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Sample records for accurate arterial input

  1. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI with Localized Arterial Input Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J.J.; Bretthorst, G.L.; Derdeyn, C.P.; Powers, W.J.; Videen, T.O.; Snyder, A.Z.; Markham, J.; Shimony, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Compared to gold-standard measurements of cerebral perfusion with positron emission tomography (PET) using H2[15O] tracers, measurements with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MR are more accessible, less expensive and less invasive. However, existing methods for analyzing and interpreting data from DSC MR have characteristic disadvantages that include sensitivity to incorrectly modeled delay and dispersion in a single, global arterial input function (AIF). We describe a model of tissue microcirculation derived from tracer kinetics which estimates for each voxel a unique, localized AIF (LAIF). Parameters of the model were estimated using Bayesian probability theory and Markov-chain Monte Carlo, circumventing difficulties arising from numerical deconvolution. Applying the new method to imaging studies from a cohort of fourteen patients with chronic, atherosclerotic, occlusive disease showed strong correlations between perfusion measured by DSC MR with LAIF and perfusion measured by quantitative PET with H2[15O]. Regression to PET measurements enabled conversion of DSC MR to a physiological scale. Regression analysis for LAIF gave estimates of a scaling factor for quantitation which described perfusion accurately in patients with substantial variability in hemodynamic impairment. PMID:20432301

  2. Validating a local Arterial Input Function method for improved perfusion quantification in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Willats, Lisa; Christensen, Soren; K Ma, Henry; A Donnan, Geoffrey; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    In bolus-tracking perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), temporal dispersion of the contrast bolus due to stenosis or collateral supply presents a significant problem for accurate perfusion quantification in stroke. One means to reduce the associated perfusion errors is to deconvolve the bolus concentration time-course data with local Arterial Input Functions (AIFs) measured close to the capillary bed and downstream of the arterial abnormalities causing dispersion. Because the MRI voxel resolution precludes direct local AIF measurements, they must be extrapolated from the surrounding data. To date, there have been no published studies directly validating these local AIFs. We assess the effectiveness of local AIFs in reducing dispersion-induced perfusion error by measuring the residual dispersion remaining in the local AIF deconvolved perfusion maps. Two approaches to locating the local AIF voxels are assessed and compared with a global AIF deconvolution across 19 bolus-tracking data sets from patients with stroke. The local AIF methods reduced dispersion in the majority of data sets, suggesting more accurate perfusion quantification. Importantly, the validation inherently identifies potential areas for perfusion underestimation. This is valuable information for the identification of at-risk tissue and management of stroke patients. PMID:21629260

  3. Automated Determination of Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI from Regions around Arteries Using Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jui-Jen; Chang, Chin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement using dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI requires accurate estimation of the arterial input function (AIF). The present work utilized the independent component analysis (ICA) method to determine the AIF in the regions adjacent to the middle cerebral artery (MCA) by the alleviated confounding of partial volume effect. Materials and Methods. A series of spin-echo EPI MR scans were performed in 10 normal subjects. All subjects received 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA contrast agent. AIFs were calculated by two methods: (1) the region of interest (ROI) selected manually and (2) weighted average of each component selected by ICA (weighted-ICA). The singular value decomposition (SVD) method was then employed to deconvolve the AIF from the tissue concentration time curve to obtain quantitative CBF values. Results. The CBF values calculated by the weighted-ICA method were 41.1 ± 4.9 and 22.1 ± 2.3 mL/100 g/min for cortical gray matter (GM) and deep white matter (WM) regions, respectively. The CBF values obtained based on the manual ROIs were 53.6 ± 12.0 and 27.9 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/min for the same two regions, respectively. Conclusion. The weighted-ICA method allowed semiautomatic and straightforward extraction of the ROI adjacent to MCA. Through eliminating the partial volume effect to minimum, the CBF thus determined may reflect more accurate physical characteristics of the T2⁎ signal changes induced by the contrast agent. PMID:27547451

  4. Automated Determination of Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI from Regions around Arteries Using Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sharon; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Lai, Jui-Jen; Chang, Chin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement using dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI requires accurate estimation of the arterial input function (AIF). The present work utilized the independent component analysis (ICA) method to determine the AIF in the regions adjacent to the middle cerebral artery (MCA) by the alleviated confounding of partial volume effect. Materials and Methods. A series of spin-echo EPI MR scans were performed in 10 normal subjects. All subjects received 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA contrast agent. AIFs were calculated by two methods: (1) the region of interest (ROI) selected manually and (2) weighted average of each component selected by ICA (weighted-ICA). The singular value decomposition (SVD) method was then employed to deconvolve the AIF from the tissue concentration time curve to obtain quantitative CBF values. Results. The CBF values calculated by the weighted-ICA method were 41.1 ± 4.9 and 22.1 ± 2.3 mL/100 g/min for cortical gray matter (GM) and deep white matter (WM) regions, respectively. The CBF values obtained based on the manual ROIs were 53.6 ± 12.0 and 27.9 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/min for the same two regions, respectively. Conclusion. The weighted-ICA method allowed semiautomatic and straightforward extraction of the ROI adjacent to MCA. Through eliminating the partial volume effect to minimum, the CBF thus determined may reflect more accurate physical characteristics of the T2(⁎) signal changes induced by the contrast agent. PMID:27547451

  5. MRI-derived arterial input functions for PET kinetic modelling in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eleanor; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneous PET-MR acquisition provides the high temporal and spatial resolution of MRI with the specificity of PET. In PET, accurate modelling of physiological function in vivo requires the time-activity curve of tracer in blood plasma, known as the arterial input function (AIF). As the gold standard method of blood sampling is inherently prohibitive in the small animal case, here we discuss how we prepare to rapidly sample MRI signals from gadolinium-doped tracer to obtain the tracer input functions from a simultaneous PET-MR measurement. ΔR2* measurements taken from EPI images were used to obtain first pass bolus AIFs in the rat brain from DSC-MRI datasets of 5 rats. AIFs obtained using our automatic algorithm were found to be consistent between animals and compared well with manual methods without need for a priori voxel selection. A variable flip angle FLASH sequence used for T1 mapping was successfully tested in a phantom study, providing accurate measurements of Gd concentration.

  6. Direct Characterization of Arterial Input Functions by Fluorescence Imaging of Exposed Carotid Artery to Facilitate Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With the goal of facilitating tracer kinetic analysis in small-animal planar fluorescence imaging, an experimental method for characterizing tracer arterial input functions is presented. The proposed method involves exposing the common carotid arteries by surgical dissection, which can then be imaged directly during tracer injection and clearance. Procedures Arterial concentration curves of IRDye-700DX-carboxylate, IRDye-800CW-EGF, and IRDye-800CW conjugated to anti-EGFR Affibody are recovered from athymic female mice (n=12) by directly imaging exposed vessels. Images were acquired with two imaging protocols: a slow-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=45 s) to recover the arterial curves from two tracers simultaneously, and a fast-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=500 ms) to characterize the first-pass peak of a single tracer. Arterial input functions obtained by the carotid imaging technique, as well as plasma curves measured by blood sampling were fit with a biexponential pharmacokinetic model. Results Pharmacological fast- and slow-phase rate constants recovered with the proposed method were 0.37±0.26 and 0.007±0.001 min−1, respectively, for the IRDye700DX-C. For the IRDye800CW-EGF, the rate constants were 0.11±0.13 and 0.003±0.002 min−1. These rate constants did not differ significantly from those calculated previously by blood sampling, as determined by an F test; however, the between-subject variability was four times lower for arterial curves recovered using the proposed technique, compared with blood sampling. Conclusions The proposed technique enables the direct characterization of arterial input functions for kinetic analysis. As this method requires no additional instrumentation, it is immediately deployable in commercially available planar fluorescence imaging systems. PMID:24420443

  7. What input data are needed to accurately model electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations?

    PubMed

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Kromhout, Hans; Bürgi, Alfred; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    The increase in mobile communication technology has led to concern about potential health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phone base stations. Different RF-EMF prediction models have been applied to assess population exposure to RF-EMF. Our study examines what input data are needed to accurately model RF-EMF, as detailed data are not always available for epidemiological studies. We used NISMap, a 3D radio wave propagation model, to test models with various levels of detail in building and antenna input data. The model outcomes were compared with outdoor measurements taken in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured RF-EMF when 3D building data and basic antenna information (location, height, frequency and direction) were used: Spearman correlations were >0.6. Model performance was not sensitive to changes in building damping parameters. Antenna-specific information about down-tilt, type and output power did not significantly improve model performance compared with using average down-tilt and power values, or assuming one standard antenna type. We conclude that 3D radio wave propagation modelling is a feasible approach to predict outdoor RF-EMF levels for ranking exposure levels in epidemiological studies, when 3D building data and information on the antenna height, frequency, location and direction are available. PMID:24472756

  8. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V.; Rooney, William D.; Garzotto, Mark G.; Springer, Charles S.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (Ktrans) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  9. Arterial input functions (AIFs) measured directly from arteries with low and standard doses of contrast agent, and AIFs derived from reference tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyang; Fan, Xiaobing; Medved, Milica; Pineda, Federico D.; Yousuf, Ambereen; Oto, Aytekin; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of arterial input function (AIF) can have large systematic errors at standard contrast agent doses in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). We compared measured AIFs from low dose (AIFLD) and standard dose (AIFSD) contrast agent injections, as well as the AIF derived from a muscle reference tissue and artery (AIFref). Twenty-two prostate cancer patients underwent DCE-MRI. Data were acquired on a 3 T scanner using an mDixon sequence. Gadobenate dimeglumine was injected twice, at doses of 0.015 and 0.085 mmol/kg. Directly measured AIFs were fitted with empirical mathematical models (EMMs) and compared to the AIF derived from a muscle reference tissue (AIFref). EMMs accurately fitted the AIFs. The 1st and 2nd pass peaks were visualized in AIFLD, but not in AIFSD, thus the peak and shape of AIFSD could not be accurately measured directly. The average scaling factor between AIFSD and AIFLD in the washout phase was only 56% of the contrast dose ratio (~6:1). The shape and magnitude of AIFref closely approximated that of AIFLD after empirically determined dose-dependent normalization. This suggests that AIFref may be a good approximation of the local AIF. PMID:26523650

  10. Novel methods for accurate identification, isolation, and genomic analysis of symptomatic microenvironments in atherosclerotic arteries.

    PubMed

    Slevin, Mark; Baldellou, Maribel; Hill, Elspeth; Alexander, Yvonne; McDowell, Garry; Murgatroyd, Christopher; Carroll, Michael; Degens, Hans; Krupinski, Jerzy; Rovira, Norma; Chowdhury, Mohammad; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Badimon, Lina

    2014-01-01

    A challenge facing surgeons is identification and selection of patients for carotid endarterectomy or coronary artery bypass/surgical intervention. While some patients with atherosclerosis develop unstable plaques liable to undergo thrombosis, others form more stable plaques and are asymptomatic. Identification of the cellular signaling mechanisms associated with production of the inflammatory, hemorrhagic lesions of mature heterogenic plaques will help significantly in our understanding of the differences in microenvironment associated with development of regions susceptible to rupture and thrombosis and may help to predict the risk of plaque rupture and guide surgical intervention to patients who will most benefit. Here, we demonstrate detailed and novel methodologies for successful and, more importantly, accurate and reproducible extraction, sampling, and analysis of micro-regions in stable and unstable coronary/carotid arteries. This information can be applied to samples from other origins and so should be useful for scientists working with micro-isolation techniques in all fields of biomedical science. PMID:24510873

  11. H ∞ synchronization of the coronary artery system with input time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Meng, Li; Zhan-Shan, Zhao; Jing, Zhang; Lian-Kun, Sun

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the H ∞ synchronization of the coronary artery system with input delay and disturbance. We focus on reducing the conservatism of existing synchronization strategies. Base on the triple integral forms of the Lyapunov–Krasovskii functional (LKF), we utilize single and double integral forms of Wirtinger-based inequality to guarantee that the synchronization feedback controller has good performance against time-varying delay and external disturbance. The effectiveness of our strategy can be exhibited by simulations under the different time-varying delays and different disturbances. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61503280, 61403278, and 61272006).

  12. Improved factor analysis of dynamic PET images to estimate arterial input function and tissue curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Mitra, Debasis; Pan, Hui; Jagust, William; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-03-01

    Factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) is a methodology of extracting time-activity curves (TACs) for corresponding different tissue types from noisy dynamic images. The challenges of FADS include long computation time and sensitivity to the initial guess, resulting in convergence to local minima far from the true solution. We propose a method of accelerating and stabilizing FADS application to sequences of dynamic PET images by adding preliminary cluster analysis of the time activity curves for individual voxels. We treat the temporal variation of individual voxel concentrations as a set of time-series and use a partial clustering analysis to identify the types of voxel TACs that are most functionally distinct from each other. These TACs provide a good initial guess for the temporal factors for subsequent FADS processing. Applying this approach to a set of single slices of dynamic 11C-PIB images of the brain allows identification of the arterial input function and two different tissue TACs that are likely to correspond to the specific and non-specific tracer binding-tissue types. These results enable us to perform direct classification of tissues based on their pharmacokinetic properties in dynamic PET without relying on a compartment-based kinetic model, without identification of the reference region, or without using any external methods of estimating the arterial input function, as needed in some techniques.

  13. Skin Temperature Over the Carotid Artery, an Accurate Non-invasive Estimation of Near Core Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Karimi Rouzbahani, Hamid Reza; Goudarzi, Mehrdad; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad; Ebrahim Soltani, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: During anesthesia, continuous body temperature monitoring is essential, especially in children. Anesthesia can increase the risk of loss of body temperature by three to four times. Hypothermia in children results in increased morbidity and mortality. Since the measurement points of the core body temperature are not easily accessible, near core sites, like rectum, are used. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure skin temperature over the carotid artery and compare it with the rectum temperature, in order to propose a model for accurate estimation of near core body temperature. Patients and Methods: Totally, 124 patients within the age range of 2 - 6 years, undergoing elective surgery, were selected. Temperature of rectum and skin over the carotid artery was measured. Then, the patients were randomly divided into two groups (each including 62 subjects), namely modeling (MG) and validation groups (VG). First, in the modeling group, the average temperature of the rectum and skin over the carotid artery were measured separately. The appropriate model was determined, according to the significance of the model’s coefficients. The obtained model was used to predict the rectum temperature in the second group (VG group). Correlation of the predicted values with the real values (the measured rectum temperature) in the second group was investigated. Also, the difference in the average values of these two groups was examined in terms of significance. Results: In the modeling group, the average rectum and carotid temperatures were 36.47 ± 0.54°C and 35.45 ± 0.62°C, respectively. The final model was obtained, as follows: Carotid temperature × 0.561 + 16.583 = Rectum temperature. The predicted value was calculated based on the regression model and then compared with the measured rectum value, which showed no significant difference (P = 0.361). Conclusions: The present study was the first research, in which rectum temperature was compared with that

  14. Accurate Collisional Cross-Sections: Important Non-Lte Input Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L.

    2010-11-01

    Non-LTE modelling for a particular atom requires accurate collisional excitation and ionization cross-sections for the entire system of transitions in the atom. This review concerns with inelastic collisions with electrons and neutral hydrogen atoms. For the selected atoms, H i and Ca ii, comparisons are made between electron impact excitation rates from ab initio calculations and various theoretical approximations. The effect of the use of modern data on non-LTE modelling is shown. For most transitions and most atoms, hydrogen collisional rates are calculated using a semi-empirical modification of the classical Thomson formula for ionization by electrons. Approaches used to estimate empirically the efficiency of hydrogenic collisions in the statistical equilibrium of atoms are reviewed. This research was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft with grant 436 RUS 17/13/07.

  15. Conversion of arterial input functions for dual pharmacokinetic modeling using Gd-DTPA/MRI and 18F-FDG/PET.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Eric; Lebel, Réjean; Croteau, Etienne; Blanchette, Marie; Tremblay, Luc; Lecomte, Roger; Bentourkia, M'hamed; Lepage, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Reaching the full potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-positron emission tomography (PET) dual modality systems requires new methodologies in quantitative image analyses. In this study, methods are proposed to convert an arterial input function (AIF) derived from gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) in MRI, into a (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) AIF in PET, and vice versa. The AIFs from both modalities were obtained from manual blood sampling in a F98-Fisher glioblastoma rat model. They were well fitted by a convolution of a rectangular function with a biexponential clearance function. The parameters of the biexponential AIF model were found statistically different between MRI and PET. Pharmacokinetic MRI parameters such as the volume transfer constant (K(trans)), the extravascular-extracellular volume fraction (ν(e)), and the blood volume fraction (ν(p)) calculated with the Gd-DTPA AIF and the Gd-DTPA AIF converted from (18)F-FDG AIF normalized with or without blood sample were not statistically different. Similarly, the tumor metabolic rates of glucose (TMRGlc) calculated with (18) F-FDG AIF and with (18) F-FDG AIF obtained from Gd-DTPA AIF were also found not statistically different. In conclusion, only one accurate AIF would be needed for dual MRI-PET pharmacokinetic modeling in small animal models. PMID:22570280

  16. Arterial input function and gray matter cerebral blood volume measurements in children

    PubMed Central

    Withey, Stephanie B.; Novak, Jan; MacPherson, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate how arterial input functions (AIFs) vary with age in children and compare the use of individual and population AIFs for calculating gray matter CBV values. Quantitative measures of cerebral blood volume (CBV) using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) require measurement of an AIF. AIFs are affected by numerous factors including patient age. Few data presenting AIFs in the pediatric population exists. Materials and Methods Twenty‐two previously treated pediatric brain tumor patients (mean age, 6.3 years; range, 2.0–15.3 years) underwent DSC‐MRI scans on a 3T MRI scanner over 36 visits. AIFs were measured in the middle cerebral artery. A functional form of an adult population AIF was fitted to each AIF to obtain parameters reflecting AIF shape. The relationship between parameters and age was assessed. Correlations between gray matter CBV values calculated using the resulting population and individual patient AIFs were explored. Results There was a large variation in individual patient AIFs but correlations between AIF shape and age were observed. The center (r = 0.596, P < 0.001) and width of the first‐pass peak (r = 0.441, P = 0.007) were found to correlate significantly with age. Intrapatient coefficients of variation were significantly lower than interpatient values for all parameters (P < 0.001). Differences in CBV values calculated with an overall population and age‐specific population AIF compared to those calculated with individual AIFs were 31.3% and 31.0%, respectively. Conclusion Parameters describing AIF shape correlate with patient age in line with expected changes in cardiac output. In pediatric DSC‐MRI studies individual patient AIFs are recommended. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;43:981–989 PMID:26514288

  17. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  18. Transcutaneous measurement of the arterial input function in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Litton, J.E.; Eriksson, L. )

    1990-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a powerful tool in medical research. Biochemical function can be both precisely localized and quantitatively measured. To achieve reliable quantitation it is necessary to know the time course of activity concentration in the arterial blood during the measurement. In this study the arterial blood curve from the brachial artery is compared to the activity measured in the internal carotid artery with a new transcutaneous detector.

  19. Accurate, fully-automated registration of coronary arteries for volumetric CT digital subtraction angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razeto, Marco; Mohr, Brian; Arakita, Kazumasa; Schuijf, Joanne D.; Fuchs, Andreas; Kühl, J. Tobias; Chen, Marcus Y.; Kofoed, Klaus F.

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis of coronary artery disease with Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography (CCTA) is complicated by the presence of signi cant calci cation or stents. Volumetric CT Digital Subtraction Angiography (CTDSA) has recently been shown to be e ective at overcoming these limitations. Precise registration of structures is essential as any misalignment can produce artifacts potentially inhibiting clinical interpretation of the data. The fully-automated registration method described in this paper addresses the problem by combining a dense deformation eld with rigid-body transformations where calci cations/stents are present. The method contains non-rigid and rigid components. Non-rigid registration recovers the majority of motion artifacts and produces a dense deformation eld valid over the entire scan domain. Discrete domains are identi ed in which rigid registrations very accurately align each calci cation/stent. These rigid-body transformations are combined within the immediate area of the deformation eld using a distance transform to minimize distortion of the surrounding tissue. A recent interim analysis of a clinical feasibility study evaluated reader con dence and diagnostic accuracy in conventional CCTA and CTDSA registered using this method. Conventional invasive coronary angiography was used as the reference. The study included 27 patients scanned with a second-generation 320-row CT detector in which 41 lesions were identi ed. Compared to conventional CCTA, CTDSA improved reader con dence in 13/36 (36%) of segments with severe calci cation and 3/5 (60%) of segments with coronary stents. Also, the false positive rate of CTDSA was reduced compared to conventional CCTA from 18% (24/130) to 14% (19/130).

  20. Kinetic quantitation of cerebral PET-FDG studies without concurrent blood sampling: statistical recovery of the arterial input function.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, F; Kirrane, J; Muzi, M; O'Sullivan, J N; Spence, A M; Mankoff, D A; Krohn, K A

    2010-03-01

    Kinetic quantitation of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies via compartmental modeling usually requires the time-course of the radio-tracer concentration in the arterial blood as an arterial input function (AIF). For human and animal imaging applications, significant practical difficulties are associated with direct arterial sampling and as a result there is substantial interest in alternative methods that require no blood sampling at the time of the study. A fixed population template input function derived from prior experience with directly sampled arterial curves is one possibility. Image-based extraction, including requisite adjustment for spillover and recovery, is another approach. The present work considers a hybrid statistical approach based on a penalty formulation in which the information derived from a priori studies is combined in a Bayesian manner with information contained in the sampled image data in order to obtain an input function estimate. The absolute scaling of the input is achieved by an empirical calibration equation involving the injected dose together with the subject's weight, height and gender. The technique is illustrated in the context of (18)F -Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET studies in humans. A collection of 79 arterially sampled FDG blood curves are used as a basis for a priori characterization of input function variability, including scaling characteristics. Data from a series of 12 dynamic cerebral FDG PET studies in normal subjects are used to evaluate the performance of the penalty-based AIF estimation technique. The focus of evaluations is on quantitation of FDG kinetics over a set of 10 regional brain structures. As well as the new method, a fixed population template AIF and a direct AIF estimate based on segmentation are also considered. Kinetics analyses resulting from these three AIFs are compared with those resulting from radially sampled AIFs. The proposed penalty-based AIF extraction method is found to

  1. High Temporal Resolution Dynamic MRI and Arterial Input Function for Assessment of GFR in Pediatric Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yoruk, Umit; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Loening, Andreas M; Hargreaves, Brian A; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a respiratory-gated high-spatiotemporal-resolution dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI technique and a high-temporal-resolution aortic input function (HTR-AIF) estimation method for glomerular filtration rate (GFR) assessment in children. Methods A high-spatiotemporal-resolution DCE-MRI method with view-shared reconstruction was modified to incorporate respiratory-gating, and an AIF estimation method that uses a fraction of the k-space data from each respiratory period was developed (HTR-AIF). The method was validated using realistic digital phantom simulations and demonstrated on clinical subjects. The GFR estimates using HTR-AIF were compared to estimates obtained by using an AIF derived directly from the view-shared images. Results Digital phantom simulations showed that using the HTR-AIF technique gives more accurate AIF estimates (RMSE = 0.0932) compared to the existing estimation method (RMSE = 0.2059) that used view-sharing (VS). For simulated GFR > 27 ml/min, GFR estimation error was between 32% and 17% using view-shared AIF, whereas estimation error was less than 10% using HTR-AIF. In all clinical subjects, the HTR-AIF method resulted in higher GFR estimations than the view-shared method. Conclusion The HTR-AIF method improves the accuracy of both the AIF and GFR estimates derived from the respiratory-gated acquisitions, and makes GFR estimation feasible in free-breathing pediatric subjects. PMID:25946307

  2. Accurate evaluation of viscoelasticity of radial artery wall during flow-mediated dilation in ultrasound measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasumasa; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, the viscoelasticity of the radial artery wall was estimated to diagnose endothelial dysfunction using a high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasound device. In the present study, we employed a commercial ultrasound device (7.5 MHz) and estimated the viscoelasticity using arterial pressure and diameter, both of which were measured at the same position. In a phantom experiment, the proposed method successfully estimated the elasticity and viscosity of the phantom with errors of 1.8 and 30.3%, respectively. In an in vivo measurement, the transient change in the viscoelasticity was measured for three healthy subjects during flow-mediated dilation (FMD). The proposed method revealed the softening of the arterial wall originating from the FMD reaction within 100 s after avascularization. These results indicate the high performance of the proposed method in evaluating vascular endothelial function just after avascularization, where the function is difficult to be estimated by a conventional FMD measurement.

  3. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R; Crone, Wendy C; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  4. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R.; Crone, Wendy C.; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  5. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  6. Characterization of the image-derived carotid artery input function using independent component analysis for the quantitation of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Chen, X.; Renaut, R.; Alexander, G. E.; Bandy, D.; Guo, H.; Reiman, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    We previously developed a noninvasive technique for the quantification of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images using an image-derived input function obtained from a manually drawn carotid artery region. Here, we investigate the use of independent component analysis (ICA) for more objective identification of the carotid artery and surrounding tissue regions. Using FDG PET data from 22 subjects, ICA was applied to an easily defined cubical region including the carotid artery and neighboring tissue. Carotid artery and tissue time activity curves and three venous samples were used to generate spillover and partial volume-corrected input functions and to calculate the parametric images of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl). Different from a blood-sampling-free ICA approach, the results from our ICA approach are numerically well matched to those based on the arterial blood sampled input function. In fact, the ICA-derived input functions and CMRgl measurements were not only highly correlated (correlation coefficients >0.99) to, but also highly comparable (regression slopes between 0.92 and 1.09), with those generated using arterial blood sampling. Moreover, the reliability of the ICA-derived input function remained high despite variations in the location and size of the cubical region. The ICA procedure makes it possible to quantify FDG PET images in an objective and reproducible manner. Image-derived input function by ICA for FDG-PET.

  7. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The radioligand {sup 11}C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. Methods: The experimental animals were injected with [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. Results: In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent

  8. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  9. Accurate genetic diagnosis of Finnish pulmonary arterial hypertension patients using oligonucleotide-selective sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vattulainen, Sanna; Aho, Joonas; Salmenperä, Pertteli; Bruce, Siina; Tallila, Jonna; Gentile, Massimiliano; Sankelo, Marja; Laitinen, Tarja; Koskenvuo, Juha W; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Myllykangas, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) among Finnish PAH patients is poorly understood. We adopted a novel-targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach called Oligonucleotide-Selective Sequencing (OS-Seq) and developed a custom data analysis and interpretation pipeline to identify pathogenic base substitutions, insertions, and deletions in seven genes associated with PAH (BMPR2, BMPR1B, ACVRL1, ENG, SMAD9, CAV1, and KCNK3) from Finnish PAH patients. This study represents the first clinical study with OS-Seq technology on patients suffering from a rare genetic disorder. We analyzed DNA samples from 21 Finnish PAH patients, whose BMPR2 and ACVRL1 mutation status had been previously studied using Sanger sequencing. Our sequencing panel covered 100% of the targeted base pairs with >15× sequencing depth. Pathogenic base substitutions were identified in the BMPR2 gene in 29% of the Finnish PAH cases. Two of the pathogenic variant-positive patients had been previously tested negative using Sanger sequencing. No clinically significant variants were identified in the six other PAH genes. Our study validates the use of targeted OS-Seq for genetic diagnostics of PAH and revealed pathogenic variants that had been previously missed using Sanger sequencing. PMID:26247051

  10. Reliable and Accurate Calcium Volume Measurement in Coronary Artery Using Intravascular Ultrasound Videos.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tadashi; Banchhor, Sumit K; Londhe, Narendra D; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Radeva, Petia; Shukla, Devarshi; Saba, Luca; Balestrieri, Antonella; Nicolaides, Andrew; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative assessment of calcified atherosclerotic volume within the coronary artery wall is vital for cardiac interventional procedures. The goal of this study is to automatically measure the calcium volume, given the borders of coronary vessel wall for all the frames of the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) video. Three soft computing fuzzy classification techniques were adapted namely Fuzzy c-Means (FCM), K-means, and Hidden Markov Random Field (HMRF) for automated segmentation of calcium regions and volume computation. These methods were benchmarked against previously developed threshold-based method. IVUS image data sets (around 30,600 IVUS frames) from 15 patients were collected using 40 MHz IVUS catheter (Atlantis® SR Pro, Boston Scientific®, pullback speed of 0.5 mm/s). Calcium mean volume for FCM, K-means, HMRF and threshold-based method were 37.84 ± 17.38 mm(3), 27.79 ± 10.94 mm(3), 46.44 ± 19.13 mm(3) and 35.92 ± 16.44 mm(3) respectively. Cross-correlation, Jaccard Index and Dice Similarity were highest between FCM and threshold-based method: 0.99, 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.95 + 0.02 respectively. Student's t-test, z-test and Wilcoxon-test are also performed to demonstrate consistency, reliability and accuracy of the results. Given the vessel wall region, the system reliably and automatically measures the calcium volume in IVUS videos. Further, we validated our system against a trained expert using scoring: K-means showed the best performance with an accuracy of 92.80%. Out procedure and protocol is along the line with method previously published clinically. PMID:26643081

  11. PROMISE of Coronary CT Angiography: Precise and Accurate Diagnosis and Prognosis in Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dustin M; Branch, Kelley R; Cury, Ricardo C

    2016-04-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is a rapidly growing and powerful diagnostic test that offers a great deal of precision with respect to diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD). Guideline statements for patients with stable ischemic heart disease have recommended CCTA for only a limited portion of intermediate-risk patients who have relative or absolute contraindications for exercise or vasodilator stress testing. The publication of two large, prospective randomized clinical trials, the Prospective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain and the Scottish Computed Tomography of the Heart Trial are likely to expand these indications. These new data from large trials, in addition to other studies, show that CCTA is highly sensitive for the detection of CAD, identifies high-risk patients for cardiac events based on extent or plaque morphology of CAD that would not be identified by other noninvasive means, and provides significantly greater diagnostic certainty for proper treatment, including referral for invasive coronary angiography with revascularization more appropriately. Superior diagnostic accuracy and prognostic data with CCTA, when compared with other functional stress tests, may result in a reduction in unnecessary downstream testing and cost savings. In addition, newer CCTA applications hold the promise of providing a complete evaluation of a patient's coronary anatomy as well as a per-vessel ischemic evaluation. This review focuses on the interval knowledge obtained from newer data on CCTA in patients with stable ischemic heart disease, primarily focusing on the contributions of the Prospective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain and the Scottish Computed Tomography of the Heart Trial. PMID:27043808

  12. Effects of the inlet conditions and blood models on accurate prediction of hemodynamics in the stented coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongfei; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Wanhua

    2015-05-01

    Hemodynamics altered by stent implantation is well-known to be closely related to in-stent restenosis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been used to investigate the hemodynamics in stented arteries in detail and help to analyze the performances of stents. In this study, blood models with Newtonian or non-Newtonian properties were numerically investigated for the hemodynamics at steady or pulsatile inlet conditions respectively employing CFD based on the finite volume method. The results showed that the blood model with non-Newtonian property decreased the area of low wall shear stress (WSS) compared with the blood model with Newtonian property and the magnitude of WSS varied with the magnitude and waveform of the inlet velocity. The study indicates that the inlet conditions and blood models are all important for accurately predicting the hemodynamics. This will be beneficial to estimate the performances of stents and also help clinicians to select the proper stents for the patients.

  13. Noninvasive measurement of regional cerebral blood flow change with H[sub 2][sup 15]O and positron and emission tomography using a mechanical injector and a standard arterial input function

    SciTech Connect

    Sadato, Norihiro; Magata, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Matoba, Naoki; Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Tamaki, Nagara; Konishi, Junji . Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Shibasaki, Hiroshi . Dept. of Brain Pathophysiology); Senda, Michio )

    1993-12-01

    To estimate changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) without arterial sampling in the study of functional-anatomical correlations in the human brain, using [sup 15]O-labeled water and PET, a standard arterial input function was generated from the input function in 10 normal volunteers with dose calibration and peak time normalization. The speed and volume of injection were precisely controlled with a mechanical injector. After global normalization of each tissue activity image, the standard arterial input function was applied to obtain estimated CBF images. Relative changes in estimated rCBF to whole brain mean CBF([delta]Fest) and those in regional tissue activity ([delta]C) were compared with true relative rCBF changes ([delta]F) in 40 pairs of images obtained from 6 normal volunteers. [delta]Fest correlated well with [delta]F, whereas [delta]C consistently underestimated [delta]F. This noninvasive method simplifies the activation studies and provides the accurate estimation of relative flow changes.

  14. Quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of prostate cancer DCE-MRI at 3T: comparison of two arterial input functions on cancer detection with digitized whole mount histopathological validation.

    PubMed

    Fennessy, Fiona M; Fedorov, Andriy; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kim, Kyung Won; Hirsch, Michelle S; Vangel, Mark G; Masry, Paul; Flood, Trevor A; Chang, Ming-Ching; Tempany, Clare M; Mulkern, Robert V; Gupta, Sandeep N

    2015-09-01

    Accurate pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in prostate cancer (PCa) requires knowledge of the concentration time course of the contrast agent in the feeding vasculature, the so-called arterial input function (AIF). The purpose of this study was to compare AIF choice in differentiating peripheral zone PCa from non-neoplastic prostatic tissue (NNPT), using PK analysis of high temporal resolution prostate DCE-MRI data and whole-mount pathology (WMP) validation. This prospective study was performed in 30 patients who underwent multiparametric endorectal prostate MRI at 3.0T and WMP validation. PCa foci were annotated on WMP slides and MR images using 3D Slicer. Foci ≥0.5cm(3) were contoured as tumor regions of interest (TROIs) on subtraction DCE (early-arterial - pre-contrast) images. PK analyses of TROI and NNPT data were performed using automatic AIF (aAIF) and model AIF (mAIF) methods. A paired t-test compared mean and 90th percentile (p90) PK parameters obtained with the two AIF approaches. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis determined diagnostic accuracy (DA) of PK parameters. Logistic regression determined correlation between PK parameters and histopathology. Mean TROI and NNPT PK parameters were higher using aAIF vs. mAIF (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in DA between AIF methods: highest for p90 volume transfer constant (K(trans)) (aAIF differences in the area under the ROC curve (Az) = 0.827; mAIF Az=0.93). Tumor cell density correlated with aAIF K(trans) (p=0.03). Our results indicate that DCE-MRI using both AIF methods is excellent in discriminating PCa from NNPT. If quantitative DCE-MRI is to be used as a biomarker in PCa, the same AIF method should be used consistently throughout the study. PMID:25683515

  15. Development of a flow feedback pulse duplicator system with rhesus monkey arterial input impedance characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaub, J. D.; Koenig, S. C.; Schroeder, M. J.; Ewert, D. L.; Drew, G. A.; Swope, R. D.; Convertino, V. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    An in vitro pulsatile pump flow system that is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows in a mock circulatory system tuned to reproduce the first nine harmonics of the input impedance of a rhesus monkey was developed and tested. The system was created as a research tool for evaluating cardiovascular function and for the design, testing, and evaluation of electrical-mechanical cardiovascular models and chronically implanted sensors. The system possesses a computerized user interface for controlling a linear displacement pulsatile pump in a controlled flow loop format to emulate in vivo cardiovascular characteristics. Evaluation of the pump system consisted of comparing its aortic pressure and flow profiles with in vivo rhesus hemodynamic waveforms in the time and frequency domains. Comparison of aortic pressure and flow data between the pump system and in vivo data showed good agreement in the time and frequency domains, however, the pump system produced a larger pulse pressure. The pump system can be used for comparing cardiovascular parameters with predicted cardiovascular model values and for evaluating such items as vascular grafts, heart valves, biomaterials, and sensors. This article describes the development and evaluation of this feedback controlled cardiovascular dynamics simulation modeling system.

  16. Development of a flow feedback pulse duplicator system with rhesus monkey arterial input impedance characteristics.

    PubMed

    Schaub, J D; Koenig, S C; Schroeder, M J; Ewert, D L; Drew, G A; Swope, R D

    1999-01-01

    An in vitro pulsatile pump flow system that is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows in a mock circulatory system tuned to reproduce the first nine harmonics of the input impedance of a rhesus monkey was developed and tested. The system was created as a research tool for evaluating cardiovascular function and for the design, testing, and evaluation of electrical-mechanical cardiovascular models and chronically implanted sensors. The system possesses a computerized user interface for controlling a linear displacement pulsatile pump in a controlled flow loop format to emulate in vivo cardiovascular characteristics. Evaluation of the pump system consisted of comparing its aortic pressure and flow profiles with in vivo rhesus hemodynamic waveforms in the time and frequency domains. Comparison of aortic pressure and flow data between the pump system and in vivo data showed good agreement in the time and frequency domains, however, the pump system produced a larger pulse pressure. The pump system can be used for comparing cardiovascular parameters with predicted cardiovascular model values and for evaluating such items as vascular grafts, heart valves, biomaterials, and sensors. This article describes the development and evaluation of this feedback controlled cardiovascular dynamics simulation modeling system. PMID:10445741

  17. Multi-modal pharmacokinetic modelling for DCE-MRI: using diffusion weighted imaging to constrain the local arterial input function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamy, Valentin; Modat, Marc; Shipley, Rebecca; Dikaios, Nikos; Cleary, Jon; Punwani, Shonit; Ourselin, Sebastien; Atkinson, David; Melbourne, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The routine acquisition of multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging data in oncology yields the possibility of combined model fitting of traditionally separate models of tissue structure and function. In this work we hypothesise that diffusion weighted imaging data may help constrain the fitting of pharmacokinetic models to dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI data. Parameters related to tissue perfusion in the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) modelling of diffusion weighted MRI provide local information on how tissue is likely to perfuse that can be utilised to guide DCE modelling via local modification of the arterial input function (AIF). In this study we investigate, based on multi-parametric head and neck MRI of 8 subjects (4 with head and neck tumours), the benefit of incorporating parameters derived from the IVIM model within the DCE modelling procedure. Although we find the benefit of this procedure to be marginal on the data used in this work, it is conceivable that a technique of this type will be of greater use in a different application.

  18. Arterial input function of an optical tracer for dynamic contrast enhanced imaging can be determined from pulse oximetry oxygen saturation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Wright, Eric A.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B.; Pogue, Brian W.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2012-12-01

    In many cases, kinetic modeling requires that the arterial input function (AIF)—the time-dependent arterial concentration of a tracer—be characterized. A straightforward method to measure the AIF of red and near-infrared optical dyes (e.g., indocyanine green) using a pulse oximeter is presented. The method is motivated by the ubiquity of pulse oximeters used in both preclinical and clinical applications, as well as the gap in currently available technologies to measure AIFs in small animals. The method is based on quantifying the interference that is observed in the derived arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) following a bolus injection of a light-absorbing dye. In other words, the change in SaO2 can be converted into dye concentration knowing the chromophore-specific extinction coefficients, the true arterial oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration. A simple error analysis was performed to highlight potential limitations of the approach, and a validation of the method was conducted in rabbits by comparing the pulse oximetry method with the AIF acquired using a pulse dye densitometer. Considering that determining the AIF is required for performing quantitative tracer kinetics, this method provides a flexible tool for measuring the arterial dye concentration that could be used in a variety of applications.

  19. Robust estimation of the arterial input function for Logan plots using an intersectional searching algorithm and clustering in positron emission tomography for neuroreceptor imaging.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Mika; Kimura, Yuichi; Yano, Junichi; Mishina, Masahiro; Yanagisawa, Masao; Ishii, Kenji; Oda, Keiichi; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2008-03-01

    The Logan plot is a powerful algorithm used to generate binding-potential images from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images in neuroreceptor studies. However, it requires arterial blood sampling and metabolite correction to provide an input function, and clinically it is preferable that this need for arterial blood sampling be obviated. Estimation of the input function with metabolite correction using an intersectional searching algorithm (ISA) has been proposed. The ISA seeks the input function from the intersection between the planes spanned by measured radioactivity curves in tissue and their cumulative integrals in data space. However, the ISA is sensitive to noise included in measured curves, and it often fails to estimate the input function. In this paper, we propose a robust estimation of the cumulative integral of the plasma time-activity curve (pTAC) using ISA (robust EPISA) to overcome noise issues. The EPISA reduces noise in the measured PET data using averaging and clustering that gathers radioactivity curves with similar kinetic parameters. We confirmed that a little noise made the estimation of the input function extremely difficult in the simulation. The robust EPISA was validated by application to eight real dynamic [(11)C]TMSX PET data sets used to visualize adenosine A(2A) receptors and four real dynamic [(11)C]PIB PET data sets used to visualize amyloid-beta plaque. Peripherally, the latter showed faster metabolism than the former. The clustering operation improved the signal-to-noise ratio for the PET data sufficiently to estimate the input function, and the calculated neuroreceptor images had a quality equivalent to that using measured pTACs after metabolite correction. Our proposed method noninvasively yields an alternative input function for Logan plots, allowing the Logan plot to be more useful in neuroreceptor studies. PMID:18187345

  20. Multiple-input nonlinear modelling of cerebral haemodynamics using spontaneous arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2 and heart rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Marmarelis, V Z; Mitsis, G D; Shin, D C; Zhang, R

    2016-05-13

    In order to examine the effect of changes in heart rate (HR) upon cerebral perfusion and autoregulation, we include the HR signal recorded from 18 control subjects as a third input in a two-input model of cerebral haemodynamics that has been used previously to quantify the dynamic effects of changes in arterial blood pressure and end-tidal CO2upon cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) measured at the middle cerebral arteries via transcranial Doppler ultrasound. It is shown that the inclusion of HR as a third input reduces the output prediction error in a statistically significant manner, which implies that there is a functional connection between HR changes and CBFV. The inclusion of nonlinearities in the model causes further statistically significant reduction of the output prediction error. To achieve this task, we employ the concept of principal dynamic modes (PDMs) that yields dynamic nonlinear models of multi-input systems using relatively short data records. The obtained PDMs suggest model-driven quantitative hypotheses for the role of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity (corresponding to distinct PDMs) in the underlying physiological mechanisms by virtue of their relative contributions to the model output. These relative PDM contributions are subject-specific and, therefore, may be used to assess personalized characteristics for diagnostic purposes. PMID:27044989

  1. Accurate quantitative measurements of brachial artery cross-sectional vascular area and vascular volume elastic modulus using automated oscillometric measurements: comparison with brachial artery ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Ochi, Noriki; Inoue, Mamiko; Nishida, Mutumi; Aziki, Kumi; Horie, Tatsunori; Katoh, Chietsugu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-01-01

    Increasing vascular diameter and attenuated vascular elasticity may be reliable markers for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements have been complex, operator-dependent or invasive. Recently, we developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure a brachial artery's estimated area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (VE). The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Rest eA and VE were measured using the recently developed automated detector with the oscillometric method. eA was estimated using pressure/volume curves and VE was defined as follows (VE=Δ pressure/ (100 × Δ area/area) mm Hg/%). Sixteen volunteers (age 35.2±13.1 years) underwent the oscillometric measurements and brachial ultrasound at rest and under nitroglycerin (NTG) administration. Oscillometric measurement was performed twice on different days. The rest eA correlated with ultrasound-measured brachial artery area (r=0.77, P<0.001). Rest eA and VE measurement showed good reproducibility (eA: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.88, VE: ICC=0.78). Under NTG stress, eA was significantly increased (12.3±3.0 vs. 17.1±4.6 mm2, P<0.001), and this was similar to the case with ultrasound evaluation (4.46±0.72 vs. 4.73±0.75 mm, P<0.001). VE was also decreased (0.81±0.16 vs. 0.65±0.11 mm Hg/%, P<0.001) after NTG. Cross-sectional vascular area calculated using this automated oscillometric measurement correlated with ultrasound measurement and showed good reproducibility. Therefore, this is a reliable approach and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. PMID:25693851

  2. An improved approach for accurate and efficient measurement of common carotid artery intima-media thickness in ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Guan, Xin; Bai, Yu; Jia, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The intima-media thickness (IMT) of common carotid artery (CCA) can serve as an important indicator for the assessment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this paper an improved approach for automatic IMT measurement with low complexity and high accuracy is presented. 100 ultrasound images from 100 patients were tested with the proposed approach. The ground truth (GT) of the IMT was manually measured for six times and averaged, while the automatic segmented (AS) IMT was computed by the algorithm proposed in this paper. The mean difference±standard deviation between AS and GT IMT is 0.0231±0.0348 mm, and the correlation coefficient between them is 0.9629. The computational time is 0.3223 s per image with MATLAB under Windows XP on an Intel Core 2 Duo CPU E7500 @2.93 GHz. The proposed algorithm has the potential to achieve real-time measurement under Visual Studio. PMID:25215292

  3. Verification of a semi-automated MRI-guided technique for non-invasive determination of the arterial input function in 15O-labeled gaseous PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Satoshi; Hori, Yuki; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Morita, Naomi; Yamamoto, Akihide; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2013-02-01

    A semi-automated MR-guided technique has been evaluated for non-invasive estimation of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) using the sequential administration of 15O oxygen (O2) and 15O carbon dioxide (CO2) during a single PET scan. Two mathematical models, which assess the arterial input function (AIF) from time-activity curves (TAC) in the internal carotid artery region, were tested, namely one with a simple correction for the recovery coefficient (RC) and another with corrections for RC and spillover from surrounding tissues. RC was determined from MRA and black-blood image. RC was also determined from C15O blood volume images as a reference. RC agreed between MR-based and C15O-PET based methods, suggesting validity of MR-based methods. Area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the early portion of estimated AIF agreed with that of measured AIF in both models. AUC of the delayed phase of estimated AIF was largely overestimated in the first model, but was sufficiently improved by the spillover correction implemented in the second model.

  4. Evaluating the Feasibility of an Agglomerative Hierarchy Clustering Algorithm for the Automatic Detection of the Arterial Input Function Using DSC-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jiandong; Yang, Jiawen; Guo, Qiyong

    2014-01-01

    During dynamic susceptibility contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI), it has been demonstrated that the arterial input function (AIF) can be obtained using fuzzy c-means (FCM) and k-means clustering methods. However, due to the dependence on the initial centers of clusters, both clustering methods have poor reproducibility between the calculation and recalculation steps. To address this problem, the present study developed an alternative clustering technique based on the agglomerative hierarchy (AH) method for AIF determination. The performance of AH method was evaluated using simulated data and clinical data based on comparisons with the two previously demonstrated clustering-based methods in terms of the detection accuracy, calculation reproducibility, and computational complexity. The statistical analysis demonstrated that, at the cost of a significantly longer execution time, AH method obtained AIFs more in line with the expected AIF, and it was perfectly reproducible at different time points. In our opinion, the disadvantage of AH method in terms of the execution time can be alleviated by introducing a professional high-performance workstation. The findings of this study support the feasibility of using AH clustering method for detecting the AIF automatically. PMID:24932638

  5. Comprehensive Population-Averaged Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Contrast–Enhanced vMagnetic Resonance Imaging of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onxley, Jennifer D.; Yoo, David S.; Muradyan, Naira; MacFall, James R.; Brizel, David M.; Craciunescu, Oana I.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To generate a population-averaged arterial input function (PA-AIF) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in head and neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI during concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Imaging consisted of 2 baseline scans 1 week apart (B1/B2) and 1 scan after 1 week of chemoradiation therapy (Wk1). Regions of interest (ROIs) in the right and left carotid arteries were drawn on coronal images. Plasma concentration curves of all ROIs were averaged and fit to a biexponential decay function to obtain the final PA-AIF (AvgAll). Right-sided and left-sided ROI plasma concentration curves were averaged separately to obtain side-specific AIFs (AvgRight/AvgLeft). Regions of interest were divided by time point to obtain time-point-specific AIFs (AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1). The vascular transfer constant (K{sub trans}) and the fractional extravascular, extracellular space volume (V{sub e}) for primaries and nodes were calculated using the AvgAll AIF, the appropriate side-specific AIF, and the appropriate time-point-specific AIF. Median K{sub trans} and V{sub e} values derived from AvgAll were compared with those obtained from the side-specific and time-point-specific AIFs. The effect of using individual AIFs was also investigated. Results: The plasma parameters for AvgAll were a{sub 1,2} = 27.11/17.65 kg/L, m{sub 1,2} = 11.75/0.21 min{sup −1}. The coefficients of repeatability (CRs) for AvgAll versus AvgLeft were 0.04 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. For AvgAll versus AvgRight, the CRs were 0.08 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. When AvgAll was compared with AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1, the CRs were slightly higher: 0.32/0.19/0.78 min{sup −1}, respectively, for K{sub trans}; and 0.07/0.08/0.09 for V{sub e}. Use of a PA-AIF was not significantly different from use of individual AIFs. Conclusion: A PA-AIF for head and neck cancer

  6. Improved predictive modeling of white LEDs with accurate luminescence simulation and practical inputs with TracePro opto-mechanical design software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Chao-hsi; Freniere, Edward R.; Smith, Linda

    2009-02-01

    The use of white LEDs for solid-state lighting to address applications in the automotive, architectural and general illumination markets is just emerging. LEDs promise greater energy efficiency and lower maintenance costs. However, there is a significant amount of design and cost optimization to be done while companies continue to improve semiconductor manufacturing processes and begin to apply more efficient and better color rendering luminescent materials such as phosphor and quantum dot nanomaterials. In the last decade, accurate and predictive opto-mechanical software modeling has enabled adherence to performance, consistency, cost, and aesthetic criteria without the cost and time associated with iterative hardware prototyping. More sophisticated models that include simulation of optical phenomenon, such as luminescence, promise to yield designs that are more predictive - giving design engineers and materials scientists more control over the design process to quickly reach optimum performance, manufacturability, and cost criteria. A design case study is presented where first, a phosphor formulation and excitation source are optimized for a white light. The phosphor formulation, the excitation source and other LED components are optically and mechanically modeled and ray traced. Finally, its performance is analyzed. A blue LED source is characterized by its relative spectral power distribution and angular intensity distribution. YAG:Ce phosphor is characterized by relative absorption, excitation and emission spectra, quantum efficiency and bulk absorption coefficient. Bulk scatter properties are characterized by wavelength dependent scatter coefficients, anisotropy and bulk absorption coefficient.

  7. The Impact of Arterial Input Function Determination Variations on Prostate Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pharmacokinetic Modeling: A Multicenter Data Analysis Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Yiyi; Fedorov, Andriy; Li, Xia; Jajamovich, Guido H.; Malyarenko, Dariya I.; Aryal, Madhava P.; LaViolette, Peter S.; Oborski, Matthew J.; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Abramson, Richard G.; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Afzal, Aneela; Tudorica, Alina; Moloney, Brendan; Gupta, Sandeep N.; Besa, Cecilia; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Mountz, James M.; Laymon, Charles M.; Muzi, Mark; Schmainda, Kathleen; Cao, Yue; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Taouli, Bachir; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Fennessy, Fiona; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has been widely used in tumor detection and therapy response evaluation. Pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI time-course data allows estimation of quantitative imaging biomarkers such as Ktrans(rate constant for plasma/interstitium contrast reagent (CR) transfer) and ve (extravascular and extracellular volume fraction). However, the use of quantitative DCE-MRI in clinical prostate imaging islimited, with uncertainty in arterial input function (AIF, i.e., the time rate of change of the concentration of CR in the blood plasma) determination being one of the primary reasons. In this multicenter data analysis challenge to assess the effects of variations in AIF quantification on estimation of DCE-MRI parameters, prostate DCE-MRI data acquired at one center from 11 prostate cancer patients were shared among nine centers. Each center used its site-specific method to determine the individual AIF from each data set and submitted the results to the managing center. Along with a literature population averaged AIF, these AIFs and their reference-tissue-adjusted variants were used by the managing center to perform pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI data sets using the Tofts model (TM). All other variables including tumor region of interest (ROI) definition and pre-contrast T1 were kept the same to evaluate parameter variations caused by AIF variations only. Considerable pharmacokinetic parameter variations were observed with the within-subject coefficient of variation (wCV) of Ktrans obtained with unadjusted AIFs as high as 0.74. AIF-caused variations were larger in Ktrans than ve and both were reduced when reference-tissue-adjusted AIFs were used. The parameter variations were largely systematic, resulting in nearly unchanged parametric map patterns. The CR intravasation rate constant, kep (= Ktrans/ve), was less sensitive to AIF variation than Ktrans (wCV for unadjusted AIFs: 0.45 for kep vs. 0.74 for Ktrans), suggesting that it

  8. An Aneurysmal Left Circumflex Artery-to-Right Atrium Fistula in a Patient with Ischemic Symptoms: Accurate Diagnosis with Dual-Source CT Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Oncel, Dilek Oncel, Guray

    2008-07-15

    In this report, we present a 55-year-old female patient with a left circumflex artery-to-right atrial fistula associated with a huge saccular aneurysm. She had undergone conventional angiography due to ischemic symptoms. In conventional angiography, a very dilated and tortuous vessel originating from the circumflex artery and continuous with a huge saccular aneurysm was visualized but the drainage site could not be demonstrated. With dual-source CT coronary angiography, the exact anatomy of this fistula was demonstrated and surgery was planned.

  9. Spatial resonance in a small artery excited by vibration input as a possible mechanism to cause hand-arm vascular disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnaik, Shrikant; Banerjee, Rupak; Kim, Jay

    2012-04-01

    Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is collectively a vasospastic and neurodegenerative occupational disease. One of the major symptoms of HAVS is vibration white finger (VWF) caused by exaggerated vasoconstriction of the arteries and skin arterioles. While VWF is a very painful and costly occupational illness, its pathology has not been well understood. In this study a small artery is modeled as a fluid filled elastic tube whose diameter changes along the axial direction. Equations of motion are developed by considering interactions between the fluid, artery wall and soft-tissue bed. It is shown that the resulting wave equation is the same as that of the basilar membrane in the cochlea of mammals. Therefore, the artery system shows a spatial resonance as in the basilar membrane, which responds with the highest amplitude at the location determined by the vibration frequency. This implies that a long-term use of one type of tool will induce high-level stresses at a few identical locations of the artery that correspond to the major frequency components of the tool. Hardening and deterioration of the artery at these locations may be a possible cause of VWF.

  10. Considerations and Protocols in Virtual Surgical Planning of Reconstructive Surgery for More Accurate and Esthetic Neomandible with Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Free Flap

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Kyoo; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Hyung Jun; Cha, In-Ho; Nam, Woong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The reconstruction of mandibular defects poses many difficulties due to the unique, complex shape of the mandible and the temporomandibular joints. With development of microvascular anastomosis, free tissue transplantation techniques, such as deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap and fibular free flap (FFF), were developed. The DCIA offers good quality and quantity of bone tissue for mandibular segmental defect and implant for dental rehabilitation. Virtual surgical planning (VSP) and stereolithography-guided osteotomy are currently successfully applied in three-dimensional mandibular reconstruction, but most use FFF. There are only a few articles on reconstruction with the DCIA that assess the postoperative results. Methods: Three patients admitted during a five month period (April of 2013 to August of 2013) underwent resection of mandible and DCIA musculo-osseous reconstruction using a VSP and stereolithographic modeling and assessment of outcomes included technical accuracy, esthetic contour, and functional outcomes. Results: This technique yielded iliac bone segment with excellent apposition and duplication of the preoperative plan. Flap survival was 100 percent and all patients maintained preoperative occlusion and contour. Conclusion: Based on our experience, we offer considerations and logically consistent protocols by classification of mandibular defects, and demonstrate the benefits in VSP and stereolithographic modeling of mandibular reconstructive surgery with DCIA flap. PMID:27489828

  11. Kinetic analysis in human brain of [11C](R)-rolipram, a positron emission tomographic radioligand to image phosphodiesterase 4: a retest study and use of an image-derived input function

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Liow, Jeih-San; Luong, Elise; Boellaard, Ronald; Gladding, Robert L.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    [11C](R)-rolipram provides a measure of the density of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) in brain, an enzyme that metabolizes cAMP. The aims of this study were to perform kinetic modeling of [11C](R)-rolipram in healthy humans using an arterial input function and to replace this arterial input in humans with an image-derived input function. Methods Twelve humans had two injections of [11C](R)-rolipram. An image-derived input function was obtained from the carotid arteries and four blood samples. The samples were used for partial volume correction and for estimating the parent concentration using HPLC analysis. Results An unconstrained two-compartment model and Logan analysis measured distribution volume VT, with good identifiability but with moderately high retest variability (15%). Similar results were obtained using the image input (ratio image/arterial VT = 1.00 ± 0.06). Conclusions Binding of [11C](R)-rolipram to PDE4 can be quantified in human brain using kinetic modeling and an arterial input function. Image input function from carotid arteries provides an equally accurate and reproducible method to quantify PDE4. PMID:21034834

  12. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... the artery (arterial bypass) to create a second source of blood supply Clot removal through a balloon catheter placed into the affected artery or through open surgery on the artery (embolectomy) Opening of the ...

  13. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the ... arteries. Blood samples are mainly taken to measure gases in the arteries. Abnormal results may point to ...

  14. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  15. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  16. Toward an inventory of nitrogen input to the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate accounting of nitrogen inputs is increasingly necessary for policy decisions related to aquatic nutrient pollution. Here we synthesize available data to provide the first integrated estimates of the amount and uncertainty of nitrogen inputs to the United States. Abou...

  17. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... limit tissue damage. Alternative Names Blood sample - arterial ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  18. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... rial line can provide valuable information to adjust oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilator (respirator; breathing machine) settings. The blood oxygen pres- sure measures from an arterial line give ...

  19. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  20. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. ...

  1. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  2. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the heart is smaller because it pumps blood only to the lungs. The left coronary artery, ... heart is larger and more muscular because it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Updated August ...

  3. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  4. The MRI-measured arterial input function resulting from a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA in a rat model of stroke slightly underestimates that of Gd-[14C]DTPA and marginally overestimates the blood-to-brain influx rate constant determined by Patlak plots.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Karki, Kishor; Ewing, James R; Divine, George W; Fenstermacher, Joseph D; Patlak, Clifford S; Knight, Robert A

    2010-06-01

    The hypothesis that the arterial input function (AIF) of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid injected by intravenous bolus and measured by the change in the T(1)-relaxation rate (Delta R(1); R(1) = 1/T(1)) of superior sagittal sinus blood (AIF-I) approximates the AIF of (14)C-labeled gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid measured in arterial blood (reference AIF) was tested in a rat stroke model (n = 13). Contrary to the hypothesis, the initial part of the Delta R(1)-time curve was underestimated, and the area under the normalized curve for AIF-I was about 15% lower than that for the reference AIF. Hypothetical AIFs for gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid were derived from the reference AIF values and averaged to obtain a cohort-averaged AIF. Influx rate constants (K(i)) and proton distribution volumes at zero time (V(p) + V(o)) were estimated with Patlak plots of AIF-I, hypothetical AIFs, and cohort-averaged AIFs and tissue Delta R(1) data. For the regions of interest, the K(i)s estimated with AIF-I were slightly but not significantly higher than those obtained with hypothetical AIFs and cohort-averaged AIF. In contrast, V(p) + V(o) was significantly higher when calculated with AIF-I. Similar estimates of K(i) and V(p) + V(o) were obtained with hypothetical AIFs and cohort-averaged AIF. In summary, AIF-I underestimated the reference AIF; this shortcoming had little effect on the K(i) calculated by Patlak plot but produced a significant overestimation of V(p) + V(o). PMID:20512853

  5. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  6. Talking Speech Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliss-Vincent, Jane; Whitford, Gigi

    2002-01-01

    This article presents both the factors involved in successful speech input use and the potential barriers that may suggest that other access technologies could be more appropriate for a given individual. Speech input options that are available are reviewed and strategies for optimizing use of speech recognition technology are discussed. (Contains…

  7. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  8. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  9. Evaluation of limited blood sampling population input approaches for kinetic quantification of [18F]fluorothymidine PET data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantification of kinetic parameters of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents normally requires collecting arterial blood samples which is inconvenient for patients and difficult to implement in routine clinical practice. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a population-based input function (POP-IF) reliant on only a few individual discrete samples allows accurate estimates of tumour proliferation using [18F]fluorothymidine (FLT). Methods Thirty-six historical FLT-PET data with concurrent arterial sampling were available for this study. A population average of baseline scans blood data was constructed using leave-one-out cross-validation for each scan and used in conjunction with individual blood samples. Three limited sampling protocols were investigated including, respectively, only seven (POP-IF7), five (POP-IF5) and three (POP-IF3) discrete samples of the historical dataset. Additionally, using the three-point protocol, we derived a POP-IF3M, the only input function which was not corrected for the fraction of radiolabelled metabolites present in blood. The kinetic parameter for net FLT retention at steady state, Ki, was derived using the modified Patlak plot and compared with the original full arterial set for validation. Results Small percentage differences in the area under the curve between all the POP-IFs and full arterial sampling IF was found over 60 min (4.2%-5.7%), while there were, as expected, larger differences in the peak position and peak height. A high correlation between Ki values calculated using the original arterial input function and all the population-derived IFs was observed (R2 = 0.85-0.98). The population-based input showed good intra-subject reproducibility of Ki values (R2 = 0.81-0.94) and good correlation (R2 = 0.60-0.85) with Ki-67. Conclusions Input functions generated using these simplified protocols over scan duration of 60 min estimate net PET-FLT retention with reasonable accuracy. PMID

  10. Apparent arterial compliance.

    PubMed

    Quick, C M; Berger, D S; Noordergraaf, A

    1998-04-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in estimating total arterial compliance. Because it cannot be measured directly, a lumped model is usually applied to derive compliance from aortic pressure and flow. The archetypical model, the classical two-element windkessel, assumes 1) system linearity and 2) infinite pulse wave velocity. To generalize this model, investigators have added more elements and have incorporated nonlinearities. A different approach is taken here. It is assumed that the arterial system 1) is linear and 2) has finite pulse wave velocity. In doing so, the windkessel is generalized by describing compliance as a complex function of frequency that relates input pressure to volume stored. By applying transmission theory, this relationship is shown to be a function of heart rate, peripheral resistance, and pulse wave reflection. Because this pressure-volume relationship is generally not equal to total arterial compliance, it is termed "apparent compliance." This new concept forms the natural counterpart to the established concept of apparent pulse wave velocity. PMID:9575945

  11. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  12. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  13. Modeling of blood flow in arterial trees.

    PubMed

    Anor, Tomer; Grinberg, Leopold; Baek, Hyoungsu; Madsen, Joseph R; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Karniadakis, George E

    2010-01-01

    Advances in computational methods and medical imaging techniques have enabled accurate simulations of subject-specific blood flows at the level of individual blood cell and in complex arterial networks. While in the past, we were limited to simulations with one arterial bifurcation, the current state-of-the-art is simulations of arterial networks consisting of hundreds of arteries. In this paper, we review the advances in methods for vascular flow simulations in large arterial trees. We discuss alternative approaches and validity of various assumptions often made to simplify the modeling. To highlight the similarities and discrepancies of data computed with different models, computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) and inexpensive one-dimensional (1D) flow simulations in very large arterial networks are employed. Finally, we discuss the possibilities, challenges, and limitations of the computational methods for predicting outcomes of therapeutic interventions for individual patients. PMID:20836052

  14. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  15. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  16. Assessment of conduit artery vasomotion using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanders, Karlis; Grabovskis, Andris; Marcinkevics, Zbignevs; Aivars, Juris Imants

    2013-11-01

    Vasomotion is a spontaneous oscillation of vascular tone. The phenomenon has been observed in small arterioles and capillaries as well as in the large conduit arteries. The layer of smooth muscle cells that surrounds a blood vessel can spontaneously and periodically change its tension and thereby the arterial wall stiffness also changes. As the understanding of the phenomenon is still rather obscure, researchers would benefit from a low-cost and reliable investigation technique such as photoplethysmography (PPG). PPG is an optical blood pulsation measurement technique that can offer substantial information about the arterial stiffness. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the usefulness of the PPG technique in the research of vasomotion and to investigate vasomotion in the relatively large conduit arteries. Continuous 15 minute long measurements of posterior tibial artery wall stiffness were taken. Artery diameter, electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiration were also simultaneously registered. Fast Fourier Transform power spectra were calculated to identify unique stiffness oscillations that did not correspond to fluctuations in the systemic parameters and thus would indicate vasomotion. We concluded that photoplethysmography is a convenient method for the research of the vasomotion in large arteries. Local stiffness parameter b/a is more accurate to use and easier to measure than the pulse wave velocity which describes stiffness of a segment of an artery. Conduit arteries might exhibit a low amplitude high frequency vasomotion ( 9 to 27 cycles per minute). Low frequency vasomotion is problematic to distinguish from the passive oscillations imposed by the arterial pressure.

  17. Input Decimated Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using an ensemble of classifiers instead of a single classifier has been shown to improve generalization performance in many pattern recognition problems. However, the extent of such improvement depends greatly on the amount of correlation among the errors of the base classifiers. Therefore, reducing those correlations while keeping the classifiers' performance levels high is an important area of research. In this article, we explore input decimation (ID), a method which selects feature subsets for their ability to discriminate among the classes and uses them to decouple the base classifiers. We provide a summary of the theoretical benefits of correlation reduction, along with results of our method on two underwater sonar data sets, three benchmarks from the Probenl/UCI repositories, and two synthetic data sets. The results indicate that input decimated ensembles (IDEs) outperform ensembles whose base classifiers use all the input features; randomly selected subsets of features; and features created using principal components analysis, on a wide range of domains.

  18. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  19. Blood Tracer Kinetics in the Arterial Tree

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Elias; Gall, Peter; Günther, Matthias; Reisert, Marco; Mader, Irina; Fleysher, Roman; Kiselev, Valerij G.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of blood supply of different organs relies on labeling blood with a suitable tracer. The tracer kinetics is linear: Tracer concentration at an observation site is a linear response to an input somewhere upstream the arterial flow. The corresponding impulse response functions are currently treated empirically without incorporating the relation to the vascular morphology of an organ. In this work we address this relation for the first time. We demonstrate that the form of the response function in the entire arterial tree is reduced to that of individual vessel segments under approximation of good blood mixing at vessel bifurcations. The resulting expression simplifies significantly when the geometric scaling of the vascular tree is taken into account. This suggests a new way to access the vascular morphology in vivo using experimentally determined response functions. However, it is an ill-posed inverse problem as demonstrated by an example using measured arterial spin labeling in large brain arteries. We further analyze transport in individual vessel segments and demonstrate that experimentally accessible tracer concentration in vessel segments depends on the measurement principle. Explicit expressions for the response functions are obtained for the major middle part of the arterial tree in which the blood flow in individual vessel segments can be treated as laminar. When applied to the analysis of regional cerebral blood flow measurements for which the necessary arterial input is evaluated in the carotid arteries, present theory predicts about 20% underestimation, which is in agreement with recent experimental data. PMID:25299048

  20. Accurate measurement of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-07-01

    The paper discusses current methods for accurate measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.

  1. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  2. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  3. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and

  4. Right hepatic artery from splenic artery: the four-leaf clover of hepatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Francesco; Dondossola, Daniele; Fornoni, Gianluca; Caccamo, Lucio; Rossi, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    The anatomy of hepatic arteries is one of the most variable. Accurate awareness of all the possible anatomic variations is crucial in the upper GI surgery and especially in liver and pancreas transplantation. The most frequent anatomical variants are: a replaced or accessory right hepatic artery (RHA) from the superior mesenteric artery (6.3-21 %), a replaced or accessory left hepatic artery (LHA) from the left gastric artery (LGA) (3-18 %) or a combination of these two variants (up to 7.4 %). Herein, we describe the case of a 67-year-old cadaveric organ donor who presented a RHA originating from the splenic artery (SA) associated with both a CHA originating from the celiac trunk (CT) and a LHA originating from the LGA. PMID:26769020

  5. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  6. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... Hardening of the arteries often occurs with aging. As you grow older, ... narrows your arteries and makes them stiffer. These changes ...

  7. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ischemia is often seen in people who have hardening of the arteries in other parts of the ... long-term (chronic) mesenteric artery ischemia caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ): Abdominal pain after eating ...

  8. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  9. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  10. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  11. Hypermnesia using auditory input.

    PubMed

    Allen, J

    1992-07-01

    The author investigated whether hypermnesia would occur with auditory input. In addition, the author examined the effects of subjects' knowledge that they would later be asked to recall the stimuli. Two groups of 26 subjects each were given three successive recall trials after they listened to an audiotape of 59 high-imagery nouns. The subjects in the uninformed group were not told that they would later be asked to remember the words; those in the informed group were. Hypermnesia was evident, but only in the uninformed group. PMID:1447564

  12. Input distributions for VISA

    SciTech Connect

    Liebetrau, A.M.

    1983-10-01

    Work is underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to improve the probabilistic analysis used to model pressurized thermal shock (PTS) incidents in reactor pressure vessels, and, further, to incorporate these improvements into the existing Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis (VISA) code. Two topics related to work on input distributions in VISA are discussed in this paper. The first involves the treatment of flaw size distributions and the second concerns errors in the parameters in the (Guthrie) equation which is used to compute ..delta..RT/sub NDT/, the shift in reference temperature for nil ductility transition.

  13. Arterial load and ventricular-arterial coupling: physiologic relations with body size and effect of obesity.

    PubMed

    Chirinos, Julio A; Rietzschel, Ernst R; De Buyzere, Marc L; De Bacquer, Dirk; Gillebert, Thierry C; Gupta, Amit K; Segers, Patrick

    2009-09-01

    Accurate quantification of arterial function is crucial to distinguishing disease states from normal variants. However, there are little data regarding methods to scale arterial load to body size in humans. We studied 2365 adults aged 35 to 55 years free of overt cardiovascular disease. We assessed arterial hemodynamics and ventricular-vascular coupling with carotid tonometry and Doppler echocardiography. To define normal (physiological) relationships between hemodynamic indices and body size, we used nonlinear regression to analyze a selected reference subsample (n=612) with normal weight (body mass index 18 to 25 kg/m(2)), waist circumference, and metabolic parameters. Most arterial hemodynamic indices demonstrated important relationships with body size, which were frequently allometric (nonlinear). Allometric indexation using appropriate powers (but not ratiometric indexation) effectively eliminated the relationships between indices of arterial load and body size in normal subjects. In the entire sample (n=2365), the adverse effects of obesity on arterial load and end-systolic ventricular stiffening were clearly demonstrated only after appropriate indexation to account for the expected normal relationship to body size. After adjustment for age and sex, a progressive increase in indexed systemic vascular resistance, effective arterial and ventricular end-systolic elastance, and a decrease in total arterial compliance were seen from normal weight to obesity (P<0.0001). Arterial load relates to body size in an allometric fashion, calling for scaling with the use of appropriate powers. Obesity exerts adverse effects on arterial load and ventricular stiffening that go beyond the normal relationship with body size. Allometric normalization should allow more accurate quantification of arterial load in future studies. PMID:19581507

  14. Serum and urinary enzyme activities in renal artery embolism.

    PubMed

    Donadio, C; Auner, I; Giordani, R; Lucchetti, A; Pentimone, F

    1986-10-31

    Renal artery embolism is not a rare occurrence, especially in patients with valvular heart disease, but the early diagnosis of this condition is infrequently accomplished. We report the clinical and laboratory data of 2 patients with valvular heart disease who presented with unilateral renal artery embolization. The usefulness of the determination of serum and urinary enzymes and renal function tests is discussed. We propose that these parameters support an earlier and more accurate diagnosis of renal artery embolism. PMID:2877758

  15. Dual-input two-compartment pharmacokinetic model of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Li; Yang, Li-Ming; Zhang, Min-Ming; Wang, Bo-Yin; Wang, Ting; Lu, Bao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of a dual-input two-compartment tracer kinetic model for evaluating tumorous microvascular properties in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: From January 2014 to April 2015, we prospectively measured and analyzed pharmacokinetic parameters [transfer constant (Ktrans), plasma flow (Fp), permeability surface area product (PS), efflux rate constant (kep), extravascular extracellular space volume ratio (ve), blood plasma volume ratio (vp), and hepatic perfusion index (HPI)] using dual-input two-compartment tracer kinetic models [a dual-input extended Tofts model and a dual-input 2-compartment exchange model (2CXM)] in 28 consecutive HCC patients. A well-known consensus that HCC is a hypervascular tumor supplied by the hepatic artery and the portal vein was used as a reference standard. A paired Student’s t-test and a nonparametric paired Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare the equivalent pharmacokinetic parameters derived from the two models, and Pearson correlation analysis was also applied to observe the correlations among all equivalent parameters. The tumor size and pharmacokinetic parameters were tested by Pearson correlation analysis, while correlations among stage, tumor size and all pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed by Spearman correlation analysis. RESULTS: The Fp value was greater than the PS value (FP = 1.07 mL/mL per minute, PS = 0.19 mL/mL per minute) in the dual-input 2CXM; HPI was 0.66 and 0.63 in the dual-input extended Tofts model and the dual-input 2CXM, respectively. There were no significant differences in the kep, vp, or HPI between the dual-input extended Tofts model and the dual-input 2CXM (P = 0.524, 0.569, and 0.622, respectively). All equivalent pharmacokinetic parameters, except for ve, were correlated in the two dual-input two-compartment pharmacokinetic models; both Fp and PS in the dual-input 2CXM were correlated with Ktrans derived from the dual-input extended Tofts model

  16. Separation of input function for rapid measurement of quantitative CMRO2 and CBF in a single PET scan with a dual tracer administration method.

    PubMed

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takuya; Iida, Hidehiro

    2007-04-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) images can be quantified using positron emission tomography (PET) by administrating (15)O-labelled water (H(15)(2)O) and oxygen ((15)O(2)). Conventionally, those images are measured with separate scans for three tracers C(15)O for CBV, H(15)(2)O for CBF and (15)O(2) for CMRO(2), and there are additional waiting times between the scans in order to minimize the influence of the radioactivity from the previous tracers, which results in a relatively long study period. We have proposed a dual tracer autoradiographic (DARG) approach (Kudomi et al 2005), which enabled us to measure CBF, OEF and CMRO(2) rapidly by sequentially administrating H(15)(2)O and (15)O(2) within a short time. Because quantitative CBF and CMRO(2) values are sensitive to arterial input function, it is necessary to obtain accurate input function and a drawback of this approach is to require separation of the measured arterial blood time-activity curve (TAC) into pure water and oxygen input functions under the existence of residual radioactivity from the first injected tracer. For this separation, frequent manual sampling was required. The present paper describes two calculation methods: namely a linear and a model-based method, to separate the measured arterial TAC into its water and oxygen components. In order to validate these methods, we first generated a blood TAC for the DARG approach by combining the water and oxygen input functions obtained in a series of PET studies on normal human subjects. The combined data were then separated into water and oxygen components by the present methods. CBF and CMRO(2) were calculated using those separated input functions and tissue TAC. The quantitative accuracy in the CBF and CMRO(2) values by the DARG approach did not exceed the acceptable range, i.e., errors in those values were within 5%, when the area under the curve in the input function of the

  17. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  18. Arctic science input wanted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Arctic Research and Policy Act (Eos, June 26, 1984, p. 412) was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan this past July. One of its objectives is to develop a 5-year research plan for the Arctic. A request for input to this plan is being issued this week to nearly 500 people in science, engineering, and industry.To promote Arctic research and to recommend research policy in the Arctic, the new law establishes a five-member Arctic Research Commission, to be appointed by the President, and establishes an Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, to be composed of representatives from nearly a dozen agencies having interests in the region. The commission will make policy recommendations, and the interagency committee will implement those recommendations. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has been designated as the lead agency of the interagency committee.

  19. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  20. Mycotic pseudo-aneurysm of the extracranial carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Desimpelaere, J; Seynaeve, P; Kockx, M; Appel, B; Gyselinck, J; Mortelmans, L

    1997-08-01

    A rare case of mycotic pseudo-aneurysm of the common carotid artery as a complication in an immunosuppressed paediatric patient is presented. Treatment of pseudo-aneurysms of the common carotid artery is generally considered to be an emergency, necessitating quick and accurate diagnosis. In patients with septicemia, angiography has to be avoided. We were able to provide the surgeon with the exact diagnosis and accurate topographical information with helical CT with 3D reformation. PMID:9351308

  1. Input Multiplicities in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Lowell B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes research investigating potential effect of input multiplicity on multivariable chemical process control systems. Several simple processes are shown to exhibit the possibility of theoretical developments on input multiplicity and closely related phenomena are discussed. (JN)

  2. Modeling and generating input processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This tutorial paper provides information relevant to the selection and generation of stochastic inputs to simulation studies. The primary area considered is multivariate but much of the philosophy at least is relevant to univariate inputs as well. 14 refs.

  3. Correlation between Doppler, Manual Morphometry, and Histopathology Based Morphometry of Radial Artery as a Conduit in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    PubMed

    Yadava, Om Prakash; Sharma, Vinod; Prakash, Arvind; Ahlawat, Vikas; Kundu, Anirban; Mohanty, Bikram K; Mishra, Rekha; Dinda, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long-term graft patency is the major factor impacting survival after coronary artery bypass grafting. Arteries are superior in this regard. Radial artery is considered the second best conduit after internal mammary artery. Several studies have shown excellent radial artery patency. We evaluated the morphologic characteristics of radial artery by three modalities, (i) preoperative Doppler ultrasound, (ii) intraoperative manual morphometry, and (iii) postoperative histology-based morphometry, and compared these with the aim of validating Doppler as a noninvasive test of choice for preoperative assessment of radial artery. Methods. This was a prospective study involving 100 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in which radial artery was used. The radial artery was assessed using preoperative Doppler ultrasound studies, intraoperative morphometry, and postoperative histopathology and morphometry. The morphometric measurements included (i) luminal diameter, (ii) intimal and medial thickness, and (iii) intima-media thickness ratio. Results. Using Bland-Altman plots, there was a 95% limit of agreement between the preoperative Doppler measurements and the postoperative histopathology and morphometry. Conclusion. Doppler ultrasound is an accurate screening test for evaluation of radial artery, in terms of intimal/medial thickness and luminal diameter as a conduit in coronary artery bypass grafting and has been validated by both morphometric and histopathology based studies. PMID:27047699

  4. Correlation between Doppler, Manual Morphometry, and Histopathology Based Morphometry of Radial Artery as a Conduit in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Om Prakash; Sharma, Vinod; Prakash, Arvind; Ahlawat, Vikas; Mohanty, Bikram K.; Mishra, Rekha; Dinda, Amit K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long-term graft patency is the major factor impacting survival after coronary artery bypass grafting. Arteries are superior in this regard. Radial artery is considered the second best conduit after internal mammary artery. Several studies have shown excellent radial artery patency. We evaluated the morphologic characteristics of radial artery by three modalities, (i) preoperative Doppler ultrasound, (ii) intraoperative manual morphometry, and (iii) postoperative histology-based morphometry, and compared these with the aim of validating Doppler as a noninvasive test of choice for preoperative assessment of radial artery. Methods. This was a prospective study involving 100 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in which radial artery was used. The radial artery was assessed using preoperative Doppler ultrasound studies, intraoperative morphometry, and postoperative histopathology and morphometry. The morphometric measurements included (i) luminal diameter, (ii) intimal and medial thickness, and (iii) intima-media thickness ratio. Results. Using Bland-Altman plots, there was a 95% limit of agreement between the preoperative Doppler measurements and the postoperative histopathology and morphometry. Conclusion. Doppler ultrasound is an accurate screening test for evaluation of radial artery, in terms of intimal/medial thickness and luminal diameter as a conduit in coronary artery bypass grafting and has been validated by both morphometric and histopathology based studies. PMID:27047699

  5. Fast and accurate propagation of coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R. D.; Beylkin, G.; Monzón, L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a fast algorithm to propagate, for any user-specified accuracy, a time-harmonic electromagnetic field between two parallel planes separated by a linear, isotropic and homogeneous medium. The analytical formulation of this problem (ca 1897) requires the evaluation of the so-called Rayleigh–Sommerfeld integral. If the distance between the planes is small, this integral can be accurately evaluated in the Fourier domain; if the distance is very large, it can be accurately approximated by asymptotic methods. In the large intermediate region of practical interest, where the oscillatory Rayleigh–Sommerfeld kernel must be applied directly, current numerical methods can be highly inaccurate without indicating this fact to the user. In our approach, for any user-specified accuracy ϵ>0, we approximate the kernel by a short sum of Gaussians with complex-valued exponents, and then efficiently apply the result to the input data using the unequally spaced fast Fourier transform. The resulting algorithm has computational complexity , where we evaluate the solution on an N×N grid of output points given an M×M grid of input samples. Our algorithm maintains its accuracy throughout the computational domain. PMID:24204184

  6. Therapeutic internal carotid or vertebral artery occlusion using the WEB device.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, Willem Jan; Sluzewski, Menno; Bechan, Ratna; Peluso, Jo Pp

    2016-06-01

    The WEB device was used to occlude the internal carotid artery or vertebral artery as treatment for large aneurysms. The WEB could be placed accurately at the desired position inside the vessel. Two WEBs were sufficient to occlude the parent artery. PMID:26861025

  7. Systolic aortic pressure-time area is a useful index describing arterial wave properties in rats with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ru-Wen; Chang, Chun-Yi; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Yu, Hsi-Yu; Luo, Jian-Ming; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Lin, Fang-Yue; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Wang, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2015-01-01

    The accurate measurement of arterial wave properties in terms of arterial wave transit time (τw) and wave reflection factor (Rf) requires simultaneous records of aortic pressure and flow signals. However, in clinical practice, it will be helpful to describe the pulsatile ventricular afterload using less-invasive parameters if possible. We investigated the possibility of systolic aortic pressure-time area (PTAs), calculated from the measured aortic pressure alone, acting as systolic workload imposed on the rat diabetic heart. Arterial wave reflections were derived using the impulse response function of the filtered aortic input impedance spectra. The cardiovascular condition in the rats with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes was characterized by (1) an elevation in PTAs; and (2) an increase in Rf and decrease in τw. We found that an inverse linear correlation between PTAs and arterial τw reached significance (τw = 38.5462 - 0.0022 × PTAs; r = 0.7708, P < 0.0001). By contrast, as the PTAs increased, the reflection intensity increased: Rf = -0.5439 + 0.0002 × PTAs; r = 0.8701; P <0 .0001. All these findings suggested that as diabetes stiffened aortas, the augmented aortic PTAs might act as a useful index describing the diabetes-related deterioration in systolic ventricular workload. PMID:26620634

  8. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  9. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  10. SDR input power estimation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones, J. C.; Nappier, J. M.

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  11. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  12. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  13. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  14. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... These blockages are more likely if there is hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) in the eye. Clots ... Blindness and vision loss Blood clots Diabetes Glaucoma Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High ...

  15. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to ...

  16. Carotid artery surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000238.htm Carotid artery surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had carotid artery surgery to restore proper blood flow to your ...

  17. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series To use the sharing features on ... 4 Normal anatomy Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  18. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007315.htm Coronary artery fistula To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Coronary artery fistula is an abnormal connection between one of ...

  19. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  20. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  1. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    RAZ scoring is a simple, accurate and inexpensive screening technique for cardiomyopathy. Although HF QRS ECG is highly sensitive for cardiomyopathy, its specificity may be compromised in patients with cardiac pathologies other than cardiomyopathy, such as uncomplicated coronary artery disease or multiple coronary disease risk factors. Further studies are required to determine whether HF QRS might be useful for monitoring cardiomyopathy severity or the efficacy of therapy in a longitudinal fashion.

  2. Coronary artery anomalies in adults: imaging at dual source CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Mourmouris, Christos; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Andreou, John

    2013-04-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries have an incidence of 1%, and most of these are benign. However, a small number are associated with myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. Various imaging modalities are available for coronary artery assessment. Recently, multi-detector CT has emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool for defining coronary artery anomalies. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the dual source CT appearance of congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries in adults. PMID:23551776

  3. Combination of Rare Right Arterial Variation with Anomalous Origins of the Vertebral Artery, Aberrant Subclavian Artery and Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, H.; San Millán Ruíz, D.; Abdo, G.; Asakura, F.; Yilmaz, H.; Lovblad, K.O.; Rüfenacht, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary A 32-year-old woman hospitalized for subarachnoid hemorrhage showed rare arterial variation on the right side with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. Angiography showed the right vertebral artery to originate from the right common carotid artery, the right subclavian artery to arise separately from the descending aorta, and persistent trigeminal artery on the right side. The possible embryonic mechanism of this previously unreported variant combination is discussed. PMID:22005696

  4. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  5. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  6. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  7. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  8. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  9. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  10. Input design for identification of aircraft stability and control derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for designing inputs to identify stability and control derivatives from flight test data is presented. This approach is based on finding inputs which provide the maximum possible accuracy of derivative estimates. Two techniques of input specification are implemented for this objective - a time domain technique and a frequency domain technique. The time domain technique gives the control input time history and can be used for any allowable duration of test maneuver, including those where data lengths can only be of short duration. The frequency domain technique specifies the input frequency spectrum, and is best applied for tests where extended data lengths, much longer than the time constants of the modes of interest, are possible. These technqiues are used to design inputs to identify parameters in longitudinal and lateral linear models of conventional aircraft. The constraints of aircraft response limits, such as on structural loads, are realized indirectly through a total energy constraint on the input. Tests with simulated data and theoretical predictions show that the new approaches give input signals which can provide more accurate parameter estimates than can conventional inputs of the same total energy. Results obtained indicate that the approach has been brought to the point where it should be used on flight tests for further evaluation.

  11. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  12. REL - English Bulk Data Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Richard Henry

    A bulk data input processor which is available for the Rapidly Extensible Language (REL) English versions is described. In REL English versions, statements that declare names of data items and their interrelationships normally are lines from a terminal or cards in a batch input stream. These statements provide a convenient means of declaring some…

  13. How to manage an arterial catheter.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-03-16

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information on the safe and effective use and management of arterial catheters, the gold standard for accurate blood pressure measurement and routine serial blood gas sampling in critical care. Arterial catheters are used when real-time blood pressure monitoring is required, such as when there is a risk of significant blood loss. ▶ Arterial catheters provide real-time blood pressure monitoring, enabling rapid identification of changes in blood pressure and guiding fluid resuscitation. ▶ Arterial catheters can be used to take blood samples without having to perform multiple arterial or venous punctures. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an arterial catheter. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26982866

  14. Optimization of a Model Corrected Blood Input Function from Dynamic FDG-PET Images of Small Animal Heart In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min; Kundu, Bijoy K

    2013-10-01

    Quantitative evaluation of dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of mouse heart in vivo is challenging due to the small size of the heart and limited intrinsic spatial resolution of the PET scanner. Here, we optimized a compartment model which can simultaneously correct for spill over and partial volume effects for both blood pool and the myocardium, compute kinetic rate parameters and generate model corrected blood input function (MCBIF) from ordered subset expectation maximization - maximum a posteriori (OSEM-MAP) cardiac and respiratory gated (18)F-FDG PET images of mouse heart with attenuation correction in vivo, without any invasive blood sampling. Arterial blood samples were collected from a single mouse to indicate the feasibility of the proposed method. In order to establish statistical significance, venous blood samples from n=6 mice were obtained at 2 late time points, when SP contamination from the tissue to the blood is maximum. We observed that correct bounds and initial guesses for the PV and SP coefficients accurately model the wash-in and wash-out dynamics of the tracer from mouse blood. The residual plot indicated an average difference of about 1.7% between the blood samples and MCBIF. The downstream rate of myocardial FDG influx constant, Ki (0.15±0.03 min(-1)), compared well with Ki obtained from arterial blood samples (P=0.716). In conclusion, the proposed methodology is not only quantitative but also reproducible. PMID:24741130

  15. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  16. Segmentation of Arteries in Minimally Invasive Surgery Using Change Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Hamed; Kosugi, Yukio; Kojima, Kazuyuki

    In laparoscopic surgery, the lack of tactile sensation and 3D visual feedback make it difficult to identify the position of a blood vessel intraoperatively. An unintentional partial tear or complete rupture of a blood vessel may result in a serious complication; moreover, if the surgeon cannot manage this situation, open surgery will be necessary. Differentiation of arteries from veins and other structures and the ability to independently detect them has a variety of applications in surgical procedures involving the head, neck, lung, heart, abdomen, and extremities. We have used the artery's pulsatile movement to detect and differentiate arteries from veins. The algorithm for change detection in this study uses edge detection for unsupervised image registration. Changed regions are identified by subtracting the systolic and diastolic images. As a post-processing step, region properties, including color average, area, major and minor axis lengths, perimeter, and solidity, are used as inputs of the LVQ (Learning Vector Quantization) network. The output results in two object classes: arteries and non-artery regions. After post-processing, arteries can be detected in the laparoscopic field. The registration method used here is evaluated in comparison with other linear and nonlinear elastic methods. The performance of this method is evaluated for the detection of arteries in several laparoscopic surgeries on an animal model and on eleven human patients. The performance evaluation criteria are based on false negative and false positive rates. This algorithm is able to detect artery regions, even in cases where the arteries are obscured by other tissues.

  17. Nonlinear input-output systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Luksic, Mladen; Su, Renjeng

    1987-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions that the nonlinear system dot-x = f(x) + ug(x) and y = h(x) be locally feedback equivalent to the controllable linear system dot-xi = A xi + bv and y = C xi having linear output are found. Only the single input and single output case is considered, however, the results generalize to multi-input and multi-output systems.

  18. Superior mesenteric origin of the proper hepatic artery: embryological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Alakkam, Anas; Hill, Robert V; Saggio, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    The hepatic arteries are subject to a great deal of anatomical variation, potentially complicating hepatobiliary surgical procedures as well as general gastrointestinal procedures that involve foregut and midgut structures. We report a case of a rare variant of the proper hepatic artery discovered during dissection of an 84-year-old male cadaver. In this individual, the common hepatic artery was absent and the proper hepatic artery was replaced directly to the superior mesenteric artery. The gastroduodenal artery and the right inferior phrenic artery took origin from the celiac trunk. In addition, there was no identifiable right gastric artery. The celiac trunk gave off three branches: the splenic, left gastric, and gastroduodenal arteries. The entire arterial blood supply to the liver, therefore, was derived from the superior mesenteric artery. Patterns of regression of the ventral branches and the partial disappearance of the ventral anastomotic arteries during embryonic development play a major role in the variations of the gut arteries. An intraoperative encounter with this particular variant carries a significant risk of iatrogenic injury with potentially devastating ischemia and necrotic results. Accurate depiction and definition of the hepatic arterial anatomy are crucial. Variations like the one described here underscore the importance of pre-operative imaging and knowledge of the embryological origins of variation. PMID:26650050

  19. A method to quantify and visualize femoral head intraosseous arteries by micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xing; Shi, Xiaotian; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Dachuan; Zhao, Dewei

    2016-08-01

    We describe a technique for perfusing a barium sulphate suspension into the intraosseous artery. Following the perfusion of abarium sulphate suspension into 14 fresh lower limbs of Chinese cadavers, micro-CT scanning was applied to digitize, quantify and visualize the intraosseous arteries in the human femoral heads. Then, the femoral heads were removed and subjected to micro-CT scanning. The data were imported into the amira and mimics programs to reconstruct and quantify the intraosseous arteries. The femoral head intraosseous artery lengths, areas, volumes, and femoral head bone volumes were quantified. The artery densities and artery ratios were calculated and analysed with independent-samples t-tests. The intraosseous vasculature volume renderings were displayed as screenshots and videos made with amira. Many intraosseous artery study technologies were compared. The barium sulphate suspension was milky white in colour. The perfusion of the barium sulphate suspension followed by micro-CT scanning provided a good representation of the intraosseous artery. The femoral head intraosseous artery lengths, areas and volumes, and the femoral head bone volumes were displayed as the X¯±S . No differences were observed between the left and right femoral head intraosseous arteries in terms of the artery densities or artery ratios. The volume renderings and 3-D orthogonal projections displayed the overall distributions of the intraosseous arteries. The videos clearly demonstrated the entry sites of the nutrition-carrying arteries, their courses and branches, and the intraosseous arterial anastomoses. Our technique is the simplest and least time-consuming method of producing accurate vascular three-dimensional reconstructions. The perfusion of a barium sulphate suspension into intraosseous arteries combined with micro-CT scanning can deliver high-resolution 3-D digitized data and images of intraosseous arteries. This technique does not require bone decalcification or bone

  20. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... if they have a history of: Abnormal cholesterol Diabetes Heart disease (coronary artery disease) High blood pressure ( hypertension ) Kidney disease involving hemodialysis Smoking Stroke ( cerebrovascular disease )

  1. Brachial artery waveforms for automatic blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Al-Jumaily, A M; Lan, H; Stergiopulos, N

    2013-02-01

    Theoretically the auscultatory method using Korotkoff sounds is more related to the maximum artery closure status, while the oscillometric method is more related to the overall artery closure status under the cuff. Therefore, the latter is less accurate than the former. This work introduces a new method, which is more accurate than the oscillometric method and suitable for automatic devices. To monitor the maximum artery closure status, a piezoelectric film sensor is attached to the skin just above the brachial artery and under the central section of the cuff where maximum cuff pressure is transferred to the arm. Using the waveform features obtained by this sensor, measurement errors of 0.7±2.5 and 1.27±4.53 mmHg were obtained for the systolic and diastolic pressure, respectively. These reflect small deviations from auscultatory clinical data. PMID:23149078

  2. Outflow Boundary Conditions for Blood Flow in Arterial Trees

    PubMed Central

    Du, Tao; Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2015-01-01

    In the modeling of the pulse wave in the systemic arterial tree, it is necessary to truncate small arterial crowns representing the networks of small arteries and arterioles. Appropriate boundary conditions at the truncation points are required to represent wave reflection effects of the truncated arterial crowns. In this work, we provide a systematic method to extract parameters of the three-element Windkessel model from the impedance of a truncated arterial tree or from experimental measurements of the blood pressure and flow rate at the inlet of the truncated arterial crown. In addition, we propose an improved three-element Windkessel model with a complex capacitance to accurately capture the fundamental-frequency time lag of the reflection wave with respect to the incident wave. Through our numerical simulations of blood flow in a single artery and in a large arterial tree, together with the analysis of the modeling error of the pulse wave in large arteries, we show that both a small truncation radius and the complex capacitance in the improved Windkessel model play an important role in reducing the modeling error, defined as the difference in dynamics induced by the structured tree model and the Windkessel models. PMID:26000782

  3. Perfusion-CT compared to H215O/O15O PET in Patients with Chronic Cervical Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Amita; Smith, Wade S.; Powers, William J.; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Chien, Jeffrey D.; Videen, Tom; Lawton, Michael T.; Finley, Bruce; Dillon, William P.; Wintermark, Max

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose As part of the Carotid Occlusion Surgery Study (COSS), patients with chronic cervical carotid artery occlusive disease are selected for extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery based on the results of 15O2/H215O PET imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of Perfusion-CT (PCT) with those of 15O2/H215O PET in a subset of COSS patients. Materials & Methods Six patients enrolled in COSS underwent a standard-of-care PCT in addition to the 15O2/H215O PET study used for determining study eligibility. PCT and PET studies were coregistered and then processed separately by different radiologists. Relative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) without arterial sampling were calculated from two PET scans, one for O15O inhalation and one for H215O injection. PCT datasets were processed using different arterial input functions (AIF), on the side of the carotid occlusion (“ischemic” inputs) and on the contralateral side (“nonischemic” inputs). The same sets of symmetric regions of interests (anterior, middle and posterior cerebral artery distribution) were drawn on both hemispheres on matching slices from both imaging modalities (PCT and PET). Relative PCT and PET CBF values (“ischemic” side divided by “nonischemic” side) were compared using linear regression model, in order to determine the most appropriate arterial input function for PCT. As a secondary analysis, PCT values of relative CBF, cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) using the most accurate arterial input function were evaluated for linear regression with respect to relative PET OEF values, which are used for determining study eligibility in COSS. Results The most accurate PCT relative CBF maps with respect to the gold standard PET CBF, were obtained when CBF values for each arterial territory are calculated using a dedicated AIF for each territory (ACA AIF for ACA territory, right MCA AIF for right

  4. A multiple-input multiple-output system for modeling the cardiac dynamics.

    PubMed

    Monzon, Jorge E; Picaza, Carlos Alvarez; Pisarello, Maria I

    2011-01-01

    We describe the dynamics of the cardiovascular system by finding the input-output relationships in the state space of a functional cardiac model, based on state equations and observability criteria of control theory. The unit step response of the multiple-input multiple-output system model illustrates the damping effect of the arterial wall to the pulsatility of the heart. Our results show that hypertensive patients exhibit a lower inertia of the blood flow. PMID:22254491

  5. Guidance laws with input saturation and nonlinear robust H∞ observers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fei; Luo, Qiang; Ji, Haibo; Gai, Wen

    2016-07-01

    A novel three-dimensional law based on input-to-state stability (ISS) and nonlinear robust H∞ filtering is proposed for interception of maneuvering targets in the presence of input saturation. A dead zone operator model is introduced to design an ISS-based guidance law to guarantee robust tracking of a maneuvering target. Input saturation and system stability are considered simultaneously, and the globally input-to-state stability have been ensured in theory. Since in practice line-of-sight (LOS) rate is difficult for a pursuer to measure accurately, the nonlinear robust H∞ filtering method is utilized to estimate it. The stability analyses and performed simulation results show that the presented approach is effective. PMID:27018143

  6. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  7. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  8. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  9. Correction of an input function for errors introduced with automated blood sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Schlyer, D.J.; Dewey, S.L.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate kinetic modeling of PET data requires an precise arterial plasma input function. The use of automated blood sampling machines has greatly improved the accuracy but errors can be introduced by the dispersion of the radiotracer in the sampling tubing. This dispersion results from three effects. The first is the spreading of the radiotracer in the tube due to mass transfer. The second is due to the mechanical action of the peristaltic pump and can be determined experimentally from the width of a step function. The third is the adsorption of the radiotracer on the walls of the tubing during transport through the tube. This is a more insidious effect since the amount recovered from the end of the tube can be significantly different than that introduced into the tubing. We have measured the simple mass transport using [{sup 18}F]fluoride in water which we have shown to be quantitatively recovered with no interaction with the tubing walls. We have also carried out experiments with several radiotracers including [{sup 18}F]Haloperidol, [{sup 11}C]L-deprenyl, [{sup 18}]N-methylspiroperidol ([{sup 18}F]NMS) and [{sup 11}C]buprenorphine. In all cases there was some retention of the radiotracer by untreated silicone tubing. The amount retained in the tubing ranged from 6% for L-deprenyl to 30% for NMS. The retention of the radiotracer was essentially eliminated after pretreatment with the relevant unlabeled compound. For example less am 2% of the [{sup 18}F]NMS was retained in tubing treated with unlabelled NMS. Similar results were obtained with baboon plasma although the amount retained in the untreated tubing was less in all cases. From these results it is possible to apply a mathematical correction to the measured input function to account for mechanical dispersion and to apply a chemical passivation to the tubing to reduce the dispersion due to adsorption of the radiotracer on the tubing walls.

  10. Input Type and Parameter Resetting: Is Naturalistic Input Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Iverson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that extended exposure to naturalistic input provides L2 learners with more of an opportunity to converge of target morphosyntactic competence as compared to classroom-only environments, given that the former provide more positive evidence of less salient linguistic properties than the latter (e.g., Isabelli 2004). Implicitly,…

  11. [An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hongwei; Liang, Huageng; Cai, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengjie; Wang, Yujie

    2013-07-01

    An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery was proposed. 3D ultrasound image was sliced into transverse, coronal and sagittal 2D images on the carotid bifurcation point. Then, the three images were processed respectively, and the carotid artery contours and thickness were obtained finally. This paper tries to overcome the disadvantages of current computer aided diagnosis method, such as high computational complexity, easily introduced subjective errors et al. The proposed method could get the carotid artery overall information rapidly, accurately and completely. It could be transplanted into clinical usage for atherosclerosis diagnosis and prevention. PMID:24195385

  12. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  13. Bilateral popliteal arterial dissection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Liang; Ko, Shih-Yu; Tan, Ken-Hing

    2012-01-01

    A clinical feature of bilateral popliteal arterial dissection without involving the descending aorta, bilateral iliac, as well as femoral arteries has never been reported in the past literature. We report a 56-year-old man with hypertension and coronary artery disease who presented to our emergency department with complaints of bilateral knee pain after long-distance walking. Physical examination was notable for elevated blood pressure, but there was no palpable pulsation over dorsalis pedis arteries on his feet. Laboratory evaluation revealed a d-dimer level of 35.2 mg/L (FEU) on the day of the test and 1.2 mg/L one and a half months ago (normal level, <0.55). These findings were suggestive of a recent-onset peripheral arterial occlusive disorder. Computed tomography of the aorta showed bilateral popliteal arterial dissection with arterial intimal flap. Abdominal aorta, bilateral iliac, and femoral arteries remained intact with only arteriosclerotic change. Minimally invasive endovascular stent grafting was then performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery. PMID:21106320

  14. Weak Radial Artery Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Poothirikovil; Sivakumar, Puthuval; Ardley, Robert G.; Oates, Crispian

    2012-01-01

    We present an 11year-old boy with a weak right radial pulse, and describe the successful application of vascular ultrasound to identify the ulnar artery dominance and a thin right radial artery with below normal Doppler flow velocity that could explain the discrepancy. The implications of identifying this anomaly are discussed. PMID:22375269

  15. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small balloon on its tip. They inflate the balloon at the blockage site in the carotid artery to flatten or compress the plaque against the artery wall. Carotid angioplasty is often combined with the placement of a small, metal, mesh-like device called a stent. When a stent is placed inside of a ...

  16. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  17. Echocardiographic presentation of anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Norman H

    2015-12-01

    In the 1970s, diagnosing anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) was often uncertain using imaging alone; however, with the advances in high-frequency transducers, advanced image processing, and other ultrasound modalities such as Doppler colour flow imaging, tissue Doppler imaging, and speckle tracking to asses regional wall motion abnormalities, modern echocardiography now permits accurate diagnosis of ALCAPA with greater certainty. Although many consider ultrasound to be the only imaging test necessary if there is a question as to the diagnosis, other imaging modalities such as MRI, CT, and cardiac catheterisation with angiography remain valuable complementary tests, especially in older patients. PMID:26675598

  18. Strategy Guideline. Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  19. Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  20. Input-output dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annoni, Jennifer; Jovanovic, Mihailo; Nichols, Joseph; Seiler, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain reduced-order models for fluid flows that can be used for control design. High-fidelity computational fluid dynamic models provide accurate characterizations of complex flow dynamics but are not suitable for control design due to their prohibitive computational complexity. A variety of methods, including proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), can be used to extract the dominant flow structures and obtain reduced-order models. In this presentation, we introduce an extension to DMD that can handle problems with inputs and outputs. The proposed method, termed input-output dynamic mode decomposition (IODMD), utilizes a subspace identification technique to obtain models of low-complexity. We show that, relative to standard DMD, the introduction of the external forcing in IODMD provides robustness with respect to small disturbances and noise. We use the linearized Navier-Stokes equations in a channel flow to demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach and to provide a comparison with standard techniques for obtaining reduced-order dynamical representations. NSF Career Grant No. NSFCMMI-1254129.

  1. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design. PMID:26827334

  2. The advanced LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chris L.; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan. T.; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V.; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J.; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z.; Martin, Rodica M.; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  3. Signal Prediction With Input Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin

    1999-01-01

    A novel coding technique is presented for signal prediction with applications including speech coding, system identification, and estimation of input excitation. The approach is based on the blind equalization method for speech signal processing in conjunction with the geometric subspace projection theory to formulate the basic prediction equation. The speech-coding problem is often divided into two parts, a linear prediction model and excitation input. The parameter coefficients of the linear predictor and the input excitation are solved simultaneously and recursively by a conventional recursive least-squares algorithm. The excitation input is computed by coding all possible outcomes into a binary codebook. The coefficients of the linear predictor and excitation, and the index of the codebook can then be used to represent the signal. In addition, a variable-frame concept is proposed to block the same excitation signal in sequence in order to reduce the storage size and increase the transmission rate. The results of this work can be easily extended to the problem of disturbance identification. The basic principles are outlined in this report and differences from other existing methods are discussed. Simulations are included to demonstrate the proposed method.

  4. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  5. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associated with hospital type and location, and variations in the rate of input price increases for various regions. We found that between 1972 and 1979 none of the regional price indexes increased at average annual rates significantly different from the national rate. For the more recent period 1977 through 1979, the increase in one Census Region was significantly below the national rate. Further analyses indicated that variations in cost-share weights for various types of hospitals produced no substantial variations in the regional price indexes relative to the national index. We consider these findings preliminary because of limitations in the availability of current, relevant, and reliable data, especially for local area wage rate increases. PMID:10309557

  6. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  7. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  8. Input/output interface module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozyazici, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    Module detects level changes in any of its 16 inputs, transfers changes to its outputs, and generates interrupts when changes are detected. Up to four changes-in-state per line are stored for later retrieval by controlling computer. Using standard TTL logic, module fits 19-inch rack-mounted console.

  9. Systems and methods for reconfiguring input devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Jeff (Inventor); De Mers, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes an input device having first and second input members configured to be activated by a user. The input device is configured to generate activation signals associated with activation of the first and second input members, and each of the first and second input members are associated with an input function. A processor is coupled to the input device and configured to receive the activation signals. A memory coupled to the processor, and includes a reconfiguration module configured to store the input functions assigned to the first and second input members and, upon execution of the processor, to reconfigure the input functions assigned to the input members when the first input member is inoperable.

  10. Vertebrobasilar Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Jessica C.; Boysen, Megan M.; Warren, Chase R.; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of vertebrobasilar artery occlusion varies with the cause of occlusion and location of ischemia. This often results in delay in diagnosis. Areas of the brain supplied by the posterior circulation are difficult to visualize and usually require angiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Intravenous thrombolysis and local-intra arterial thrombolysis are the most common treatment approaches used. Recanalization of the occluded vessel significantly improves morbidity and mortality. Here we present a review of the literature and a case of a patient with altered mental status caused by vertebrobasilar artery occlusion. PMID:21691534

  11. Celiac Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, D. Michael; McBride, Michael; Livesay, James J.; Dougherty, Kathryn G.; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2006-01-01

    Aneurysm of the celiac artery is an uncommon clinical problem; fewer than 180 cases have been reported in the world medical literature. Most patients are symptomatic at the time of diagnosis. However, occasionally such aneurysms are detected incidentally during diagnostic imaging for other diseases. We present the case of a 72-year-old man who had an asymptomatic celiac artery aneurysm detected by computed tomographic angiography after endoluminal exclusion of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm. The patient underwent successful resection of the aneurysm and revascularization of the aorta–common hepatic and splenic arteries with use of an autologous saphenous vein graft. PMID:16878636

  12. Predict amine solution properties accurately

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Meisen, A.; Chakma, A.

    1996-02-01

    Improved process design begins with using accurate physical property data. Especially in the preliminary design stage, physical property data such as density viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat can affect the overall performance of absorbers, heat exchangers, reboilers and pump. These properties can also influence temperature profiles in heat transfer equipment and thus control or affect the rate of amine breakdown. Aqueous-amine solution physical property data are available in graphical form. However, it is not convenient to use with computer-based calculations. Developed equations allow improved correlations of derived physical property estimates with published data. Expressions are given which can be used to estimate physical properties of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), monoethanolamine (MEA) and diglycolamine (DGA) solutions.

  13. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  14. National Hospital Input Price Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  15. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability. PMID:25661070

  16. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of PAD is atherosclerosis. This happens when plaque ... substance made up of fat and cholesterol. It causes the arteries to narrow or become blocked. This ...

  17. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ve started to help the medicine work. Other Organizations American Heart Association Questions to Ask Your Doctor Am I at risk for coronary artery disease (CAD)? What lifestyle changes should I make to decrease my risk of ...

  18. Coronary artery spasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocker or a long-acting nitrate long-term. Beta-blockers are another type of medicine that is used with other coronary artery problems. However, beta-blockers may make this problem worse. They should be ...

  19. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  20. Giant Subclavian Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Counts, Sarah; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old construction executive presenting with chest pain, shortness of breath, and dizziness on exertion secondary to a giant left subclavian artery aneurysm and aortic valvular disease. PMID:27231430

  1. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have had a stroke or TIA, a nervous system (neurological) exam will show other problems. You may also have the following tests: Blood cholesterol and triglycerides test Blood sugar (glucose) test Ultrasound of the carotid arteries ( carotid ...

  2. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... P. Peripheral arterial diseases. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... noncoronary obstructive vascular disease.In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  3. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  4. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Smoking and Your ... in the body's arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis . Over time, plaque can harden and narrow the ...

  5. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspirin and heart disease Butter, margarine, and cooking oils Carotid artery surgery - discharge Cholesterol and ... by: Daniel Kantor, MD, Kantor Neurology, Coconut Creek, FL and Immediate Past President of the ...

  6. On the Compressibility of Arterial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D R; McGarry, J P

    2016-04-01

    Arterial tissue is commonly assumed to be incompressible. While this assumption is convenient for both experimentalists and theorists, the compressibility of arterial tissue has not been rigorously investigated. In the current study we present an experimental-computational methodology to determine the compressibility of aortic tissue and we demonstrate that specimens excised from an ovine descending aorta are significantly compressible. Specimens are stretched in the radial direction in order to fully characterise the mechanical behaviour of the tissue ground matrix. Additionally biaxial testing is performed to fully characterise the anisotropic contribution of reinforcing fibres. Due to the complexity of the experimental tests, which entail non-uniform finite deformation of a non-linear anisotropic material, it is necessary to implement an inverse finite element analysis scheme to characterise the mechanical behaviour of the arterial tissue. Results reveal that ovine aortic tissue is highly compressible; an effective Poisson's ratio of 0.44 is determined for the ground matrix component of the tissue. It is also demonstrated that correct characterisation of material compressibility has important implications for the calibration of anisotropic fibre properties using biaxial tests. Finally it is demonstrated that correct treatment of material compressibility has significant implications for the accurate prediction of the stress state in an artery under in vivo type loading. PMID:26297340

  7. Evolution of complete arterial grafting. For coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, B F; Fuller, J A; Tatoulis, J

    1998-01-01

    Arterial grafting for the correction of coronary artery disease preceded the use of saphenous vein grafts, but the overwhelming popularity of the saphenous vein from 1970 to 1985 left the development of arterial grafting dormant. Excellent graft patency results from pedicled internal thoracic artery grafting and continued saphenous vein graft failure prompted our unit to explore complete arterial grafting with internal thoracic artery and radial artery grafts. One thousand and fifty-three patients who received a combination of internal thoracic artery and radial artery grafts were compared with 1,156 patients who received internal thoracic artery and saphenous vein grafts. All patients underwent primary coronary artery bypass surgery between 1995 and 1998. The early mortality and morbidity and the probability of survival at 2 years were similar in both groups of patients. Early graft patency studies of 35 radial artery grafts showed 33 (94%) were patent at a mean of 12 months. Complete arterial grafting using internal thoracic and radial arteries is safe and may provide a long-term benefit. Images PMID:9566058

  8. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740]. PMID:22707921

  9. Wavelet-based neural network analysis of internal carotid arterial Doppler signals.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya; Güler, Inan

    2006-06-01

    In this study, internal carotid arterial Doppler signals recorded from 130 subjects, where 45 of them suffered from internal carotid artery stenosis, 44 of them suffered from internal carotid artery occlusion and the rest of them were healthy subjects, were classified using wavelet-based neural network. Wavelet-based neural network model, employing the multilayer perceptron, was used for analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals. Multi-layer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to detect stenosis and occlusion in internal carotid arteries. In order to determine the MLPNN inputs, spectral analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals was performed using wavelet transform (WT). The MLPNN was trained, cross validated, and tested with training, cross validation, and testing sets, respectively. All these data sets were obtained from internal carotid arteries of healthy subjects, subjects suffering from internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion. The correct classification rate was 96% for healthy subjects, 96.15% for subjects having internal carotid artery stenosis and 96.30% for subjects having internal carotid artery occlusion. The classification results showed that the MLPNN trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was effective to detect internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion. PMID:16848135

  10. Statistics over features for internal carotid arterial disorders detection.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to extract the representative features of the internal carotid arterial (ICA) Doppler ultrasound signals and to present the accurate classification model. This paper presented the usage of statistics over the set of the extracted features (Lyapunov exponents and the power levels of the power spectral density estimates obtained by the eigenvector methods) in order to reduce the dimensionality of the extracted feature vectors. Since classification is more accurate when the pattern is simplified through representation by important features, feature extraction and selection play an important role in classifying systems such as neural networks. Mixture of experts (ME) and modified mixture of experts (MME) architectures were formulated and used as basis for detection of arterial disorders. Three types of ICA Doppler signals (Doppler signals recorded from healthy subjects, subjects having stenosis, and subjects having occlusion) were classified. The classification results confirmed that the proposed ME and MME has potential in detecting the arterial disorders. PMID:18179791

  11. Evaluating peripheral arterial volume distensibility by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Xu, Guan; Wei, Xinbin; Cheng, Qian; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Stiffness of arteries, especially small arteries, is an important marker for many diseases and a good parameter to evaluate the risks of cardiovascular problems. In this research, we proposed a new method for measurement of local arterial distensibility by using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) technology. Taking advantages from its excellent sensitivity and high spatial resolution, PAM can evaluate the morphology and volume change of a small artery accurately without involving any contrast agent. When working in the linear elastic range of a vessel, measuring the initial and the distended diameters of the vessel before and after pressure change facilitates quantitative assessment of vessel distensibility. The preliminary experiment on well-controlled gel phantoms demonstrates the feasibility of this technology.

  12. A parallel sparse algorithm targeting arterial fluid mechanics computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguoglu, Murat; Takizawa, Kenji; Sameh, Ahmed H.; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2011-09-01

    Iterative solution of large sparse nonsymmetric linear equation systems is one of the numerical challenges in arterial fluid-structure interaction computations. This is because the fluid mechanics parts of the fluid + structure block of the equation system that needs to be solved at every nonlinear iteration of each time step corresponds to incompressible flow, the computational domains include slender parts, and accurate wall shear stress calculations require boundary layer mesh refinement near the arterial walls. We propose a hybrid parallel sparse algorithm, domain-decomposing parallel solver (DDPS), to address this challenge. As the test case, we use a fluid mechanics equation system generated by starting with an arterial shape and flow field coming from an FSI computation and performing two time steps of fluid mechanics computation with a prescribed arterial shape change, also coming from the FSI computation. We show how the DDPS algorithm performs in solving the equation system and demonstrate the scalability of the algorithm.

  13. Reticular thalamic responses to nociceptive inputs in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chen-Tung; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2003-04-11

    The present study compares nociceptive responses of neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RT) to those of the ventroposterior lateral nucleus (VPL). Extracellular single-unit activities of cells in the RT and VPL were recorded in anesthetized rats. Only units with identified tactile receptive fields in the forepaw or hindpaw were studied. In the first series of experiments, RT and VPL responses to pinching with a small artery clamp were tested with the rats under pentobarbital, urethane, ketamine, or halothane anesthesia. Under all types of anesthesia, many RT units were inhibited. Second, the specificity of the nociceptive response was tested by pinching and noxious heating of the unit's tactile receptive field. Of the 39 VPL units tested, 20 were excited by both types of noxious stimuli. In sharp contrast, of the 30 RT units tested, none were excited and 17 were inhibited. In a third series of experiments, low-intensity and beam-diffused CO(2) laser irradiation was used to activate peripheral nociceptive afferents. Wide-dynamic-range VPL units responded with short- and long-latency excitations. In contrast, RT units had short-latency excitation followed by long-latency inhibition. Nociceptive input inhibited RT units in less than 500 ms. We conclude that a significant portion of RT neurons were polysynaptically inhibited by nociceptive inputs. Since all the cells tested were excited by light tactile inputs, the somatosensory RT may serve in the role of a modality gate, which modifies (i.e. inhibits) tactile inputs while letting noxious inputs pass. PMID:12663087

  14. Tracheoinnominate artery fistula following tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Keçeligil, H T; Erk, M K; Kolbakir, F; Yildirim, A; Yilman, M; Unal, R

    1995-10-01

    Tracheoinnominate artery fistula is a relatively rare but highly lethal complication occurring in patients with long-standing tracheostomies. Early evaluation of this problem and prompt aggressive therapy are necessary. When massive haemorrhage begins, immediate arterial compression, control of the airway and subsequent treatment of the injured artery may be lifesaving. Immediate surgical exploration through a median sternotomy is necessary to control the proximal and distal innominate artery. After the damaged artery has been excised, vascular reconstruction can be performed to preserve the connection between the proximal and distal ends of the innominate artery. A pedicled pericardial patch was successfully used for the tracheal reconstruction. PMID:8574535

  15. Understanding Arteries | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Understanding Arteries Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Below: ... the arteries and veins are healthy. A Healthy Artery An artery is a muscular tube. It has ...

  16. Remote sensing inputs to water demand modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Jensen, J. R.; Tinney, L. R.; Rector, M.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the ability of remote sensing techniques to economically generate data required by water demand models, the Geography Remote Sensing Unit, in conjunction with the Kern County Water Agency of California, developed an analysis model. As a result it was determined that agricultural cropland inventories utilizing both high altitude photography and LANDSAT imagery can be conducted cost effectively. In addition, by using average irrigation application rates in conjunction with cropland data, estimates of agricultural water demand can be generated. However, more accurate estimates are possible if crop type, acreage, and crop specific application rates are employed. An analysis of the effect of saline-alkali soils on water demand in the study area is also examined. Finally, reference is made to the detection and delineation of water tables that are perched near the surface by semi-permeable clay layers. Soil salinity prediction, automated crop identification on a by-field basis, and a potential input to the determination of zones of equal benefit taxation are briefly touched upon.

  17. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Spontaneous Rupture of the Omental Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Yamagami, Takuji; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Tazoe, Jun; Asai, Shunsuke; Masui, Koji; Ikeda, Jun; Nagata, Akihiro; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We encountered a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. A 25-year-old man without any episode of abdominal trauma or bleeding disorders came to the emergency unit with left upper abdominal pain. Hematoma with extravasation of the greater omentum and a hemoperitoneum was confirmed on abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Bleeding from the omental artery was suspected based on these findings. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed after extravasation of the omental artery, which arises from the left gastroepiploic artery, was confirmed on arteriography. Partial ometectomy was performed 10 days after transcatheter arterial embolization, revealing that the hematoma measured 10 cm in diameter in the greater omentum. Pathological examination showed rupture of the branch of an omental artery without abnormal findings, such as an aneurysm or neoplasm. Thus, we diagnosed him with spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the surgery, with a favorable postoperative course.

  18. Optimization of precipitation inputs for SWAT modeling in mountainous catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuo, Ye; Chiogna, Gabriele; Disse, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation is often the most important input data in hydrological models when simulating streamflow in mountainous catchment. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a widely used hydrological model, only makes use of data from one precipitation gauging station which is nearest to the centroid of each subcatchment, eventually corrected using the band elevation method. This leads in general to inaccurate subcatchment precipitation representation, which results in unreliable simulation results in mountainous catchment. To investigate the impact of the precipitation inputs and consider the high spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, we first interpolated 21 years (1990-2010) of daily measured data using the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) method. Averaged IDW daily values have been calculated at the subcatchment scale to be further supplied as optimized precipitation inputs for SWAT. Both datasets (Measured data and IDW data) are applied to three Alpine subcatchments of the Adige catchment (North-eastern Italy, 12100 km2) as precipitation inputs. Based on the calibration and validation results, model performances are evaluated according to the Nash Sutchliffe Efficiency (NSE) and Coefficient of Determination (R2). For all three subcatchments, the simulation results with IDW inputs are better than the original method which uses measured inputs from the nearest station. This suggests that IDW method could improve the model performance in Alpine catchments to some extent. By taking into account and weighting the distance between precipitation records, IDW supplies more accurate precipitation inputs for each individual Alpine subcatchment, which would as a whole lead to an improved description of the hydrological behavior of the entire Adige catchment.

  19. Continuous noninvasive arterial pressure measurement using the volume clamp method: an evaluation of the CNAP device in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julia Y; Negulescu, Ileana; Schöfthaler, Miriam; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Meidert, Agnes S; Huber, Wolfgang; Schmid, Roland M; Saugel, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    The CNAP system allows continuous noninvasive arterial pressure measurement based on the volume clamp method using a finger cuff. We aimed to evaluate the agreement between arterial pressure measurements noninvasively obtained using the CNAP device and arterial catheter-derived arterial pressure measurements in intensive care unit patients. In 55 intensive care unit patients, we simultaneously recorded arterial pressure values obtained by an arterial catheter placed in the abdominal aorta through the femoral artery (criterion standard) and arterial pressure values determined noninvasively using CNAP. We performed Bland-Altman analysis and calculated the percentage error. The mean difference (±standard deviation, 95% limits of agreement, percentage error) between noninvasive (CNAP) and invasively assessed arterial pressure was for mean arterial pressure +1 mmHg (±9 mmHg, -16 to +19 mmHg, 22%), for systolic arterial pressure -10 mmHg (±16 mmHg, -42 to +21 mmHg, 27%), and for diastolic arterial pressure +7 mmHg (±9 mmHg, -10 to +24 mmHg, 28%). Our results indicate a reasonable accuracy and precision for the determination of mean and diastolic arterial pressure by noninvasive continuous arterial pressure measurements using the volume clamp method compared with the criterion standard (invasive arterial catheter). Systolic arterial pressure is determined less accurately and precisely. PMID:25726179

  20. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  1. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  2. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  3. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  4. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  5. All about Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... angioplasty (AN-gee-oh-plas-tee), also called balloon angioplasty , a narrow tube with a balloon attached is inserted and threaded into an artery. Then the balloon is inflated, opening the narrowed artery. Awire tube, ...

  6. Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100160.htm Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - series To use the sharing features ... out of 9 Normal anatomy Overview The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle. The right ...

  7. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  8. About Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  9. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Claudication

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty deposits inside them. This is called atherosclerosis. If you have PAD, your arms, and more ... also more likely in people who already have atherosclerosis in other arteries, such as the arteries in ...

  10. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: current status.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and kidney failure. Randomized prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extrarenal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical end points. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess kidney damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  11. Combination of rare right arterial variation with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. A case report.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, H; San Millán Ruíz, D; Abdo, G; Asakura, F; Yilmaz, H; Lovblad, K O; Rüfenacht, D A

    2011-09-01

    A 32-year-old woman hospitalized for subarachnoid hemorrhage showed rare arterial variation on the right side with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. Angiography showed the right vertebral artery to originate from the right common carotid artery, the right subclavian artery to arise separately from the descending aorta, and persistent trigeminal artery on the right side. The possible embryonic mechanism of this previously unreported variant combination is discussed. PMID:22005696

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Arterial Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Cecelja, Marina; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Stiffening of large arteries is a hallmark of vascular aging and one of the most important determinants of the age-related increase in blood pressure and cardiovascular disease events. Despite a substantial genetic component, the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability in arterial stiffness remain unknown. Previous genetic studies have identified several genetic variants that are associated with measures of arterial stiffness. Here, we review the relevant advances in the identification of pathways underlying arterial stiffness from genomic studies. PMID:27493903

  13. Coronary Artery Diagnosis Aided by Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefko, Kamil

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is due to atheromatous narrowing and subsequent occlusion of the coronary vessel. Application of optimised feed forward multi-layer back propagation neural network (MLBP) for detection of narrowing in coronary artery vessels is presented in this paper. The research was performed using 580 data records from traditional ECG exercise test confirmed by coronary arteriography results. Each record of training database included description of the state of a patient providing input data for the neural network. Level and slope of ST segment of a 12 lead ECG signal recorded at rest and after effort (48 floating point values) was the main component of input data for neural network was. Coronary arteriography results (verified the existence or absence of more than 50% stenosis of the particular coronary vessels) were used as a correct neural network training output pattern. More than 96% of cases were correctly recognised by especially optimised and a thoroughly verified neural network. Leave one out method was used for neural network verification so 580 data records could be used for training as well as for verification of neural network.

  14. Partial volume correction of the microPET blood input function using ensemble learning independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kuan-Hao; Lee, Jih-Shian; Li, Jia-Hung; Yang, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ren-Shian; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2009-03-01

    Medical images usually suffer from a partial volume effect (PVE), which may degrade the accuracy of any quantitative information extracted from the images. Our aim was to recreate accurate radioactivity concentration and time-activity curves (TACs) by microPET R4 quantification using ensemble learning independent component analysis (EL-ICA). We designed a digital cardiac phantom for this simulation and in order to evaluate the ability of EL-ICA to correct the PVE, the simulated images were convoluted using a Gaussian function (FWHM = 1-4 mm). The robustness of the proposed method towards noise was investigated by adding statistical noise (SNR = 2-16). During further evaluation, another set of cardiac phantoms were generated from the reconstructed images, and Poisson noise at different levels was added to the sinogram. In real experiments, four rat microPET images and a number of arterial blood samples were obtained; these were used to estimate the metabolic rate of FDG (MRFDG). Input functions estimated using the FastICA method were used for comparison. The results showed that EL-ICA could correct PVE in both the simulated and real cases. After correcting for the PVE, the errors for MRFDG, when estimated by the EL-ICA method, were smaller than those when TACs were directly derived from the PET images and when the FastICA approach was used.

  15. Repositioning Recitation Input in College English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to discuss how recitation input helps overcome the negative influences on the basis of second language acquisition theory and confirms the important role that recitation input plays in improving college students' oral and written English.

  16. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  17. Uterine artery embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... the procedure. UAE is less invasive than surgical treatments for uterine fibroids. Many women may return more quickly to activities ... SC, Spies JB, Worthington-Kirsch R, et al. Uterine artery embolization for ... from the FIBROID registry. Obstet Gynecol . 2008; 111:22-33. Munro ...

  18. Flight Test Validation of Optimal Input Design and Comparison to Conventional Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1997-01-01

    A technique for designing optimal inputs for aerodynamic parameter estimation was flight tested on the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV). Model parameter accuracies calculated from flight test data were compared on an equal basis for optimal input designs and conventional inputs at the same flight condition. In spite of errors in the a priori input design models and distortions of the input form by the feedback control system, the optimal inputs increased estimated parameter accuracies compared to conventional 3-2-1-1 and doublet inputs. In addition, the tests using optimal input designs demonstrated enhanced design flexibility, allowing the optimal input design technique to use a larger input amplitude to achieve further increases in estimated parameter accuracy without departing from the desired flight test condition. This work validated the analysis used to develop the optimal input designs, and demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the optimal input design technique.

  19. Diagnostic Value of Transthoracic Echocardiography in Patients With Anomalous Origin of the Left Coronary Artery From the Pulmonary Artery.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Zhonghua; Yang, Jiao; Yang, Ya; Li, Yi-Jia; Leng, Zhao-Ting; Liu, Guo-Wen; Pu, Li-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a rare congenital coronary abnormality associated with early infant mortality and sudden death in adults. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) plays an important role in early detection and diagnosis of ALCAPA as a noninvasive modality. However, its diagnostic value is not well studied. The purpose of this study is to determine the performance of TTE in the diagnostic assessment of ALCAPA as compared with coronary CT and invasive coronary angiography.A total of 22 patients (13 women and 9 men, mean age, 12.9 ± 19.5 years) with ALCAPA who underwent echocardiographic examination for clinical diagnosis were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Transthoracic echocardiographic features of ALCAPA were analyzed and its diagnostic value was compared with invasive coronary angiography and coronary CT angiography (CTA) with surgical findings serving as the gold standard. Surgery was performed in all of the patients to establish the dual coronary artery system. Five underwent the Takeuchi procedure and 17 had re-implantation of the anomalous left coronary artery. Of 20 patients, echocardiographic diagnoses were in good agreement with findings at surgery, resulting in the diagnostic accuracy of 90.9%. Two cases were misdiagnosed-one as the right coronary artery to pulmonary artery fistula and the other as rheumatic heart disease. The echocardiographic features of these patients with ALCAPA included: abnormal left coronary ostium arising from the pulmonary trunk with retrograde coronary artery flow in 20 patients; enlargement of the right coronary artery in 17 patients; abundant intercoronary septal collaterals in 17 patients; and moderate and significant mitral regurgitation in 14 patients. The diagnostic accuracy of invasive coronary angiography (in 17 patients) and coronary CTA (in 9 patients) was 100%.This study shows that TTE is an accurate, noninvasive imaging modality for displaying

  20. Diagnostic Value of Transthoracic Echocardiography in Patients With Anomalous Origin of the Left Coronary Artery From the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Zhonghua; Yang, Jiao; Yang, Ya; Li, Yi-Jia; Leng, Zhao-Ting; Liu, Guo-Wen; Pu, Li-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a rare congenital coronary abnormality associated with early infant mortality and sudden death in adults. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) plays an important role in early detection and diagnosis of ALCAPA as a noninvasive modality. However, its diagnostic value is not well studied. The purpose of this study is to determine the performance of TTE in the diagnostic assessment of ALCAPA as compared with coronary CT and invasive coronary angiography. A total of 22 patients (13 women and 9 men, mean age, 12.9 ± 19.5 years) with ALCAPA who underwent echocardiographic examination for clinical diagnosis were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Transthoracic echocardiographic features of ALCAPA were analyzed and its diagnostic value was compared with invasive coronary angiography and coronary CT angiography (CTA) with surgical findings serving as the gold standard. Surgery was performed in all of the patients to establish the dual coronary artery system. Five underwent the Takeuchi procedure and 17 had re-implantation of the anomalous left coronary artery. Of 20 patients, echocardiographic diagnoses were in good agreement with findings at surgery, resulting in the diagnostic accuracy of 90.9%. Two cases were misdiagnosed—one as the right coronary artery to pulmonary artery fistula and the other as rheumatic heart disease. The echocardiographic features of these patients with ALCAPA included: abnormal left coronary ostium arising from the pulmonary trunk with retrograde coronary artery flow in 20 patients; enlargement of the right coronary artery in 17 patients; abundant intercoronary septal collaterals in 17 patients; and moderate and significant mitral regurgitation in 14 patients. The diagnostic accuracy of invasive coronary angiography (in 17 patients) and coronary CTA (in 9 patients) was 100%. This study shows that TTE is an accurate, noninvasive imaging modality

  1. Effects of Auditory Input in Individuation Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Christopher W.; Sloutsky, Vladimir M.

    2008-01-01

    Under many conditions auditory input interferes with visual processing, especially early in development. These interference effects are often more pronounced when the auditory input is unfamiliar than when the auditory input is familiar (e.g. human speech, pre-familiarized sounds, etc.). The current study extends this research by examining how…

  2. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Problems caused by input filter interaction and conventional input filter design techniques are discussed. The concept of feedforward control is modeled with an input filter and a buck regulator. Experimental measurement and comparison to the analytical predictions is carried out. Transient response and the use of a feedforward loop to stabilize the regulator system is described. Other possible applications for feedforward control are included.

  3. Textual Enhancement of Input: Issues and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Park, Eun Sung; Combs, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The input enhancement hypothesis proposed by Sharwood Smith (1991, 1993) has stimulated considerable research over the last 15 years. This article reviews the research on textual enhancement of input (TE), an area where the majority of input enhancement studies have aggregated. Methodological idiosyncrasies are the norm of this body of research.…

  4. Input Devices for Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Karen

    The versatility of the computer can be expanded considerably for young handicapped children by using input devices other than the typewriter-style keyboard. Input devices appropriate for young children can be classified into four categories: alternative keyboards, contact switches, speech input devices, and cursor control devices. Described are…

  5. Basilar Artery Aneurysm at a Persistent Trigeminal Artery Junction

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, G.B.; Conti, M.L.M.; Veiga, J.C.E.; Jory, M.; Souza, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The trigeminal artery is an anastomosis between the embryonic precursors of the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems, and may persist into adult life. The association of the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) with cerebral aneurysm is well documented in the literature and, in general, aneurysms are located in the anterior circulation. We describe a patient who presented with a panencephalic Fisher III subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. Digital arteriography showed a saccular aneurysm in the middle third of the basilar artery, adjacent to the junction with a persistent trigeminal artery. She was submitted to endovascular treatment with embolization of the basilar artery aneurysm with coils. Aneurysms at the PTA junction with the basilar artery are rare. This paper describes a case of PTA associated with an aneurysm in the basilar artery at PTA junction and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:22005697

  6. Markers of arterial stiffness in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Marc; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Thalhammer, Christoph; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R

    2015-09-01

    Increased arterial stiffness results from reduced elasticity of the arterial wall and is an independent predictor for cardiovascular risk. The gold standard for assessment of arterial stiffness is the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Other parameters such as central aortic pulse pressure and aortic augmentation index are indirect, surrogate markers of arterial stiffness, but provide additional information on the characteristics of wave reflection. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterised by its association with systolic hypertension, increased arterial stiffness, disturbed wave reflexion and prognosis depending on ankle-brachial pressure index. This review summarises the physiology of pulse wave propagation and reflection and its changes due to aging and atherosclerosis. We discuss different non-invasive assessment techniques and highlight the importance of the understanding of arterial pulse wave analysis for each vascular specialist and primary care physician alike in the context of PAD. PMID:26317253

  7. Noninvasive quantification of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in rats using (18)F-FDG PET and standard input function.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuki; Ihara, Naoki; Teramoto, Noboru; Kunimi, Masako; Honda, Manabu; Kato, Koichi; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of arterial input function (AIF) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies is technically challenging. The present study aimed to develop a method based on a standard arterial input function (SIF) to estimate input function without blood sampling. We performed (18)F-fluolodeoxyglucose studies accompanied by continuous blood sampling for measurement of AIF in 11 rats. Standard arterial input function was calculated by averaging AIFs from eight anesthetized rats, after normalization with body mass (BM) and injected dose (ID). Then, the individual input function was estimated using two types of SIF: (1) SIF calibrated by the individual's BM and ID (estimated individual input function, EIF(NS)) and (2) SIF calibrated by a single blood sampling as proposed previously (EIF(1S)). No significant differences in area under the curve (AUC) or cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlc) were found across the AIF-, EIF(NS)-, and EIF(1S)-based methods using repeated measures analysis of variance. In the correlation analysis, AUC or CMRGlc derived from EIF(NS) was highly correlated with those derived from AIF and EIF(1S). Preliminary comparison between AIF and EIF(NS) in three awake rats supported an idea that the method might be applicable to behaving animals. The present study suggests that EIF(NS) method might serve as a noninvasive substitute for individual AIF measurement. PMID:25966947

  8. A new interpretation and validation of variance based importance measures for models with correlated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Wenrui; Lu, Zhenzhou; Li, Luyi

    2013-05-01

    In order to explore the contributions by correlated input variables to the variance of the output, a novel interpretation framework of importance measure indices is proposed for a model with correlated inputs, which includes the indices of the total correlated contribution and the total uncorrelated contribution. The proposed indices accurately describe the connotations of the contributions by the correlated input to the variance of output, and they can be viewed as the complement and correction of the interpretation about the contributions by the correlated inputs presented in "Estimation of global sensitivity indices for models with dependent variables, Computer Physics Communications, 183 (2012) 937-946". Both of them contain the independent contribution by an individual input. Taking the general form of quadratic polynomial as an illustration, the total correlated contribution and the independent contribution by an individual input are derived analytically, from which the components and their origins of both contributions of correlated input can be clarified without any ambiguity. In the special case that no square term is included in the quadratic polynomial model, the total correlated contribution by the input can be further decomposed into the variance contribution related to the correlation of the input with other inputs and the independent contribution by the input itself, and the total uncorrelated contribution can be further decomposed into the independent part by interaction between the input and others and the independent part by the input itself. Numerical examples are employed and their results demonstrate that the derived analytical expressions of the variance-based importance measure are correct, and the clarification of the correlated input contribution to model output by the analytical derivation is very important for expanding the theory and solutions of uncorrelated input to those of the correlated one.

  9. Quantification of breast arterial calcification using full field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, Sabee; Xu Tong; Ducote, Justin; Iribarren, Carlos

    2008-04-15

    Breast arterial calcification is commonly detected on some mammograms. Previous studies indicate that breast arterial calcification is evidence of general atherosclerotic vascular disease and it may be a useful marker of coronary artery disease. It can potentially be a useful tool for assessment of coronary artery disease in women since mammography is widely used as a screening tool for early detection of breast cancer. However, there are currently no available techniques for quantification of calcium mass using mammography. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is possible to quantify breast arterial calcium mass using standard digital mammography. An anthropomorphic breast phantom along with a vessel calcification phantom was imaged using a full field digital mammography system. Densitometry was used to quantify calcium mass. A calcium calibration measurement was performed at each phantom thickness and beam energy. The known (K) and measured (M) calcium mass on 5 and 9 cm thickness phantoms were related by M=0.964K-0.288 mg (r=0.997 and SEE=0.878 mg) and M=1.004K+0.324 mg (r=0.994 and SEE=1.32 mg), respectively. The results indicate that accurate calcium mass measurements can be made without correction for scatter glare as long as careful calcium calibration is made for each breast thickness. The results also indicate that composition variations and differences of approximately 1 cm between calibration phantom and breast thickness introduce only minimal error in calcium measurement. The uncertainty in magnification is expected to cause up to 5% and 15% error in calcium mass for 5 and 9 cm breast thicknesses, respectively. In conclusion, a densitometry technique for quantification of breast arterial calcium mass was validated using standard full field digital mammography. The results demonstrated the feasibility and potential utility of the densitometry technique for accurate quantification of breast arterial calcium mass using standard digital

  10. COSMIC/NASTRAN Free-field Input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    A user's guide to the COSMIC/NASTRAN free field input for the Bulk Data section of the NASTRAN program is proposed. The free field input is designed to be user friendly and the user is not forced out of the computer system due to input errors. It is easy to use, with only a few simple rules to follow. A stand alone version of the COSMIC/NASTRAN free field input is also available. The use of free field input is illustrated by a number of examples.

  11. Non-Newtonian effects of blood on LDL transport inside the arterial lumen and across multi-layered arterial wall with and without stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza; Mesri, Yaser

    2016-06-01

    Blood non-Newtonian behavior on low-density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulation is analyzed numerically, while fluid-multilayered arteries are adopted for nonstenotic and 30%-60% symmetrical stenosed models. Present model considers non-Newtonian effects inside the lumen and within arterial layers simultaneously, which has not been examined in previous studies. Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with the mass transport convection-diffusion equations and Darcy’s model for species transport inside the luminal flow and across wall layers, respectively. Carreau model for the luminal flow and the modified Darcy equation for the power-law fluid within arterial layers are employed to model blood rheological characteristics, appropriately. Results indicate that in large arteries with relatively high Reynolds number Newtonian model estimates LDL concentration patterns well enough, however, this model seriously incompetent for regions with low WSS. Moreover, Newtonian model for plasma underestimates LDL concentration especially on luminal surface and across arterial wall. Therefore, applying non-Newtonian model seems essential for reaching to a more accurate estimation of LDL distribution in the artery. Finally, blood flow inside constricted arteries demonstrates that LDL concentration patterns along the stenoses inside the luminal flow and across arterial layers are strongly influenced as compared to the nonstenotic arteries. Additionally, among four stenosis severity grades, 40% stenosis is prone to more LDL accumulation along the post-stenotic regions.

  12. Morphological characteristics of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Dodevski, A; Tosovska Lazarova, D; Zhivadinovik, J; Lazareska, M; Stojovska-Jovanovska, E

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of new techniques in diagnostic and interventional radiology and progress in micro neurosurgery, accurate knowledge of the brain blood vessels is essential for daily clinical work. The aim of this study was to describe the morphological characteristics of the superior cerebellar artery and to emphasize their clinical significance. In this study we examined radiographs of 109 patients who had CT angiography at the University Clinic for Radiology in Skopje, R. Macedonia. This study included 49 females and 60 males, ranging in age from 27 to 83 years; mean age 57.4 ± 11.8 years. In 105 patients SCA arose from the basilar artery on both sides as a single vessel. In two patients SCA arose as a duplicate trunk from the basilar artery. We found unilateral duplication on the right SCA in one patient, and bilateral duplication in one patient. In two patients was noticed origin of the SCA from PCA as a single trunk from adult type of the PCA. Through knowledge of the anatomy and variations of SCA is important for clinicians as well as basic scientists who deal with problems related to intracranial vasculature in daily basis for save performance of diagnostic and interventional procedures. PMID:26076777

  13. Duplex scan sonography of renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Rabbia, C; Valpreda, S

    2003-06-01

    Renal artery stenosis is the most common cause of potentially remediable secondary hypertension. The most common causes include atherosclerosis and fibromuscular dysplasia. Particularly the atherosclerotic form is a progressive disease that may lead to gradual and silent loss of renal functional tissue. Thus, early diagnosis of renal artery stenosis is an important clinical objective since interventional therapy may improve or cure hypertension and preserve renal function. Screening for renal artery stenosis is indicated in the suspicion of renovascular hypertension or ischemic nephropathy in order to identify patients in which an endoluminal or a surgical revascularization is advisable. In the recent years many noninvasive tests have been proposed and evaluated in the clinical practice, in alternative to arteriography. These include nuclear scan, color Doppler sonography, CT angiography and MR angiography. Sonography is usually the first diagnostic modality for the non invasive evaluation of renal vascular disease with 95% sensitivity and 90% specificity when performed in dedicated laboratories. Despite sonography is highly affected by operator dependence, and it takes a lot of time to train good operators, actually is the best screening test because it is not expensive, non invasive and accurate. When a discrepancy exists between the clinical data and the results of US, other tests are mandatory. PMID:12865875

  14. PREVIMER : Meteorological inputs and outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenel, H.; Lecornu, F.; Kerléguer, L.

    2009-09-01

    PREVIMER is a pre-operational system aiming to provide a wide range of users, from private individuals to professionals, with short-term forecasts about the coastal environment along the French coastlines bordering the English Channel, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea. Observation data and digital modelling tools first provide 48-hour (probably 96-hour by summer 2009) forecasts of sea states, currents, sea water levels and temperatures. The follow-up of an increasing number of biological parameters will, in time, complete this overview of coastal environment. Working in partnership with the French Naval Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine, SHOM), the French National Weather Service (Météo-France), the French public science and technology research institute (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, IRD), the European Institute of Marine Studies (Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, IUEM) and many others, IFREMER (the French public institute fo marine research) is supplying the technologies needed to ensure this pertinent information, available daily on Internet at http://www.previmer.org, and stored at the Operational Coastal Oceanographic Data Centre. Since 2006, PREVIMER publishes the results of demonstrators assigned to limited geographic areas and to specific applications. This system remains experimental. The following topics are covered : Hydrodynamic circulation, sea states, follow-up of passive tracers, conservative or non-conservative (specifically of microbiological origin), biogeochemical state, primary production. Lastly, PREVIMER provides researchers and R&D departments with modelling tools and access to the database, in which the observation data and the modelling results are stored, to undertake environmental studies on new sites. The communication will focus on meteorological inputs to and outputs from PREVIMER. It will draw the lessons from almost 3 years during

  15. Turn customer input into innovation.

    PubMed

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis. PMID:12964470

  16. Identifying and Tracking Simulated Synaptic Inputs from Neuronal Firing: Insights from In Vitro Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Volgushev, Maxim; Ilin, Vladimir; Stevenson, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurately describing synaptic interactions between neurons and how interactions change over time are key challenges for systems neuroscience. Although intracellular electrophysiology is a powerful tool for studying synaptic integration and plasticity, it is limited by the small number of neurons that can be recorded simultaneously in vitro and by the technical difficulty of intracellular recording in vivo. One way around these difficulties may be to use large-scale extracellular recording of spike trains and apply statistical methods to model and infer functional connections between neurons. These techniques have the potential to reveal large-scale connectivity structure based on the spike timing alone. However, the interpretation of functional connectivity is often approximate, since only a small fraction of presynaptic inputs are typically observed. Here we use in vitro current injection in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons to validate methods for inferring functional connectivity in a setting where input to the neuron is controlled. In experiments with partially-defined input, we inject a single simulated input with known amplitude on a background of fluctuating noise. In a fully-defined input paradigm, we then control the synaptic weights and timing of many simulated presynaptic neurons. By analyzing the firing of neurons in response to these artificial inputs, we ask 1) How does functional connectivity inferred from spikes relate to simulated synaptic input? and 2) What are the limitations of connectivity inference? We find that individual current-based synaptic inputs are detectable over a broad range of amplitudes and conditions. Detectability depends on input amplitude and output firing rate, and excitatory inputs are detected more readily than inhibitory. Moreover, as we model increasing numbers of presynaptic inputs, we are able to estimate connection strengths more accurately and detect the presence of connections more quickly. These results illustrate the

  17. Multimodality Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Donghee; Danad, Ibrahim; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Lin, Fay Y.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and various cardiovascular imaging modalities have been introduced for the purpose of diagnosing and determining the severity of CAD. More recently, advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have contributed to the widespread clinical application of cardiac CT for accurate and noninvasive evaluation of CAD. In this review, we focus on imaging assessment of CAD based upon CT, which includes coronary artery calcium screening, coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, and fractional flow reserve CT. Further, we provide a discussion regarding the potential implications, benefits and limitations, as well as the possible future directions according to each modality. PMID:27081438

  18. Prediction of mean arterial blood pressure with linear stochastic models.

    PubMed

    Genc, Sahika

    2011-01-01

    A model-based approach that integrates known portion of the cardiovascular system and unknown portion through a parameter estimation to predict evolution of the mean arterial pressure is considered. The unknown portion corresponds to the neural portion that acts like a controller that takes corrective actions to regulate the arterial blood pressure at a constant level. The input to the neural part is the arterial pressure and output is the sympathetic nerve activity. In this model, heart rate is considered a proxy for sympathetic nerve activity. The neural portion is modeled as a linear discrete-time system with random coefficients. The performance of the model is tested on a case study of acute hypotensive episodes (AHEs) on PhysioNet data. TPRs and FPRs improve as more data becomes available during estimation period. PMID:22254409

  19. An input shaping controller enabling cranes to move without sway

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, N.; Singhose, W.; Kriikku, E.

    1997-06-01

    A gantry crane at the Savannah River Technology Center was retrofitted with an Input Shaping controller. The controller intercepts the operator`s pendant commands and modifies them in real time so that the crane is moved without residual sway in the suspended load. Mechanical components on the crane were modified to make the crane suitable for the anti-sway algorithm. This paper will describe the required mechanical modifications to the crane, as well as, a new form of Input Shaping that was developed for use on the crane. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new process. Several practical considerations will be discussed including a novel (patent pending) approach for making small, accurate moves without residual oscillations.

  20. Right-sided reverse T composite arterial grafting to complete revascularization of the right coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Aazami, Mathias H.; Abbasi-Teshnizi, Mohammad; Amini, Shahram; Lotfinejad, Nasim Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Complete arterial revascularization for the right coronary artery is underused mainly due to technical issues. Herein we report on a new approach for complete arterial revascularization of arterial revascularization for the right coronary artery branches. Complete arterial revascularization for the right coronary artery revascularization was performed in 8 patients using a reverse T composite arterial graft. None of the patients suffered perioperative myocardial infarction. All patients underwent noninvasive coronary imaging, displaying an early patency rate of 100%. Complete arterial arterial revascularization for the right coronary artery revascularization using a reverse T graft offers a new paradigm with enhanced technical flexibility in performing all arterial myocardial complete revascularizations in selected patients. PMID:25714223

  1. Accurate scatter compensation using neural networks in radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Koichi; Nishizaki, N. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The paper presents a new method to estimate primary photons using an artificial neural network in radionuclide imaging. The neural network for [sup 99m]Tc had three layers, i.e., one input layer with five units, one hidden layer with five units, and one output layer with two units. As input values to the input units, the authors used count ratios which were the ratios of the counts acquired by narrow windows to the total count acquired by a broad window with the energy range from 125 to 154 keV. The outputs were a scatter count ratio and a primary count ratio. Using the primary count ratio and the total count they calculated the primary count of the pixel directly. The neural network was trained with a back-propagation algorithm using calculated true energy spectra obtained by a Monte Carlo method. The simulation showed that an accurate estimation of primary photons was accomplished within an error ratio of 5% for primary photons.

  2. Plaque and arterial vulnerability investigation in a three-layer atherosclerotic human coronary artery using computational fluid-structure interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is the common form of cardiovascular diseases and known to be the main reason of deaths in the world. Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) simulations can be employed to assess the interactions of artery/plaque and blood to provide a more precise anticipation for rupture of arterial tissue layers and plaque tissues inside an atherosclerotic artery. To date, the arterial tissue in computational FSI simulations has been considered as a one-layer structure. However, a single layer assumption might have deeply bounded the results and, consequently, more computational simulation is needed by considering the arterial tissue as a three-layer structure. In this study, a three-dimensional computational FSI model of an atherosclerotic artery with a three-layer structure and different plaque types was established to perform a more accurate arterial wall/plaque tissue vulnerability assessment. The hyperelastic material coefficients of arterial layers were calculated and implemented in the computational model. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved using the explicit dynamics finite element code LS-DYNA. The results revealed the significant role of plaque types in the normal and shear stresses induced within the arterial tissue layers. The highest von Mises and shear stresses were observed on the stiffest calcified plaque with 3.59 and 3.27 MPa, while the lowest von Mises and shear stresses were seen on the hypocellular plaque with 1.15 and 0.63 MPa, respectively. Regardless of plaque types, the media and adventitia layers were played protective roles by displaying less stress on their wall, whilst the intima layer was at a high risk of rupture. The findings of this study have implications not only for determining the most vulnerable arterial layer/plaque tissue inside an atherosclerotic coronary artery but also for balloon-angioplasty, stenting, and bypass surgeries.

  3. Earth Reflected Solar Radiation Input to Spherical Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, F. G.

    1961-01-01

    A general calculation is given for the earth's albedo input to a spherical satellite, with the assumption that the earth can be considered a diffusely reflecting sphere. The results are presented in general form so that appropriate values for the solar constant and albedo of the earth can be used as more accurate values become available. The results are also presented graphically; the incident power is determined on the assumption that the mean solar constant is 1.353 x 10( exp 6) erg/(sq cm.sec) and the albedo of the earth is 0.34.

  4. Novel Biomarkers of Arterial and Venous Ischemia in Microvascular Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Gerard K.; Monahan, John F. W.; Davis, Gabrielle B.; Lee, Yong Suk; Ragina, Neli P.; Wang, Charles; Zhou, Zhao Y.; Hong, Young Kwon; Spivak, Ryan M.; Wong, Alex K.

    2013-01-01

    The field of reconstructive microsurgery is experiencing tremendous growth, as evidenced by recent advances in face and hand transplantation, lower limb salvage after trauma, and breast reconstruction. Common to all of these procedures is the creation of a nutrient vascular supply by microsurgical anastomosis between a single artery and vein. Complications related to occluded arterial inflow and obstructed venous outflow are not uncommon, and can result in irreversible tissue injury, necrosis, and flap loss. At times, these complications are challenging to clinically determine. Since early intervention with return to the operating room to re-establish arterial inflow or venous outflow is key to flap salvage, the accurate diagnosis of early stage complications is essential. To date, there are no biochemical markers or serum assays that can predict these complications. In this study, we utilized a rat model of flap ischemia in order to identify the transcriptional signatures of venous congestion and arterial ischemia. We found that the critical ischemia time for the superficial inferior epigastric fasciocutaneus flap was four hours and therefore performed detailed analyses at this time point. Histolgical analysis confirmed significant differences between arterial and venous ischemia. The transcriptome of ischemic, congested, and control flap tissues was deciphered by performing Affymetrix microarray analysis and verified by qRT-PCR. Principal component analysis revealed that arterial ischemia and venous congestion were characterized by distinct transcriptomes. Arterial ischemia and venous congestion was characterized by 408 and 1536>2-fold differentially expressed genes, respectively. qRT-PCR was used to identify five candidate genes Prol1, Muc1, Fcnb, Il1b, and Vcsa1 to serve as biomarkers for flap failure in both arterial ischemia and venous congestion. Our data suggests that Prol1 and Vcsa1 may be specific indicators of venous congestion and allow clinicians to

  5. Brachial artery pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Katie; Radwan, Rami; Shingler, Guy; Davies, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of an elderly man who presented with an upper arm swelling that had developed following a humeral fracture 8 months previously. The swelling was painless but associated with significantly diminished motor function of his right hand and concurrent paraesthaesia. On examination, a large pulsatile mass was identified and CT angiography confirmed the presence of an 11×7 cm brachial artery pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent surgical repair in which a fragment of the humerus was found to have punctured the brachial artery resulting in a pseudoaneurysm. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative period and was discharged 2 days later having regained some motor function in his right hand. PMID:24859555

  6. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  7. Caliber-Persistent Artery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sabrina Araújo Pinho; Ruiz, Marcelo Martinson; Kaba, Shajadi Pardo; Florezi, Giovanna Piacenza; Lemos Júnior, Celso Augusto; Witzel, Andréa Lusvarghi

    2015-01-01

    Caliber-persistent artery (CPLA) of the lip is a common vascular anomaly in which a main arterial branch extends to the surface of the mucous tissue with no reduction in its diameter. It usually manifests as pulsatile papule, is easily misdiagnosed, and is observed more frequently among older people, suggesting that its development may involve a degenerative process associated with aging; CPLA is also characterized by the loss of tone of the adjacent supporting connective tissue. Although the diagnosis is clinical, high-resolution Doppler ultrasound is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating the lesion. This report describes the case of a 58-year-old male patient who complained of a lesion of the lower lip with bleeding and recurrent ulceration. The patient was successfully treated in our hospital after a diagnosis of CPLA and is currently undergoing a clinical outpatient follow-up with no complaints. PMID:26448884

  8. Coronary artery fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Said, S.A.M.; Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Fieren, M.J.C.H.; Meijboom, E.J.; van der Werf, T.; Bennink, G.B.W.E.

    2002-01-01

    The aetiology of congenital coronary artery fistulas remains a challenging issue. Coronary arteries with an anatomically normal origin may, for obscure reasons, terminate abnormally and communicate with different single or multiple cardiac chambers or great vessels. When this occurs, the angiographic morphological appearance may vary greatly from discrete channels to plexiform network of vessels. Coronary arteriovenous fistulas (CAVFs) have neither specific signs nor pathognomonic symptoms; the spectrum of clinical features varies considerably. The clinical presentation of symptomatic cases can include angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, fatigue, dyspnoea, CHF, SBE, ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias or even sudden cardiac death. CAVFs may, however, be a coincidental finding during diagnostic coronary angiography (CAG). CAG is considered the gold standard for diagnosing and delineating the morphological anatomy and pathway of CAVFs. There are various tailored therapeutic modalities for the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CAVFs, including conservative pharmacological strategy, percutaneous transluminal embolisation and surgical ligation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696067

  9. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klooster, N J; Kitslaar, P; Janevski, B K

    1988-06-01

    Two patients with unilateral popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) are reported. The importance of diligence in angiographic diagnosis and recognition of the so-called "functional" PAES group as a separate entity are stressed. It is inferred from our material that a surgical approach for PAES is to be advocated since surgical release of the entrapment can lead to complete resolution of symptoms regardless of aetiology. PMID:2837797

  10. LATENT LIFE OF ARTERIES.

    PubMed

    Carrel, A

    1910-07-23

    When a segment of artery, killed by heat, formalin or glycerin is transplanted, it undergoes a rapid degeneration. Its muscle fibers disappear while the tissue of the host reacts by building a new wall of connective tissue. When the transplanted vessel has been preserved in a condition of latent life, no degeneration of the wall occurs, or the wall undergoes only partial degeneration. The muscle fibers can keep their normal appearance, even for a long time after the operation. It is, therefore, demonstrated that arteries can be preserved outside of the body in a condition of unmanifested actual life. The best method of preservation consists of placing the vessels, immersed in vaselin, in an ice box, the temperature of which is slightly above the freezing point. From a surgical standpoint, the transplantation of preserved vessels can be used with some safety. When the arteries were kept in defibrinated blood or vaselin and in cold storage, the proportion of positive results was 75 and 80 per cent., and this can probably be increased. PMID:19867337

  11. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009. (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents; bypass surgery; cilostazol; exercise; pentoxifylline; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA); prostaglandins; smoking cessation; and statins. PMID:19454099

  12. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010. Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review. We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 70 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents, bypass surgery, cilostazol, exercise, pentoxifylline, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), prostaglandins, smoking cessation, and statins. PMID:21477401

  13. Cerebral Arteries Extraction using Level Set Segmentation and Adaptive Tracing for CT Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yong; Zhou Xiaobo; Srinivasan, Ranga; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Young, Geoff

    2007-11-02

    We propose an approach for extracting cerebral arteries from partial Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA). The challenges of extracting cerebral arteries from CTA come from the fact that arteries are usually surrounded by bones and veins in the lower portion of a CTA volume. There exists strong intensity-value overlap between vessels and surrounding objects. Besides, it is inappropriate to assume the 2D cross sections of arteries are circle or ellipse, especially for abnormal vessels. The navigation of the arteries could change suddenly in the 3D space. In this paper, a method based on level set segmentation is proposed to target this challenging problem. For the lower portion of a CTA volume, we use geodesic active contour method to detect cross section of arteries in the 2D space. The medial axis of the artery is obtained by adaptively tracking along its navigation path. This is done by finding the minimal cross section from cutting the arteries under different angles in the 3D spherical space. This method is highly automated, with minimum user input of providing only the starting point and initial navigation direction of the arteries of interests.

  14. [Staged reconstruction of brachiocephalic arteries and coronary artery bypass grafting].

    PubMed

    Lysenko, A V; Belov, Iu V; Stonogin, A V

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the results of staged treatment of 28 patients with lesion of brachiocephalic arteries and ischemic heart disease. Patients underwent reconstructive surgery on brachiocephalic arteries (n=34) and coronary artery bypass grafting (n=28). Diagnostic and surgical features are described and indications for this technique are defined. The authors studied Russian and international experience, described postoperative complications and suggested ways to improve the results of simultaneous interventions. PMID:26081182

  15. Necessity and risks of arterial blood sampling in healthy volunteer studies.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Bruno Georg; Vermehren, Johannes; Zimmermann, Michael; Huynh, Thomas Tao; Doehring, Alexandra; Ferreiros, Nerea; Senzel, Stephan; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Erbe, Matthias; Geisslinger, Gerd; Harder, Sebastian; Angst, Martin S; Lötsch, Jörn

    2012-10-01

    Arterial blood sampling is necessary when drugs such as the fast-acting opioid analgesic remifentanil exhibit relevant differences between arterial and venous blood concentrations. Arterial cannulation is generally considered to be clinically safe and has thus become a standard procedure in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessments. However, rare cases of arterial occlusions have to be considered in risk-benefit assessments of arterial sampling in pharmacokinetic studies, especially when including healthy volunteers. In an actual case, arterial occlusion requiring surgical repair was caused by a factor V Leiden thrombophilia associated genetic variant F5 1691G>A (rs6025) and aggravated by a hypoplastic radial artery. Neither risk factor had been identified prior to enrolment by routine laboratory tests such as the prothrombin time (international normalized ratio), partial thromboplastin time and the clinical Allen's test of arterial function. Re-assessment of the necessity of arterial sampling showed that none of the potential alternatives, target concentrations of computerized infusions or venous concentrations during non-steady-state and steady-state conditions could provide the arterial concentrations. Relying on venous concentrations may result in erroneous pharmacodynamic parameters. Accurate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies relying on precisely measured blood concentrations require serial sampling techniques during both steady-state and non-steady-state conditions. However, as illustrated by the presented case, incidents involving the generally safe procedure of arterial sampling are possible, although rare. To further minimize the risks, screening of subjects for prothrombotic risks and careful assessment of the suitability of the artery should be considered in pharmacokinetic studies requiring arterial cannulation. PMID:23018527

  16. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Kelkar, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The problems caused by the interaction between the input filter, output filter, and the control loop are discussed. The input filter design is made more complicated because of the need to avoid performance degradation and also stay within the weight and loss limitations. Conventional input filter design techniques are then dicussed. The concept of pole zero cancellation is reviewed; this concept is the basis for an approach to control the peaking of the output impedance of the input filter and thus mitigate some of the problems caused by the input filter. The proposed approach for control of the peaking of the output impedance of the input filter is to use a feedforward loop working in conjunction with feedback loops, thus forming a total state control scheme. The design of the feedforward loop for a buck regulator is described. A possible implementation of the feedforward loop design is suggested.

  17. Input estimation from measured structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Cross, Elizabeth; Silva, Ramon A; Farrar, Charles R; Bement, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  18. Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery in children: 15 years experience.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianyong; Ding, Wenhong; Xiao, Yanyan; Jin, Mei; Zhang, Guizhen; Cheng, Pei; Han, Ling

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to illustrate the experience of treating children with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA). The clinical data for 19 children with ALCAPA admitted to Beijing Anzhen Hospital from August 1993 to June 2009 were reviewed. According to the data, 47.4% (9/19) of the patients had a misdiagnosis of endocardial fibroelastosis, and 15.8% (3/19) had a misdiagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Electrocardiography showed abnormal Q waves with T wave inversion in leads I, avL, and V4-V6 of 18 patients, especially in lead avL. The ratio of proximal right coronary artery diameter to aotic root diameter exceeded 0.20 for 15 of 16 patients. Apical ventricular aneurysm or aneurysmal dilation (52.6%,10/19), enhanced echogenicity of papillary muscles (84.2%, 16/19), and increased coronary collaterals (78.9%, 15/19) were detected frequently during echocardiography. A total of 18 patients underwent cardiac surgery including left coronary artery (LCA) ligation for 1 patient (5.6%), LCA ligation plus coronary artery bypass grafting for 1 patient (5.6%), Takeuchi operation for 7 patients (38.9%), and LCA reimplantation for 9 patients (50.0%). Five patients died in the hospital, and the remainder were asymptomatic during a follow-up period of 6 to 166 months. Their abnormal Q waves gradually regressed, and left ventricular systolic function and size returned to normal with alleviation of mitral insufficiency. The clinical features of ALCAPA are helpful for determining an accurate diagnosis. This anomaly can be treated successfully by several types of operations with good prognosis. PMID:20976445

  19. Reconstruction of an input function from a dynamic PET water image using multiple tissue curves.

    PubMed

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Yukito; Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is important for the understanding of normal and pathologic brain physiology. When CBF is assessed using PET with [Formula: see text] (15)O or C(15)O2, its calculation requires an arterial input function, which generally requires invasive arterial blood sampling. The aim of the present study was to develop a new technique to reconstruct an image derived input function (IDIF) from a dynamic [Formula: see text] (15)O PET image as a completely non-invasive approach. Our technique consisted of using a formula to express the input using tissue curve with rate constant parameter. For multiple tissue curves extracted from the dynamic image, the rate constants were estimated so as to minimize the sum of the differences of the reproduced inputs expressed by the extracted tissue curves. The estimated rates were used to express the inputs and the mean of the estimated inputs was used as an IDIF. The method was tested in human subjects (n  =  29) and was compared to the blood sampling method. Simulation studies were performed to examine the magnitude of potential biases in CBF and to optimize the number of multiple tissue curves used for the input reconstruction. In the PET study, the estimated IDIFs were well reproduced against the measured ones. The difference between the calculated CBF values obtained using the two methods was small as around  <8% and the calculated CBF values showed a tight correlation (r  =  0.97). The simulation showed that errors associated with the assumed parameters were  <10%, and that the optimal number of tissue curves to be used was around 500. Our results demonstrate that IDIF can be reconstructed directly from tissue curves obtained through [Formula: see text] (15)O PET imaging. This suggests the possibility of using a completely non-invasive technique to assess CBF in patho-physiological studies. PMID:27401833

  20. Reconstruction of an input function from a dynamic PET water image using multiple tissue curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Yukito; Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is important for the understanding of normal and pathologic brain physiology. When CBF is assessed using PET with {{\\text{H}}2} 15O or C15O2, its calculation requires an arterial input function, which generally requires invasive arterial blood sampling. The aim of the present study was to develop a new technique to reconstruct an image derived input function (IDIF) from a dynamic {{\\text{H}}2} 15O PET image as a completely non-invasive approach. Our technique consisted of using a formula to express the input using tissue curve with rate constant parameter. For multiple tissue curves extracted from the dynamic image, the rate constants were estimated so as to minimize the sum of the differences of the reproduced inputs expressed by the extracted tissue curves. The estimated rates were used to express the inputs and the mean of the estimated inputs was used as an IDIF. The method was tested in human subjects (n  =  29) and was compared to the blood sampling method. Simulation studies were performed to examine the magnitude of potential biases in CBF and to optimize the number of multiple tissue curves used for the input reconstruction. In the PET study, the estimated IDIFs were well reproduced against the measured ones. The difference between the calculated CBF values obtained using the two methods was small as around  <8% and the calculated CBF values showed a tight correlation (r  =  0.97). The simulation showed that errors associated with the assumed parameters were  <10%, and that the optimal number of tissue curves to be used was around 500. Our results demonstrate that IDIF can be reconstructed directly from tissue curves obtained through {{\\text{H}}2} 15O PET imaging. This suggests the possibility of using a completely non-invasive technique to assess CBF in patho-physiological studies.

  1. Evaluating the Sensitivity of Agricultural Model Performance to Different Climate Inputs: Supplemental Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotter, Michael J.; Ruane, Alex C.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Elliott, Joshua W.

    2015-01-01

    Projections of future food production necessarily rely on models, which must themselves be validated through historical assessments comparing modeled and observed yields. Reliable historical validation requires both accurate agricultural models and accurate climate inputs. Problems with either may compromise the validation exercise. Previous studies have compared the effects of different climate inputs on agricultural projections but either incompletely or without a ground truth of observed yields that would allow distinguishing errors due to climate inputs from those intrinsic to the crop model. This study is a systematic evaluation of the reliability of a widely used crop model for simulating U.S. maize yields when driven by multiple observational data products. The parallelized Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (pDSSAT) is driven with climate inputs from multiple sources reanalysis, reanalysis that is bias corrected with observed climate, and a control dataset and compared with observed historical yields. The simulations show that model output is more accurate when driven by any observation-based precipitation product than when driven by non-bias-corrected reanalysis. The simulations also suggest, in contrast to previous studies, that biased precipitation distribution is significant for yields only in arid regions. Some issues persist for all choices of climate inputs: crop yields appear to be oversensitive to precipitation fluctuations but under sensitive to floods and heat waves. These results suggest that the most important issue for agricultural projections may be not climate inputs but structural limitations in the crop models themselves.

  2. Physiological outflow boundary conditions methodology for small arteries with multiple outlets: a patient-specific hepatic artery haemodynamics case study.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, Jorge; Antón, Raúl; Bernal, Nebai; Rivas, Alejandro; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Sangro, Bruno; Bilbao, José Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Physiological outflow boundary conditions are necessary to carry out computational fluid dynamics simulations that reliably represent the blood flow through arteries. When dealing with complex three-dimensional trees of small arteries, and therefore with multiple outlets, the robustness and speed of convergence are also important. This study derives physiological outflow boundary conditions for cases in which the physiological values at those outlets are not known (neither in vivo measurements nor literature-based values are available) and in which the tree exhibits symmetry to some extent. The inputs of the methodology are the three-dimensional domain and the flow rate waveform and the systolic and diastolic pressures at the inlet. The derived physiological outflow boundary conditions, which are a physiological pressure waveform for each outlet, are based on the results of a zero-dimensional model simulation. The methodology assumes symmetrical branching and is able to tackle the flow distribution problem when the domain outlets are at branches with a different number of upstream bifurcations. The methodology is applied to a group of patient-specific arteries in the liver. The methodology is considered to be valid because the pulsatile computational fluid dynamics simulation with the inflow flow rate waveform (input of the methodology) and the derived outflow boundary conditions lead to physiological results, that is, the resulting systolic and diastolic pressures at the inlet match the inputs of the methodology, and the flow split is also physiological. PMID:25934258

  3. Urgent Intracranial Carotid Artery Decompression after Penetrating Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Joon

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of intracranial carotid artery occlusion due to penetrating craniofacial injury by high velocity foreign body that was relieved by decompressive surgery. A 46-year-old man presented with a penetrating wound to his face. A piece of an electric angular grinder disc became lodged in the anterior skull base. Computed tomography revealed that the disc had penetrated the unilateral paraclinoid and suprasellar areas without flow of the intracranial carotid artery on the lesion side. The cavernous sinus was also compromised. Removal of the anterior clinoid process reopened the carotid blood flow, and the injection of glue into the cavernous sinus restored complete hemostasis during extraction of the fragment from the face. Digital subtraction angiography revealed complete recanalization of the carotid artery without any evidence of dissection. Accurate diagnosis regarding the extent of the compromised structures and urgent decompressive surgery with adequate hemostasis minimized the severity of penetrating damage in our patient. PMID:23634269

  4. Intimal pulmonary artery sarcoma presenting as dyspnea: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Jeff M; Thakkar, Snehal G; Borden, Ernest C; Budd, George T

    2007-01-01

    Background We report a case of pulmonary sarcoma which is a rare cause of the common symptom of dyspnea. Case presentation A fifty-one year old previously healthy male presented to the emergency room with complaints of dyspnea on exertion. A cardiac workup including an exercise stress test was negative but an echocardiography showed pulmonary stenosis. Cardiac MRI showed a large mass extending from the pulmonic valve to both the right and left pulmonary arteries suggestive of sarcoma. A complete resection and repair of the pulmonary artery was done and adjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide was recommended. The patient is currently disease free after eighteen months. Conclusion Pulmonary artery sarcomas are a difficult diagnosis. The diagnosis may remain elusive for some time until the proper imaging techniques are utilized to make a diagnosis. Earlier and accurate diagnosis may lead to earlier interventions and improve survival. PMID:17603895

  5. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  6. Pulmonary arterial remodeling revealed by microfocal x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Johnson, Roger H.; Dhyani, Anita H.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2001-05-01

    Animal models and micro-CT imaging are useful for understanding the functional consequences of, and identifying the genes involved in, the remodeling of vascular structures that accompanies pulmonary vascular disease. Using a micro-CT scanner to image contrast-enhanced arteries in excised lungs from fawn hooded rats (a strain genetically susceptible to hypoxia induced pulmonary hypertension), we found that portions of the pulmonary arterial tree downstream from a given diameter were morphometrically indistinguishable. This 'self-consistency' property provided a means for summarizing the pulmonary arterial tree architecture and mechanical properties using a parameter vector obtained from measurements of the contiguous set of vessel segments comprising the longest (principal) pathway and its branches over a range of vascular pressures. This parameter vector was used to characterize the pulmonary vascular remodeling that occurred in rats exposed to a hypoxic (11.5% oxygen) environment and provided the input to a hemodynamic model relating structure to function. The major effect of the remodeling was a longitudinally (pulmonary artery to arterioles) uniform decrease in vessel distensibility that resulted in a 90% increase in arterial resistance. Despite the almost uniform change in vessel distensibility, over 50% of the resistance increase was attributable to vessels with unstressed diameters less than 125 microns.

  7. True aneurysm of brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovričević, Ivo; Franjić, Dario Bjorn; Brkić, Petar; Tomas, Davor

    2010-10-01

    True upper extremity peripheral artery aneurysms are a rarely encountered arterial disorder. Following computer-tomography angiographic (CT-a) imaging examination, true saccular aneurysm, originating from the left brachial artery was diagnosed in the 77-year-old female without history of trauma. The aneurysm was resected by surgical intervention, and primary repair of the brachial artery was performed by interposition of a part of great saphenous vein harvested from the left groin and creation of two end-to-end anastomoses between interposition graft and previously resected part of brachial artery. No complication was observed during the follow-up. Surgical intervention for upper extremity aneurysms should be initiated without delay. Factors combined with minimal morbidity associated with repair suggest that surgical repair should be performed routinely for true upper extremity arterial aneurysms. PMID:20865459

  8. Management of tracheoinnominate artery fistula.

    PubMed

    Wright, C D

    1996-11-01

    TIF is a rare and often fatal complication of tracheostomy. Bleeding from the trachea after tracheostomy demands urgent investigation. Bronchoscopy is the diagnostic procedure of choice. Bedside control of hemorrhage by cuff overinflation or digital arterial compression can be lifesaving. Prompt operation with division of the innominate artery and separation of the trachea from the divided artery by viable tissue is indicated. Neurologic complications are rare. PMID:8934014

  9. Input to the PRAST computer code used in the SRS probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Kearnaghan, D.P.

    1992-10-15

    The PRAST (Production Reactor Algorithm for Source Terms) computer code was developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company and Science Application International Corporation for the quantification of source terms for the SRS Savannah River Site (SRS) Reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment. PRAST requires as input a set of release fractions, decontamination factors, transfer fractions and source term characteristics that accurately reflect the conditions that are evaluated by PRAST. This document links the analyses which form the basis for the PRAST input parameters. In addition, it gives the distribution of the input parameters that are uncertain and considered to be important to the evaluation of the source terms to the environment.

  10. A dual-input nonlinear system analysis of autonomic modulation of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chon, K. H.; Mullen, T. J.; Cohen, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Linear analyses of fluctuations in heart rate and other hemodynamic variables have been used to elucidate cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The role of nonlinear contributions to fluctuations in hemodynamic variables has not been fully explored. This paper presents a nonlinear system analysis of the effect of fluctuations in instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) on heart rate (HR) fluctuations. To successfully employ a nonlinear analysis based on the Laguerre expansion technique (LET), we introduce an efficient procedure for broadening the spectral content of the ILV and ABP inputs to the model by adding white noise. Results from computer simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of broadening the spectral band of input signals to obtain consistent and stable kernel estimates with the use of the LET. Without broadening the band of the ILV and ABP inputs, the LET did not provide stable kernel estimates. Moreover, we extend the LET to the case of multiple inputs in order to accommodate the analysis of the combined effect of ILV and ABP effect on heart rate. Analyzes of data based on the second-order Volterra-Wiener model reveal an important contribution of the second-order kernels to the description of the effect of lung volume and arterial blood pressure on heart rate. Furthermore, physiological effects of the autonomic blocking agents propranolol and atropine on changes in the first- and second-order kernels are also discussed.

  11. Arterial pulse wave pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C.; Gorelick, D.; Chen, W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An arterial pulse wave pressure transducer is introduced. The transducer is comprised of a fluid filled cavity having a flexible membrane disposed over the cavity and adapted to be placed on the skin over an artery. An arterial pulse wave creates pressure pulses in the fluid which are transduced, by a pressure sensitive transistor in direct contact with the fluid, into an electric signal. The electrical signal is representative of the pulse waves and can be recorded so as to monitor changes in the elasticity of the arterial walls.

  12. Proinflammation of Aging Central Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Monticone, Robert E.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial aging is a cornerstone of organismal aging. The central arterial wall structurally and functionally remodels under chronic proinflammatory stress over a lifetime. The low grade proinflammation that accompanies advancing age causes arterial wall thickening and stiffening. These structural and functional alterations are consequences of adverse molecular and cellular events, e.g., an increase in local angiotensin II signaling that induces an inflammatory phenotypic shift of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, interventions to restrict proinflammatory signaling are a rational approach to delay or prevent age-associated adverse arterial remodeling. PMID:25171100

  13. Arterial pressure transfer characteristics: effects of travel time.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Berend E; Guelen, Ilja; Stok, Wim J; Wesseling, Karel H; Spaan, Jos A E; Westerhof, Nico; Bos, Willem Jan; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the quantitative contribution of all local conduit arterial, blood, and distal load properties to the pressure transfer function from brachial artery to aorta. The model was based on anatomical data, Young's modulus, wall viscosity, blood viscosity, and blood density. A three-element windkessel represented the distal arterial tree. Sensitivity analysis was performed in terms of frequency and magnitude of the peak of the transfer function and in terms of systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure in the aorta. The root mean square error (RMSE) described the accuracy in wave-shape prediction. The percent change of these variables for a 25% alteration of each of the model parameters was calculated. Vessel length and diameter are found to be the most important parameters determining pressure transfer. Systolic and diastolic pressure changed <3% and RMSE <1.8 mmHg for a 25% change in vessel length and diameter. To investigate how arterial tapering influences the pressure transfer, a single uniform lossless tube was modeled. This simplification introduced only small errors in systolic and diastolic pressures (1% and 0%, respectively), and wave shape was less well described (RMSE, approximately 2.1 mmHg). Local (arm) vasodilation affects the transfer function little, because it has limited effect on the reflection coefficient. Since vessel length and diameter translate into travel time, this parameter can describe the transfer accurately. We suggest that with a, preferably, noninvasively measured travel time, an accurate individualized description of pressure transfer can be obtained. PMID:16963619

  14. Misleading findings of subclavian artery and vein transection.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, T; Moulakakis, K; Pavlidis, P; Boudouris, I; Pomoni, M; Georgakis, P

    2007-08-01

    Trauma involving the subclavian and axillary arteries is relatively infrequent. However, it can result in devastating functional disability of the upper limb due to significant and permanent associated neurologic deficits. Uncertainty exists in relation to certain aspects of therapeutical management of patients with trauma of the upper limb. Although decision pathway and algorithms have been proposed by several authors, the indications for surgery remain uncertain and not established. Two main points seem to be the most important determinants of the therapeutical strategy; first the viability of the limb and second the accurate determination of the vascular and nerve damage. We present a patient with a traumatic disruption of the subclavian artery and vein and concomitant brachial plexus injury following a road traffic accident. We highlight the role of accurate diagnosis to avoid life and limb-threatening complications from missed diagnosis. Also we review the recent literature emphasizing the therapeutical strategy and the role of conventional surgical repair and endovascular treatment. PMID:18019282

  15. EDP Applications to Musical Bibliography: Input Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Donald C.

    1972-01-01

    The application of Electronic Data Processing (EDP) has been a boon in the analysis and bibliographic control of music. However, an extra step of encoding must be undertaken for input of music. The best hope to facilitate musical input is the development of an Optical Character Recognition (OCR) music-reading machine. (29 references) (Author/NH)

  16. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  17. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND..., requests for input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from...

  18. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  19. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  20. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  1. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  2. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  3. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  4. Computing Functions by Approximating the Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mayer

    2012-01-01

    In computing real-valued functions, it is ordinarily assumed that the input to the function is known, and it is the output that we need to approximate. In this work, we take the opposite approach: we show how to compute the values of some transcendental functions by approximating the input to these functions, and obtaining exact answers for their…

  5. Managing Input during Assistive Technology Product Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Young Mi

    2011-01-01

    Many different sources of input are available to assistive technology innovators during the course of designing products. However, there is little information on which ones may be most effective or how they may be efficiently utilized within the design process. The aim of this project was to compare how three types of input--from simulation tools,…

  6. 39 CFR 3020.92 - Public input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public input. 3020.92 Section 3020.92 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Requests Initiated by the Postal Service to Change the Mail Classification Schedule § 3020.92 Public input. The Commission shall publish...

  7. [The single coronary artery].

    PubMed

    Godart, F; Berzin, B; Rihani, R; Pecheux, M; Dutoit, A

    1992-04-01

    Single coronary artery is a fairly rare entity which may nevertheless be found in 0.4 per cent of coronary arteriograms. The authors report 3 cases seen in 2 departments of cardiology. In each patient, despite the existence of definite cardiovascular risk factors, this distribution was a factor worsening coronary ischemia, leading to complete thrombosis in one case. Although most often a chance discovery, a review of the literature justifies the attribution to this anomaly of the onset of angina, infarction or even sudden death. PMID:1642437

  8. Statistical identification of effective input variables. [SCREEN

    SciTech Connect

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A statistical sensitivity analysis procedure has been developed for ranking the input data of large computer codes in the order of sensitivity-importance. The method is economical for large codes with many input variables, since it uses a relatively small number of computer runs. No prior judgemental elimination of input variables is needed. The sceening method is based on stagewise correlation and extensive regression analysis of output values calculated with selected input value combinations. The regression process deals with multivariate nonlinear functions, and statistical tests are also available for identifying input variables that contribute to threshold effects, i.e., discontinuities in the output variables. A computer code SCREEN has been developed for implementing the screening techniques. The efficiency has been demonstrated by several examples and applied to a fast reactor safety analysis code (Venus-II). However, the methods and the coding are general and not limited to such applications.

  9. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  10. Remote balance weighs accurately amid high radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggenberger, D. N.; Shuck, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    Commercial beam-type balance, modified and outfitted with electronic controls and digital readout, can be remotely controlled for use in high radiation environments. This allows accurate weighing of breeder-reactor fuel pieces when they are radioactively hot.

  11. Detailed map of a cis-regulatory input function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Y.; Mayo, A. E.; Surette, M. G.; Alon, U.

    2003-06-01

    Most genes are regulated by multiple transcription factors that bind specific sites in DNA regulatory regions. These cis-regulatory regions perform a computation: the rate of transcription is a function of the active concentrations of each of the input transcription factors. Here, we used accurate gene expression measurements from living cell cultures, bearing GFP reporters, to map in detail the input function of the classic lacZYA operon of Escherichia coli, as a function of about a hundred combinations of its two inducers, cAMP and isopropyl -D-thiogalactoside (IPTG). We found an unexpectedly intricate function with four plateau levels and four thresholds. This result compares well with a mathematical model of the binding of the regulatory proteins cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and LacI to the lac regulatory region. The model is also used to demonstrate that with few mutations, the same region could encode much purer AND-like or even OR-like functions. This possibility means that the wild-type region is selected to perform an elaborate computation in setting the transcription rate. The present approach can be generally used to map the input functions of other genes.

  12. A virtual instrument for real time in vivo measurement of carotid artery compliance.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jayaraj; Jayashankar, V

    2008-01-01

    A new virtual instrument for real time, non invasive measurement of carotid artery compliance is proposed. The instrument is a reliable, compact and low cost alternative to the conventional ultrasound scanner and wall tracking system for carotid artery compliance measurement. The measurement system uses an ultrasound pulse echo method to probe the carotid artery. The reflected echoes are processed using Hilbert transform techniques. Peak detection and echo tracking are implemented in LabVIEW. A comparison is done between manual and automatic method of echo identification. The instrument gives a display of the variation of carotid diameter in real time and calculates the various estimates of arterial compliance from the analyzed data. The capability of the instrument to accurately determine arterial compliance measures is demonstrated by experiments performed on human subjects. PMID:19163155

  13. Origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, G P; Spach, M S; Effmann, E L; Sabiston, D C

    1987-01-01

    Origin of the right pulmonary artery from the aorta is a congenital malformation usually associated with serious symptoms in the first year of life and characterized by a poor prognosis. Sixty-five patients with this disorder have been reviewed in the literature, and 95% presented during the first year with signs of congestive heart failure. All had cardiomegaly by radiographic and electrocardiographic examination. An accurate diagnosis was established by cineangiography, and associated cardiovascular anomalies were present in 85%. Origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta is much more common than origin of the left pulmonary artery from this vessel (8 to 1). Twenty-three patients were managed without operation with a 30% 1-year survival rate. Among those patients managed surgically, the survival rate was 84% at 1 year. It is now clear that operation should be done as early as possible to prevent irreversible changes occurring in the pulmonary arterial vasculature since microscopic features of pulmonary hypertension have been seen during the first month of life. One patient was operated on at 5 months with correction of the deformity. The pulmonary arterial pressure decreased to normal after operation. This child is now asymptomatic and his 10-year postoperative follow-up is the longest found in the literature. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2A. Fig. 2B. Fig. 2C. Fig. 3. Fig. 4A and B. Fig. 8. PMID:3606229

  14. Understanding the Code: keeping accurate records.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In his continuing series looking at the legal and professional implications of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's revised Code of Conduct, Richard Griffith discusses the elements of accurate record keeping under Standard 10 of the Code. This article considers the importance of accurate record keeping for the safety of patients and protection of district nurses. The legal implications of records are explained along with how district nurses should write records to ensure these legal requirements are met. PMID:26418404

  15. The inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery.

    PubMed

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Won, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Chang-Seok; Han, Seung-Ho; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hoan

    2012-12-01

    We report a rare case of a left inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery in an 84-year-old female cadaver. A common trunk for the inferior epigastric and obturator arteries firstly originated from the left internal iliac artery, at 3.0 mm below the bifurcation of the left common iliac artery. This trunk ran straight between the left external iliac artery and left external iliac vein, and was finally divided into the left inferior epigastric and left obturator arteries just superior to the inguinal ligament. PMID:23301197

  16. The inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery

    PubMed Central

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Won, Hyung-Jin; Han, Seung-Ho; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hoan

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare case of a left inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery in an 84-year-old female cadaver. A common trunk for the inferior epigastric and obturator arteries firstly originated from the left internal iliac artery, at 3.0 mm below the bifurcation of the left common iliac artery. This trunk ran straight between the left external iliac artery and left external iliac vein, and was finally divided into the left inferior epigastric and left obturator arteries just superior to the inguinal ligament. PMID:23301197

  17. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay carotid artery disease and stroke . Your risk for carotid artery ...

  18. A new generalized correlation for accurate vapor pressure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hui; Yang, Wenming

    2012-08-01

    An accurate knowledge of the vapor pressure of organic liquids is very important for the oil and gas processing operations. In combustion modeling, the accuracy of numerical predictions is also highly dependent on the fuel properties such as vapor pressure. In this Letter, a new generalized correlation is proposed based on the Lee-Kesler's method where a fuel dependent parameter 'A' is introduced. The proposed method only requires the input parameters of critical temperature, normal boiling temperature and the acentric factor of the fluid. With this method, vapor pressures have been calculated and compared with the data reported in data compilation for 42 organic liquids over 1366 data points, and the overall average absolute percentage deviation is only 1.95%.

  19. Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rogerio; Jardim, Carlos; Humbert, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), formerly called primary pulmonary hypertension, is a rare disease (incidence and prevalence rates of approximately one and six cases per million inhabitants, respectively) with different clinical phenotypes. A group of diverse conditions manifest pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and share similar pathological and/or clinical findings with IPAH. By definition, IPAH is diagnosed only after alternative diagnoses have been ruled out. Extensive investigation is needed to determine if PAH is associated with thyroid diseases, infectious diseases, autoimmune conditions, exposure to certain drugs (particularly anorexigens), certain genetic mutations, and so on. The presence of genetic abnormalities and risk factors (such as specific drug exposures) reinforces the "multiple hit" concept for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Fortunately, within the past two decades, therapeutic options have become available for IPAH, resulting in improved survival and clinical outcomes. At least seven different compounds have been registered for PAH treatment. However, even with aggressive PAH-specific therapy, mortality rates remain high (∼40% at 5 years). Given the high mortality rates, the use of combinations of agents that work by different pathways has been advocated (either as "add-on" therapy or initial "up front" therapy). Further, new therapeutic agents and treatment strategies are on the near horizon, aiming to further improve survival from the remarkable progress already seen. PMID:24037625

  20. Coronary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Weir, Ian

    2006-05-01

    The near exponential rise in percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI) in the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease and the consequent decline in referral of patients for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has lead to a crisis in cardiac surgery. Is CABG, one of the most successful and widely applied surgical procedures, about to follow surgery for peptic ulcer disease into obsolescence? The question has serious implications for service provision and training as well as for informed patient consent. Keith Dawkins puts the case for PCI and gives a very clear and concise account of its inexorable rise to pre-eminence. David Taggart has taken on the Goliath of interventional cardiology and its associated industry by persuasively marshalling the data from the evidence base which strongly favours surgery in triple vessel and left main coronary disease. He points to the lack of long-term results and also to the weaknesses of many of the comparative studies so far published. His arguments have been positively received on both sides of the Atlantic but it is by no means certain that they will bring about the multidisciplinary approach to providing patients with treatment options which he and others advocate. It also remains to be seen whether the evidence base when it is eventually acquired will vindicate the present increasing dominance of PCI over CABG. PMID:16719994

  1. Describing the catchment-averaged precipitation as a stochastic process improves parameter and input estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giudice, Dario; Albert, Carlo; Rieckermann, Jörg; Reichert, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall input uncertainty is one of the major concerns in hydrological modeling. Unfortunately, during inference, input errors are usually neglected, which can lead to biased parameters and implausible predictions. Rainfall multipliers can reduce this problem but still fail when the observed input (precipitation) has a different temporal pattern from the true one or if the true nonzero input is not detected. In this study, we propose an improved input error model which is able to overcome these challenges and to assess and reduce input uncertainty. We formulate the average precipitation over the watershed as a stochastic input process (SIP) and, together with a model of the hydrosystem, include it in the likelihood function. During statistical inference, we use "noisy" input (rainfall) and output (runoff) data to learn about the "true" rainfall, model parameters, and runoff. We test the methodology with the rainfall-discharge dynamics of a small urban catchment. To assess its advantages, we compare SIP with simpler methods of describing uncertainty within statistical inference: (i) standard least squares (LS), (ii) bias description (BD), and (iii) rainfall multipliers (RM). We also compare two scenarios: accurate versus inaccurate forcing data. Results show that when inferring the input with SIP and using inaccurate forcing data, the whole-catchment precipitation can still be realistically estimated and thus physical parameters can be "protected" from the corrupting impact of input errors. While correcting the output rather than the input, BD inferred similarly unbiased parameters. This is not the case with LS and RM. During validation, SIP also delivers realistic uncertainty intervals for both rainfall and runoff. Thus, the technique presented is a significant step toward better quantifying input uncertainty in hydrological inference. As a next step, SIP will have to be combined with a technique addressing model structure uncertainty.

  2. Cycle accurate and cycle reproducible memory for an FPGA based hardware accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameh W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-03-15

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for using a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to simulate operations of a device under test (DUT). The DUT includes a device memory having a number of input ports, and the FPGA is associated with a target memory having a second number of input ports, the second number being less than the first number. In one embodiment, a given set of inputs is applied to the device memory at a frequency Fd and in a defined cycle of time, and the given set of inputs is applied to the target memory at a frequency Ft. Ft is greater than Fd and cycle accuracy is maintained between the device memory and the target memory. In an embodiment, a cycle accurate model of the DUT memory is created by separating the DUT memory interface protocol from the target memory storage array.

  3. Aortopulmonary Window with Anomalous Origin of the Right Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Trunk

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Juan A.; De Leon, Julio P.; Villagra, Fernando; Checa, Salvador L.; Sanchez, Pedro A.; Gomez, Ricardo; Fortuny, Ramon; Mª Brito, Jose

    1986-01-01

    A case of aortopulmonary window associated with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery in a 3-month-old boy is reported. Angiographic diagnosis could be difficult because of the simultaneous filling of both great arteries that obscure the origin of the anomalous vessel; however, a careful evaluation of the angiogram may contribute to an accurate diagnosis. The surgical correction of this association of defects requires the connection of the aorta with the anomalous coronary ostium. An intrapulmonary tunneling procedure by means of a baffle is described. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1986; 13:325-331) Images PMID:15226864

  4. Intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm complicating corrosive acid poisoning: Diagnosis with CT and treatment with transarterial embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Chalapathi Rao, MV; Rathi, Abhishek A; Reddy, Sharath P; Sahu, Sambit

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of intercostal artery are very rare. All the published cases have been caused by trauma, either iatrogenic or otherwise. They can cause hemothorax, retroperitoneal hemorrhage or can present as pulsatile chest mass. Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced CT and conventional angiogram can accurately diagnose this condition. All the reported cases have been treated by embolisation, stenting or surgery. We report an unusual case of intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm arising as a complication of corrosive poisoning presenting with hematemesis and treated by glue embolisation. The authors believe this to be the first case of intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm that is non-traumatic, complicating corrosive poisoning and presenting with hematemesis. PMID:25024522

  5. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation. PMID:26888065

  6. Computer measurement of arterial disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J.; Selzer, R. H.; Barndt, R.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Brooks, S.

    1980-01-01

    Image processing technique quantifies human atherosclerosis by computer analysis of arterial angiograms. X-ray film images are scanned and digitized, arterial shadow is tracked, and several quantitative measures of lumen irregularity are computed. In other tests, excellent agreement was found between computer evaluation of femoral angiograms on living subjects and evaluation by teams of trained angiographers.

  7. Noninvasive image derived heart input function for CMRglc measurements in small animal slow infusion FDG PET studies.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guoming; Paul, Cumming; Todica, Andrei; Hacker, Marcus; Bartenstein, Peter; Böning, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Absolute quantitation of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) can be obtained in positron emission tomography (PET) studies when serial measurements of the arterial [(18)F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) input are available. Since this is not always practical in PET studies of rodents, there has been considerable interest in defining an image-derived input function (IDIF) by placing a volume of interest (VOI) within the left ventricle of the heart. However, spill-in arising from trapping of FDG in the myocardium often leads to progressive contamination of the IDIF, which propagates to underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc. We therefore developed a novel, non-invasive method for correcting the IDIF without scaling to a blood sample. To this end, we first obtained serial arterial samples and dynamic FDG-PET data of the head and heart in a group of eight anaesthetized rats. We fitted a bi-exponential function to the serial measurements of the IDIF, and then used the linear graphical Gjedde-Patlak method to describe the accumulation in myocardium. We next estimated the magnitude of myocardial spill-in reaching the left ventricle VOI by assuming a Gaussian point-spread function, and corrected the measured IDIF for this estimated spill-in. Finally, we calculated parametric maps of CMRglc using the corrected IDIF, and for the sake of comparison, relative to serial blood sampling from the femoral artery. The uncorrected IDIF resulted in 20% underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc relative to the gold standard arterial input method. However, there was no bias with the corrected IDIF, which was robust to the variable extent of myocardial tracer uptake, such that there was a very high correlation between individual CMRglc measurements using the corrected IDIF with gold-standard arterial input results. Based on simulation, we furthermore find that electrocardiogram-gating, i.e. ECG-gating is not necessary for IDIF quantitation using our approach. PMID:23160517

  8. Noninvasive image derived heart input function for CMRglc measurements in small animal slow infusion FDG PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Guoming; Cumming, Paul; Todica, Andrei; Hacker, Marcus; Bartenstein, Peter; Böning, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Absolute quantitation of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) can be obtained in positron emission tomography (PET) studies when serial measurements of the arterial [18F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) input are available. Since this is not always practical in PET studies of rodents, there has been considerable interest in defining an image-derived input function (IDIF) by placing a volume of interest (VOI) within the left ventricle of the heart. However, spill-in arising from trapping of FDG in the myocardium often leads to progressive contamination of the IDIF, which propagates to underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc. We therefore developed a novel, non-invasive method for correcting the IDIF without scaling to a blood sample. To this end, we first obtained serial arterial samples and dynamic FDG-PET data of the head and heart in a group of eight anaesthetized rats. We fitted a bi-exponential function to the serial measurements of the IDIF, and then used the linear graphical Gjedde-Patlak method to describe the accumulation in myocardium. We next estimated the magnitude of myocardial spill-in reaching the left ventricle VOI by assuming a Gaussian point-spread function, and corrected the measured IDIF for this estimated spill-in. Finally, we calculated parametric maps of CMRglc using the corrected IDIF, and for the sake of comparison, relative to serial blood sampling from the femoral artery. The uncorrected IDIF resulted in 20% underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc relative to the gold standard arterial input method. However, there was no bias with the corrected IDIF, which was robust to the variable extent of myocardial tracer uptake, such that there was a very high correlation between individual CMRglc measurements using the corrected IDIF with gold-standard arterial input results. Based on simulation, we furthermore find that electrocardiogram-gating, i.e. ECG-gating is not necessary for IDIF quantitation using our approach.

  9. Peripheral arterial injuries: a reassessment.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, H F; Parnell, C L; Williams, G D; Campbell, G S

    1976-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with peripheral arterial injuries were subjected to acute repair, negative exploration, or late repair of the complications of the arterial injury (false aneurysm, A-V fistula, and/or limb ischemia). The causes of failure after acute injury include extensive local soft tissue and bony damage, severe concomitant head, chest or abdominal wounding, stubborn reliance on negative arteriograms in patients with probable arterial injury, failure to repair simultaneous venous injuries, or harvesting of a vein graft from a severely damaged extremity. There is a positive correlation between non-operative expectant treatment and the incidence of late vascular complications requiring late arterial repair. Delayed complications of arterial injuries occurred most frequently in wounds below the elbow and knee. PMID:973757

  10. Set Theory Applied to Uniquely Define the Inputs to Territorial Systems in Emergy Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    The language of set theory can be utilized to represent the emergy involved in all processes. In this paper we use set theory in an emergy evaluation to ensure an accurate representation of the inputs to territorial systems. We consider a generic territorial system and we describ...

  11. The Effects of Input-Based Practice on Pragmatic Development of Requests in L2 Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shuai

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of input-based practice on developing accurate and speedy requests in second-language Chinese. Thirty learners from intermediate-level Chinese classes were assigned to an intensive training group (IT), a regular training group (RT), and a control group. The IT and the RT groups practiced using four Chinese…

  12. Reactive nitrogen inputs to US lands and waterways: how certain are we about sources and fluxes?

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overabundance of reactive nitrogen (N) as a result of anthropogenic activities has led to multiple human health and environmental concerns. Efforts to address these concerns require an accurate accounting of N inputs. Here, we present a novel synthesis of data describing N inp...

  13. Optical input impedance of nanostrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan; Du, Ya-ping

    2012-05-01

    We conduct an investigation into optical nanoantennas in the form of a strip dipole made from aluminum. With the finite-difference time domain simulation both optical input impedance and radiation efficiency of nanostrip antennas are addressed. An equivalent circuit is presented as well for the nanostrip antennas at optical resonances. The optical input resistance can be adjusted by varying the geometric parameters of antenna strips. By changing both strip area and strip length simultaneously, optical input resistance can be adjusted for matching impedance with an external feeding or loading circuit. It is found that the optical radiation efficiency does not change significantly when the size of a nanostrip antenna varies moderately.

  14. Wireless, relative-motion computer input device

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides a system for controlling a computer display in a workspace using an input unit/output unit. A train of EM waves are sent out to flood the workspace. EM waves are reflected from the input unit/output unit. A relative distance moved information signal is created using the EM waves that are reflected from the input unit/output unit. Algorithms are used to convert the relative distance moved information signal to a display signal. The computer display is controlled in response to the display signal.

  15. Patent arterial duct

    PubMed Central

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  16. Patent arterial duct.

    PubMed

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  17. Accurate and efficient reconstruction of deep phylogenies from structured RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Stocsits, Roman R.; Letsch, Harald; Hertel, Jana; Misof, Bernhard; Stadler, Peter F.

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are probably the most frequently used data source in phylogenetic reconstruction. Individual columns of rRNA alignments are not independent as a consequence of their highly conserved secondary structures. Unless explicitly taken into account, these correlation can distort the phylogenetic signal and/or lead to gross overestimates of tree stability. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches are of course amenable to using RNA-specific substitution models that treat conserved base pairs appropriately, but require accurate secondary structure models as input. So far, however, no accurate and easy-to-use tool has been available for computing structure-aware alignments and consensus structures that can deal with the large rRNAs. The RNAsalsa approach is designed to fill this gap. Capitalizing on the improved accuracy of pairwise consensus structures and informed by a priori knowledge of group-specific structural constraints, the tool provides both alignments and consensus structures that are of sufficient accuracy for routine phylogenetic analysis based on RNA-specific substitution models. The power of the approach is demonstrated using two rRNA data sets: a mitochondrial rRNA set of 26 Mammalia, and a collection of 28S nuclear rRNAs representative of the five major echinoderm groups. PMID:19723687

  18. Accurate and efficient reconstruction of deep phylogenies from structured RNAs.

    PubMed

    Stocsits, Roman R; Letsch, Harald; Hertel, Jana; Misof, Bernhard; Stadler, Peter F

    2009-10-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are probably the most frequently used data source in phylogenetic reconstruction. Individual columns of rRNA alignments are not independent as a consequence of their highly conserved secondary structures. Unless explicitly taken into account, these correlation can distort the phylogenetic signal and/or lead to gross overestimates of tree stability. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches are of course amenable to using RNA-specific substitution models that treat conserved base pairs appropriately, but require accurate secondary structure models as input. So far, however, no accurate and easy-to-use tool has been available for computing structure-aware alignments and consensus structures that can deal with the large rRNAs. The RNAsalsa approach is designed to fill this gap. Capitalizing on the improved accuracy of pairwise consensus structures and informed by a priori knowledge of group-specific structural constraints, the tool provides both alignments and consensus structures that are of sufficient accuracy for routine phylogenetic analysis based on RNA-specific substitution models. The power of the approach is demonstrated using two rRNA data sets: a mitochondrial rRNA set of 26 Mammalia, and a collection of 28S nuclear rRNAs representative of the five major echinoderm groups. PMID:19723687

  19. An Accurate and Dynamic Computer Graphics Muscle Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, David Asher

    1997-01-01

    A computer based musculo-skeletal model was developed at the University in the departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering. This model accurately represents human shoulder kinematics. The result of this model is the graphical display of bones moving through an appropriate range of motion based on inputs of EMGs and external forces. The need existed to incorporate a geometric muscle model in the larger musculo-skeletal model. Previous muscle models did not accurately represent muscle geometries, nor did they account for the kinematics of tendons. This thesis covers the creation of a new muscle model for use in the above musculo-skeletal model. This muscle model was based on anatomical data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) cadaver study. Two-dimensional digital images from the VHP were analyzed and reconstructed to recreate the three-dimensional muscle geometries. The recreated geometries were smoothed, reduced, and sliced to form data files defining the surfaces of each muscle. The muscle modeling function opened these files during run-time and recreated the muscle surface. The modeling function applied constant volume limitations to the muscle and constant geometry limitations to the tendons.

  20. Spiral CT During Selective Accessory Renal Artery Angiography: Assessment of Vascular Territory Before Aortic Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Dorffner, Roland; Thurnher, Siegfried; Prokesch, Rupert; Youssefzadeh, Soraya; Hoelzenbein, Thomas; Lammer, Johannes

    1998-03-15

    We evaluated the vascular territory of accessory renal arteries in cases where the vessel might be overlapped by an aortic stent-graft. Spiral CT during selective accessory renal artery angiography was performed in four patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (including one with a horseshoe kidney). The volume of the vascular territory of each renal artery was measured using a software program provided by the CT unit manufacturer. The supernumerary renal arteries perfused 32%, 37%, 15%, and 16% of the total renal mass, respectively. In two patients, stent-grafts were implanted, which resulted in occlusion of the supernumerary renal artery. The volume of the renal infarction was equal to the volume perfused by the artery as calculated before implantation of the stent-graft.The method proposed is accurate for estimating the size of the expected renal infarction. It might help to determine whether placement of a stent-graft is acceptable.

  1. Scaling of global input-output networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sai; Qi, Zhengling; Qu, Shen; Zhu, Ji; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Jia, Xiaoping; Xu, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Examining scaling patterns of networks can help understand how structural features relate to the behavior of the networks. Input-output networks consist of industries as nodes and inter-industrial exchanges of products as links. Previous studies consider limited measures for node strengths and link weights, and also ignore the impact of dataset choice. We consider a comprehensive set of indicators in this study that are important in economic analysis, and also examine the impact of dataset choice, by studying input-output networks in individual countries and the entire world. Results show that Burr, Log-Logistic, Log-normal, and Weibull distributions can better describe scaling patterns of global input-output networks. We also find that dataset choice has limited impacts on the observed scaling patterns. Our findings can help examine the quality of economic statistics, estimate missing data in economic statistics, and identify key nodes and links in input-output networks to support economic policymaking.

  2. Artery phantoms for intravascular optical coherence tomography: healthy arteries.

    PubMed

    Bisaillon, Charles-Étienne; Dufour, Marc L; Lamouche, Guy

    2011-09-01

    We present a method to make phantoms of coronary arteries for intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). The phantoms provide a calibrated OCT response similar to the layered structure of arteries. The optical properties of each layer are achieved with specific concentrations of alumina and carbon black in a silicone matrix. This composition insures high durability and also approximates the elastic properties of arteries. The phantoms are fabricated in a tubular shape by the successive deposition and curing of liquid silicone mixtures on a lathe setup. PMID:21991552

  3. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge. PMID:27216840

  4. Subvoxel accurate graph search using non-Euclidean graph space.

    PubMed

    Abràmoff, Michael D; Wu, Xiaodong; Lee, Kyungmoo; Tang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Graph search is attractive for the quantitative analysis of volumetric medical images, and especially for layered tissues, because it allows globally optimal solutions in low-order polynomial time. However, because nodes of graphs typically encode evenly distributed voxels of the volume with arcs connecting orthogonally sampled voxels in Euclidean space, segmentation cannot achieve greater precision than a single unit, i.e. the distance between two adjoining nodes, and partial volume effects are ignored. We generalize the graph to non-Euclidean space by allowing non-equidistant spacing between nodes, so that subvoxel accurate segmentation is achievable. Because the number of nodes and edges in the graph remains the same, running time and memory use are similar, while all the advantages of graph search, including global optimality and computational efficiency, are retained. A deformation field calculated from the volume data adaptively changes regional node density so that node density varies with the inverse of the expected cost. We validated our approach using optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the retina and 3-D MR of the arterial wall, and achieved statistically significant increased accuracy. Our approach allows improved accuracy in volume data acquired with the same hardware, and also, preserved accuracy with lower resolution, more cost-effective, image acquisition equipment. The method is not limited to any specific imaging modality and readily extensible to higher dimensions. PMID:25314272

  5. Multiple-input experimental modal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allemang, R. J.; Brown, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The development of experimental modal analysis techniques is reviewed. System and excitation assumptions are discussed. The methods examined include the forced normal mode excitation method, the frequency response function method, the damped complex exponential response method, the Ibrahim time domain approach, the polyreference approach, and mathematical input-output model methods. The current trend toward multiple input utilization in the estimation of system parameters is noted.

  6. Input/output system for multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernick, D.L.; Chan, K.K.; Chan, W.M.; Dan, Y.F.; Hoang, D.M.; Hussain, Z.; Iswandhi, G.I.; Korpi, J.E.; Sanner, M.W.; Zwangerman, J.A.

    1989-04-11

    A device controller is described, comprising: a first port-input/output controller coupled to a first input/output channel bus; and a second port-input/output controlled coupled to a second input/output channel bus; each of the first and second port-input/output controllers having: a first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a first host processor to provide a first data path on a first I/O channel through the first port I/O controller between the first host processor and any peripheral, and at least a second ownership latch means operative independently of the first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a second host processor independently of the first port input/output controller to provide a second data path on a second I/O channel through the second port I/O controller between the second host processor and any peripheral devices coupled to the device controller.

  7. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A novel input filter compensation scheme for a buck regulator that eliminates the interaction between the input filter output impedance and the regulator control loop is presented. The scheme is implemented using a feedforward loop that senses the input filter state variables and uses this information to modulate the duty cycle signal. The feedforward design process presented is seen to be straightforward and the feedforward easy to implement. Extensive experimental data supported by analytical results show that significant performance improvement is achieved with the use of feedforward in the following performance categories: loop stability, audiosusceptibility, output impedance and transient response. The use of feedforward results in isolating the switching regulator from its power source thus eliminating all interaction between the regulator and equipment upstream. In addition the use of feedforward removes some of the input filter design constraints and makes the input filter design process simpler thus making it possible to optimize the input filter. The concept of feedforward compensation can also be extended to other types of switching regulators.

  8. Significance of Input Correlations in Striatal Function

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Man Yi; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    The striatum is the main input station of the basal ganglia and is strongly associated with motor and cognitive functions. Anatomical evidence suggests that individual striatal neurons are unlikely to share their inputs from the cortex. Using a biologically realistic large-scale network model of striatum and cortico-striatal projections, we provide a functional interpretation of the special anatomical structure of these projections. Specifically, we show that weak pairwise correlation within the pool of inputs to individual striatal neurons enhances the saliency of signal representation in the striatum. By contrast, correlations among the input pools of different striatal neurons render the signal representation less distinct from background activity. We suggest that for the network architecture of the striatum, there is a preferred cortico-striatal input configuration for optimal signal representation. It is further enhanced by the low-rate asynchronous background activity in striatum, supported by the balance between feedforward and feedback inhibitions in the striatal network. Thus, an appropriate combination of rates and correlations in the striatal input sets the stage for action selection presumably implemented in the basal ganglia. PMID:22125480

  9. Influential input classification in probabilistic multimedia models

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Dennis P.H.; Geng, Shu

    1999-05-01

    Monte Carlo analysis is a statistical simulation method that is often used to assess and quantify the outcome variance in complex environmental fate and effects models. Total outcome variance of these models is a function of (1) the uncertainty and/or variability associated with each model input and (2) the sensitivity of the model outcome to changes in the inputs. To propagate variance through a model using Monte Carlo techniques, each variable must be assigned a probability distribution. The validity of these distributions directly influences the accuracy and reliability of the model outcome. To efficiently allocate resources for constructing distributions one should first identify the most influential set of variables in the model. Although existing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis methods can provide a relative ranking of the importance of model inputs, they fail to identify the minimum set of stochastic inputs necessary to sufficiently characterize the outcome variance. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a novel sensitivity/uncertainty analysis method for assessing the importance of each variable in a multimedia environmental fate model. Our analyses show that for a given scenario, a relatively small number of input variables influence the central tendency of the model and an even smaller set determines the shape of the outcome distribution. For each input, the level of influence depends on the scenario under consideration. This information is useful for developing site specific models and improving our understanding of the processes that have the greatest influence on the variance in outcomes from multimedia models.

  10. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  11. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  12. Noninvasive Monitoring of Arterial Viscoelastic Indices Using a Foil-type Pressure Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Hiromi; Hirano, Harutoyo; Kutluk, Abdugheni; Tsuji, Toshio; Fukuda, Osamu; Ueno, Naohiro; Ukawa, Teiji; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Kawamoto, Masashi; Yoshizumi, Masao

    This paper proposes a noninvasive method for estimating the dynamic characteristics of arterial walls using pulse waves measured in various parts of the body by a foil-type pressure sensor. The sensor not only has high sensitivity and flexibility but also features the ability to continuously measure the alternating-current component of pulse waves. These capabilities make it suitable for estimating the dynamic characteristics of arterial walls. In this paper, a foil-type pressure sensor was employed to measure pulse waves based on the tonometry approach, and a method of estimating changes in arterial viscoelastic indices was proposed based on the measured pulse waves and photoplethysmograms. In order to accurately measure blood pressure, first, we examined suitable mechanical forces to the sensor, and found that values of 5-25[N] yielded the best performance. We then estimated the arterial viscoelastic indices of a radial artery and a dorsal pedis artery when mechanical pain stimuli were applied to the subjects. The results suggested that the estimated indices can be used to quantitatively assess vascular response caused by sympathicotonia. We thus concluded that the proposed method enabled noninvasive measurement of pulse waves in the dorsal pedis artery and estimation of arterial viscoelastic indices.

  13. A Semi-Automatic Coronary Artery Segmentation Framework Using Mechanical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ken; Yang, Rongqian; Li, Lihua; Ou, Shanxing; Chen, Yuke; Dou, Jianhong

    2015-10-01

    CVD (cardiovascular disease) is one of the biggest threats to human beings nowadays. An early and quantitative diagnosis of CVD is important in extending lifespan and improving people's life quality. Coronary artery stenosis can prevent CVD. To diagnose the degree of stenosis, the inner diameter of coronary artery needs to be measured. To achieve such measurement, the coronary artery is segmented by using a method that is based on morphology and the continuity between computed tomography image slices. A centerline extraction method based on mechanical simulation is proposed. This centerline extraction method can figure out a basic framework of the coronary artery by simulating pixel dots of the artery image into mass points. Such mass points have tensile forces, with which the outer pixel dots can be drawn to the center. Subsequently, the centerline of the coronary artery can be outlined by using the local line-fitting method. Finally, the nearest point method is adopted to measure the inner diameter. Experimental results showed that the methods proposed in this paper can precisely extract the centerline of the coronary artery and can accurately measure its inner diameter, thereby providing a basis for quantitative diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis. PMID:26310950

  14. Beyond Rainfall Multipliers: Describing Input Uncertainty as an Autocorrelated Stochastic Process Improves Inference in Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giudice, D.; Albert, C.; Reichert, P.; Rieckermann, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall is the main driver of hydrological systems. Unfortunately, it is highly variable in space and time and therefore difficult to observe accurately. This poses a serious challenge to correctly estimate the catchment-averaged precipitation, a key factor for hydrological models. As biased precipitation leads to biased parameter estimation and thus to biased runoff predictions, it is very important to have a realistic description of precipitation uncertainty. Rainfall multipliers (RM), which correct each observed storm with a random factor, provide a first step into this direction. Nevertheless, they often fail when the estimated input has a different temporal pattern from the true one or when a storm is not detected by the raingauge. In this study we propose a more realistic input error model, which is able to overcome these challenges and increase our certainty by better estimating model input and parameters. We formulate the average precipitation over the watershed as a stochastic input process (SIP). We suggest a transformed Gauss-Markov process, which is estimated in a Bayesian framework by using input (rainfall) and output (runoff) data. We tested the methodology in a 28.6 ha urban catchment represented by an accurate conceptual model. Specifically, we perform calibration and predictions with SIP and RM using accurate data from nearby raingauges (R1) and inaccurate data from a distant gauge (R2). Results show that using SIP, the estimated model parameters are "protected" from the corrupting impact of inaccurate rainfall. Additionally, SIP can correct input biases during calibration (Figure) and reliably quantify rainfall and runoff uncertainties during both calibration (Figure) and validation. In our real-word application with non-trivial rainfall errors, this was not the case with RM. We therefore recommend SIP in all cases where the input is the predominant source of uncertainty. Furthermore, the high-resolution rainfall intensities obtained with this

  15. A new synthesis for terrestrial nitrogen inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Morford, S. L.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) inputs sustain many different aspects of local soil processes, their services, and their interactions with the broader Earth system. We present a new synthesis for terrestrial N inputs that explicitly considers both rock and atmospheric sources of N. We review evidence for state-factor regulation over biological fixation, deposition, and rock-weathering inputs from local to global scales and in transient vs. steady-state landscapes. Our investigation highlights strong organism and topographic (relief) controls over all three N input pathways, with the anthropogenic factor clearly important in rising N deposition rates. In addition, the climate, parent material, and time factors are shown to influence patterns of fixation and rock-weathering inputs of N in diverse soil systems. Data reanalysis suggests that weathering of N-rich parent material could resolve several known cases of "missing N inputs" in ecosystems, and demonstrates how the inclusion of rock N sources into modern concepts can lead to a richer understanding of spatial and temporal patterns of ecosystem N availability. For example, explicit consideration of rock N inputs into classic pedogenic models (e.g., the Walker and Syers model) yields a fundamentally different expectation from the standard case: weathering of N-rich parent material could enhance N availability and facilitate terrestrial succession in developmentally young sites even in the absence of N-fixing organisms. We conclude that a state-factor framework for N complements our growing understanding multiple-source controls on phosphorus and cation availability in Earth's soil, but with significant exceptions given the lack of an N fixation analogue in all other biogeochemical cycles. Rather, non-symmetrical feedbacks among input pathways in which high N inputs via deposition or rock-weathering sources have the potential to reduce biological fixation rates mark N as fundamentally different from other nutrients. The new synthesis

  16. A Novel Native Derived Coronary Artery Tissue-Flap Model

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, Alexander; Hülsmann, Jörn; Pinto, Antonio; Barth, Mareike; Fomin, Andrey; Lichtenberg, Artur; Akhyari, Payam

    2013-01-01

    Although tissue-engineering approaches have led to significant progress in the quest of finding a viable substitute for dysfunctional myocardium, the vascularization of such bioartificial constructs still remains a major challenge. Hence, there is a need for model systems that allow us to study and better understand cardiac and vascular biology to overcome current limitations. Therefore, in this study, in toto decellularized rat hearts with a patent vessel system were processed into standardized coronary artery tissue flaps adherent to the ascending aorta. Protein diffusivity analysis and blood perfusion of the coronary arteries showed proper sealing of the de-endothelialized vessels. Retrograde aortic perfusion allowed for selective seeding of the coronary artery system, while surface seeding of the tissue flaps allowed for additional controlled coculture with cardiac cells. The coronary artery tissue-flap model offers a patent and perfusable coronary vascular architecture with a preserved cardiac extracellular matrix, therefore mimicking nature's input to the highest possible degree. This offers the possibility to study re-endothelialization and endothelial function of different donor cell types and their interaction with cardiac cells in a standardized biologically derived cardiac in vitro model, while establishing a platform that could be used for in vitro drug testing and stem cell differentiation studies. PMID:23631507

  17. A new system for ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure recording

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J; Gibbs, R; MacLachlan, Donald; Fox, Kim M

    1992-01-01

    Objective—To develop a complete system for the measurement, recording, and analysis of ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure. Design—The new system consists of a pulmonary artery catheter, an ambulatory recorder, and a desktop computer. Pulmonary artery pressure is measured by a micromanometer tipped catheter with an in vivo calibration system to allow correction for zero drift. This catheter is plugged into a small battery powered recorder. The recorder has two input channels, one for pressure and one for an event marker. The pressure wave is sampled 32 times/s, processed by an in built computer, compressed, and stored in semiconductor memory. On completion of a recording, data is transferred from the ambulatory recorder through a serial data link to an Acorn Archimedes desktop computer on which further data processing, statistical analysis, graphics, and printouts can be obtained. Results—The system has been used in 18 patients, with technically successful recording in 14, less than 15 minutes of data loss in three, and 12 hours of data loss in one. Conclusions—A new system for ambulatory pulmonary artery monitoring has been developed and used clinically with success. It may provide new perspectives on the pathophysiology of disease as it applies to everyday life. PMID:1389746

  18. Medial Arterial Calcification: An Overlooked Player in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a global health issue that is becoming more prevalent in an aging world population. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease are also on the increase, and both are associated with accelerated vascular calcification and an unfavorable prognosis in PAD. These data challenge the traditional athero-centric view of PAD, instead pointing toward a disease process complicated by medial arterial calcification. Like atherosclerosis, aging is a potent risk factor for medial arterial calcification, and accelerated vascular aging may underpin the devastating manifestations of PAD, particularly in patients prone to calcification. Consequently, this review will attempt to dissect the relationship between medial arterial calcification and atherosclerosis in PAD and identify common as well as novel risk factors that may contribute to and accelerate progression of PAD. In this context, we focus on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, DNA damage, and vascular aging, as well as the unexplored role of neuropathy. PMID:27312224

  19. Left Subclavian Artery Occlusion: Femoro-Axillary Artery Retrograde Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The treatment tactics for subclavian artery occlusion include the more commonly used endovascular therapy rather than surgical intervention. We present a case of a 61-year-old woman with dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure who experienced left finger necrosis in the left upper extremity. To salvage the limb, we performed femoro-axillary (fem-ax) artery bypass using an autologous saphenous vein graft. However, 10 months later, she experienced coldness in the left forearm. Angiography revealed chronic total occlusion of the venous bypass. Despite emergent thrombectomy, redo fem-ax artery bypass operation was performed using a prosthetic graft. Upper limb salvage can be achieved by fem-ax artery retrograde bypass. PMID:27386454

  20. Nonlinear, multiple-input modeling of cerebral autoregulation using Volterra Kernel estimation.

    PubMed

    Kouchakpour, H; Allen, R; Simpson, D M

    2010-01-01

    Autoregulation refers to the automatic adjustment of blood flow to supply the required oxygen and glucose and remove waste, in proportion to the tissue's requirement at any instant of time. For the brain, cerebral autoregulation is an active process by which cerebral blood flow is controlled at an approximately steady level despite changes in the arterial blood pressure. Robust assessment of the cerebral autoregulation by a model that characterizes this system has been the goal of many studies, searching for techniques that can be used in clinical scenarios to detect potentially dangerous impairment of control. Multiple input, single output (MISO) models can be used to assess autoregulation, and system parameters can be estimated from spontaneous beat-to-beat variations in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and breath-by-breath end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ETCO2)) as inputs, and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) as the output. In this study a non-linear, multivariate approach, based on Volterra-type kernel estimation models is employed. The results are compared with linear models as well as nonlinear single-input single-output (SISO) models. The normalized mean squared error was used as the criteria of performance of each model in assessing cerebral autoregulation. Our simulation results indicate that for relatively short signals (around 300 sec), nonlinear, multiple-input models based on Volterra systems performed best, though the benefit varied considerably between subjects. When using a fixed model for all recordings, a linear SISO model with ABP as input provided the smallest average modeling error. PMID:21096582

  1. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  2. [Simultaneous brachiocephalic arteries reconstruction and coronary artery bypass grafting].

    PubMed

    Lysenko, A V; Belov, Iu V; Stonogin, A V

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the results of simultaneous surgical treatment of 55 patients with brachiocephalic arteries lesion and ischemic heart disease. All patients underwent reconstructive operations on brachiocephalic arteries and CABG. The features of diagnosis and surgical stage are described. The indications for this method are defined. The authors studied russian and world experience; complications of simultaneous operations are presented. It is suggested ways for improvement of results of simultaneous reconstructions. PMID:26031945

  3. Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm Formation with Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Tadashi; Kamiya, Chiaki; Suzuki, Jun; Sato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Celiac stenosis or occlusion is attributed partly to increase blood flow at pancreatic arcade from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) system and may play a causal role in true aneurysm of pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDAA) formation. However, despite possible increased blood flow in the pancreatic arcades like celiac stenosis, PDAAs with a stenotic SMA are extremely rare, with only three cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of PDAA with SMA stenosis and review the literature. PMID:25298835

  4. Peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Atmer, B; Jogestrand, T; Laska, J; Lund, F

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease in patients with coronary artery disease has been investigated in many different ways and depends on the diagnostic methods and the definition of the atherosclerotic manifestations in the different vascular beds. In this study we used the non-invasive methods digital volume pulse plethysmography and ankle and toe blood pressure measurements to identify arterial abnormalities in the lower limbs in 58 patients (49 males and 9 females; age 37-72 years) examined with coronary angiography. The prevalence of peripheral artery disease was 22%, in agreement with the results of most previous investigations. There was a tendency towards increasing prevalence of peripheral artery disease with more advanced coronary artery disease: 14% of the patients with no or minimal coronary atheromotous lesions, 18% of the patients with moderate coronary atheromotous lesions and 32% of the patients with marked coronary atheromotous disease. For this reason a non-invasive investigation of the peripheral arterial circulation should be included early in the clinical consideration of patients with chest pain or similar symptoms suggesting coronary heart disease. Toe pressure measurement appears to be the most appropriate technique being rather simple in management and also in evaluation of results. PMID:7658111

  5. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians. PMID:21915169

  6. DREAM-3D and the importance of model inputs and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, Reiner; Tu, Weichao; Cunningham, Gregory; Jorgensen, Anders; Chen, Yue

    2015-04-01

    Recent work on radiation belt 3D diffusion codes such as the Los Alamos "DREAM-3D" code have demonstrated the ability of such codes to reproduce realistic magnetospheric storm events in the relativistic electron dynamics - as long as sufficient "event-oriented" boundary conditions and code inputs such as wave powers, low energy boundary conditions, background plasma densities, and last closed drift shell (outer boundary) are available. In this talk we will argue that the main limiting factor in our modeling ability is no longer our inability to represent key physical processes that govern the dynamics of the radiation belts (radial, pitch angle and energy diffusion) but rather our limitations in specifying accurate boundary conditions and code inputs. We use here DREAM-3D runs to show the sensitivity of the modeled outcomes to these boundary conditions and inputs, and also discuss alternate "proxy" approaches to obtain the required inputs from other (ground-based) sources.

  7. On-line breakage monitoring of small drills with input impedance of driving motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lianyu; Ling, Shih-Fu; Tseng, Ching-Huan

    2007-01-01

    Input current of driving motor has been employed with success as monitoring signature for tool breakage and wear detection in manufacturing processes for more than a decade. In micro-drilling, however, the accuracy of current signature downgrades significantly owing to the disturbances often seen in electrical power supply. This paper reports the investigation results on the effectiveness of using the input impedance of the spindle motor as monitoring signature for detecting drill breakage in micro-drilling. As input impedance is an inherent property of a dynamic system and independent upon the system input such as voltage or current fluctuations and thus avoids the difficulties faced by the methods using current signature. Experimental results show that impedance signature reflects torque variations well and indicates health conditions of drills properly during micro-drilling processes. When associated with an artificial neural network to recognise its waveform, impedance signature is capable of identifying drill breakages promptly and accurately.

  8. Hyperelastic modelling of arterial layers with distributed collagen fibre orientations

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, T. Christian; Ogden, Ray W; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2005-01-01

    Constitutive relations are fundamental to the solution of problems in continuum mechanics, and are required in the study of, for example, mechanically dominated clinical interventions involving soft biological tissues. Structural continuum constitutive models of arterial layers integrate information about the tissue morphology and therefore allow investigation of the interrelation between structure and function in response to mechanical loading. Collagen fibres are key ingredients in the structure of arteries. In the media (the middle layer of the artery wall) they are arranged in two helically distributed families with a small pitch and very little dispersion in their orientation (i.e. they are aligned quite close to the circumferential direction). By contrast, in the adventitial and intimal layers, the orientation of the collagen fibres is dispersed, as shown by polarized light microscopy of stained arterial tissue. As a result, continuum models that do not account for the dispersion are not able to capture accurately the stress–strain response of these layers. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to develop a structural continuum framework that is able to represent the dispersion of the collagen fibre orientation. This then allows the development of a new hyperelastic free-energy function that is particularly suited for representing the anisotropic elastic properties of adventitial and intimal layers of arterial walls, and is a generalization of the fibre-reinforced structural model introduced by Holzapfel & Gasser (Holzapfel & Gasser 2001 Comput. Meth. Appl. Mech. Eng. 190, 4379–4403) and Holzapfel et al. (Holzapfel et al. 2000 J. Elast. 61, 1–48). The model incorporates an additional scalar structure parameter that characterizes the dispersed collagen orientation. An efficient finite element implementation of the model is then presented and numerical examples show that the dispersion of the orientation of collagen fibres in the adventitia of human

  9. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... this depends on which arteries are affected. Coronary Arteries Coronary arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to the ...

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  11. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  12. Input/output system identification - Learning from repeated experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.; Longman, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes three approaches and possible variations for the determination of the Markov parameters for forced response data using general inputs. It is shown that, when the parameters in the solution procedure are bootstrapped, the results can be obtained very efficiently, but the errors propagate throughout all parameters. By arranging the data in a different form and using singular value decomposition, the resulting identified parameters are more accurate, in the least number of successive experiments, at the expense of a large matrix singular value decomposition. When a recursive procedure is employed, the calculations can be performed very efficiently, but the number of repetitions of the experiments is much greater for a given accuracy than for any of the previous approaches. An alternative formulation is proposed to combine the advantages of each of the approaches.

  13. Noise facilitates transcriptional control under dynamic inputs.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Ryan A; Tay, Savaş

    2015-01-29

    Cells must respond sensitively to time-varying inputs in complex signaling environments. To understand how signaling networks process dynamic inputs into gene expression outputs and the role of noise in cellular information processing, we studied the immune pathway NF-κB under periodic cytokine inputs using microfluidic single-cell measurements and stochastic modeling. We find that NF-κB dynamics in fibroblasts synchronize with oscillating TNF signal and become entrained, leading to significantly increased NF-κB oscillation amplitude and mRNA output compared to non-entrained response. Simulations show that intrinsic biochemical noise in individual cells improves NF-κB oscillation and entrainment, whereas cell-to-cell variability in NF-κB natural frequency creates population robustness, together enabling entrainment over a wider range of dynamic inputs. This wide range is confirmed by experiments where entrained cells were measured under all input periods. These results indicate that synergy between oscillation and noise allows cells to achieve efficient gene expression in dynamically changing signaling environments. PMID:25635454

  14. Six axis force feedback input device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, Timothy (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a low friction, low inertia, six-axis force feedback input device comprising an arm with double-jointed, tendon-driven revolute joints, a decoupled tendon-driven wrist, and a base with encoders and motors. The input device functions as a master robot manipulator of a microsurgical teleoperated robot system including a slave robot manipulator coupled to an amplifier chassis, which is coupled to a control chassis, which is coupled to a workstation with a graphical user interface. The amplifier chassis is coupled to the motors of the master robot manipulator and the control chassis is coupled to the encoders of the master robot manipulator. A force feedback can be applied to the input device and can be generated from the slave robot to enable a user to operate the slave robot via the input device without physically viewing the slave robot. Also, the force feedback can be generated from the workstation to represent fictitious forces to constrain the input device's control of the slave robot to be within imaginary predetermined boundaries.

  15. Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... P. Peripheral arterial diseases. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... noncoronary obstructive vascular disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  16. Management of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Gey, Daniela C; Lesho, Emil P; Manngold, Johannes

    2004-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is common, but the diagnosis frequently is overlooked because of subtle physical findings and lack of classic symptoms. Screening based on the ankle brachial index using Doppler ultrasonography may be more useful than physical examination alone. Noninvasive modalities to locate lesions include magnetic resonance angiography, duplex scanning, and hemodynamic localization. Major risk factors for peripheral arterial disease are cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, older age (older than 40 years), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and hyperhomocystinemia. Nonsurgical therapy for intermittent claudication involves risk-factor modification, exercise, and pharmacologic therapy. Based on available evidence, a supervised exercise program is the most effective treatment. All patients with peripheral arterial disease should undergo aggressive control of blood pressure, sugar intake, and lipid levels. All available strategies to help patients quit smoking, such as counseling and nicotine replacement, should be used. Effective drug therapies for peripheral arterial disease include aspirin (with or without dipyridamole), clopidogrel, cilostazol, and pentoxifylline. PMID:14971833

  17. Retrieval of Branching Sequences in an Associative Memory Model with Common External Input and Bias Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katahira, Kentaro; Kawamura, Masaki; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okada, Masato

    2007-04-01

    We investigate a recurrent neural network model with common external and bias inputs that can retrieve branching sequences. Retrieval of memory sequences is one of the most important functions of the brain. A lot of research has been done on neural networks that process memory sequences. Most of it has focused on fixed memory sequences. However, many animals can remember and recall branching sequences. Therefore, we propose an associative memory model that can retrieve branching sequences. Our model has bias input and common external input. Kawamura and Okada reported that common external input enables sequential memory retrieval in an associative memory model with auto- and weak cross-correlation connections. We show that retrieval processes along branching sequences are controllable with both the bias input and the common external input. To analyze the behaviors of our model, we derived the macroscopic dynamical description as a probability density function. The results obtained by our theory agree with those obtained by computer simulations.

  18. Novel, congenital iliac arterial anatomy: Absent common iliac arteries and left internal iliac artery

    PubMed Central

    Green, Christopher S.; Helmy, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the iliac arterial system are rare and can be associated with ischemia. With an increase in vascular imaging and interventions, such anomalies are likely to be encountered with greater frequency. We present the case of a 25-year-old female who was incidentally found to have absence of the common iliac arteries bilaterally and the left internal iliac artery, a constellation not previously reported in the literature. We present relevant imaging findings, review embryonic vascular development, and discuss potential clinical implications.

  19. Cervical arterial dissection: current concepts .

    PubMed

    Menon, Ranjith K; Norris, John W

    2008-10-01

    The increasing use and safety of noninvasive imaging in recent years has revealed the surprising frequency of dissection of the carotid and vertebral arteries (cervical arterial dissection [CAD]) as a cause of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. This review is an overview of current concepts and practice of patients with CAD, but our ideas are constantly evolving with new discoveries from neurovascular imaging and medical and surgical management in this area. PMID:18990128

  20. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  1. Impact of Multislice CT Angiography on Planning of Radiological Catheter Placement for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.3/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 {+-} 0.4/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 {+-} 0.8/2.2 {+-} 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 {+-} 0.8/2.6 {+-} 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  2. The input optics of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D. B.; Arain, M. A.; Ciani, G.; Feldbaum, D.; Fulda, P.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, R.; Heintze, M.; Martin, R. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Williams, L. F.; Mueller, G.; Quetschke, V.; Korth, W. Z.; Reitze, D. H.; Derosa, R. T.; Effler, A.; Kokeyama, K.; Frolov, V. V.; Mullavey, A.; Poeld, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Input Optics (IO) of advanced LIGO will be described. The IO consists of all the optics between the laser and the power recycling mirror. The scope of the IO includes the following hardware: phase modulators, power control, input mode cleaner, an in-vacuum Faraday isolator, and mode matching telescopes. The IO group has developed and characterized RTP-based phase modulators capable of operation at 180 W cw input power. In addition, the Faraday isolator is compensated for depolarization and thermal lensing effects up to the same power and is capable of achieving greater than 40 dB isolation. This research has been supported by the NSF through Grants PHY-1205512 and PHY-1505598. LIGO-G1600067.

  3. Computer Generated Inputs for NMIS Processor Verification

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Mullens; J. E. Breeding; J. A. McEvers; R. W. Wysor; L. G. Chiang; J. R. Lenarduzzi; J. T. Mihalczo; J. K. Mattingly

    2001-06-29

    Proper operation of the Nuclear Identification Materials System (NMIS) processor can be verified using computer-generated inputs [BIST (Built-In-Self-Test)] at the digital inputs. Preselected sequences of input pulses to all channels with known correlation functions are compared to the output of the processor. These types of verifications have been utilized in NMIS type correlation processors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory since 1984. The use of this test confirmed a malfunction in a NMIS processor at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) in 1998. The NMIS processor boards were returned to the U.S. for repair and subsequently used in NMIS passive and active measurements with Pu at VNIIEF in 1999.

  4. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  5. Inferior epigastric artery pseudoaneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Avula, SK

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inferior epigastric artery (IEA) pseudoaneurysms are recognised complications of abdominal wall procedures, and a variety of approaches including surgical excision and ligation, percutaneous procedures and conservative management have been employed in treating this rare complication. Methods We describe a case of an IEA pseudoaneurysm diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) angiography, 14 days following a laparoscopic assisted low anterior resection, which was managed successfully with surgical excision and ligation. A review of the literature identified 32 reports of this complication since 1973 with 69% of cases occurring since 2000. Findings The main aetiology of IEA pseudoaneurysm was abdominal surgery (n=20); 65% of cases were attributable to abdominal wound closure or laparoscopic surgery. Two-thirds (66%) of patients presented between 11 and 63 days, and all except 1 case presented with discomfort, abdominal mass or haemodynamic instability. Colour Doppler ultrasonography was the imaging modality of choice (n=18), either alone or in combination with computed tomography and/or angiography. Surgical ligation and excision and percutaneous coil embolisation formed the mainstay of attempted treatments (69%), particularly following treatment failure using an alternative technique. Conclusions The incidence of iatrogenic IEA pseudoaneurysms appears to be increasing. Awareness of this rare complication is of clinical importance to avoid excessive morbidity for affected individuals. PMID:26263930

  6. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  7. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  8. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  9. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  10. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  11. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  12. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  13. Replenishment of magma chambers by light inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Whitehead, John A.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    1986-05-01

    Magma chambers, particularly those of basaltic composition, are often replenished by an influx of magma whose density is less than that of the resident magma. This paper describes the fundamental fluid mechanics involved in the replenishment by light inputs. If ρ denotes the uniform density of the resident magma and ρ — Δρ that of the input, the situation is described by the reduced gravity g' = gΔρ/ρ, the volume flux Q, and the viscosities of the resident and input magmas νe and νi, respectively. The (nondimensional) Reynolds numbers, Ree = (g'Q3)1/5/νe and Rei = (g'Q3)1/5/νi and chamber geometry then completely specify the system. For sufficiently low values of the two Reynolds numbers (each less than approximately 10), the input rises as a laminar conduit. For larger values of the Reynolds numbers, the conduit may break down and exhibit either a varicose or a meander instability and entrain some resident magma. At still larger Reynolds numbers, the flow will become quite unsteady and finally turbulent. The values of the Reynolds numbers at which these transitions occur have been documented by a series of experiments with water, glycerine, and corn syrup. If the input rises as a turbulent plume, significant entrainment of the resident magma can take place. The final spatial distribution of the mixed magma depends on the geometry of the chamber. If the chamber is much wider than it is high, the mixed magma forms a compositionally stratified region between the roof and a sharp front above uncontaminated magma. In the other geometrical extreme, the input magma is mixed with almost all of the resident magma. If the density of the resident magma is already stratified, the input plume may penetrate only part way into the chamber, even though its initial density is less than that of the lowest density resident magma. The plume will then intrude horizontally and form a hybrid layer at an intermediate depth. This provides a mechanism for preventing even

  14. An update of input instructions to TEMOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The theory and operation of a FORTRAN 4 computer code, designated as TEMOD, used to calcuate tubular thermoelectric generator performance is described in WANL-TME-1906. The original version of TEMOD was developed in 1969. A description is given of additions to the mathematical model and an update of the input instructions to the code. Although the basic mathematical model described in WANL-TME-1906 has remained unchanged, a substantial number of input/output options were added to allow completion of module performance parametrics as required in support of the compact thermoelectric converter system technology program.

  15. Input/Output Subroutine Library Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Efficient, easy-to-use program moved easily to different computers. Purpose of NAVIO, Input/Output Subroutine Library, provides input/output package of software for FORTRAN programs that is portable, efficient, and easy to use. Implemented as hierarchy of libraries. At bottom is very small library containing only non-portable routines called "I/O Kernel." Design makes NAVIO easy to move from one computer to another, by simply changing kernel. NAVIO appropriate for software system of almost any size wherein different programs communicate through files.

  16. Tube-Load Model Parameter Estimation for Monitoring Arterial Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guanqun; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2011-01-01

    A useful model of the arterial system is the uniform, lossless tube with parametric load. This tube-load model is able to account for wave propagation and reflection (unlike lumped-parameter models such as the Windkessel) while being defined by only a few parameters (unlike comprehensive distributed-parameter models). As a result, the parameters may be readily estimated by accurate fitting of the model to available arterial pressure and flow waveforms so as to permit improved monitoring of arterial hemodynamics. In this paper, we review tube-load model parameter estimation techniques that have appeared in the literature for monitoring wave reflection, large artery compliance, pulse transit time, and central aortic pressure. We begin by motivating the use of the tube-load model for parameter estimation. We then describe the tube-load model, its assumptions and validity, and approaches for estimating its parameters. We next summarize the various techniques and their experimental results while highlighting their advantages over conventional techniques. We conclude the review by suggesting future research directions and describing potential applications. PMID:22053157

  17. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  18. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  19. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  20. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  1. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  2. Coronary Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Coronary Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... exercise routine produced a strong heart!" Fast Facts Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood ...

  3. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / ... narrows or blocks these arteries—a condition called coronary artery disease (CAD) or coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs. A ...

  4. Improving Quality by Maintaining Accurate Problems in the EHR

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-02

    Asthma; Atrial Fibrillation; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Coronary Artery Disease; Congestive Heart Failure; Hyperlipidemia; Hypertension; Myocardial Infarction; Sickle Cell Disease; Sleep Apnea; Smoking; Stroke; Tuberculosis

  5. Field measurement of moisture-buffering model inputs for residential buildings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woods, Jason; Winkler, Jon

    2016-02-05

    Moisture adsorption and desorption in building materials impact indoor humidity. This effect should be included in building-energy simulations, particularly when humidity is being investigated or controlled. Several models can calculate this moisture-buffering effect, but accurate ones require model inputs that are not always known to the user of the building-energy simulation. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model. The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative-humidity profile, measure all of the moisture-transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air-conditioner condensate), and calculate the onlymore » unmeasured term—the moisture sorption into the materials. We validated this method with laboratory measurements, which we used to measure the EMPD model inputs of two houses. After deriving these inputs, we measured the humidity of the same houses during tests with realistic latent and sensible loads and demonstrated the accuracy of this approach. Furthermore, these results show that the EMPD model, when given reasonable inputs, is an accurate moisture-buffering model.« less

  6. Deep circumflex iliac artery as a free arterial graft for myocardial revascularization.

    PubMed

    Yaginuma, G; Sakurai, M; Meguro, T; Ota, K; Abe, K

    2000-02-01

    When complete revascularization cannot be obtained with the internal thoracic artery and the other arterial grafts, the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) may be an excellent alternative conduit. The deep circumflex iliac artery was used as a free graft for direct myocardial revascularization in 4 patients from January to July 1999. We describe our experience with this arterial conduit, review the anatomy of the artery, and present our harvesting technique. PMID:10735725

  7. Input Shaping enhanced Active Disturbance Rejection Control for a twin rotor multi-input multi-output system (TRMS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Jianwei; Lao, Dazhong; Li, Donghai; Chen, Junhui

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a composite control based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) and Input Shaping is presented for TRMS with two degrees of freedom (DOF). The control tasks consist of accurately tracking desired trajectories and obtaining disturbance rejection in both horizontal and vertical planes. Due to un-measurable states as well as uncertainties stemming from modeling uncertainty and unknown disturbance torques, ADRC is employed, and feed-forward Input Shaping is used to improve the dynamical response. In the proposed approach, because the coupling effects are maintained in controller derivation, there is no requirement to decouple the TRMS into horizontal and vertical subsystems, which is usually performed in the literature. Finally, the proposed method is implemented on the TRMS platform, and the results are compared with those of PID and ADRC in a similar structure. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The operation of the controller allows for an excellent set-point tracking behavior and disturbance rejection with system nonlinearity and complex coupling conditions. PMID:26922492

  8. Instrumentation for measuring energy inputs to implements

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, F.D.; Wilhelm, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    A microcomputer-based instrumentation system for monitoring tractor operating parameters and energy inputs to implements was developed and mounted on a 75-power-takeoff-KW tractor. The instrumentation system, including sensors and data handling equipment, is discussed. 10 refs.

  9. Selecting training inputs via greedy rank covering

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, A.L.; Santen, J.P.H. van

    1996-12-31

    We present a general method for selecting a small set of training inputs, the observations of which will suffice to estimate the parameters of a given linear model. We exemplify the algorithm in terms of predicting segmental duration of phonetic-segment feature vectors in a text-to-speech synthesizer, but the algorithm will work for any linear model and its associated domain.

  10. Multichannel analyzers at high rates of input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, S. J.; Strauss, M. G.

    1969-01-01

    Multichannel analyzer, used with a gating system incorporating pole-zero compensation, pile-up rejection, and baseline-restoration, achieves good resolution at high rates of input. It improves resolution, reduces tailing and rate-contributed continuum, and eliminates spectral shift.

  11. Adaptive Random Testing with Combinatorial Input Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Random testing (RT) is a fundamental testing technique to assess software reliability, by simply selecting test cases in a random manner from the whole input domain. As an enhancement of RT, adaptive random testing (ART) has better failure-detection capability and has been widely applied in different scenarios, such as numerical programs, some object-oriented programs, and mobile applications. However, not much work has been done on the effectiveness of ART for the programs with combinatorial input domain (i.e., the set of categorical data). To extend the ideas to the testing for combinatorial input domain, we have adopted different similarity measures that are widely used for categorical data in data mining and have proposed two similarity measures based on interaction coverage. Then, we propose a new version named ART-CID as an extension of ART in combinatorial input domain, which selects an element from categorical data as the next test case such that it has the lowest similarity against already generated test cases. Experimental results show that ART-CID generally performs better than RT, with respect to different evaluation metrics. PMID:24772036

  12. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon (C) input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon ...

  13. Multiple Input Microcantilever Sensor with Capacitive Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L., Jr.; Brown, G.M.; Bryan, W.L.; Clonts, L.G.; DePriest, J.C.; Emergy, M.S.; Ericson, M.N.; Hu, Z.; Jones, R.L.; Moore, M.R.; Oden, P.I.; Rochelle, J.M.; Smith, S.F.; Threatt, T.D.; Thundat, T.; Turner, G.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Wintenberg, A.L.

    1999-03-11

    A surface-micromachined MEMS process has been used to demonstrate multiple-input chemical sensing using selectively coated cantilever arrays. Combined hydrogen and mercury-vapor detection was achieved with a palm-sized, self-powered module with spread-spectrum telemetry reporting.

  14. Input-Based Incremental Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcroft, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This fascinating presentation of current research undoes numerous myths about how we most effectively learn new words in a second language. In clear, reader-friendly text, the author details the successful approach of IBI vocabulary instruction, which emphasizes the presentation of target vocabulary as input early on and the incremental (gradual)…

  15. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon sequ...

  16. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain.

  17. DO MODEL UNCERTAINTY WITH CORRELATED INPUTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of correlation among the input parameters and variables on the output uncertainty of the Streeter-Phelps water quality model is examined. hree uncertainty analysis techniques are used: sensitivity analysis, first-order error analysis, and Monte Carlo simulation. odifie...

  18. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...

  19. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...

  20. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...

  1. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS-GENERAL...

  2. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain. PMID:26565270

  3. Numerical simulation of LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    None, Shivanand; Jamal, Nafis; Yoshida, Sanichiro

    2005-11-01

    Numerical analysis has been carried out to understand the performance of the Input Optics used in the first generation of LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) detector. The input optics is a subsystem consisting of a mode cleaner and mode-matching telescope, where all the optics are suspended and installed in vacuum. Using the end-to-end package (LIGO programming language), computer codes have been made to simulate the input optics. Giving realistic seismic noise to the suspension point of the optics and using the length sensing/alignment sensing control for the mode cleaner, the performance of the input optics has been simulated under various scenarios such as with an order of magnitude higher seismic noise than the normal level, and with/without the alignment sensing control feedback from the arm cavity to the mode-matching telescope. The results are assessed in terms of the beam pointing fluctuation of the laser beam going into the arm cavities, and its influence on the optical coupling to the arm cavities and the noise level at the gravitational wave port signal.

  4. Treatments of Precipitation Inputs to Hydrologic Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrological models are used to assess many water resources problems from agricultural use and water quality to engineering issues. The success of these models are dependent on correct parameterization; the most sensitive being the rainfall input time series. These records can come from land-based ...

  5. Input, Interaction and Output: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan; Mackey, Alison

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of what has come to be known as the "Interaction Hypothesis," the basic tenet of which is that through input and interaction with interlocutors, language learners have opportunities to notice differences between their own formulations of the target language and the language of their conversational…

  6. Physiologic control algorithms for rotary blood pumps using pressure sensor input.

    PubMed

    Bullister, Edward; Reich, Sanford; Sluetz, James

    2002-11-01

    Hierarchical algorithms have been developed for enhanced physiologic control and monitoring of blood pumps using pressure inputs. Pressures were measured at pump inlet and outlet using APEX pressure sensors (APSs). The APS is a patented, long-term implantable, flow-through blood pressure sensor and designed to control implantable heart pumps. The algorithms have been tested using a Donavan circulatory mock-loop setup, a generic rotary pump, and LabVIEW software. The hierarchical algorithms control pump speed using pump inlet pressure as a primary independent variable and pump outlet pressure as a secondary dependent variable. Hierarchical control algorithms based on feedback from pressure sensors can control the speed of the pump to stably maintain ventricular filling pressures and arterial pressures. Monitoring algorithms based on pressure inputs are able to approximate flow rate and hydraulic power for the pump and the left ventricle. PMID:12406146

  7. Patient-Specific Computational Models of Coronary Arteries Using Monoplane X-Ray Angiograms

    PubMed Central

    Zifan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease in western countries. Early detection and diagnosis of CAD is quintessential to preventing mortality and subsequent complications. We believe hemodynamic data derived from patient-specific computational models could facilitate more accurate prediction of the risk of atherosclerosis. We introduce a semiautomated method to build 3D patient-specific coronary vessel models from 2D monoplane angiogram images. The main contribution of the method is a robust segmentation approach using dynamic programming combined with iterative 3D reconstruction to build 3D mesh models of the coronary vessels. Results indicate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed pipeline. In conclusion, patient-specific modelling of coronary vessels is of vital importance for developing accurate computational flow models and studying the hemodynamic effects of the presence of plaques on the arterial walls, resulting in lumen stenoses, as well as variations in the angulations of the coronary arteries. PMID:27403203

  8. Arterial air embolism

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Rowan

    1967-01-01

    The incidence and the outcome of systemic air embolism in 340 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass in this unit for congenital defects of the cardiac septa and diseases involving the aortic and mitral valves have been studied. This was thought to have occurred in 40 patients, of whom 10 died. The distribution of air embolism according to the types of operation undertaken was as follows: six of 127 for atrial septal defect; six of 36 for ventricular septal defect; seven of 42 for mitral valve replacement; seven of 47 for aortic valve débridement; and 14 of 55 for aortic valve replacement. The cause was considered to have been systolic ejection of air into the aorta which, following cardiotomy, had been trapped in the pulmonary veins, the left atrium, the ventricular trabeculae, and the aortic root. Since the adoption of a more rigid `debubbling' routine, air embolism has not occurred. The incidence of pulmonary complications occurring in these patients after bypass was studied. Unilateral atelectasis, which occurred in five patients, resulted from retained bronchial secretions in all and was cured by bronchoscopic aspiration in all. The cause of bilateral atelectases, occurring in nine patients and fatal in eight of these, appeared to be related to cardiopulmonary factors and not to air embolism. Acute air injection made into the pulmonary artery of a dog resulted in pulmonary hypertension and a grossly deficient pulmonary circulation, but changes were largely resolved within a week. In view of this, it is considered that pulmonary air embolism may temporarily embarrass the right heart after the repair of a ventricular septal defect in a patient with an elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and diminished pulmonary vascular bed. Images PMID:6035795

  9. Application of multiple input random and polyreference analysis techniques to the Galileo spacecraft modal test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Hunt, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental modal analysis of the Galileo spacecraft was required to verify a finite element model used in loads analysis. Multiple input random and polyreference analysis techniques were applied in this program to demonstrate their effectiveness in determining the modal characteristics of a complex space structure. The methods were successful in determining an accurate set of modal data from two days of data acquisition. A complete set of results was available within 24 hours of test completion. Final analysis shows the modes from the multiple input random tests to be more complete and orthogonal than those obtained from classical sine dwell methods.

  10. Proposition of an outflow boundary approach for carotid artery stenosis CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Furusawa, Toyoki; Sia, Sheau Fung; Umezu, Mitsuo; Qian, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose an innovative approach of setting outlet boundary conditions for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of human common carotid arteries (CCAs) bifurcation based on the concept of energy loss minimisation at flow bifurcation. Comparisons between this new approach and previously reported boundary conditions were also made. The results showed that CFD simulation based on the proposed boundary conditions gave an accurate prediction of the critical stenosis ratio of carotid arteries (at around 65%). Other boundary conditions, such as the constant external pressure (P = 0) and constant outflow ratio, either overestimated or underestimated the critical stenosis ratio of carotid arteries. The patient-specific simulation results furthermore indicated that the calculated internal carotid artery flow ratio at CCA bifurcation (61%) coincided with the result obtained by clinical measurements through the use of Colour Doppler ultrasound. PMID:22288780

  11. [Optical coherence tomography of coronary arteries--a novel intravascular imaging modality].

    PubMed

    Mrevlje, B; Legutko, J; Jąkała, J; Noč, M; Dudek, D; Birkemeyer, R; Aboukoura, M; Nienaber, C

    2014-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the latest intravascular imaging modality for the investigation of coronary arteries. It can be used in patients with stable coronary artery disease as well as in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Its almost microscope-like resolution of 10-20 μm (10-times greater than intravascular ultrasound) gives us the most detailed insight into the coronary artery wall in vivo so far.Optical coherence tomography can be used for accurate qualitative and quantitative assessment of stenoses in stable coronary artery disease and accurate guidance of percutaneous coronary interventions as well as accurate postprocedural control. In patients with acute coronary syndrome it can be used for the detection of culprit of the culprit lesion (vulnerable plaque) which allows the operator to cover not only angiographically tightest stenosis (angiographic culprit lesion, caused in most cases by thrombus only) but most importantly the vulnerable plaque, which led to the acute event, as well. Furthermore, optical coherence tomography allows accurate assessment of thrombotic burden, stent apposition/malapposition, edge dissections and tissue prolaps or thrombus protrusions throught stent struts, etc. PMID:25225864

  12. Infective Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Caused by Campylobacter fetus.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Ogawa, Hiroko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Hasegawa, Kou; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Otsuka, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old man with a persistent high fever was diagnosed to have an infective aneurysm in his left internal iliac artery. A blood culture detected a gram-negative spiral rod that was first identified as Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis based on a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. However, the strain was finally confirmed to be Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus based on a genetic analysis. The infection was successfully treated with emergency resection of the aneurysm, followed by 4 weeks of antibiotic therapy. Involvement of the peripheral artery is uncommon in cases of C. fetus-infective aneurysm. To figure out the epidemiology and pathogenicity of C. fetus infection, the accurate identification of the responsible organisms is essential. PMID:26278295

  13. MODEL VALIDATION FOR A NONINVASIVE ARTERIAL STENOSIS DETECTION PROBLEM

    PubMed Central

    BANKS, H. THOMAS; HU, SHUHUA; KENZ, ZACKARY R.; KRUSE, CAROLA; SHAW, SIMON; WHITEMAN, JOHN; BREWIN, MARK P.; GREENWALD, STEPHEN E.; BIRCH, MALCOLM J.

    2014-01-01

    A current thrust in medical research is the development of a non-invasive method for detection, localization, and characterization of an arterial stenosis (a blockage or partial blockage in an artery). A method has been proposed to detect shear waves in the chest cavity which have been generated by disturbances in the blood flow resulting from a stenosis. In order to develop this methodology further, we use one-dimensional shear wave experimental data from novel acoustic phantoms to validate a corresponding viscoelastic mathematical model. We estimate model parameters which give a good fit (in a sense to be precisely defined) to the experimental data, and use asymptotic error theory to provide confidence intervals for parameter estimates. Finally, since a robust error model is necessary for accurate parameter estimates and confidence analysis, we include a comparison of absolute and relative models for measurement error. PMID:24506547

  14. Simultaneous identification of elastic properties, thickness, and diameter of arteries excited with ultrasound radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Parikshit; Urban, Matthew W.; Le Maître, Olivier P.; Greenleaf, James F.; Aquino, Wilkins

    2015-07-01

    The elastic and geometric properties of arteries have been long recognized as important predictors of cardiovascular disease. This work presents a robust technique for the noninvasive characterization of anisotropic elastic properties as well as thickness and diameter in arterial vessels. In our approach, guided waves are excited along arteries using the radiation force of ultrasound. Group velocity is used as the quantity of interest to reconstruct elastic and geometric features of the vessels. One of the main contributions of this work is a systematic approach based on sparse-grid collocation interpolation to construct surrogate models of arteries. These surrogate models are in turn used with direct-search optimization techniques to produce fast and accurate estimates of elastic properties, diameter, and thickness. One of the attractive features of the proposed approach is that once a surrogate model is built, it can be used for near real-time identification across many different types of arteries. We demonstrate the feasibility of the method using simulated and in vitro laboratory experiments on a silicon rubber tube and a porcine carotid artery. Our results show that using our proposed method, we can reliably identify the longitudinal modulus, thickness, and diameter of arteries. The circumferential modulus was found to have little influence in the group velocity, which renders the former quantity unidentifiable using the current experimental setting. Future work will consider the measurement of circumferential waves with the objective of improving the identifiability of the circumferential modulus.

  15. Simultaneous identification of elastic properties, thickness, and diameter of arteries excited with ultrasound radiation force.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Parikshit; Urban, Matthew W; Le Maître, Olivier P; Greenleaf, James F; Aquino, Wilkins

    2015-07-01

    The elastic and geometric properties of arteries have been long recognized as important predictors of cardiovascular disease. This work presents a robust technique for the noninvasive characterization of anisotropic elastic properties as well as thickness and diameter in arterial vessels. In our approach, guided waves are excited along arteries using the radiation force of ultrasound. Group velocity is used as the quantity of interest to reconstruct elastic and geometric features of the vessels. One of the main contributions of this work is a systematic approach based on sparse-grid collocation interpolation to construct surrogate models of arteries. These surrogate models are in turn used with direct-search optimization techniques to produce fast and accurate estimates of elastic properties, diameter, and thickness. One of the attractive features of the proposed approach is that once a surrogate model is built, it can be used for near real-time identification across many different types of arteries. We demonstrate the feasibility of the method using simulated and in vitro laboratory experiments on a silicon rubber tube and a porcine carotid artery. Our results show that using our proposed method, we can reliably identify the longitudinal modulus, thickness, and diameter of arteries. The circumferential modulus was found to have little influence in the group velocity, which renders the former quantity unidentifiable using the current experimental setting. Future work will consider the measurement of circumferential waves with the objective of improving the identifiability of the circumferential modulus. PMID:26109582

  16. Feasibility of using vessel-detection software for the endovascular treatment of visceral arterial bleeding.

    PubMed

    Iwazawa, Jin; Ohueo, Shoichi; Hashimoto, Naoko; Mitani, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the feasibility of using vessel-detection software to identify damaged arteries during endovascular embolization in five patients with visceral arterial hemorrhages. We used a software program originally developed to detect tumor feeder vessels in liver tumor embolization with C-arm computed tomography datasets to detect the vessels responsible for the arterial hemorrhages in patients with splenic artery pseudoaneurysms (n=2), lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n=2), and bladder tumor bleeding (n=1). In all cases, the injured vessel was identified accurately on a three-dimensional vascular map at the optimal working angle with a relatively short mean processing time of 118 s (range, 107-136 s). The operating angiographers used this information to direct the catheter into the damaged artery without sequential angiographic runs. The software analysis was also used to plan coil delivery to the most appropriate site in the injured artery. The results suggest that the vessel-detection software for liver tumor embolization can also be used to detect damaged vessels and to plan treatment strategies in endovascular embolization of visceral arterial hemorrhage. PMID:24356295

  17. Simultaneous identification of elastic properties, thickness, and diameter of arteries excited with ultrasound radiation force

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Parikshit; Urban, Matthew W.; Le Maître, Olivier P.; Greenleaf, James F.; Aquino, Wilkins

    2015-01-01

    The elastic and geometric properties of arteries have been long recognized as important predictors of cardiovascular disease. This work presents a robust technique for the noninvasive characterization of anisotropic elastic properties as well as thickness and diameter in arterial vessels. In our approach, guided waves are excited along arteries using the radiation force of ultrasound. Group velocity is used as the quantity of interest to reconstruct elastic and geometric features of the vessels. One of the main contributions of this work is a systematic approach based on sparse-grid collocation interpolation to construct surrogate models of arteries. These surrogate models are in turn used with direct-search optimization techniques to produce fast and accurate estimates of elastic properties, diameter, and thickness. One of the attractive features of the proposed approach is that once a surrogate model is built, it can be used for near real-time identification across many different types of arteries. We demonstrate the feasibility of the method using simulated and in vitro laboratory experiments on a silicon rubber tube and a porcine carotid artery. Our results show that using our proposed method, we can reliably identify the longitudinal modulus, thickness, and diameter of arteries. The circumferential modulus was found to have little influence in the group velocity, which renders the former quantity unidentifiable using the current experimental setting. Future work will consider the measurement of circumferential waves with the objective of improving the identifiability of the circumferential modulus. PMID:26109582

  18. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  19. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  20. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  1. Relation between respiratory variations in pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform amplitude and arterial pulse pressure in ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Cannesson, Maxime; Besnard, Cyril; Durand, Pierre G; Bohé, Julien; Jacques, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure is a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with circulatory failure. The main limitation of this method is that it requires an invasive arterial catheter. Both arterial and pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveforms depend on stroke volume. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the relationship between respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure and respiratory variation in pulse oximetry plethysmographic (POP) waveform amplitude. Method This prospective clinical investigation was conducted in 22 mechanically ventilated patients. Respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure and respiratory variation in POP waveform amplitude were recorded simultaneously in a beat-to-beat evaluation, and were compared using a Spearman correlation test and a Bland–Altman analysis. Results There was a strong correlation (r2 = 0.83; P < 0.001) and a good agreement (bias = 0.8 ± 3.5%) between respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure and respiratory variation in POP waveform amplitude. A respiratory variation in POP waveform amplitude value above 15% allowed discrimination between patients with respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure above 13% and those with variation of 13% or less (positive predictive value 100%). Conclusion Respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure above 13% can be accurately predicted by a respiratory variation in POP waveform amplitude above 15%. This index has potential applications in patients who are not instrumented with an intra-arterial catheter. PMID:16277719

  2. Blood pressure measurement for accurate assessment of patient status in emergency medical settings.

    PubMed

    Convertino, Victor A

    2012-06-01

    Obtaining blood pressure measurements with traditional sphygomanometry that are insensitive and nonspecific can fail to provide an accurate assessment of patient status, particularly in specific clinical scenarios of acute reduction in central blood volume such as hemorrhage or orthostatic testing. This paper provides a review of newly emerging monitoring technologies that are being developed and integrated to improve patient diagnosis by using collection and feature extraction in real time of arterial waveforms by machine-learning algorithms. With assessment of continuous, noninvasively measured arterial waveforms, machine-learning algorithms have been developed with the capability to predict cardiovascular collapse with > 96% accuracy and a correlation of 0.89 between the time of predicted and actual cardiovascular collapse (e.g., shock, syncope) using a human model of progressive central hypovolemia. The resulting capability to obtain earlier predictions of imminent hemodynamic instability has significant implications for effective countermeasure applications by the aeromedical community. The ability to obtain real-time, continuous information about changes in features and patterns of arterial waveforms in addition to standard blood pressure provides for the first time the capability to assess the status of circulatory blood volume of the patient and can be used to diagnose progression toward development of syncope or overt shock, or guide fluid resuscitation. PMID:22764618

  3. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  4. Are Kohn-Sham conductances accurate?

    PubMed

    Mera, H; Niquet, Y M

    2010-11-19

    We use Fermi-liquid relations to address the accuracy of conductances calculated from the single-particle states of exact Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory. We demonstrate a systematic failure of this procedure for the calculation of the conductance, and show how it originates from the lack of renormalization in the KS spectral function. In certain limits this failure can lead to a large overestimation of the true conductance. We also show, however, that the KS conductances can be accurate for single-channel molecular junctions and systems where direct Coulomb interactions are strongly dominant. PMID:21231333

  5. Accurate density functional thermochemistry for larger molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-06-20

    Density functional methods are combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. Seven different density functionals are assessed for the evaluation of heats of formation, Delta H 0 (298 K), for a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O and N. The use of bond separation energies results in a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of all the density functionals. The B3-LYP functional has the smallest mean absolute deviation from experiment (1.5 kcal mol/f).

  6. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  7. A hemodynamics model to study the collective behavior of the ventricular-arterial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin Wang, Yuh-Ying; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2013-01-01

    Applying principles from complex systems to study the efficacy of integrative therapies has become a new interest in medical research. We aimed to construct a concise model for the ventricular-arterial (VA) system and to provide a systematic method for exploring its overall behavior. The transportation of blood from the heart to the peripheral arterioles via hydraulic pressure forces was described by a multi-rank model. Parts of the VA system that have strong mutual interactions were combined into a single sub system. Sub systems of four different ranks were characterized. We then applied the multi-rank model to analyze the aortic pressure wave generated by the periodic ventricular blood ejection, the renal pressure in response to the input from the VA system, and the blood flowing from the renal artery to its arterioles. Maintaining the pressure distribution along the main arteries and in all of the organs with the lowest possible ventricular input turned out to be the first principle for the operation of an efficient VA system. By this principle, we pointed out the benefit of some arterial structures in mammals, derived specific regulation rules and deduced some fundamental concepts for healing. The justification of the biomechanics in our model that differed greatly from those in the prevailing models was given. We concluded that the oscillatory motion and the pressure pulse of the arterial system can be analyzed as steady states with resonance behaviors and suggested utilizing this model to construct integrative therapies for diseases correlated with abnormality in blood circulation.

  8. Engineering of arteries in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Angela H; Niklason, Laura E

    2014-06-01

    This review will focus on two elements that are essential for functional arterial regeneration in vitro: the mechanical environment and the bioreactors used for tissue growth. The importance of the mechanical environment to embryological development, vascular functionality, and vascular graft regeneration will be discussed. Bioreactors generate mechanical stimuli to simulate biomechanical environment of arterial system. This system has been used to reconstruct arterial grafts with appropriate mechanical strength for implantation by controlling the chemical and mechanical environments in which the grafts are grown. Bioreactors are powerful tools to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on extracellular matrix architecture and mechanical properties of engineered vessels. Hence, biomimetic systems enable us to optimize chemo-biomechanical culture conditions to regenerate engineered vessels with physiological properties similar to those of native arteries. In addition, this article reviews various bioreactors designed especially to apply axial loading to engineered arteries. This review will also introduce and examine different approaches and techniques that have been used to engineer biologically based vascular grafts, including collagen-based grafts, fibrin-gel grafts, cell sheet engineering, biodegradable polymers, and decellularization of native vessels. PMID:24399290

  9. Coronary Artery Imaging with Transthoracic Doppler Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaaki; Nakazono, Akemi

    2016-07-01

    Coronary artery imaging with transthoracic Doppler echocardiography is a simple and useful technique to diagnose significant coronary artery stenosis. The visualization of mosaic flow in the proximal left coronary artery provides a direct indication of the presence of significant stenosis at the corresponding site during routine echocardiography. Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) has a high diagnostic accuracy and feasibility in detecting the presence of functionally significant coronary stenosis in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and in the right coronary artery. The measurement of CFVR in the LAD also provides prognostic information in patients with intermediate coronary stenosis. This review summarizes the utility of transthoracic coronary artery imaging. PMID:27216843

  10. Anomalous Origin of the Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery: The Role of Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT).

    PubMed

    Al Umairi, Rashid Saif; Al Kindi, Faiza; Al Busaidi, Fadhila

    2016-09-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a rare congenital coronary abnormality also known as Bland-White-Garland syndrome. The incidence of ALCAPA is about 1 in every 300,000 live births, and constitutes 0.24% and 0.46% of all congenital cardiac disease. It has a high infant mortality rate reaching up to 90% if left untreated. For many years, the diagnosis of ALCAPA was by angiography or autopsy. However, multislice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive imaging tool that allows accurate, non-invasive diagnosis of ALCAPA. Here we report a case of ALCAPA in a six-month-old girl who presented with a two-week history of cough, fever, tachypnea, and sweating during feeding. During admission, an echocardiogram was performed that revealed ALCAPA, which was confirmed using CT. We discuss the role of MSCT in its diagnosis. PMID:27602196

  11. Anomalous Origin of the Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery: The Role of Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT)

    PubMed Central

    Al Umairi, Rashid Saif; Al Kindi, Faiza; Al Busaidi, Fadhila

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a rare congenital coronary abnormality also known as Bland-White-Garland syndrome. The incidence of ALCAPA is about 1 in every 300,000 live births, and constitutes 0.24% and 0.46% of all congenital cardiac disease. It has a high infant mortality rate reaching up to 90% if left untreated. For many years, the diagnosis of ALCAPA was by angiography or autopsy. However, multislice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive imaging tool that allows accurate, non-invasive diagnosis of ALCAPA. Here we report a case of ALCAPA in a six-month-old girl who presented with a two-week history of cough, fever, tachypnea, and sweating during feeding. During admission, an echocardiogram was performed that revealed ALCAPA, which was confirmed using CT. We discuss the role of MSCT in its diagnosis. PMID:27602196

  12. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  13. Accurate radiative transfer calculations for layered media.

    PubMed

    Selden, Adrian C

    2016-07-01

    Simple yet accurate results for radiative transfer in layered media with discontinuous refractive index are obtained by the method of K-integrals. These are certain weighted integrals applied to the angular intensity distribution at the refracting boundaries. The radiative intensity is expressed as the sum of the asymptotic angular intensity distribution valid in the depth of the scattering medium and a transient term valid near the boundary. Integrated boundary equations are obtained, yielding simple linear equations for the intensity coefficients, enabling the angular emission intensity and the diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of the scattering layer to be calculated without solving the radiative transfer equation directly. Examples are given of half-space, slab, interface, and double-layer calculations, and extensions to multilayer systems are indicated. The K-integral method is orders of magnitude more accurate than diffusion theory and can be applied to layered scattering media with a wide range of scattering albedos, with potential applications to biomedical and ocean optics. PMID:27409700

  14. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  15. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  16. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  17. Development of optoelectronic monitoring system for ear arterial pressure waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasayama, Satoshi; Imachi, Yu; Yagi, Tamotsu; Imachi, Kou; Ono, Toshirou; Man-i, Masando

    1994-02-01

    Invasive intra-arterial blood pressure measurement is the most accurate method but not practical if the subject is in motion. The apparatus developed by Wesseling et al., based on a volume-clamp method of Penaz (Finapres), is able to monitor continuous finger arterial pressure waveforms noninvasively. The limitation of Finapres is the difficulty in measuring the pressure of a subject during work that involves finger or arm action. Because the Finapres detector is attached to subject's finger, the measurements are affected by inertia of blood and hydrostatic effect cause by arm or finger motion. To overcome this problem, the authors made a detector that is attached to subject's ear and developed and optoelectronic monitoring systems for ear arterial pressure waveform (Earpres). An IR LEDs, photodiode, and air cuff comprised the detector. The detector was attached to a subject's ear, and the space adjusted between the air cuff and the rubber plate on which the LED and photodiode were positioned. To evaluate the accuracy of Earpres, the following tests were conducted with participation of 10 healthy male volunteers. The subjects rested for about five minutes, then performed standing and squatting exercises to provide wide ranges of systolic and diastolic arterial pressure. Intra- and inter-individual standard errors were calculated according to the method of van Egmond et al. As a result, average, the averages of intra-individual standard errors for earpres appeared small (3.7 and 2.7 mmHg for systolic and diastolic pressure respectively). The inter-individual standard errors for Earpres were about the same was Finapres for both systolic and diastolic pressure. The results showed the ear monitor was reliable in measuring arterial blood pressure waveforms and might be applicable to various fields such as sports medicine and ergonomics.

  18. Acute Atherosis of the Uterine Spiral Arteries: Clinicopathologic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo-Yeon; Kim, Yeon Mee

    2015-01-01

    Acute atherosis is unique vascular changes of the placenta associated with poor placentation. It is characterized by subendothelial lipid-filled foam cells, fibrinoid necrosis of the arterial wall, perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, and it is histologically similar to early-stage atherosclerosis. Acute atherosis is rare in normal pregnancies, but is frequently observed in non- transformed spiral arteries in abnormal pregnancies, such as preeclampsia, small for gestational age (SGA), fetal death, spontaneous preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes. In preeclampsia, spiral arteries fail to develop physiologic transformation and retain thick walls and a narrow lumen. Failure of physiologic transformation of spiral arteries is believed to be the main cause of uteroplacental ischemia, which can lead to the production of anti-angiogenic factors and induce endothelial dysfunction and eventually predispose the pregnancy to preeclampsia. Acute atherosis is more frequently observed in the spiral arteries of the decidua of the placenta (parietalis or basalis) than in the decidual or myometrial segments of the placental bed. The presence and deeper location of acute atherosis is associated with poorer pregnancy outcomes, more severe disease, earlier onset of preeclampsia, and a greater frequency of SGA neonates in patients with preeclampsia. Moreover, the idea that the presence of acute atherosis in the placenta may increase the risk of future cardiovascular disease in women with a history of preeclampsia is of growing concern. Therefore, placental examination is crucial for retrospective investigation of pregnancy complications and outcomes, and accurate placental pathology based on universal diagnostic criteria in patients with abnormal pregnancies is essential for clinicopathologic correlation. PMID:26530045

  19. An Integrative Method for Accurate Comparative Genome Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Swidan, Firas; Rocha, Eduardo P. C; Shmoish, Michael; Pinter, Ron Y

    2006-01-01

    We present MAGIC, an integrative and accurate method for comparative genome mapping. Our method consists of two phases: preprocessing for identifying “maximal similar segments,” and mapping for clustering and classifying these segments. MAGIC's main novelty lies in its biologically intuitive clustering approach, which aims towards both calculating reorder-free segments and identifying orthologous segments. In the process, MAGIC efficiently handles ambiguities resulting from duplications that occurred before the speciation of the considered organisms from their most recent common ancestor. We demonstrate both MAGIC's robustness and scalability: the former is asserted with respect to its initial input and with respect to its parameters' values. The latter is asserted by applying MAGIC to distantly related organisms and to large genomes. We compare MAGIC to other comparative mapping methods and provide detailed analysis of the differences between them. Our improvements allow a comprehensive study of the diversity of genetic repertoires resulting from large-scale mutations, such as indels and duplications, including explicitly transposable and phagic elements. The strength of our method is demonstrated by detailed statistics computed for each type of these large-scale mutations. MAGIC enabled us to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the different forces shaping prokaryotic genomes from different clades, and to quantify the importance of novel gene content introduced by horizontal gene transfer relative to gene duplication in bacterial genome evolution. We use these results to investigate the breakpoint distribution in several prokaryotic genomes. PMID:16933978

  20. Extremely accurate sequential verification of RELAP5-3D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mesina, George L.; Aumiller, David L.; Buschman, Francis X.

    2015-11-19

    Large computer programs like RELAP5-3D solve complex systems of governing, closure and special process equations to model the underlying physics of nuclear power plants. Further, these programs incorporate many other features for physics, input, output, data management, user-interaction, and post-processing. For software quality assurance, the code must be verified and validated before being released to users. For RELAP5-3D, verification and validation are restricted to nuclear power plant applications. Verification means ensuring that the program is built right by checking that it meets its design specifications, comparing coding to algorithms and equations and comparing calculations against analytical solutions and method ofmore » manufactured solutions. Sequential verification performs these comparisons initially, but thereafter only compares code calculations between consecutive code versions to demonstrate that no unintended changes have been introduced. Recently, an automated, highly accurate sequential verification method has been developed for RELAP5-3D. The method also provides to test that no unintended consequences result from code development in the following code capabilities: repeating a timestep advancement, continuing a run from a restart file, multiple cases in a single code execution, and modes of coupled/uncoupled operation. In conclusion, mathematical analyses of the adequacy of the checks used in the comparisons are provided.« less

  1. Extremely accurate sequential verification of RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George L.; Aumiller, David L.; Buschman, Francis X.

    2015-11-19

    Large computer programs like RELAP5-3D solve complex systems of governing, closure and special process equations to model the underlying physics of nuclear power plants. Further, these programs incorporate many other features for physics, input, output, data management, user-interaction, and post-processing. For software quality assurance, the code must be verified and validated before being released to users. For RELAP5-3D, verification and validation are restricted to nuclear power plant applications. Verification means ensuring that the program is built right by checking that it meets its design specifications, comparing coding to algorithms and equations and comparing calculations against analytical solutions and method of manufactured solutions. Sequential verification performs these comparisons initially, but thereafter only compares code calculations between consecutive code versions to demonstrate that no unintended changes have been introduced. Recently, an automated, highly accurate sequential verification method has been developed for RELAP5-3D. The method also provides to test that no unintended consequences result from code development in the following code capabilities: repeating a timestep advancement, continuing a run from a restart file, multiple cases in a single code execution, and modes of coupled/uncoupled operation. In conclusion, mathematical analyses of the adequacy of the checks used in the comparisons are provided.

  2. AUTOMATED, HIGHLY ACCURATE VERIFICATION OF RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    George L Mesina; David Aumiller; Francis Buschman

    2014-07-01

    Computer programs that analyze light water reactor safety solve complex systems of governing, closure and special process equations to model the underlying physics. In addition, these programs incorporate many other features and are quite large. RELAP5-3D[1] has over 300,000 lines of coding for physics, input, output, data management, user-interaction, and post-processing. For software quality assurance, the code must be verified and validated before being released to users. Verification ensures that a program is built right by checking that it meets its design specifications. Recently, there has been an increased importance on the development of automated verification processes that compare coding against its documented algorithms and equations and compares its calculations against analytical solutions and the method of manufactured solutions[2]. For the first time, the ability exists to ensure that the data transfer operations associated with timestep advancement/repeating and writing/reading a solution to a file have no unintended consequences. To ensure that the code performs as intended over its extensive list of applications, an automated and highly accurate verification method has been modified and applied to RELAP5-3D. Furthermore, mathematical analysis of the adequacy of the checks used in the comparisons is provided.

  3. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Marlino, Sergio; Turrà, Francesco; Graziano, Pasquale; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Superficial ulnar artery is a rare finding but shows significant surgical implications. Its thinness and pliability make this flap an excellent solution for soft tissue reconstruction, especially in the head and neck region. We hereby report a successful free superficial ulnar artery perforator forearm flap transfer for tongue reconstruction. A 64-year-old man presenting with a squamous cell carcinoma of the left tongue underwent a wide resection of the tumor, left radical neck dissection, and reconstruction of the tongue and the left tonsillar pillar with the mentioned flap. No complications were observed postoperatively. The flap survived completely; no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up was detected. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap has shown to be a safe alternative to other free tissue flaps in specific forearm anatomic conditions. PMID:25102397

  4. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  5. Input to state stability in reservoir models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Models in ecology and biogeochemistry, in particular models of the global carbon cycle, can be generalized as systems of non-autonomous ordinary differential equations (ODEs). For many applications, it is important to determine the stability properties for this type of systems, but most methods available for autonomous systems are not necessarily applicable for the non-autonomous case. We discuss here stability notions for non-autonomous nonlinear models represented by systems of ODEs explicitly dependent on time and a time-varying input signal. We propose Input to State Stability (ISS) as candidate for the necessary generalization of the established analysis with respect to equilibria or invariant sets for autonomous systems, and show its usefulness by applying it to reservoir models typical for element cycling in ecosystem, e.g. in soil organic matter decomposition. We also show how ISS generalizes existent concepts formerly only available for Linear Time Invariant (LTI) and Linear Time Variant (LTV) systems to the nonlinear case.

  6. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position,more » and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.« less

  7. Multimodal interfaces with voice and gesture input

    SciTech Connect

    Milota, A.D.; Blattner, M.M.

    1995-07-20

    The modalities of speech and gesture have different strengths and weaknesses, but combined they create synergy where each modality corrects the weaknesses of the other. We believe that a multimodal system such a one interwining speech and gesture must start from a different foundation than ones which are based solely on pen input. In order to provide a basis for the design of a speech and gesture system, we have examined the research in other disciplines such as anthropology and linguistics. The result of this investigation was a taxonomy that gave us material for the incorporation of gestures whose meanings are largely transparent to the users. This study describes the taxonomy and gives examples of applications to pen input systems.

  8. Circadian light-input pathways in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Taishi; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Light is the most important environmental cue to entrain the circadian clock in most animals. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the light entrainment mechanisms of the clock have been well-studied. The Drosophila brain contains approximately 150 neurons that rhythmically express circadian clock genes. These neurons are called "clock neurons" and control behavioral activity rhythms. Many clock neurons express the Cryptochrome (CRY) protein, which is sensitive to UV and blue light, and thus enables clock neurons deep in the brain to directly perceive light. In addition to the CRY protein, external photoreceptors in the Drosophila eyes play an important role in circadian light-input pathways. Recent studies have provided new insights into the mechanisms that integrate these light inputs into the circadian network of the brain. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the light entrainment pathways in the Drosophila circadian clock. PMID:27066180

  9. Input on NIH Toolbox inclusion criteria

    PubMed Central

    Victorson, David; Debb, Scott M.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The NIH Toolbox is intended to be responsive to the needs of investigators evaluating neurologic and behavioral function in diverse settings. Early phases of the project involved gathering information and input from potential end users. Methods: Information was collected through literature and instrument database reviews, requests for information, consensus meetings, and expert interviews and integrated into the NIH Toolbox development process in an iterative manner. Results: Criteria for instrument inclusion, subdomains to be assessed, and preferences regarding instrument cost and length were obtained. Existing measures suitable for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox and areas requiring new measure development were identified. Conclusion: The NIH Toolbox was developed with explicit input from potential end users regarding many of its key features. PMID:23479548

  10. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position, and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.

  11. Multi-input square iterative learning control with input rate limits and bounds.

    PubMed

    Driessen, B J; Sadegh, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple modification of the iterative learning control algorithm of Arimoto et al. (1984) for the case where the inputs are bounded and time-rate-limited. The Jacobian error condition for monotonicity of input-error, rather than output-error, norms, is specified, the latter being insufficient to assure convergence, as proved herein. To the best of our knowledge, these facts have not been previously pointed out in the iterative learning control literature. We present a new proof that the modified controller produces monotonically decreasing input error norms, with a norm that covers the entire time interval of a learning trial. PMID:18238150

  12. Robust Accurate Non-Invasive Analyte Monitor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-11-03

    An improved method and apparatus for determining noninvasively and in vivo one or more unknown values of a known characteristic, particularly the concentration of an analyte in human tissue. The method includes: (1) irradiating the tissue with infrared energy (400 nm-2400 nm) having at least several wavelengths in a given range of wavelengths so that there is differential absorption of at least some of the wavelengths by the tissue as a function of the wavelengths and the known characteristic, the differential absorption causeing intensity variations of the wavelengths incident from the tissue; (2) providing a first path through the tissue; (3) optimizing the first path for a first sub-region of the range of wavelengths to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the first sub-region; (4) providing a second path through the tissue; and (5) optimizing the second path for a second sub-region of the range, to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the second sub-region. In the preferred embodiment a third path through the tissue is provided for, which path is optimized for a third sub-region of the range. With this arrangement, spectral variations which are the result of tissue differences (e.g., melanin and temperature) can be reduced. At least one of the paths represents a partial transmission path through the tissue. This partial transmission path may pass through the nail of a finger once and, preferably, twice. Also included are apparatus for: (1) reducing the arterial pulsations within the tissue; and (2) maximizing the blood content i the tissue.

  13. Sensory synergy as environmental input integration

    PubMed Central

    Alnajjar, Fady; Itkonen, Matti; Berenz, Vincent; Tournier, Maxime; Nagai, Chikara; Shimoda, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a method to feed proper environmental inputs back to the central nervous system (CNS) remains one of the challenges in achieving natural movement when part of the body is replaced with an artificial device. Muscle synergies are widely accepted as a biologically plausible interpretation of the neural dynamics between the CNS and the muscular system. Yet the sensorineural dynamics of environmental feedback to the CNS has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we address this issue by exploring the concept of sensory synergy. In contrast to muscle synergy, we hypothesize that sensory synergy plays an essential role in integrating the overall environmental inputs to provide low-dimensional information to the CNS. We assume that sensor synergy and muscle synergy communicate using these low-dimensional signals. To examine our hypothesis, we conducted posture control experiments involving lateral disturbance with nine healthy participants. Proprioceptive information represented by the changes on muscle lengths were estimated by using the musculoskeletal model analysis software SIMM. Changes on muscles lengths were then used to compute sensory synergies. The experimental results indicate that the environmental inputs were translated into the two dimensional signals and used to move the upper limb to the desired position immediately after the lateral disturbance. Participants who showed high skill in posture control were found to be likely to have a strong correlation between sensory and muscle signaling as well as high coordination between the utilized sensory synergies. These results suggest the importance of integrating environmental inputs into suitable low-dimensional signals before providing them to the CNS. This mechanism should be essential when designing the prosthesis' sensory system to make the controller simpler. PMID:25628523

  14. Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingfan Zhang Qinghong

    2006-09-15

    In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

  15. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  16. Solar wind-magnetosphere energy input functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bargatze, L.F.; McPherron, R.L.; Baker, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    A new formula for the solar wind-magnetosphere energy input parameter, P/sub i/, is sought by applying the constraints imposed by dimensional analysis. Applying these constraints yields a general equation for P/sub i/ which is equal to rho V/sup 3/l/sub CF//sup 2/F(M/sub A/,theta) where, rho V/sup 3/ is the solar wind kinetic energy density and l/sub CF//sup 2/ is the scale size of the magnetosphere's effective energy ''collection'' region. The function F which depends on M/sub A/, the Alfven Mach number, and on theta, the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle is included in the general equation for P/sub i/ in order to model the magnetohydrodynamic processes which are responsible for solar wind-magnetosphere energy transfer. By assuming the form of the function F, it is possible to further constrain the formula for P/sub i/. This is accomplished by using solar wind data, geomagnetic activity indices, and simple statistical methods. It is found that P/sub i/ is proportional to (rho V/sup 2/)/sup 1/6/VBG(theta) where, rho V/sup 2/ is the solar wind dynamic pressure and VBG(theta) is a rectified version of the solar wind motional electric field. Furthermore, it is found that G(theta), the gating function which modulates the energy input to the magnetosphere, is well represented by a ''leaky'' rectifier function such as sin/sup 4/(theta/2). This function allows for enhanced energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented southward. This function also allows for some energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented northward. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Persistent trigeminal artery arising from the arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, usually arising from the cavernous or precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and connecting to the distal basilar artery. There are two types of PTA, lateral and medial. We present the first case of a lateral-type PTA arising from the large arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the left ICA with findings from both magnetic resonance angiography and selective catheter angiography. PMID:22215430

  18. Angiographic Enigma: A Single Coronary Artery with the Right Coronary Artery Originating from the Distal Left Circumflex Artery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satyajit; Sahoo, Sanat Kumar; Tripathy, Mahendra Prasad; Jena, Giridhari

    2015-01-01

    An isolated single coronary artery (SCA) is a rare anomaly. A SCA originating from the left sinus of Valsalva is even rarer than one arising from the right. Most patients with a congenital coronary artery anomaly are asymptomatic. Herein, we report an extremely uncommon variant, where the right coronary artery arose from the distal segment of the left circumflex artery with slow coronary flow leading to myocardial ischemia. PMID:27326353

  19. Boolean modeling of neural systems with point-process inputs and outputs.

    PubMed

    Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Zanos, Theodoros P; Courellis, Spiros H; Berger, Theodore W

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel modeling approach for neural systems with point-process inputs and outputs (binary time-series of 0's and 1's) that utilizes Boolean operators of modulo-2 multiplication and addition, corresponding to the logical AND and OR operations respectively. The form of the employed mathematical model is akin to a "Boolean-Volterra" model that contains the product terms of all relevant input lags in a hierarchical order, where terms of order higher than first represent nonlinear interactions among the various lagged values of each input point-process or among lagged values of various inputs (if multiple inputs exist) as they reflect on the output. The coefficients of this Boolean model are also binary variables that indicate the presence or absence of the respective term in each specific model/system. Simulations are used to explore the properties of such models and the feasibility of accurate estimation of such models from short data-records in the presence of noise (i.e. spurious spikes). The results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining reliable estimates of such models, even in the presence of considerable noise in the input and/or output, thus making the proposed approach an attractive candidate for modeling neural systems in a practical context. PMID:17946091

  20. Minimizing structural vibrations with Input Shaping (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhose, Bill; Singer, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A new method for commanding machines to move with increased dynamic performance was developed. This method is an enhanced version of input shaping, a patented vibration suppression algorithm. This technique intercepts a command input to a system command that moves the mechanical system with increased performance and reduced residual vibration. This document describes many advanced methods for generating highly optimized shaping sequences which are tuned to particular systems. The shaping sequence is important because it determines the trade off between move/settle time of the system and the insensitivity of the input shaping algorithm to variations or uncertainties in the machine which can be controlled. For example, a system with a 5 Hz resonance that takes 1 second to settle can be improved to settle instantaneously using a 0.2 shaping sequence (thus improving settle time by a factor of 5). This system could vary by plus or minus 15% in its natural frequency and still have no apparent vibration. However, the same system shaped with a 0.3 second shaping sequence could tolerate plus or minus 40% or more variation in natural frequency. This document describes how to generate sequences that maximize performance, sequences that maximize insensitivity, and sequences that trade off between the two. Several software tools are documented and included.

  1. [Input and output channels of quantum biocomputers].

    PubMed

    Minina, S V; Liberman, E A

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed that "Quantum Molecular" computer of a neuron consists of the cell cytoskeleton serving as calculating media and input ionic channel sending a hypersound signal to observe these media. The sound spreads through the media travelling along microtubules and microfilaments and switching between those via molecular bridges which serve as elementary switches. The whole system works like a wave guiding net connecting input ionic channels (which generate different sound signals) and output ionic channels (which are controlled by the processed sound signals). Thus the output of such systems depends on the input (controlled by synaptic activity) and on the construction and state of these calculating media. We think that the sound waves spreading through different calculating media solve different physical problems. The construction of the calculating part of the cytoskeleton, according to the hypothesis, is different in different neurons. It is defined by special protein which is produced by DNA, RNA and protein molecular word processor (during brain development and, may be, education). We comment on how the existence of an extremal computer produces an impact on physics and mathematics exemplified by the optimality principle as substitution of physical relativity principle for a complex problem. PMID:1693290

  2. Designing Beam Steering for Accurate Measurement of Intima-Media Thickness at Carotid Sinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashiyama, Takashi; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    Recently, cardiovascular disease has become the second most common cause of death in Japan following malignant neoplasm formation. Therefore, it is necessary to diagnose atherosclerosis during its early stages because atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of cardiovascular diseases. The carotid sinus is a site that is easily affected by atherosclerosis [C. K. Zarins et al.: Circ. Res. 53 (1983) 502]; therefore, the diagnosis of this disease at this site is important [S. C. Nicholls et al.: Stroke 20 (1989) 175]. However, it is difficult to accurately diagnose atherosclerosis in the carotid sinus in the long-axis plane, which is parallel to the axis of the vessel, using conventional linear scanning because the carotid sinus is not flat along the axis of the vessel, and the ultrasonic beams used in linear scanning are perpendicular to the arterial wall in a limited region. Echoes from regions that are not perpendicular to the ultrasonic beams are very weak and the arterial wall in such regions is hardly recognized in a B-mode image. In this study, the position of the arterial wall was predetermined on the basis of the B-mode image obtained by conventional linear scanning, then ultrasonic beams were transmitted again so that all beams were almost perpendicular to the arterial wall. In basic experiments, a nonflat object made of silicone rubber was measured and it was shown that it is possible to image a nonflat object over the entire scanned area using the proposed beam steering method. Furthermore, in in vivo experiments, the intima-media complex was imaged over the entire scanned area at the carotid sinus.

  3. Branches and arterial supply of the recurrent artery of Heubner.

    PubMed

    Maga, Paweł; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Krzyżewski, Roger M; Golec, Joanna; Depukat, Paweł; Gregorczyk-Maga, Iwona; Skrzat, Janusz

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the branches and arterial supply of the recurrent artery of Heubner (RAH) in order to provide detailed information to neurosurgeons operating in this area of the brain. A total of 70 human brains (39 male and 31 female) obtained from cadavers (aged 31-75 years) during routine autopsies were examined; brains from individuals who died due to neurological disorders were not included in the study. Immediately after dissection the arteries were perfused with acrylic paint emulsion through the circle of Willis or electively through the RAH. Brains were fixed in a 10 % solution of formaldehyde and sectioned; the sections were analyzed under a stereoscopic light microscope (magnification 2-40×). The RAH was present in 138 hemispheres with a mean of 1.99 per hemisphere. Mean RAH length was 25.2 mm and the mean diameter, in its place of origin, was 1 mm. Between two and 30 (mean 9.4) branches originated from the stem of the RAH. Each branch then divided into 2-40 smaller branches (mean 19). Primary branches were divided and named in accordance with their course and arterial supply. Primary RAH branches include the anterior perforating substance, sylvian fissure, olfactory, frontal, hypothalamic, optic tract and connecting branches. Left and right hemispheres were asymmetrically supplied by RAH branches, but none of these discrepancies were of statistical significance. PMID:23860669

  4. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  5. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: a review.

    PubMed

    Azab, Waleed; Delashaw, Johnny; Mohammed, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is the largest of the fetal carotid-basilar anastomotic arteries, and it persists for the longest embryonic period. The artery usually involutes after the development of the posterior communicating artery. The exact causes of persistence of this primitive vessel into adulthood are not completely clear. Angiographic and anatomical descriptions of the various persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) configurations and their relation to the remainder of the cerebrovascular tree and the other surrounding structures have been reported. Persistent trigeminal artery can be associated with many other vascular anomalies and disorders including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations and carotid-cavernous fistulae. A thorough understanding of the anatomical and angiographic features of this persistent embryonic arterial channel is of utmost importance when making therapeutic decisions and embarking on surgical or endovascular intervention for any pertinent pathological condition. We review the embryology, angiographic features, microsurgical anatomy and associated vascular anomalies and disorders of the persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:22843453

  6. Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of patients and may eliminate the need for coronary artery bypass surgery. The outcome is relief from chest pain ... of the narrowing is not accomplished, heart surgery (coronary artery bypass graft surgery, also called a CABG) may be ...

  7. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is done using a small surgical cut. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut in your groin after using some ...

  8. Facts about Transposition of the Great Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Septal Defect Atrioventricular Septal Defect Coarctation of the Aorta D-Transposition of the Great Arteries Hypoplastic Left ... of the heart—the pulmonary artery and the aorta —are switched in position, or “transposed”. Normally, blood ...

  9. Transposition of the Greater Arteries (TGA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease Diseases of the arteries, valves, and aorta, as well as cardiac rhythm disturbances Aortic Valve ... Transposition of the Great Arteries Coarctation of the Aorta Truncus Arteriosus Single Ventricle Defects Lung, Esophageal, and ...

  10. MedlinePlus: Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Blood Institute Start Here Coronary Artery Bypass (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish Coronary Artery Bypass ... and Blood Institute) Specifics Limited-Access Heart Surgery (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish Types of Coronary ...

  11. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  12. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  13. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  14. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  15. The thermodynamic cost of accurate sensory adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yuhai

    2015-03-01

    Living organisms need to obtain and process environment information accurately in order to make decisions critical for their survival. Much progress have been made in identifying key components responsible for various biological functions, however, major challenges remain to understand system-level behaviors from the molecular-level knowledge of biology and to unravel possible physical principles for the underlying biochemical circuits. In this talk, we will present some recent works in understanding the chemical sensory system of E. coli by combining theoretical approaches with quantitative experiments. We focus on addressing the questions on how cells process chemical information and adapt to varying environment, and what are the thermodynamic limits of key regulatory functions, such as adaptation.

  16. Accurate numerical solutions of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Nasir Uddin, Khan; Nadeem Alam, Khan

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an investigation to analyze the vibration of a conservative nonlinear oscillator in the form u" + lambda u + u^(2n-1) + (1 + epsilon^2 u^(4m))^(1/2) = 0 for any arbitrary power of n and m. This method converts the differential equation to sets of algebraic equations and solve numerically. We have presented for three different cases: a higher order Duffing equation, an equation with irrational restoring force and a plasma physics equation. It is also found that the method is valid for any arbitrary order of n and m. Comparisons have been made with the results found in the literature the method gives accurate results.

  17. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  18. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception. PMID:24549293

  19. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  20. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  1. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  2. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  3. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities. PMID:12747164

  4. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  5. A 1D model of the arterial circulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Aslanidou, Lydia; Trachet, Bram; Reymond, Philippe; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Segers, Patrick; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    At a time of growing concern over the ethics of animal experimentation, mouse models are still an indispensable source of insight into the cardiovascular system and its most frequent pathologies. Nevertheless, reference data on the murine cardiovascular anatomy and physiology are lacking. In this work, we developed and validated an in silico, one dimensional model of the murine systemic arterial tree consisting of 85 arterial segments. Detailed aortic dimensions were obtained in vivo from contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography in 3 male, C57BL/6J anesthetized mice and 3 male ApoE(-/-) mice, all 12-weeks old. Physiological input data were gathered from a wide range of literature data. The integrated form of the Navier-Stokes equations was solved numerically to yield pressures and flows throughout the arterial network. The resulting model predictions have been validated against invasive pressure waveforms and non-invasive velocity and diameter waveforms that were measured in vivo on an independent set of 47 mice. In conclusion, we present a validated one-dimensional model of the anesthetized murine cardiovascular system that can serve as a versatile tool in the field of preclinical cardiovascular research. PMID:26555250

  6. TRAS principles blight arterial bypass and plasty.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M V; Mehta, L A; Kothari, V M

    1997-01-01

    A new concept--Tissue Requisitions (Principle I)/Relinquishes (Principle II) Arterial Supply--of TRAS principles is introduced to help appreciate the failures/successes of modern medicine's attempts at restoring arterial flow in luminally compromised coronary/carotid fields, an invasive branch rightly called vascular ReRheology, which comprises diagnosing/treating arterial blocks. The technical wizardry of arterial reconstruction (bypass) or lumen--restoration (plasty) has to reckon with the TRAS principles all the time. PMID:10740714

  7. Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Configuration for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boodhwani, Munir; Hanet, Claude; de Kerchove, Laurent; Navarra, Emiliano; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-01-01

    Background— Bilateral internal thoracic arteries (BITA) have demonstrated superior patency and improved survival in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. However, the optimal configuration for BITA utilization and its effect on long-term outcome remains uncertain. Methods and Results— We randomly assigned 304 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting using BITA to either in situ or Y grafting configurations. The primary end point was 3-year angiographic patency. Secondary end points included major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (ie, death from any cause, stroke, myocardial infarction, or repeat revascularization) at 7 years. More coronary targets were able to be revascularized using internal thoracic arteries in patients randomized to Y grafting versus in situ group (3.2±0.8 versus 2.4±0.5 arteries/patient; P<0.01). The primary end point did not show significant differences in graft patency between groups. Secondary end points occurred more frequently in the in situ group (P=0.03), with 7-year rates of 34±10% in the in situ and 25±12% in the Y grafting groups, driven largely by a higher incidence of repeat revascularization in the in situ group (14±4.5% versus 7.4±3.2% at 7 years; P=0.009). There were no significant differences in hospital mortality or morbidity or in late survival, myocardial infarction, or stroke between groups. Conclusions— Three-year systematic angiographic follow-up revealed no significant difference in graft patency between the 2 BITA configurations. However, compared with in situ configuration, the use of BITA in a Y grafting configuration results in lower rates of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events at 7 years. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01666366. PMID:27406988

  8. Multiple-Input Subject-Specific Modeling of Plasma Glucose Concentration for Feedforward Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately develop subject-specific, input causation models, for blood glucose concentration (BGC) for large input sets can have a significant impact on tightening control for insulin dependent diabetes. More specifically, for Type 1 diabetics (T1Ds), it can lead to an effective artificial pancreas (i.e., an automatic control system that delivers exogenous insulin) under extreme changes in critical disturbances. These disturbances include food consumption, activity variations, and physiological stress changes. Thus, this paper presents a free-living, outpatient, multiple-input, modeling method for BGC with strong causation attributes that is stable and guards against overfitting to provide an effective modeling approach for feedforward control (FFC). This approach is a Wiener block-oriented methodology, which has unique attributes for meeting critical requirements for effective, long-term, FFC. PMID:25620845

  9. Finite volume and asymptotic methods for stochastic neuron models with correlated inputs.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Robert; Marpeau, Fabien; Ma, Jianfu; Barua, Aditya; Josić, Krešimir

    2012-07-01

    We consider a pair of stochastic integrate and fire neurons receiving correlated stochastic inputs. The evolution of this system can be described by the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation with non-trivial boundary conditions resulting from the refractory period and firing threshold. We propose a finite volume method that is orders of magnitude faster than the Monte Carlo methods traditionally used to model such systems. The resulting numerical approximations are proved to be accurate, nonnegative and integrate to 1. We also approximate the transient evolution of the system using an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, and use the result to examine the properties of the joint output of cell pairs. The results suggests that the joint output of a cell pair is most sensitive to changes in input variance, and less sensitive to changes in input mean and correlation. PMID:21717104

  10. Automated construction of arterial and venous trees in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiao; Abràmoff, Michael D; Garvin, Mona K

    2015-10-01

    While many approaches exist to segment retinal vessels in fundus photographs, only a limited number focus on the construction and disambiguation of arterial and venous trees. Previous approaches are local and/or greedy in nature, making them susceptible to errors or limiting their applicability to large vessels. We propose a more global framework to generate arteriovenous trees in retinal images, given a vessel segmentation. In particular, our approach consists of three stages. The first stage is to generate an overconnected vessel network, named the vessel potential connectivity map (VPCM), consisting of vessel segments and the potential connectivity between them. The second stage is to disambiguate the VPCM into multiple anatomical trees, using a graph-based metaheuristic algorithm. The third stage is to classify these trees into arterial or venous (A/V) trees. We evaluated our approach with a ground truth built based on a public database, showing a pixel-wise classification accuracy of 88.15% using a manual vessel segmentation as input, and 86.11% using an automatic vessel segmentation as input. PMID:26636114

  11. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  12. Normal Proximal Coronary Artery Diameters in Adults from India as Assessed by Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevappa, Manjappa; Math, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The normative data of coronary artery size among Indians are sparse. It is often essential to know the coronary dimensions especially during interventions such as stenting to choose the appropriate size of the stent and to decide the very need for stenting. In current practice it is the luminal angiography which is most widely employed to assess the coronary artery size. However, luminal angiography is not very accurate in estimating the epicardial coronary artery size as it does not take into account the mural thickness of the arterial wall. Hence it is prudent to assess coronary artery size by other methods such as Computed Tomography (CT) coronary angiography, quantitative coronary angiogram, Magnetic Resonanace (MR) angiogram, etc. In this study we chose computed tomography as it demonstrates mural thickness along with lumen of the vessels and hence measures the diameter more accurately. Aim To establish normative data for diameters of the proximal coronary artery segments during life by using MDCT in a cohort of individuals without any structural heart disease. Materials and Methods Between October 2012 and April 2013, 168 consecutive patients who did not have any structural heart disease underwent CT coronary angiography for evaluation of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) with atypical symptoms with low pretest probability. Patients who were found to have no coronary artery disease on CT-CAG were recruited in this study. The baseline clinical status and demographic data were obtained from the hospital records. Results In our study we found that the mean indexed diameter to BSA among females for LMCA 2.32±0.12mm, LAD 1.95±0.15mm, LCX 1.73±0.20mm and RCA 1.84±0.22mm. For males the values were LMCA 2.33±0.13mm, LAD 1.94±0.16mm, LCX 1.74±0.21mm, and RCA 1.79±0.20mm. These values are comparable to other studies. Conclusion We attempted to establish normative data for normal proximal coronary artery dimensions among South Indian population

  13. Spontaneous Recanalization of Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Following Angioplasty and Stenting of Inferior Mesenteric Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Erhan Cil, Barbaros E.; Arat, Anil; Baykal, Atac; Karaman, Kerem; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-02-15

    An 84-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and coronary artery disease was admitted with a progressively worsening diffuse abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and angiography revealed occlusion of the origin and proximal portion of superior mesenteric artery. Aortography also showed severe origin stenosis of inferior mesenteric artery and that the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery was supplied by a prominent marginal artery of Drummond. Patient was effectively treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the inferior mesenteric artery. Follow-up imaging studies demonstrated patency of the stent and spontaneous recanalization of superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  14. Hemimelia and absence of the peroneal artery.

    PubMed

    Huda, S; Sangster, G; Pramanik, A; Sankararaman, S; Tice, H; Ibrahim, H

    2014-02-01

    The arterial patterns of the lower extremities of three patients with congenital absence fibulae (hemimelia) were evaluated to determine whether the relationship existed between the absence of peroneal artery and hemimelia. Computerized tomograph angiography revealed the absence of peroneal artery in all the patients with dysplastic limbs and absent fibula. PMID:24476661

  15. Endovascular treatment of isolated arterial pulmonary malinosculation

    PubMed Central

    Mammen, Suraj; Keshava, Shyamkumar N; Moses, Vinu; Chiramel, George Koshy; Irodi, Aparna; Gnanamuthu, Birla Roy

    2015-01-01

    We report the endovascular management of a series of four cases of isolated systemic supply to normal lung or isolated arterial pulmonary malinosculation of the left lung. In these cases, the basal segments of the left lung lacked normal pulmonary arterial supply and instead received systemic arterial blood from the descending thoracic aorta. The relevant anatomy and literature are also reviewed. PMID:26288517

  16. Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.) What is P.A.D.? Arteries Clogged With Plaque Peripheral arterial disease (P. ... button on your keyboard.) Why Is P.A.D. Dangerous? Click for more information Blocked blood flow ...

  17. How the type of input function affects the dynamic response of conducting polymer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingcan; Alici, Gursel; Mutlu, Rahim; Li, Weihua

    2014-10-01

    There has been a growing interest in smart actuators typified by conducting polymer actuators, especially in their (i) fabrication, modeling and control with minimum external data and (ii) applications in bio-inspired devices, robotics and mechatronics. Their control is a challenging research problem due to the complex and nonlinear properties of these actuators, which cannot be predicted accurately. Based on an input-shaping technique, we propose a new method to improve the conducting polymer actuators’ command-following ability, while minimizing their electric power consumption. We applied four input functions with smooth characteristics to a trilayer conducting polymer actuator to experimentally evaluate its command-following ability under an open-loop control strategy and a simulated feedback control strategy, and, more importantly, to quantify how the type of input function affects the dynamic response of this class of actuators. We have found that the four smooth inputs consume less electrical power than sharp inputs such as a step input with discontinuous higher-order derivatives. We also obtained an improved transient response performance from the smooth inputs, especially under the simulated feedback control strategy, which we have proposed previously [X Xiang, R Mutlu, G Alici, and W Li, 2014 “Control of conducting polymer actuators without physical feedback: simulated feedback control approach with particle swarm optimization’, Journal of Smart Materials and Structure, 23]. The idea of using a smooth input command, which results in lower power consumption and better control performance, can be extended to other smart actuators. Consuming less electrical energy or power will have a direct effect on enhancing the operational life of these actuators.

  18. Inhibitory control in mind and brain 2.0: Blocked-input models of saccadic countermanding

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Gordon D.; Yamaguchi, Motonori; Schall, Jeffrey D.; Palmeri, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    The interactive race model of saccadic countermanding assumes that response inhibition results from an interaction between a go unit, identified with gaze-shifting neurons, and a stop unit, identified with gaze-holding neurons, in which activation of the stop unit inhibits the growth of activation in the go unit to prevent it from reaching threshold. The interactive race model accounts for behavioral data and predicts physiological data in monkeys performing the stop-signal task. We propose an alternative model that assumes that response inhibition results from blocking the input to the go unit. We show that the blocked-input model accounts for behavioral data as accurately as the original interactive race model and predicts aspects of the physiological data more accurately. We extend the models to address the steady-state fixation period before the go stimulus is presented and find that the blocked-input model fits better than the interactive race model. We consider a model in which fixation activity is boosted when a stop signal occurs and find that it fits as well as the blocked input model but predicts very high steady-state fixation activity after the response is inhibited. We discuss the alternative linking propositions that connect computational models to neural mechanisms, the lessons to be learned from model mimicry, and generalization from countermanding saccades to countermanding other kinds of responses. PMID:25706403

  19. Can Selforganizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; Klose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using delta(z) = z(sub phot) - z(sub spec)) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods

  20. Higher order accurate partial implicitization: An unconditionally stable fourth-order-accurate explicit numerical technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The previously obtained second-order-accurate partial implicitization numerical technique used in the solution of fluid dynamic problems was modified with little complication to achieve fourth-order accuracy. The Von Neumann stability analysis demonstrated the unconditional linear stability of the technique. The order of the truncation error was deduced from the Taylor series expansions of the linearized difference equations and was verified by numerical solutions to Burger's equation. For comparison, results were also obtained for Burger's equation using a second-order-accurate partial-implicitization scheme, as well as the fourth-order scheme of Kreiss.