    PubMed

    Holobar, Ales; Minetto, Marco Alessandro; Botter, Alberto; Negro, Francesco; Farina, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the decomposition results obtained from high-density surface electromyography (EMG) and concurrently recorded intramuscular EMG. Surface EMG signals were recorded with electrode grids from the tibialis anterior, biceps brachii, and abductor digiti minimi muscles of twelve healthy men during isometric contractions ranging between 5% and 20% of the maximal force. Bipolar intramuscular EMG signals were recorded with pairs of wire electrodes. Surface and intramuscular EMG were independently decomposed into motor unit spike trains. When averaged over all the contractions of the same contraction force, the percentage of discharge times of motor units identified by both decompositions varied in the ranges 84%-87% (tibialis anterior), 84%-86% (biceps brachii), and 87%-92% (abductor digiti minimi) across the force levels analyzed. This index of agreement between the two decompositions was linearly correlated with a self-consistency measure of motor unit discharge pattern that was based on coefficient of variation for the interspike interval (R(2) = 0.68 for tibialis anterior, R(2) = 0.56 for biceps brachii, and R(2) = 0.38 for abductor digiti minimi). These results constitute an important contribution to the validation of the noninvasive approach for the investigation of motor unit behavior in isometric low-force tasks.

  13. Accuracies of facial soft tissue depth means for estimating ground truth skin surfaces in forensic craniofacial identification.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N

    2015-07-01

    Facial soft tissue thickness means have long been used as a proxy to estimate the soft tissue envelope, over the skull, in craniofacial identification. However, estimation errors of these statistics are not well understood, making casework selection of the best performing estimation models impossible and overarching method accuracies controversial. To redress this situation, residuals between predicted and ground truth values were calculated in two experiments: (1) for 27 suites of means drawn from 10 recently published studies, all examining the same 10 landmarks (N ≥ 3051), and tested against six independent raw datasets of contemporary living adults (N = 797); and (2) pairwise tests of the above six, and five other, raw datasets (N = 1063). In total, 380 out-of-sample tests of 416 arithmetic means were conducted across 11 independent samples. Experiment 1 produced an overarching mean absolute percentage error (MAE) of 29% and a standard error of the estimate (S(est)) of 2.7 mm. Experiment 2 yielded MAE of 32% and S(est) of 2.8 mm. In any instance, MAE was always ≥20% of the ground truth value. The overarching 95% limits of the error, for contemporary samples, was large (11.4 mm). CT-derived means from South Korean males and Black South African females routinely performed well across the test samples and produced the smallest errors of any tests (but did so for Black American male reference samples). Sample-specific statistics thereby performed poorly despite discipline esteem. These results—and the practice of publishing means without prior model validation—demand major reforms in the field. PMID:25394746

  14. Accuracies of facial soft tissue depth means for estimating ground truth skin surfaces in forensic craniofacial identification.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N

    2015-07-01

    Facial soft tissue thickness means have long been used as a proxy to estimate the soft tissue envelope, over the skull, in craniofacial identification. However, estimation errors of these statistics are not well understood, making casework selection of the best performing estimation models impossible and overarching method accuracies controversial. To redress this situation, residuals between predicted and ground truth values were calculated in two experiments: (1) for 27 suites of means drawn from 10 recently published studies, all examining the same 10 landmarks (N ≥ 3051), and tested against six independent raw datasets of contemporary living adults (N = 797); and (2) pairwise tests of the above six, and five other, raw datasets (N = 1063). In total, 380 out-of-sample tests of 416 arithmetic means were conducted across 11 independent samples. Experiment 1 produced an overarching mean absolute percentage error (MAE) of 29% and a standard error of the estimate (S(est)) of 2.7 mm. Experiment 2 yielded MAE of 32% and S(est) of 2.8 mm. In any instance, MAE was always ≥20% of the ground truth value. The overarching 95% limits of the error, for contemporary samples, was large (11.4 mm). CT-derived means from South Korean males and Black South African females routinely performed well across the test samples and produced the smallest errors of any tests (but did so for Black American male reference samples). Sample-specific statistics thereby performed poorly despite discipline esteem. These results—and the practice of publishing means without prior model validation—demand major reforms in the field.

  15. Comparative evaluation of different thermally modified wood samples finishing with UV-curable and waterborne coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, René; Muszyńska, Monika; Krystofiak, Tomasz; Labidi, Jalel

    2015-12-01

    Thermally modified wood has been developed as an industrial method to improve durability and dimensional stability of wood and thus extends the range of uses and service life of wood-based products. Despite the improvements gained by treatment, surface finishing using coatings prevents esthetical changes such as color degradation or occasional growth of mold adding protection in outdoor use and extending the service life of products. The wood finishing process was carried out with commercially available waterborne and UV-curable coatings on industrially modified at 192, 200, 212 °C and unmodified European ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) wood, using an industrial rollers system and a laboratory brushing system. Changes caused by thermal treatment which could affect the surface finish were measured and compared with control samples, such as water uptake, wettability and acidity. Following the wood finishing, surface properties and esthetic changes were evaluated; as well as the coatings performance. Thermally modified wood presented improved adherence compared with unmodified wood with a significant improvement in samples modified at 212 °C, which also present the highest hardness when UV-cured. Finishes with UV-curing maintain the hydrophobic effect of thermally modified wood, whereas waterborne finishes increase the surface wettability. Thermal modification did not negatively influence on the elastic properties of the coated substrate and thus allows this material to be finished with different coating systems in the same conditions as unmodified wood.

  16. The reliability and accuracy of two methods for proximal caries detection and depth on directly visible proximal surfaces: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ekstrand, K R; Luna, L E; Promisiero, L; Cortes, A; Cuevas, S; Reyes, J F; Torres, C E; Martignon, S

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the reliability and accuracy of the ICDAS and radiographs in detecting and estimating the depth of proximal lesions on extracted teeth. The lesions were visible to the naked eye. Three trained examiners scored a total of 132 sound/carious proximal surfaces from 106 primary teeth and 160 sound/carious proximal surfaces from 140 permanent teeth. The selected surfaces were first scored visually, using the 7 classes in the ICDAS. They were then assessed on radiographs using a 5-point classification system. Reexaminations were conducted with both scoring systems. Teeth were then sectioned and the selected surfaces histologically classified using a stereomicroscope (×5). Intrareproducibility values (weighted kappa statistics) for the ICDAS for both primary and permanent teeth were >0.9, and for the radiographs between 0.6 and 0.8. Interreproducibility values for the ICDAS were >0.85, for the radiographs >0.6. For both primary and permanent teeth, the accuracy of each examiner (Spearman's correlation coefficient) for the ICDAS was ≥0.85, and for the radiographs ≥0.45. Corresponding data were achieved when using pooled data from the 3 examiners for both the ICDAS and the radiographs. The associations between the 2 detection methods were measured to be moderate. In particular, the ICDAS was accurate in predicting lesion depth (histologically) confined to the enamel/outer third of the dentine versus deeper lesions. This study shows that when proximal lesions are open for inspection, the ICDAS is a more reliable and accurate method than the radiograph for detecting and estimating the depth of the lesion in both primary and permanent teeth.

  17. Survey mirrors and lenses and their required surface accuracy. Volume 1. Technical report. Final report for September 15, 1978-December 1, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Beesing, M. E.; Buchholz, R. L.; Evans, R. A.; Jaminski, R. W.; Mathur, A. K.; Rausch, R. A.; Scarborough, S.; Smith, G. A.; Waldhauer, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the optical performance of a variety of concentrating solar collectors is reported. The study addresses two important issues: the accuracy of reflective or refractive surfaces required to achieve specified performance goals, and the effect of environmental exposure on the performance concentrators. To assess the importance of surface accuracy on optical performance, 11 tracking and nontracking concentrator designs were selected for detailed evaluation. Mathematical models were developed for each design and incorporated into a Monte Carlo ray trace computer program to carry out detailed calculations. Results for the 11 concentrators are presented in graphic form. The models and computer program are provided along with a user's manual. A survey data base was established on the effect of environmental exposure on the optical degradation of mirrors and lenses. Information on environmental and maintenance effects was found to be insufficient to permit specific recommendations for operating and maintenance procedures, but the available information is compiled and reported and does contain procedures that other workers have found useful.

  18. On the Accuracy of Stratospheric Aerosol Extinction and Surface Area Derived from in situ and Remote Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh

    Measurements from University of Wyoming balloon-borne optical particle counters (OPCs) provide one of the longest stratospheric aerosol records in the world. In this study, University of Wyoming OPC measurements are compared with Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE II) satellite measurements to uncover the reason for differences between SAGE II and OPC measurements during non-volcanic (background) periods. The surface area density (SAD) estimation from various stratospheric aerosol measurements is important, because of surface reactions which affect abundances of oxides of nitrogen and ozone, and thereby the chemistry of the stratosphere. It is therefore important to get an accurate estimation of surface area density, as many climate models use aerosol climatologies provided by satellites. OPC and SAGE II measurements are compared for volcanic (1991-1996) and non-volcanic or background (1997-2004) periods. The extinction comparisons show that OPC extinctions calculated at SAGE II wavelengths are about a factor of 2 lower than SAGE II during the non-volcanic period. Under volcanic conditions the differences decrease; however, OPC extinction is still less than SAGE II extinction. This led to an investigation of the three most important systematic errors associated with the OPC measurements anisokineticity, evaporation of particles in the OPC inlet, and counting efficiency. The effect of anisokineticity is found to be negligible. For calculating the evaporation of particles in the OPC inlet, a heat transfer model is developed to calculate the mean air temperature inside the inlet, which is then coupled with a microphysical model to predict the evaporation of stratospheric aerosol particles. This evaporation increases OPC extinctions by 10-15% for both volcanic and non-volcanic cases; however, counting efficiency is the major source of error, which increases the extinction by 30-50% for the volcanic case, and 80-150% for the non-volcanic cases. These corrections

  19. Ultrasound for wool dyeing and finishing.

    PubMed

    McNeil, S J; McCall, R A

    2011-01-01

    The effects of ultrasound at 35-39 kHz on several wool dyeing and finishing processes have been investigated as a way of reducing environmental impact. Ultrasound improved the effectiveness of cleaning scoured wool in water and to a lesser extent in water-nonionic surfactant. Scanning electron microscopy did not indicate any surface damage. Fluorescence microscopy revealed increased levels of sulphydryl groups on the wool surface suggesting ultrasound caused the removal of thioester-bound lipids. Ultrasound pre-treatment increased the effectiveness of subsequent oxidative-reductive bleaching, but had no effect on the uptake of acid levelling and acid milling dyes. The pre-treatment retarded the uptake of reactive dye, possibly by increasing the crystallinity of the fibre or removing surface bound lipids. Ultrasound did not improve dyeing under conditions that are currently used in industry, but did show potential to reduce the chemical and energy requirements of dyeing wool with reactive and acid milling dyes, but not acid levelling dyes. PMID:20675174

  20. Study on ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing process using low frequency alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinzhong; Zou, Yanhua; Sugiyama, Hitoshi

    2015-07-01

    We proposed a new ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) process using low frequency alternating magnetic field in this paper. Magnetic cluster themselves may produce the up and down movement change under alternating magnetic force. The movement may not only promote the dispersion of micro-magnetic particles, but also improve stirring effect and cross-cutting effects of the abrasives, achieving circulation and update to ensure the stability of grinding tools. This process is considered to be able to efficiently apply in ultra-precision finishing of plane and complicated micro-surfaces. In this study, we investigated the effects of alternating magnetic field on magnetic field distribution, finishing force and abrasive behavior. Furthermore, a set of experimental devices have been designed for finishing SUS304 stainless steel plate. The present work is aimed at understanding finishing particularity of this process and studying impacts of important process parameters namely grinding fluid, rotational speed of magnetic pole, current frequency on change in finish surface and material removal. Experimental results indicate that the process can realize ultra-precision finishing of plane by using oily grinding fluid. In the present research, the surface roughness of SUS304 stainless steel plate was improved from 240.24 nm to 4.38 nm by this process.

  1. Roughness Analysis on Composite Materials (Microfilled, Nanofilled and Silorane) After Different Finishing and Polishing Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Pettini, Francesco; Corsalini, Massimo; Savino, Maria Grazia; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Venere, Daniela Di; Pappalettere, Carmine; Monno, Giuseppe; Boccaccio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The finishing and polishing of composite materials affect the restoration lifespan. The market shows a variety of finishing and polishing procedures and the choice among them is conditioned by different factors such as the resulting surface roughness. In the present study, 156 samples were realized with three composite materials, -microfilled, nanofilled and silorane-, and treated with different finishing and polishing procedures. Profilometric analyses were carried out on the samples’ surface, the measured roughness values were submitted to statistical analysis. A complete factorial plan was drawn up and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate whether the following factors affect the values of roughness: (i) material; (ii) polishing/finishing procedure. Tukey post-hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant differences between the material/procedure combinations. The results show that the tested materials do not affect the resulting surface quality but roughness values depend on the finishing/polishing procedure adopted. The procedures that involve: (a) the finishing with medium Sof-Lex discs and (b) the finishing with two tungsten carbide multi-blade milling cutters Q series and UF series are those that allow the lowest values of roughness to be obtained. PMID:26734113

  2. Roughness Analysis on Composite Materials (Microfilled, Nanofilled and Silorane) After Different Finishing and Polishing Procedures.

    PubMed

    Pettini, Francesco; Corsalini, Massimo; Savino, Maria Grazia; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Venere, Daniela Di; Pappalettere, Carmine; Monno, Giuseppe; Boccaccio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The finishing and polishing of composite materials affect the restoration lifespan. The market shows a variety of finishing and polishing procedures and the choice among them is conditioned by different factors such as the resulting surface roughness. In the present study, 156 samples were realized with three composite materials, -microfilled, nanofilled and silorane-, and treated with different finishing and polishing procedures. Profilometric analyses were carried out on the samples' surface, the measured roughness values were submitted to statistical analysis. A complete factorial plan was drawn up and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate whether the following factors affect the values of roughness: (i) material; (ii) polishing/finishing procedure. Tukey post-hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant differences between the material/procedure combinations. The results show that the tested materials do not affect the resulting surface quality but roughness values depend on the finishing/polishing procedure adopted. The procedures that involve: (a) the finishing with medium Sof-Lex discs and (b) the finishing with two tungsten carbide multi-blade milling cutters Q series and UF series are those that allow the lowest values of roughness to be obtained. PMID:26734113

  3. New finishing possibilities for producing durable multifunctional cotton/wool and viscose/wool blended fabrics.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N A; El-Zairy, M R; Eid, B M; El-Zairy, E M R; Emam, E M

    2015-03-30

    This research work focuses on the development of a one-bath functional finishing procedure for imparting durable multifunctional properties such as easy care, soft-hand, antibacterial and/or ultra violet (UV) protection to cotton/wool and viscose/wool blends using diverse finishing combinations and formulations. In this study finishing agents such as reactant resin, silicon softeners, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, triclosan, and pigment colorant were selected using magnesium chloride/citric acid as a mixed catalyst and the pad-dry microwave fixation technique. The results reveal that enhancement in the imparted functional properties are governed by type of the finished substrate as well as nature and concentration of finishing formulation components. The finished fabrics still retained high level of functionalities even after 15 consecutive laundering. Surface morphology and composition of selected samples were investigated using scan electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The mode of interactions was also investigated. Practical applications for multifunctionlization of cellulose/wool blended fabrics are possible using these sorts of proper finishing formulations and unique finishing application method. PMID:25563959

  4. New finishing possibilities for producing durable multifunctional cotton/wool and viscose/wool blended fabrics.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N A; El-Zairy, M R; Eid, B M; El-Zairy, E M R; Emam, E M

    2015-03-30

    This research work focuses on the development of a one-bath functional finishing procedure for imparting durable multifunctional properties such as easy care, soft-hand, antibacterial and/or ultra violet (UV) protection to cotton/wool and viscose/wool blends using diverse finishing combinations and formulations. In this study finishing agents such as reactant resin, silicon softeners, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, triclosan, and pigment colorant were selected using magnesium chloride/citric acid as a mixed catalyst and the pad-dry microwave fixation technique. The results reveal that enhancement in the imparted functional properties are governed by type of the finished substrate as well as nature and concentration of finishing formulation components. The finished fabrics still retained high level of functionalities even after 15 consecutive laundering. Surface morphology and composition of selected samples were investigated using scan electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The mode of interactions was also investigated. Practical applications for multifunctionlization of cellulose/wool blended fabrics are possible using these sorts of proper finishing formulations and unique finishing application method.

  5. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-11-21

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = (3)He, (4)He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6-7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the accuracy of

  6. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-11-21

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6–7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the

  7. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  8. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  9. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  10. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  11. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  12. METAL FINISHING FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL (MFFPPT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metal Finishing Facility Pollution Tool (MFFPPT) is being developed to allow the metal finishing industry an easy method to evaluate potential pollution prevention options. In order to reduce the quantity of pollutants generated by a process, the sources of pollutants within ...

  13. Effect of Flexural Rigidity of Tool on Machining Accuracy during Microgrooving by Ultrasonic Vibration Cutting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Toshiaki

    2010-12-01

    It is necessary to form fine holes and grooves by machining in the manufacture of equipment in the medical or information field and the establishment of such a machining technology is required. In micromachining, the use of the ultrasonic vibration cutting method is expected and examined. In this study, I experimentally form microgrooves in stainless steel SUS304 by the ultrasonic vibration cutting method and examine the effects of the shape and material of the tool on the machining accuracy. As a result, the following are clarified. The evaluation of the machining accuracy of the straightness of the finished surface revealed that there is an optimal rake angle of the tools related to the increase in cutting resistance as a result of increases in work hardening and the cutting area. The straightness is improved by using a tool with low flexural rigidity. In particular, Young's modulus more significantly affects the cutting accuracy than the shape of the tool.

  14. JSC Metal Finishing Waste Minimization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Erica

    2003-01-01

    THe paper discusses the following: Johnson Space Center (JSC) has achieved VPP Star status and is ISO 9001 compliant. The Structural Engineering Division in the Engineering Directorate is responsible for operating the metal finishing facility at JSC. The Engineering Directorate is responsible for $71.4 million of space flight hardware design, fabrication and testing. The JSC Metal Finishing Facility processes flight hardware to support the programs in particular schedule and mission critical flight hardware. The JSC Metal Finishing Facility is operated by Rothe Joint Venture. The Facility provides following processes: anodizing, alodining, passivation, and pickling. JSC Metal Finishing Facility completely rebuilt in 1998. Total cost of $366,000. All new tanks, electrical, plumbing, and ventilation installed. Designed to meet modern safety, environmental, and quality requirements. Designed to minimize contamination and provide the highest quality finishes.

  15. Influence of Head Motion on the Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction with Cone-Beam CT: Landmark Identification Errors in Maxillofacial Surface Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-Myoung; Cho, Jin-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of head motion on the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. Materials and Methods Fifteen dry skulls were incorporated into a motion controller which simulated four types of head motion during CBCT scan: 2 horizontal rotations (to the right/to the left) and 2 vertical rotations (upward/downward). Each movement was triggered to occur at the start of the scan for 1 second by remote control. Four maxillofacial surface models with head motion and one control surface model without motion were obtained for each skull. Nine landmarks were identified on the five maxillofacial surface models for each skull, and landmark identification errors were compared between the control model and each of the models with head motion. Results Rendered surface models with head motion were similar to the control model in appearance; however, the landmark identification errors showed larger values in models with head motion than in the control. In particular, the Porion in the horizontal rotation models presented statistically significant differences (P < .05). Statistically significant difference in the errors between the right and left side landmark was present in the left side rotation which was opposite direction to the scanner rotation (P < .05). Conclusions Patient movement during CBCT scan might cause landmark identification errors on the 3D surface model in relation to the direction of the scanner rotation. Clinicians should take this into consideration to prevent patient movement during CBCT scan, particularly horizontal movement. PMID:27065238

  16. Versatile piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source for gaseous compounds and organic molecules with femtomole accuracy for UHV and surface science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schiesser, Alexander; Schaefer, Rolf

    2009-08-15

    This note describes the construction of a piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source based upon a design presented in an earlier work [D. Proch and T. Trickl, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 60, 713 (1988)]. The design features significant modifications that permit the determination of the number of molecules in a beam pulse with an accuracy of 1x10{sup 11} molecules per pulse. The 21 cm long plunger-nozzle setup allows the molecules to be brought to any point of the UHV chamber with very high intensity. Furthermore, besides typical gaseous compounds, also smaller organic molecules with a vapor pressure higher than 0.1 mbar at room temperature may serve as feed material. This makes the new design suitable for various applications in chemical and surface science studies.

  17. High-precision, high-accuracy ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography using vertical cavity surface emitting laser light source.

    PubMed

    Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Liu, Jonathan J; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Jiang, James; Fujimoto, James G; Cable, Alex E

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using vertical cavity surface emitting laser technology. The ability to adjust laser parameters and high-speed acquisition enables imaging ranges from a few centimeters up to meters using the same instrument. We discuss the challenges of long-range OCT imaging. In vivo human-eye imaging and optical component characterization are presented. The precision and accuracy of OCT-based measurements are assessed and are important for ocular biometry and reproducible intraocular distance measurement before cataract surgery. Additionally, meter-range measurement of fiber length and multicentimeter-range imaging are reported. 3D visualization supports a class of industrial imaging applications of OCT.

  18. Automatic tool path generation for finish machining

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Kwan S.; Loucks, C.S.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-03-01

    A system for automatic tool path generation was developed at Sandia National Laboratories for finish machining operations. The system consists of a commercially available 5-axis milling machine controlled by Sandia developed software. This system was used to remove overspray on cast turbine blades. A laser-based, structured-light sensor, mounted on a tool holder, is used to collect 3D data points around the surface of the turbine blade. Using the digitized model of the blade, a tool path is generated which will drive a 0.375 inch diameter CBN grinding pin around the tip of the blade. A fuzzified digital filter was developed to properly eliminate false sensor readings caused by burrs, holes and overspray. The digital filter was found to successfully generate the correct tool path for a blade with intentionally scanned holes and defects. The fuzzified filter improved the computation efficiency by a factor of 25. For application to general parts, an adaptive scanning algorithm was developed and presented with simulation results. A right pyramid and an ellipsoid were scanned successfully with the adaptive algorithm.

  19. Accuracy Assessment of Aqua-MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Over Coastal Regions: Importance of Quality Flag and Sea Surface Wind Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. C.; Wang, J.; Zeng, J.; Petrenko, M.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Ichoku, C.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal regions around the globe are a major source for anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere, but the underlying surface characteristics are not favorable for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) algorithms designed for retrieval of aerosols over dark land or open-ocean surfaces. Using data collected from 62 coastal stations worldwide from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) from approximately 2002-2010, accuracy assessments are made for coastal aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from MODIS aboard Aqua satellite. It is found that coastal AODs (at 550 nm) characterized respectively by the MODIS Dark Land (hereafter Land) surface algorithm, the Open-Ocean (hereafter Ocean) algorithm, and AERONET all exhibit a log-normal distribution. After filtering by quality flags, the MODIS AODs respectively retrieved from the Land and Ocean algorithms are highly correlated with AERONET (with R(sup 2) is approximately equal to 0.8), but only the Land algorithm AODs fall within the expected error envelope greater than 66% of the time. Furthermore, the MODIS AODs from the Land algorithm, Ocean algorithm, and combined Land and Ocean product show statistically significant discrepancies from their respective counterparts from AERONET in terms of mean, probability density function, and cumulative density function, which suggest a need for future improvement in retrieval algorithms. Without filtering with quality flag, the MODIS Land and Ocean AOD dataset can be degraded by 30-50% in terms of mean bias. Overall, the MODIS Ocean algorithm overestimates the AERONET coastal AOD by 0.021 for AOD less than 0.25 and underestimates it by 0.029 for AOD greater than 0.25. This dichotomy is shown to be related to the ocean surface wind speed and cloud contamination effects on the satellite aerosol retrieval. The Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reveals that wind speeds over the global coastal region 25 (with a mean and median

  20. Effort required to finish shotgun-generated genome sequences differs significantly among vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The approaches for shotgun-based sequencing of vertebrate genomes are now well-established, and have resulted in the generation of numerous draft whole-genome sequence assemblies. In contrast, the process of refining those assemblies to improve contiguity and increase accuracy (known as 'sequence finishing') remains tedious, labor-intensive, and expensive. As a result, the vast majority of vertebrate genome sequences generated to date remain at a draft stage. Results To date, our genome sequencing efforts have focused on comparative studies of targeted genomic regions, requiring sequence finishing of large blocks of orthologous sequence (average size 0.5-2 Mb) from various subsets of 75 vertebrates. This experience has provided a unique opportunity to compare the relative effort required to finish shotgun-generated genome sequence assemblies from different species, which we report here. Importantly, we found that the sequence assemblies generated for the same orthologous regions from various vertebrates show substantial variation with respect to misassemblies and, in particular, the frequency and characteristics of sequence gaps. As a consequence, the work required to finish different species' sequences varied greatly. Application of the same standardized methods for finishing provided a novel opportunity to "assay" characteristics of genome sequences among many vertebrate species. It is important to note that many of the problems we have encountered during sequence finishing reflect unique architectural features of a particular vertebrate's genome, which in some cases may have important functional and/or evolutionary implications. Finally, based on our analyses, we have been able to improve our procedures to overcome some of these problems and to increase the overall efficiency of the sequence-finishing process, although significant challenges still remain. Conclusion Our findings have important implications for the eventual finishing of the draft whole

  1. Plutonium finishing plant dangerous waste training plan

    SciTech Connect

    ENTROP, G.E.

    1999-05-24

    This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the Plutonium Finish Plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  2. The Adolescent Who Does Not Finish Anything.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breiner, Sander J.

    1985-01-01

    Practical information for therapists who deal with adolescents who do not finish tasks is presented. The relationship of task incompletion to neurosis, psychosis, depression, homosexuality, and drug abuse is described, and techniques and guidelines for treatment are provided. (Author)

  3. Investigation on Multi-Physics Simulation-Based Virtual Machining System for Vibratory Finishing of Integrally Bladed Rotors (IBRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achiamah-Ampomah, N.; Cheng, Kai

    2016-02-01

    An investigation was carried out to improve the slow surface finishing times of integrally bladed rotors (IBRs) in the aerospace industry. Traditionally they are finished by hand, or more currently by abrasive flow machining. The use of a vibratory finishing technique to improve process times has been suggested; however as a largely empirical process, very few studies have been done to improve and optimize the cycle times, showing that critical and ongoing research is still needed in this area. An extensive review of the literature was carried out, and the findings used to identify the key parameters and model equations which govern the vibratory process. Recommendations were made towards a multi-physics-based simulation model, as well as projections made for the future of vibratory finishing and optimization of surface finishes and cycle times.

  4. Toward Chemical Accuracy in the Description of Ion-Water Interactions through Many-Body Representations. I. Halide-Water Dimer Potential Energy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Pushp; Götz, Andreas W; Paesani, Francesco

    2016-06-14

    Despite recent progress, a unified understanding of how ions affect the structure and dynamics of water across different phases remains elusive. Here, we report the development of full-dimensional many-body potential energy functions, called MB-nrg (Many-Body-energy), for molecular simulations of halide ion-water systems from the gas phase to the condensed phase. The MB-nrg potentials are derived entirely from "first-principles" calculations carried out at the F12 explicitly correlated coupled-cluster level including single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, CCSD(T)-F12, in the complete basis set limit. Building upon the functional form of the MB-pol water potential, the MB-nrg potentials are expressed through the many-body expansion of the total energy in terms of explicit contributions representing one-body, two-body, and three-body interactions, with all higher-order contributions being described by classical induction. The specific focus of this study is on the MB-nrg two-body terms representing the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the corresponding H2O-X(-) dimers, with X(-)= F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-). The accuracy of the MB-nrg PESs is systematically assessed through extensive comparisons with results obtained using both ab initio models and polarizable force fields for energies, structures, and harmonic frequencies of the H2O-X(-) dimers.

  5. Toward Chemical Accuracy in the Description of Ion-Water Interactions through Many-Body Representations. I. Halide-Water Dimer Potential Energy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Pushp; Götz, Andreas W; Paesani, Francesco

    2016-06-14

    Despite recent progress, a unified understanding of how ions affect the structure and dynamics of water across different phases remains elusive. Here, we report the development of full-dimensional many-body potential energy functions, called MB-nrg (Many-Body-energy), for molecular simulations of halide ion-water systems from the gas phase to the condensed phase. The MB-nrg potentials are derived entirely from "first-principles" calculations carried out at the F12 explicitly correlated coupled-cluster level including single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, CCSD(T)-F12, in the complete basis set limit. Building upon the functional form of the MB-pol water potential, the MB-nrg potentials are expressed through the many-body expansion of the total energy in terms of explicit contributions representing one-body, two-body, and three-body interactions, with all higher-order contributions being described by classical induction. The specific focus of this study is on the MB-nrg two-body terms representing the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the corresponding H2O-X(-) dimers, with X(-)= F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-). The accuracy of the MB-nrg PESs is systematically assessed through extensive comparisons with results obtained using both ab initio models and polarizable force fields for energies, structures, and harmonic frequencies of the H2O-X(-) dimers. PMID:27145081

  6. Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

    2005-08-30

    In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

  7. Effect of Finishing Time on Microleakage at the Composite-Repair Interface

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Berahman, Nazanin; Niazi, Elmira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repair is a conservative treatment of defective composite restoration. Sealing the repair interface is a critical factor to achieve successful repaired restorations. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluatethe effect of three finishing times on the microleakage at the composite-repair interface. Method: Eighty composite specimens (Z250) were made and aged for eight weeks in water. They were randomly divided into four groups. In the control group, repairing was done with no surface treatment and using bonding agent. In groups 2 to 4, the specimens were repaired following roughening, etching and use of Adper Single Bond, and finished immediately, after 20 minutes and after 24 hours, respectively. After thermocycling, the microleakage at the repair interface was assessed using dye-penetration technique. The results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: There was a significant difference among the four groups (P<0.001). The control group with the highest leakage showed a significant difference with the other groups (P<0.05). Immediate finishing showed a significantly higher leakage compared to 20-minute and 24-hour delayed finishing time (P<0.001). The two latter groups had no difference. Conclusion: Immediate finishing of the repaired restorations negatively affect the sealing at the repair interface, while 20-minute and 24-hour delayed finishing had no adverse effect on the interface sealing. PMID:27733876

  8. Surface roughness measurement of tooling spheres for laser measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarr, Dennis P.; Reed, Paul W.

    2001-02-01

    The usage of chrome or highly polished precision tooling (reference) spheres is common in the calibration and operational characterization of measurement systems such as a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM). The usage of a three-dimensional, (3D) laser triangulation, non-contact measurement system on CMMs and other scanning systems pose several obstacles. The highly specular mirror finish on the tooling sphere provides an accurate mechanical entity that has adverse results with laser sensors. The development of tooling spheres with a diffuse surface would benefit laser based measurement systems. The surface roughness and reflectivity properties have an effect on the laser measurements' accuracy. Efforts to develop spheres and establish meaningful measurements of spheres with modified surface finishes are investigated.

  9. Pneumonia outbreaks in calves and finishers.

    PubMed

    2016-03-19

    Pneumonia in calves and finishers. Ovarian tumour in a calf . Abortion associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 in a suckler herd. Parasitic gastroenteritis causing illthrift and death in sheep. Outbreaks of acute fasciolosis in sheep. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for December 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26993450

  10. Why Do Photo Finish Images Look Weird?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregorcic, Bor; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with effects that appear on photographs of rotating objects when taken by a photo finish camera, a rolling shutter camera or a computer scanner. These effects are very similar to Roget's palisade illusion. A simple quantitative analysis of the images is also provided. The effects are explored using a computer scanner in a way that…

  11. AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FROM SWINE FINISHING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results from two new studies at swine finishing facilities. (NOTE: Concentrated anaimal feeding operations (CAFOs) are being examined in several regions of the U.S. as major sources of ammonia and particulate matter precursors. EPA's National Risk Management Re...

  12. Pneumonia outbreaks in calves and finishers.

    PubMed

    2016-03-19

    Pneumonia in calves and finishers. Ovarian tumour in a calf . Abortion associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 in a suckler herd. Parasitic gastroenteritis causing illthrift and death in sheep. Outbreaks of acute fasciolosis in sheep. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for December 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  13. Permanent flame retardant finishing of textiles by allyl-functionalized polyphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Gall, Thomas; Knittel, Dierk; Gutmann, Jochen S; Opwis, Klaus

    2015-05-13

    Despite their excellent flame retardant properties, polyphosphazenes are currently not used as flame retardant agents for textile finishing, because a permanent fixation on the substrate surface has failed so far. Here, we present the successful synthesis and characterization of a noncombustible and foam-forming polyphosphazene derivative, that can be immobilized durably on cotton and different cotton/polyester blended fabrics using photoinduced grafting reactions. The flame retardant properties are improved, a higher limiting oxygen index is found, and the modified textiles pass several standardized flammability tests. As flame retardant mechanism a synergistic effect between the immobilized polyphosphazene and the textile substrate was observed. The polyphosphazene finishing induces an earlier decomposition of the material with a reduced mass loss in thermogravimetric analysis. The decomposition of cotton and polyester leads to the formation of phosphorus oxynitride, which forms a protecting barrier layer on the fiber surface. In addition, the permanence of the flame retardant finishing was proven by laundry and abrasion tests. PMID:25902050

  14. Permanent flame retardant finishing of textiles by allyl-functionalized polyphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Gall, Thomas; Knittel, Dierk; Gutmann, Jochen S; Opwis, Klaus

    2015-05-13

    Despite their excellent flame retardant properties, polyphosphazenes are currently not used as flame retardant agents for textile finishing, because a permanent fixation on the substrate surface has failed so far. Here, we present the successful synthesis and characterization of a noncombustible and foam-forming polyphosphazene derivative, that can be immobilized durably on cotton and different cotton/polyester blended fabrics using photoinduced grafting reactions. The flame retardant properties are improved, a higher limiting oxygen index is found, and the modified textiles pass several standardized flammability tests. As flame retardant mechanism a synergistic effect between the immobilized polyphosphazene and the textile substrate was observed. The polyphosphazene finishing induces an earlier decomposition of the material with a reduced mass loss in thermogravimetric analysis. The decomposition of cotton and polyester leads to the formation of phosphorus oxynitride, which forms a protecting barrier layer on the fiber surface. In addition, the permanence of the flame retardant finishing was proven by laundry and abrasion tests.

  15. Evaluation of Some Finishing Properties of Oil Palm Particleboard for Furniture Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnasingam, J.; Nyugen, V.; Ioras, F.

    The finishing properties of particleboard made from the Empty-Fruit Bunch (EFB) of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) were evaluated for its suitability for furniture applications, using different coating and overlay materials. The results found that the thick plastic-formica overlay provided the best surface finish, in terms of surface smoothness, adhesion strength and impact resistance. Although the polyurethane lacquer provided an acceptable finish, its quality and performance is not comparable to that of the thick plastic overlay. Despite the fact that the use of such overlay material may render the material not aesthetically appealing and limit it to concealed applications or where the thick overlay material is tolerated, its cost competitiveness and environmental friendliness may be able to position the oil palm particleboard as a substitute for the conventional wood-based particleboard in the furniture manufacturing industry.

  16. Validation of accuracy and repeatability of UltraSurf metrology on common optical shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFisher, Scott; Matthews, Greg; Fess, Edward

    2015-10-01

    Advancements in optical manufacturing technology allow optical designers to implement steep aspheric or high departure surfaces into their systems. Accurate metrology during the grinding and polishing stages of asphere manufacturing will reduce time and cost. Measuring these surfaces with common interferometers or profilometers can be difficult due to large surface slopes or unpolished surface texture. OptiPro has developed UltraSurf to qualify the form, figure, and thickness of steep aspheric and freeform optics. UltraSurf is a computer controlled, non-contact coordinate measuring machine. It incorporates five air-bearing axes, linear motors, high-resolution feedback, and a non-contact probe. The measuring probe is scanned over the optical surface while maintaining perpendicularity and a constant focal offset. There are multiple probe technologies available on UltraSurf, and each probe has strengths and weaknesses relative to the material properties, surface finish, and figure error of an optical component. Validation of the system accuracy, repeatability, and methodology must be performed to trust the measurement data. Form and figure maps of a flat, a sphere, and an asphere using UltraSurf will be presented with comparisons to interferometry. In addition, accuracy, repeatability, and machine qualification will be discussed.

  17. Realtime and High Accuracy VLBI in Chinese Lunar Exploration Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimin, Zheng

    The Chinese VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) Network - CVN consists of five radio telescopes and one data processing center. CVN is a powerful tracking and navigation tool in the Chinese lunar exploration projects. To meet the quick response of the CE lunar probes navigation requirements, station observation data must be sent to the VLBI center and processed in the real time mode. CVN has demonstrated its ability in the CE -1 and CE-2 missions. In December 2013, the CE-3 lander was successfully sent to the lunar surface and the Yutu rover was released. The new VLBI center and Tianma antenna came into use. During the mission, the lander carried the special Differential Oneway Range (DOR) beacon instead of the normal continuous spectrum VLBI signals. To get the high-precision result, CVN used the delta-DOR technique to track the lander with very extreme accuracy. VLBI delay residuals after orbit determination was nearly 0.5ns. The accuracy of landing position is better than 100 meters. The e-VLBI technique made the observable turnover time as short as 20~40 seconds. The same beam VLBI was used to determine the relative position between the lander and rover with meter accuracy. In the subsequent lunar missions, the new deep stations will join CVN and extend the baseline length. After the soft landing and sampling, the lander will be launched from the lunar surface and finish rendezvous and docking with the orbiter. The VLBI synthesis mapping method and the same beam VLBI can get the accurate lander location and support the rendezvous and docking procedure.

  18. Improved Microbe Assembly and Finishing Using 454 8kb Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Buhay, Christian

    2010-06-03

    Christian Buhay from Baylor College of Medicine's Human Genome Sequencing Center discusses microbial genome finishing strategies on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  19. Wetting studies of lead-free solders on lead-free PWB finishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattiraju, Seshagirirao Venkata

    There is a universal focus for producing environmentally friendly products in many different areas of science and engineering. Pb in electronic solder has become the target recently. The shift towards Pb-free manufacturing is a complicated issue. For a successful transition to Pb-free manufacturing in electronics assembly, it is critical to understand the behavior of Pb-free solders (in bulk and paste form) and their interaction with the Pb-free printed wiring board (PWB) finishes before their implementation in high volume electronics manufacturing can be realized. In this research work, studies were performed to characterize the wetting process of some Pb-free solders and Pb-free PWB finishes. Results obtained from solder paste spread tests and wetting balance experiments with several Pb-free solder alloys and Pb-free PWB finishes are presented and conclusions are drawn on the solderability of the alloys and finishes. The solder alloys studied were Sn3.4Ag4.8Bi, Sn4.0Ag0.5 Cu, Sn3.5Ag and Sn0.7Cu. Eutectic Sn37Pb was used as a reference. The PWB surface finishes were immersion Sn, electroless Ni/immersion Au, immersion Ag and organic solderability preservative (OSP). Effects of multiple reflow cycles on solderability of the test coupons were also studied. Statistical analyses were performed on the data obtained from the wetting balance and spread tests. Wetting balance experiments were conducted in air while the spread tests were performed in air and nitrogen to understand the effect of reflow atmosphere on the spreading. Surface analyses techniques such as Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were applied to understand and analyze the surfaces. Conclusions were drawn based on the data obtained from the wetting balance and spread experiments and results from the surface and thermodynamic analyses were applied to augment the experimental results. Sequential Electrochemical Reduction Analysis (SERA) was also performed on the

  20. Characterization of M40J Desized and Finished Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Gosau, Jan-M.; Shin, E. Eugene; McCorkle, Linda; O'Malley, Michelle; Sutter, James K.; Wheeler, Don

    1990-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on desized and finished M40J carbon fibers shown. The topics include: 1) Program Goals and Prior Year Results Summary; 2) Continuous Desizing and Finishing System Development; 3) Characterizzation of Desized and Finished M40J Carbon Fibers and 4) Conclusions and Future Work.

  1. Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Fitzsimmons, Michael [LANL

    2016-07-12

    Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  2. Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  3. Sequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogasterheterochromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Kennedy, Cameron; Acevedo,David; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Dimitri,Patrizio; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2007-06-15

    Genome sequences for most metazoans are incomplete due tothe presence of repeated DNA in the pericentromeric heterochromatin. Theheterochromatic regions of D. melanogaster contain 20 Mb of sequenceamenable to mapping, sequence assembly and finishing. Here we describethe generation of 15 Mb of finished or improved heterochromatic sequenceusing available clone resources and assembly and mapping methods. We alsoconstructed a BAC-based physical map that spans approximately 13 Mb ofthe pericentromeric heterochromatin, and a cytogenetic map that positionsapproximately 11 Mb of BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds in specificchromosomal locations. The integrated sequence assembly and maps greatlyimprove our understanding of the structure and composition of this poorlyunderstood fraction of a metazoan genome and provide a framework forfunctional analyses.

  4. Why do photo finish images look weird?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorcic, Bor; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2012-09-01

    This paper deals with effects that appear on photographs of rotating objects when taken by a photo finish camera, a rolling shutter camera or a computer scanner. These effects are very similar to Roget's palisade illusion. A simple quantitative analysis of the images is also provided. The effects are explored using a computer scanner in a way that is also suitable for a student project activity.

  5. Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K.; Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

  6. Agile robotic edge finishing system research

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a new project undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories to develop an agile, automated, high-precision edge finishing system. The project has a two-year duration and was initiated in October, 1994. This project involves re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing workcell at Sandia; and developing intelligent methods for automating process definition and for controlling finishing processes. The resulting system will serve as a prototype for systems that will be deployed into highly flexible automated production lines. The production systems will be used to produce a wide variety of products with limited production quantities and quick turnaround requirements. The prototype system is designed to allow programming, process definition, fixture re-configuration, and process verification to be performed off-line for new products. CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing) models of the part will be used to assist with the automated process development and process control tasks. To achieve Sandia`s performance goals, the system will be employ advanced path planning, burr prediction expert systems, automated process definition, statistical process models in a process database, and a two-level control scheme using hybrid position-force control and fuzzy logic control. In this paper, we discuss the progress and the planned system development under this project.

  7. A Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Detail Reproduction of Four Hydrophilic Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression Materials Tested Under Dry, Moist, and Wet Conditions-An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Nagrath, Rahul; Lahori, Manesh; Agrawal, Manjari

    2014-12-01

    Vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials have application in a wide variety of situations in both fixed and removable prosthodontics. A major limitation of VPS impression materials is their hydrophobicity. There are two aspects of this problem, the wettability of the polymerized impression by dental gypsum materials and the ability of the unpolymerized material to wet intraoral tissues. To address this problem, manufacturers have added surfactants and labelled these new products as "hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane." The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare dimensional accuracy and surface detail reproduction of four hydrophilic VPS impression materials, when used under dry, moist, and wet conditions. A total of 180 samples were made of stainless steel die similar to as described in ADA sp. no. 19. The die was scored with three horizontal and two vertical lines. Impressions were made under dry, moist and wet conditions. Dimensional accuracy was measured by comparing the length of the middle horizontal line in each impression to the same line on the metal die, by using Universal Length Measuring machine. A 2-way ANOVA was performed on the percentage change data for measured lengths of the 4 impression materials under the 3 conditions to evaluate dimensional accuracy. Surface detail was evaluated in two ways: (1) by use of criteria similar to ADA sp. no. 19 for detail reproduction, and (2) by use of a method that categorized the impressions as satisfactory or unsatisfactory based on their surface characteristics: presence of pits, voids, or roughness. Pearson X2 (α = 0.05) was used to compare surface detail reproduction results. Conditions (dry, moist, and wet) did not cause significant adverse effects on the dimensional accuracy of all the four material. With both surface detail analyses, dry, moist, and wet conditions had a significant effect on the detail reproduction of all the four materials (P < 0.05). The study concluded that the

  8. A Methodology to Assess the Accuracy with which Remote Data Characterize a Specific Surface, as a Function of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM): Application to Three Italian Coastal Waters

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Betti, Mattia; Campanelli, Alessandra; Di Cicco, Annalisa; Guglietta, Daniela; Penna, Pierluigi; Piermattei, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    This methodology assesses the accuracy with which remote data characterizes a surface, as a function of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM). The purpose is to identify the best remote data that improves the characterization of a surface, evaluating the number of bands in the spectral range. The first step creates an accurate dataset of remote simulated data, using in situ hyperspectral reflectances. The second step evaluates the capability of remote simulated data to characterize this surface. The spectral similarity measurements, which are obtained using classifiers, provide this capability. The third step examines the precision of this capability. The assumption is that in situ hyperspectral reflectances are considered the “real” reflectances. They are resized with the same spectral range of the remote data. The spectral similarity measurements which are obtained from “real” resized reflectances, are considered “real” measurements. Therefore, the quantity and magnitude of “errors” (i.e., differences between spectral similarity measurements obtained from “real” resized reflectances and from remote data) provide the accuracy as a function of FWHM. This methodology was applied to evaluate the accuracy with which CHRIS-mode1, CHRIS-mode2, Landsat5-TM, MIVIS and PRISMA data characterize three coastal waters. Their mean values of uncertainty are 1.59%, 3.79%, 7.75%, 3.15% and 1.18%, respectively. PMID:24434875

  9. Antimicrobial finish of textiles by chitosan UV-curing.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Franco; Periolatto, Monica

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this research work was to develop a textile finish based on the radical UV-curing of chitosan on textiles to confer antimicrobial properties. Chitosan is a biopolymer with unique properties such as biodegradability, non-toxicity, antimicrobial activity. In this work cotton or silk fabrics and synthetic filter fabrics were impregnated with an acid solution of chitosan added of the photoinitiator in the proper amount and cured at room temperature by exposure to UV lamp. Process conditions such as percentage add-on, dilution, chitosan-fabric contact time, irradiation time and power, were optimized. The antimicrobial activity of finished fabrics was tested according to ASTM E 2149-01 standard test performed with Escherichia Coli ATCC 8739. Moreover dyeing test with Turquoise Telon dye were carried out to evaluate the treatment homogeneity while the amino group content was determined by ninhydrin assay. Moreover on cotton and silk fabrics the treatment fastness to domestic laundering was tested, according to UNI EN ISO105-C01. Obtained results showed a strong antimicrobial activity conferred by the treatment, homogeneous on fabric surface. It is evident already at low add-on, without affecting the hand properties of natural fabrics and the filtration characteristics of the synthetic filter fabrics. Finally, washing fastness was better for samples prepared with a better penetration of chitosan inside the fibers.

  10. Antimicrobial finish of textiles by chitosan UV-curing.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Franco; Periolatto, Monica

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this research work was to develop a textile finish based on the radical UV-curing of chitosan on textiles to confer antimicrobial properties. Chitosan is a biopolymer with unique properties such as biodegradability, non-toxicity, antimicrobial activity. In this work cotton or silk fabrics and synthetic filter fabrics were impregnated with an acid solution of chitosan added of the photoinitiator in the proper amount and cured at room temperature by exposure to UV lamp. Process conditions such as percentage add-on, dilution, chitosan-fabric contact time, irradiation time and power, were optimized. The antimicrobial activity of finished fabrics was tested according to ASTM E 2149-01 standard test performed with Escherichia Coli ATCC 8739. Moreover dyeing test with Turquoise Telon dye were carried out to evaluate the treatment homogeneity while the amino group content was determined by ninhydrin assay. Moreover on cotton and silk fabrics the treatment fastness to domestic laundering was tested, according to UNI EN ISO105-C01. Obtained results showed a strong antimicrobial activity conferred by the treatment, homogeneous on fabric surface. It is evident already at low add-on, without affecting the hand properties of natural fabrics and the filtration characteristics of the synthetic filter fabrics. Finally, washing fastness was better for samples prepared with a better penetration of chitosan inside the fibers. PMID:22905533

  11. Percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve finished-water samples containing free chlorine, 2004-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valder, Joshua F.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Bender, David A.; Price, Curtis V.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents finished-water matrix-spike recoveries of 270 anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve water samples containing free chlorine. Percent recoveries were calculated using analytical results from a study conducted during 2004-10 for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The study was intended to characterize the effect of quenching on finished-water matrix-spike recoveries and to better understand the potential oxidation and transformation of 270 anthropogenic organic compounds. The anthropogenic organic compounds studied include those on analytical schedules 1433, 2003, 2033, 2060, 2020, and 4024 of the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory. Three types of samples were collected from 34 NAWQA locations across the Nation: (1) quenched finished-water samples (not spiked), (2) quenched finished-water matrix-spike samples, and (3) nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples. Percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds in quenched and nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples are presented. Comparisons of percent recoveries between quenched and nonquenched spiked samples can be used to show how quenching affects finished-water samples. A maximum of 18 surface-water and 34 groundwater quenched finished-water matrix-spike samples paired with nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples were analyzed. Percent recoveries for the study are presented in two ways: (1) finished-water matrix-spike samples supplied by surface-water or groundwater, and (2) by use (or source) group category for surface-water and groundwater supplies. Graphical representations of percent recoveries for the quenched and nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples also are presented.

  12. CONFIRMING THE RESULTS: AN ACCURACY ASSESSMENT OF REMOTE PRODUCTS, AN EXAMPLE COMPARING MULTIPLE MID-ATLANTIC SUB-PIXEL IMPERVIOUS SURFACE MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic impervious surfaces have an important relationship with non-point source pollution (NPS) in urban watersheds. The amount of impervious surface area in a watershed is a key indicator of landscape change. As a single variable, it serves to intcgrate a number of concur...

  13. Accuracy of recent potential energy surfaces for the He-N2 interaction. II. Molecular beam scattering and bulk gas relaxation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Fortún Stoker, Jamie; Dham, Ashok K.; McCourt, Frederick R. W.; Dickinson, Alan S.

    2008-06-01

    A new semiempirical exchange-Coulomb model potential energy surface for the N2-He interaction was reported recently [A. K. Dham et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 054302 (2007)] and, using it, the temperature dependence of bulk gas properties of N2-He mixtures, such as the second virial coefficient and traditional transport phenomena, most of which depend primarily on the isotropic component of the interaction potential energy surface, was determined. Values of these properties, along with values calculated using two high-quality ab initio potential energy surfaces [C.-H. Hu and A. J. Thakkar, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 2541 (1996); K. Patel et al., ibid 119, 909 (2003)] were compared critically to available experimental data. The present paper reports on the ability of the same three potential energy surfaces to predict state-to-state and total differential cross sections, total integral cross sections, and the temperature dependence of bulk gas relaxation phenomena (including magnetic field effects on transport coefficients). While all three potential energy surfaces give total differential and higher speed integral scattering results that fall within the experimental uncertainties, integral scattering results and state-to-state differential cross section measurements consistently exceed the calculated values. All three surfaces give similar agreement with the relaxation properties of N2-He binary mixtures, with the semiempirical exchange-Coulomb model potential energy surface giving slightly better overall agreement with experiment than the two ab initio potential energy surfaces.

  14. The effects of stainless steel finish on Salmonella Typhimurium attachment, biofilm formation and sensitivity to chlorine.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Yaron, Sima

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS) surfaces can be sources for cross contamination in food processing facilities, possessing a great threat to public health and food quality. Here the aim was to demonstrate the influence of surface finish of AISI 316 SS on colonization, biofilm formation and susceptibility of Salmonella Typhimurium to disinfection. Initial attachment of S. Typhimurium on surfaces of SS was four times lower, when surface was polished by Bright-Alum (BA) or Electropolishing (EP), as compared to Mechanical Sanded (MS) or the untreated surface (NT). The correlation between roughness and initial bacterial attachment couldn't account on its own to explain differences seen. Biofilms with similar thickness (15-18 μm) were developed on all surfaces 1-day post inoculation, whereas EP was the least covered surface (23%). Following 5-days, biofilm thickness was lowest on EP and MS (30 μm) and highest on NT (62 μm) surfaces. An analysis of surface composition suggested a link between surface chemistry and biofilm development, where the higher concentrations of metal ions in EP and MS surfaces correlated with limited biofilm formation. Interestingly, disinfection of biofilms with chlorine was up to 130 times more effective on the EP surface (0.005% surviving) than on the other surfaces. Overall these results suggest that surface finish should be considered carefully in a food processing plant. PMID:23628616

  15. The effects of stainless steel finish on Salmonella Typhimurium attachment, biofilm formation and sensitivity to chlorine.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Yaron, Sima

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS) surfaces can be sources for cross contamination in food processing facilities, possessing a great threat to public health and food quality. Here the aim was to demonstrate the influence of surface finish of AISI 316 SS on colonization, biofilm formation and susceptibility of Salmonella Typhimurium to disinfection. Initial attachment of S. Typhimurium on surfaces of SS was four times lower, when surface was polished by Bright-Alum (BA) or Electropolishing (EP), as compared to Mechanical Sanded (MS) or the untreated surface (NT). The correlation between roughness and initial bacterial attachment couldn't account on its own to explain differences seen. Biofilms with similar thickness (15-18 μm) were developed on all surfaces 1-day post inoculation, whereas EP was the least covered surface (23%). Following 5-days, biofilm thickness was lowest on EP and MS (30 μm) and highest on NT (62 μm) surfaces. An analysis of surface composition suggested a link between surface chemistry and biofilm development, where the higher concentrations of metal ions in EP and MS surfaces correlated with limited biofilm formation. Interestingly, disinfection of biofilms with chlorine was up to 130 times more effective on the EP surface (0.005% surviving) than on the other surfaces. Overall these results suggest that surface finish should be considered carefully in a food processing plant.

  16. Finishing and proof testing of windows for manned space craft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miska, Herbert A.

    1993-12-01

    The development of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in the early 1970s marked the first time that a fracture mechanics approach was taken to the design of the window systems of a manned space craft. Earlier vehicles were never subjected to repeated launch and re-entry and therefore fatigue or slow crack growth were not major concerns. The design and proof test methodology evolved at that time continues to be applied in the development of the window systems for the Space Station Freedom. A combination of fixed abrasive grinding, lapping, and chemical machining is employed on the fused silica window panes to insure that sub- surface damage is carefully controlled and minimized. All panes are proof tested under controlled atmospheric conditions which preclude crack growth during the test. This paper also covers some of the history of space craft window design, the rationale for the material choices as well as a review of the finishing and test methods employed.

  17. Accuracy assessment of land surface temperature retrievals from Landsat 7 ETM + in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica using iButton temperature loggers and weather station data.

    PubMed

    Brabyn, Lars; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Stichbury, Glen; Cary, Craig; Storey, Bryan; Laughlin, Daniel C; Katurji, Marwan

    2014-04-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are the largest snow/ice-free regions on this vast continent, comprising 1% of the land mass. Due to harsh environmental conditions, the valleys are bereft of any vegetation. Land surface temperature is a key determinate of microclimate and a driver for sensible and latent heat fluxes of the surface. The Dry Valleys have been the focus of ecological studies as they arguably provide the simplest trophic structure suitable for modelling. In this paper, we employ a validation method for land surface temperatures obtained from Landsat 7 ETM + imagery and compared with in situ land surface temperature data collected from four transects totalling 45 iButtons. A single meteorological station was used to obtain a better understanding of daily and seasonal cycles in land surface temperatures. Results show a good agreement between the iButton and the Landsat 7 ETM + product for clear sky cases. We conclude that Landsat 7 ETM + derived land surface temperatures can be used at broad spatial scales for ecological and meteorological research.

  18. Accuracy assessment of land surface temperature retrievals from Landsat 7 ETM + in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica using iButton temperature loggers and weather station data.

    PubMed

    Brabyn, Lars; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Stichbury, Glen; Cary, Craig; Storey, Bryan; Laughlin, Daniel C; Katurji, Marwan

    2014-04-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are the largest snow/ice-free regions on this vast continent, comprising 1% of the land mass. Due to harsh environmental conditions, the valleys are bereft of any vegetation. Land surface temperature is a key determinate of microclimate and a driver for sensible and latent heat fluxes of the surface. The Dry Valleys have been the focus of ecological studies as they arguably provide the simplest trophic structure suitable for modelling. In this paper, we employ a validation method for land surface temperatures obtained from Landsat 7 ETM + imagery and compared with in situ land surface temperature data collected from four transects totalling 45 iButtons. A single meteorological station was used to obtain a better understanding of daily and seasonal cycles in land surface temperatures. Results show a good agreement between the iButton and the Landsat 7 ETM + product for clear sky cases. We conclude that Landsat 7 ETM + derived land surface temperatures can be used at broad spatial scales for ecological and meteorological research. PMID:24366817

  19. On the accuracy of stratospheric aerosol extinction derived from in situ size distribution measurements and surface area density derived from remote SAGE II and HALOE extinction measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Deshler, Terry

    2015-08-26

    In situ stratospheric aerosol measurements, from University of Wyoming optical particle counters (OPCs), are compared with Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE) II (versions 6.2 and 7.0) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite measurements to investigate differences between SAGE II/HALOE-measured extinction and derived surface area and OPC-derived extinction and surface area. Coincident OPC and SAGE II measurements are compared for a volcanic (1991-1996) and nonvolcanic (1997 2005) period. OPC calculated extinctions agree with SAGE II measurements, within instrumental uncertainty, during the volcanic period, but have been a factor of 2 low during the nonvolcanic period. Three systematic errors associated with themore » OPC measurements, anisokineticity, inlet particle evaporation, and counting efficiency, were investigated. An overestimation of the OPC counting efficiency is found to be the major source of systematic error. With this correction OPC calculated extinction increases by 15 30% (30 50%) for the volcanic (nonvolcanic) measurements. These changes significantly improve the comparison with SAGE II and HALOE extinctions in the nonvolcanic cases but slightly degrade the agreement in the volcanic period. These corrections have impacts on OPC-derived surface area density, exacerbating the poor agreement between OPC and SAGE II (version 6.2) surface areas. This disparity is reconciled with SAGE II version 7.0 surface areas. For both the volcanic and nonvolcanic cases these changes in OPC counting efficiency and in the operational SAGE II surface area algorithm leave the derived surface areas from both platforms in significantly better agreement and within the 40% precision of the OPC moment calculations.« less

  20. On the accuracy of stratospheric aerosol extinction derived from in situ size distribution measurements and surface area density derived from remote SAGE II and HALOE extinction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Deshler, Terry

    2015-08-26

    In situ stratospheric aerosol measurements, from University of Wyoming optical particle counters (OPCs), are compared with Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE) II (versions 6.2 and 7.0) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite measurements to investigate differences between SAGE II/HALOE-measured extinction and derived surface area and OPC-derived extinction and surface area. Coincident OPC and SAGE II measurements are compared for a volcanic (1991-1996) and nonvolcanic (1997 2005) period. OPC calculated extinctions agree with SAGE II measurements, within instrumental uncertainty, during the volcanic period, but have been a factor of 2 low during the nonvolcanic period. Three systematic errors associated with the OPC measurements, anisokineticity, inlet particle evaporation, and counting efficiency, were investigated. An overestimation of the OPC counting efficiency is found to be the major source of systematic error. With this correction OPC calculated extinction increases by 15 30% (30 50%) for the volcanic (nonvolcanic) measurements. These changes significantly improve the comparison with SAGE II and HALOE extinctions in the nonvolcanic cases but slightly degrade the agreement in the volcanic period. These corrections have impacts on OPC-derived surface area density, exacerbating the poor agreement between OPC and SAGE II (version 6.2) surface areas. This disparity is reconciled with SAGE II version 7.0 surface areas. For both the volcanic and nonvolcanic cases these changes in OPC counting efficiency and in the operational SAGE II surface area algorithm leave the derived surface areas from both platforms in significantly better agreement and within the 40% precision of the OPC moment calculations.

  1. Finishing bacterial genome assemblies with Mix

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Among challenges that hamper reaping the benefits of genome assembly are both unfinished assemblies and the ensuing experimental costs. First, numerous software solutions for genome de novo assembly are available, each having its advantages and drawbacks, without clear guidelines as to how to choose among them. Second, these solutions produce draft assemblies that often require a resource intensive finishing phase. Methods In this paper we address these two aspects by developing Mix , a tool that mixes two or more draft assemblies, without relying on a reference genome and having the goal to reduce contig fragmentation and thus speed-up genome finishing. The proposed algorithm builds an extension graph where vertices represent extremities of contigs and edges represent existing alignments between these extremities. These alignment edges are used for contig extension. The resulting output assembly corresponds to a set of paths in the extension graph that maximizes the cumulative contig length. Results We evaluate the performance of Mix on bacterial NGS data from the GAGE-B study and apply it to newly sequenced Mycoplasma genomes. Resulting final assemblies demonstrate a significant improvement in the overall assembly quality. In particular, Mix is consistent by providing better overall quality results even when the choice is guided solely by standard assembly statistics, as is the case for de novo projects. Availability Mix is implemented in Python and is available at https://github.com/cbib/MIX, novel data for our Mycoplasma study is available at http://services.cbib.u-bordeaux2.fr/mix/. PMID:24564706

  2. Analysis of finishing reactive distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, J.; Aguirre, P.; Frey, T.; Stichlmair, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a novel method to deal with the design and the synthesis of finishing reactive distillation columns with one reactive core, two rectifying sections, and one stripping section is presented. The attention of the work is concentrated on three subjects: (1) the feasibility of a given separation at both finite and total reflux operation; (2) the minimum energy demand operation; (3) the distribution of the reaction between the reactor and the finishing reactive column. The design problem presents the same grade of difficulty as that found in the design of conventional extractive columns. A geometric based method is used to explain key features of reactive distillation. Here, the relation between the reaction yield and the distillate flow rate plays a role similar to that of the entrainer flow in extractive distillation. Hence, special attention is given to the behavior of the profiles inside the rectifying section below the reactive core. The methodology is illustrated using the well-known MTBE case study.

  3. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) STABILIZATION & PACKAGING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-01-14

    Fluor Hanford is pleased to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Stabilization and Packaging Project (SPP) for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2004. The SPP thermally stabilized and/or packaged nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials left in PFP facilities from 40 years of nuclear weapons production and experimentation. The stabilization of the plutonium-bearing materials substantially reduced the radiological risk to the environment and security concerns regarding the potential for terrorists to acquire the non-stabilized plutonium products for nefarious purposes. The work was done In older facilities which were never designed for the long-term storage of plutonium, and required working with materials that were extremely radioactive, hazardous, pyrophoric, and In some cases completely unique. I n some Instances, one-of-a-kind processes and equipment were designed, installed, and started up. The SPP was completed ahead of schedule, substantially beating all Interim progress milestone dates set by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and in the Hanford Site's Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), and finished $1-million under budget.

  4. Preference for starting and finishing behavior patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Shimp, C P; Sabulsky, S L; Childers, L J

    1989-01-01

    Pigeon's key pecking was reinforced with food in two experiments in which the correspondence between preference for starting one of two reinforced behavior patterns and the likelihood of finishing it subsequently was examined. Reinforcers were scheduled according to concurrent schedules for two classes of interresponse times, modified such that reinforcers followed a center-key peck terminating either a shorter interresponse time started by a left-key peck or a longer interresponse time started by a right-key peck. In Experiment 1, the times when reinforcers potentially were available were not discriminated, whereas in Experiment 2 they were. Absolute reinforced pattern durations were varied. The relative frequency of starting a particular pattern was highly correlated with relative frequency of that completed pattern in both experiments. Other relations between starting and finishing a pattern depended on whether reinforced interresponse times were discriminated. For instance, preference for starting a pattern sometimes correlated negatively with the likelihood of subsequently completing it. The present experiments are described as capturing part of the ordinary language meaning of "intention," according to which an organism's behavior at one moment sets the occasion for an observer to say that the organism "intends" in the future to engage in one behavior rather than another. PMID:2584918

  5. Detection of Protozoa in Surface and Finished Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are known to be the host to approximately 1500 infectious agents, out of which 66 are protozoa and 287 are helminths. Therefore, from a global perspective helminths and protozoan parasites account for approximately one fourth of the total infectious diseases of humans. A s...

  6. Responsive Surface Finishing of Textiles using Smart Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaratnam, Karthik; Fan, Qinguo

    2003-03-01

    Smart polymers that can change their properties according to the environment have significant potential in widespread applications. Poly N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNIPAAm) exhibits lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and is known to undergo phase transition when the temperature is raised from room temperature to about 32 aC.Experiments were performed to graft PNIPAAm onto cotton fabric. Significant amount of grafting of the polymer on the fabric was observed, and the samples were characterized using SEM and FTIR. The performance of these grafted cotton fabrics was studied and the fabric shows considerable changes in the wettability above and below the LCST of the PNIPAAm polymer. The PNIPAAm grafted cotton fabric is hydrophilic below 32 aC and hydrophobic above 32 aC. The contact angle of the PNIPAAm polymer was also studied, and the angle was found to be increasing as the temperature exceeds the LCST of the PNIPAAm polymer. The PNIPAAm polymer was colored using acid dyes, and these colored gels were grafted onto the cotton fabric. The colored PNIPAAm grafted cotton fabric showed a considerable color difference when measured with the spectrophotometer based on CIELAB system. The reflectance values of these samples were found to decrease as the temperature of the colored PNIPAAm grafted cotton fabric exceeded the LCST of PNIPAAm polymer.

  7. [Experimental analysis of finishing lines in ceramometal restorations].

    PubMed

    Gascón, F; Gil, J A; Fons, A; Badal, R

    1990-11-01

    The preparation is the first step of any tooth reconstruction. The biological integration of the protesis is depending on the marginal adaptation (finish line of the preparation), occlusal adaptation (occlusal reduction), longevity of the restoration (retention and luting) and esthetics. The effect the two finish line of the preparation is studied using experimental design. In porcelain-fused-to-metal the finish line of the preparation in chanfer is superior at the beveled shoulder, because proportioning better marginal adaptation. PMID:2076124

  8. [Experimental analysis of finishing lines in ceramometal restorations].

    PubMed

    Gascón, F; Gil, J A; Fons, A; Badal, R

    1990-11-01

    The preparation is the first step of any tooth reconstruction. The biological integration of the protesis is depending on the marginal adaptation (finish line of the preparation), occlusal adaptation (occlusal reduction), longevity of the restoration (retention and luting) and esthetics. The effect the two finish line of the preparation is studied using experimental design. In porcelain-fused-to-metal the finish line of the preparation in chanfer is superior at the beveled shoulder, because proportioning better marginal adaptation.

  9. Effects of cryogenic cooling by liquid nitrogen jet on forces, temperature and surface residual stresses in grinding steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Chattopadhyay, A. B.

    Grinding is a widely employed finishing process for different materials such as metals, ceramics, glass, carbides, rocks, etc. to achieve good geometrical (form) and dimensional accuracy with acceptable surface finish and surface integrity. However, it is inherently characterized by high specific energy requirements, unlike other conventional machining processes such as turning, milling, etc., which lead to a high grinding zone temperature and poor surface integrity. Many methods have been investigated to control this high grinding zone temperature, but all have their shortfalls, both technological and environmental, in exchange for controlling the grinding zone temperature. This paper briefly discusses the results obtained with regard to grinding forces, specific energy, grinding zone temperature and surface residual stress when using cryogenic cooling and compares them to the results from dry grinding and grinding with soluble oil. Cryogenic cooling seems to have the edge over other coolants in terms of controlling the temperature, residual stresses and grinding forces, and it is also environment friendly.

  10. 6. FACTORY BUILDING, WITH FINISHED PRODUCT WAREHOUSE IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FACTORY BUILDING, WITH FINISHED PRODUCT WAREHOUSE IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Maizewood Insulation Company Factory, 275 Salina Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  11. Finishing The Euchromatic Sequence Of The Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel; Pennacchio, Len

    2004-09-07

    The sequence of the human genome encodes the genetic instructions for human physiology, as well as rich information about human evolution. In 2001, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium reported a draft sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome. Since then, the international collaboration has worked to convert this draft into a genome sequence with high accuracy and nearly complete coverage. Here, we report the result of this finishing process.The current genome sequence (Build 35) contains 2.85 billion nucleotides interrupted by only 341 gaps. It covers {approx}99% of the euchromatic genome and is accurate to an error rate of {approx}1 event per 100,000 bases. Many of the remaining euchromatic gaps are associated with segmental duplications and will require focused work with new methods. The near-complete sequence, the first for a vertebrate, greatly improves the precision of biological analyses of the human genome including studies of gene number,birth and death. Notably, the human genome seems to encode only20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence reported here should serve as a firm foundation for biomedical research in the decades ahead.

  12. Research on the magnetorheological finishing (MRF) technology with dual polishing heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Zhang, Yunfei; He, Jianguo; Zheng, Yongcheng; Luo, Qing; Hou, Jing; Yuan, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a key polishing technique capable of rapidly converging to the required surface figure. Due to the deficiency of general one-polishing-head MRF technology, a dual polishing heads MRF technology was studied and a dual polishing heads MRF machine with 8 axes was developed. The machine has the ability to manufacture large aperture optics with high figure accuracy. The large polishing head is suitable for polishing large aperture optics, controlling large spatial length's wave structures, correcting low-medium frequency errors with high removal rates. While the small polishing head has more advantages in manufacturing small aperture optics, controlling small spatial wavelength's wave structures, correcting mid-high frequency and removing nanoscale materials. Material removal characteristic and figure correction ability for each of large and small polishing head was studied. Each of two polishing heads respectively acquired stable and valid polishing removal function and ultra-precision flat sample. After a single polishing iteration using small polishing head, the figure error in 45mm diameter of a 50 mm diameter plano optics was significantly improved from 0.21λ to 0.08λ by PV (RMS 0.053λ to 0.015λ). After three polishing iterations using large polishing head , the figure error in 410mm×410mm of a 430mm×430mm large plano optics was significantly improved from 0.40λ to 0.10λ by PV (RMS 0.068λ to 0.013λ) .This results show that the dual polishing heads MRF machine not only have good material removal stability, but also excellent figure correction capability.

  13. Prophylometric and SEM analyses of four different finishing methods

    PubMed Central

    CHIODERA, G.; CERUTTI, F.; CERUTTI, A.; PUTIGNANO, A.; MANGANI, F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Adhesion is the pivot of the modern restorative dentistry. Inlays, onlays and veneers have become a valid alternative to the traditional prosthetic treatments even in the rehabilitation of extremely damaged teeth, allowing a consistent saving of sound tooth tissues. Composite resins and dental adhesive are continously investigated and improved, nevertheless the optimization of the tooth-adhesive interface has to be considered: in fact, the long-term stability of adhesion between tooth and composite material depends on the treatment of the amelo-dentinal surfaces. This study investigated the quality of the occlusal walls of a cavity prepared to receive an inlay and finished with four different systems: thin and extra-thin diamond coated burs, a 12-blades carbide burs and a diamond-coated tip driven by sonic instrument. Consequently, prophylometric and SEM analyses were performed on the samples. The average roughness values recorded by the prophylometer were expressed by the parameters Ra and RZ: there is a correspondence between the numeric values and the pictures of the SEM. The results show a better quality (low roughness values) of the surface treated with multi-blade burs, followed by the this and extra-thin diamond coated burs. The 25 micron diamond-coated tip of the sonic instrument obtains the roughest surface and a sensibly higher amount of smear layer than the other tested systems. PMID:23741601

  14. Relative Accuracy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  15. 7 CFR 58.525 - Storage of finished product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Storage of finished product. 58.525 Section 58.525... Procedures § 58.525 Storage of finished product. Cottage cheese after packaging shall be promptly stored at a... distribution and storage prior to sale the product should be maintained at a temperature of 45 °F. or...

  16. 7 CFR 58.525 - Storage of finished product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Storage of finished product. 58.525 Section 58.525... Procedures § 58.525 Storage of finished product. Cottage cheese after packaging shall be promptly stored at a... distribution and storage prior to sale the product should be maintained at a temperature of 45 °F. or...

  17. 7 CFR 58.525 - Storage of finished product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Storage of finished product. 58.525 Section 58.525... Procedures § 58.525 Storage of finished product. Cottage cheese after packaging shall be promptly stored at a... distribution and storage prior to sale the product should be maintained at a temperature of 45 °F. or...

  18. 16 CFR 1508.7 - Construction and finishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Construction and finishing. 1508.7 Section 1508.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.7 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood...

  19. 16 CFR 1508.7 - Construction and finishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction and finishing. 1508.7 Section 1508.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.7 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood...

  20. NATIONAL METAL FINISHING ENVIRONMENTAL R&D PLAN - AN UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an update to the National Metal Finishing Environmental R&D Plan (EPA/600/R-97/095), dated September 1997. The 1997 Plan and Update are available on the National Metal Finishing Resource Center's web site, www.nmfrc.org. The primary purpose in preparing an up...

  1. Plutonium finishing plant safety systems and equipment list

    SciTech Connect

    Bergquist, G.G.

    1995-01-06

    The Safety Equipment List (SEL) supports Analysis Report (FSAR), WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010. The SEL is a breakdown and classification of all Safety Class 1, 2, and 3 equipment, components, or system at the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex.

  2. Pollution prevention and water conservation in metals finishing operations

    SciTech Connect

    O`Shaughnessy, J.; Clark, W.; Lizotte, R.P. Jr.; Mikutel, D.

    1996-11-01

    Attleboro, Massachusetts is the headquarters of the Materials and Controls Group of Texas Instruments Incorporated (Texas Instruments). In support of their activities, Texas Instruments operates a number of metal finishing and electroplating processes. The water supply and the wastewater treatment requirements are supplied throughout the facility from a central location. Water supply quality requirements varies with each manufacturing operation. As a result, manufacturing operations are classified as either high level or a lower water quality. The facility has two methods of wastewater treatment and disposal. The first method involves hydroxide and sulfide metals precipitation prior to discharge to a surface water. The second method involves metals precipitation, filtration, and discharge via sewer to the Attleboro WTF. The facility is limited to a maximum wastewater discharge of 460,000 gallons per day to surface water under the existing National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. There is also a hydraulic flow restriction on pretreated wastewater that is discharged to the Attleboro WTF. Both of these restrictions combined with increased production could cause the facility to reach the treatment capacity. The net effect is that wastewater discharge problems are becoming restrictive to the company`s growth. This paper reviews Texas Instruments efforts to overcome these restrictions through pollution prevention and reuse practices rather than expansion of end of pipe treatment methods.

  3. Protein sources for finishing calves as affected by management system.

    PubMed

    Sindt, M H; Stock, R A; Klopfenstein, T J; Vieselmeyer, B A

    1993-03-01

    Two beef production systems were evaluated in conjunction with an evaluation of escape protein sources for finishing calves. Two hundred forty crossbred steers and 80 crossbred heifer calves (BW = 267 +/- 2 kg) were split into two groups: 1) control, finished (207 d) after a 3-wk feedlot adjustment period and 2) grazing cornstalks for 74 d after a 3-wk feedlot adjustment period, then finished (164 d). Finishing treatments were sources and proportions of supplemental CP: 1) urea 100%; 2) soybean meal (SBM) 100%; 3) blood meal (BM) 50%, urea 50%; 4) feather meal (FTH) 50%, urea 50%; 5) SBM 50%, FTH 25%, urea 25%; 6) SBM 25%, FTH 38%, urea 37%; 7) FTH 25%, BM 25%, urea 50%, and 8) FTH 38%, BM 13%, urea 50%. Treatments 1 to 8 were fed in dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diets. Treatments 9 and 10 were supplement Treatments 1 and 7 fed in diets based on high-moisture corn. Calves finished after a 74-d period of grazing cornstalks consumed more feed (P < .01) and gained faster (P < .01) but were less efficient (P < .05) than calves finished directly after weaning. Although not statistically different, calves finished after grazing cornstalks and supplemented with natural protein in the feedlot were 7% more efficient than calves supplemented with urea alone. Efficiency of calves finished directly after weaning was similar for calves supplemented with natural protein or urea alone. Supplementing SBM/FTH/urea or BM/FTH/urea improved feed efficiency compared with supplementing FTH/urea alone. These data suggest that allowing calves to graze cornstalks before finishing is a possible management option, but this system may require more metabolizable protein in the finishing diet to maximize feed efficiency if the calves are expressing compensatory growth. PMID:8463161

  4. Phosphorus requirement of finishing feedlot calves.

    PubMed

    Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Milton, C T; Brink, D; Orth, M W; Whittet, K M

    2002-06-01

    Dietary P supplied to feedlot cattle is important because an inadequate supply will compromise performance, whereas excess P may harm the environment. However, P requirements of feedlot cattle are not well documented. Therefore, 45 steer calves (265.2+/-16.6 kg) were individually fed to determine the P required for gain and bone integrity over a 204-d finishing period. The basal diet consisted of 33.5% high-moisture corn, 30% brewers grits, 20% corn bran, 7.5% cottonseed hulls, 3% tallow, and 6% supplement. Treatments consisted of 0.16 (no supplemental inorganic P), 0.22, 0.28, 0.34, and 0.40% P (DM basis). Supplemental P was provided by monosodium phosphate top-dressed to the daily feed allotment. Blood was sampled every 56 d to assess P status. At slaughter, phalanx and metacarpal bones were collected from the front leg to determine bone ash and assess P resorption from bone. Dry matter intake and ADG did not change linearly (P > 0.86) or quadratically (P > 0.28) due to P treatment. Feed efficiency was not influenced (P > 0.30) by P treatment and averaged 0.169. Plasma inorganic P averaged across d 56 to 204 responded quadratically, with calves fed 0.16% P having the lowest concentration of plasma inorganic P. However, plasma inorganic P concentration (5.7 mg/dL) for steers fed 0.16% P is generally considered adequate. Total bone ash weight was not influenced by dietary P for phalanx (P = 0.19) or metacarpal bones (P = 0.37). Total P intake ranged from 14.2 to 35.5 g/d. The NRC (1996) recommendation for these calves was 18.7 g/d, assuming 68% absorption. Based on performance results, P requirements for finishing calves is < 0.16% of diet DM or 14.2 g/d. Based on these observations, we suggest that typical grain-based feedlot cattle diets do not require supplementation of inorganic mineral P to meet P requirements.

  5. 40 CFR 425.10 - Applicability; description of the hair pulp, chrome tan, retan-wet finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING... finished leather by chemically dissolving the hide hair, chrome tanning, and retan-wet finishing....

  6. Metal finishing wastewater pressure filter optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Norford, S.W.; Diener, G.A.; Martin, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    The 300-M Area Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility (LETF) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an end-of-pipe industrial wastewater treatment facility, that uses precipitation and filtration which is the EPA Best Available Technology economically achievable for a Metal Finishing and Aluminum Form Industries. The LETF consists of three close-coupled treatment facilities: the Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility (DETF), which uses wastewater equalization, physical/chemical precipitation, flocculation, and filtration; the Chemical Treatment Facility (CTF), which slurries the filter cake generated from the DETF and pumps it to interim-StatuS RCRA storage tanks; and the Interim Treatment/Storage Facility (IT/SF) which stores the waste from the CTF until the waste is stabilized/solidified for permanent disposal, 85% of the stored waste is from past nickel plating and aluminum canning of depleted uranium targets for the SRS nuclear reactors. Waste minimization and filtration efficiency are key to cost effective treatment of the supernate, because the waste filter cake generated is returned to the IT/SF. The DETF has been successfully optimized to achieve maximum efficiency and to minimize waste generation.

  7. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  8. Metal finishing wastewater pressure filter optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Norford, S.W.; Diener, G.A.; Martin, H.L.

    1992-12-31

    The 300-M Area Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility (LETF) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an end-of-pipe industrial wastewater treatment facility, that uses precipitation and filtration which is the EPA Best Available Technology economically achievable for a Metal Finishing and Aluminum Form Industries. The LETF consists of three close-coupled treatment facilities: the Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility (DETF), which uses wastewater equalization, physical/chemical precipitation, flocculation, and filtration; the Chemical Treatment Facility (CTF), which slurries the filter cake generated from the DETF and pumps it to interim-StatuS RCRA storage tanks; and the Interim Treatment/Storage Facility (IT/SF) which stores the waste from the CTF until the waste is stabilized/solidified for permanent disposal, 85% of the stored waste is from past nickel plating and aluminum canning of depleted uranium targets for the SRS nuclear reactors. Waste minimization and filtration efficiency are key to cost effective treatment of the supernate, because the waste filter cake generated is returned to the IT/SF. The DETF has been successfully optimized to achieve maximum efficiency and to minimize waste generation.

  9. Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals: nonaqueous fluids development, optical finish, and laser damage performance at 1064 nm and 532 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Ehrmann, P R; Bickel, R C

    2009-11-05

    Over the past year we have been working on specialized MR fluids for polishing KDP crystals. KDP is an extremely difficult material to conventionally polish due to its water solubility, low hardness, and temperature sensitivity. Today, KDP crystals are finished using single-point diamond turning (SPDT) tools and nonaqueous lubricants/coolants. KDP optics fabricated using SPDT, however, are limited to surface corrections due to tool/method characteristics with surface quality driven by microroughness from machine pitch, speed, force, and diamond tool character. MRF polishing offers a means to circumvent many of these issues since it is deterministic which makes the technique practical for surface and transmitted wavefront correction, is low force, and is temperature independent. What is lacking is a usable nonaqueous MR fluid that is chemically and physically compatible with KDP which can be used for polishing and subsequently cleaned from the optical surface. In this study, we will present the fluid parameters important in the design and development of nonaqueous MR fluid formulations capable of polishing KDP and how these parameters affect MRF polishing. We will also discuss requirements peculiar to successful KDP polishing and how they affect optical figure/finish and laser damage performance at 1064 nm and 532 nm.

  10. Effect of silicone finishes on the burning behavior of polyester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyon, Julien Xavier Eric

    Polyester fibers are widely used as filling in home applications such as pillows or comforters. Silicone finishes can be used to reduce friction between fibers during processing or as softeners to impart a pleasant down like hand on the fibers. However, it has been reported that these added silicone-based finishes may have a negative effect on the burning behavior of polyester. This research examined the possible mechanisms that can modify the response of polyester fibers when subjected to a flame source. In this study, a spunbond needled polyester nonwoven substrate was treated with different commercial silicone-based finishes. A vertical flame test was used to compare the effect of silicone finishes on the burning behavior of polyester to the inherent burning behavior of untreated polyester. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were performed on spunbond polyester fabric samples to investigate the influence of silicone finishes on the thermal degradation of polyester in air. Residues from TGA were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with elemental analysis. Vertical flammability testing showed that even at a low level, the application of silicone-based finishes on a polyester substrate resulted in a dramatic increase of the flame propagation by preventing its inherent response to heat. Thermograms suggested that the silicone finishes had little or no effect on the thermal degradation of polyester substrates.

  11. An overview of plastic optical fiber end finishers at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mishina, M.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Korienek, J.

    1993-11-01

    Several years ago the need for equipment to precisely finish the ends of plastic optical fibers was recognized. Many high energy physics experiments use thousands of these fibers which must be polished on one or both ends. A fast, easy-to-operate machine yielding repeatable finishes was needed. Three types of machines were designed and constructed that are in daily use at Fermilab, all finish the fiber ends by flycutting with a diamond tool. Althrough diamond flycutting of plastic is not new, the size and fragility of plastic optical fibers present several challenges.

  12. 40 CFR 425.90 - Applicability; description of the retan-wet finish-splits subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE... resulting from any tannery which processes previously unhaired and tanned splits into finished leather...

  13. 40 CFR 463.30 - Applicability; description of the finishing water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PLASTICS MOLDING AND FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Finishing... the finishing water subcategory are processes where water comes in contact with the plastic...

  14. 40 CFR 463.30 - Applicability; description of the finishing water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PLASTICS MOLDING AND FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Finishing... the finishing water subcategory are processes where water comes in contact with the plastic...

  15. Surface errors in the course of machining precision optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskup, H.; Haberl, A.; Rascher, R.

    2015-08-01

    Precision optical components are usually machined by grinding and polishing in several steps with increasing accuracy. Spherical surfaces will be finished in a last step with large tools to smooth the surface. The requested surface accuracy of non-spherical surfaces only can be achieved with tools in point contact to the surface. So called mid-frequency errors (MSFE) can accumulate with zonal processes. This work is on the formation of surface errors from grinding to polishing by conducting an analysis of the surfaces in their machining steps by non-contact interferometric methods. The errors on the surface can be distinguished as described in DIN 4760 whereby 2nd to 3rd order errors are the so-called MSFE. By appropriate filtering of the measured data frequencies of errors can be suppressed in a manner that only defined spatial frequencies will be shown in the surface plot. It can be observed that some frequencies already may be formed in the early machining steps like grinding and main-polishing. Additionally it is known that MSFE can be produced by the process itself and other side effects. Beside a description of surface errors based on the limits of measurement technologies, different formation mechanisms for selected spatial frequencies are presented. A correction may be only possible by tools that have a lateral size below the wavelength of the error structure. The presented considerations may be used to develop proposals to handle surface errors.

  16. Classification and storage of wastewater from floor finish removal operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, C.E.

    1996-05-01

    This study evaluates the wastewater generated from hard surface floor finish removal operations at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in order to determine if this wastewater is a hazardous waste, either by statistical evaluation, or other measurable regulatory guidelines established in California Regulations. This research also comparatively evaluates the 55 gallon drum and other portable tanks, all less than 1,000 gallons in size in order to determine which is most effective for the management of this waste stream at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The statistical methods in SW-846 were found to be scientifically questionable in their application to hazardous waste determination. In this statistical evaluation, the different data transformations discussed in the regulatory guidance document were applied along with the log transformation to the population of 18 samples from 55 gallon drums. Although this statistical evaluation proved awkward in its application, once the data is collected and organized on a spreadsheet this statistical analysis can be an effective tool which can aid the environmental manager in the hazardous waste classification process.

  17. Multifunctional finishing of cellulosic/polyester blended fabrics.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N A; Eid, B M; Youssef, M A; Ibrahim, H M; Ameen, H A; Salah, A M

    2013-09-12

    Innovative/efficient finishing systems for imparting multi-functional properties to cotton/polyester and viscose/polyester blends were developed. Factors affecting the extent of functionalization including type and concentration of the nano-hybrid, i.e. silver nanoparticles/polyvinyl pyrolidone hybrid (Ag-NP's/PVP) or zinc oxide nanoparticles/hyperbranched polyamide-amine hybrid (ZnO-NP's/HBPAA), concentration of Basic Blue 9, or chitosan and sequence of treatment using citric acid as cross-linker were reported. Loading of β-CD, with its hydrophobic cavities, onto the cross-linked substrates and subsequent treatment with Neem-oil, Lavender-oil or 4-hydroxybenzophenone was also studied. The obtained products exhibit a remarkable easy care, antibacterial and/or UV-blocking functional properties. The improvement in the imparted properties and durability to wash is governed by type and amount of loaded active ingredients. Mode of interactions was suggested, and surface modifications together with composition of selected samples were also confirmed by SEM images and EDX spectra. PMID:23911516

  18. Electrocoagulation treatment of metal finishing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Odongo, Isabel E; McFarland, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    Electrocoagulation has been found to be a consistent and reliable industrial wastewater treatment process capable of removing heavy metals to levels well below pretreatment discharge standards. Results from the testing of a 113 L/min pilot scale electrocoagulation unit indicated that electrocoagulation was capable of decreasing the cadmium, chromium, and nickel concentrations from 0.14, 18.1, and 0.06 parts per million (ppm) to 0.029, 0.039, and 0.020 ppm respectively, at a 1-min hydraulic retention time. In the presence of a strong chelating substance, electrocoagulation performance was found to be effective in reducing both chromium and nickel concentrations to levels well below discharge limits. At a pH of 8.0, chromium and nickel influent concentrations of 0.328 and 0.062 ppm, respectively, were reduced to 0.005 and 0.04 ppm. The electrocoagulation removal efficiency for chromium remained high at over 98% and appeared to be unaffected by the presence of chelating substances. Utilizing aluminum as the sacrificial anode improved the removal efficiency of targeted heavy metals when the industrial wastewater was treated under acidic conditions. At a pH of 5.6, the influent concentrations of the regulated heavy metals cadmium, chromium, and nickel were reduced from 0.55, 49.7, and 13.7 ppm, respectively, to 0.013, 2.7, and 0.8 ppm at a 1-min hydraulic retention time. The results of these tests suggest that the formation of ferric hydroxide and aluminum hydroxide through the electrocoagulation process may be an effective approach for treating metal finishing wastewaters.

  19. Surface assessment and mitigation of DUV optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue

    2015-09-01

    CaF2 is one of the foremost optical materials used in ArF excimer laser optics. Surface quality of optically finished CaF2 plays an important role in the component's lifetime. Several techniques were employed to assess surface quality of optically finished CaF2 in terms of top surface and subsurface damage, resulting in subsurface-damagefree CaF2. UV light and plasma interaction with CaF2 surfaces were investigated. The results were discussed in terms of surface roughness and cleanness associated with surface finishing and optical coatings.

  20. Increasing Accuracy in Computed Inviscid Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A technique has been devised to increase the accuracy of computational simulations of flows of inviscid fluids by increasing the accuracy with which surface boundary conditions are represented. This technique is expected to be especially beneficial for computational aeroacoustics, wherein it enables proper accounting, not only for acoustic waves, but also for vorticity and entropy waves, at surfaces. Heretofore, inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions have been limited to third-order accuracy in time for stationary surfaces and to first-order accuracy in time for moving surfaces. For steady-state calculations, it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is needed for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady flow phenomena. The present technique is the first surface treatment that provides the needed high accuracy through proper accounting of higher-order time derivatives. The present technique is founded on a method known in art as the Hermitian modified solution approximation (MESA) scheme. This is because high time accuracy at a surface depends upon, among other things, correction of the spatial cross-derivatives of flow variables, and many of these cross-derivatives are included explicitly on the computational grid in the MESA scheme. (Alternatively, a related method other than the MESA scheme could be used, as long as the method involves consistent application of the effects of the cross-derivatives.) While the mathematical derivation of the present technique is too lengthy and complex to fit within the space available for this article, the technique itself can be characterized in relatively simple terms: The technique involves correction of surface-normal spatial pressure derivatives at a boundary surface to satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions and thereby achieve arbitrarily high orders of time accuracy in special cases. The boundary conditions can now include a potentially infinite number

  1. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  2. Classification accuracy improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Improvements made in processing system designed for MIDAS (prototype multivariate interactive digital analysis system) effects higher accuracy in classification of pixels, resulting in significantly-reduced processing time. Improved system realizes cost reduction factor of 20 or more.

  3. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Dangerous Waste Training Plan

    SciTech Connect

    ENTROP, G.E.

    1999-12-03

    This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the plutonium finishing plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  4. Use of Optical Mapping in Bacterial Genome Finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dibyendu

    2010-06-03

    Dibyendu Kumar from the University of Florida discusses whole-genome optical mapping to help validate bacterial genome assemblies on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  5. CHARACTERISTICS OF KLEBSIELLA FROM TEXTILE FINISHING PLANT EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Klebsiella strains are found in abnormally high numbers in a stream receiving wastewater from a textile finishing plant. Representative strains are randomly selected to determine biochemical, serotype, and virulence patterns. All strains conform to the commonly accepted biochemic...

  6. VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED INTERIOR ARCH. SSW BY 205 DEGREES - Chasm Brook Bridge, Spanning Chasm Brook on West Sargent Mountain Carriage Road, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  7. 2. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding bearing diameters on locomotive axle. Norton grinder, 1942 (dated). Melvin Grassmeyer, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  8. 3. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding bearing diameters on locomotive axle. Norton grinder, 1942 (dated). Melvin Grassmeyer, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  9. 55. VIEW OF FINISHED CONCRETE COUNTERWEIGHT CAR SUPPORTED BY BLOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. VIEW OF FINISHED CONCRETE COUNTERWEIGHT CAR SUPPORTED BY BLOCK AND TACKLE ASSEMBLY LOOKING WEST, Date unknown, circa January 1948. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Surface decontamination of solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.W.; Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.

    1980-04-01

    This paper summarizes work in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop vibratory finishing into a large-scale decontamination system that can minimize the volume of surface-contaminated metallic and nonmetallic waste requiring geologic disposal. Vibratory finishing is a mass finishing process used in the metal finishing industry to debur, clean and improve surface finishes. The process combines a mechanical scrubbing action of a solid medium with the cleaning action of a liquid compound. The process takes place in a vibrating tub. Tests have demonstrated the ability to rapidly reduce contamination levels of transuranic-contaminated waste to substantially less than 10 nCi/g, the current limit for transuranic waste. The process is effective on a wide range of materials including stainless steel, Plexiglas, Neoprene, and Hypalon, the principal materials in Hanford glove boxes.

  11. Study on formation mechanism of periodic ripple on finished KDP crystal in cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Guipeng; Guan, Chaoliang

    2015-07-01

    A kind of formation mechanism of periodic ripple on finished KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate) crystal in cutting process is studied by analyzing the change of equivalent axial stiffness of aerostatic spindle and consequent motion of spindle shaft caused by fluctuation of supply air pressure. The analysis shows that fluctuation of supply air pressure is one of the reasons to cause surface ripple. Correlative experiments are taken and validate the analysis. By strictly controlling air pressure fluctuation, the Peak-to-Valley (PV) value of surface ripple generated by both spiral turning and face flycutting processes are reduced to less than 5nm.

  12. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  13. 8. Finish line, marked by white poles, as viewed from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Finish line, marked by white poles, as viewed from infield tote board. Shown are all the best locations for viewing the finish line, including the Clubhouse on the left and Original Grandstand on the right. For a similar view taken in 1939 by a photographer for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper, see photo WA-201-24. (August 1993) - Longacres, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  14. Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools: New Facilities Management Information System Promising, but Improved Data Accuracy Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    A General Accounting Office (GAO) study evaluated the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) new facilities management information system (FMIS). Specifically, the study examined whether the new FMIS addresses the old system's weaknesses and meets BIA's management needs, whether BIA has finished validating the accuracy of data transferred from the old…

  15. Improvement of Velocity Measurement Accuracy of Leaky Surface Acoustic Waves for Materials with Highly Attenuated Waveform of the V(z) curve by the Line-Focus-Beam Ultrasonic Material Characterization System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yuji; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kushibiki, Jun‑ichi

    2006-05-01

    Measurement accuracies of leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) velocities for materials with highly attenuated waveforms of V(z) curves obtained by the line-focus-beam ultrasonic material characterization (LFB-UMC) system are investigated. Theoretical investigations were carried out and experiments were performed for TiO2-SiO2 glass (C-7972), Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glass ceramic (Zerodur\\textregistered), and (111) gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) single crystal as specimens. Waveform attenuations of V(z) curves for C-7972 and Zerodur\\textregistered are greater than those for the (111) GGG single crystal. Frequency dependences of the waveform attenuations were calculated for each specimen by considering the propagation attenuation of LSAWs. The theoretical results revealed that the waveform attenuation dominantly depends upon the acoustic energy loss due to the water loading effect on the specimen surface, and that the waveform attenuation becomes smaller with decreasing frequency. Significant improvement of the measurement precision of LSAW velocities was demonstrated for each specimen using three LFB ultrasonic devices with different curvature radii R of the cylindrical acoustic lenses: R=2.0 mm at 75 MHz, R=1.5 mm at 110 MHz, and R=1.0 mm at 225 MHz; for C-7972, the precisions were improved from ± 0.0053% at 225 MHz to ± 0.0020% at 75 MHz.

  16. Effect of Various Finishing Procedures on the Reflectivity (Shine) of Tooth Enamel – An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Chitko, Shrikant Shrinivas; Kerudi, Veerendra Virupaxappa; Maheshwari, Amit Ratanlal; Patil, Neeraj Suresh; Tekale, Pawankumar Dnyandeo; Gore, Ketan Ashorao; Zope, Amit Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reflectivity of an object is a good parameter for surface finish. As the patient evaluates finishing as a function of gloss/reflectivity/shine an attempt is made here to evaluate changes in surface finish with custom made reflectometer. Aim The aim of the present study was to study the effect of various procedures during orthodontic treatment on the shine of enamel, using a custom made reflectometer. Materials and Methods Sixty one extracted premolars were collected and each tooth was mounted on acrylic block. Reflectivity of the teeth was measured as compared to standard before any procedure. One tooth was kept as standard throughout the study. Sixty teeth were acid etched. Reflectivity was measured on custom made reflectometer and readings recorded. Same procedure was repeated after debonding. Then 60 samples were divided into three groups: Group 1 - Tungsten Carbide, Group 2 - Astropol, Group 3- Sof-Lex disc depending upon the finishing method after debonding and reflectivity was measured. Results The mean percentage of reflectivity after acid etching was 31.4%, debonding 45.5%, Tungsten carbide bur finishing (Group 1) was 58.3%, Astropol (Group 2) 72.8%, and Sof-Lex disc (Group 3) 84.4% as that to the standard. There was statistically very highly significant (p<0.001) difference in reflectivity restored by the three finishing materials in the study. Thus, the light reflection was better in Group 3> Group 2> Group 1. Conclusion The primary goal was to restore the enamel to its original state after orthodontic treatment. The methods tested in this study could not restore the original enamel reflectivity. PMID:27656557

  17. Prevalence of clinical signs of disease in Danish finisher pigs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, H H; Nielsen, E O; Hassing, A-G; Ersbøll, A K; Nielsen, J P

    2008-03-22

    Between December 1999 and February 2001, two visits, eight weeks apart, were made to 90 herds of Danish finisher pigs. The prevalence of clinical signs was recorded by three veterinary technicians from the Danish Bacon and Meat Council according to a standardised procedure; they had been trained and their observations were monitored and validated before and during the study. A total of 154,347 finisher pigs were examined and 22,136 clinical signs were recorded. Vices accounted for 43 per cent of the signs. The highest mean prevalence was observed for ear necrosis (4.44 per cent), followed by respiratory signs (2.17 per cent), lameness (1.92 per cent), other skin diseases (1.73 per cent), tail bites (1.26 per cent), umbilical hernia (0.78 per cent), flank bites (0.52 per cent), diarrhoea (0.27 per cent), respiratory distress (0.12 per cent), atrophic rhinitis (0.10 per cent), recumbency (0.09 per cent) and central nervous disease (0.05 per cent). The prevalence of atrophic rhinitis was higher in conventional herds than in specific pathogen-free herds. The prevalence of clinical signs of atrophic rhinitis was higher among finishers weighing 51 to 75 kg than among finishers weighing up to 50 kg, and the prevalence of respiratory signs was higher among finishers weighing 51 to 75 kg then among finishers weighing 76 to 100 kg. PMID:18359931

  18. Effect of temperature and O-ring gland finish on sealing ability of Viton V747-75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1993-01-01

    As a part of the redesign project of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) following the Challenger accident, the field joint was redesigned to minimize the relative joint motion caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for the field joint were designed both to accommodate structural deflections and to promote pressure-assisted sealing. Tests were conducted in various face seal fixtures to evaluate the ability of Viton V747-75 O-rings to seal for a range of temperatures and surface finishes of the redesigned O-ring gland. The effect of surface finish on the sealing performance and wear characteristics of the O-rings was evaluated during simulated launch conditions that included low-frequency vibrations, gap openings, and rapid pressurizations. The effect of contamination on the sealing performance was also investigated. The O-rings sealed throughout the 75 deg F leak check test and for the seal tests from 50 deg F to 120 deg F for the range of surface finishes investigated. Although abrasions were found in the O-rings from pressurization against the rougher finishes, these abrasions were not detrimental to sealing. Below 50 deg F, Viton V747-75 O-rings were insufficiently resilient to track the test gap opening.

  19. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of 1,3-butadiene for hydrophobic finishing of textile substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Kartick K.; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of textile has both ecological and economical advantages over the wet-chemical processing. However, reaction in atmospheric pressure plasma has important challenges to be overcome before it can be successfully used for finishing applications in textile. These challenges are (i) generating stable glow plasma in presence liquid/gaseous monomer, and (ii) keeping the generated radicals active in the presence of contaminants such as oxygen and air. In this study, a stable glow plasma was generated at atmospheric pressure in the mixture of gaseous reactive monomer-1,3-butadiene and He and was made to react with cellulosic textile substrate. After 12 min of plasma treatment, the hydrophilic surface of the cellulosic substrate turned into highly hydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic finish was found to be durable to soap washing. After soap washing, a water drop of 37 μl took around 250 s to get absorbed in the treated sample compared to < 1 s in the untreated samples. The plasma modified samples showed water contact angle of around 134°. Both top and bottom sides of the fabric showed similar hydrophobic results in terms of water absorbency and contact angle. The results may be attributed to chemical reaction of butadiene with the cellulosic textile substrate. The surface characterization of the plasma modified samples under SEM and AFM revealed modification of the surface under <100 nm. The results showed that atmospheric pressure plasma can be successfully used for carrying out reaction of 1,3-butadiene with cellulosic textile substrates for producing hydrophobic surface finish.

  20. Optimizing use of distillers grains in finishing diets containing steam-flaked corn.

    PubMed

    Depenbusch, B E; Loe, E R; Sindt, J J; Cole, N A; Higgins, J J; Drouillard, J S

    2009-08-01

    Two hundred ninety-nine crossbred yearling steers (363 +/- 15 kg initial BW) were fed for an average of 114 d in a finishing study comparing 7 diets in which steam-flaked corn was used as the principal energy source. Forty-nine pens were used in this study with 7 BW blocks, 7 pens per treatment, and 5 to 7 steers per pen. A control diet with no distillers grains with solubles (DGS) was compared with 6 diets containing 15% DGS (DM basis). The diets contained wet sorghum DGS with 0 or 6% alfalfa hay, dried sorghum DGS with 0 or 6% alfalfa hay, wet corn DGS with 6% alfalfa hay, or dried corn DGS with 6% alfalfa hay. Apparent total tract digestibilities were calculated by total collection of fecal material from the concrete-surfaced pens over a 72-h period. Dry matter intake, ADG, G:F, and carcass characteristics were similar (P > or = 0.18) for steers fed finishing diets with or without 15% DGS. However, apparent total tract digestibilities of DM and OM were 2.8% less (P < or = 0.03) for finishing diets containing 15% DGS (DM basis). Dry matter intake, ADG, G:F, apparent total tract digestibility, and carcass characteristics were not different (P > or = 0.09) for steers fed finishing diets containing sorghum or corn DGS. Dry matter intake, ADG, G:F, apparent total tract digestibility, and carcass characteristics also were not different (P > or = 0.10) for steers fed finishing diets containing wet or dried DGS. Steers fed sorghum DGS with 6% hay consumed more DM (P < 0.01) and gained more BW (P < 0.01) than steers fed diets without hay, but G:F were not different (P > 0.78). Sorghum DGS diets containing alfalfa hay were 4% less (P = 0.01) digestible than sorghum DGS diets containing no hay. Carcasses of steers fed sorghum DGS diets without hay were lighter, leaner, and had decreased USDA yield grades (P = 0.01) compared with steers fed sorghum DGS diets containing hay. Feeding moderate levels (i.e., 15%, DM basis) of DGS resulted in growth performance and carcass

  1. Facile and durable antimicrobial finishing of cotton textiles using a silver salt and UV light.

    PubMed

    Kozicki, Marek; Sąsiadek, Elżbieta; Kołodziejczyk, Marek; Komasa, Justyna; Adamus, Agnieszka; Maniukiewicz, Waldemar; Pawlaczyk, Aleksandra; Szynkowska, Małgorzata; Rogowski, Jacek; Rybicki, Edward

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present facile antimicrobial finishing of cotton textiles. Screen printing was used for surface-finishing of cotton using a printing paste containing silver nitrate. UVC irradiation was applied to convert silver nitrate into a color product, thus also changing the color of the textiles. The color, its strength and stability of samples, depend on absorbed UVC energy and the formula of the printing paste. Scanning electron microscopy with the energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry revealed formation of silver particles on cotton threads; X-ray diffraction analysis and the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry did not provide clear information on these products. Microbiological studies revealed that the samples inhibited proliferation of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Washing fastness tests confirmed resistance of the samples to at least 50 washings. Additionally, the inhibition zones increased as the number of washing cycles increased, which is unique for such samples. This work also presents an approach to the design of antimicrobially finished workwear.

  2. 40 CFR 410.40 - Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... woven fabric finishing subcategory. 410.40 Section 410.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Fabric Finishing Subcategory § 410.40 Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing... following types of textile mills: woven fabric finishers, which may include any or all of the following...

  3. Orthodontic treatment outcomes obtained by application of a finishing protocol

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Flórez, Alvaro; Barbosa-Lis, Diana María; Zapata-Noreña, Oscar Arturo; Marín-Velásquez, Julissa Andrea; Afanador-Bayona, Sergio Andrés

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the results of a finishing protocol implemented in patients treated in the Orthodontics graduate program at Universidad de Antioquia. Evaluation was carried out by means of the criteria set by the Objective Grading System (OGS) of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO). Methods: Cast models and panoramic radiographs of 34 patients were evaluated. The intervention group (IG) consisted of 17 patients (19.88 ± 4.4 years old) treated under a finishing protocol. This protocol included training in finishing, application of a finishing guide, brackets repositioning and patient's follow-up. Results of the IG were compared to a control group of 17 patients (21.88 ± 7.0 years old) selected by stratified randomization without finishing intervention (CG). Results: The scores for both CG and IG were 38.00 ± 9.0 and 31.41 ± 9.6 (p = 0.048), respectively. The score improved significantly in the IG group, mainly regarding marginal ridges (CG: 5.59 ± 2.2; IG: 3.65 ± 1.8) (p = 0.009) and root angulation (CG: 7.59 ± 2.8; IG: 4.88 ± 2.6) (p = 0.007). Criteria that did not improve, but had the highest scores were: alignment (CG: 6.35 ± 2.7; IG: 6.82 ± 2.8) (p = 0.62) and buccolingual inclination (CG: 3.6 ± 5.88; IG: 5.29 ± 3.9) (p = 0.65). Conclusions: Standardization and implementation of a finishing protocol contributed to improve clinical performance in the Orthodontics graduate program, as expressed by occlusal outcomes. Greater emphasis should be given on the finishing phase to achieve lower scores in the ABO grading system. PMID:27275620

  4. Design and Analysis of a Micromechanical Three-Component Force Sensor for Characterizing and Quantifying Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Q.; Wu, W.; Zhang, D.; Wei, B.; Sun, W.; Wang, Y.; Ge, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Roughness, which can represent the trade-off between manufacturing cost and performance of mechanical components, is a critical predictor of cracks, corrosion and fatigue damage. In order to measure polished or super-finished surfaces, a novel touch probe based on three-component force sensor for characterizing and quantifying surface roughness is proposed by using silicon micromachining technology. The sensor design is based on a cross-beam structure, which ensures that the system possesses high sensitivity and low coupling. The results show that the proposed sensor possesses high sensitivity, low coupling error, and temperature compensation function. The proposed system can be used to investigate micromechanical structures with nanometer accuracy.

  5. Accuracy potentials for large space antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The relationships among materials selection, truss design, and manufacturing techniques in the interest of surface accuracies for large space antennas are discussed. Among the antenna configurations considered are: tetrahedral truss, pretensioned truss, and geodesic dome and radial rib structures. Comparisons are made of the accuracy achievable by truss and dome structure types for a wide variety of diameters, focal lengths, and wavelength of radiated signal, taking into account such deforming influences as solar heating-caused thermal transients and thermal gradients.

  6. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Yin, Shuangye (Broad Institute)

    2016-07-12

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  7. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shuangye

    2012-06-01

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  8. Studies on Application of Aroma Finish on Silk Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipparagi, Sanganna Aminappa; Srinivasa, Thirumalappa; Das, Brojeswari; Naik, Subhas Venkatappa; Purushotham, Serampur Parappa

    2016-06-01

    Aromatic treatments on textiles have gained importance in the recent years. In the present article work has been done on fragrance finish application on silk material. Silk is an expensive natural fibre used for apparel purpose and known for its feel and appeal. Incorporation of fragrance material in silk product, will add more value to it. Present work focuses to impart durable aroma finish for silk products to be home washed or subjected to dry cleaning. Microencapsulated aroma chemical has been used for the treatment. Impregnation method, Exhaust method, Dip-Pad-Dry method and Spray method have been used to see the influence of application method on the uptake and performance. Evaluation of the aroma treated material has been done through subjective evaluation as per Odor Intensity Reference Scaling (OIRS). Effect of the aroma finishing on the physical properties of the fabric has also been studied. No adverse effect has been observed on the stiffness of the fabric after the aroma treatment.

  9. Predicting the Digestible Energy of Rapeseed Meal from Its Chemical Composition in Growing-finishing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T.; Liu, L.; Piao, X. S.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to establish a digestible energy (DE) content prediction model of rapeseed meal for growing-finishing pig based on rapeseed meal’s chemical composition. In experiment 1, observed linear relationships between the determined DE content of 22 rapeseed meal calibration samples and proximate nutrients, gross energy (GE) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) were used to develop the DE prediction model. In experiment 2, 4 samples of rapeseed meal selected at random from the primary rapeseed growing regions of China were used for testing the accuracy of DE prediction models. The results indicated that the DE was negatively correlated with NDF (r = −0.86) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) (r = −0.73) contents, and moderately correlated with gross energy (GE; r = 0.56) content in rapeseed meal calibration samples. In contrast, no significant correlations were found for crude protein, ether extract, crude fiber and ash contents. According to the regression analysis, NDF or both NDF and GE were found to be useful for the DE prediction models. Two prediction models: DE = 16.775−0.147×NDF (R2 = 0.73) and DE = 11.848−0.131×NDF+0.231×GE (R2 = 0.76) were obtained. The maximum absolute difference between the in vivo DE determinations and the predicted DE values was 0.62 MJ/kg and the relative difference was 5.21%. Therefore, it was concluded that, for growing-finishing pigs, these two prediction models could be used to predict the DE content of rapeseed meal with acceptable accuracy. PMID:25049576

  10. Surface topography measurements over the 1 meter to 10 micrometer spatial period bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Furenlid, K.; DeBiasse, R.A.; Church, E.L.; Army Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ )

    1989-09-01

    A recently-developed long-trace surface profiling instrument (LTP) is now in operation in our laboratory measuring surface profiles on grazing incidence aspheres and also conventional optical surface. The LTP characterizes surface height profiles in a non-contact manner over spatial periods ranging from 1 meter (the maximum scan length) to 2 mm (the Nyquist period for 1 mm sampling period) and complements the range of our WYKO NCP-1000 2.5X surface roughness profiler (5 mm to 9.8 {mu}m). Using these two instruments, we can fully characterize both figure and finish of an optical surface in the same way that we normally characterize surface finish, e.g., by means of the power spectral density function in the spatial frequency domain. A great deal of information about the distribution of figure errors over various spatial frequency ranges is available from this data, which is useful for process control and predicting performance at the desired wavelength and incidence angle. In addition, the LTP is able to measure the absolute radius of curvature on long-radius optics with high precision and accuracy. Angular errors in the optical head are measured in real time by an electronic autocollimator as the head traverses the linear air bearing slide. Measurements of kilometer radius optics can be made very quickly and the data analyzed in a format that is very easy to understand. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  11. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  12. Method and means for producing fluorocarbon finishes on fibrous structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, Madeline S. (Inventor); Stringham, Roger S. (Inventor); Fogg, Lawrence C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved process and apparatus is provided for imparting chemically bonded fluorocarbon finishes to textiles. In the process, the textiles are contacted with a gaseous mixture of fluoroolefins in an inert diluent gas in the presence of ultraviolet light under predetermined conditions.

  13. Graphic Arts: The Press and Finishing Processes. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Dan

    This document contains teacher and student materials for a course in graphic arts concentrating on printing presses and the finishing process for publications. Seven units of instruction cover the following topics: (1) offset press systems; (2) offset inks and dampening chemistry; (3) offset press operating procedures; (4) preventive maintenance…

  14. 71. September 1913 "No. 113. Some of the finished bitulithic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. September 1913 "No. 113. Some of the finished bitulithic or bituminous macadam road after being sanded and rolled, in the foreground. In the middle distance men are applying oil to incomplete section. In the far distance, roller is working on foundation course." - Crater Lake National Park Roads, Klamath Falls, Klamath County, OR

  15. DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN SOURCE AND FINISHED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have occurred with the most notable being the 1993 episode in Milwaukee. As a result, the past decade has seen a massive effort expended on the development of methods to detect Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in source and finish...

  16. THE USEPA'S METAL FINISHING FACILITY RISK SCREENING TOOL (MFFRST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmetal ProtectionAgenccy's Metal Finishing
    Facility Risk Screening Tool (MFFRST)

    William M. Barrett Jr, Ph.D. , P.E. ; Paul Harten, Ph.D.1, and Matthew Lorber

    The US Environmental Protection Agency completed the development of the first version of...

  17. Cement Finishing. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nama, Joe

    This instructor's guide accompanies the self-paced student training modules on cement finishing, available separately as CE 031 576. Introductory materials include a description of the components of the pre-apprenticeship project, discussion of teacher's role in students' completion of the modules, and scope and contents of Phase 2 training. Each…

  18. Carpentry and Finishing Procedures. Building Maintenance. Module II. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Sam; Brunk, Art

    This curriculum guide, keyed to the building maintenance competency profile developed by industry and education professionals, provides three units on carpentry and finishing procedures. The first unit, Exterior Carpentry, contains the following lessons: carpentry safety procedures, ladder and scaffolding safety, door installation/repair,…

  19. Introduction to Concrete Finishing. Instructor Edition. Introduction to Construction Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide contains the materials required to teach a competency-based introductory course in concrete finishing to students who have chosen to explore careers in construction. The following topics are covered in the course's three instructional units: concrete materials, concrete tools, and applied skills. Each unit contains some or…

  20. Plutonium Finishing Plant assessment of confinement system bypass leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.D.

    1996-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to document walk-through`s of the safety class confinement systems at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In addition this document outlines the actions taken to assess the confinement system for bypass leakage as well as establishing disposition for discovered deficiencies at the PFP.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF THE METAL FINISHING FACILITY RISK SCREENING TOOL (MFFRST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently the US EPA completed the development of the first version of the Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool (MFFRST) and has made this product available to the general public. MFFRST calculates the air emissions from a metal plating line and determines the risk to bot...

  2. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Finishing and Distribution Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the finishing and distribution cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards…

  3. Interior Finishes. Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Performance Criteria. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. Construction Fund, Albany, NY.

    A research program and the testing methods it developed are described, indicating the performance criteria of interior finishes for walls, ceilings and floors. Material exposure criteria are given with the probability of damage ratings for--(1) physical impact, (2) chemical damage, (3) biological, food and water damage. The relationship of…

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF THE METAL FINISHING FACILITY RISK SCREENING TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enhancement of the US Environmental Protection Agency's
    Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool (MFFRST)

    William M. Barrett Jr, Ph.D., P.E. , P.E.; Paul Harten, Ph.D.1, Matt Lorber , Charles Peck , and Steve Schwartz, P.E., Q.E.P.3

    Recently, the US Environ...

  5. Techniques for setting modes of thermal and deformation effect at combined hardening and finishing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimyanov, Kh M.; Rakhimyanov, K. Kh; Rakhimyanov, A. Kh; Kutyshkin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers the issues of setting the modes of thermal and deformation effects in the basic schemes at combined hardening and finishing operations. On the basis of solving the thermal physical problem of material high rate heating, the parameters of a thermohardened layer were determined within the range of the investigated modes. An algorithm for setting the mode parameters of high rate heating responsible for the hardening effect at the combined processing was proposed. The analysis of the mathematical model for forming a surface microrelief at ultrasonic deformation showed that the sizes, the form of fragments and the density of a microrelief were determined by the processing kinematic parameters. An algorithm for setting the rotation speed and feeding at ultrasonic deformation according to microrelief characteristics was developed. The conditions to form a completely regular microrelief on the processed surface that represent the ratio between a single imprint diameter at the ultrasonic deformation and the processing kinematic parameters were determined. The complex of the algorithms suggested for setting the mode parameters of high rate heating and ultrasonic deformation constitutes the techniques for setting the modes of combined hardening and finishing operations.

  6. Comparison of nitrate levels in raw water and finished water from historical monitoring data on Iowa municipal drinking water supplies.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Peter J; Smith, Brian J; Feng, Zhen-Fang; Kantamneni, Jiji R; Riley, David G

    2006-05-01

    Nitrate contamination of water sources is a concern where large amounts of nitrogen fertilizers are regularly applied to soils. Ingested nitrate from dietary sources and drinking water can be converted to nitrite and ultimately to N-nitroso compounds, many of which are known carcinogens. Epidemiologic studies of drinking water nitrate and cancer report mixed findings; a criticism is the use of nitrate concentrations from retrospective drinking water data to assign exposure levels. Residential point-of-use nitrate data are scarce; gaps in historical data for municipal supply finished water hamper exposure classification efforts. We used generalized linear regression models to estimate and compare historical raw water and finished water nitrate levels (1960s-1990s) in single source Iowa municipal supplies to determine whether raw water monitoring data could supplement finished water data to improve exposure assessment. Comparison of raw water and finished water samples (same sampling date) showed a significant difference in nitrate levels in municipalities using rivers; municipalities using other surface water or alluvial groundwater had no difference in nitrate levels. A regional aggregation of alluvial groundwater municipalities was constructed based on results from a previous study showing regional differences in nitrate contamination of private wells; results from this analysis were mixed, dependent upon region and decade. These analyses demonstrate using historical raw water nitrate monitoring data to supplement finished water data for exposure assessment is appropriate for individual Iowa municipal supplies using alluvial groundwater, lakes or reservoirs. Using alluvial raw water data on a regional basis is dependent on region and decade.

  7. Surface preparation methods to enhance dynamic surface property measurements of shocked metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellner, M. B.; Vogan McNeil, W.; Gray, G. T.; Huerta, D. C.; King, N. S. P.; Neal, G. E.; Valentine, S. J.; Payton, J. R.; Rubin, J.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Buttler, W. T.

    2008-04-01

    This effort investigates surface-preparation methods to enhance dynamic surface-property measurements of shocked metal surfaces. To assess the ability of making reliable and consistent dynamic surface-property measurements, the amount of material ejected from the free surface upon shock release to vacuum (ejecta) was monitored for shocked Al-1100 and Sn targets. Four surface-preparation methods were considered: Fly-cut machine finish, diamond-turned machine finish, polished finish, and ball rolled. The samples were shock loaded by in-contact detonation of HE PBX-9501 on the front side of the metal coupons. Ejecta production at the back side or free side of the metal coupons was monitored using piezoelectric pins, optical shadowgraphy, and x-ray attenuation radiography.

  8. 40 CFR 63.5390 - How do I measure the HAP content of a finish?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the HAP content of a finish, the reference method is EPA Method 311 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 63... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Testing...

  9. 40 CFR 63.5395 - How do I measure the density of a finish?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... density of a finish, the reference method is EPA Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60. You may use... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Testing...

  10. 40 CFR 425.20 - Applicability; description of the hair save, chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING... cattle-like hides into finished leather by hair save unhairing, chrome tanning, and retan-wet finishing....

  11. 40 CFR 427.80 - Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. 427.80 Section 427.80 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Coating or Finishing of Asbestos Textiles Subcategory § 427.80 Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  12. 40 CFR 427.80 - Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. 427.80 Section 427.80 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Coating or Finishing of Asbestos Textiles Subcategory § 427.80 Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  13. 40 CFR 427.80 - Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. 427.80 Section 427.80 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Coating or Finishing of Asbestos Textiles Subcategory § 427.80 Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  14. 40 CFR 427.80 - Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. 427.80 Section 427.80 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Coating or Finishing of Asbestos Textiles Subcategory § 427.80 Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  15. 40 CFR 427.80 - Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. 427.80 Section 427.80 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Coating or Finishing of Asbestos Textiles Subcategory § 427.80 Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  16. 40 CFR 410.40 - Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fabric finishing subcategory. 410.40 Section 410.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Woven Fabric Finishing Subcategory § 410.40 Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing subcategory....

  17. 40 CFR 410.60 - Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carpet finishing subcategory. 410.60 Section 410.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carpet Finishing Subcategory § 410.60 Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory. The provisions of...

  18. 40 CFR 410.60 - Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carpet finishing subcategory. 410.60 Section 410.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carpet Finishing Subcategory § 410.60 Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory. The provisions of...

  19. 40 CFR 410.60 - Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carpet finishing subcategory. 410.60 Section 410.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carpet Finishing Subcategory § 410.60 Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory. The provisions of...

  20. 40 CFR 410.60 - Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carpet finishing subcategory. 410.60 Section 410.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carpet Finishing Subcategory § 410.60 Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory. The provisions of...

  1. 40 CFR 410.60 - Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carpet finishing subcategory. 410.60 Section 410.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carpet Finishing Subcategory § 410.60 Applicability; description of the carpet finishing subcategory. The provisions of...

  2. 21 CFR 181.26 - Drying oils as components of finished resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Drying oils as components of finished resins. 181... Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.26 Drying oils as components of finished resins. Substances classified as drying oils, when migrating from food-packaging material (as components of finished...

  3. 40 CFR 410.40 - Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... fabric finishing subcategory. 410.40 Section 410.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Woven Fabric Finishing Subcategory § 410.40 Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing subcategory....

  4. 40 CFR 410.50 - Applicability; description of the knit fabric finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... fabric finishing subcategory. 410.50 Section 410.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Knit Fabric Finishing Subcategory § 410.50 Applicability; description of the knit fabric finishing subcategory....

  5. 40 CFR 410.40 - Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... fabric finishing subcategory. 410.40 Section 410.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Woven Fabric Finishing Subcategory § 410.40 Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing subcategory....

  6. 40 CFR 410.40 - Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fabric finishing subcategory. 410.40 Section 410.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Woven Fabric Finishing Subcategory § 410.40 Applicability; description of the woven fabric finishing subcategory....

  7. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  8. 40 CFR 141.511 - What is required of new finished water reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reservoirs? 141.511 Section 141.511 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.511 What is required of new finished water reservoirs? If your system begins construction of a finished water reservoir on...

  9. 40 CFR 141.511 - What is required of new finished water reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reservoirs? 141.511 Section 141.511 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.511 What is required of new finished water reservoirs? If your system begins construction of a finished water reservoir on...

  10. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  11. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  12. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  13. 40 CFR 141.511 - What is required of new finished water reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reservoirs? 141.511 Section 141.511 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.511 What is required of new finished water reservoirs? If your system begins construction of a finished water reservoir on...

  14. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  15. 40 CFR 141.511 - What is required of new finished water reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reservoirs? 141.511 Section 141.511 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.511 What is required of new finished water reservoirs? If your system begins construction of a finished water reservoir on...

  16. 40 CFR 141.511 - What is required of new finished water reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reservoirs? 141.511 Section 141.511 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.511 What is required of new finished water reservoirs? If your system begins construction of a finished water reservoir on...

  17. Effect of Finishing System on Subcutaneous Fat Melting Point and Fatty Acid Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Angus-cross steers (n = 69) were used to determine the effect of finishing system on subcutaneous fat melting point and fatty acid composition. Three finishing systems were evaluated: 1) mixed pasture for 134 d [MP], 2) mixed pasture for 93 d and alfalfa for 41 d [AL], or 3) concentrate finishing f...

  18. Supercritical carbon dioxide assisted silicon based finishing of cellulosic fabric: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amina L; Er-Rafik, Meriem; Moller, Martin

    2013-10-15

    Usage of supercritical carbon dioxide as a medium for finishing cotton fabrics with modified dimethylsiloxane polymers terminated with silanol groups was investigated, different cross-linkers namely 3-isocyanatepropyltriethoxysilane (IPES) and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) were used for covalently bonding between silicon and cellulose. The presence and the amount of PDMS compounds on the treated fabrics were characterized by FT-IR. Qualitative and quantitative information on the distribution of the silicon molecules across the fibre cross section was provided by SEM/EDX analysis and Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) respectively. The results confirm that all fibres treated with PDMS and IPES have larger silicon amounts than those treated with TEOS. SC-CO2 medium provides good coating of cotton surface with a 3D network of DMS compound and cross linker, and leads to forming highest DMS concentration in a layer between 1 and 2μ under the surface of cotton fabrics.

  19. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents. PMID:16541075

  20. Sensory quality of beef from different finishing diets.

    PubMed

    Resconi, V C; Campo, M M; Font i Furnols, M; Montossi, F; Sañudo, C

    2010-11-01

    Beef production under different local husbandry systems might have meat sensory quality implications for the marketing of these products abroad. In order to assess the effect of finishing diet systems on beef quality, a trained sensory taste panel assessed meat aged for 20 days from 80 Uruguayan Hereford steers that were finished on one of the following diets: T1=Pasture [4% of animal live weight (LW)], T2=Pasture [3% LW plus concentrate (0.6% LW)], T3=Pasture [3% LW plus concentrate (1.2% LW)], or T4=Concentrate plus hay ad libitum. Beef odour and flavour intensities decreased with an increase in the energy content of the diet. The meat from T2 had the lowest acid flavour and strange odours intensities. In general, steers fed only concentrate plus hay (T4) produced meat that had an inferior sensory quality because they had more pronounced off-flavours and was tougher. PMID:20696533

  1. Method and system for processing optical elements using magnetorheological finishing

    DOEpatents

    Menapace, Joseph Arthur; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene; Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A

    2012-09-18

    A method of finishing an optical element includes mounting the optical element in an optical mount having a plurality of fiducials overlapping with the optical element and obtaining a first metrology map for the optical element and the plurality of fiducials. The method also includes obtaining a second metrology map for the optical element without the plurality of fiducials, forming a difference map between the first metrology map and the second metrology map, and aligning the first metrology map and the second metrology map. The method further includes placing mathematical fiducials onto the second metrology map using the difference map to form a third metrology map and associating the third metrology map to the optical element. Moreover, the method includes mounting the optical element in the fixture in an MRF tool, positioning the optical element in the fixture; removing the plurality of fiducials, and finishing the optical element.

  2. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents.

  3. 26. A battery of calender presses at work finishing magazine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. A battery of calender presses at work finishing magazine paper. After the coated paper has been dried and put into rolls, as shown in the preceding pictures, it is brought to the room shown here. A roll is put in the reel at the man's shoulder in the foreground and started through the machine. It passes between the two top rollers and then in and out between the succeeding rollers, until it reaches the bottom. Many tons' pressure have ironed it before it comes out and is rolled up again. This process gives it the finish that the National Geographic must have to maintain its high standard. (p.240.) - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  4. Reticence, Accuracy and Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2015-12-01

    James Hansen has cautioned the scientific community against "reticence," by which he means a reluctance to speak in public about the threat of climate change. This may contribute to social inaction, with the result that society fails to respond appropriately to threats that are well understood scientifically. Against this, others have warned against the dangers of "crying wolf," suggesting that reticence protects scientific credibility. We argue that both these positions are missing an important point: that reticence is not only a matter of style but also of substance. In previous work, Bysse et al. (2013) showed that scientific projections of key indicators of climate change have been skewed towards the low end of actual events, suggesting a bias in scientific work. More recently, we have shown that scientific efforts to be responsive to contrarian challenges have led scientists to adopt the terminology of a "pause" or "hiatus" in climate warming, despite the lack of evidence to support such a conclusion (Lewandowsky et al., 2015a. 2015b). In the former case, scientific conservatism has led to under-estimation of climate related changes. In the latter case, the use of misleading terminology has perpetuated scientific misunderstanding and hindered effective communication. Scientific communication should embody two equally important goals: 1) accuracy in communicating scientific information and 2) efficacy in expressing what that information means. Scientists should strive to be neither conservative nor adventurous but to be accurate, and to communicate that accurate information effectively.

  5. Loading and Unloading Finishing Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Arlene; McGlone, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Current guidelines suggest the use of ramps below 20 degrees to load and unload pigs; however, they do not suggest the use of any specific bedding. Bedding types (nothing, feed, sand, wood shavings, and hay) were tested with finishing pigs (70–120 kg) to determine which was most effective in reducing slips, falls, and vocalizations at three ramp angles, two moisture levels, over two seasons. Slips, falls, and vocalizations were summed to establish a scoring system for the types of beddings. Heart rate and the total time it took to load and unload pigs, increased as the slope increased. Bedding, bedding moisture, season, and ramp slope interacted to impact the total time it took for finishing pigs to load and unload the ramp. Selection of the best bedding depends on ramp slope, season, and wetness of bedding. Abstract The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of finishing pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps with a slope below 20 degrees to load and unload pigs. However, the total time it takes to load and unload animals and slips, falls, and vocalizations are a welfare concern. Three ramp angles (0, 10 or 20 degrees), five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay), two moistures (dry or wet bedding, >50% moisture) over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter) were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 2400 pig observations) and analyzed with a scoring system. The use of bedding during summer or winter played a role in the total time it took to load and unload the ramp (p < 0.05). Bedding, bedding moisture, season, and slope significantly interacted to impact the total time to load and unload finishing pigs (p < 0.05). Heart rate and the total time it took to load and unload the ramp increased as the slope of the ramp increased (p < 0.05). Heart rates were higher during the

  6. Development of laser finishing for non-circular profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.W.; Sheng, P.S.

    1995-03-01

    A laser-based technique for finishing of non-circular cylindrical parts is presented. In this process, the frequency characteristics of a desired non-circular shape is extracted from a CAD through a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm and implemented through a CO{sub 2} laser machining system. A galvanometer-based scanner is used in the process to achieve programmable beam trajectories and high-speed finishing. An error estimation scheme can be developed to determine the final dimensional error of the non-circular profile. This process can be selected as both a batch production tool and a rapid prototyping tool based on the designated processing rate and precision. Initial experimental results include the production of two- and three-lobed profiles, as well as definition of part feature using higher-order harmonics, in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with corresponding R{sub a} values of less than 1 {mu}m. The machine tool elements and general procedure for non-circular laser finishing are also presented.

  7. Dust control technology usage patterns in the drywall finishing industry.

    PubMed

    Young-Corbett, Deborah E; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2009-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to quantify drywall finishing industry usage rates of dust control technology, identify barriers to technology adoption, and explore firm owner perception of risk. Industry use of the following technologies was described: wet methods, respiratory protection, pole sanders, ventilated sanders, and low-dust joint compound. A survey instrument composed of both Likert-type scaled items and open-ended items was developed and administered by telephone to the census population of the owners of member firms of trade associations: Finishing Contractors Association and Association of the Wall and Ceiling Industries. Of 857 firms, 264 interviews were completed. Along with descriptive statistics, results were analyzed to examine effects of firm size and union affiliation on responses. Responses to open-ended items were analyzed using content analysis procedures. Firm owners rated the risk of dust to productivity and customer satisfaction as low-moderate. Half rated the dust as having some impact on worker health, with higher impacts indicated by owners of small firms. Among the available control technologies, respiratory protection was used most frequently. Several barriers to implementation of the more effective control technologies were identified. Barriers associated with technology usability, productivity, and cost, as well as misperceptions of risk, should be addressed to improve dust control in the drywall finishing industry.

  8. Finishes and furnishings: considerations for critical care environments.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Misty; Bowman, Ken L

    2011-01-01

    When selecting finishes and furnishings within a critical care unit, multiple factors can ultimately affect patient outcomes, impact costs, and contribute to operational efficiencies. First, consider the culture of the regional location, operations of the specific facility, and the recent focus on patient-centered care. The intention is to create an appropriate familiarity and comfort level with the environment for the patient and family. Second, safety and infection control are of utmost concern, particularly for the critical care patient with limited mobility. The planning and design team must be acutely aware of the regulations and guidelines of various governing agencies, local codes, and best design practices that can directly affect choices of finishes and furnishings. Flooring, wall, and window finishes, lighting, art and color, as well as furniture and fabric selection should be considered. Issues to address include maintenance, durability, sustainability, infection control, aesthetics, safety, wayfinding, and acoustics. Balancing these issues with comfort, patient and staff satisfaction, accommodations for an aging population, increasing bariatric needs, efficient operations, and avoidance of "never events" requires team collaboration and communication, knowledge of product advancements, a keen awareness of how environmental stimuli are perceived, and utilization of the best available evidence to make informed design decisions.

  9. Fundamental studies of tin whiskering in microelectronics finishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinol, Lesly Agnes

    Common electronics materials, such as tin, copper, steel, and brass, are ambient reactive under common use conditions, and as such are prone to corrosion. During the early 1940s, reports of failures due to electrical shorting of components caused by 'whisker' (i.e., filamentary surface protrusion) growth on many surface types---including the aforementioned metals---began to emerge. Lead alloying of tin (3--10% by weight, typically in the eutectic proportion) eliminated whiskering risk for decades, until the July 2006 adoption of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) directive was issued by the European Union. This directive, which has since been adopted by California and parts of China, severely restricted the use of lead (<1000 ppm) in all electrical and electronics equipment being placed on the EU market, imposing the need for developing reliable new "lead-free" alternatives to SnPb. In spite of the abundance of modern-day anecdotes chronicling whisker-related failures in satellites, nuclear power stations, missiles, pacemakers, and spacecraft navigation equipment, pure tin finishes are still increasingly being employed today, and the root cause(s) of tin whiskering remains elusive. This work describes a series of structured experiments exploring the fundamental relationships between the incidence of tin whiskering (as dependent variable) and numerous independent variables. These variables included deposition method (electroplating, electroless plating, template-based electrochemical synthesis, and various physical vapor deposition techniques, including resistive evaporation, electron beam evaporation, and sputtering), the inclusion of microparticles and organic contamination, the effects of sample geometry, and nanostructuring. Key findings pertain to correlations between sample geometry and whisker propensity, and also to the stress evolution across a series of 4"-diameter silicon wafers of varying thicknesses with respect to the degree of post

  10. Discrimination of 1990s original automotive paint systems: a collaborative study of black nonmetallic base coat/clear coat finishes using infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ryland, S; Bishea, G; Brun-Conti, L; Eyring, M; Flanagan, B; Jergovich, T; MacDougall, D; Suzuki, E

    2001-01-01

    The 1990s saw the introduction of significantly new types of paint binder chemistries into the automotive finish coat market. Considering the pronounced changes in the binders that can now be found in automotive paints and their potential use in a wide variety of finishes worldwide, the Paint Subgroup of the Scientific Working Group for Materials (SWGMAT) initiated a validation study to investigate the ability of commonly accepted methods of forensic paint examination to differentiate between these newer types of paints. Nine automotive paint systems typical of original equipment applications were acquired from General Motors Corporation in 1992. They consisted of steel panels coated with typical electrocoat primers and/or primer surfacers followed by a black nonmetallic base coat and clear coat. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the discrimination power of common forensic techniques when applied to the newer generation original automotive finishes. The second purpose was to evaluate interlaboratory reproducibility of automotive paint spectra collected on a variety of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers and accessories normally used for forensic paint examinations. The results demonstrate that infrared spectroscopy is an effective tool for discriminating between the major automotive paint manufacturers' formulation types which are currently used in original finishes. Furthermore, and equally important, the results illustrate that the mid-infrared spectra of these finishes are generally quite reproducible even when comparing data from different laboratories, commercial FT-IR instruments, and accessories in a "real world," mostly uncontrolled, environment.

  11. Airborne Topographic Mapper Calibration Procedures and Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Chreston F.; Krabill, William B.; Manizade, Serdar S.; Russell, Rob L.; Sonntag, John G.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Description of NASA Airborn Topographic Mapper (ATM) lidar calibration procedures including analysis of the accuracy and consistancy of various ATM instrument parameters and the resulting influence on topographic elevation measurements. The ATM elevations measurements from a nominal operating altitude 500 to 750 m above the ice surface was found to be: Horizontal Accuracy 74 cm, Horizontal Precision 14 cm, Vertical Accuracy 6.6 cm, Vertical Precision 3 cm.

  12. Polishing and local planarization of plastic spherical capsules using tumble finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratwala, T. I.; Steele, W. A.; Feit, M. D.; Moreno, K.; Stadermann, M.; Fair, J.; Chen, K.; Nikroo, A.; Youngblood, K.; Wu, K.

    2012-11-01

    A new method (a variant of tumble finishing) for polishing and achieving local planarization on precision spherical, plastic capsules is described. Such capsules have niche applications, such as ablators used in high-peak-power laser targets for fusion energy research. The as-manufactured ablators contain many shallow domes (many 100's of nm high and a few 10's of μm wide) on the outer surface which are undesirable due to contributions to instabilities during implosion. These capsules were polished (i.e., tumble finished) by rotating a cylindrical vial containing the capsule, many borosilicate glass or zirconia media, and an aqueous-based colloidal silica polishing slurry. During tumble finishing, the relative media/capsule motions cause multiple, random sliding spherical-spherical Hertzian contacts, resulting in material removal, and possibly plastic deformation, on the capsule. As a result, the domes were observed to locally planarize (i.e., converge to lower heights). Utilizing the correct kinematics (i.e., the characteristics of the media/capsule motions), as controlled by the vial rotation rate and the fill fraction of media and slurry, the high velocity downward circumferential media motions were avoided, preventing fracturing of the fragile capsules. Also, the resulting post-polished surface roughness on the capsule was found to scale with the initial media surface roughness. Hence, pre-polishing the media greatly reduced the roughness of the media and thus the roughness of the polished capsule. A material removal model is described based on the Preston model and spherical-spherical Hertzian contacts which shows reasonable agreement with measured average removal rates of 35 ± 15 nm/day and which serves as a valuable tool to scale the polishing behavior with changes in process variables. Narrow domes were observed to planarize more rapidly than wider domes. A local planarization convergence model is also described, based on the concept of workpiece

  13. EOS mapping accuracy study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, R. B.; Eppes, T. A.; Ouellette, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were performed to evaluate various image positioning methods for possible use in the earth observatory satellite (EOS) program and other earth resource imaging satellite programs. The primary goal is the generation of geometrically corrected and registered images, positioned with respect to the earth's surface. The EOS sensors which were considered were the thematic mapper, the return beam vidicon camera, and the high resolution pointable imager. The image positioning methods evaluated consisted of various combinations of satellite data and ground control points. It was concluded that EOS attitude control system design must be considered as a part of the image positioning problem for EOS, along with image sensor design and ground image processing system design. Study results show that, with suitable efficiency for ground control point selection and matching activities during data processing, extensive reliance should be placed on use of ground control points for positioning the images obtained from EOS and similar programs.

  14. Landsat classification accuracy assessment procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mead, R. R.; Szajgin, John

    1982-01-01

    A working conference was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 12-14 November, 1980 dealing with Landsat classification Accuracy Assessment Procedures. Thirteen formal presentations were made on three general topics: (1) sampling procedures, (2) statistical analysis techniques, and (3) examples of projects which included accuracy assessment and the associated costs, logistical problems, and value of the accuracy data to the remote sensing specialist and the resource manager. Nearly twenty conference attendees participated in two discussion sessions addressing various issues associated with accuracy assessment. This paper presents an account of the accomplishments of the conference.

  15. Subsurface Damage and Microstructure Development in Precision Microground Hard Ceramics Using Magnetorheological Finishing Spots

    SciTech Connect

    Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of spots taken with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) for estimating subsurface damage (SSD) depth from deterministic microgrinding for three hard ceramics: aluminum oxynitride (Al23O27N5/ALON), polycrystalline alumina (AL2O3/PCA), and chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (Si4C/SiC). Using various microscopy techniques to characterize the surfaces, we find that the evolution of surface microroughness with the amount of material removed shows two stages. In the first, the damaged layer and SSD induced by microgrinding are removed, and the surface roughness reaches a low value. Peak-to-valley (p-v) surface microroughness induced from grinding gives a measure of the SSD depth in the first stage. With the removal of additional material, a second stage develops, wherein the interaction of MRF and the material's microstructure is revealed. We study the development of this texture for these har ceramics with the use of power spectral density to characterize surface features.

  16. In vitro evaluation of the effect of two finishing and polishing systems on four esthetic restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rochna; Gupta, Ruchi

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the surface roughness of esthetic restorative materials after finishing and polishing. Materials and Methods: All 60 specimens were divided into four groups. Group I: Nanocomposite, Z 350 XT (3M ESPE, USA); Group II: Microhybrid composite, Z 250 (3M ESPE, USA); Group III: Compomer, Dyract XP (LD Caulk/Dentsply, USA); and Group IV: Resin modified glass ionomer cement (GIC), Fuji II LC (GC, Japan). Each group was again divided into three subgroups. Subgroup A: Sof-Lex (3M ESPE); Subgroup B: Super-Snap Rainbow finishing and polishing kit (Shofu INC, Japan); and Subgroup C: Control Mylar strip. Surface roughness was determined by Perthen Perthometer S6P profilometer. Result: Filtek Z350 XT showed minimum surface roughness followed by Filtek Z250, Dyract XT and Fuji II LC. Super-Snap exhibited less surface roughness than Sof-Lex polishing systems. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by multiple post hoc comparisons using least square difference method and unpaired t-test was used. Conclusion: Filtek Z350 XT with Mylar strip exhibited least surface roughness. PMID:24347895

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF ISSUES TO BE CONSIDERED FOR PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) ACCELERATED CLOSURE

    SciTech Connect

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2005-02-23

    This paper describes some of the basic issues identified to date related to the proposed closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) site. It is to be used as a preliminary planning supplement to enable application of the many guidance documents that are now available to describe the statutory and DOE requirements for closure of a Hanford site contaminated with low levels of plutonium. The major issues identified herein include: (1) Closure barrier performance, life expectancy and design criteria; (2) Public and interest group acceptability of closure approach; (3) Quantity of plutonium that will remain; (4) Void backfilling prior to barrier placement; (5) Identification of closure zone boundary; and (6) Impact of 241Z and 241Z-361 waste unit closure plans on the PFP surface barrier design.

  18. Multifunctional finishing of wool fabrics by chitosan UV-grafting: an approach.

    PubMed

    Periolatto, Monica; Ferrero, Franco; Vineis, Claudia; Rombaldoni, Fabio

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this study was the surface modification of wool fibers to confer a multifunctional finishing to the fabrics, improving the textile value and its applications without damage of comfort properties. The attention was focused on an economical and environmental friendly process to obtain an effective treatment with good durability to washing. Chitosan in acetic acid solution was applied by padding, and grafted by ultraviolet radiation, through radical reactions promoted by a photoinitiator. 2% chitosan grafted was enough to confer satisfactory antimicrobial activity (67% reduction of Escherichia coli) after an oxidative wool pre-treatment and 1h impregnation at 50 °C. Moreover treated wool fabrics showed a strong dyeability increase toward acid dye. However the evaluation of the treatment durability to laundering showed different behavior depending on the nature of the surfactants. Finally, anti-felting properties with respect to untreated fabrics were revealed, while no effect was shown toward anti-pilling properties.

  19. Effluent management for a metal finishing industry aiming zero discharge conditions.

    PubMed

    Babuna, Fatos Germirli; Kabdasli, Isik; Sözen, Seval; Orhon, Derin

    2006-01-01

    Technical applicability of zero discharge conditions is evaluated for the specific case of a large metal finishing industry located within the protection zone of a surface water body designated as a potential source for domestic water supply. Within the context of a sound water management strategy, a detailed process profile of the plant is established with relevant balance between water demand and wastewater generation. Quality restrictions for various water uses are identified. Wastewater flows are segregated depending on significant quality parameters. A comprehensive treatment scheme is defined for optimum wastewater recycle and reuse. Source allocation is made for the reuse of different streams of recycled wastewater. The study indicates that wastewater reuse can only be implemented with an efficiency of around 85-90% for the selected industry.

  20. Phenotypic and Genotypic Diversity of Salmonella in Finishing Swine.

    PubMed

    Pires, Alda F A; Funk, Julie A; Habing, Greg G; Bolin, Carole

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella enterica (nontyphoidal) is one of the major causes of foodborne diseases in the United States and worldwide. Molecular typing methods are significant tools used to better understand the transmission and ecology of Salmonella in order to implement pre-harvest control measures. The objectives of this study were to describe the Salmonella genotypes, the distribution of isolate subtypes from different ecological niches (i.e., barn environment, nursery, and individual pigs) and their evolution over time in a longitudinal study conducted in three finishing sites (housing pigs from 10 weeks of age until slaughter at 24-26 weeks of age). Among the 107 Salmonella isolates submitted for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, there were 25 distinct subtypes. PFGE genotyping results were consistent with the serotype findings. A large number of distinguishable PFGE patterns (i.e., within the same serovar) were observed and different combinations of subtypes were identified within and across sites and cohorts. New subtypes may result of the introduction of new strains, genetic changes, or ongoing transmission of evolved strains within the production system. The same subtypes were detected intermittently during the study period, which suggests the persistence of indistinguishable subtypes in this production system. In addition, this study suggests persistence of the same subtype over several cohorts of pigs and potential residual contamination from the barn. Factors affecting adaptation and transmission of Salmonella within and among ecological systems (e.g., finishing pigs, nursery, and environment) should be further investigated. Understanding genotypic diversity of Salmonella in different ecological niches during pre-harvest may contribute to the development of more targeted and cost effective control programs during nursery and finishing phases. PMID:26977814

  1. 40 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Example Logs for Recording Leather Finish Use and HAP Content

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Example Logs for Recording Leather... Finishing Operations Part 63, Subpt. TTTT, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Example Logs for Recording Leather Finish Use and HAP Content Month:______Year:______ Finish Inventory Log Finish type...

  2. 40 CFR 63.5385 - How do I measure the quantity of finish applied to the leather?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mass, or density, and volume of each applied finish. (b) Determine the mass of each applied finish with... density and volume of each applied finish according to the criteria listed in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section: (1) Determine the density of each applied finish in pounds per gallon in...

  3. 40 CFR 63.5385 - How do I measure the quantity of finish applied to the leather?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... density, and volume of each applied finish. (b) Determine the mass of each applied finish with a scale... finishing operations must be weighed or have a predetermined weight. (c) Determine the density and volume of...: (1) Determine the density of each applied finish in pounds per gallon in accordance with §...

  4. Determination of heavy metal toxicity of finished leather solid waste.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Ahmet

    2009-05-01

    This paper investigates the toxicity in leather products of heavy metals known to be detrimental to the ecosystem. Heavy metal concentrations in leather samples were identified with ICP-OES, and toxicity was determined using a MetPLATE bioassay. Chromium and aluminium were found to constitute 98% of the total concentration of heavy metals in finished leather tanned with chromium and aluminium salts, while in some vegetable-tanned leather, zirconium was the only heavy metal identified. The average inhibition values for chromium, aluminium and vegetable tanned leather were 98.08%, 97.04% and 62.36%, respectively. PMID:19165404

  5. Determination of heavy metal toxicity of finished leather solid waste.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Ahmet

    2009-05-01

    This paper investigates the toxicity in leather products of heavy metals known to be detrimental to the ecosystem. Heavy metal concentrations in leather samples were identified with ICP-OES, and toxicity was determined using a MetPLATE bioassay. Chromium and aluminium were found to constitute 98% of the total concentration of heavy metals in finished leather tanned with chromium and aluminium salts, while in some vegetable-tanned leather, zirconium was the only heavy metal identified. The average inhibition values for chromium, aluminium and vegetable tanned leather were 98.08%, 97.04% and 62.36%, respectively.

  6. Automated edge finishing using an active XY table

    DOEpatents

    Loucks, Clifford S.; Starr, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for automated edge finishing using hybrid position/force control of an XY table. The disclosure is particularly directed to learning the trajectory of the edge of a workpiece by "guarded moves". Machining is done by controllably moving the XY table, with the workpiece mounted thereon, along the learned trajectory with feedback from a force sensor. Other similar workpieces can be mounted, without a fixture on the XY table, located and the learned trajectory adjusted

  7. Test Expectancy Affects Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theory suggests that the accuracy of metacognitive monitoring is affected by the cues used to judge learning. Researchers have improved monitoring accuracy by directing attention to more appropriate cues; however, this is the first study to more directly point students to more appropriate cues using instructions regarding tests and…

  8. Accuracy Assessment of Altimeter Derived Geostrophic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leben, R. R.; Powell, B. S.; Born, G. H.; Guinasso, N. L.

    2002-12-01

    Along track sea surface height anomaly gradients are proportional to cross track geostrophic velocity anomalies allowing satellite altimetry to provide much needed satellite observations of changes in the geostrophic component of surface ocean currents. Often, surface height gradients are computed from altimeter data archives that have been corrected to give the most accurate absolute sea level, a practice that may unnecessarily increase the error in the cross track velocity anomalies and thereby require excessive smoothing to mitigate noise. Because differentiation along track acts as a high-pass filter, many of the path length corrections applied to altimeter data for absolute height accuracy are unnecessary for the corresponding gradient calculations. We report on a study to investigate appropriate altimetric corrections and processing techniques for improving geostrophic velocity accuracy. Accuracy is assessed by comparing cross track current measurements from two moorings placed along the descending TOPEX/POSEIDON ground track number 52 in the Gulf of Mexico to the corresponding altimeter velocity estimates. The buoys are deployed and maintained by the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS) under Interagency Contracts with Texas A&M University. The buoys telemeter observations in near real-time via satellite to the TABS station located at the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) at Texas A&M. Buoy M is located in shelf waters of 57 m depth with a second, Buoy N, 38 km away on the shelf break at 105 m depth. Buoy N has been operational since the beginning of 2002 and has a current meter at 2m depth providing in situ measurements of surface velocities coincident with Jason and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter over flights. This allows one of the first detailed comparisons of shallow water near surface current meter time series to coincident altimetry.

  9. Accident Analysis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Polycube Stabilization Process

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON-MAKI, B.B.

    2001-05-14

    The Polycube Stabilization Project involves low temperature oxidation, without combustion, of polystyrene cubes using the production muffle furnaces in Glovebox HC-21C located in the Remote Mechanical ''C'' (RMC) Line in Room 230A in the 234-52 Facility. Polycubes are polystyrene cubes containing various concentrations of plutonium and uranium oxides. Hundreds of these cubes were manufactured for criticality experiments, and currently exist as unstabilized storage forms at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). This project is designed to stabilize and prepare the polycube material for stable storage using a process very similar to the earlier processing of sludges in these furnaces. The significant difference is the quantity of hydrogenous material present, and the need to place additional controls on the heating rate of the material. This calculation note documents the analyses of the Representative Accidents identified in Section 2.4.4 of Hazards Analysis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Polycube Stabilization Process, HNF-7278 (HNF 2000). These two accidents, ''Deflagration in Glovebox HC-21C due to Loss of Power'' and ''Seismic Failure of Glovebox HC-21C'', will be further assessed in this accident analysis.

  10. 40 CFR 410.20 - Applicability; description of the wool finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wool Finishing Subcategory... are applicable to process wastewater discharges resulting from the following types of textile...

  11. 40 CFR 410.20 - Applicability; description of the wool finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wool Finishing Subcategory... are applicable to process wastewater discharges resulting from the following types of textile...

  12. 40 CFR 410.20 - Applicability; description of the wool finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wool Finishing Subcategory... are applicable to process wastewater discharges resulting from the following types of textile...

  13. 40 CFR 410.20 - Applicability; description of the wool finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wool Finishing Subcategory... are applicable to process wastewater discharges resulting from the following types of textile...

  14. 40 CFR 463.30 - Applicability; description of the finishing water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PLASTICS MOLDING AND FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY.... Processes in the finishing water subcategory are processes where water comes in contact with the...

  15. Utilization of Magnetorheological Finishing as a Diagnostic Tool for Investigating the Three-Dimensional Structure of Fractures in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Steele, W A; Wong, L L; Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E

    2005-11-11

    We have developed an experimental technique that combines magnetorheological finishing (MRF) and microscopy to examine fractures and/or artifacts in optical materials. The technique can be readily used to provide access to, and interrogation of, a selected segment of a fracture or object that extends beneath the surface. Depth slicing, or cross-sectioning at selected intervals, further allows the observation and measurement of the three-dimensional nature of the sites and the generation of volumetric representations that can be used to quantify shape and depth, and to understand how they were created, how they interact with surrounding material, and how they may be eliminated or mitigated.

  16. Removal of Lattice Imperfections that Impact the Optical Quality of Ti:Sapphire using Advanced Magnetorheological Finishing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Schaffers, K I; Bayramian, A J; Davis, P J; Ebbers, C A; Wolfe, J E; Caird, J A; Barty, C J

    2008-02-26

    Advanced magnetorheological finishing (MRF) techniques have been applied to Ti:sapphire crystals to compensate for sub-millimeter lattice distortions that occur during the crystal growing process. Precise optical corrections are made by imprinting topographical structure onto the crystal surfaces to cancel out the effects of the lattice distortion in the transmitted wavefront. This novel technique significantly improves the optical quality for crystals of this type and sets the stage for increasing the availability of high-quality large-aperture sapphire and Ti:sapphire optics in critical applications.

  17. When Does Choice of Accuracy Measure Alter Imputation Accuracy Assessments?

    PubMed

    Ramnarine, Shelina; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Li-Shiun; Culverhouse, Robert; Duan, Weimin; Hancock, Dana B; Hartz, Sarah M; Johnson, Eric O; Olfson, Emily; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Saccone, Nancy L

    2015-01-01

    Imputation, the process of inferring genotypes for untyped variants, is used to identify and refine genetic association findings. Inaccuracies in imputed data can distort the observed association between variants and a disease. Many statistics are used to assess accuracy; some compare imputed to genotyped data and others are calculated without reference to true genotypes. Prior work has shown that the Imputation Quality Score (IQS), which is based on Cohen's kappa statistic and compares imputed genotype probabilities to true genotypes, appropriately adjusts for chance agreement; however, it is not commonly used. To identify differences in accuracy assessment, we compared IQS with concordance rate, squared correlation, and accuracy measures built into imputation programs. Genotypes from the 1000 Genomes reference populations (AFR N = 246 and EUR N = 379) were masked to match the typed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) coverage of several SNP arrays and were imputed with BEAGLE 3.3.2 and IMPUTE2 in regions associated with smoking behaviors. Additional masking and imputation was conducted for sequenced subjects from the Collaborative Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence and the Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence in African Americans (N = 1,481 African Americans and N = 1,480 European Americans). Our results offer further evidence that concordance rate inflates accuracy estimates, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. For common variants, squared correlation, BEAGLE R2, IMPUTE2 INFO, and IQS produce similar assessments of imputation accuracy. However, for rare and low frequency variants, compared to IQS, the other statistics tend to be more liberal in their assessment of accuracy. IQS is important to consider when evaluating imputation accuracy, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. PMID:26458263

  18. ACCURACY LIMITATIONS IN LONG TRACE PROFILOMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    TAKACS,P.Z.; QIAN,S.

    2003-08-25

    As requirements for surface slope error quality of grazing incidence optics approach the 100 nanoradian level, it is necessary to improve the performance of the measuring instruments to achieve accurate and repeatable results at this level. We have identified a number of internal error sources in the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that affect measurement quality at this level. The LTP is sensitive to phase shifts produced within the millimeter diameter of the pencil beam probe by optical path irregularities with scale lengths of a fraction of a millimeter. We examine the effects of mirror surface ''macroroughness'' and internal glass homogeneity on the accuracy of the LTP through experiment and theoretical modeling. We will place limits on the allowable surface ''macroroughness'' and glass homogeneity required to achieve accurate measurements in the nanoradian range.

  19. Water-soluble pesticides in finished water of community water supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coupe, R.H.; Blomquist, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Although considerable data have been published on the occurrence and distribution of pesticides in surface water, there is little information from full-scale studies on how pesticides in source water are affected by the treatment process. In this pilot study, source water and finished (treated) water samples were collected from 12 community water systems (CWSs) across the United States and analyzed for water-soluble pesticides. The facilities were selected in part because they relied on surface water as their source water and their supplies were considered vulnerable to pesticide contamination. A treatment plant's, ability to remove or degrade a pesticide has been shown to be dependent on numerous variables, including surface water characteristics, pH, oxidant type, contact time, and operational procedures. Among the 12 CWSs tracked by this research, the treatment processes effectiveness varied significantly. Although some pesticides in the source water were removed by treatment, others passed through the treatment process and into the distribution system. Future study is needed to examine exactly how the treatment process within each of the participating systems affected pesticide concentration. None of the pesticides, analyzed in this research were found at concentrations above standards set by the US Environmental Protection Agency for treated water. However, this work should serve as a wake-up call for treatment personnel and facility managers: If their source water is contaminated with pesticides, then the treatment process may not be completely effective at removing these pesticides from the water. - MPM.

  20. Investigation of rapidly solidified aluminum by using diamond turning and a magnetorheological finishing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Otieno, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    The metal mirror has been widely used in optical application for a longtime. Especially the aluminum 6061 is often considered the preferred material for manufacturing optical components for ground-based astronomical applications. One reason for using this material is its high specific stiffness and excellent thermal properties. However, a large amount of data exists for this material and commercially available aluminum 6061 using single point diamond turning (SPDT) and polishing process can achieve surface roughness values of approximately 2 to 4 nm, which is adequate for applications that involve the infrared spectral range, but not for the shorter spectral range. A novel aluminum material, fabricated using a rapid solidification process that is equivalent to the conventional aluminum 6061 alloy grade has been used in optical applications in recent years because of its smaller grain size. In this study, the surface quality of the rapid solidification aluminum after single point diamond turning and followed by magnetorheological finish (MRF) process is investigated and compared with conventional aluminum 6061. Both the surface roughness Ra was evaluated using white light interferometers. Finally, indicators such as optimal fabrication parameter combination and optical performance are discussed.

  1. The cleaning of float glass and how it affects the corrosion of finished mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Goggin, R.; Pohlman, S.; Russell, P.

    1981-10-01

    The basic concept of solar energy thermal conversion concentrator systems relies on the use of reflective surfaces. These are typically silvered glass mirrors made using a wet chemical process. A typical wet chemical process includes the cleaning of the float glass, sensitization with stannous chloride, application of a silver film, deposition of a copper film, and application of a protective paint coating. To evaluate the effect of each process variable, facilities were developed to duplicate the mirroring procedure. They were then utilized to provide precise control over each step. The results so far indicate that the cleaning step is most critical to the durability of the finished product. Several cleaning procedures were assessed, and utilizing a felt block with pumice as an abrasive proved to be most effective. It is thought that the pumice removes the surface ''gel'' layer of glass, as well as dirt, grease, and any other contaminants present, allowing better adhesion of the silver to the glass surface. A poorly prepared sheet of glass can result in a poor adhesive bond between the silver film and the glass substrate and subsequent rapid deterioration of the reflectance of the mirror.

  2. Research concerning optimum cutting parameters according with tool path strategy for finishing procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A. E.; Anania, F. D.; Zapciu, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optimization of cutting parameters in NC milling needs to be studied because of its influence on machining time and cost. Today, any CAM software offers many tool path strategies to milling free form geometries. However, the users must have the know-how to choose the strategies according to geometry complexity, cutting tool geometry and its contact on the machined surface. Choosing the right strategy with the right cutting parameter is a rather difficult task to do on the machine tool. In this paper we try to take into account the influence of the toolpath over the surface quality for finishing operation. The main goal is to establish a direct link between machining parameters and toolpath in order to obtain the same surface quality for different trajectories. The first step consist in making a series of experiments for standards toolpaths (which can be found in any CAM software) like one-way, zig-zag, spiral from outside to inside, zig-zag at 45 dgr on a milling center. Based on the results, a correction coefficient for the feed rate was established.

  3. Plutonium Finishing Plant Transition Project mission analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Courson, D.B.

    1994-09-21

    This report defines the mission for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Transition Project (PFPTP) using a systems engineering approach. This mission analysis will be the basis for the functional analysis which will further define and break down the mission statement into all of the detailed functions required to accomplish the mission. The functional analysis is then used to develop requirements, allocate those requirements to functions, and eventually be used to design the system. This report: presents the problem which will be addressed, defines PFP Transition Project, defines the overall mission statement, describes the existing, initial conditions, defines the desired, final conditions, identifies the mission boundaries and external interfaces, identifies the resources required to carry out the mission, describes the uncertainties and risks, and discusses the measures which will be used to determine success.

  4. Microencapsulated citronella oil for mosquito repellent finishing of cotton textiles.

    PubMed

    Specos, M M Miró; García, J J; Tornesello, J; Marino, P; Vecchia, M Della; Tesoriero, M V Defain; Hermida, L G

    2010-10-01

    Microcapsules containing citronella essential oil were prepared by complex coacervation and applied to cotton textiles in order to study the repellent efficacy of the obtained fabrics. Citronella released from treated textiles was indirectly monitored by the extractable content of its main components. Repellent activity was assessed by exposure of a human hand and arm covered with the treated textiles to Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Fabrics treated with microencapsulated citronella presented a higher and longer lasting protection from insects compared to fabrics sprayed with an ethanol solution of the essential oil, assuring a repellent effect higher than 90% for three weeks. Complex coacervation is a simple, low cost, scalable and reproducible method of obtaining encapsulated essential oils for textile application. Repellent textiles were achieved by padding cotton fabrics with microcapsules slurries using a conventional pad-dry method. This methodology requires no additional investment for textile finishing industries, which is a desirable factor in developing countries. PMID:20673937

  5. Second floor plan. (Also includes a roof plan and finish ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second floor plan. (Also includes a roof plan and finish schedule.) March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 13, approved March, 1962; specifications no. OCI-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/13, Rev. "C"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 7 February 1984. Roof plan scale one-sixteenth inch to one foot; second floor plan scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 28.75x41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  6. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) HVAC System Component Index

    SciTech Connect

    DICK, J.D.

    2000-02-28

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) WAC System includes sub-systems 25A through 25K. Specific system boundaries and justifications are contained in HNF-SD-CP-SDD-005, ''Definition and Means of Maintaining the Ventilation System Confinement Portion of the PFP Safety Envelope.'' The procurement requirements associated with the system necessitates procurement of some system equipment as Commercial Grade Items in accordance with HNF-PRO-268, ''Control of Purchased Items and Services.'' This document lists safety class and safety significant components for the Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning and specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items, as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item.

  7. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J.; Nass, R.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  8. Analysis of Failure to Finish a Race in a Cohort of Thoroughbred Racehorses in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Jasmine; Rogers, Chris; Bolwell, Charlotte; Cogger, Naomi; Gee, Erica; Mcllwraith, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to describe the incidence of failure to finish a race in flat-racing Thoroughbreds in New Zealand as these are summary indicators of falls, injuries and poor performance. Retrospective data on six complete flat racing seasons (n = 188,615 race starts) of all Thoroughbred flat race starts from 1 August 2005 to 31 July 2011 were obtained. The incidence of failure to finish events and binomial exact 95% confidence intervals were calculated per 1000 horse starts. The association between horse-, rider- and race-level variables with the outcomes failure to finish, pulled-up/fell and lost rider were examined with a mixed effects Poisson regression model. A total of 544 horses failed to finish in 188,615 race starts with an overall incidence of 2.88 per 1000 horse starts (95% CI 2.64-3.12). The incidence of failure to finish horses across each race year showed little variability. In the univariable analysis race distance, larger field size, season, and ratings bands showed association with failing to finish a race. The overall failure to finish outcome was associated with season, race distance and ratings bands (horse experience and success ranking criteria). In the multivariable analysis, race distance and ratings bands were associated with horses that pulled-up/fell; season, apprentice allowances and ratings bands were associated with the outcome lost rider. The failure to finish rate was lower than international figures for race day catastrophic injury. Racing and environmental variables were associated with failure to finish a race highlighting the multifactorial nature of race-day events. Further investigation of risk factors for failure to finish is required to better understand the reasons for a low failure to finish rate in Thoroughbred flat races in New Zealand.

  9. Lysine requirement for growing-finishing immunocastrated male pigs.

    PubMed

    Alebrante, Leandro; Donzele, Juarez Lopes; Donzele, Rita Flavia Miranda de Oliveira; da Silva, Francisco Carlos de Oliveira; Kiefer, Charles; Rocha, Gabriel Cipriano

    2015-12-01

    Eighty boars (19.3 ± 2.49 kg) were vaccinated twice (100 and 128 days of age) against gonadotropin releasing hormone (Vivax™ vaccine), for a randomised block design study aiming to evaluate five digestible lysine (DLys) level treatments, with three phase-feeding per treatments (9-8-7; 10-9-8; 11-10-9; 12-11-10 and 13-12-11 g/kg) during the growing-finishing phases (54-100, 100-128 and 128-155 days of age, respectively). Pigs were fed their respective diets ad libitum from 54 to 155 days and weighed at 100, 128 and 155 days. Pig loin (Longissimus dorsi) area, loin depth and backfat thickness were measured by ultrasound at 100 and 155 days. Hot carcass weight, meat quantity and meat yield were measured at slaughter. From 54 to 100 days (pre-immunocastration), DLys levels linearly improved pig feed conversion and loin area, the level of DLys for minimum feed conversion and maximum loin area was 13 g/kg. However, DLys levels had no effect on the performance of boars from 54 to 128 days (pre-immunocastration), nor on the performance and carcass parameters of immunocastrated male pigs between 54 and 155 days. A sequence of diets containing 9, 8 and 7 g/kg of DLys fed from 54 to 100, 100 to 128 and 128 to 155 days, respectively, meet the requirement of growing-finishing immunocastrated male pigs. PMID:26245916

  10. Using infrared thermography for the creation of a window surface temperature database to validate computer heat transfer models

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, F.A.; Griffith, B.T.; Tuerler, D.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-04-01

    IR thermography is well suited for resolving small differences in the thermal performance of highly insulating window systems. Infrared thermographic measurements made in conjunction with reference emitter techniques in a controlled and characterized laboratory setting can have an absolute accuracy of {plus_minus}0.5{degree}C. Quantitative infrared thermography requires that a number of sources of error related to measurement accuracy and test environmental conditions be quantified and minimized to the extent possible. Laboratory-based infrared thermography can be used to generate window surface temperature profile databases which can be used to direct the development of 2-D and 3-D finite element and finite difference method fenestration heat transfer simulation codes, identify their strengths and weaknesses, set research priorities, and validate finished modeling tools. Development of such a database is under way at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and will be made available for public use.

  11. Millimeter accuracy satellites for two color ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1993-01-01

    The principal technical challenge in designing a millimeter accuracy satellite to support two color observations at high altitudes is to provide high optical cross-section simultaneously with minimal pulse spreading. In order to address this issue, we provide, a brief review of some fundamental properties of optical retroreflectors when used in spacecraft target arrays, develop a simple model for a spherical geodetic satellite, and use the model to determine some basic design criteria for a new generation of geodetic satellites capable of supporting millimeter accuracy two color laser ranging. We find that increasing the satellite diameter provides: a larger surface area for additional cube mounting thereby leading to higher cross-sections; and makes the satellite surface a better match for the incoming planar phasefront of the laser beam. Restricting the retroreflector field of view (e.g. by recessing it in its holder) limits the target response to the fraction of the satellite surface which best matches the optical phasefront thereby controlling the amount of pulse spreading. In surveying the arrays carried by existing satellites, we find that European STARLETTE and ERS-1 satellites appear to be the best candidates for supporting near term two color experiments in space.

  12. Effect of feeding sodium butyrate in the late finishing period on Salmonella carriage, seroprevalence, and growth of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Walia, Kavita; Argüello, Hector; Lynch, Helen; Leonard, Finola C; Grant, Jim; Yearsley, Dermot; Kelly, Sinead; Duffy, Geraldine; Gardiner, Gillian E; Lawlor, Peadar G

    2016-09-01

    Pork is an important source of human salmonellosis and low-cost on-farm control measures may provide a useful element in reducing the prevalence of this pathogen in food. This study investigated the effectiveness of dietary supplementation with sodium butyrate administered to finisher pigs for ∼4-weeks prior to slaughter to control Salmonella shedding on highly contaminated farms. Two trials (A and B) were conducted on two commercial pig farms, which had a history of high Salmonella seroprevalence. In both trials, pens (14 pens of 12 pigs/pen in Trial A and 12 pens of 12-17 pigs/pen in Trial B) were randomly assigned to a control (finisher feed without additive) or a treatment group (the same feed with 3kg sodium butyrate/t) for 24-28days, depending on the trial. Faeces were collected from each pig on days 0, 12 and 24/28, and blood, caecal digesta and ileocaecal/mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from the slaughterhouse. Pigs were weighed at the start and end of the trials, feed intake was recorded, and carcass quality parameters were recorded at slaughter. In Trial A, Salmonella shedding was reduced in the treatment compared to the control group at the end of the trial (30% versus 57% probability of detecting Salmonella in faeces, respectively; p<0.001). This reflected the serology results, with detection of a lower seroprevalence in the treatment compared to the control group using the 20% optical density cut-off (69.5% versus 89%; p=0.001). However, no effect on faecal shedding or seroprevalance was observed in Trial B, which may be explained by the detection of a concomitant infection with Lawsonia intracellularis. No significant differences in Salmonella recovery rates were observed in the caecal digesta or lymph nodes in either trial. Furthermore, feed intake, weight gain, and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) did not differ between groups (p>0.05) in either trial. Numerical improvements in weight gain and FCE were found with sodium butyrate treatment

  13. Effect of feeding sodium butyrate in the late finishing period on Salmonella carriage, seroprevalence, and growth of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Walia, Kavita; Argüello, Hector; Lynch, Helen; Leonard, Finola C; Grant, Jim; Yearsley, Dermot; Kelly, Sinead; Duffy, Geraldine; Gardiner, Gillian E; Lawlor, Peadar G

    2016-09-01

    Pork is an important source of human salmonellosis and low-cost on-farm control measures may provide a useful element in reducing the prevalence of this pathogen in food. This study investigated the effectiveness of dietary supplementation with sodium butyrate administered to finisher pigs for ∼4-weeks prior to slaughter to control Salmonella shedding on highly contaminated farms. Two trials (A and B) were conducted on two commercial pig farms, which had a history of high Salmonella seroprevalence. In both trials, pens (14 pens of 12 pigs/pen in Trial A and 12 pens of 12-17 pigs/pen in Trial B) were randomly assigned to a control (finisher feed without additive) or a treatment group (the same feed with 3kg sodium butyrate/t) for 24-28days, depending on the trial. Faeces were collected from each pig on days 0, 12 and 24/28, and blood, caecal digesta and ileocaecal/mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from the slaughterhouse. Pigs were weighed at the start and end of the trials, feed intake was recorded, and carcass quality parameters were recorded at slaughter. In Trial A, Salmonella shedding was reduced in the treatment compared to the control group at the end of the trial (30% versus 57% probability of detecting Salmonella in faeces, respectively; p<0.001). This reflected the serology results, with detection of a lower seroprevalence in the treatment compared to the control group using the 20% optical density cut-off (69.5% versus 89%; p=0.001). However, no effect on faecal shedding or seroprevalance was observed in Trial B, which may be explained by the detection of a concomitant infection with Lawsonia intracellularis. No significant differences in Salmonella recovery rates were observed in the caecal digesta or lymph nodes in either trial. Furthermore, feed intake, weight gain, and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) did not differ between groups (p>0.05) in either trial. Numerical improvements in weight gain and FCE were found with sodium butyrate treatment

  14. Accuracy in optical overlay metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringoltz, Barak; Marciano, Tal; Yaziv, Tal; DeLeeuw, Yaron; Klein, Dana; Feler, Yoel; Adam, Ido; Gurevich, Evgeni; Sella, Noga; Lindenfeld, Ze'ev; Leviant, Tom; Saltoun, Lilach; Ashwal, Eltsafon; Alumot, Dror; Lamhot, Yuval; Gao, Xindong; Manka, James; Chen, Bryan; Wagner, Mark

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we discuss the mechanism by which process variations determine the overlay accuracy of optical metrology. We start by focusing on scatterometry, and showing that the underlying physics of this mechanism involves interference effects between cavity modes that travel between the upper and lower gratings in the scatterometry target. A direct result is the behavior of accuracy as a function of wavelength, and the existence of relatively well defined spectral regimes in which the overlay accuracy and process robustness degrades (`resonant regimes'). These resonances are separated by wavelength regions in which the overlay accuracy is better and independent of wavelength (we term these `flat regions'). The combination of flat and resonant regions forms a spectral signature which is unique to each overlay alignment and carries certain universal features with respect to different types of process variations. We term this signature the `landscape', and discuss its universality. Next, we show how to characterize overlay performance with a finite set of metrics that are available on the fly, and that are derived from the angular behavior of the signal and the way it flags resonances. These metrics are used to guarantee the selection of accurate recipes and targets for the metrology tool, and for process control with the overlay tool. We end with comments on the similarity of imaging overlay to scatterometry overlay, and on the way that pupil overlay scatterometry and field overlay scatterometry differ from an accuracy perspective.

  15. The accuracy of optical scanning: influence of convergence and die preparation.

    PubMed

    Chan, D C N; Chung, A K-H; Haines, J; Yau, E H-T; Kuo, C-C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the data acquisition and modeling process of laser and white light scanners by evaluating the reproducibility of digitized simulated crowns with different convergences. A secondary purpose was to analyze the influence of die preparation by testing this hypothesis with a set of dies without ditching compared with a set with well-defined margins. Ditching or trimming the die defines the position of the margin and acts as a guide to gingival contour when the restoration is being waxed. Two light scanners (a white light optical scanner [Steinbichler Gmbh, Neubeuern, Germany] and red laser light scanner [TurboDent System, Taichung, Taiwan]) were evaluated. Two sets of simulated crowns were fabricated as cone frustrum models with a total occlusal convergence (TOC) of 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25° and a 9-mm base and 3-mm height using a precision milling machine and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technique. One set of the dies was ditched immediately below the finish line to enhance marginal definition. Each die was optically digitized five times directly with the two different measuring systems. The area of each triangle in the scan that is occlusal to the margin line was calculated and summed to produce the final surface area measurement provided. The digitizing error was compared with the computed surface area of the original master die sets and compared with a paired t-test (df=4; 95% CI). There was no difference in accuracy of the untrimmed dies between the two systems evaluated. We also did not find any difference in the 0° (p=0.12) and 5° degree (p=0.21) groups among the ditched dies. However, when the TOC exceeded 5°, there was a significant difference between the two groups, with the laser groups having a smaller error percentage. Three-dimensional light scanning was not affected by the convergence angle except in the 0°-5° range. Trimming the dies greatly

  16. 46 CFR 116.422 - Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Fire Protection § 116.422 Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations. (a) Ceilings, linings, and any furring incidental to their installation in...

  17. 46 CFR 116.422 - Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Fire Protection § 116.422 Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations. (a) Ceilings, linings, and any furring incidental to their installation in...

  18. 46 CFR 116.422 - Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Fire Protection § 116.422 Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations. (a) Ceilings, linings, and any furring incidental to their installation in...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF THE U.S. EPA'S METAL FINISHING FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal finishing processes are a type of chemical processes and can be modeled using Computer Aided Process Engineering (CAPE). Currently, the U.S. EPA is developing the Metal Finishing Facility Pollution Prevention Tool (MFFP2T), a pollution prevention software tool for the meta...

  20. 40 CFR 410.20 - Applicability; description of the wool finishing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: wool finishers, including carbonizing, fulling, dyeing, bleaching, rinsing, fireproofing, and other... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the wool... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wool Finishing...