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Sample records for accurate clinical information

  1. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  2. 78 FR 34604 - Submitting Complete and Accurate Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 Submitting Complete and Accurate Information AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... accurate information as would a licensee or an applicant for a license.'' DATES: Submit comments by August... may submit comments by any of the following methods (unless this document describes a different...

  3. The Clinical Impact of Accurate Cystine Calculi Characterization Using Dual-Energy Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Haley, William E; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Qu, Mingliang; Cernigliaro, Joseph G; Goldfarb, David S; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has recently been suggested as the imaging modality of choice for kidney stones due to its ability to provide information on stone composition. Standard postprocessing of the dual-energy images accurately identifies uric acid stones, but not other types. Cystine stones can be identified from DECT images when analyzed with advanced postprocessing. This case report describes clinical implications of accurate diagnosis of cystine stones using DECT.

  4. Clinically accurate fetal ECG parameters acquired from maternal abdominal sensors

    PubMed Central

    CLIFFORD, Gari; SAMENI, Reza; WARD, Mr. Jay; ROBINSON, Julian; WOLFBERG, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the accuracy of a novel system for measuring fetal heart rate and ST-segment changes using non-invasive electrodes on the maternal abdomen. STUDY DESIGN Fetal ECGs were recorded using abdominal sensors from 32 term laboring women who had a fetal scalp electrode (FSE) placed for a clinical indication. RESULTS Good quality data for FHR estimation was available in 91.2% of the FSE segments, and 89.9% of the abdominal electrode segments. The root mean square (RMS) error between the FHR data calculated by both methods over all processed segments was 0.36 beats per minute. ST deviation from the isoelectric point ranged from 0 to 14.2% of R-wave amplitude. The RMS error between the ST change calculated by both methods averaged over all processed segments was 3.2%. CONCLUSION FHR and ST change acquired from the maternal abdomen is highly accurate and on average is clinically indistinguishable from FHR and ST change calculated using FSE data. PMID:21514560

  5. Integrated clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, G

    1995-01-01

    SIDOCI (Système Informatisé de DOnnées Cliniques Intégrées) is a Canadian joint venture introducing newly-operating paradigms into hospitals. The main goal of SIDOCI is to maintain the quality of care in todayUs tightening economy. SIDOCI is a fully integrated paperless patient-care system which automates and links all information about a patient. Data is available on-line and instantaneously to doctors, nurses, and support staff in the format that best suits their specific requirements. SIDOCI provides a factual and chronological summary of the patient's progress by drawing together clinical information provided by all professionals working with the patient, regardless of their discipline, level of experience, or physical location. It also allows for direct entry of the patient's information at the bedside. Laboratory results, progress notes, patient history and graphs are available instantaneously on screen, eliminating the need for physical file transfers. The system, incorporating a sophisticated clinical information database, an intuitive graphical user interface, and customized screens for each medical discipline, guides the user through standard procedures. Unlike most information systems created for the health care industry, SIDOCI is longitudinal, covering all aspects of the health care process through its link to various vertical systems already in place. A multidisciplinary team has created a clinical dictionary that provides the user with most of the information she would normally use: symptoms, signs, diagnoses, allergies, medications, interventions, etc. This information is structured and displayed in such a manner that health care professionals can document the clinical situation at the touch of a finger. The data is then encoded into the patient's file. Once encoded, the structured data is accessible for research, statistics, education, and quality assurance. This dictionary complies with national and international nomenclatures. It also

  6. Integrated clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, G

    1995-01-01

    SIDOCI (Système Informatisé de DOnnées Cliniques Intégrées) is a Canadian joint venture introducing newly-operating paradigms into hospitals. The main goal of SIDOCI is to maintain the quality of care in todayUs tightening economy. SIDOCI is a fully integrated paperless patient-care system which automates and links all information about a patient. Data is available on-line and instantaneously to doctors, nurses, and support staff in the format that best suits their specific requirements. SIDOCI provides a factual and chronological summary of the patient's progress by drawing together clinical information provided by all professionals working with the patient, regardless of their discipline, level of experience, or physical location. It also allows for direct entry of the patient's information at the bedside. Laboratory results, progress notes, patient history and graphs are available instantaneously on screen, eliminating the need for physical file transfers. The system, incorporating a sophisticated clinical information database, an intuitive graphical user interface, and customized screens for each medical discipline, guides the user through standard procedures. Unlike most information systems created for the health care industry, SIDOCI is longitudinal, covering all aspects of the health care process through its link to various vertical systems already in place. A multidisciplinary team has created a clinical dictionary that provides the user with most of the information she would normally use: symptoms, signs, diagnoses, allergies, medications, interventions, etc. This information is structured and displayed in such a manner that health care professionals can document the clinical situation at the touch of a finger. The data is then encoded into the patient's file. Once encoded, the structured data is accessible for research, statistics, education, and quality assurance. This dictionary complies with national and international nomenclatures. It also

  7. Clinical Protocol Information System

    PubMed Central

    Wirtschafter, David D.; Gams, Richard; Ferguson, Carol; Blackwell, William; Boackle, Paul

    1980-01-01

    The Clinical Protocol Information System (CPIS) supports the clinical research and patient care objectives of the SouthEastern Cancer Study Group (SEG). The information system goals are to improve the evaluability of clinical trials, decrease the frequency of adverse patient events, implement drug toxicity surveillance, improve the availability of study data and demonstrate the criteria for computer networks that can impact on the general medical care of the community. Nodes in the network consist of Data General MicroNova MP-100 minicomputers that drive the interactive data dialogue and communicate with the network concentrator (another DG MicroNova) in Birmingham. Functions supported include: source data editing, care “advice,” care “audit,” care “explanation,” and treatment note printing. The complete database is updated nightly and resides on UAB's IBM 370/158-AP.

  8. Ultra-accurate collaborative information filtering via directed user similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Song, W.-J.; Liu, J.-G.

    2014-07-01

    A key challenge of the collaborative filtering (CF) information filtering is how to obtain the reliable and accurate results with the help of peers' recommendation. Since the similarities from small-degree users to large-degree users would be larger than the ones in opposite direction, the large-degree users' selections are recommended extensively by the traditional second-order CF algorithms. By considering the users' similarity direction and the second-order correlations to depress the influence of mainstream preferences, we present the directed second-order CF (HDCF) algorithm specifically to address the challenge of accuracy and diversity of the CF algorithm. The numerical results for two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, show that the accuracy of the new algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art CF algorithms. Comparing with the CF algorithm based on random walks proposed by Liu et al. (Int. J. Mod. Phys. C, 20 (2009) 285) the average ranking score could reach 0.0767 and 0.0402, which is enhanced by 27.3% and 19.1% for MovieLens and Netflix, respectively. In addition, the diversity, precision and recall are also enhanced greatly. Without relying on any context-specific information, tuning the similarity direction of CF algorithms could obtain accurate and diverse recommendations. This work suggests that the user similarity direction is an important factor to improve the personalized recommendation performance.

  9. Ethics and epistemology of accurate prediction in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Hey, Spencer Phillips

    2015-07-01

    All major research ethics policies assert that the ethical review of clinical trial protocols should include a systematic assessment of risks and benefits. But despite this policy, protocols do not typically contain explicit probability statements about the likely risks or benefits involved in the proposed research. In this essay, I articulate a range of ethical and epistemic advantages that explicit forecasting would offer to the health research enterprise. I then consider how some particular confidence levels may come into conflict with the principles of ethical research.

  10. Ethics and epistemology of accurate prediction in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Hey, Spencer Phillips

    2015-07-01

    All major research ethics policies assert that the ethical review of clinical trial protocols should include a systematic assessment of risks and benefits. But despite this policy, protocols do not typically contain explicit probability statements about the likely risks or benefits involved in the proposed research. In this essay, I articulate a range of ethical and epistemic advantages that explicit forecasting would offer to the health research enterprise. I then consider how some particular confidence levels may come into conflict with the principles of ethical research. PMID:25249375

  11. Probabilistic techniques for obtaining accurate patient counts in Clinical Data Warehouses.

    PubMed

    Myers, Risa B; Herskovic, Jorge R

    2011-12-01

    Proposal and execution of clinical trials, computation of quality measures and discovery of correlation between medical phenomena are all applications where an accurate count of patients is needed. However, existing sources of this type of patient information, including Clinical Data Warehouses (CDWs) may be incomplete or inaccurate. This research explores applying probabilistic techniques, supported by the MayBMS probabilistic database, to obtain accurate patient counts from a Clinical Data Warehouse containing synthetic patient data. We present a synthetic Clinical Data Warehouse, and populate it with simulated data using a custom patient data generation engine. We then implement, evaluate and compare different techniques for obtaining patients counts. We model billing as a test for the presence of a condition. We compute billing's sensitivity and specificity both by conducting a "Simulated Expert Review" where a representative sample of records are reviewed and labeled by experts, and by obtaining the ground truth for every record. We compute the posterior probability of a patient having a condition through a "Bayesian Chain", using Bayes' Theorem to calculate the probability of a patient having a condition after each visit. The second method is a "one-shot" approach that computes the probability of a patient having a condition based on whether the patient is ever billed for the condition. Our results demonstrate the utility of probabilistic approaches, which improve on the accuracy of raw counts. In particular, the simulated review paired with a single application of Bayes' Theorem produces the best results, with an average error rate of 2.1% compared to 43.7% for the straightforward billing counts. Overall, this research demonstrates that Bayesian probabilistic approaches improve patient counts on simulated patient populations. We believe that total patient counts based on billing data are one of the many possible applications of our Bayesian framework. Use of

  12. Automatic and Accurate Shadow Detection Using Near-Infrared Information.

    PubMed

    Rüfenacht, Dominic; Fredembach, Clément; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to automatically detect shadows in a fast and accurate manner by taking advantage of the inherent sensitivity of digital camera sensors to the near-infrared (NIR) part of the spectrum. Dark objects, which confound many shadow detection algorithms, often have much higher reflectance in the NIR. We can thus build an accurate shadow candidate map based on image pixels that are dark both in the visible and NIR representations. We further refine the shadow map by incorporating ratios of the visible to the NIR image, based on the observation that commonly encountered light sources have very distinct spectra in the NIR band. The results are validated on a new database, which contains visible/NIR images for a large variety of real-world shadow creating illuminant conditions, as well as manually labeled shadow ground truth. Both quantitative and qualitative evaluations show that our method outperforms current state-of-the-art shadow detection algorithms in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  13. A new accurate pill recognition system using imprint information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Kamata, Sei-ichiro

    2013-12-01

    Great achievements in modern medicine benefit human beings. Also, it has brought about an explosive growth of pharmaceuticals that current in the market. In daily life, pharmaceuticals sometimes confuse people when they are found unlabeled. In this paper, we propose an automatic pill recognition technique to solve this problem. It functions mainly based on the imprint feature of the pills, which is extracted by proposed MSWT (modified stroke width transform) and described by WSC (weighted shape context). Experiments show that our proposed pill recognition method can reach an accurate rate up to 92.03% within top 5 ranks when trying to classify more than 10 thousand query pill images into around 2000 categories.

  14. 16 CFR 1101.32 - Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reasonable steps to assure information is... Reasonable Steps Commission Will Take To Assure Information It Discloses Is Accurate, and That Disclosure Is... Administers § 1101.32 Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate. (a) The Commission considers...

  15. 16 CFR 1101.32 - Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reasonable steps to assure information is... Reasonable Steps Commission Will Take To Assure Information It Discloses Is Accurate, and That Disclosure Is... Administers § 1101.32 Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate. (a) The Commission considers...

  16. Clinical research before informed consent.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G

    2014-06-01

    Clinical research with patient-subjects was routinely conducted without informed consent for research participation prior to 1966. The aim of this article is to illuminate the moral climate of clinical research at this time, with particular attention to placebo-controlled trials in which patient-subjects often were not informed that they were participating in research or that they might receive a placebo intervention rather than standard medical treatment or an experimental treatment for their condition. An especially valuable window into the thinking of clinical investigators about their relationship with patient-subjects in the era before informed consent is afforded by reflection on two articles published by psychiatric researchers in 1966 and 1967, at the point of transition between clinical research conducted under the guise of medical care and clinical research based on consent following an invitation to participate and disclosure of material information about the study. Historical inquiry relating to the practice of clinical research without informed consent helps to put into perspective the moral progress associated with soliciting consent following disclosure of pertinent information; it also helps to shed light on an important issue in contemporary research ethics: the conditions under which it is ethical to conduct clinical research without informed consent.

  17. A Clinical Information Display System

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Bruce J.; Lenhard, Raymond E.; Braine, Hayden; Kammer, Anne

    1977-01-01

    A clinical information display system has been implemented as part of a prototype Oncology Clinical Information System for the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center. The information system has been developed to support the management of patient therapy. Capabilities in the prototype include a patient data system, a patient abstract, a tumor registry, an appointment system, a census system, and a clinical information display system. This paper describes the clinical information display component of the prototype. It has the capability of supporting up to 10,000 patient records with online data entry and editing. At the present time, the system is being used only in the Oncology Center. There are plans, however, for trial use by other departments, and the system represents a tool with a potential for more general application.

  18. Simulating Expert Clinical Comprehension: Adapting Latent Semantic Analysis to Accurately Extract Clinical Concepts from Psychiatric Narrative

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Trevor; Blatter, Brett; Patel, Vimla

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive studies reveal that less-than-expert clinicians are less able to recognize meaningful patterns of data in clinical narratives. Accordingly, psychiatric residents early in training fail to attend to information that is relevant to diagnosis and the assessment of dangerousness. This manuscript presents cognitively motivated methodology for the simulation of expert ability to organize relevant findings supporting intermediate diagnostic hypotheses. Latent Semantic Analysis is used to generate a semantic space from which meaningful associations between psychiatric terms are derived. Diagnostically meaningful clusters are modeled as geometric structures within this space and compared to elements of psychiatric narrative text using semantic distance measures. A learning algorithm is defined that alters components of these geometric structures in response to labeled training data. Extraction and classification of relevant text segments is evaluated against expert annotation, with system-rater agreement approximating rater-rater agreement. A range of biomedical informatics applications for these methods are suggested. PMID:18455483

  19. Radial artery blood pressure measurement in neonates: an accurate and convenient technique in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; van Genderingen, H R; Lafeber, H N; Hack, W W

    1995-01-01

    To achieve accurate blood pressure measurement through radial artery catheters in infants, we previously developed an experimental high-fidelity catheter-manometer system (CMS). As this system lacks facilities for flushing and for blood sampling, we aimed to further develop this technique in order to make the system suitable for clinical practice. In addition, we aimed to develop methods to automate processing of the pressure wave forms. The high-fidelity system to be improved consisted of a 24 Gauge catheter, a threeway stopcock and a tip-manometer. We inserted this system in the catheter-manometer system as routinely used i.e. the remaining end of the stopcock was connected to the fluid-filled CMS as used routinely. This combined system became clinically applicable, since blood samples could be obtained and flushing could be performed. The measurement chain was completed by application of a modified physiological monitor and a computerized method to analyze pressure wave forms. In this manner accurate beat-to-beat pressure parameters were obtained. This technique was applied to 25 neonates admitted for intensive care and requiring arterial access. Gestational age of these infants ranged from 25-40 (median 29) weeks and birth weight ranges from 500-3375 (median 1060) grams. In all infants the technique was found to be convenient and the high-fidelity blood pressure measurements were performed without any problems. The advantage of the present system is the potential for both correct intermittent recordings of arterial wave forms in close relation to clinical condition and for the establishment of accurate radial artery beat-to-beat pressure values in clinical practice.

  20. Bacteremia with Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius: clinical correlates of more accurate identification of isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L; Miller, S I; Garner, C V; Ferraro, M J; Calderwood, S B

    1989-01-01

    Two biotypes of Streptococcus bovis can be identified by laboratory testing and can be distinguished from the phenotypically similar organism Streptococcus salivarius. We assessed the clinical relevance of careful identification of these organisms in 68 patients with streptococcal bacteremia caused by these similar species. S. bovis was more likely to be clinically significant when isolated from blood (89%) than was S. salivarius (23%). There was a striking association between S. bovis I bacteremia and underlying endocarditis (94%) compared with that of S. bovis II bacteremia (18%). Bacteremia with S. bovis I was also highly correlated with an underlying colonic neoplasm (71% of patients overall, 100% of those with thorough colonic examinations) compared with bacteremia due to S. bovis II or S. salivarius (17% overall, 25% of patients with thorough colonic examinations). We conclude that careful identification of streptococcal bacteremic isolates as S. bovis biotype I provides clinically important information and should be more widely applied. PMID:2915024

  1. ACE-I Angioedema: Accurate Clinical Diagnosis May Prevent Epinephrine-Induced Harm

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, R. Mason; Felder, Sarah; Borici-Mazi, Rozita; Ball, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Upper airway angioedema is a life-threatening emergency department (ED) presentation with increasing incidence. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor induced angioedema (AAE) is a non-mast cell mediated etiology of angioedema. Accurate diagnosis by clinical examination can optimize patient management and reduce morbidity from inappropriate treatment with epinephrine. The aim of this study is to describe the incidence of angioedema subtypes and the management of AAE. We evaluate the appropriateness of treatments and highlight preventable iatrogenic morbidity. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of consecutive angioedema patients presenting to two tertiary care EDs between July 2007 and March 2012. Results Of 1,702 medical records screened, 527 were included. The cause of angioedema was identified in 48.8% (n=257) of cases. The most common identifiable etiology was AAE (33.1%, n=85), with a 60.0% male predominance. The most common AAE management strategies included diphenhydramine (63.5%, n=54), corticosteroids (50.6%, n=43) and ranitidine (31.8%, n=27). Epinephrine was administered in 21.2% (n=18) of AAE patients, five of whom received repeated doses. Four AAE patients required admission (4.7%) and one required endotracheal intubation. Epinephrine induced morbidity in two patients, causing myocardial ischemia or dysrhythmia shortly after administration. Conclusion AAE is the most common identifiable etiology of angioedema and can be accurately diagnosed by physical examination. It is easily confused with anaphylaxis and mismanaged with antihistamines, corticosteroids and epinephrine. There is little physiologic rationale for epinephrine use in AAE and much risk. Improved clinical differentiation of mast cell and non-mast cell mediated angioedema can optimize patient management. PMID:27330660

  2. Differential contribution of visual and auditory information to accurately predict the direction and rotational motion of a visual stimulus.

    PubMed

    Park, Seoung Hoon; Kim, Seonjin; Kwon, MinHyuk; Christou, Evangelos A

    2016-03-01

    Vision and auditory information are critical for perception and to enhance the ability of an individual to respond accurately to a stimulus. However, it is unknown whether visual and auditory information contribute differentially to identify the direction and rotational motion of the stimulus. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of an individual to accurately predict the direction and rotational motion of the stimulus based on visual and auditory information. In this study, we recruited 9 expert table-tennis players and used table-tennis service as our experimental model. Participants watched recorded services with different levels of visual and auditory information. The goal was to anticipate the direction of the service (left or right) and the rotational motion of service (topspin, sidespin, or cut). We recorded their responses and quantified the following outcomes: (i) directional accuracy and (ii) rotational motion accuracy. The response accuracy was the accurate predictions relative to the total number of trials. The ability of the participants to predict the direction of the service accurately increased with additional visual information but not with auditory information. In contrast, the ability of the participants to predict the rotational motion of the service accurately increased with the addition of auditory information to visual information but not with additional visual information alone. In conclusion, this finding demonstrates that visual information enhances the ability of an individual to accurately predict the direction of the stimulus, whereas additional auditory information enhances the ability of an individual to accurately predict the rotational motion of stimulus.

  3. The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-08-01

    Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/- 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/- 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0-1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LCMS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate easurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/- 1 ppm and elution time easurements within +/- 0.01 NET.

  4. Information workstations in clinical pathology.

    PubMed

    Spackman, K A

    1991-03-01

    Multitasking operating systems and expanding networks now permit smooth access to remote computers, peripherals, data, and information resources. Graphic user interfaces and productivity-enhancing software packages reduce the need for training and memorization of commands. New models of desktop computers based on "data-centered" software architecture can enhance workstation usefulness even more. Pathologists need to consider how these tools might improve access to and management of information and knowledge.

  5. Capturing Accurate and Useful Information on Medication-Related Telenursing Triage Calls.

    PubMed

    Lake, R; Li, L; Baysari, M; Byrne, M; Robinson, M; Westbrook, J I

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses providing telenursing triage and advice services record information on the medication related calls they handle. However the quality and consistency of these data were rarely examined. Our aim was to examine medication related calls made to the healthdirect advice service in November 2014, to assess their basic characteristics and how the data entry format influenced information collected and data consistency. Registered nurses selected the patient question type from a range of categories, and entered the medications involved in a free text field. Medication names were manually extracted from the free text fields. We also compared the selected patient question type with the free text description of the call, in order to gauge data consistency. Results showed that nurses provided patients with advice on medication-related queries in a timely matter (the median call duration of 9 minutes). From 1835 calls, we were able to identify and classify 2156 medications into 384 generic names. However, in 204 cases (11.2% of calls) no medication name was entered. A further 308 (15.0%) of the medication names entered were not identifiable. When we compared the selected patient question with the free text description of calls, we found that these were consistent in 63.27% of cases. Telenursing and triage advice services provide a valuable resource to the public with quick and easily accessible advice. To support nurses provide quality services and record accurate information about the queries, appropriate data entry format and design would be beneficial. PMID:27440292

  6. Preferential access to genetic information from endogenous hominin ancient DNA and accurate quantitative SNP-typing via SPEX

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Paul; Sanchez, Juan J.; Cooper, Alan; Endicott, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of targeted genetic loci from ancient, forensic and clinical samples is usually built upon polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated sequence data. However, many studies have shown that PCR amplification from poor-quality DNA templates can create sequence artefacts at significant levels. With hominin (human and other hominid) samples, the pervasive presence of highly PCR-amplifiable human DNA contaminants in the vast majority of samples can lead to the creation of recombinant hybrids and other non-authentic artefacts. The resulting PCR-generated sequences can then be difficult, if not impossible, to authenticate. In contrast, single primer extension (SPEX)-based approaches can genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms from ancient fragments of DNA as accurately as modern DNA. A single SPEX-type assay can amplify just one of the duplex DNA strands at target loci and generate a multi-fold depth-of-coverage, with non-authentic recombinant hybrids reduced to undetectable levels. Crucially, SPEX-type approaches can preferentially access genetic information from damaged and degraded endogenous ancient DNA templates over modern human DNA contaminants. The development of SPEX-type assays offers the potential for highly accurate, quantitative genotyping from ancient hominin samples. PMID:19864251

  7. Rapid, accurate, and comparative differentiation of clinically and industrially relevant microorganisms via multiple vibrational spectroscopic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Subaihi, Abdu; Mohammadtaheri, Mahsa; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-08-15

    Despite the fact that various microorganisms (e.g., bacteria, fungi, viruses, etc.) have been linked with infectious diseases, their crucial role towards sustaining life on Earth is undeniable. The huge biodiversity, combined with the wide range of biochemical capabilities of these organisms, have always been the driving force behind their large number of current, and, as of yet, undiscovered future applications. The presence of such diversity could be said to expedite the need for the development of rapid, accurate and sensitive techniques which allow for the detection, differentiation, identification and classification of such organisms. In this study, we employed Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman, and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopies, as molecular whole-organism fingerprinting techniques, combined with multivariate statistical analysis approaches for the classification of a range of industrial, environmental or clinically relevant bacteria (P. aeruginosa, P. putida, E. coli, E. faecium, S. lividans, B. subtilis, B. cereus) and yeast (S. cerevisiae). Principal components-discriminant function analysis (PC-DFA) scores plots of the spectral data collected from all three techniques allowed for the clear differentiation of all the samples down to sub-species level. The partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models generated using the SERS spectral data displayed lower accuracy (74.9%) when compared to those obtained from conventional Raman (97.8%) and FT-IR (96.2%) analyses. In addition, whilst background fluorescence was detected in Raman spectra for S. cerevisiae, this fluorescence was quenched when applying SERS to the same species, and conversely SERS appeared to introduce strong fluorescence when analysing P. putida. It is also worth noting that FT-IR analysis provided spectral data of high quality and reproducibility for the whole sample set, suggesting its applicability to a wider range of samples, and perhaps the

  8. Conditional mutual inclusive information enables accurate quantification of associations in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Zhao, Juan; Hao, Jin-Kao; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2015-03-11

    Mutual information (MI), a quantity describing the nonlinear dependence between two random variables, has been widely used to construct gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Despite its good performance, MI cannot separate the direct regulations from indirect ones among genes. Although the conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to identify the direct regulations, it generally underestimates the regulation strength, i.e. it may result in false negatives when inferring gene regulations. In this work, to overcome the problems, we propose a novel concept, namely conditional mutual inclusive information (CMI2), to describe the regulations between genes. Furthermore, with CMI2, we develop a new approach, namely CMI2NI (CMI2-based network inference), for reverse-engineering GRNs. In CMI2NI, CMI2 is used to quantify the mutual information between two genes given a third one through calculating the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the postulated distributions of including and excluding the edge between the two genes. The benchmark results on the GRNs from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in Escherichia coli demonstrate the superior performance of CMI2NI. Specifically, even for gene expression data with small sample size, CMI2NI can not only infer the correct topology of the regulation networks but also accurately quantify the regulation strength between genes. As a case study, CMI2NI was also used to reconstruct cancer-specific GRNs using gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). CMI2NI is freely accessible at http://www.comp-sysbio.org/cmi2ni.

  9. Measuring informant discrepancies in clinical child research.

    PubMed

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Kazdin, Alan E

    2004-09-01

    Discrepancies among informants' ratings of child psychopathology have important implications for diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Typically, parents and children complete measures (e.g., self-report checklists, diagnostic instruments) to assess child dysfunction. Ratings gathered from these sources reveal relatively little agreement on the nature and extent of the child's social, emotional, and behavioral problems. This article reviews and illustrates the most frequently used methods of measuring informant discrepancies in the clinical child literature (i.e., raw difference, standardized difference, and residual difference scores) and outlines key considerations to influence their selection. The authors conclude that frequently used methods of measuring informant discrepancies are not interchangeable and recommend that future investigations examining informant discrepancies in clinical child research use the standardized difference score as their measure of informant discrepancies.

  10. Is the Posner Reaction Time Test More Accurate Than Clinical Tests in Detecting Left Neglect in Acute and Chronic Stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Rengachary, Jennifer; d'Avossa, Giovanni; Sapir, Ayelet; Shulman, Gordon L.; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of common clinical tests for left neglect with that of a computerized reaction time Posner test in a stroke population. Design Neglect measures were collected longitudinally in stroke patients at the acute (≈2wk) and chronic (≈9mo) stage. Identical measures were collected in a healthy control group. Setting Inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation. Participants Acute stroke patients (n=59) with left neglect, 30 of whom were tested longitudinally; healthy age-matched controls (n=30). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures A receiver operating characteristic analysis, ranking the measures' sensitivity and specificity using a single summary statistic. Results Most clinical tests were adequately accurate at the acute stage, but many were near chance at the chronic stage. The Posner test was the most sensitive test at both stages, the most sensitive variable being the reaction time difference for detecting targets appearing on the left compared to the right side. Conclusions Computerized reaction time tests can be used to screen for subtle but potentially clinically relevant left neglect, which may not be detectable by conventional clinical tests, especially at the chronic stage. Such tests may be useful to assess the severity of the patients' deficits and provide more accurate measures of the degree of recovery in clinical trials than established clinical measures. PMID:19969172

  11. Information-based monitoring of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tsiatis, Anastasios A

    2006-10-15

    When designing a clinical trial to compare the effect of different treatments on response, a key issue facing the statistician is to determine how large a study is necessary to detect a clinically important difference with sufficient power. This is the case whether the study will be analysed only once (single-analysis) or whether it will be monitored periodically with the possibility of early stopping (group-sequential). Standard sample size calculations are based on both the magnitude of difference that is considered clinically important as well as values for the nuisance parameters in the statistical model. For planning purposes, best guesses are made for the value of the nuisance parameters and these are used to determine the sample size. However, if these guesses are incorrect this will affect the subsequent power to detect the clinically important difference. It is argued in this paper that statistical precision is directly related to Statistical Information and that the study should continue until the requisite statistical information is obtained. This is referred to as information-based design and analysis of clinical trials. We also argue that this type of methodology is best suited with group-sequential trials which monitor the data periodically and allow for estimation of the statistical information as the study progresses. PMID:16927248

  12. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research. PMID:27571061

  13. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research. PMID:27571061

  14. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research.

  15. Radiologist's clinical information review workstation interfaced with digital dictation system.

    PubMed

    McEnery, K W; Suitor, C T; Hildebrand, S; Downs, R L

    2000-05-01

    Efficient access to information systems integrated into the radiologist's interpretation workflow will result in a more informed radiologist, with an enhanced capability to render an accurate interpretation. We describe our implementation of radStation, a radiologist's clinical information review workstation that combines a digital dictation station with a clinical information display. radStation uses client software distributed to the radiologist's workstation and central server software, both running Windows NT (Microsoft, Redmond, WA). The client system has integrated digital dictation software. The bar-code microphone (Boomerang, Dictaphone Corp, Stratford, CT) also serves as a computer input device forwarding the procedure's accession number to the server software. This initiates multiple queries to available legacy databases, including the radiology information system (RIS), laboratory information system, clinic notes, hospital discharge, and operative report system. The three-tier architecture then returns the clinical results to the radStation client for display. At the conclusion of the dictation, the digital voice file is transferred to the dictation server and the client notifies the RIS to update the examination status. The system is efficient in its information retrieval, with queries displayed in about 1 second. The radStation client requires less than 5 minutes of radiologist training in its operation, given that its control interface integrates with the well-learned dictation process. The telephone-based dictation system, which this new system replaced, remains available as a back-up system in the event of an unexpected digital dictation system failure. This system is well accepted and valued by the radiologists. The system interface is quickly mastered. The system does not interrupt dictation workflow with the display of all information initiated with examination bar-coding. This system's features could become an accepted model as a standard tool

  16. Can script concordance testing be used in nursing education to accurately assess clinical reasoning skills?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Tyia; Comer, Linda; Kossick, Mark A; Neubrander, Judy

    2014-05-01

    The Script Concordance Test (SCT) has been used successfully in medical schools to assess clinical reasoning in medical students, but it has not been widely used in nursing education. The purpose of this study was to provide additional evidence of the validity and reliability of the SCT in evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students by replicating a previous study. The test was administered to 48 first-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing students. A scoring grid was developed using the aggregate scores method based on the modal responses of 13 panel members. The reliability of the scores was measured by Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and the scores of the students and the panel were compared using a t test. The difference between the panel's and the students' scores was statistically significant, and the reliability of the scores is high. The SCT provides a reliable, standardized, and easy-to-administer method of evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students.

  17. An universal and accurate replica technique for scanning electron microscope study in clinical dentistry.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G; Davidson, C

    1981-09-01

    One of the main concerns of dental research is the observation of the oral tissues and the materials applied to the dentition. The changes in composition and structure of the outer surfaces and the materials deposited on these surfaces are of special interest. In the literature, a variety of replica techniques for these purposes is described (Grundy in 1971 [12]; Saxton in 1973 [25]). The use of these techniques is limited because of artifacts in the samples, and a restricted resolution power resulting from useful magnifications in the order of 800x. An accurate and universal replica technique for the examination of specimens to be viewed under the SEM has been developed. The first impression is made by a light body silicone elastomer (President Coltene). The positive replica is made by electrodeposition of copper in an electro plating bath (Acru plat 5 electronic, Dr. Th. Wieland, D-7530 Pforzheim). The reliability and accuracy of this replica technique was verified by a scanning electron microscopic comparison of the replicas and the actual structures of etched enamel. To illustrate the applicability of the replica technique to structures with much lower hardness, also high resolution images of dental plaque were produced. The copper surface offers a perfect, original and proper electroconductive medium that withstands the bombardment of electrons and the relatively severe conditions in the scanning electron microscope. Reproducibility was accurate as judged by the duplication in position, size, and shape of the fine detail at magnifications of 7500x offering a resolution of 25 nm.

  18. Clinical information systems for integrated healthcare networks.

    PubMed Central

    Teich, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    In the 1990's, a large number of hospitals and medical practices have merged to form integrated healthcare networks (IHN's). The nature of an IHN creates new demands for information management, and also imposes new constraints on information systems for the network. Important tradeoffs must be made between homogeneity and flexibility, central and distributed governance, and access and confidentiality. This paper describes key components of clinical information systems for IHN's, and examines important design decisions that affect the value of such systems. Images Figure 1 PMID:9929178

  19. Cleveland Clinic intelligent mouthguard: a new technology to accurately measure head impact in athletes and soldiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Adam; Samorezov, Sergey

    2013-05-01

    Nearly 2 million Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) occur in the U.S. each year, with societal costs approaching $60 billion. Including mild TBI and concussion, TBI's are prevalent in soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan as well as in domestic athletes. Long-term risks of single and cumulative head impact dosage may present in the form of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, suicide, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), dementia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Quantifying head impact dosage and understanding associated risk factors for the development of long-term sequelae is critical toward developing guidelines for TBI exposure and post-exposure management. The current knowledge gap between head impact exposure and clinical outcomes limits the understanding of underlying TBI mechanisms, including effective treatment protocols and prevention methods for soldiers and athletes. In order to begin addressing this knowledge gap, Cleveland Clinic is developing the "Intelligent Mouthguard" head impact dosimeter. Current testing indicates the Intelligent Mouthguard can quantify linear acceleration with 3% error and angular acceleration with 17% error during impacts ranging from 10g to 174g and 850rad/s2 to 10000rad/s2, respectively. Correlation was high (R2 > 0.99, R2 = 0.98, respectively). Near-term development will be geared towards quantifying head impact dosages in vitro, longitudinally in athletes and to test new sensors for possible improved accuracy and reduced bias. Long-term, the IMG may be useful to soldiers to be paired with neurocognitive clinical data quantifying resultant TBI functional deficits.

  20. NEOCIVET: Towards accurate morphometry of neonatal gyrification and clinical applications in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hosung; Lepage, Claude; Maheshwary, Romir; Jeon, Seun; Evans, Alan C; Hess, Christopher P; Barkovich, A James; Xu, Duan

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral cortical folding becomes dramatically more complex in the fetal brain during the 3rd trimester of gestation; the process continues in a similar fashion in children who are born prematurely. To quantify this morphological development, it is necessary to extract the interface between gray matter and white matter, which is particularly challenging due to changing tissue contrast during brain maturation. We employed the well-established CIVET pipeline to extract this cortical surface, with point correspondence across subjects, using a surface-based spherical registration. We then developed a variant of the pipeline, called NEOCIVET, that quantified cortical folding using mean curvature and sulcal depth while addressing the well-known problems of poor and temporally-varying gray/white contrast as well as motion artifact in neonatal MRI. NEOCIVET includes: i) a tissue classification technique that analyzed multi-atlas texture patches using the nonlocal mean estimator and subsequently applied a label fusion approach based on a joint probability between templates, ii) neonatal template construction based on age-specific sub-groups, and iii) masking of non-interesting structures using label-fusion approaches. These techniques replaced modules that might be suboptimal for regional analysis of poor-contrast neonatal cortex. The proposed segmentation method showed more accurate results in subjects with various ages and with various degrees of motion compared to state-of-the-art methods. In the analysis of 158 preterm-born neonates, many with multiple scans (n=231; 26-40weeks postmenstrual age at scan), NEOCIVET identified increases in cortical folding over time in numerous cortical regions (mean curvature: +0.003/week; sulcal depth: +0.04mm/week) while folding did not change in major sulci that are known to develop early (corrected p<0.05). The proposed pipeline successfully mapped cortical structural development, supporting current models of cerebral morphogenesis

  1. Measuring Mortality Information in Clinical Data Warehouses.

    PubMed

    Jones, Barrett; Vawdrey, David K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to track and report long-term outcomes, especially mortality, is essential for advancing clinical research. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for assessing the quality of mortality information in clinical research databases. Using the clinical data warehouse (CDW) at Columbia University Medical Center as a case study, we measured: 1) agreement in vital status between our institution's patient registration system and the U.S. Social Security Administration's Death Master File (DMF), 2) the proportion of patients marked as deceased according to the DMF records who had subsequent visits to our institution, and 3) the proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age. Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution's patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF. Of 315,037 patients in our CDW who marked as deceased according to the DMF, 2.1% had a subsequent clinical encounter at our institution. The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively. These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1-4). PMID:26306284

  2. Measuring Mortality Information in Clinical Data Warehouses

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Barrett; Vawdrey, David K.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to track and report long-term outcomes, especially mortality, is essential for advancing clinical research. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for assessing the quality of mortality information in clinical research databases. Using the clinical data warehouse (CDW) at Columbia University Medical Center as a case study, we measured: 1) agreement in vital status between our institution’s patient registration system and the U.S. Social Security Administration’s Death Master File (DMF), 2) the proportion of patients marked as deceased according to the DMF records who had subsequent visits to our institution, and 3) the proportion of patients still living according to Columbia’s CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age. Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution’s patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF. Of 315,037 patients in our CDW who marked as deceased according to the DMF, 2.1% had a subsequent clinical encounter at our institution. The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia’s CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively. These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1–4). PMID:26306284

  3. Measuring Mortality Information in Clinical Data Warehouses.

    PubMed

    Jones, Barrett; Vawdrey, David K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to track and report long-term outcomes, especially mortality, is essential for advancing clinical research. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for assessing the quality of mortality information in clinical research databases. Using the clinical data warehouse (CDW) at Columbia University Medical Center as a case study, we measured: 1) agreement in vital status between our institution's patient registration system and the U.S. Social Security Administration's Death Master File (DMF), 2) the proportion of patients marked as deceased according to the DMF records who had subsequent visits to our institution, and 3) the proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age. Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution's patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF. Of 315,037 patients in our CDW who marked as deceased according to the DMF, 2.1% had a subsequent clinical encounter at our institution. The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively. These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1-4).

  4. Infrastructure support for Clinical Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, Greg, A.

    2007-06-15

    Executive Summary: For the past 5 years, Adventist Health has been implementing a clinical information system, titled Project IntelliCare, throughout its 19 hospitals. To successfully do this, a commitment was made to ensure continuous availability of vital patient health information to the local hospitals. This commitment required a centralized data center with sufficient capacity and a backup data center to be used in case of technical software or natural disaster where interruptions could occur. The DOE grant provided financial assistance to purchase equipment to increase the capacity of an existing data center, along with purchase of more sophisticated software for the data center thus providing a reduction in time that information is unavailable to the local hospitals when hardware or software problems occur. Relative to public good, this translates into increased safety and convenience for the patients we serve because their electronic medical records are current and available a higher percentage of the time.

  5. Informal interprofessional learning: visualizing the clinical workplace.

    PubMed

    Wagter, Judith Martine; van de Bunt, Gerhard; Honing, Marina; Eckenhausen, Marina; Scherpbier, Albert

    2012-05-01

    Daily collaboration of senior doctors, residents and nurses involves a major potential for sharing knowledge between professionals. Therefore, more attention needs to be paid to informal learning to create strategies and appropriate conditions for enhancing and effectuating informal learning in the workplace. The aim of this study is to visualize and describe patterns of informal interprofessional learning relations among staff in complex care. Questionnaires with four network questions - recognized as indicators of informal learning in the clinical workplace - were handed out to intensive and medium care unit (ICU/MCU) staff members (N = 108), of which 77% were completed and returned. Data were analyzed using social network analysis and Mokken scale analysis. Densities, tie strength and reciprocity of the four networks created show MCU and ICU nurses as subgroups within the ward and reveal central but relatively one-sided relations of senior doctors with nurses and residents. Based on the analyses, we formulated a scale of intensity of informal learning relations that can be used to understand and stimulate informal interprofessional learning.

  6. Clinical use of diodes and micro-chambers to obtain accurate small field output factor measurements.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Charles, P H; Cranmer-Sargison, G; Crowe, S B; Langton, C M; Thwaites, D I; Trapp, J V

    2015-06-01

    There have been substantial advances in small field dosimetry techniques and technologies, over the last decade, which have dramatically improved the achievable accuracy of small field dose measurements. This educational note aims to help radiation oncology medical physicists to apply some of these advances in clinical practice. The evaluation of a set of small field output factors (total scatter factors) is used to exemplify a detailed measurement and simulation procedure and as a basis for discussing the possible effects of simplifying that procedure. Field output factors were measured with an unshielded diode and a micro-ionisation chamber, at the centre of a set of square fields defined by a micro-multileaf collimator. Nominal field sizes investigated ranged from 6 × 6 to 98 × 98 mm(2). Diode measurements in fields smaller than 30 mm across were corrected using response factors calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the diode geometry and daisy-chained to match micro-chamber measurements at intermediate field sizes. Diode measurements in fields smaller than 15 mm across were repeated twelve times over three separate measurement sessions, to evaluate the reproducibility of the radiation field size and its correspondence with the nominal field size. The five readings that contributed to each measurement on each day varied by up to 0.26  %, for the "very small" fields smaller than 15 mm, and 0.18 % for the fields larger than 15 mm. The diode response factors calculated for the unshielded diode agreed with previously published results, within uncertainties. The measured dimensions of the very small fields differed by up to 0.3 mm, across the different measurement sessions, contributing an uncertainty of up to 1.2 % to the very small field output factors. The overall uncertainties in the field output factors were 1.8 % for the very small fields and 1.1 % for the fields larger than 15 mm across. Recommended steps for acquiring small field output

  7. Accurate refinement of docked protein complexes using evolutionary information and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Farhoodi, Roshanak; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2016-06-01

    One of the major challenges for protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate native-like structures from false positives. Docking methods are often inaccurate and the results have to be refined and re-ranked to obtain native-like complexes and remove outliers. In a previous work, we introduced AccuRefiner, a machine learning based tool for refining protein-protein complexes. Given a docked complex, the refinement tool produces a small set of refined versions of the input complex, with lower root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of atomic positions with respect to the native structure. The method employs a unique ranking tool that accurately predicts the RMSD of docked complexes with respect to the native structure. In this work, we use a deep learning network with a similar set of features and five layers. We show that a properly trained deep learning network can accurately predict the RMSD of a docked complex with 1.40 Å error margin on average, by approximating the complex relationship between a wide set of scoring function terms and the RMSD of a docked structure. The network was trained on 35000 unbound docking complexes generated by RosettaDock. We tested our method on 25 different putative docked complexes produced also by RosettaDock for five proteins that were not included in the training data. The results demonstrate that the high accuracy of the ranking tool enables AccuRefiner to consistently choose the refinement candidates with lower RMSD values compared to the coarsely docked input structures. PMID:26846813

  8. Accurate refinement of docked protein complexes using evolutionary information and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Farhoodi, Roshanak; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2016-06-01

    One of the major challenges for protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate native-like structures from false positives. Docking methods are often inaccurate and the results have to be refined and re-ranked to obtain native-like complexes and remove outliers. In a previous work, we introduced AccuRefiner, a machine learning based tool for refining protein-protein complexes. Given a docked complex, the refinement tool produces a small set of refined versions of the input complex, with lower root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of atomic positions with respect to the native structure. The method employs a unique ranking tool that accurately predicts the RMSD of docked complexes with respect to the native structure. In this work, we use a deep learning network with a similar set of features and five layers. We show that a properly trained deep learning network can accurately predict the RMSD of a docked complex with 1.40 Å error margin on average, by approximating the complex relationship between a wide set of scoring function terms and the RMSD of a docked structure. The network was trained on 35000 unbound docking complexes generated by RosettaDock. We tested our method on 25 different putative docked complexes produced also by RosettaDock for five proteins that were not included in the training data. The results demonstrate that the high accuracy of the ranking tool enables AccuRefiner to consistently choose the refinement candidates with lower RMSD values compared to the coarsely docked input structures.

  9. Informal sources of supervision in clinical training.

    PubMed

    Farber, Barry A; Hazanov, Valery

    2014-11-01

    Although formal, assigned supervision is a potent source of learning and guidance for psychotherapy trainees, many beginning psychotherapists use other, informal sources of supervision or consultation for advice and support. Results of an online survey of beginning trainees (N = 146) indicate that other than their formally assigned supervisor, trainees most often consult with colleagues in their program, their own psychotherapist, and their significant other; that they're most likely to seek these other sources of help when they're feeling stuck or feel they've made a clinical mistake; that they do so because they need extra reassurance and suggestions; that they feel the advice given from these sources is helpful; and that they don't especially regret sharing this information. Several case examples are used to illustrate these points. Discussing clinical material with informal sources is, apparently, a great deal more common than typically acknowledged, and as such, has implications for training programs (including discussions of ethics) and formal supervision.

  10. Can Raters with Reduced Job Descriptive Information Provide Accurate Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) Ratings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Lee; Harvey, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    Job-naive raters provided with job descriptive information made Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) ratings which were validated against ratings of job analysts who were also job content experts. None of the reduced job descriptive information conditions enabled job-naive raters to obtain either acceptable levels of convergent validity with…

  11. Partnering industry to develop clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Victoria; Hamer, Susan

    2012-09-01

    Over the past six months, the nursing team from the Department of Health's Informatics Directorate has been working with colleagues in industry to promote and share learning and understanding of issues surrounding the nursing profession. Team members were asked among other things to identify key questions senior nursing colleagues and suppliers should ask one another when considering the implementation of a new system for recording clinical information and extracting pertinent data. This article aims to encourage collaborative working and understanding of the importance of senior nurse involvement in choosing and delivering the right system for staff and patients. PMID:23008903

  12. 16 CFR 1101.32 - Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to release to the public: (1) The Commission staff or a qualified person or entity outside the... will review the information in light of the comments. The degree of review by the Commission and...

  13. An examination of information quality as a moderator of accurate personality judgment.

    PubMed

    Letzring, Tera D; Human, Lauren J

    2014-10-01

    Information quality is an important moderator of the accuracy of personality judgment, and this article describes research focusing on how specific kinds of information are related to accuracy. In this study, 228 participants (159 female, 69 male; mean age = 23.43; 86.4% Caucasian) in unacquainted dyads were assigned to discuss thoughts and feelings, discuss behaviors, or engage in behaviors. Interactions lasted 25-30 min, and participants provided ratings of their partners and themselves following the interaction on the Big Five traits, ego-control, and ego-resiliency. Next, the amount of different types of information made available by each participant was objectively coded. The accuracy criterion, composed of self- and acquaintance ratings, was used to assess distinctive and normative accuracy using the Social Accuracy Model. Participants in the discussion conditions achieved higher distinctive accuracy than participants who engaged in behaviors, but normative accuracy did not differ across conditions. Information about specific behaviors and general behaviors were among the most consistent predictors of higher distinctive accuracy. Normative accuracy was more likely to decrease than increase when higher-quality information was available. Verbal information about behaviors is the most useful for learning about how people are unique.

  14. Polyallelic structural variants can provide accurate, highly informative genetic markers focused on diagnosis and therapeutic targets: Accuracy vs. Precision.

    PubMed

    Roses, A D

    2016-02-01

    Structural variants (SVs) include all insertions, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, with several common types of nucleotide repeats including single sequence repeats, short tandem repeats, and insertion-deletion length variants. Polyallelic SVs provide highly informative markers for association studies with well-phenotyped cohorts. SVs can influence gene regulation by affecting epigenetics, transcription, splicing, and/or translation. Accurate assays of polyallelic SV loci are required to define the range and allele frequency of variable length alleles. PMID:26517180

  15. Simple, Sensitive and Accurate Multiplex Detection of Clinically Important Melanoma DNA Mutations in Circulating Tumour DNA with SERS Nanotags

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Eugene J.H.; Wang, Yuling; Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and accurate identification of specific DNA mutations can influence clinical decisions. However accurate diagnosis from limiting samples such as circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is challenging. Current approaches based on fluorescence such as quantitative PCR (qPCR) and more recently, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) have limitations in multiplex detection, sensitivity and the need for expensive specialized equipment. Herein we describe an assay capitalizing on the multiplexing and sensitivity benefits of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with the simplicity of standard PCR to address the limitations of current approaches. This proof-of-concept method could reproducibly detect as few as 0.1% (10 copies, CV < 9%) of target sequences thus demonstrating the high sensitivity of the method. The method was then applied to specifically detect three important melanoma mutations in multiplex. Finally, the PCR/SERS assay was used to genotype cell lines and ctDNA from serum samples where results subsequently validated with ddPCR. With ddPCR-like sensitivity and accuracy yet at the convenience of standard PCR, we believe this multiplex PCR/SERS method could find wide applications in both diagnostics and research. PMID:27446486

  16. Findings from the Clinical Information Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and to propose a selection of best papers published in 2014 in the field of Clinical Information Systems (CIS). Method A query with search terms from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) catalog as well as additional free text search terms was designed to identify relevant publications in the field of clinical information systems from PubMed and Web of Science®. The retrieved articles were then categorized in a multi-pass review carried out separately by the section editors. The final selection of 15 candidate papers was then peer-reviewed by Yearbook editors and external reviewers. Based on the review results the four best papers were then selected at the best papers selection meeting with the IMIA Yearbook editorial board. Results The query was carried out in mid-January 2015, yielding a combined result set of 1525 articles which were published in 722 different journals. Among these articles two main thematic sections were identified: i) Interoperability from a syntactical and semantic point of view as well as from a long-term preservation and organizational/legal point of view and ii) secondary use of existing health data in all its shades. Here, patient safety was a major scope of application. Conclusions CIS have become mature over the last years. The focus has now moved beyond data acquisition for just supporting the local care workflows. Actual research efforts in the CIS domain comprise the breakdown of information silos, the reduction of barriers between different systems of different care providers and secondary use of accumulated health data for multiple purposes. PMID:26293854

  17. Accurate human microsatellite genotypes from high-throughput resequencing data using informed error profiles

    PubMed Central

    Highnam, Gareth; Franck, Christopher; Martin, Andy; Stephens, Calvin; Puthige, Ashwin; Mittelman, David

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive sequences are biologically and clinically important because they can influence traits and disease, but repeats are challenging to analyse using short-read sequencing technology. We present a tool for genotyping microsatellite repeats called RepeatSeq, which uses Bayesian model selection guided by an empirically derived error model that incorporates sequence and read properties. Next, we apply RepeatSeq to high-coverage genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project to evaluate performance and accuracy. The software uses common formats, such as VCF, for compatibility with existing genome analysis pipelines. Source code and binaries are available at http://github.com/adaptivegenome/repeatseq. PMID:23090981

  18. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:26633821

  19. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate.

    PubMed

    Minyoo, Abel B; Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul; Lankester, Felix

    2015-12-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere.

  20. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate.

    PubMed

    Minyoo, Abel B; Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul; Lankester, Felix

    2015-12-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:26633821

  1. Accurate detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae ciprofloxacin susceptibility directly from genital and extragenital clinical samples: towards genotype-guided antimicrobial therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Marcus J.; Hall, Catherine L.; Miari, Victoria F.; Cole, Michelle; Laing, Ken G.; Jagatia, Heena; Harding-Esch, Emma; Monahan, Irene M.; Planche, Timothy; Hinds, Jason; Ison, Catherine A.; Chisholm, Stephanie; Butcher, Philip D.; Sadiq, Syed Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increasing use of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) as the primary means of diagnosing gonococcal infection has resulted in diminished availability of Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibility data. We conducted a prospective diagnostic assessment of a real-time PCR assay (NGSNP) enabling direct detection of gonococcal ciprofloxacin susceptibility from a range of clinical sample types. Methods NGSNP, designed to discriminate an SNP associated with ciprofloxacin resistance within the N. gonorrhoeae genome, was validated using a characterized panel of geographically diverse isolates (n = 90) and evaluated to predict ciprofloxacin susceptibility directly on N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT lysates derived from genital (n = 174) and non-genital (n = 116) samples (n = 290), from 222 culture-confirmed clinical episodes of gonococcal infection. Results NGSNP correctly genotyped all phenotypically susceptible (n = 49) and resistant (n = 41) panel isolates. Ciprofloxacin-resistant N. gonorrhoeae was responsible for infection in 29.7% (n = 66) of clinical episodes evaluated. Compared with phenotypic susceptibility testing, NGSNP demonstrated sensitivity and specificity of 95.8% (95% CI 91.5%–98.3%) and 100% (95% CI 94.7%–100%), respectively, for detecting ciprofloxacin-susceptible N. gonorrhoeae, with a positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI 97.7%–100%). Applied to urogenital (n = 164), rectal (n = 40) and pharyngeal samples alone (n = 30), positive predictive values were 100% (95% CI 96.8%–100%), 100% (95% CI 87.2%–100%) and 100% (95% CI 82.4%–100%), respectively. Conclusions Genotypic prediction of N. gonorrhoeae ciprofloxacin susceptibility directly from clinical samples was highly accurate and, in the absence of culture, will facilitate use of tailored therapy for gonococcal infection, sparing use of current empirical treatment regimens and enhancing acquisition of susceptibility data for

  2. Exploratory Movement Generates Higher-Order Information That Is Sufficient for Accurate Perception of Scaled Egocentric Distance

    PubMed Central

    Mantel, Bruno; Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Campbell, Alain; Bardy, Benoît G.

    2015-01-01

    Body movement influences the structure of multiple forms of ambient energy, including optics and gravito-inertial force. Some researchers have argued that egocentric distance is derived from inferential integration of visual and non-visual stimulation. We suggest that accurate information about egocentric distance exists in perceptual stimulation as higher-order patterns that extend across optics and inertia. We formalize a pattern that specifies the egocentric distance of a stationary object across higher-order relations between optics and inertia. This higher-order parameter is created by self-generated movement of the perceiver in inertial space relative to the illuminated environment. For this reason, we placed minimal restrictions on the exploratory movements of our participants. We asked whether humans can detect and use the information available in this higher-order pattern. Participants judged whether a virtual object was within reach. We manipulated relations between body movement and the ambient structure of optics and inertia. Judgments were precise and accurate when the higher-order optical-inertial parameter was available. When only optic flow was available, judgments were poor. Our results reveal that participants perceived egocentric distance from the higher-order, optical-inertial consequences of their own exploratory activity. Analysis of participants’ movement trajectories revealed that self-selected movements were complex, and tended to optimize availability of the optical-inertial pattern that specifies egocentric distance. We argue that accurate information about egocentric distance exists in higher-order patterns of ambient energy, that self-generated movement can generate these higher-order patterns, and that these patterns can be detected and used to support perception of egocentric distance that is precise and accurate. PMID:25856410

  3. Combining Evolutionary Information and an Iterative Sampling Strategy for Accurate Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Braun, Tatjana; Koehler Leman, Julia; Lange, Oliver F

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has shown that the accuracy of ab initio structure prediction can be significantly improved by integrating evolutionary information in form of intra-protein residue-residue contacts. Following this seminal result, much effort is put into the improvement of contact predictions. However, there is also a substantial need to develop structure prediction protocols tailored to the type of restraints gained by contact predictions. Here, we present a structure prediction protocol that combines evolutionary information with the resolution-adapted structural recombination approach of Rosetta, called RASREC. Compared to the classic Rosetta ab initio protocol, RASREC achieves improved sampling, better convergence and higher robustness against incorrect distance restraints, making it the ideal sampling strategy for the stated problem. To demonstrate the accuracy of our protocol, we tested the approach on a diverse set of 28 globular proteins. Our method is able to converge for 26 out of the 28 targets and improves the average TM-score of the entire benchmark set from 0.55 to 0.72 when compared to the top ranked models obtained by the EVFold web server using identical contact predictions. Using a smaller benchmark, we furthermore show that the prediction accuracy of our method is only slightly reduced when the contact prediction accuracy is comparatively low. This observation is of special interest for protein sequences that only have a limited number of homologs.

  4. The economic motivations for clinical information systems.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P. D.; van Mulligen, E.

    1996-01-01

    For three decades (1960-1990) the primary use of computers in hospitals' in the U.S. was to ease the task of reimbursement for care rendered and to automate results reporting for high-volume, time-critical tests such as clinical laboratory procedures. Hospitals were regarded as independent organizations/revenue centers which could pass costs to third party payers. Beginning in the mid-eighties, U.S. hospitals were no longer reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis for many patients, but received a fixed payment regardless of the actual cost of treating a patient. The size of the payment depended upon the patients' type of illness (Diagnostically related group). This approach gave hospitals incentives to reduce costs, but did not foster a fully competitive environment. Now, in the mid-nineties, hospitals in the U.S. are seen as cost centers in an integrated health care delivery system. Within this environment, a longitudinal patient record is necessary to increase levels of communication between healthcare providers. While certain management functions remain hospital-centered, clinical information systems must now cover a spectrum of patient activities within the ambulatory and inpatient arena. Several of the leading healthcare providers use computer-based logic to alert care givers whenever standards of care are not being achieved. These institutions feel that such capability will be the real impetus to reduce cost and improve the quality of care. Based upon observations over four decades, it appears that economic considerations play the major role in determining which kinds of information systems are deployed in the healthcare arena. PMID:8947748

  5. Honey bees can perform accurately directed waggle dances based solely on information from a homeward trip.

    PubMed

    Edrich, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Honey bees were displaced several 100 m from their hive to an unfamiliar site and provisioned with honey. After feeding, almost two-thirds of the bees flew home to their hive within a 50 min observation time. About half of these returning, bees signalled the direction of the release site in waggle dances thus demonstrating that the dance can be guided entirely by information gathered on a single homeward trip. The likely reason for the bees' enthusiastic dancing on their initial return from this new site was the highly rewarding honeycomb that they were given there. The attractive nature of the site is confirmed by many of these bees revisiting the site and continuing to forage there.

  6. Accurately decoding visual information from fMRI data obtained in a realistic virtual environment

    PubMed Central

    Floren, Andrew; Naylor, Bruce; Miikkulainen, Risto; Ress, David

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional interactive virtual environments (VEs) are a powerful tool for brain-imaging based cognitive neuroscience that are presently under-utilized. This paper presents machine-learning based methods for identifying brain states induced by realistic VEs with improved accuracy as well as the capability for mapping their spatial topography on the neocortex. VEs provide the ability to study the brain under conditions closer to the environment in which humans evolved, and thus to probe deeper into the complexities of human cognition. As a test case, we designed a stimulus to reflect a military combat situation in the Middle East, motivated by the potential of using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. Each subject experienced moving through the virtual town where they encountered 1–6 animated combatants at different locations, while fMRI data was collected. To analyze the data from what is, compared to most studies, more complex and less controlled stimuli, we employed statistical machine learning in the form of Multi-Voxel Pattern Analysis (MVPA) with special attention given to artificial Neural Networks (NN). Extensions to NN that exploit the block structure of the stimulus were developed to improve the accuracy of the classification, achieving performances from 58 to 93% (chance was 16.7%) with six subjects. This demonstrates that MVPA can decode a complex cognitive state, viewing a number of characters, in a dynamic virtual environment. To better understand the source of this information in the brain, a novel form of sensitivity analysis was developed to use NN to quantify the degree to which each voxel contributed to classification. Compared with maps produced by general linear models and the searchlight approach, these sensitivity maps revealed a more diverse pattern of information relevant to the classification of cognitive state. PMID:26106315

  7. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions.

  8. Development of transfer standard devices for ensuring the accurate calibration of ultrasonic physical therapy machines in clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekkenberg, R. T.; Richards, A.; Beissner, K.; Zeqiri, B.; Prout, G.; Cantrall, Ch; Bezemer, R. A.; Koch, Ch; Hodnett, M.

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapy ultrasound is widely applied to patients. However, many devices do not comply with the relevant standard stating that the actual power output shall be within +/-20% of the device indication. Extreme cases have been reported: from delivering effectively no ultrasound or operating at maximum power at all powers indicated. This can potentially lead to patient injury as well as mistreatment. The present European (EC) project is an ongoing attempt to improve the quality of the treatment of patients being treated with ultrasonic physical-therapy. A Portable ultrasound Power Standard (PPS) is being developed and accurately calibrated. The PPS includes: Ultrasound transducers (including one exhibiting an unusual output) and a driver for the ultrasound transducers that has calibration and proficiency test functions. Also included with the PPS is a Cavitation Detector to determine the onset of cavitation occurring within the propagation medium. The PPS will be suitable for conducting in-the-field accreditation (proficiency testing and calibration). In order to be accredited it will be important to be able to show traceability of the calibration, the calibration process and qualification of testing staff. The clinical user will benefit from traceability because treatments will be performed more reliably.

  9. Transforming Clinic Environments into Information Workspaces for Patients

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Kenton T.; Skeels, Meredith; Civan-Hartzler, Andrea; Pratt, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    Although clinic environments are a primary location for exchanging information with clinicians, patients experience these spaces as harsh environments to access, use, exchange, and manage information. In this paper, we present results from an ethnographic-inspired study of breast cancer patients actively interacting with information in clinic environments. Through observations and interviews, we observed information interactions in awkward physical positions; inefficient use of existing clinical space; separation of patients from their information and lack of support for collaborative document viewing. These factors compromised patients’ abilities to manage their information work when they experienced bursts of information exchange, lack of advance information, fragmented attention, and heightened stress in clinic environments. To overcome these challenges, we identify formative strategies to focus attention, encourage collaboration, and improve communication in clinical settings. PMID:21654895

  10. Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Information – Current and Future Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    According to a patient-centered viewpoint, the meaning of harmonization in the context of laboratory medicine is that the information should be comparable irrespective of the measurement procedure used and where and/or when a measurement is made. Harmonization represents a fundamental aspect of quality in laboratory medicine as its ultimate goal is to improve patient outcomes through the provision of an accurate and actionable laboratory information. Although the initial focus has to a large extent been to harmonize and standardize analytical processes and methods, the scope of harmonization goes beyond to include all other aspects of the total testing process (TTP), such as terminology and units, report formats, reference intervals and decision limits, as well as tests and test profiles request and criteria for interpretation. Two major progresses have been made in the area of harmonization in laboratory medicine: first, the awareness that harmonization should take into consideration not only the analytical phase but all steps of the TTP, thus dealing with the request, the sample, the measurement, and the report. Second, as the processes required to achieve harmonization are complicated, a systematic approach is needed. The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) has played a fundamental and successful role in the development of standardized and harmonized assays, and now it should continue to work in the field through the collaboration and cooperation with many other stakeholders.

  11. Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Information - Current and Future Strategies.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Mario

    2016-02-01

    According to a patient-centered viewpoint, the meaning of harmonization in the context of laboratory medicine is that the information should be comparable irrespective of the measurement procedure used and where and/or when a measurement is made. Harmonization represents a fundamental aspect of quality in laboratory medicine as its ultimate goal is to improve patient outcomes through the provision of an accurate and actionable laboratory information. Although the initial focus has to a large extent been to harmonize and standardize analytical processes and methods, the scope of harmonization goes beyond to include all other aspects of the total testing process (TTP), such as terminology and units, report formats, reference intervals and decision limits, as well as tests and test profiles request and criteria for interpretation. Two major progresses have been made in the area of harmonization in laboratory medicine: first, the awareness that harmonization should take into consideration not only the analytical phase but all steps of the TTP, thus dealing with the request, the sample, the measurement, and the report. Second, as the processes required to achieve harmonization are complicated, a systematic approach is needed. The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) has played a fundamental and successful role in the development of standardized and harmonized assays, and now it should continue to work in the field through the collaboration and cooperation with many other stakeholders. PMID:27683502

  12. Information Model for Reusability in Clinical Trial Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahl, Bhanu

    2013-01-01

    In clinical research, New Drug Application (NDA) to health agencies requires generation of a large number of documents throughout the clinical development life cycle, many of which are also submitted to public databases and external partners. Current processes to assemble the information, author, review and approve the clinical research documents,…

  13. Adoption of Clinical Information Systems in Health Services Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Charles J.; Holland, Gloria J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual model of factors which influence organizational decisions to invest in the installation of clinical information systems. Using results of previous research as a framework, the relative influence of clinical, fiscal, and strategic-institutional decision structures are examined. These adoption decisions are important in health services organizations because clinical information is essential for managing demand and allocating resources, managing quality of care, and controlling costs.

  14. A clinical information consultation service at a teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Tobia, R C; Kronick, D A; Harris, G D

    1983-01-01

    The library and the department of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio cooperated in a three-month pilot project to test a clinical information consultation service that provides patient care information to house staff members in the clinical setting. Evaluation indicated that users were highly satisfied with the service. Results of our pilot project seem to show that a clinical information consultation service can be an efficient and cost-effective means to provide information in a patient-care setting. PMID:6652299

  15. A clinical information consultation service at a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Tobia, R C; Kronick, D A; Harris, G D

    1983-10-01

    The library and the department of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio cooperated in a three-month pilot project to test a clinical information consultation service that provides patient care information to house staff members in the clinical setting. Evaluation indicated that users were highly satisfied with the service. Results of our pilot project seem to show that a clinical information consultation service can be an efficient and cost-effective means to provide information in a patient-care setting.

  16. [Information technologies in clinical cytology (a lecture)].

    PubMed

    Shabalova, I P; Dzhangirova, T V; Kasoian, K T

    2010-07-01

    The lecture is devoted to the urgent problem that is to increase the quality of cytological diagnosis, by diminishing the subjectivism factor via introduction of up-to-date computer information technologies into a cytologist's practice. Its main lines from the standardization of cytological specimen preparation to the registration of a cytologist's opinion and the assessment of the specialist's work quality at the laboratories that successfully use the capacities of the current information systems are described. Information technology capabilities to improve the interpretation of the cellular composition of cytological specimens are detailed. PMID:20799410

  17. Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research.

  18. Republished: Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research.

  19. An ontologically founded architecture for information systems in clinical and epidemiological research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an ontologically founded basic architecture for information systems, which are intended to capture, represent, and maintain metadata for various domains of clinical and epidemiological research. Clinical trials exhibit an important basis for clinical research, and the accurate specification of metadata and their documentation and application in clinical and epidemiological study projects represents a significant expense in the project preparation and has a relevant impact on the value and quality of these studies. An ontological foundation of an information system provides a semantic framework for the precise specification of those entities which are presented in this system. This semantic framework should be grounded, according to our approach, on a suitable top-level ontology. Such an ontological foundation leads to a deeper understanding of the entities of the domain under consideration, and provides a common unifying semantic basis, which supports the integration of data and the interoperability between different information systems. The intended information systems will be applied to the field of clinical and epidemiological research and will provide, depending on the application context, a variety of functionalities. In the present paper, we focus on a basic architecture which might be common to all such information systems. The research, set forth in this paper, is included in a broader framework of clinical research and continues the work of the IMISE on these topics. PMID:21995847

  20. Minnesota clinics' adoption, use and exchange of electronic health information.

    PubMed

    Soderberg, Karen; Laventure, Marty

    2013-09-01

    In 2007, Minnesota passed a law requiring all health care providers in the state to implement an interoperable electronic health record (EHR) system by January 1, 2015. Since then, the Minnesota Department of Health has been monitoring progress each year by surveying hospitals, clinics and other health and health care facilities about their EHR use. This article summarizes findings from the 2013 survey of ambulatory clinics. Those results show Minnesota clinics are well on the way to achieving the state's goals for using EHRs to exchange information: 87% of clinics have adopted EHRs, 80% routinely use medication guides and alerts, and 36% exchange health information with unaffiliated settings.

  1. Sufficient trial size to inform clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Manski, Charles F; Tetenov, Aleksey

    2016-09-20

    Medical research has evolved conventions for choosing sample size in randomized clinical trials that rest on the theory of hypothesis testing. Bayesian statisticians have argued that trials should be designed to maximize subjective expected utility in settings of clinical interest. This perspective is compelling given a credible prior distribution on treatment response, but there is rarely consensus on what the subjective prior beliefs should be. We use Wald's frequentist statistical decision theory to study design of trials under ambiguity. We show that ε-optimal rules exist when trials have large enough sample size. An ε-optimal rule has expected welfare within ε of the welfare of the best treatment in every state of nature. Equivalently, it has maximum regret no larger than ε We consider trials that draw predetermined numbers of subjects at random within groups stratified by covariates and treatments. We report exact results for the special case of two treatments and binary outcomes. We give simple sufficient conditions on sample sizes that ensure existence of ε-optimal treatment rules when there are multiple treatments and outcomes are bounded. These conditions are obtained by application of Hoeffding large deviations inequalities to evaluate the performance of empirical success rules. PMID:27601679

  2. Informed consent, confidentiality, and subject rights in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Smith-Tyler, June

    2007-05-01

    The informed consent process is designed to inform the subject of the risks, rights, and benefits of participation in a clinical research trial. Informed consent, while not always necessary, is a critical component of ethical research involving human subjects. This article includes an overview of two sets of regulations regarding informed consent found in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Titles 21 and 45: 21 CFR 50 and 56, the Food and Drug Administration Regulations, and 45 CFR 46, where applicable, the Department of Health and Human Services Regulations. Also included in this discussion are the general requirements of informed consent; challenging issues regarding informed consent; determining and obtaining informed consent in research involving vulnerable subjects (e.g., children, critically ill patients); the use of genetic information; confidentiality and privacy of subject information; and compensation for injury during a research study. Examples of acceptable and unacceptable (exculpatory) informed consent language are also provided as they may pertain to commercial gain, confidentiality, and compensation for injury. The goal of this article is to provide the clinical researcher with an explanation of the legal requirements for informed consent in clinical research. The researcher faces many challenges in implementing effective informed consent beyond the federal regulations.

  3. The Information Quality Triangle: a methodology to assess clinical information quality.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Rémy; Qouiyd, Samiha; Ouagne, David; Pasche, Emilie; Daniel, Christel; Boussaïd, Omar; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2010-01-01

    Building qualitative clinical decision support or monitoring based on information stored in clinical information (or EHR) systems cannot be done without assessing and controlling information quality. Numerous works have introduced methods and measures to qualify and enhance data, information models and terminologies quality. This paper introduces an approach based on an Information Quality Triangle that aims at providing a generic framework to help in characterizing quality measures and methods in the context of the integration of EHR data in a clinical datawarehouse. We have successfully experimented the proposed approach at the HEGP hospital in France, as part of the DebugIT EU FP7 project.

  4. Units of Measure in Clinical Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schadow, Gunther; McDonald, Clement J.; Suico, Jeffrey G.; Föhring, Ulrich; Tolxdorff, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The authors surveyed existing standard codes for units of measures, such as ISO 2955, ANSI ×3.50, and Health Level 7′s ISO+. Because these standards specify only the character representation of units, the authors developed a semantic model for units based on dimensional analysis. Through this model, conversion between units and calculations with dimensioned quantities become as simple as calculating with numbers. All atomic symbols for prefixes and units are defined in one small table. Huge permutated conversion tables are not required. This method is also simple enough to be widely implementable in today's information systems. To promote the application of the method the authors provide an open-source implementation of this method in JAVA. All existing code standards for units, however, are incomplete for practical use and require substantial changes to correct their many ambiguities. The authors therefore developed a code for units that is much more complete and free from ambiguities. PMID:10094068

  5. Are general practitioners able to accurately diagnose dementia and identify Alzheimer's disease? A comparison with an outpatient memory clinic.

    PubMed Central

    van Hout, H; Vernooij-Dassen, M; Poels, P; Hoefnagels, W; Grol, R

    2000-01-01

    Since the introduction of agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, and in order to increase understanding of a patient's changed behaviour, it has become particularly important that dementia is both diagnosed at an early stage and differentiated into its subtypes. This study aims to ascertain whether GPs were able to diagnose dementia and identify the type of dementia accurately and confidently. GPs were well able to assess the firmness of their own dementia diagnoses, which supposes that they are able to make appropriate selection for referral. Diagnostic support from a specialised team can particularly contribute to identifying the type of dementia. PMID:10897518

  6. Clinical Trials Registration and Results Information Submission. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-09-21

    This final rule details the requirements for submitting registration and summary results information, including adverse event information, for specified clinical trials of drug products (including biological products) and device products and for pediatric postmarket surveillances of a device product to ClinicalTrials.gov, the clinical trial registry and results data bank operated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This rule provides for the expanded registry and results data bank specified in Title VIII of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) to help patients find trials for which they might be eligible, enhance the design of clinical trials and prevent duplication of unsuccessful or unsafe trials, improve the evidence base that informs clinical care, increase the efficiency of drug and device development processes, improve clinical research practice, and build public trust in clinical research. The requirements apply to the responsible party (meaning the sponsor or designated principal investigator) for certain clinical trials of drug products (including biological products) and device products that are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and for pediatric postmarket surveillances of a device product that are ordered by FDA. PMID:27658315

  7. The role of clinical information technology in depression care management.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Amy M; McGinnis, Gretchen Flanders; Belnap, Bea Herbeck; Klinkman, Michael; Thomas, Marshall

    2006-01-01

    We examine the literature on the growing application of clinical information technology in managing depression care and highlight lessons learned from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's national program "Depression in Primary Care-Incentives Demonstrations." Several program sites are implementing depression care registries. Key issues discussed about implementing registries include using a simple yet functional format, designing registries to track multiple conditions versus depression alone (i.e., patient-centric versus disease-centric registries) and avoiding violations of patient privacy with the advent of more advanced information technologies (e.g., web-based formats). Finally, we discuss some implications of clinical information technology for health care practices and policy makers.

  8. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  9. Clinical and Management Requirements for Computerized Mental Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Levinton, Paula H.; Dunning, Tessa F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Information requirements of mental health providers are sufficiently different from those of other health care managers to warrant a different approach to the development of management information systems (MIS). Advances in computer technology and increased demands for fiscal accountability have led to developing integrated mental health information systems (MHIS) that support clinical and management requirements. In a study made to define a set of generic information requirements of mental health providers that can be supported by an MHIS, it was found that basic data needs can be defined and classified in functional terms: clinical, management, and consultation/education requirements. A basic set of data to support these needs was defined: demographic, financial, clinical, programmatic, and service delivery data.

  10. A study of clinical and information management processes in the surgical pre-assessment clinic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Establishing day-case surgery as the preferred hospital admission route for all eligible patients requires adequate preoperative assessment of patients in order to quickly distinguish those who will require minimum assessment and are suitable for day-case admission from those who will require more extensive management and will need to be admitted as inpatients. Methods As part of a study to elucidate clinical and information management processes within the patient surgical pathway in NHS Scotland, we conducted a total of 10 in-depth semi-structured interviews during 4 visits to the Dumfries & Galloway Royal Infirmary surgical pre-assessment clinic. We modelled clinical processes using process-mapping techniques and analysed interview data using qualitative methods. We used Normalisation Process Theory as a conceptual framework to interpret the factors which were identified as facilitating or hindering information elucidation tasks and communication within the multi-disciplinary team. Results The pre-assessment clinic of Dumfries & Galloway Royal Infirmary was opened in 2008 in response to clinical and workflow issues which had been identified with former patient management practices in the surgical pathway. The preoperative clinic now operates under well established processes and protocols. The use of a computerised system for managing preoperative documentation substantially transformed clinical practices and facilitates communication and information-sharing among the multi-disciplinary team. Conclusion Successful deployment and normalisation of innovative clinical and information management processes was possible because both local and national strategic priorities were synergistic and the system was developed collaboratively by the POA staff and the health-board IT team, resulting in a highly contextualised operationalisation of clinical and information management processes. Further concerted efforts from a range of stakeholders are required to fully

  11. CliniProteus: A flexible clinical trials information management system

    PubMed Central

    Mathura, Venkatarajan S; Rangareddy, Mahendiranath; Gupta, Pankaj; Mullan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials involve multi-site heterogeneous data generation with complex data input-formats and forms. The data should be captured and queried in an integrated fashion to facilitate further analysis. Electronic case-report forms (eCRF) are gaining popularity since it allows capture of clinical information in a rapid manner. We have designed and developed an XML based flexible clinical trials data management framework in .NET environment that can be used for efficient design and deployment of eCRFs to efficiently collate data and analyze information from multi-site clinical trials. The main components of our system include an XML form designer, a Patient registration eForm, reusable eForms, multiple-visit data capture and consolidated reports. A unique id is used for tracking the trial, site of occurrence, the patient and the year of recruitment. Availability http://www.rfdn.org/bioinfo/CTMS/ctms.html. PMID:21670796

  12. Clinical information systems: strategic imperatives driving IDNs forward.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M

    1999-11-01

    Reviewing the "state of the art" of clinical information systems in healthcare, one can't help but be struck by how many promises remain unfulfilled. Yes, there have been advances in electronic medical information systems in the past three decades, but in many ways, the same problems exist today that have existed all along. Implementation of clinical information systems (CIS) still requires major changes in workflow. And those core problems continue to dog the progress of integrated healthcare delivery systems, which are struggling to demonstrate value to purchasers, payers, providers, and consumers as they aggregate vertically and horizontally across the continuum. At the same time, mastering the "people" issues, those that revolve around how technology is integrated into the clinical practice of medicine, continues to be the key success factor for producing a usable solution, even with all the advances in hardware and software. PMID:10724559

  13. Review of the Registration in the Clinical Research Information Service

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research registration is required in many countries to improve transparency of clinical research and to ensure subject safety. Developed in February 2010, the Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS) is an online registration system for clinical studies in Korea and one of the primary registries of the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. The present analysis investigated the characteristics of studies registered in the CRIS between February 2010 and December 2014. Data for the analysis were extracted from the CRIS database. As of December 31, 2014, 1,323 clinical studies were registered. Of these, 938 (70.9%) were interventional studies and 385 (29.1%) were observational studies. A total of 248 (18.7%) studies were funded by government sources, 1,051 (79.4%) by non-government sources, and 24 (1.8%) by both. The most frequently studied disease category based on the ICD-10 classification was the digestive system (13.1%), followed by the nervous system (9.4%) and musculoskeletal system (9.1%). Only 17.8% of the studies were registered prior to enrollment of the first subject. Comparing the number of registered or approved clinical studies between the CRIS, the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, and ClinicalTrials.gov suggests that a considerable number of clinical studies are not registered with the CRIS; therefore, we would suggest that such registration should be the mandatory legal requirement. PMID:26770030

  14. Information Technology for Clinical, Translational and Comparative Effectiveness Research

    PubMed Central

    Choquet, R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To select and summarize key contributions to current research in the field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI). Method: A bibliographic search using a combination of MeSH and free terms search over PubMed was performed followed by a blinded review. Results The review process resulted in the selection of four papers illustrating various aspects of current research efforts in the area of CRI. The first paper tackles the challenge of extracting accurate phenotypes from Electronic Healthcare Records (EHRs). Privacy protection within shared de-identified, patient-level research databases is the focus of the second selected paper. Two other papers exemplify the growing role of formal representation of clinical data - in metadata repositories - and knowledge – in ontologies - for supporting the process of reusing data for clinical research. Conclusions The selected articles demonstrate how concrete platforms are currently achieving interoperability across clinical research and care domains and have reached the evaluation phase. When EHRs linked to genetic data have the potential to shift the research focus from research driven patient recruitment to phenotyping in large population, a key issue is to lower patient re-identification risks for biomedical research databases. Current research illustrates the potential of knowledge engineering to support, in the coming years, the scientific lifecycle of clinical research. PMID:25123747

  15. Defining, monitoring and combining safety information in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Enas, G G; Goldstein, D J

    Assessment of clinical trial safety data for industry, regulatory agencies, medical practitioners and patients requires definition and measurement, monitoring, and overall analysis. Prospective 'safety' definitions and reliable measurement tools reduce inefficient data collection and improve the validity of resulting analyses. Statistical tools can help investigators monitor safety data from controlled clinical trials and help improve post-marketing surveillance. Also, when evaluating overall safety, one needs to assess all available information by combining information from many trials and other sources. Planning for this combined assessment, incorporating flexibility to assess unanticipated yet important nuances in individual trials, may be more important than the actual statistical analysis method used. A keen awareness of the future needs of consumers of this information is quite important. Some current proposals to combine safety information will be discussed.

  16. Development of a clinical data warehouse from an intensive care clinical information system.

    PubMed

    de Mul, Marleen; Alons, Peter; van der Velde, Peter; Konings, Ilse; Bakker, Jan; Hazelzet, Jan

    2012-01-01

    There are relatively few institutions that have developed clinical data warehouses, containing patient data from the point of care. Because of the various care practices, data types and definitions, and the perceived incompleteness of clinical information systems, the development of a clinical data warehouse is a challenge. In order to deal with managerial and clinical information needs, as well as educational and research aims that are important in the setting of a university hospital, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands, developed a data warehouse incrementally. In this paper we report on the in-house development of an integral part of the data warehouse specifically for the intensive care units (ICU-DWH). It was modeled using Atos Origin Metadata Frame method. The paper describes the methodology, the development process and the content of the ICU-DWH, and discusses the need for (clinical) data warehouses in intensive care.

  17. Clinical utility of an electronic poisons information and clinical decision support tool.

    PubMed

    Watts, Martin; Fountain, John; Reith, David M; Herbison, Peter

    2003-08-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of a computer toxicology database/clinical decision aid by clinical practitioners. The study investigated the sources that Emergency Department (ED) personnel use to obtain toxicology information and performed a quality audit of the current database. A questionnaire survey of ED staff was used in departments with access to the New Zealand Poisons Centre Substance Database (NZSD), a toxicology CD ROM computer database. Outcome measures were reported use of alternative data sources when managing clinical toxicology presentations and the qualities of the NZSD. Computer databases are commonly used for the management of clinical toxicology cases and the toxicology computer database/clinical decision aid studied is well accepted and used in Emergency Medicine practice. The users of the NZSD assessed the usability and quality of the information of the database. PMID:12909152

  18. The wired physician: current clinical information on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, K; McFarland, M A

    1996-07-01

    The Internet and associated World Wide Web are electronic technologies that can help physicians identify needed clinical information quickly and can put physicians in ready contact with other specialists for communication and consultation. This article outlines the kinds of resources available on the Internet and methods for connecting your personal computer to the "information superhighway." Selected Internet sites and a short bibliography of books and articles relating to the Internet are included. PMID:8772319

  19. A Systematic Approach to Find a Professional Audiology Clinic: Patient-Based Information.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gungu; Kim, Gibbeum; Na, Wondo; Han, Woojae

    2016-09-01

    This brief communication introduced a systematic way to find a professional audiology clinic developed for patients and professionals by the American Academy of Audiology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and Healthy Hearing. Patients can access each organization's website to find professionals and/or clinics based on criteria such as location, hours, special areas, types of service, reviews and rating by previous patients, and kinds of insurance accepted. Such a system may protect the patients from information overload, guarantee accurate information, and help them find themselves professional audiologists who can assist them. We expect professional organizations to adopt this system as soon as possible and link hearing-impaired patients with professional audiologists in Korea. PMID:27626086

  20. A Systematic Approach to Find a Professional Audiology Clinic: Patient-Based Information

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gungu; Kim, Gibbeum; Na, Wondo

    2016-01-01

    This brief communication introduced a systematic way to find a professional audiology clinic developed for patients and professionals by the American Academy of Audiology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and Healthy Hearing. Patients can access each organization's website to find professionals and/or clinics based on criteria such as location, hours, special areas, types of service, reviews and rating by previous patients, and kinds of insurance accepted. Such a system may protect the patients from information overload, guarantee accurate information, and help them find themselves professional audiologists who can assist them. We expect professional organizations to adopt this system as soon as possible and link hearing-impaired patients with professional audiologists in Korea.

  1. A Systematic Approach to Find a Professional Audiology Clinic: Patient-Based Information.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gungu; Kim, Gibbeum; Na, Wondo; Han, Woojae

    2016-09-01

    This brief communication introduced a systematic way to find a professional audiology clinic developed for patients and professionals by the American Academy of Audiology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and Healthy Hearing. Patients can access each organization's website to find professionals and/or clinics based on criteria such as location, hours, special areas, types of service, reviews and rating by previous patients, and kinds of insurance accepted. Such a system may protect the patients from information overload, guarantee accurate information, and help them find themselves professional audiologists who can assist them. We expect professional organizations to adopt this system as soon as possible and link hearing-impaired patients with professional audiologists in Korea.

  2. A Systematic Approach to Find a Professional Audiology Clinic: Patient-Based Information

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gungu; Kim, Gibbeum; Na, Wondo

    2016-01-01

    This brief communication introduced a systematic way to find a professional audiology clinic developed for patients and professionals by the American Academy of Audiology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and Healthy Hearing. Patients can access each organization's website to find professionals and/or clinics based on criteria such as location, hours, special areas, types of service, reviews and rating by previous patients, and kinds of insurance accepted. Such a system may protect the patients from information overload, guarantee accurate information, and help them find themselves professional audiologists who can assist them. We expect professional organizations to adopt this system as soon as possible and link hearing-impaired patients with professional audiologists in Korea. PMID:27626086

  3. Paving the way to a more effective informed consent process: Recommendations from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer; Kennett, Michele; Perlmutter, Jane; Forrest, Annemarie

    2016-07-01

    Ethically sound clinical research requires that prospective study participants provide voluntary informed consent before any study procedures begin. The original intent was to provide the participant with clear, accurate information about study specifics (e.g., risks/benefits) to aid in the decision to participate. Broad consensus among sponsors, research staff, study participants, and advocates indicate that the current process could be improved to enhance participants' understanding of study-related information and meet the needs of individuals. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) convened a project to identify problems in the current process and to formulate recommendations for improvement. A literature review, expert interviews, and multi-stakeholder meeting were conducted to identify barriers and develop solutions for a more effective informed consent process. Four key topics were the foundation of the recommendations: 1) defining an effective informed consent process, 2) training research staff, 3) improving the informed consent document, and 4) exploring the use of electronic consent. The ideal informed consent process involves an ongoing, interactive conversation between the participant and knowledgeable, responsive research staff who were trained in best practices. The informed consent process should be supported by a tiered informed consent document that provides critically relevant information to aid in the decision to participate in a study. Adoption of the CTTI informed consent recommendations should lead to a more participant-centric informed consent process. Participant involvement better meets the needs of participants and benefits the clinical trial enterprise by promoting a research culture that encourages informed participation in clinical studies.

  4. How accurately does the VIVO Harvester reflect actual Clinical and Translational Sciences Award–affiliated faculty member publications?*

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan D.; Kroth, Philip J.; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Hantak, Chad M.; Weagel, Edward F.; Hannigan, Gale G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The research tested the accuracy of the VIVO Harvester software in identifying publications authored by faculty members affiliated with a National Institutes of Health Clinical and Translational Sciences Award (CTSA) site. Methods: Health sciences librarians created “gold standard” lists of references for the years 2001 to 2011 from PubMed for twenty-five randomly selected investigators from one CTSA site. These gold standard lists were compared to the same twenty-five investigators' reference lists produced by VIVO Harvester. The authors subjected the discrepancies between the lists to sensitivity and specificity analyses. Results: The VIVO Harvester correctly identified only about 65% of the total eligible PubMed references for the years 2001–2011 for the CTSA-affiliated investigators. The identified references produced by VIVO Harvester were precise yet incomplete. The sensitivity rate was 0.65, and the specificity rate was 1.00. Conclusion: While the references produced by VIVO Harvester could be confirmed in PubMed, the VIVO Harvester retrieved only two-thirds of the required references from PubMed. National Institutes of Health CTSA sites will need to supplement VIVO Harvester–produced references with the expert searching skills of health sciences librarians. Implications: Health sciences librarians with searching skills need to alert their CTSA sites about these deficiencies and offer their skills to advance their sites' missions. PMID:25552940

  5. Use of IDEF modeling to develop an information management system for drug and alcohol outpatient treatment clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Kenneth J.

    1995-10-01

    Few information systems create a standardized clinical patient record in which there are discrete and concise observations of patient problems and their resolution. Clinical notes usually are narratives which don't support an aggregate and systematic outcome analysis. Many programs collect information on diagnosis and coded procedures but are not focused on patient problems. Integrated definition (IDEF) methodology has been accepted by the Department of Defense as part of the Corporate Information Management Initiative and serves as the foundation that establishes a need for automation. We used IDEF modeling to describe present and idealized patient care activities. A logical IDEF data model was created to support those activities. The modeling process allows for accurate cost estimates based upon performed activities, efficient collection of relevant information, and outputs which allow real- time assessments of process and outcomes. This model forms the foundation for a prototype automated clinical information system (ACIS).

  6. Legal briefing: informed consent in the clinical context.

    PubMed

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Hexum, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    This issue's "Legal Briefing" column covers recent legal developments involving informed consent.1 We covered this topic in previous articles in The Journal of Clinical Ethics.2 But an updated discussion is warranted. First, informed consent remains a central and critically important issue in clinical ethics. Second, there have been numerous significant legal changes over the past year. We categorize recent legal developments into the following 13 categories: (1) Medical Malpractice Liability, (2) Medical Malpractice Liability in Wisconsin, (3) Medical Malpractice Liability in Novel Situations, (4) Enforcement by Criminal Prosecutors, (5) Enforcement by State Medical Boards, (6) Enforcement through Anti-Discrimination Laws, (7) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to End-of-Life Counseling, (8) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to Aid in Dying, (9) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to Abortion, (10) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to Telemedicine, (11) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to Other Interventions, (12) Statutorily Mandated Gag and Censorship Laws, (13) Informed Consent in the Research Context. PMID:24972066

  7. [Informed consent in clinical practice and medical research].

    PubMed

    Santillan-Doherty, Patricio; Cabral-Castañeda, Antonio; Soto-Ramírez, Luis

    2003-01-01

    The present paper deals with the basic aspects, influences and elements that constitute Informed Consent seeing it as a process and not only as an administrative format. Both the patient-physician relationship, as well as the research subject-investigator relationship, should be seen in the same manner, in spite of recognizing specific objectives for each one. For this reason, Informed Consent should not be different regarding both clinical as well as research activities. The patient-physician relationship presents a disbalance of power within the relationship in favor of the physician; this adds to the moral considerations that take place within both participants. Informed Consent should be defined in a broad sense as all those actions that promote a process of communication and dialogue which facilitates a person in order to make decisions with respect of an action, practice or product that have an impact on his/her body, intimacy or other vital spaces. Informed Consent has influences that originate in basic bioethical principles (autonomy, beneficience, non-maleficence, justice), professional and international declarations (Hippocratic Oath, Declaration of Helsinki), as well as legal considerations pertinent to each country. In our country legality emmanates from the General Health Law which, unfortunately, only contemplates Informed Consent as part of the relation established in clinical research. However, the Official Medican Norm on the Clinical Record establishes the conditions where Informed Consent must be obtained during clinical as well as research activities. Primary components of Informed Consent (revelation, capacity to understand and voluntariness), can be better understood when divided into several elements: information, voluntariness, risks and benefits, confidentiality, return of information, utility of the process and management of fragility. Informed Consent should be legally instrumented in an explicit written manner (administrative formats

  8. Managing medical images and clinical information: InCor's experience.

    PubMed

    Furuie, Sergio S; Rebelo, Marina S; Moreno, Ramon A; Santos, Marcelo; Bertozzo, Nivaldo; Motta, Gustavo H M B; Pires, Fabio A; Gutierrez, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Patients usually get medical assistance in several clinics and hospitals during their lifetime, archiving vital information in a dispersed way. Clearly, a proper patient care should take into account that information in order to check for incompatibilities, avoid unnecessary exams, and get relevant clinical history. The Heart Institute (InCor) of São Paulo, Brazil, has been committed to the goal of integrating all exams and clinical information within the institution and other hospitals. Since InCor is one of the six institutes of the University of São Paulo Medical School and each institute has its own information system, exchanging information among the institutes is also a very important aspect that has been considered. In the last few years, a system for transmission, archiving, retrieval, processing, and visualization of medical images integrated with a hospital information system has been successfully created and constitutes the InCor's electronic patient record (EPR). This work describes the experience in the effort to develop a functional and comprehensive EPR, which includes laboratory exams, images (static, dynamic, and three dimensional), clinical reports, documents, and even real-time vital signals. A security policy based on a contextual role-based access control model was implemented to regulate user's access to EPR. Currently, more than 10 TB of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images have been stored using the proposed architecture and the EPR stores daily more than 11 GB of integrated data. The proposed storage subsystem allows 6 months of visibility for rapid retrieval and more than two years for automatic retrieval using a jukebox. This paper addresses also a prototype for the integration of distributed and heterogeneous EPR.

  9. Leveraging a clinical research information system to assist biospecimen data and workflow management: a hybrid approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Large multi-center clinical studies often involve the collection and analysis of biological samples. It is necessary to ensure timely, complete and accurate recording of analytical results and associated phenotypic and clinical information. The TRIBE-AKI Consortium http://www.yale.edu/tribeaki supports a network of multiple related studies and sample biorepository, thus allowing researchers to take advantage of a larger specimen collection than they might have at an individual institution. Description We describe a biospecimen data management system (BDMS) that supports TRIBE-AKI and is intended for multi-center collaborative clinical studies that involve shipment of biospecimens between sites. This system works in conjunction with a clinical research information system (CRIS) that stores the clinical data associated with the biospecimens, along with other patient-related parameters. Inter-operation between the two systems is mediated by an interactively invoked suite of Web Services, as well as by batch code. We discuss various challenges involved in integration. Conclusions Our experience indicates that an approach that emphasizes inter-operability is reasonably optimal in allowing each system to be utilized for the tasks for which it is best suited. PMID:21884570

  10. How Can Psychological Science Inform Research About Genetic Counseling for Clinical Genomic Sequencing?

    PubMed Central

    Rini, Christine; Bernhardt, Barbara A.; Roberts, J. Scott; Christensen, Kurt D.; Evans, James P.; Brothers, Kyle B.; Roche, Myra I.; Berg, Jonathan S.; Henderson, Gail E.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation genomic sequencing technologies (including whole genome or whole exome sequencing) are being increasingly applied to clinical care. Yet, the breadth and complexity of sequencing information raise questions about how best to communicate and return sequencing information to patients and families in ways that facilitate comprehension and optimal health decisions. Obtaining answers to such questions will require multidisciplinary research. In this paper, we focus on how psychological science research can address questions related to clinical genomic sequencing by explaining emotional, cognitive, and behavioral processes in response to different types of genomic sequencing information (e.g., diagnostic results and incidental findings). We highlight examples of psychological science that can be applied to genetic counseling research to inform the following questions: (1) What factors influence patients' and providers' informational needs for developing an accurate understanding of what genomic sequencing results do and do not mean?; (2) How and by whom should genomic sequencing results be communicated to patients and their family members?; and (3) How do patients and their families respond to uncertainties related to genomic information? PMID:25488723

  11. How can sharing clinical information be made to work?

    PubMed

    Neame, R; Olson, M

    1998-01-01

    There is a recognised need to share clinical information in order to improve integrity, continuity, safety and speed of delivering patient care. This remains a serious weakness in the conceptualisation of existing health information management systems. The evolution of structured (e.g., HL7) messaging standards has been driven largely from an administrative information viewpoint, as have many of the initiatives driving the development of electronic patient record (EPR) systems. Neither appears to address crucial needs for clinical data exchanges often across wide areas to meet the needs of best quality, cost-effective and low risk patient care delivery. The present reality is that clinical messaging is complex, rigid and ineffective, and the business case for its users is not compelling. Administrative and financial arrangements need to be developed which support the more widespread use of clinical data exchanges. This paper underlines the importance of web technology as a key element in the communications strategy and as an adjunct (or alternative) to more structured messaging environments. It also raises some of the fundamental structural problems, which impact the use of messaging in healthcare, and puts forward proposals as to how these may best be addressed and resolved.

  12. Clinical writing about clients: is informed consent sufficient?

    PubMed

    Barnett, Jeffrey E

    2012-03-01

    The use of client information in clinical writings or presentations may be very helpful in advancing the knowledge base of the profession. Yet, the very act of asking a client for permission to use their treatment information in this way may be detrimental to the therapeutic alliance and treatment process. As such, great care must be taken in how such issues are considered and acted upon. Sieck's article (2011, Obtaining clinical writing informed consent versus using client disguise and recommendations for practice. Psychotherapy, 49, pp. 3-11.) on the use of informed consent for obtaining permission to use a client's treatment information for professional writing and presentations is examined and discussed. The nature and role of the informed consent process is accentuated; psychotherapist needs and goals and client vulnerabilities are each addressed in the context of the relevant sections of the APA Ethics Code and each psychotherapist's obligation to act only in ways consistent with each client's best interests. Recommendations for a thoughtful consideration of these issues are presented, consistent with Sieck's proposed decision-making process for use in these situations.

  13. Clinical information systems: cornerstone for an efficient hospital management.

    PubMed

    Lovis, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The university hospitals of Geneva are the largest consortium of public hospitals in Switzerland. This organization is born in 1995, after a political decision to merge the seven public and teaching hospitals of the Canton of Geneva. From an information technologies perspective, it took several years to reach a true unified vision of the complete organization. The clinical information system is deployed in all sites covering in- and outpatient cares. It is seen as the cornerstone of information management and flow in the organization, for direct patient care and decision support, but also for the management to drive, improve and leverage the activities, for better efficiency, quality and safety of care, but also to drive processes. As the system has become more important for the organization, it has required progressive changes in its governance. The high importance of interoperability and use of formal representation has become a major challenge in order to be able to reuse clinical information for real-time care and management activities, and for secondary usage such as billing, resource management, strategic planning and clinical research. This paper proposes a short overview of the tools allowing to leverage the management for physicians, nurses, human resources and hospital governance.

  14. Clinical simulation: A method for development and evaluation of clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sanne; Kushniruk, Andre W; Nøhr, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Use of clinical simulation in the design and evaluation of eHealth systems and applications has increased during the last decade. This paper describes a methodological approach for using clinical simulations in the design and evaluation of clinical information systems. The method is based on experiences from more than 20 clinical simulation studies conducted at the ITX-lab in the Capital Region of Denmark during the last 5 years. A ten-step approach to conducting simulations is presented in this paper. To illustrate the approach, a clinical simulation study concerning implementation of Digital Clinical Practice Guidelines in a prototype planning and coordination module is presented. In the case study potential benefits were assessed in a full-scale simulation test including 18 health care professionals. The results showed that health care professionals can benefit from such a module. Unintended consequences concerning terminology and changes in the division of responsibility amongst healthcare professionals were also identified, and questions were raised concerning future workflow across sector borders. Furthermore unexpected new possible benefits concerning improved communication, content of information in discharge letters and quality management emerged during the testing. In addition new potential groups of users were identified. The case study is used to demonstrate the potential of using the clinical simulation approach described in the paper.

  15. The role of cognitive switching in head-up displays. [to determine pilot ability to accurately extract information from either of two sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, E.

    1979-01-01

    The pilot's ability to accurately extract information from either one or both of two superimposed sources of information was determined. Static, aerial, color 35 mm slides of external runway environments and slides of corresponding static head-up display (HUD) symbology were used as the sources. A three channel tachistoscope was utilized to show either the HUD alone, the scene alone, or the two slides superimposed. Cognitive performance of the pilots was assessed by determining the percentage of correct answers given to two HUD related questions, two scene related questions, or one HUD and one scene related question.

  16. Ontology patterns-based transformation of clinical information.

    PubMed

    Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Miñarro-Giménez, José Antonio; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Schulz, Stefan; Menárguez-Tortosa, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The semantic interoperability of clinical information requires methods able to transform heterogeneous data sources from both technological and structural perspectives, into representations that facilitate the sharing of meaning. The SemanticHealthNet (SHN) project proposes using semantic content patterns for representing clinical information based on a model of meaning, preventing users from a deep knowledge on ontology and description logics formalism. In this work we propose a flexible transformation method that uses semantic content patterns to guide the mapping between the source data and a target domain ontology. As use case we show how one of the semantic content patterns proposed in SHN can be used to transform heterogeneous data about medication administration.

  17. [Study on Information Extraction of Clinic Expert Information from Hospital Portals].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanpeng; Dong, Jiancheng; Qian, Danmin; Geng, Xingyun; Wu, Huiqun; Wang, Li

    2015-12-01

    Clinic expert information provides important references for residents in need of hospital care. Usually, such information is hidden in the deep web and cannot be directly indexed by search engines. To extract clinic expert information from the deep web, the first challenge is to make a judgment on forms. This paper proposes a novel method based on a domain model, which is a tree structure constructed by the attributes of search interfaces. With this model, search interfaces can be classified to a domain and filled in with domain keywords. Another challenge is to extract information from the returned web pages indexed by search interfaces. To filter the noise information on a web page, a block importance model is proposed. The experiment results indicated that the domain model yielded a precision 10.83% higher than that of the rule-based method, whereas the block importance model yielded an F₁ measure 10.5% higher than that of the XPath method.

  18. [Study on Information Extraction of Clinic Expert Information from Hospital Portals].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanpeng; Dong, Jiancheng; Qian, Danmin; Geng, Xingyun; Wu, Huiqun; Wang, Li

    2015-12-01

    Clinic expert information provides important references for residents in need of hospital care. Usually, such information is hidden in the deep web and cannot be directly indexed by search engines. To extract clinic expert information from the deep web, the first challenge is to make a judgment on forms. This paper proposes a novel method based on a domain model, which is a tree structure constructed by the attributes of search interfaces. With this model, search interfaces can be classified to a domain and filled in with domain keywords. Another challenge is to extract information from the returned web pages indexed by search interfaces. To filter the noise information on a web page, a block importance model is proposed. The experiment results indicated that the domain model yielded a precision 10.83% higher than that of the rule-based method, whereas the block importance model yielded an F₁ measure 10.5% higher than that of the XPath method. PMID:27079096

  19. Understanding information synthesis in oral surgery for the design of systems for clinical information technology.

    PubMed

    Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Chanakarn, Piyawadee; Phisutphatthana, Sirada; Pongpatarat, Kanchala; Wongwaithongdee, Udom; Oupadissakoon, Chanekrid

    2015-12-01

    An understanding of the processes of clinical decision-making is essential for the development of health information technology. In this study we have analysed the acquisition of information during decision-making in oral surgery, and analysed cognitive tasks using a "think-aloud" protocol. We studied the techniques of processing information that were used by novices and experts as they completed 4 oral surgical cases modelled from data obtained from electronic hospital records. We studied 2 phases of an oral surgeon's preoperative practice including the "diagnosis and planning of treatment" and "preparing for a procedure". A framework analysis approach was used to analyse the qualitative data, and a descriptive statistical analysis was made of the quantitative data. The results showed that novice surgeons used hypotheticodeductive reasoning, whereas experts recognised patterns to diagnose and manage patients. Novices provided less detail when they prepared for a procedure. Concepts regarding "signs", "importance", "decisions", and "process" occurred most often during acquisition of information by both novices and experts. Based on these results, we formulated recommendations for the design of clinical information technology that would help to improve the acquisition of clinical information required by oral surgeons at all levels of expertise in their clinical decision-making.

  20. The status of and future research into Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: the need of accurate diagnosis, objective assessment, and acknowledging biological and clinical subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Frank N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Although Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) are used interchangeably, the diagnostic criteria define two distinct clinical entities. Cognitive impairment, (muscle) weakness, circulatory disturbances, marked variability of symptoms, and, above all, post-exertional malaise: a long-lasting increase of symptoms after a minor exertion, are distinctive symptoms of ME. This latter phenomenon separates ME, a neuro-immune illness, from chronic fatigue (syndrome), other disorders and deconditioning. The introduction of the label, but more importantly the diagnostic criteria for CFS have generated much confusion, mostly because chronic fatigue is a subjective and ambiguous notion. CFS was redefined in 1994 into unexplained (persistent or relapsing) chronic fatigue, accompanied by at least four out of eight symptoms, e.g., headaches and unrefreshing sleep. Most of the research into ME and/or CFS in the last decades was based upon the multivalent CFS criteria, which define a heterogeneous patient group. Due to the fact that fatigue and other symptoms are non-discriminative, subjective experiences, research has been hampered. Various authors have questioned the physiological nature of the symptoms and qualified ME/CFS as somatization. However, various typical symptoms can be assessed objectively using standardized methods. Despite subjective and unclear criteria and measures, research has observed specific abnormalities in ME/CFS repetitively, e.g., immunological abnormalities, oxidative and nitrosative stress, neurological anomalies, circulatory deficits and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, to improve future research standards and patient care, it is crucial that patients with post-exertional malaise (ME) and patients without this odd phenomenon are acknowledged as separate clinical entities that the diagnosis of ME and CFS in research and clinical practice is based upon accurate criteria and an objective assessment of characteristic symptoms

  1. Perspectives on clinical informatics: integrating large-scale clinical, genomic, and health information for clinical care.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-12-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  2. Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K.

    2013-01-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population. PMID:24465229

  3. Assignment of Calibration Information to Deeper Phylogenetic Nodes is More Effective in Obtaining Precise and Accurate Divergence Time Estimates.

    PubMed

    Mello, Beatriz; Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-01-01

    Divergence time estimation has become an essential tool for understanding macroevolutionary events. Molecular dating aims to obtain reliable inferences, which, within a statistical framework, means jointly increasing the accuracy and precision of estimates. Bayesian dating methods exhibit the propriety of a linear relationship between uncertainty and estimated divergence dates. This relationship occurs even if the number of sites approaches infinity and places a limit on the maximum precision of node ages. However, how the placement of calibration information may affect the precision of divergence time estimates remains an open question. In this study, relying on simulated and empirical data, we investigated how the location of calibration within a phylogeny affects the accuracy and precision of time estimates. We found that calibration priors set at median and deep phylogenetic nodes were associated with higher precision values compared to analyses involving calibration at the shallowest node. The results were independent of the tree symmetry. An empirical mammalian dataset produced results that were consistent with those generated by the simulated sequences. Assigning time information to the deeper nodes of a tree is crucial to guarantee the accuracy and precision of divergence times. This finding highlights the importance of the appropriate choice of outgroups in molecular dating. PMID:24855333

  4. Clinical genomics information management software linking cancer genome sequence and clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stuart; Jiao, Wei; Brown, Andrew M K; Petrocelli, Teresa; Tran, Ben; Zhang, Tong; McPherson, John D; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Onetto, Nicole; Hudson, Thomas J; Dancey, Janet; Siu, Lillian L; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    Using sequencing information to guide clinical decision-making requires coordination of a diverse set of people and activities. In clinical genomics, the process typically includes sample acquisition, template preparation, genome data generation, analysis to identify and confirm variant alleles, interpretation of clinical significance, and reporting to clinicians. We describe a software application developed within a clinical genomics study, to support this entire process. The software application tracks patients, samples, genomic results, decisions and reports across the cohort, monitors progress and sends reminders, and works alongside an electronic data capture system for the trial's clinical and genomic data. It incorporates systems to read, store, analyze and consolidate sequencing results from multiple technologies, and provides a curated knowledge base of tumor mutation frequency (from the COSMIC database) annotated with clinical significance and drug sensitivity to generate reports for clinicians. By supporting the entire process, the application provides deep support for clinical decision making, enabling the generation of relevant guidance in reports for verification by an expert panel prior to forwarding to the treating physician.

  5. High IFIT1 expression predicts improved clinical outcome, and IFIT1 along with MGMT more accurately predicts prognosis in newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Chen, Yao; Lin, Guo-Shi; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Tang, Wen-Long; Huang, Jian-Huang; Chen, Jin-Shou; Wang, Xing-Fu; Lin, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeat 1 (IFIT1) plays a key role in growth suppression and apoptosis promotion in cancer cells. Interferon was reported to induce the expression of IFIT1 and inhibit the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT).This study aimed to investigate the expression of IFIT1, the correlation between IFIT1 and MGMT, and their impact on the clinical outcome in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The expression of IFIT1 and MGMT and their correlation were investigated in the tumor tissues from 70 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The effects on progression-free survival and overall survival were evaluated. Of 70 cases, 57 (81.4%) tissue samples showed high expression of IFIT1 by immunostaining. The χ(2) test indicated that the expression of IFIT1 and MGMT was negatively correlated (r = -0.288, P = .016). Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed high IFIT1 expression as a favorable prognostic indicator for progression-free survival (P = .005 and .017) and overall survival (P = .001 and .001), respectively. Patients with 2 favorable factors (high IFIT1 and low MGMT) had an improved prognosis as compared with others. The results demonstrated significantly increased expression of IFIT1 in newly diagnosed glioblastoma tissue. The negative correlation between IFIT1 and MGMT expression may be triggered by interferon. High IFIT1 can be a predictive biomarker of favorable clinical outcome, and IFIT1 along with MGMT more accurately predicts prognosis in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. PMID:26980050

  6. The Effectiveness and Clinical Usability of a Handheld Information Appliance

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical environments are complex, stressful, and safety critical—heightening the demand for technological solutions that will help clinicians manage health information efficiently and safely. The industry has responded by creating numerous, increasingly compact and powerful health IT devices that fit in a pocket, hook to a belt, attach to eyeglasses, or wheel around on a cart. Untethering a provider from a physical “place” with compact, mobile technology while delivering the right information at the right time and at the right location are generally welcomed in clinical environments. These developments however, must be looked at ecumenically. The cognitive load of clinicians who are occupied with managing or operating several different devices during the process of a patient encounter is increased, and we know from decades of research that cognitive overload frequently leads to error. “Technology crowding,” enhanced by the plethora of mobile health IT, can actually become an additional millstone for busy clinicians. This study was designed to gain a deeper understanding of clinicians' interactions with a mobile clinical computing appliance (Motion Computing C5) designed to consolidate numerous technological functions into an all-in-one device. Features of usability and comparisons to current methods of documentation and task performance were undertaken and results are described. PMID:22548159

  7. Proteomics and Ovarian Cancer: Integrating Proteomics Information Into Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Hays, John L.; Kim, Geoffrey; Giuroiu, Iulia; Kohn, Elise C.

    2010-01-01

    The power of proteomics allows unparalleled opportunity to query the molecular mechanisms of a malignant cell and the tumor microenvironment in patients with ovarian cancer and other solid tumors. This information has given us insight into the perturbations of signaling pathways within tumor cells and has aided the discovery of new drug targets for the tumor and possible prognostic indicators of outcome and disease response to therapy. Proteomics analysis of serum and ascites has also given us sources with which to discover possible early markers for the presence of new disease and for the progression of established cancer throughout the course of treatment. Unfortunately, this wealth of information has yielded little to date in changing the clinical care of these patients from a diagnostic, prognostic, or treatment perspective. The rational examination and translation of proteomics data in the context of past clinical trials and the design of future clinical trials must occur before we can march forward into the future of personalized medicine. PMID:20561909

  8. Clinical decision support for perioperative information management systems.

    PubMed

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2013-12-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems are being used to optimize the increasingly complex care that our health care system delivers. These systems have become increasingly important in the delivery of perioperative care for patients undergoing cardiac, thoracic, and vascular procedures. The adoption of perioperative information management systems (PIMS) has allowed these technologies to enter the operating room and support the clinical work flow of anesthesiologists and operational processes. Constructing effective CDS systems necessitates an understanding of operative work flow and technical considerations as well as achieving integration with existing information systems. In this review, we describe published examples of CDS for PIMS, including support for cardiopulmonary bypass separation physiological alarms, β-blocker guideline adherence, enhanced revenue capture for arterial line placement, and detection of hemodynamic monitoring gaps. Although these and other areas are amenable to CDS systems, the challenges of latency and data reliability represent fundamental limitations on the potential application of these tools to specific types of clinical issues. Ultimately, we expect that CDS will remain an important tool in our efforts to optimize the quality of care delivered.

  9. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment: Accurate ranges have given a large improvement in the lunar orbit and new selenophysical information.

    PubMed

    Bender, P L; Currie, D G; Poultney, S K; Alley, C O; Dicke, R H; Wilkinson, D T; Eckhardt, D H; Faller, J E; Kaula, W M; Mulholland, J D; Plotkin, H H; Silverberg, E C; Williams, J G

    1973-10-19

    The lunar ranging measurements now being made at the McDonald Observatory have an accuracy of 1 nsec in round-trip travel time. This corresponds to 15 cm in the one-way distance. The use of lasers with pulse-lengths of less than 1 nsec is expected to give an accuracy of 2 to 3 cm in the next few years. A new station is under construction in Hawaii, and additional stations in other countries are either in operation or under development. It is hoped that these stations will form the basis for a worldwide network to determine polar motion and earth rotation on a regular basis, and will assist in providing information about movement of the tectonic plates making up the earth's surface. Several mobile lunar ranging stations with telescopes having diameters of 1.0 m or less could, in the future, greatly extend the information obtainable about motions within and between the tectonic plates. The data obtained so far by the McDonald Observatory have been used to generate a new lunar ephemeris based on direct numerical integration of the equations of motion for the moon and planets. With this ephemeris, the range to the three Apollo retro-reflectors can be fit to an accuracy of 5 m by adjusting the differences in moments of inertia of the moon about its principal axes, the selenocentric coordinates of the reflectors, and the McDonald longitude. The accuracy of fitting the results is limited currently by errors of the order of an arc second in the angular orientation of the moon, as derived from the best available theory of how the moon rotates in response to the torques acting on it. Both a new calculation of the moon's orientation as a function of time based on direct numerical integration of the torque equations and a new analytic theory of the moon's orientation are expected to be available soon, and to improve considerably the accuracy of fitting the data. The accuracy already achieved routinely in lunar laser ranging represents a hundredfold improvement over any

  10. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment: Accurate ranges have given a large improvement in the lunar orbit and new selenophysical information.

    PubMed

    Bender, P L; Currie, D G; Poultney, S K; Alley, C O; Dicke, R H; Wilkinson, D T; Eckhardt, D H; Faller, J E; Kaula, W M; Mulholland, J D; Plotkin, H H; Silverberg, E C; Williams, J G

    1973-10-19

    The lunar ranging measurements now being made at the McDonald Observatory have an accuracy of 1 nsec in round-trip travel time. This corresponds to 15 cm in the one-way distance. The use of lasers with pulse-lengths of less than 1 nsec is expected to give an accuracy of 2 to 3 cm in the next few years. A new station is under construction in Hawaii, and additional stations in other countries are either in operation or under development. It is hoped that these stations will form the basis for a worldwide network to determine polar motion and earth rotation on a regular basis, and will assist in providing information about movement of the tectonic plates making up the earth's surface. Several mobile lunar ranging stations with telescopes having diameters of 1.0 m or less could, in the future, greatly extend the information obtainable about motions within and between the tectonic plates. The data obtained so far by the McDonald Observatory have been used to generate a new lunar ephemeris based on direct numerical integration of the equations of motion for the moon and planets. With this ephemeris, the range to the three Apollo retro-reflectors can be fit to an accuracy of 5 m by adjusting the differences in moments of inertia of the moon about its principal axes, the selenocentric coordinates of the reflectors, and the McDonald longitude. The accuracy of fitting the results is limited currently by errors of the order of an arc second in the angular orientation of the moon, as derived from the best available theory of how the moon rotates in response to the torques acting on it. Both a new calculation of the moon's orientation as a function of time based on direct numerical integration of the torque equations and a new analytic theory of the moon's orientation are expected to be available soon, and to improve considerably the accuracy of fitting the data. The accuracy already achieved routinely in lunar laser ranging represents a hundredfold improvement over any

  11. Subjective sense of memory strength and the objective amount of information accurately remembered are related to distinct neural correlates at encoding.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shaozheng; van Marle, Hein J F; Hermans, Erno J; Fernández, Guillén

    2011-06-15

    Although commonly used, the term memory strength is not well defined in humans. Besides durability, it has been conceptualized by retrieval characteristics, such as subjective confidence associated with retrieval, or objectively, by the amount of information accurately retrieved. Behaviorally, these measures are not necessarily correlated, indicating that distinct neural processes may underlie them. Thus, we aimed at disentangling neural activity at encoding associated with either a subsequent subjective sense of memory strength or with a subsequent objective amount of information remembered. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants were scanned while incidentally encoding a series of photographs of complex scenes. The next day, they underwent two memory tests, quantifying memory strength either subjectively (confidence on remembering the gist of a scene) or objectively (the number of details accurately remembered within a scene). Correlations between these measurements were mutually partialed out in subsequent memory analyses of fMRI data. Results revealed that activation in left ventral lateral prefrontal cortex and temporoparietal junction predicted subsequent confidence ratings. In contrast, parahippocampal and hippocampal activity predicted the number of details remembered. Our findings suggest that memory strength may reflect a functionally heterogeneous set of (at least two) phenomena. One phenomenon appears related to prefrontal and temporoparietal top-down modulations, resulting in the subjective sense of memory strength that is potentially based on gist memory. The other phenomenon is likely related to medial-temporal binding processes, determining the amount of information accurately encoded into memory. Thus, our study dissociated two distinct phenomena that are usually described as memory strength.

  12. Use of altered informed consent in pragmatic clinical research

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Ross E.; Beskow, Laura M.; Ford, Daniel E.; Lantos, John D.; McCall, Jonathan; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Pletcher, Mark J.; Rath, Brian; Schmidt, Hollie; Weinfurt, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    There are situations in which the requirement to obtain conventional written informed consent can impose significant or even insurmountable barriers to conducting pragmatic clinical research, including some comparative effectiveness studies and cluster-randomized trials. Although certain federal regulations governing research in the United States (45 CFR 46) define circumstances in which any of the required elements may be waived, the same standards apply regardless of whether any single element is to be waived or whether consent is to be waived in its entirety. Using the same threshold for a partial or complete waiver limits the options available to IRBs as they seek to optimize a consent process. In this article, we argue that new standards are necessary in order to enable important pragmatic clinical research while at the same time protecting patients’ rights and interests. PMID:26374677

  13. Methodology of integration of a clinical data warehouse with a clinical information system: the HEGP case.

    PubMed

    Zapletal, Eric; Rodon, Nicolas; Grabar, Natalia; Degoulet, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    Clinical Data Warehouses (CDW) can complement current Clinical Information Systems (CIS) with functions that are not easily implemented by traditional operational database systems. Here, we describe the design and deployment strategy used at the Pompidou University Hospital in southwest Paris. Four realms are described: technological realm, data realm, restitution realm, and administration realm. The corresponding UML use cases and the mapping rules from the shared integrated electronic health records to the five axes of the i2b2 CDW star model are presented. Priority is given to the anonymization and security principles used for the 1.2 million patient records currently stored in the CDW. Exploitation of a CDW by clinicians and investigators can facilitate clinical research, quality evaluations and outcome studies. These indirect benefits are among the reasons for the continuous use of an integrated CIS.

  14. Supporting Clinical Cognition: A Human-Centered Approach to a Novel ICU Information Visualization Dashboard

    PubMed Central

    Faiola, Anthony; Srinivas, Preethi; Duke, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Advances in intensive care unit bedside displays/interfaces and electronic medical record (EMR) technology have not adequately addressed the topic of visual clarity of patient data/information to further reduce cognitive load during clinical decision-making. We responded to these challenges with a human-centered approach to designing and testing a decision-support tool: MIVA 2.0 (Medical Information Visualization Assistant, v.2). Envisioned as an EMR visualization dashboard to support rapid analysis of real-time clinical data-trends, our primary goal originated from a clinical requirement to reduce cognitive overload. In the study, a convenience sample of 12 participants were recruited, in which quantitative and qualitative measures were used to compare MIVA 2.0 with ICU paper medical-charts, using time-on-task, post-test questionnaires, and interviews. Findings demonstrated a significant difference in speed and accuracy with the use of MIVA 2.0. Qualitative outcomes concurred, with participants acknowledging the potential impact of MIVA 2.0 for reducing cognitive load and enabling more accurate and quicker decision-making. PMID:26958190

  15. The impact of genetic information on policy and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Abel, Elizabeth; Horner, Sharon D; Tyler, Diane; Innerarity, Sheryl A

    2005-02-01

    This article discusses genetics-related policy issues that have an impact on health care systems, health care providers, and their patients: privacy, mass screening, family screening, and knowledge dissemination. Access, cost, and ethical implications are important discussant points for each of these genetic-related policy issues. Embedded in the issue of privacy are concerns of insurability, confidentiality, and discrimination. The public health policy implications related to mass screening programs include efficacy of the screening tests, availability of primary and secondary interventions, access, costs, and program evaluation. Policy issues for family screening are similar to mass screening, with added concerns about privacy and availability of adequate resources, including health care providers and counselors trained in genetics. Knowledge dissemination is critical to maintaining currency of clinical information and applications of genetic technologies and treatments. As genetic information expands, the need for knowledge dissemination will increase. The importance of advanced practice nurses' involvement in these policy issues is discussed. PMID:16443953

  16. Automatic generation of computable implementation guides from clinical information models.

    PubMed

    Boscá, Diego; Maldonado, José Alberto; Moner, David; Robles, Montserrat

    2015-06-01

    Clinical information models are increasingly used to describe the contents of Electronic Health Records. Implementation guides are a common specification mechanism used to define such models. They contain, among other reference materials, all the constraints and rules that clinical information must obey. However, these implementation guides typically are oriented to human-readability, and thus cannot be processed by computers. As a consequence, they must be reinterpreted and transformed manually into an executable language such as Schematron or Object Constraint Language (OCL). This task can be difficult and error prone due to the big gap between both representations. The challenge is to develop a methodology for the specification of implementation guides in such a way that humans can read and understand easily and at the same time can be processed by computers. In this paper, we propose and describe a novel methodology that uses archetypes as basis for generation of implementation guides. We use archetypes to generate formal rules expressed in Natural Rule Language (NRL) and other reference materials usually included in implementation guides such as sample XML instances. We also generate Schematron rules from NRL rules to be used for the validation of data instances. We have implemented these methods in LinkEHR, an archetype editing platform, and exemplify our approach by generating NRL rules and implementation guides from EN ISO 13606, openEHR, and HL7 CDA archetypes. PMID:25910958

  17. Technological innovations in the development of cardiovascular clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Nan-Chen; Chang, Chung-Yi; Lee, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Jeen-Chen; Chan, Chien-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that computerized clinical case management and decision support systems can be used to assist surgeons in the diagnosis of disease, optimize surgical operation, aid in drug therapy and decrease the cost of medical treatment. Therefore, medical informatics has become an extensive field of research and many of these approaches have demonstrated potential value for improving medical quality. The aim of this study was to develop a web-based cardiovascular clinical information system (CIS) based on innovative techniques, such as electronic medical records, electronic registries and automatic feature surveillance schemes, to provide effective tools and support for clinical care, decision-making, biomedical research and training activities. The CIS developed for this study contained monitoring, surveillance and model construction functions. The monitoring layer function provided a visual user interface. At the surveillance and model construction layers, we explored the application of model construction and intelligent prognosis to aid in making preoperative and postoperative predictions. With the use of the CIS, surgeons can provide reasonable conclusions and explanations in uncertain environments.

  18. Making the case for a clinical information system: the chief information officer view.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Carole M

    2007-03-01

    Adequate decision support for clinicians and other caregivers requires accessible and reliable patient information. Powerful societal and economic forces are moving us toward an integrated, patient-centered health care information system that will allow caregivers to exchange up-to-date patient health information quickly and easily. These forces include patient safety, potential health care cost savings, empowerment of consumers (and their subsequent demands for quality), new federal policies, and growing regional health care initiatives. Underspending on health care information technologies has gone on for many years; and the creation and implementation of a comprehensive clinical information system will entail many difficulties, particularly in regard to patients' privacy and control of their information, standardization of electronic health records, cost of adopting information technology, unbalanced financial incentives, and the varying levels of preparation across caregivers. There will also be potential effects on the physician-patient relationship. Ultimately, an integrated system will require a concerted transformation of the health care industry that is akin to what the banking industry has accomplished with electronic automation. Critical care units provide a good starting point for how information system technologies can be used and electronic patient information collected, although the robust systems designed for intensive care units are not always used to their potential. PMID:17371748

  19. Making the case for a clinical information system: the chief information officer view.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Carole M

    2007-03-01

    Adequate decision support for clinicians and other caregivers requires accessible and reliable patient information. Powerful societal and economic forces are moving us toward an integrated, patient-centered health care information system that will allow caregivers to exchange up-to-date patient health information quickly and easily. These forces include patient safety, potential health care cost savings, empowerment of consumers (and their subsequent demands for quality), new federal policies, and growing regional health care initiatives. Underspending on health care information technologies has gone on for many years; and the creation and implementation of a comprehensive clinical information system will entail many difficulties, particularly in regard to patients' privacy and control of their information, standardization of electronic health records, cost of adopting information technology, unbalanced financial incentives, and the varying levels of preparation across caregivers. There will also be potential effects on the physician-patient relationship. Ultimately, an integrated system will require a concerted transformation of the health care industry that is akin to what the banking industry has accomplished with electronic automation. Critical care units provide a good starting point for how information system technologies can be used and electronic patient information collected, although the robust systems designed for intensive care units are not always used to their potential.

  20. Paving the way to a more effective informed consent process: Recommendations from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer; Kennett, Michele; Perlmutter, Jane; Forrest, Annemarie

    2016-07-01

    Ethically sound clinical research requires that prospective study participants provide voluntary informed consent before any study procedures begin. The original intent was to provide the participant with clear, accurate information about study specifics (e.g., risks/benefits) to aid in the decision to participate. Broad consensus among sponsors, research staff, study participants, and advocates indicate that the current process could be improved to enhance participants' understanding of study-related information and meet the needs of individuals. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) convened a project to identify problems in the current process and to formulate recommendations for improvement. A literature review, expert interviews, and multi-stakeholder meeting were conducted to identify barriers and develop solutions for a more effective informed consent process. Four key topics were the foundation of the recommendations: 1) defining an effective informed consent process, 2) training research staff, 3) improving the informed consent document, and 4) exploring the use of electronic consent. The ideal informed consent process involves an ongoing, interactive conversation between the participant and knowledgeable, responsive research staff who were trained in best practices. The informed consent process should be supported by a tiered informed consent document that provides critically relevant information to aid in the decision to participate in a study. Adoption of the CTTI informed consent recommendations should lead to a more participant-centric informed consent process. Participant involvement better meets the needs of participants and benefits the clinical trial enterprise by promoting a research culture that encourages informed participation in clinical studies. PMID:27327780

  1. Dolphin project--cooperative regional clinical system centered on clinical information center.

    PubMed

    Takada, Akira; Guo, s Jinqiu; Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Suzuki, Muneou; Suenaga, Takatoshi; Kikuchi, Ken; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2005-08-01

    In 2001, a system was created to improve patient service, improve the quality of medical care, and achieve efficient medical care. A Data Center was established to accumulate and manage clinical information in the regions and share clinical information safely and appropriately. The system has already been in operation for 3 years. Even though a patient may have been examined at multiple hospitals, his medical record information will be integrated at the Center. This ensures medical care continuity and enables the patient to view his own medical records at home. Its usefulness in obtaining informed consent has been demonstrated as well. XML instances established in the MML standards (MML (Medical Markup Language): http.//www.medxml.net/E_mml30/mmlv3_E_index.htm Accessed July 2004; Jpn. J. Med. Informatics (JJMI) 17(3):203-207, 1997; J. Med. Syst. 24(3):195-211, 2000; J. Med. Syst. 27(4):357-366, 2003; J. Med. Syst. 28(6):523-533, 2004) are used for Electronic Medical Record System data exchange between the Data Center and each medical institution. The openness provided by XML makes it possible to connect diverse electronic medical records to the Center. As of the year 2004, over 10 types of electronic medical records have an MML interface, enabling connection to the Center.

  2. Development and clinical evaluation of a highly accurate dengue NS1 rapid test: from the preparation of a soluble NS1 antigen to the construction of an RDT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihoo; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2015-06-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) is important. There are numerous products on the market claiming to detect DENV NS1, but these are not always reliable. In this study, a highly sensitive and accurate rapid diagnostic test (RDT) was developed using anti-dengue NS1 monoclonal antibodies. A recombinant NS1 protein was produced with high antigenicity and purity. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against this purified NS1 antigen. The RDT was constructed using a capturing (4A6A10, Kd=7.512±0.419×10(-9)) and a conjugating antibody (3E12E6, Kd=7.032±0.322×10(-9)). The diagnostic performance was evaluated with NS1-positive clinical samples collected from various dengue endemic countries and compared to SD BioLine Dengue NS1 Ag kit. The constructed RDT exhibited higher sensitivity (92.9%) with more obvious diagnostic performance than the commercial kit (83.3%). The specificity of constructed RDT was 100%. The constructed RDT could offer a reliable point-of-care testing tool for the early detection of dengue infections in remote areas and contribute to the control of dengue-related diseases. PMID:25824725

  3. Development and clinical evaluation of a highly accurate dengue NS1 rapid test: from the preparation of a soluble NS1 antigen to the construction of an RDT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihoo; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2015-06-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) is important. There are numerous products on the market claiming to detect DENV NS1, but these are not always reliable. In this study, a highly sensitive and accurate rapid diagnostic test (RDT) was developed using anti-dengue NS1 monoclonal antibodies. A recombinant NS1 protein was produced with high antigenicity and purity. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against this purified NS1 antigen. The RDT was constructed using a capturing (4A6A10, Kd=7.512±0.419×10(-9)) and a conjugating antibody (3E12E6, Kd=7.032±0.322×10(-9)). The diagnostic performance was evaluated with NS1-positive clinical samples collected from various dengue endemic countries and compared to SD BioLine Dengue NS1 Ag kit. The constructed RDT exhibited higher sensitivity (92.9%) with more obvious diagnostic performance than the commercial kit (83.3%). The specificity of constructed RDT was 100%. The constructed RDT could offer a reliable point-of-care testing tool for the early detection of dengue infections in remote areas and contribute to the control of dengue-related diseases.

  4. A Leader in Clinical Trials, Medical Data, & Electronic Health Information | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hill Photo courtesy of Bachrach A Leader in Clinical Trials, Medical Data, & Electronic Health Information This year marks ... has provided the latest, most complete information about clinical trials in the United States and abroad. It is ...

  5. 76 FR 63355 - Proposed Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical course of Depression Among patients with...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical course of Depression Among patients with... depression in heart failure patients. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection... information technology. Title: Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients with Heart...

  6. 78 FR 27243 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: Interactive Informed Consent for Pediatric Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... Informed Consent for Pediatric Clinical Trials SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506... information on the proposed project, contact: Ms. Victoria Pemberton, Clinical Trials Specialist, National... Informed Consent for Pediatric Clinical Trials, 0925-New, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute...

  7. Information-seeking behavior and use of information resources by clinical research coordinators

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Charles B.; Tannery, Nancy H.; Epstein, Barbara A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The study sought to understand the literature searching experiences and skills of clinical research coordinators at a large academic medical center. Setting/Participants/Resources: The Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, conducted a survey of clinical research coordinators at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center to solicit their perceived use and knowledge of the library's electronic resources. Brief Description: The University of Pittsburgh Institutional Review Board (IRB) is a “high volume IRB” that monitors human subject research at both the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. More than 3,500 human research studies and clinical trials are active at any given time. Many studies entail more than minimal risk to human subjects, with the majority evaluating or including a drug or medical device. Clinical research coordinators are involved in most of these studies or trials. Their roles and responsibilities focus on managing many aspects of the study or clinical trial. As a first step in understanding the literature searching experiences and skills of these research coordinators, baseline data were gathered from this group in November 2004. Results/Outcome: The data from this survey indicate that clinical research coordinators are a population who would benefit from training by academic medical center librarians in how to use electronic library resources and services. Evaluation Method: A Web-based survey solicited participants' information (gender, education, job title) and role in the IRB process (job responsibilities, number studies they manage). The majority of the survey questions focused on the use of specific electronic library resources, the type of information wanted, and the types of problems encountered. PMID:16404469

  8. Automated Extraction of Substance Use Information from Clinical Texts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Elizabeth S.; Pakhomov, Serguei; Arsoniadis, Elliot; Carter, Elizabeth W.; Lindemann, Elizabeth; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2015-01-01

    Within clinical discourse, social history (SH) includes important information about substance use (alcohol, drug, and nicotine use) as key risk factors for disease, disability, and mortality. In this study, we developed and evaluated a natural language processing (NLP) system for automated detection of substance use statements and extraction of substance use attributes (e.g., temporal and status) based on Stanford Typed Dependencies. The developed NLP system leveraged linguistic resources and domain knowledge from a multi-site social history study, Propbank and the MiPACQ corpus. The system attained F-scores of 89.8, 84.6 and 89.4 respectively for alcohol, drug, and nicotine use statement detection, as well as average F-scores of 82.1, 90.3, 80.8, 88.7, 96.6, and 74.5 respectively for extraction of attributes. Our results suggest that NLP systems can achieve good performance when augmented with linguistic resources and domain knowledge when applied to a wide breadth of substance use free text clinical notes. PMID:26958312

  9. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  10. Exploring the structure and organization of information within nursing clinical handovers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Maree; Jefferies, Diana; Nicholls, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Clinical handover is the primary source of patient information for nurses; however, inadequate information transfer compromises patient safety. We investigated the content and organization of information conveyed at 81 handovers. A structure that captures and presents the information transferred at handover emerged: identification of the patient and clinical risks, clinical history/presentation, clinical status, care plan and outcomes/goals of care (ICCCO). This approach covers essential information while allowing for prioritization of information when required. Further research into the impact of ICCCO on patient safety is in progress.

  11. Seizure reporting technologies for epilepsy treatment: A review of clinical information needs and supporting technologies.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Jonathan; Khuwatsamrit, Thanin; Askew, Brittain; Ehrenberg, Joshua Andrew; Helmers, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    This review surveys current seizure detection and classification technologies as they relate to aiding clinical decision-making during epilepsy treatment. Interviews and data collected from neurologists and a literature review highlighted a strong need for better distinguishing between patients exhibiting generalized and partial seizure types as well as achieving more accurate seizure counts. This information is critical for enabling neurologists to select the correct class of antiepileptic drugs (AED) for their patients and evaluating AED efficiency during long-term treatment. In our questionnaire, 100% of neurologists reported they would like to have video from patients prior to selecting an AED during an initial consultation. Presently, only 30% have access to video. In our technology review we identified that only a subset of available technologies surpassed patient self-reporting performance due to high false positive rates. Inertial seizure detection devices coupled with video capture for recording seizures at night could stand to address collecting seizure counts that are more accurate than current patient self-reporting during day and night time use.

  12. Evaluating Evidence-Informed Clinical Reasoning Proficiency in Oral Practical Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisler, Paul R.; Hummel, Chris; Piebes, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is the specific cognitive process used by health care practitioners to formulate accurate diagnoses for complex patient problems and to set up and carry out effective care. Athletic training students and practitioners need to develop and display effective clinical reasoning skills in the assessment of injury and illness as a…

  13. Technological Feasibility of a Nursing Clinical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Hajbaghery, Mohsen Adib; Akbari, Hossein; Esmaili, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A successful implementation of an information system is impossible without sufficient knowledge of available technical resources of an institute. The aim of this study was to determine technical feasibility of a nursing clinical information system (NCIS) in Mazandaran province, Iran, 2015. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in three steps. In the first step, a data gathering tool was developed through an unsystematic literature review. In the second step, a questionnaire was developed and validity of the tool was confirmed by receiving opinions of faculty members and calculating indices of Content Validity Index (CVI) and Content Validity Ratio (CVR). The questionnaire reliability was confirmed by calculating Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (α= 0.72). In the third step, the feasibility of implementation of NCIS was evaluated by forming a panel of IT experts (n= 30), and through a questionnaire. Data were collected by 5-point Likert scale, very low to very high (scoring 1–5). Scores of each item were calculated and score percentage was determined. Chi-square and Fisher Exact tests were used. Results Maximum possibility of implementing NCIS were in the hardware area, additional equipment (92.6%), in the area of software, financial software (99.4%), in the area of network equipment, the possibility of integration with other internal systems, (92.6%) and in the area of network security, the possibility of backup version for security purposes (97.4%). Type of employment was statistically significant according to IT experts’ opinions (p= 0.014) Conclusion Hardware and software infrastructures for implementation of NCIS were desirable. The provision of more portable computers, advanced equipment such as barcode scanner, Radio-frequency identification (RFID), some approaches for increase accessibility of the system and essential databases from other resources and also increase of network lines’ speed are necessary. PMID:27790348

  14. 77 FR 6808 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Information Program on Clinical Trials; Maintaining a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... on Clinical Trials; Maintaining a Registry and Results Databank Summary: In compliance with the... Program on Clinical Trials: Maintaining a Registry and Results Databank. Type of Information Collection... Information Collection: The National Institutes of Health operates ClinicalTrials.gov , which was...

  15. Automated Methods to Extract Patient New Information from Clinical Notes in Electronic Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) has resulted in rapid text proliferation within clinical care. Clinicians' use of copying and pasting functions in EHR systems further compounds this by creating a large amount of redundant clinical information in clinical documents. A mixture of redundant information (especially outdated…

  16. 76 FR 78740 - Agency Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients With... Control No. 2900- 0719.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Titles: Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression.... Abstracts: The data collected will be used to evaluate the prevalence of clinical depression and...

  17. IrisPlex: a sensitive DNA tool for accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour in the absence of ancestry information.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Ballantyne, Kaye N; van Oven, Mannis; Lao, Oscar; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-06-01

    A new era of 'DNA intelligence' is arriving in forensic biology, due to the impending ability to predict externally visible characteristics (EVCs) from biological material such as those found at crime scenes. EVC prediction from forensic samples, or from body parts, is expected to help concentrate police investigations towards finding unknown individuals, at times when conventional DNA profiling fails to provide informative leads. Here we present a robust and sensitive tool, termed IrisPlex, for the accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour from DNA in future forensic applications. We used the six currently most eye colour-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that previously revealed prevalence-adjusted prediction accuracies of over 90% for blue and brown eye colour in 6168 Dutch Europeans. The single multiplex assay, based on SNaPshot chemistry and capillary electrophoresis, both widely used in forensic laboratories, displays high levels of genotyping sensitivity with complete profiles generated from as little as 31pg of DNA, approximately six human diploid cell equivalents. We also present a prediction model to correctly classify an individual's eye colour, via probability estimation solely based on DNA data, and illustrate the accuracy of the developed prediction test on 40 individuals from various geographic origins. Moreover, we obtained insights into the worldwide allele distribution of these six SNPs using the HGDP-CEPH samples of 51 populations. Eye colour prediction analyses from HGDP-CEPH samples provide evidence that the test and model presented here perform reliably without prior ancestry information, although future worldwide genotype and phenotype data shall confirm this notion. As our IrisPlex eye colour prediction test is capable of immediate implementation in forensic casework, it represents one of the first steps forward in the creation of a fully individualised EVC prediction system for future use in forensic DNA intelligence.

  18. A risk assessment of two interorganizational clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Sicotte, Claude; Paré, Guy; Moreault, Marie-Pierre; Paccioni, André

    2006-01-01

    A risk analysis framework was used to examine the implementation barriers that may hamper the successful implementation of interorganizational clinical information systems (ICIS). In terms of study design, an extensive literature review was first performed in order to elaborate a comprehensive model of project risk factors. To test the applicability of the model, we next conducted a longitudinal multiple-case study of two large-scale ICIS demonstration projects carried out in Quebec, Canada. Variations in the levels of several risk dimensions measured throughout the duration of the projects were analyzed to determine their impact on successful implementation. The analysis shows that the proposed framework, composed of five risk dimensions, was very robust, and suitable for conducting a thorough risk analysis. The results also show that there are links between the quality of the risk management and the level of project outcomes. To be successful, it is important that the implementation efforts be distributed proportionally according to the importance of each of the risk factors. Furthermore, because the risks evolve dynamically, there is a need for high responsiveness to emerging implementation problems. Thus, implementation success lies in the ability of the project management team to be aware of and to manage several risk threats simultaneously and coherently since they evolve dynamically through time and interact with one another. PMID:16799130

  19. A Risk Assessment of Two Interorganizational Clinical Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sicotte, Claude; Paré, Guy; Moreault, Marie-Pierre; Paccioni, André

    2006-01-01

    A risk analysis framework was used to examine the implementation barriers that may hamper the successful implementation of interorganizational clinical information systems (ICIS). In terms of study design, an extensive literature review was first performed in order to elaborate a comprehensive model of project risk factors. To test the applicability of the model, we next conducted a longitudinal multiple-case study of two large-scale ICIS demonstration projects carried out in Quebec, Canada. Variations in the levels of several risk dimensions measured throughout the duration of the projects were analyzed to determine their impact on successful implementation. The analysis shows that the proposed framework, composed of five risk dimensions, was very robust, and suitable for conducting a thorough risk analysis. The results also show that there are links between the quality of the risk management and the level of project outcomes. To be successful, it is important that the implementation efforts be distributed proportionally according to the importance of each of the risk factors. Furthermore, because the risks evolve dynamically, there is a need for high responsiveness to emerging implementation problems. Thus, implementation success lies in the ability of the project management team to be aware of and to manage several risk threats simultaneously and coherently since they evolve dynamically through time and interact with one another. PMID:16799130

  20. Clinical simulation and workflow by use of two clinical information systems, the electronic health record and digital dictation.

    PubMed

    Koldby, Sven; Schou Jensen, Iben

    2013-01-01

    Clinical information systems do not always support clinician workflows. An increasing number of unintended clinical incidents might be related to implementation of clinical information systems and to a new registration praxis of unintended clinical incidents. Evidence of performing clinical simulations before implementation of new clinical information systems provides the basis for use of this method. The intention has been to evaluate patient safety issues, functionality, workflow, and usefulness of a new solution before implementation in the hospitals. Use of a solution which integrates digital dictation and the EHR (electronic health record) were simulated in realistic and controlled clinical environments. Useful information dealing with workflow and patient safety were obtained. The clinical simulation demonstrated that the EHR locks during use of the integration of digital dictation, thus making it impossible to use the EHR or connected applications during digital dictation. The results of the simulations showed that the tested and evaluated solution does not support the clinical workflow. Conducting the simulations enabled us to improve the solution before implementation, but further development is necessary before implementation of the solution.

  1. Image engine: an integrated multimedia clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Buchanan, B G; Cooper, G F; Kaplan, B; Vries, J K

    1995-01-01

    Image Engine is a microcomputer-based system for the integration, storage, retrieval, and sharing of digitized clinical images. The system seeks to address the problem of integrating a wide range of clinically important images with the text-based electronic patient record. Rather than create a single, integrated database system for all clinical data, we are developing a separate image database system that creates real-time, dynamic links to other network-based clinical databases. To the user, this system will present an integrated multimedia representation of the patient record, providing access to both the image and text-based data required for effective clinical decision making. PMID:8591216

  2. Image engine: an integrated multimedia clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Buchanan, B G; Cooper, G F; Kaplan, B; Vries, J K

    1995-01-01

    Image Engine is a microcomputer-based system for the integration, storage, retrieval, and sharing of digitized clinical images. The system seeks to address the problem of integrating a wide range of clinically important images with the text-based electronic patient record. Rather than create a single, integrated database system for all clinical data, we are developing a separate image database system that creates real-time, dynamic links to other network-based clinical databases. To the user, this system will present an integrated multimedia representation of the patient record, providing access to both the image and text-based data required for effective clinical decision making.

  3. Towards knowledge-based systems in clinical practice: development of an integrated clinical information and knowledge management support system.

    PubMed

    Kalogeropoulos, Dimitris A; Carson, Ewart R; Collinson, Paul O

    2003-09-01

    Given that clinicians presented with identical clinical information will act in different ways, there is a need to introduce into routine clinical practice methods and tools to support the scientific homogeneity and accountability of healthcare decisions and actions. The benefits expected from such action include an overall reduction in cost, improved quality of care, patient and public opinion satisfaction. Computer-based medical data processing has yielded methods and tools for managing the task away from the hospital management level and closer to the desired disease and patient management level. To this end, advanced applications of information and disease process modelling technologies have already demonstrated an ability to significantly augment clinical decision making as a by-product. The wide-spread acceptance of evidence-based medicine as the basis of cost-conscious and concurrently quality-wise accountable clinical practice suffices as evidence supporting this claim. Electronic libraries are one-step towards an online status of this key health-care delivery quality control environment. Nonetheless, to date, the underlying information and knowledge management technologies have failed to be integrated into any form of pragmatic or marketable online and real-time clinical decision making tool. One of the main obstacles that needs to be overcome is the development of systems that treat both information and knowledge as clinical objects with same modelling requirements. This paper describes the development of such a system in the form of an intelligent clinical information management system: a system which at the most fundamental level of clinical decision support facilitates both the organised acquisition of clinical information and knowledge and provides a test-bed for the development and evaluation of knowledge-based decision support functions.

  4. Impact and user satisfaction of a clinical information portal embedded in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development.

  5. Impact and user satisfaction of a clinical information portal embedded in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development. PMID:22016670

  6. Impact and User Satisfaction of a Clinical Information Portal Embedded in an Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development. PMID:22016670

  7. A Study of the Effectiveness of Information Design Principles Applied to Clinical Research Questionnaires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Beverly B.; Schultz, Jessica R.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of information design principles and feedback-based usability testing in developing clinical questionnaires. Finds that a form developed using information design principles collected significantly more data than did a control form. (SR)

  8. CliniWeb: managing clinical information on the World Wide Web.

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, W R; Brown, K E; Donohoe, L C; Campbell, E M; Horacek, A E

    1996-01-01

    The World Wide Web is a powerful new way to deliver on-line clinical information, but several problems limit its value to health care professionals: content is highly distributed and difficult to find, clinical information is not separated from non-clinical information, and the current Web technology is unable to support some advanced retrieval capabilities. A system called CliniWeb has been developed to address these problems. CliniWeb is an index to clinical information on the World Wide Web, providing a browsing and searching interface to clinical content at the level of the health care student or provider. Its database contains a list of clinical information resources on the Web that are indexed by terms from the Medical Subject Headings disease tree and retrieved with the assistance of SAPHIRE. Limitations of the processes used to build the database are discussed, together with directions for future research. PMID:8816350

  9. National-scale clinical information exchange in the United Kingdom: lessons for the United States

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Buchan, Iain E

    2010-01-01

    Over the last four decades, the UK has made large investments in healthcare information technology. The authors conducted interviews and reviewed published and unpublished documents to describe national-scale clinical information exchange in England, how it was achieved, and the problems experienced that the USA might avoid. Clinical information exchange in the UK was accomplished by establishing a foundation of policy, infrastructure, and systems of care, by creating and acquiring clinical computing applications and with strong use of financial and clinical incentives. Many software and hardware vendors played a part in this effort; they participated in a national framework created by the NHS in which standards for exchange are specified and their applications designed to make clinical information exchange part of normal practice. Great potential exists for cost reduction, increased safety, and greater patient involvement as a result of clinical information exchange. PMID:21134976

  10. Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... events Visit the podcast archive Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/Disorders Related ... for Your Patients Information about Depression Information about Bipolar Disorder Wellness Tools DBSA Support Groups Active Research Studies ...

  11. Identification of potential surgical site infections leveraging an enterprise clinical information warehouse.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Jennifer; Erdal, Selnur; Wellington, Linda; Mekhjian, Hagop; Kamal, Jyoti

    2008-11-06

    At The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC), infection control practitioners (ICPs) need an accurate list of patients undergoing defined operative procedures to track surgical site infections. Using data from the OSUMC Information Warehouse (IW), we have created an automated report detailing required data. This report also displays associated surgical and pathology text or dictated reports providing additional information to the ICPs.

  12. Multimodal Neuroimaging-Informed Clinical Applications in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Rafael; Kopell, Brian H.; Sprooten, Emma; Goodman, Wayne K.; Frangou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging data acquisition and analysis hold the promise to enhance the ability to make diagnostic and prognostic predictions and perform treatment planning in neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior research using a variety of types of neuroimaging techniques has confirmed that neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with dysfunction in anatomical and functional brain circuits. We first discuss current challenges associated with the identification of reliable neuroimaging markers for diagnosis and prognosis in mood disorders and for neurosurgical treatment planning for deep brain stimulation (DBS). We then present data on the use of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and prognosis of mood disorders and for DBS treatment planning. We demonstrate how multivariate analyses of functional activation and connectivity parameters can be used to differentiate patients with bipolar disorder from those with major depressive disorder and non-affective psychosis. We also present data on connectivity parameters that mediate acute treatment response in affective and non-affective psychosis. We then focus on precision mapping of functional connectivity in native space. We describe the benefits of integrating anatomical fiber reconstruction with brain functional parameters and cortical surface measures to derive anatomically informed connectivity metrics within the morphological context of each individual brain. We discuss how this approach may be particularly promising in psychiatry, given the clinical and etiological heterogeneity of the disorders, and particularly in treatment response prediction and planning. Precision mapping of connectivity is essential for DBS. In DBS, treatment electrodes are inserted into positions near key gray matter nodes within the circuits considered relevant to disease expression. However, targeting white matter tracts that underpin connectivity within these circuits may increase treatment efficacy and tolerability therefore relevant

  13. Multimodal Neuroimaging-Informed Clinical Applications in Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Rafael; Kopell, Brian H; Sprooten, Emma; Goodman, Wayne K; Frangou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging data acquisition and analysis hold the promise to enhance the ability to make diagnostic and prognostic predictions and perform treatment planning in neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior research using a variety of types of neuroimaging techniques has confirmed that neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with dysfunction in anatomical and functional brain circuits. We first discuss current challenges associated with the identification of reliable neuroimaging markers for diagnosis and prognosis in mood disorders and for neurosurgical treatment planning for deep brain stimulation (DBS). We then present data on the use of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and prognosis of mood disorders and for DBS treatment planning. We demonstrate how multivariate analyses of functional activation and connectivity parameters can be used to differentiate patients with bipolar disorder from those with major depressive disorder and non-affective psychosis. We also present data on connectivity parameters that mediate acute treatment response in affective and non-affective psychosis. We then focus on precision mapping of functional connectivity in native space. We describe the benefits of integrating anatomical fiber reconstruction with brain functional parameters and cortical surface measures to derive anatomically informed connectivity metrics within the morphological context of each individual brain. We discuss how this approach may be particularly promising in psychiatry, given the clinical and etiological heterogeneity of the disorders, and particularly in treatment response prediction and planning. Precision mapping of connectivity is essential for DBS. In DBS, treatment electrodes are inserted into positions near key gray matter nodes within the circuits considered relevant to disease expression. However, targeting white matter tracts that underpin connectivity within these circuits may increase treatment efficacy and tolerability therefore relevant

  14. Isosemantic rendering of clinical information using formal ontologies and RDF.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Bosca, Diego; Legaz-García, Mari Carmen; Tao, Cui; Fernández Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Schulz, Stefan; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    The generation of a semantic clinical infostructure requires linking ontologies, clinical models and terminologies [1]. Here we describe an approach that would permit data coming from different sources and represented in different standards to be queried in a homogeneous and integrated way. Our assumption is that data providers should be able to agree and share the meaning of the data they want to exchange and to exploit. We will describe how Clinical Element Model (CEM) and OpenEHR datasets can be jointly exploited in Semantic Web environments.

  15. Isosemantic rendering of clinical information using formal ontologies and RDF.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Bosca, Diego; Legaz-García, Mari Carmen; Tao, Cui; Fernández Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Schulz, Stefan; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    The generation of a semantic clinical infostructure requires linking ontologies, clinical models and terminologies [1]. Here we describe an approach that would permit data coming from different sources and represented in different standards to be queried in a homogeneous and integrated way. Our assumption is that data providers should be able to agree and share the meaning of the data they want to exchange and to exploit. We will describe how Clinical Element Model (CEM) and OpenEHR datasets can be jointly exploited in Semantic Web environments. PMID:23920859

  16. Perception Gaps and the Adoption of Information Technology in the Clinical Healthcare Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Implementation of information systems has lagged in many areas of clinical healthcare for a variety of reasons. Economics, data complexity and resistance are among the often quoted roadblocks. Research suggests that physicians play a major part in the adoption, use and diffusion of information technology (IT) in clinical settings. There are also…

  17. [Construction and thinking of data element standard directory of traditional Chinese medicine clinical pharmacy information].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Xia; Jin, Zhong-Zheng; Guo, Gui-Ming; Zhai, Hua-Qiang; Jin, Shi-Yuan

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop the data element standard directory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical pharmacy information, to provide application standards and models of TCM clinical pharmacy for the electronic medical record (EMR). The developed line of work is as follows: initially establish research through four forms: literature analysis, questionnaires, discussion groups, expert advice. The research range from the Chinese herbal medicine research, herbal origin, harvesting, processing, identification of traits, physical and chemical identification, modern research, character, taste, Indications, clinical application, processing, dispensing medicine, Chinese medicine specifications, usage, dosage, caution, efficacy indications to small packaging applications, drug research, management and other related issues, including traditional Chinese medicine theory, application and hospital management information; according to the general and part 16 content of the national "Health Information Data Element Standards", and the basic method of extracting data element to study and develop the data element of TCM clinical pharmacy information from the defining content. Correspondingly propose the ideas and methods of construction of the "Data Element Standard Directory of TCM Clinical Pharmacy Information", sort out medicine clinical information data element standard catalog, divided into basic categories, clinical application class, management class three parts, and set norms and standards of identifying data elements, definitions, allowable value of traditional Chinese medicine clinical information, and discuss the sources and standards of information collection, leaving the interface, standardized and scientific terminology, docking with the existing standards, maintenance and management program and oter issues.

  18. 77 FR 22578 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Information Program on Clinical Trials: Maintaining a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Program on Clinical Trials: Maintaining a Registry and Results Databank SUMMARY: Under the provisions of... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Information Program on Clinical Trials: Maintaining a Registry... Collection: The National Institutes of Health operates ClinicalTrials.gov , which was established as...

  19. 78 FR 13067 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Foreign Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Foreign Clinical Studies Not Conducted Under an Investigational New Drug... contained in FDA's regulations on foreign clinical studies not conducted under an investigational new drug... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Foreign Clinical Studies Not Conducted Under an...

  20. Diabetes Information Technology: Designing Informatics Systems to Catalyze Change in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Lester, William T.; Zai, Adrian H.; Chueh, Henry C.; Grant, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Current computerized reminder and decision support systems intended to improve diabetes care have had a limited effect on clinical outcomes. Increasing pressures on health care networks to meet standards of diabetes care have created an environment where information technology systems for diabetes management are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems, and poorly integrated into the existing workflow. After defining the components of diabetes disease management, the authors present an eight-step conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective diabetes information technology systems for translating clinical information into clinical action. PMID:19885355

  1. Roogle: an information retrieval engine for clinical data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Cuggia, Marc; Garcelon, Nicolas; Campillo-Gimenez, Boris; Bernicot, Thomas; Laurent, Jean-François; Garin, Etienne; Happe, André; Duvauferrier, Régis

    2011-01-01

    High amount of relevant information is contained in reports stored in the electronic patient records and associated metadata. R-oogle is a project aiming at developing information retrieval engines adapted to these reports and designed for clinicians. The system consists in a data warehouse (full-text reports and structured data) imported from two different hospital information systems. Information retrieval is performed using metadata-based semantic and full-text search methods (as Google). Applications may be biomarkers identification in a translational approach, search of specific cases, and constitution of cohorts, professional practice evaluation, and quality control assessment.

  2. A clinical information system strategic planning model for integrated healthcare delivery networks.

    PubMed

    Snyder-Halpern, R; Chervany, N L

    2000-12-01

    As healthcare organizations are transformed into consolidated healthcare delivery networks, their success is increasingly dependent on the integration and effectiveness of their clinical information systems (CIS). Greater financial investments are being made in CIS products and services to support processes related to clinical care oversight, direct care delivery, and ancillary clinical services. To make good investment decisions, these enterprises must engage in a comprehensive strategic planning process that tightly links their healthcare delivery network clinical strategy, CIS strategic vision, and specific CIS investments. The authors illustrate the linkages among these three strategic planning stages through the application of a clinical information system strategic planning model to a case example.

  3. Implementing a Web-based clinical information system using EMR middle layer services.

    PubMed Central

    Kittredge, R. L.; Estey, G.; Pappas, J. J.; Barnett, G. O.

    1996-01-01

    The Clinical Summary is a Web-based application for accessing the clinical database at the Massachusetts General Hospital. The application has been developed to give physicians in our health care community access to clinical information for patients they refer to our hospital. "Middle layer" services, written previously for the hospital's clinical workstation, supply much of the application's functionality. Employment of reusable services together with a Web-based front end has afforded a rapid and inexpensive means for developing a new clinical information system. This paper discusses the system's design, function, and methods of implementation. PMID:8947742

  4. Metadata registry and management system based on ISO 11179 for cancer clinical trials information system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yu Rang; Kim*, Ju Han

    2006-01-01

    Standardized management of data elements (DEs) for Case Report Form (CRF) is crucial in Clinical Trials Information System (CTIS). Traditional CTISs utilize organization-specific definitions and storage methods for Des and CRFs. We developed metadata-based DE management system for clinical trials, Clinical and Histopathological Metadata Registry (CHMR), using international standard for metadata registry (ISO 11179) for the management of cancer clinical trials information. CHMR was evaluated in cancer clinical trials with 1625 DEs extracted from the College of American Pathologists Cancer Protocols for 20 major cancers. PMID:17238675

  5. Implications of the concept of minimal risk in research on informed choice in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kyoko; Nisker, Jeff

    2015-10-01

    The concept of a minimal risk threshold in research, beneath which exception to informed consent and ethics review processes may occur, has been codified for over 30 years in many national research regulations and by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences. Although minimal risk in research constitutes one of the criteria for allowing waiver of informed consent or modification to the consent process and a large body of literature exists, discussion of a minimal risk threshold in clinical practice has not occurred. One reason for lack of discussion may be that implicit consent is accepted for a wide range of routine clinical practices. Extending the role of minimal risk in research to clinical practice might assist clinicians in identifying circumstances for which implicit consent is indeed sufficient and circumstances in which it is not. Further, concepts from minimal risk in research might assist clinicians regarding when information provision in health promotion is required. We begin by reviewing concepts in both minimal risk in research and informed choice in clinical practice. We then explore how a clinical minimal risk concept may clarify recommendations for information provision in clinical practice and support the patient's informed choice regarding therapeutic and diagnostic procedures and also health promotion. Given that clinical practice involves a broad scope of health information, professional practice guidelines on information provision based on the application of the minimal risk threshold in research could be developed to guide clinicians in what information must be provided to their patients.

  6. Development of a clinical information tool for the electronic medical record: a case study*

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Fiorillo, Anthony B

    2010-01-01

    Question: What is the process of developing a clinical information tool to be embedded in the electronic health record of a very large and diverse academic medical center? Setting: The development took place at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System. Method: The clinical information tool developed is a search box with subject tabs to provide quick access to designated full-text information resources. Each subject tab offers a federated search of a different pool of resources. Search results are organized “on the fly” into meaningful categories using clustering technology and are directly accessible from the results page. Results: After more than a year of discussion and planning, a clinical information tool was embedded in the academic medical center's electronic health record. Conclusion: The library successfully developed a clinical information tool, called Clinical-e, for use at the point of care. Future development will refine the tool and evaluate its impact and effectiveness. PMID:20648256

  7. Understanding the dynamics of information technology implementation: a study of clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Paré, G; Elam, J J

    1995-01-01

    Health care institutions are considering a variety of emerging information technologies (ITs) in the hope of increasing efficiency, reducing costs, re-engineering work processes, and improving quality of care. The recent, rapid advances made in the use of innovative ITs in the health care field can present a plethora of problems to the administrative staff. Perhaps the most pressing of these concerns is the ability of today's hospitals to effectively create and utilize computer-based information systems. IT implementation has long been of great interest for information systems researchers. This branch of information system study seeks to identify those factors that are integral to optimizing the usage of IT. For example, researchers have advised practitioners that managerial support, high quality system design, commitment to advancing with the field, and extensive project planning are all key elements of successful system. In sum, previous research has produced a set of managerial proscriptions which, taken as a whole, constitute the "ideal" way to implement an IT system. Yet despite these normative principles and proscriptions, many health care institutions continue to find their attempts to make use of IT fraught with difficulty. Therefore, the objective of this study is to broaden and edify our understanding of IT implementation. More specifically, we seek to dispel the myth of the "ideal" system setup by exploring some of the alternative systems in use. We wish to investigate how and why the components of these alternative systems interact to produce utilization success (or failure). The study investigates the establishment and subsequent use of three clinical information systems (CIS) in a large tertiary care teaching hospital. The first case study is that of the hospital-wide implementation of a computer system that allows physicians to sign their medical records electronically. The second case examines the use of an electronic patient chart used to support

  8. Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) in clinical samples: Evolving methods and strategies for the accurate determination of HPV status of head and neck carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Westra, William H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Much recent attention has highlighted a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) related to human papillomavirus (HPV) that has an epidemiologic, demographic, molecular and clinical profile which is distinct from non-HPV-related HNSCC. The clinical significance of detecting HPV in a HNSCC has resulted in a growing expectation for HPV testing of HNSCCs. Although the growing demand for routine testing is understandable and appropriate, it has impelled an undisciplined approach that has been largely unsystematic. The current state of the art has now arrived at a point where a better understanding of HPV-related tumorigenesis and a growing experience with HPV testing can now move wide scale, indiscriminant and non-standardized testing towards a more directed, clinically relevant and standardized approach. This review will address the current state of HPV detection; and will focus on why HPV testing is important, when HPV testing is appropriate, and how to test for the presence of HPV in various clinical samples. As no single test has been universally accepted as a best method, this review will consider the strengths and weaknesses of some of the more commonly used assays, and will emphasize some emerging techniques that may improve the efficiency of HPV testing of clinical samples including cytologic specimens. PMID:24932529

  9. [Development of information system at Sestre Milosrdnice Clinical Hospital].

    PubMed

    Plasaj, Tomislav

    2005-01-01

    Information Systems (IS) in healthcare are complex with a heterogeneous structure. They support decision making in healthcare and therefore must be integrated, consistent, reliable, secure and simple for use and maintenance. Data entry is strongly controlled, data are coded and ready for inventory printing or scientific analysis. Efforts in developing the Integrated Hospital Information System (IHIS) at Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital, Zagreb (Croatia) from a Hospital Information System (HIS) are presented. From the very beginning, the Information System was developed without planning, only to satisfy the current needs and to stay within financial possibilities. Today, many hospital departments have their own Information Subsystems and one or two servers. All local area networks and offline computers are connected to optical ring and through the farm of servers (firewall, www, e-mail, DNS-Domain Name System) to the Internet. We need a long time to achieve the current degree of development of IS. However, today we can obviously recognize a few layers of information applications just like business application, medicine application, scientific application, education application, telemedicine and Internet application. Very powerful information technology and very fast progress in communications leads to digital or paperless hospital. PMID:16095194

  10. Developing Clinical Information Needs and Systems. Final Grant Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noback, Richardson K.; Byrd, Gary D.

    This report represents the extended research following an initial three-year grant reported on in 1975. Goals were: (1) to enact, observe, and assess the results of a program in which medical librarians become integral members of multi-disciplinary patient care and educational teams; and (2) to test the ability of these Clinical Medical Librarians…

  11. MedTime: a temporal information extraction system for clinical narratives.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Hsinchun; Brown, Randall A

    2013-12-01

    Temporal information extraction from clinical narratives is of critical importance to many clinical applications. We participated in the EVENT/TIMEX3 track of the 2012 i2b2 clinical temporal relations challenge, and presented our temporal information extraction system, MedTime. MedTime comprises a cascade of rule-based and machine-learning pattern recognition procedures. It achieved a micro-averaged f-measure of 0.88 in both the recognitions of clinical events and temporal expressions. We proposed and evaluated three time normalization strategies to normalize relative time expressions in clinical texts. The accuracy was 0.68 in normalizing temporal expressions of dates, times, durations, and frequencies. This study demonstrates and evaluates the integration of rule-based and machine-learning-based approaches for high performance temporal information extraction from clinical narratives.

  12. Clinical Decision Support for Whole Genome Sequence Information Leveraging a Service-Oriented Architecture: a Prototype

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time. PMID:25954430

  13. Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians. Methods: Questionnaires, interviews, and observations were used to collect data from twenty-five nursing students and twenty-five clinical nurses. Results: Nursing students and clinical nurses were most likely to rely on colleagues and books for medical information, while other resources they frequently cited included personal digital assistants, electronic journals and books, and drug representatives. Significantly more nursing students than clinical nurses used online databases, including CINAHL and PubMed, to locate health information, and nursing students were more likely than clinical nurses to report performing a database search at least one to five times a week. Conclusions and Recommendations: Nursing students made more use of all available resources and were better trained than clinical nurses, but both groups lacked database-searching skills. Participants were eager for more patient care information, more database training, and better computer skills; therefore, health sciences librarians have the opportunity to meet the nurses' information needs and improve nurses' clinical information-seeking behavior. PMID:15858624

  14. 75 FR 34142 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Study of Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Study of Clinical Efficacy Information in Professional Labeling and Direct-to... on the proposed collection of certain information by the agency. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act...

  15. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    Lanman, Richard B; Mortimer, Stefanie A; Zill, Oliver A; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A; Divers, Stephen G; Hoon, Dave S B; Kopetz, E Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G; Baca, Arthur M; Kermani, Bahram G; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital Sequencing™ is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient's cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing.

  16. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Oliver A.; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A.; Divers, Stephen G.; Hoon, Dave S. B.; Kopetz, E. Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G.; Baca, Arthur M.; Kermani, Bahram G.; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital SequencingTM is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient’s cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing. PMID:26474073

  17. CISweb: Dynamically Generated Reference for a Clinical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Banken, J; Lober, WB; Love, E; Gossett, A; Lowry, D

    2001-01-01

    We devised a method of producing dynamically generated reference material based on flexible templates. Our open source system allows modification of an entire website through a user-friendly interface to a database. This model has multiple other applications in developing informational /educational websites.

  18. Another Fine MeSH: Clinical Medicine Meets Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Alan; Booth, Andrew; Ford, Nigel

    1999-01-01

    Discusses evidence-based medicine (EBM) and the need for systematic use of databases like MEDLINE with more sophisticated search strategies to optimize the retrieval of relevant papers. Describes an empirical study of hospital libraries that examined requests for information and search strategies using both structured and unstructured forms.…

  19. [Adoption of information and communication technologies in the dialysis clinics of Bahia State].

    PubMed

    Mota, Fábio Batista; Ferreira Júnior, Hamilton de Moura

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the adoption and use of information and communication technologies within private dialysis clinics in Bahia State. A case study was developed with companies by applying, to clinics' managerial teams, a research questionnaire adapted from RedeSist and from PINTEC. The sample included 20 companies, listed by CNES of the Ministry of Health, and obtained a positive usage rate data of 60%. The collected quantitative information was analyzed by interviewees' answer frequency distribution. Conclusion indicates that the adoption of information and communication technologies by the clinics is not directly related to their access to these technologies but to the under usage of their economical potential.

  20. CRC Clinical Trials Management System (CTMS): An Integrated Information Management Solution for Collaborative Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R.O.; Greaves, Andrew W.; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Research Consortium (CRC) consists of 9 geographically distributed sites conducting a program of research including both basic science and clinical components. To enable the CRC’s clinical research efforts, a system providing for real-time collaboration was required. CTMS provides such functionality, and demonstrates that the use of novel data modeling, web-application platforms, and management strategies provides for the deployment of an extensible, cost effective solution in such an environment. PMID:14728471

  1. Obtaining clinical writing informed consent versus using client disguise and recommendations for practice.

    PubMed

    Sieck, Barbara C

    2012-03-01

    Clinical writing about psychotherapy clients has long been a part of didactic texts and research articles because it allows new treatments and interventions to be presented in an effective and memorable way. The main ways that clinicians write about their clients include obtaining informed consent, using client disguise, or creating case composites. Although many clinicians use a combination of all three approaches, this article specifically addresses the implications of using clinical writing informed consent. The present article begins with a brief history of clinical writing and an examination of the relevant standards in the current APA Ethics Code and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act; this is followed by a discussion of the benefits of engaging in the clinical writing informed consent process. Subsequently, the limitations of using clinical writing informed consent are explored, including the potentially negative impact on the therapeutic alliance and the client's progress. The article concludes that clinicians should be cautious when deciding to engage in clinical writing informed consent. Recommendations in the form of a checklist are provided to help clinicians identify when it is most appropriate to use client disguise or case composites, and how to do so, as well as when it is appropriate to engage in clinical writing informed consent. Future directions are considered.

  2. Detailed Clinical Models: Representing Knowledge, Data and Semantics in Healthcare Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper will present an overview of the developmental effort in harmonizing clinical knowledge modeling using the Detailed Clinical Models (DCMs), and will explain how it can contribute to the preservation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) data. Methods Clinical knowledge modeling is vital for the management and preservation of EHR and data. Such modeling provides common data elements and terminology binding with the intention of capturing and managing clinical information over time and location independent from technology. Any EHR data exchange without an agreed clinical knowledge modeling will potentially result in loss of information. Results Many attempts exist from the past to model clinical knowledge for the benefits of semantic interoperability using standardized data representation and common terminologies. The objective of each project is similar with respect to consistent representation of clinical data, using standardized terminologies, and an overall logical approach. However, the conceptual, logical, and the technical expressions are quite different in one clinical knowledge modeling approach versus another. There currently are synergies under the Clinical Information Modeling Initiative (CIMI) in order to create a harmonized reference model for clinical knowledge models. Conclusions The goal for the CIMI is to create a reference model and formalisms based on for instance the DCM (ISO/TS 13972), among other work. A global repository of DCMs may potentially be established in the future. PMID:25152829

  3. Postmortem CT is more accurate than clinical diagnosis for identifying the immediate cause of death in hospitalized patients: a prospective autopsy-based study.

    PubMed

    Inai, Kunihiro; Noriki, Sakon; Kinoshita, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Toyohiko; Kimura, Hirohiko; Nishijima, Akihiko; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Naiki, Hironobu

    2016-07-01

    Despite 75 to 90 % physician accuracy in determining the underlying cause of death, precision of determination of the immediate cause of death is approximately 40 %. In contrast, two thirds of immediate causes of death in hospitalized patients are correctly diagnosed by postmortem computed tomography (CT). Postmortem CT might provide an alternative approach to verifying the immediate cause of death. To evaluate the effectiveness of postmortem CT as an alternative method to determine the immediate cause of death in hospitalized patients, an autopsy-based prospective study was performed. Of 563 deaths from September 2011 to August 2013, 50 consecutive cadavers undergoing hospital autopsies with consent for additional postmortem CT at the University of Fukui were enrolled. The accuracy of determination of the immediate cause of death by postmortem CT was evaluated in these patients. Diagnostic discrepancy was also compared between radiologists and attending physicians. The immediate cause of death was correctly diagnosed in 37 of 50 subjects using postmortem CT (74 %), concerning 29 cases of respiratory failure, 4 of hemorrhage, 3 of liver failure and 1 of septic shock. Six cases of organ failure involving 13 patients were not identified as the cause of death by postmortem CT. Regarding the immediate cause of death, accuracy of clinical diagnosis was significantly lower than that of postmortem CT (46 vs 74 %, P < 0.01). Postmortem CT may be more useful than clinical diagnosis for identifying the immediate cause of death in hospitalized patients not undergoing autopsy. PMID:27085336

  4. Factors shaping effective utilization of health information technology in urban safety-net clinics.

    PubMed

    George, Sheba; Garth, Belinda; Fish, Allison; Baker, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Urban safety-net clinics are considered prime targets for the adoption of health information technology innovations; however, little is known about their utilization in such safety-net settings. Current scholarship provides limited guidance on the implementation of health information technology into safety-net settings as it typically assumes that adopting institutions have sufficient basic resources. This study addresses this gap by exploring the unique challenges urban resource-poor safety-net clinics must consider when adopting and utilizing health information technology. In-depth interviews (N = 15) were used with key stakeholders (clinic chief executive officers, medical directors, nursing directors, chief financial officers, and information technology directors) from staff at four clinics to explore (a) nonhealth information technology-related clinic needs, (b) how health information technology may provide solutions, and (c) perceptions of and experiences with health information technology. Participants identified several challenges, some of which appear amenable to health information technology solutions. Also identified were requirements for effective utilization of health information technology including physical infrastructural improvements, funding for equipment/training, creation of user groups to share health information technology knowledge/experiences, and specially tailored electronic billing guidelines. We found that despite the potential benefit that can be derived from health information technologies, the unplanned and uninformed introduction of these tools into these settings might actually create more problems than are solved. From these data, we were able to identify a set of factors that should be considered when integrating health information technology into the existing workflows of low-resourced urban safety-net clinics in order to maximize their utilization and enhance the quality of health care in such settings.

  5. A hybrid approach to survival model building using integration of clinical and molecular information in censored data.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ickwon; Kattan, Michael W; Wells, Brian J; Yu, Changhong

    2012-01-01

    In medical society, the prognostic models, which use clinicopathologic features and predict prognosis after a certain treatment, have been externally validated and used in practice. In recent years, most research has focused on high dimensional genomic data and small sample sizes. Since clinically similar but molecularly heterogeneous tumors may produce different clinical outcomes, the combination of clinical and genomic information, which may be complementary, is crucial to improve the quality of prognostic predictions. However, there is a lack of an integrating scheme for clinic-genomic models due to the P ≥ N problem, in particular, for a parsimonious model. We propose a methodology to build a reduced yet accurate integrative model using a hybrid approach based on the Cox regression model, which uses several dimension reduction techniques, L₂ penalized maximum likelihood estimation (PMLE), and resampling methods to tackle the problem. The predictive accuracy of the modeling approach is assessed by several metrics via an independent and thorough scheme to compare competing methods. In breast cancer data studies on a metastasis and death event, we show that the proposed methodology can improve prediction accuracy and build a final model with a hybrid signature that is parsimonious when integrating both types of variables.

  6. Selecting clinical diagnoses: logical strategies informed by experience.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Donald Edward; Campos, Daniel G

    2016-08-01

    This article describes reasoning strategies used by clinicians in different diagnostic circumstances and how these modes of inquiry may allow further insight into the evaluation and treatment of patients. Specifically, it aims to make explicit the implicit logical considerations that guide a variety of strategies in the diagnostic process, as exemplified in specific clinical cases. It focuses, in particular, in strategies that clinicians use to move from a large set of possible diagnoses initially suggested by abductive inferences - the process of hypothesis generation that creates a diagnostic space - to a narrower set or even to a single 'best' diagnosis, where the criteria to determine what is 'best' may differ according to different strategies. Experienced clinicians should have a diversified kit of strategies - for example, Bayesian probability or inference to a lovely explanation - to select from among previously generated hypotheses, rather than rely on any one approach every time.

  7. Using biological markers to inform a clinically meaningful treatment response.

    PubMed

    Yehuda, Rachel; Bierer, Linda M; Pratchett, Laura C; Pelcovitz, Michelle

    2010-10-01

    Combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) demonstrate less robust improvement following treatments than do civilians with PTSD. This paper discusses a theoretical model for evaluating treatment response based on the extent of change in biological markers of symptom severity or resilience between treatment initiation and termination. Such analysis permits a determination of biological change associated with the liberal criteria commonly used to determine treatment response in combat PTSD, and a comparison of this to the biological change associated with clinical response determined according to the conservative definition more appropriate to civilian PTSD. Interim data supporting the utility of this approach is presented based on preliminary analyses from our work in progress. We propose that future studies consider the unique consequences of combat trauma and develop treatments that incorporate the complex nature of the exposure and response characteristic of a veteran population. PMID:20955338

  8. Optimizing perioperative decision making: improved information for clinical workflow planning.

    PubMed

    Doebbeling, Bradley N; Burton, Matthew M; Wiebke, Eric A; Miller, Spencer; Baxter, Laurence; Miller, Donald; Alvarez, Jorge; Pekny, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative care is complex and involves multiple interconnected subsystems. Delayed starts, prolonged cases and overtime are common. Surgical procedures account for 40-70% of hospital revenues and 30-40% of total costs. Most planning and scheduling in healthcare is done without modern planning tools, which have potential for improving access by assisting in operations planning support. We identified key planning scenarios of interest to perioperative leaders, in order to examine the feasibility of applying combinatorial optimization software solving some of those planning issues in the operative setting. Perioperative leaders desire a broad range of tools for planning and assessing alternate solutions. Our modeled solutions generated feasible solutions that varied as expected, based on resource and policy assumptions and found better utilization of scarce resources. Combinatorial optimization modeling can effectively evaluate alternatives to support key decisions for planning clinical workflow and improving care efficiency and satisfaction.

  9. Stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy of the prostate (SHARP), 33.5 Gy in five fractions for localized disease: First clinical trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Berit L. . E-mail: ronblm@vmmc.org; Hsi, R. Alex; Pham, Huong T.; Fowler, Jack F.; Esagui, Laura C.; Corman, John

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy (SHARP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I/II trial of SHARP performed for localized prostate cancer using 33.5 Gy in 5 fractions, calculated to be biologically equivalent to 78 Gy in 2 Gy fractions ({alpha}/{beta} ratio of 1.5 Gy). Noncoplanar conformal fields and daily stereotactic localization of implanted fiducials were used for treatment. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated by American Urologic Association (AUA) score and Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and self-reported sexual function were recorded at specified follow-up intervals. Results: The study includes 40 patients. The median follow-up is 41 months (range, 21-60 months). Acute toxicity Grade 1-2 was 48.5% (GU) and 39% (GI); 1 acute Grade 3 GU toxicity. Late Grade 1-2 toxicity was 45% (GU) and 37% (GI). No late Grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported. Twenty-six patients reported potency before therapy; 6 (23%) have developed impotence. Median time to PSA nadir was 18 months with the majority of nadirs less than 1.0 ng/mL. The actuarial 48-month biochemical freedom from relapse is 70% for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition and 90% by the alternative nadir + 2 ng/mL failure definition. Conclusions: SHARP for localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal acute or late toxicity. Dose escalation should be possible.

  10. Factors influencing outcomes of clinical information systems implementation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Dianne; Cummings, Greta G; LeBlanc, Lisa; Smith, Donna L

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare agencies spend significant resources to acquire or develop clinical information systems. However, implementation of clinical information systems often report significant failures. A systematic review of the research literature identified processes and outcomes of clinical information system implementation and factors that influenced success or failure. Of 124 original papers, 18 met the primary inclusion criteria-clinical systems implementation, healthcare facility, and outcome measures. Data extraction elements included study characteristics, outcomes, and implementation risk factors classified according to the Expanded Systems Life Cycle. The quality of each study was also assessed. Forty-nine outcomes of clinical information system implementation were identified. No single implementation strategy proved completely effective. The findings of this synthesis direct the attention of managers and decision makers to the importance of clinical context to successful implementation of clinical information systems. The highest number of factors influencing success or failure was reported during implementation and system "go-live." End-user support or lack thereof was the important factor in both successful and failed implementations, respectively. Following the Expanded Systems Life Cycle management model instead of a traditional project management approach may contribute to greater success over time, by paying particular attention to the underrecognized maintenance phase of implementation. PMID:19411944

  11. Design of a Clinical Information Management System to Support DNA Analysis Laboratory Operation

    PubMed Central

    Dubay, Christopher J.; Zimmerman, David; Popovich, Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The LabDirector system has been developed at the Oregon Health Sciences University to support the operation of our clinical DNA analysis laboratory. Through an iterative design process which has spanned two years, we have produced a system that is both highly tailored to a clinical genetics production laboratory and flexible in its implementation, to support the rapid growth and change of protocols and methodologies in use in the field. The administrative aspects of the system are integrated with an enterprise schedule management system. The laboratory side of the system is driven by a protocol modeling and execution system. The close integration between these two aspects of the clinical laboratory facilitates smooth operations, and allows management to accurately measure costs and performance. The entire application has been designed and documented to provide utility to a wide range of clinical laboratory environments.

  12. The deployment of information technology in clinical laboratories and its impact on professional roles.

    PubMed

    Friedman, B A; Mitchell, W

    1992-01-01

    New information technology is deployed in hospital clinical laboratories to increase both the quality and efficiency of laboratory operations. Although total laboratory expenses may rise as a result of technology deployment, the average cost per test may decline. S-curves can be used to illustrate the effects of new information technology--such as a laboratory information system (LIS)--on the useful output and use of resources in laboratories. Major changes are now occurring as a result of the deployment of information technology, most notably in the area of automated information management. The role of laboratory professionals must be modified in response to this new information environment. The generation of information within clinical laboratories should be considered as the beginning--not the end--of the responsibility of laboratory professionals. PMID:10116938

  13. The clinical adoption meta-model: a temporal meta-model describing the clinical adoption of health information systems.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan; Lau, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Health information systems (HISs) hold the promise to transform health care; however, their adoption is challenged. We have developed the Clinical Adoption Meta-Model (CAMM) to help describe processes and possible challenges with clinical adoption. The CAMM, developed through an action research study to evaluate a provincial HIS, is a temporal model with four dimensions: availability, use, behaviour changes, and outcome changes. Seven CAMM archetypes are described, illustrating classic trajectories of adoption of HISs over time. Each archetype includes an example from the literature. The CAMM and its archetypes can support HIS implementers, evaluators, learners, and researchers. PMID:24884588

  14. A CIS (Clinical Information System) Quality Evaluation Tool for Nursing Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon Ah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to evaluate the quality of a clinical information system (CIS) conceived by nurses and conduct a pilot test with the developed tool as an initial assessment. CIS quality is required for successful implementation in information technology (IT) environments. The study started with the realization that…

  15. 77 FR 50547 - Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (PACT: Clinical Innovation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... Study--Helping Veterans Manage Chronic Pain); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration... emergency clearance is being requested for information needed to assess the effectiveness of pain care...).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Titles: Clinical Innovation Study--Helping Veterans Manage Chronic Pain. a. Pain...

  16. Factors Influencing Electronic Clinical Information Exchange in Small Medical Group Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralewski, John E.; Zink, Therese; Boyle, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the organizational factors that influence electronic health information exchange (HIE) by medical group practices in rural areas. Methods: A purposive sample of 8 small medical group practices in 3 experimental HIE regions were interviewed to determine the extent of clinical information exchange…

  17. Sharing of information by students in an objective structured clinical examination.

    PubMed

    Rutala, P J; Witzke, D B; Leko, E O; Fulginiti, J V; Taylor, P J

    1991-03-01

    Increasing numbers of medical schools are using Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) to evaluate students. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination employs a multiple-station format and standardized patients to document students' clinical skills. A lengthy format is necessary; testing an entire class often necessitates multiple repetitions of the same examination. This dictates a need to minimize sharing of information among students. We studied six administrations of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination designed to measure skills. Analyses were conducted to detect changes in scores over the administrations as well as over the 8.5 hours of each day of testing. An increase in either might indicate information sharing had occurred. No significant increase occurred. If information was shared, it had no significant effect on scores. Skills a student uses to approach a patient should not change even if the patient's complaints are known.

  18. Discussions of Cancer Clinical Trials with the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Information Service

    PubMed Central

    BYRNE, MARGARET M.; KORNFELD, JULIE; VANDERPOOL, ROBIN; BELANGER, MARC

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are essential for the development of new and effective treatments for cancer; however, participation rates are low. One reason for this is lack of knowledge about clinical trials. This study assessed how often clinical trials are discussed on calls to National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Information Service (CIS). The authors quantitatively analyzed 283,094 calls to the CIS (1-800-4-CANCER) over 3 years (2006–2008). They calculated descriptive statistics and multivariate regressions to determine whether specific caller characteristics are associated with the presence of a clinical trials discussion. In addition, 2 focus groups were conducted with CIS information specialists (n = 12) to provide insight into the findings. The authors found that approximately 9.3% of CIS calls discussed clinical trials, with higher percentages for patients (12.5%) and family members (15.4%). Calls with Hispanics, Blacks, and Spanish speakers were less likely to include a conversation. For all cancers, patients who are in treatment or experiencing a recurrence were statistically significantly more likely to discuss clinical trials. CIS information specialists reported callers’ limited knowledge of clinical trials. The CIS has the unique ability to make a substantial effect in educating patients about clinical trials as an option in cancer treatment and care. PMID:22150169

  19. Using an information warehouse to screen patients for clinical trials: a prototype.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Jyoti; Pasuparthi, Kabardhi; Rogers, Patrick; Buskirk, Jason; Mekhjian, Hagop

    2005-01-01

    Success of a clinical trial recruitment process for drug discovery and new treatments depends on screening and identifying eligible patients in a timely manner. This can be a complex and tedious process that in many instances requires a research nurse to manually track patients that may be eligible. At the Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) we have developed a web-based functional prototype that uses the data stored in the Information Warehouse (IW) to screen patients that meet the eligibility criteria for clinical trials. Using this prototype, a researcher can apply a set of inclusion/exclusion criteria pertinent to a research protocol and instantly find patients that may qualify for the clinical trial without revealing their identity. A researcher has access to all detailed historical clinical information such as lab results, diagnosis codes, pathology reports and clinical notes.

  20. Information needs of health care professionals in an AIDS outpatient clinic as determined by chart review.

    PubMed Central

    Giuse, N B; Huber, J T; Giuse, D A; Brown, C W; Bankowitz, R A; Hunt, S

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the information needs of health care professionals in HIV-related clinical encounters, and to determine the suitability of existing information sources to address those needs. SETTING: HIV outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Seven health care professionals with diverse training and patient care involvement. METHODS: Based on patient charts describing 120 patient encounters, participants generated 266 clinical questions. Printed and on-line information sources were used to answer questions in two phases: using commonly available sources and using all available medical library sources. MEASUREMENTS: The questions were divided into 16 categories by subject. The number of questions answered, their categories, the information source(s) providing answers, and the time required to answer questions were recorded for each phase. RESULTS: Each participant generated an average of 3.8 clinical questions per chart. Five categories accounted for almost 75% of all questions; the treatment protocols/regimens category was most frequent (24%). A total of 245 questions (92%) were answered, requiring an average of 15 minutes per question. Most (87%) of the questions were answered via electronic sources, even though paper sources were consulted first. CONCLUSIONS: The participating professionals showed considerable information needs. A combination of on-line and paper sources was necessary to provide the answers. The study suggests that present-day information sources are not entirely satisfactory for answering clinical questions generated by examining charts of HIV-infected patients. PMID:7850563

  1. Technology-Assisted Patient Access to Clinical Information: An Evaluation Framework for Blue Button

    PubMed Central

    Nazi, Kim M; Luger, Tana M; Amante, Daniel J; Smith, Bridget M; Barker, Anna; Shimada, Stephanie L; Volkman, Julie E; Garvin, Lynn; Simon, Steven R; Houston, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient access to clinical information represents a means to improve the transparency and delivery of health care as well as interactions between patients and health care providers. We examine the movement toward augmenting patient access to clinical information using technology. Our analysis focuses on “Blue Button,” a tool that many health care organizations are implementing as part of their Web-based patient portals. Objective We present a framework for evaluating the effects that technology-assisted access to clinical information may have on stakeholder experiences, processes of care, and health outcomes. Methods A case study of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) efforts to make increasing amounts of clinical information available to patients through Blue Button. Drawing on established collaborative relationships with researchers, clinicians, and operational partners who are engaged in the VA’s ongoing implementation and evaluation efforts related to Blue Button, we assessed existing evidence and organizational practices through key informant interviews, review of documents and other available materials, and an environmental scan of published literature and the websites of other health care organizations. Results Technology-assisted access to clinical information represents a significant advance for VA patients and marks a significant change for the VA as an organization. Evaluations of Blue Button should (1) consider both processes of care and outcomes, (2) clearly define constructs of focus, (3) examine influencing factors related to the patient population and clinical context, and (4) identify potential unintended consequences. Conclusions The proposed framework can serve as a roadmap to guide subsequent research and evaluation of technology-assisted patient access to clinical information. To that end, we offer a series of related recommendations. PMID:24675395

  2. Exploring the use of large clinical data to inform patients for shared decision making.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brent; Proulx, Joshua; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Barriers to patient participation in the shared decision making process prevent patients from fully participating in evaluating treatment options and treatment selection. Patients who use a decision aid are more informed and engaged in the shared decision making process. Patient decision aids do not use real clinical data for patient information and may not represent the data well. We designed an interface, for a shared decision making aid, that leverages clinical data to inform risk ratios and create patient stories, or vignettes, and present a visual representation of quantified treatment outcomes data. Usability testing was conducted with experts to evaluate the interface and the utility of using real clinical information that patients can explore. The experts' comments were transcribed and coded for themes. Themes were quantified and comments were interpreted for refinement and modification to the patient decision aid interface and data visualization.

  3. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  4. Audit of the informed consent process as a part of a clinical research quality assurance program.

    PubMed

    Lad, Pramod M; Dahl, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    Audits of the informed consent process are a key element of a clinical research quality assurance program. A systematic approach to such audits has not been described in the literature. In this paper we describe two components of the audit. The first is the audit of the informed consent document to verify adherence with federal regulations. The second component is comprised of the audit of the informed consent conference, with emphasis on a real time review of the appropriate communication of the key elements of the informed consent. Quality measures may include preparation of an informed consent history log, notes to accompany the informed consent, the use of an informed consent feedback tool, and the use of institutional surveys to assess comprehension of the informed consent process.

  5. SANDS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Clinical Decision Support in a National Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. PMID:18434256

  6. Student Information Systems Demystified: The Increasing Demand for Accurate, Timely Data Means Schools and Districts Are Relying Heavily on SIS Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntire, Todd

    2004-01-01

    Student information systems, one of the first applications of computer technology in education, are undergoing a significant transition yet again. The first major shift in SIS technologies occurred about 15 years ago when they evolved from mainframe programs to client-server solutions. Now, vendors across the board are offering centralized…

  7. Guidance on Evaluating Options for Representing Clinical Data within Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Hardiker, Nicholas R; Hynes, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The health information system PlunketPlus is a clinical initiative of Plunket (the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society) with a goal of further improving the health outcomes for children in New Zealand. The success of PlunketPlus depends heavily on how data is represented within the system. The purpose of the study described in this paper was to use PlunketPlus as a case study to inform the development of guidance on evaluating options for representing clinical data within health information systems, with a particular focus on automating existing informational processes. It has been possible to take some of the lessons learned to inform the development of initial more generic guidance that might be applicable across a range of domains. This paper concludes with a description of how Plunket applied the guidance as part of the development of PlunketPlus.

  8. Connecting public health and clinical information systems by using a standardized methodology.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd G M E

    2007-01-01

    To meet the challenge for efficient, high quality and sustainable care, health systems in developed and increasingly in developing countries require extended communication and cooperation between all principals involved in citizen's care. The challenge also concerns supporting information systems, which demand interoperation with public health, bioinformatics, genomics, administrative, governmental, and other sources of data. The paper describes an architecture development methodology for modeling the integration between clinical and public health information systems that harmonizes existent standardized modeling approaches and integrates HL7 domain knowledge. An integration-architecture for information sharing between public health surveillance and clinical information systems is derived demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Predominantly, a harmonized process for analysis, design, implementation and maintenance of semantically interoperable information systems based on formal grammars is discussed in some detail.

  9. How Strong are Passwords Used to Protect Personal Health Information in Clinical Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Katherine; Jonker, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Background Findings and statements about how securely personal health information is managed in clinical research are mixed. Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate the security of practices used to transfer and share sensitive files in clinical trials. Methods Two studies were performed. First, 15 password-protected files that were transmitted by email during regulated Canadian clinical trials were obtained. Commercial password recovery tools were used on these files to try to crack their passwords. Second, interviews with 20 study coordinators were conducted to understand file-sharing practices in clinical trials for files containing personal health information. Results We were able to crack the passwords for 93% of the files (14/15). Among these, 13 files contained thousands of records with sensitive health information on trial participants. The passwords tended to be relatively weak, using common names of locations, animals, car brands, and obvious numeric sequences. Patient information is commonly shared by email in the context of query resolution. Files containing personal health information are shared by email and, by posting them on shared drives with common passwords, to facilitate collaboration. Conclusion If files containing sensitive patient information must be transferred by email, mechanisms to encrypt them and to ensure that password strength is high are necessary. More sophisticated collaboration tools are required to allow file sharing without password sharing. We provide recommendations to implement these practices. PMID:21317106

  10. An Automated Medical Information Management System (OpScan-MIMS) in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, S.; Baker, T.G.; Ritchey, M.G.; Alterescu, S.; Friedman, C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes an automated medical information management system within a clinic setting. The system includes an optically scanned data entry system (OpScan), a generalized, interactive retrieval and storage software system(Medical Information Management System, MIMS) and the use of time-sharing. The system has the advantages of minimal hardware purchase and maintenance, rapid data entry and retrieval, user-created programs, no need for user knowledge of computer language or technology and is cost effective. The OpScan-MIMS system has been operational for approximately 16 months in a sexually transmitted disease clinic. The system's application to medical audit, quality assurance, clinic management and clinical training are demonstrated.

  11. Biomedical data mining in clinical routine: expanding the impact of hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Marcel; Markó, Kornel; Daumke, Philipp; Paetzold, Jan; Roesner, Arnold; Klar, Rüdiger

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we want to describe how the promising technology of biomedical data mining can improve the use of hospital information systems: a large set of unstructured, narrative clinical data from a dermatological university hospital like discharge letters or other dermatological reports were processed through a morpho-semantic text retrieval engine ("MorphoSaurus") and integrated with other clinical data using a web-based interface and brought into daily clinical routine. The user evaluation showed a very high user acceptance - this system seems to meet the clinicians' requirements for a vertical data mining in the electronic patient records. What emerges is the need for integration of biomedical data mining into hospital information systems for clinical, scientific, educational and economic reasons.

  12. WebCIS: large scale deployment of a Web-based clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Hripcsak, G; Cimino, J J; Sengupta, S

    1999-01-01

    WebCIS is a Web-based clinical information system. It sits atop the existing Columbia University clinical information system architecture, which includes a clinical repository, the Medical Entities Dictionary, an HL7 interface engine, and an Arden Syntax based clinical event monitor. WebCIS security features include authentication with secure tokens, authorization maintained in an LDAP server, SSL encryption, permanent audit logs, and application time outs. WebCIS is currently used by 810 physicians at the Columbia-Presbyterian center of New York Presbyterian Healthcare to review and enter data into the electronic medical record. Current deployment challenges include maintaining adequate database performance despite complex queries, replacing large numbers of computers that cannot run modern Web browsers, and training users that have never logged onto the Web. Although the raised expectations and higher goals have increased deployment costs, the end result is a far more functional, far more available system. PMID:10566471

  13. Key informants' perspectives of implementing chromosomal microarrays into clinical practice in Australia.

    PubMed

    Turbitt, Erin; Halliday, Jane L; Metcalfe, Sylvia A

    2013-08-01

    High-resolution genomic tests have the potential to revolutionize healthcare by vastly improving mutation detection. The use of chromosomal microarray (CMA) represents one of the earliest examples of these new genomic tests being introduced and disseminated in the clinic. While CMA has clear advantages over traditional karyotyping in terms of mutation detection, little research has investigated the process by which CMA was implemented in clinical settings. Fifteen key informants, six clinicians, and nine laboratory scientists from four Australian states were interviewed about their experiences during and in the time since CMA was adopted for clinical use. Participants discussed challenges such as result interpretation and communication. Strengths were also highlighted, including the collaborative approaches of some centers. Clinical experiences and opinions can inform larger studies with a range of stakeholders, including patients. The historical perspectives from this retrospective study can be helpful in guiding the implementation of future genomic technologies such as whole exome/genome sequencing.

  14. Information needs of clinical teams: analysis of questions received by the Clinical Informatics Consult Service

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Rebecca N.; Giuse, Nunzia B.; Wilder Gish, Kimbra; Sathe, Nila A.; Dietrich, Mary S.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the types of questions received by Clinical Informatics Consult Service (CICS) librarians from clinicians on rounds and to analyze the number of clearly differentiated viewpoints provided in response. Design: Questions were retrieved from an internal database, the CICS Knowledge Base, and analyzed for redundancy by subject analysis. The unique questions were classified into ten categories by subject. Treatment-related questions were analyzed for the number of viewpoints represented in the librarian's response. Results: The CICS Knowledge Base contained 476 unique questions and 71 redundant questions. Among the unique queries, the top two categories accounted for 67%: treatment (36%) and disease description (31%). Within the treatment-related subset, 138 questions (59%) required representation of more than one viewpoint in the librarian's response. Discussion: Questions generated by clinicians frequently require comprehensive, critical appraisal of the medical literature, a need that can be filled by librarians trained in such techniques. This study demonstrates that many questions require representation of more than one viewpoint to answer completely. Moreover, the redundancy rate underscores the need for resources like the CICS Knowledge Base. By critically analyzing the medical literature, CICS librarians are providing a time-saving and valuable service for clinicians and charting new territory for librarians. PMID:11337949

  15. The development and evaluation of a nursing information system for caring clinical in-patient.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-Wen; Li, Chih-Ping; Wang, Mei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to develop a nursing information system in order to simplify the admission procedure for caring clinical in-patient, enhance the efficiency of medical information documentation. Therefore, by correctly delivering patients’ health records, and providing continues care, patient safety and care quality would be effectively improved. The study method was to apply Spiral Model development system to compose a nursing information team. By using strategies of data collection, working environment observation, applying use-case modeling, and conferences of Joint Application Design (JAD) to complete the system requirement analysis and design. The Admission Care Management Information System (ACMIS) mainly included: (1) Admission nursing management information system. (2) Inter-shift meeting information management system. (3) The linkage of drug management system and physical examination record system. The framework contained qualitative and quantitative components that provided both formative and summative elements of the evaluation. System evaluation was to apply information success model, and developed questionnaire of consisting nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction. The results of questionnaires were users’ satisfaction, the perceived self-involvement, age and information quality were positively to personal and organizational effectiveness. According to the results of this study, the Admission Care Management Information System was practical to simplifying clinic working procedure and effective in communicating and documenting admission medical information. PMID:26578276

  16. The development and evaluation of a nursing information system for caring clinical in-patient.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-Wen; Li, Chih-Ping; Wang, Mei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to develop a nursing information system in order to simplify the admission procedure for caring clinical in-patient, enhance the efficiency of medical information documentation. Therefore, by correctly delivering patients’ health records, and providing continues care, patient safety and care quality would be effectively improved. The study method was to apply Spiral Model development system to compose a nursing information team. By using strategies of data collection, working environment observation, applying use-case modeling, and conferences of Joint Application Design (JAD) to complete the system requirement analysis and design. The Admission Care Management Information System (ACMIS) mainly included: (1) Admission nursing management information system. (2) Inter-shift meeting information management system. (3) The linkage of drug management system and physical examination record system. The framework contained qualitative and quantitative components that provided both formative and summative elements of the evaluation. System evaluation was to apply information success model, and developed questionnaire of consisting nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction. The results of questionnaires were users’ satisfaction, the perceived self-involvement, age and information quality were positively to personal and organizational effectiveness. According to the results of this study, the Admission Care Management Information System was practical to simplifying clinic working procedure and effective in communicating and documenting admission medical information.

  17. Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education.

    PubMed

    Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

    2014-01-01

    Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area.

  18. ClinicalTrials.gov registration can supplement information in abstracts for systematic reviews: a comparison study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The inclusion of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reported in conference abstracts in systematic reviews is controversial, partly because study design information and risk of bias is often not fully reported in the abstract. The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) requires trial registration of abstracts submitted for their annual conference as of 2007. Our goal was to assess the feasibility of obtaining study design information critical to systematic reviews, but not typically included in conference abstracts, from the trial registration record. Methods We reviewed all conference abstracts presented at the ARVO meetings from 2007 through 2009, and identified 496 RCTs; 154 had a single matching registration record in ClinicalTrials.gov. Two individuals independently extracted information from the abstract and the ClinicalTrials.gov record, including study design, sample size, inclusion criteria, masking, interventions, outcomes, funder, and investigator name and contact information. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. We assessed the frequencies of reporting variables appearing in the abstract and the trial register and assessed agreement of information reported in both sources. Results We found a substantial amount of study design information in the ClinicalTrials.gov record that was unavailable in the corresponding conference abstract, including eligibility criteria associated with gender (83%; 128/154); masking or blinding of study participants (53%, 82/154), persons administering treatment (30%, 46/154), and persons measuring the outcomes (40%, 61/154)); and number of study centers (58%; 90/154). Only 34% (52/154) of abstracts explicitly described a primary outcome, but a primary outcome was included in the “Primary Outcome” field in the ClinicalTrials.gov record for 82% (126/154) of studies. One or more study interventions were reported in each abstract, but agreed exactly with those reported in Clinical

  19. The NIAID Division of AIDS enterprise information system: integrated decision support for global clinical research programs

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nitin; Varghese, Suresh; Virkar, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of AIDS (DAIDS) Enterprise Information System (DAIDS-ES) is a web-based system that supports NIAID in the scientific, strategic, and tactical management of its global clinical research programs for HIV/AIDS vaccines, prevention, and therapeutics. Different from most commercial clinical trials information systems, which are typically protocol-driven, the DAIDS-ES was built to exchange information with those types of systems and integrate it in ways that help scientific program directors lead the research effort and keep pace with the complex and ever-changing global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Whereas commercially available clinical trials support systems are not usually disease-focused, DAIDS-ES was specifically designed to capture and incorporate unique scientific, demographic, and logistical aspects of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and vaccine research in order to provide a rich source of information to guide informed decision-making. Sharing data across its internal components and with external systems, using defined vocabularies, open standards and flexible interfaces, the DAIDS-ES enables NIAID, its global collaborators and stakeholders, access to timely, quality information about NIAID-supported clinical trials which is utilized to: (1) analyze the research portfolio, assess capacity, identify opportunities, and avoid redundancies; (2) help support study safety, quality, ethics, and regulatory compliance; (3) conduct evidence-based policy analysis and business process re-engineering for improved efficiency. This report summarizes how the DAIDS-ES was conceptualized, how it differs from typical clinical trial support systems, the rationale for key design choices, and examples of how it is being used to advance the efficiency and effectiveness of NIAID's HIV/AIDS clinical research programs. PMID:21816958

  20. The NIAID Division of AIDS enterprise information system: integrated decision support for global clinical research programs.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Jonathan M; Gupta, Nitin; Varghese, Suresh; Virkar, Hemant

    2011-12-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of AIDS (DAIDS) Enterprise Information System (DAIDS-ES) is a web-based system that supports NIAID in the scientific, strategic, and tactical management of its global clinical research programs for HIV/AIDS vaccines, prevention, and therapeutics. Different from most commercial clinical trials information systems, which are typically protocol-driven, the DAIDS-ES was built to exchange information with those types of systems and integrate it in ways that help scientific program directors lead the research effort and keep pace with the complex and ever-changing global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Whereas commercially available clinical trials support systems are not usually disease-focused, DAIDS-ES was specifically designed to capture and incorporate unique scientific, demographic, and logistical aspects of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and vaccine research in order to provide a rich source of information to guide informed decision-making. Sharing data across its internal components and with external systems, using defined vocabularies, open standards and flexible interfaces, the DAIDS-ES enables NIAID, its global collaborators and stakeholders, access to timely, quality information about NIAID-supported clinical trials which is utilized to: (1) analyze the research portfolio, assess capacity, identify opportunities, and avoid redundancies; (2) help support study safety, quality, ethics, and regulatory compliance; (3) conduct evidence-based policy analysis and business process re-engineering for improved efficiency. This report summarizes how the DAIDS-ES was conceptualized, how it differs from typical clinical trial support systems, the rationale for key design choices, and examples of how it is being used to advance the efficiency and effectiveness of NIAID's HIV/AIDS clinical research programs.

  1. A clinical information systems strategy for a large integrated delivery network.

    PubMed Central

    Kuperman, G. J.; Spurr, C.; Flammini, S.; Bates, D.; Glaser, J.

    2000-01-01

    Integrated delivery networks (IDNs) are an emerging class of health care institutions. IDNs are formed from the affiliation of individual health care institutions and are intended to be more efficient in the current fiscal health care environment. To realize efficiencies and support their strategic visions, IDNs rely critically on excellent information technology (IT). Because of its importance to the mission of the IDN, strategic decisions about IT are made by the top leadership of the IDN. At Partners HealthCare System, a large IDN in Boston, MA, a clinical information systems strategy has been created to support the Partners clinical vision. In this paper, we discuss the Partners' structure, clinical vision, and current IT initiatives in place to address the clinical vision. The initiatives are: a clinical data repository, inpatient process support, electronic medical records, a portal strategy, referral applications, knowledge resources, support for product lines, patient computing, confidentiality, and clinical decision support. We address several of the issues encountered in trying to bring excellent information technology to a large IDN. PMID:11079921

  2. Centers Speak Up: The Clinical Context for Health Information Technology in the Ambulatory Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ming; Webster, Tashonna R.; Curry, Leslie; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Fifield, Judith; Burstin, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Clinicians in ambulatory care settings are increasingly called upon to use health information technology (health IT) to improve practice efficiency and performance. Successful adoption of health IT requires an understanding of how clinical tasks and workflows will be affected; yet this has not been well described. Objective To describe how health IT functions within a clinical context. Design Qualitative study, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Participants Executives and staff at 4 community health centers, 3 health center networks, and 1 large primary care organization. Approach Transcribed audio-recorded interviews, analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results Systematic characterization of clinical context identified 6 primary clinical domains. These included results management, intra-clinic communication, patient education and outreach, inter-clinic coordination, medication management, and provider education and feedback. We generated clinical process diagrams to characterize these domains. Participants suggested that underlying workflows for these domains must be fully operational to ensure successful deployment of health IT. Conclusions Understanding the clinical context is a necessary precursor to successful deployment of health IT. Process diagrams can serve as the basis for EHR certification, to identify challenges, to measure health IT adoption, or to develop curricular content regarding the role of health IT in clinical practice. PMID:18373132

  3. Current state of information technologies for the clinical research enterprise across academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shawn N; Dubey, Anil; Embi, Peter J; Harris, Paul A; Richter, Brent G; Turisco, Fran; Weber, Griffin M; Tcheng, James E; Keogh, Diane

    2012-06-01

    Information technology (IT) to support clinical research has steadily grown over the past 10 years. Many new applications at the enterprise level are available to assist with the numerous tasks necessary in performing clinical research. However, it is not clear how rapidly this technology is being adopted or whether it is making an impact upon how clinical research is being performed. The Clinical Research Forum's IT Roundtable performed a survey of 17 representative academic medical centers (AMCs) to understand the adoption rate and implementation strategies within this field. The results were compared with similar surveys from 4 and 6 years ago. We found the adoption rate for four prominent areas of IT-supported clinical research had increased remarkably, specifically regulatory compliance, electronic data capture for clinical trials, data repositories for secondary use of clinical data, and infrastructure for supporting collaboration. Adoption of other areas of clinical research IT was more irregular with wider differences between AMCs. These differences appeared to be partially due to a set of openly available applications that have emerged to occupy an important place in the landscape of clinical research enterprise-level support at AMC's. PMID:22686207

  4. Information systems for administration, clinical documentation and quality assurance in an Austrian disease management programme.

    PubMed

    Beck, Peter; Truskaller, Thomas; Rakovac, Ivo; Bruner, Fritz; Zanettin, Dominik; Pieber, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    5.9% of the Austrian population is affected by diabetes mellitus. Disease Management is a structured treatment approach that is suitable for application to the diabetes mellitus area and often is supported by information technology. This article describes the information systems developed and implemented in the Austrian disease management programme for type 2 diabetes. Several workflows for administration as well as for clinical documentation have been implemented utilizing the Austrian e-Health infrastructure. De-identified clinical data is available for creating feedback reports for providers and programme evaluation.

  5. Designing a clinical dashboard to fill information gaps in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Jordan L; Cimino, James J; Fred, Matthew R; Green, Robert A; Vawdrey, David K

    2014-01-01

    Data fragmentation within electronic health records causes gaps in the information readily available to clinicians. We investigated the information needs of emergency medicine clinicians in order to design an electronic dashboard to fill information gaps in the emergency department. An online survey was distributed to all emergency medicine physicians at a large, urban academic medical center. The survey response rate was 48% (52/109). The clinical information items reported to be most helpful while caring for patients in the emergency department were vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG) reports, previous discharge summaries, and previous lab results. Brief structured interviews were also conducted with 18 clinicians during their shifts in the emergency department. From the interviews, three themes emerged: 1) difficulty accessing vital signs, 2) difficulty accessing point-of-care tests, and 3) difficulty comparing the current ECG with the previous ECG. An emergency medicine clinical dashboard was developed to address these difficulties.

  6. Finnish physicians' experiences with computer-supported patient information exchange and communication in clinical work.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Johanna; Nieminen, Marko; Hypponen, Hannele; Laaveri, Tinja

    2011-01-01

    Several researchers share the concern of healthcare information systems failing to support communication and collaboration in clinical practices. The objective of this paper is to investigate the current state of computer-supported patient information exchange and associated communication between clinicians. We report findings from a national survey on Finnish physicians? experiences with their currently used clinical information systems with regard to patient information documentation, retrieval, management and exchange-related tasks. The questionnaire study with 3929 physicians indicated the main concern being cross-organisational patient information delivery. In addition, physicians argued computer usage increasingly steals time and attention from caring activities and even disturbs physician?nurse collaboration. Problems in information management were particularly emphasised among those physicians working in hospitals and wards. The survey findings indicated that collaborative applications and mobile or wireless solutions have not been widely adapted in Finnish healthcare and suggested an urgent need for adopting appropriate information and communication technology applications to support information exchange and communication between physicians, and physicians and nurses.

  7. Impact of the information age on residency training: communication, access to public information, and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Donald M; Belitsky, Richard; Cohen, Mitchell B; Cabaniss, Deborah L; Dickstein, Leah J; Bernstein, Carol A; Kaplan, Allan S; Scheiber, Stephen C; Crisp-Han, Holly D; Wrzosek, Marika I; Silberman, Edward K

    2015-02-01

    Access to technology in practice helps physicians manage information, communicate, and research topics; however, those in training receive almost no formal preparation for integrating web-based technologies into practice. One reason for this is that many faculty-aside from junior faculty or those in recent generations-did not grow up using Internet communication, may use it minimally, if at all, in their own practices, and may know little about its forms and varieties. This report presents a case to illustrate how these disparities may play out in the supervisory situation and makes suggestions about helping supervisors integrate technology-awareness into their teaching. PMID:25124878

  8. Impact of the information age on residency training: communication, access to public information, and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Donald M; Belitsky, Richard; Cohen, Mitchell B; Cabaniss, Deborah L; Dickstein, Leah J; Bernstein, Carol A; Kaplan, Allan S; Scheiber, Stephen C; Crisp-Han, Holly D; Wrzosek, Marika I; Silberman, Edward K

    2015-02-01

    Access to technology in practice helps physicians manage information, communicate, and research topics; however, those in training receive almost no formal preparation for integrating web-based technologies into practice. One reason for this is that many faculty-aside from junior faculty or those in recent generations-did not grow up using Internet communication, may use it minimally, if at all, in their own practices, and may know little about its forms and varieties. This report presents a case to illustrate how these disparities may play out in the supervisory situation and makes suggestions about helping supervisors integrate technology-awareness into their teaching.

  9. Improving information availability in vascular surgical clinics. A service evaluation and improvement project.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Katherine; Kreckler, Simon; Handa, Ashok; Handa, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    This prospective service evaluation was designed to assess the availability of critical information required in vascular surgical clinics. All the data was collected via a repeated questionnaire, and the outcomes from each cycle were used to highlight where intervention was required to improve the surgical clinic experience. The first audit identified outpatient clinic deficiencies and allowed for problem analysis. Two Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) cycles then were undertaken. Interventions following each cycle included consultant access to online duplex scans and secretarial access to referral letters. Results from the first cycle showed that approximately 20% of clinic appointments were missing information and only 30% of these issues were resolved during the clinic using a work around. Following the first intervention; the numbers of missing patient notes reduced to 4.3% (10.5%), and referral letters to 3.6% (4.6%). Although the numbers of missing duplex scan results increased to 6.5% (3.3%), the new system of online scan results allowed for all scans to be accessed during the clinic. Following results of a second PDCA cycle, vascular surgical secretaries were given access to 'choose and book', a database of GP referral letters. Post intervention, all missing referral letters (2%) could be accessed immediately within the clinic setting. Data driven interventions and repeated PDCA cycles can improve hospital systems for minimal cost. With an annual clinic turnaround of 2500 patients, these interventions can reduce clinic delays and potential harm caused by unavailable records for up to 500 patients a year. PMID:26893887

  10. Classification of Benign and Malignant Thyroid Nodules Using a Combined Clinical Information and Gene Expression Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jianlei; Du, Jing; Wang, Lin; Gu, Shengli; Cheng, Juan; Yang, Jun; Lu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background A key challenge in thyroid carcinoma is preoperatively diagnosing malignant thyroid nodules. A novel diagnostic test that measures the expression of a 3-gene signature (DPP4, SCG5 and CA12) has demonstrated promise in thyroid carcinoma assessment. However, more reliable prediction methods combining clinical features with genomic signatures with high accuracy, good stability and low cost are needed. Methodology/Principal Findings 25 clinical information were recorded in 771 patients. Feature selection and validation were conducted using random forest. Thyroid samples and clinical data were obtained from 142 patients at two different hospitals, and expression of the 3-gene signature was measured using quantitative PCR. The predictive abilities of three models (based on the selected clinical variables, the gene expression profile, and integrated gene expression and clinical information) were compared. Seven clinical characteristics were selected based on a training set (539 patients) and tested in three test sets, yielding predictive accuracies of 82.3% (n = 232), 81.4% (n = 70), and 81.9% (n = 72). The predictive sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 72.3%, 80.5% and 76.8% for the model based on the gene expression signature, 66.2%, 81.8% and 74.6% for the model based on the clinical data, and 83.1%, 84.4% and 83.8% for the combined model in a 10-fold cross-validation (n = 142). Conclusions These findings reveal that the integrated model, which combines clinical data with the 3-gene signature, is superior to models based on gene expression or clinical data alone. The integrated model appears to be a reliable tool for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid tumors. PMID:27776138

  11. 77 FR 51850 - Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (PACT: Clinical Innovation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Study--Helping Veterans Manage Chronic Pain); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration... emergency clearance is being requested for information needed to assess the effectiveness of pain care...: Clinical Innovation Study--Helping Veterans Manage Chronic Pain a. Pain Care Management Tracking Tool,...

  12. A Review of "Research-Informed Clinical Practice" in Initial Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burn, Katharine; Mutton, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the kinds of relationship between research and practice that have been envisaged in programmes designed to provide opportunities for beginning teachers to engage in "research-informed clinical practice". Although the terminology varies, scope for inclusion is defined by an intention to facilitate and deepen the…

  13. The Definition of Placebo in the Informed Consent Forms of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Astrid; Baños, Josep-E.; Llop, Cristina; Farré, Magí

    2014-01-01

    Aim Lack of knowledge concerning the nature of placebo and why it is necessary may influence the participation of patients in clinical trials. The objective of the present study is to review how placebo is described in written information for participants in clinical trials to be evaluated by a Human Research Ethics Committee. Methods All research protocols submitted for evaluation in a Spanish hospital during 2007–2013 were reviewed. The main characteristics of the studies using a placebo were collected. Three authors read each of them to determine how the term “placebo” was explained and if there was any comment on its efficacy and safety. Results Two thousand seven-hundred and forty research protocols were evaluated, of which three hundred and fifty-nine used a placebo. Pharmaceutical companies sponsored most placebo-controlled clinical trials (91.9%), and phase III studies were the commonest (59.9%). Oncology (15.0%), cardiology (14.2%), and neurology (13.1%) made the greatest contributions. A review of the informed consent forms showed that placebo was described in a similar manner in most studies: the explanation was limited to between four and eight words. Very few gave information about the risks of its use or adverse reactions from its administration. None of the studies provided details about the placebo effect. And 23 lacked any information about placebo at all. Conclusions Explanations about placebo in informed consent forms is often scarce, and information about the placebo effect and associated risks are absent. This situation may influence a full understanding of placebo by participants in clinical trials and might reduce their informed decision to participate. PMID:25423149

  14. Mapping from a clinical data warehouse to the HL7 Reference Information Model.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Jason A; Scully, Ken; Tropello, Steve; Boyd, James; Dalton, Jason; Pelletier, Sandra; Egyhazy, Csaba

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale data integration efforts to support clinical and biologic research are greatly facilitated by the adoption of standards for the representation and exchange of data. As part of a larger project to design the necessary architecture for multi-institutional sharing of disparate biomedical data, we explored the potential of the HL7 Reference Information Model (RIM) for representing the data stored in a local academic clinical data warehouse. A necessary first step in information exchange with such a warehouse is the development and utilization of tools for transforming between local data schemas and standards-based conceptual data models. We describe our initial efforts at mapping clinical concepts from a relational data warehouse to the HL7 RIM.

  15. Mapping query terms to data and schema using content based similarity search in clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Safari, Leila; Patrick, Jon D

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the issues in mapping the terms of a query to the field names of the schema of an Entity Relationship (ER) model or to the data part of the Entity Attribute Value (EAV) model using similarity based Top-K algorithm in clinical information system together with an extension of EAV mapping for medication names. In addition, the details of the mapping algorithm and the required pre-processing including NLP (Natural Language Processing) tasks to prepare resources for mapping are explained. The experimental results on an example clinical information system demonstrate more than 84 per cent of accuracy in mapping. The results will be integrated into our proposed Clinical Data Analytics Language (CliniDAL) to automate mapping process in CliniDAL.

  16. Informed consent in clinical research; Do patients understand what they have signed?

    PubMed

    Villamañán, Elena; Ruano, Margarita; Fernández-de Uzquiano, Enma; Lavilla, Paz; González, Diana; Freire, Mercedes; Sobrino, Carmen; Herrero, Alicia

    2016-05-01

    Informed consent is an essential element of research, and signing this document is required to conduct most clinical trials. Its aim is to inform patients what their participation in the study will involve. However, increasingly, their complexity and length are making them difficult to understand, which might lead patients to give their authorization without having read them previously or without having understood what is stated. In this sense, the Ethics Committees for Clinical Research, and Pharmacists specialized in Hospital Pharmacy and Primary Care in their capacity as members of said committees, play an important and difficult role in defending the rights of patients. These Committees will review thoroughly these documents to guarantee that all legal requirements have been met and, at the same time, that they are easy to understand by the potential participants in a clinical trial.

  17. Informed consent in clinical research; Do patients understand what they have signed?

    PubMed

    Villamañán, Elena; Ruano, Margarita; Fernández-de Uzquiano, Enma; Lavilla, Paz; González, Diana; Freire, Mercedes; Sobrino, Carmen; Herrero, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Informed consent is an essential element of research, and signing this document is required to conduct most clinical trials. Its aim is to inform patients what their participation in the study will involve. However, increasingly, their complexity and length are making them difficult to understand, which might lead patients to give their authorization without having read them previously or without having understood what is stated. In this sense, the Ethics Committees for Clinical Research, and Pharmacists specialized in Hospital Pharmacy and Primary Care in their capacity as members of said committees, play an important and difficult role in defending the rights of patients. These Committees will review thoroughly these documents to guarantee that all legal requirements have been met and, at the same time, that they are easy to understand by the potential participants in a clinical trial. PMID:27145389

  18. Selecting a commercial clinical information system: an academic medical center's experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, E T; Abendroth, T W

    1994-01-01

    Choosing a commercial clinical information system to meet the information needs of patient care, research, education, administration, finance, and ongoing changes of the healthcare system of an academic medical center is a challenging task. For the past six months, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center undertook this task through (i) establishing a task force, (ii) assessing end-user information needs, (iii) understanding future institutional development and strategies, (iv) conceptualizing the ideal system, (v) identifying a short list of vendors, (vi) sending RFIs to vendors, (vii) visiting vendors' headquarters, (viii) technical review, (ix) reference calls, (x) using consultation services, (xi) on-site demonstration, and (xii) visiting the vendor's clients. PMID:7950008

  19. Use of information: environmental standards, assessments of risk, prevention and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Becklake, M R

    1985-07-22

    Information which relates morbidity or mortality to environmental conditions (exposure-response relationships) forms the basis for public health as well as for clinical action. For both types of action, the information base is the same, neither complete nor comprehensive. So, both types of action are based on hypothesis, the best available to explain the facts, but subject to review in the light of new facts. Even though the volume of information may be considerable, as in the case of asbestos, there are always gaps in knowledge to be bridged by judgement. This should be made on the basis of as complete an evaluation as possible of all the available evidence.

  20. Selecting a commercial clinical information system: an academic medical center's experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, E T; Abendroth, T W

    1994-01-01

    Choosing a commercial clinical information system to meet the information needs of patient care, research, education, administration, finance, and ongoing changes of the healthcare system of an academic medical center is a challenging task. For the past six months, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center undertook this task through (i) establishing a task force, (ii) assessing end-user information needs, (iii) understanding future institutional development and strategies, (iv) conceptualizing the ideal system, (v) identifying a short list of vendors, (vi) sending RFIs to vendors, (vii) visiting vendors' headquarters, (viii) technical review, (ix) reference calls, (x) using consultation services, (xi) on-site demonstration, and (xii) visiting the vendor's clients.

  1. Profitable capitation requires accurate costing.

    PubMed

    West, D A; Hicks, L L; Balas, E A; West, T D

    1996-01-01

    In the name of costing accuracy, nurses are asked to track inventory use on per treatment basis when more significant costs, such as general overhead and nursing salaries, are usually allocated to patients or treatments on an average cost basis. Accurate treatment costing and financial viability require analysis of all resources actually consumed in treatment delivery, including nursing services and inventory. More precise costing information enables more profitable decisions as is demonstrated by comparing the ratio-of-cost-to-treatment method (aggregate costing) with alternative activity-based costing methods (ABC). Nurses must participate in this costing process to assure that capitation bids are based upon accurate costs rather than simple averages. PMID:8788799

  2. Novel Representation of Clinical Information in the ICU: Developing User Interfaces which Reduce Information Overload.

    PubMed

    Pickering, B W; Herasevich, V; Ahmed, A; Gajic, O

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of electronic medical records (EMR) and computerized physician order entry (CPOE) into the intensive care unit (ICU) is transforming the way health care providers currently work. The challenge facing developers of EMR's is to create products which add value to systems of health care delivery. As EMR's become more prevalent, the potential impact they have on the quality and safety, both negative and positive, will be amplified. In this paper we outline the key barriers to effective use of EMR and describe the methodology, using a worked example of the output. AWARE (Ambient Warning and Response Evaluation), is a physician led, electronic-environment enhancement program in an academic, tertiary care institution's ICU. The development process is focused on reducing information overload, improving efficiency and eliminating medical error in the ICU.

  3. Comparing and using assessments of the value of information to clinical decision-making.

    PubMed Central

    Urquhart, C J; Hepworth, J B

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the Value project, which assessed the value to clinical decision-making of information supplied by National Health Service (NHS) library and information services. The project not only showed how health libraries in the United Kingdom help clinicians in decision-making but also provided quality assurance guidelines for these libraries to help make their information services more effective. The paper reviews methods and results used in previous studies of the value of health libraries, noting that methodological differences appear to affect the results. The paper also discusses aspects of user involvement, categories of clinical decision-making, the value of information to present and future clinical decisions, and the combination of quantitative and qualitative assessments of value, as applied to the Value project and the studies reviewed. The Value project also demonstrated that the value placed on information depends in part on the career stage of the physician. The paper outlines the structure of the quality assurance tool kit, which is based on the findings and methods used in the Value project. PMID:8913550

  4. The educational and supportive needs of informal caregivers working at Refentse Clinic, Hammanskraal.

    PubMed

    Richter, M S; Peu, D

    2004-03-01

    Informal caregivers have long been used as health care providers. It is also not uncommon in present days, to see such practice in the community. This practice of caring normally occurs within the context of the family. The purpose of the study is to explore and describe the educational and supportive needs of informal caregivers. This will assist in planning and establishing health education programmes and a supportive network, for the informal caregivers at Refentse clinic, at Hammanskraal. A qualitative, explorative and descriptive design was followed, to collect the data. Participants in this study were informal caregivers, who were involved in Refentse clinic and resided in Stinkwater village. The method of choice, to gather data, was focus groups. An unstructured interview with a schedule was followed. Tesch's method was used, to analyse the data. The results indicated that the informal caregivers' educational needs were mostly concentrated on health promotion and disease prevention activities. Their needs concerning support, mainly concentrated around support from government, the community, the University and the Primary Health Care clinic, in the area where they are serving. Personal needs focussed on recognition and respect.

  5. Lollipops in the Clinic: Information Dense Mutation Plots for Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Cory

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Concise visualization is critical to present large amounts of information in a minimal space that can be interpreted quickly. Clinical applications in precision medicine present an important use case due to the time dependent nature of the interpretations, although visualization is increasingly necessary across the life sciences. In this paper we describe the Lollipops software for the presentation of panel or exome sequencing results. Source code and binaries are freely available at https://github.com/pbnjay/lollipops. Although other software and web resources exist to produce lollipop diagrams, these packages are less suited to clinical applications. The demands of precision medicine require the ability to easily fit into a workflow and incorporate external information without manual intervention. Results The Lollipops software provides a simple command line interface that only requires an official gene symbol and mutation list making it easily scriptable. External information is integrated using the publicly available Uniprot and Pfam resources. Heuristics are used to select the most informative components and condense them for a concise plot. The output is a flexible Scalable Vector Graphic (SVG) diagram that can be displayed in a web page or graphic illustration tool. Conclusion The Lollipops software creates information-dense, publication-quality mutation plots for automated pipelines and high-throughput workflows in precision medicine. The automatic data integration enables clinical data security, and visualization heuristics concisely present knowledge with minimal user configuration. PMID:27490490

  6. The Readability of Information and Consent Forms in Clinical Research in France

    PubMed Central

    Ménoni, Véronique; Lucas, Noël; Leforestier, Jean François; Dimet, Jérôme; Doz, François; Chatellier, Gilles; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Chappuy, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative tools have been developed to evaluate the readability of written documents and have been used in several studies to evaluate information and consent forms. These studies all showed that such documents had a low level of readability. Our objective is to evaluate the readability of Information and Consent Forms (ICFs) used in clinical research. Methods and Findings Clinical research protocols were collected from four public clinical research centers in France. Readability was evaluated based on three criteria: the presence of an illustration, the length of the text and its Flesch score. Potential effects of protocol characteristics on the length and readability of the ICFs were determined. Medical and statutory parts of the ICF form were analyzed separately. The readability of these documents was compared with that of everyday contracts, press articles, literary extracts and political speeches. We included 209 protocols and the corresponding 275 ICFs. The median length was 1304 words. Their Flesch readability scores were low (median: 24), and only about half that of selected press articles. ICF s for industrially sponsored and randomized protocols were the longest and had the highest readability scores. More than half (52%) of the text in ICFs concerned medical information, and this information was statistically (p<0.05) more readable (Flesch: 28) than statutory information (Flesch: 21). Conclusion Regardless of the field of research, the ICFs for protocols included had poor readability scores. However, a prospective analysis of this test in French should be carried out before it is put into general use. PMID:20485505

  7. Construction of a Drug Safety Assurance Information System Based on Clinical Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Springer, John A.; Iannotti, Nicholas V.; Sprague, Jon E.; Kane, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    To capitalize on the vast potential of patient genetic information to aid in assuring drug safety, a substantial effort is needed in both the training of healthcare professionals and the operational enablement of clinical environments. Our research aims to satisfy these needs through the development of a drug safety assurance information system (GeneScription) based on clinical genotyping that utilizes patient-specific genetic information to predict and prevent adverse drug responses. In this paper, we present the motivations for this work, the algorithms at the heart of GeneScription, and a discussion of our system and its uses. We also describe our efforts to validate GeneScription through its evaluation by practicing pharmacists and pharmacy professors and its repeated use in training pharmacists. The positive assessment of the GeneScription software tool by these domain experts provides strong validation of the importance, accuracy, and effectiveness of GeneScription. PMID:25969745

  8. Clinical, information and business process modeling to promote development of safe and flexible software.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Deveny, Elizabeth; Morrison, Iain; Lewis, Bryn

    2006-09-01

    Using a factorial vignette survey and modeling methodology, we developed clinical and information models - incorporating evidence base, key concepts, relevant terms, decision-making and workflow needed to practice safely and effectively - to guide the development of an integrated rule-based knowledge module to support prescribing decisions in asthma. We identified workflows, decision-making factors, factor use, and clinician information requirements. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) and public domain software and knowledge engineering tools (e.g. Protégé) were used, with the Australian GP Data Model as the starting point for expressing information needs. A Web Services service-oriented architecture approach was adopted within which to express functional needs, and clinical processes and workflows were expressed in the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). This formal analysis and modeling methodology to define and capture the process and logic of prescribing best practice in a reference implementation is fundamental to tackling deficiencies in prescribing decision support software.

  9. Text de-identification for privacy protection: a study of its impact on clinical text information content.

    PubMed

    Meystre, Stéphane M; Ferrández, Óscar; Friedlin, F Jeffrey; South, Brett R; Shen, Shuying; Samore, Matthew H

    2014-08-01

    As more and more electronic clinical information is becoming easier to access for secondary uses such as clinical research, approaches that enable faster and more collaborative research while protecting patient privacy and confidentiality are becoming more important. Clinical text de-identification offers such advantages but is typically a tedious manual process. Automated Natural Language Processing (NLP) methods can alleviate this process, but their impact on subsequent uses of the automatically de-identified clinical narratives has only barely been investigated. In the context of a larger project to develop and investigate automated text de-identification for Veterans Health Administration (VHA) clinical notes, we studied the impact of automated text de-identification on clinical information in a stepwise manner. Our approach started with a high-level assessment of clinical notes informativeness and formatting, and ended with a detailed study of the overlap of select clinical information types and Protected Health Information (PHI). To investigate the informativeness (i.e., document type information, select clinical data types, and interpretation or conclusion) of VHA clinical notes, we used five different existing text de-identification systems. The informativeness was only minimally altered by these systems while formatting was only modified by one system. To examine the impact of de-identification on clinical information extraction, we compared counts of SNOMED-CT concepts found by an open source information extraction application in the original (i.e., not de-identified) version of a corpus of VHA clinical notes, and in the same corpus after de-identification. Only about 1.2-3% less SNOMED-CT concepts were found in de-identified versions of our corpus, and many of these concepts were PHI that was erroneously identified as clinical information. To study this impact in more details and assess how generalizable our findings were, we examined the overlap between

  10. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Yan, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui; Xie, Liang-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume.

  11. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  12. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  13. Potential impact of advanced clinical information technology on cancer care in 2015.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F

    2006-08-01

    New clinical information technologies now sporadically available will soon be in routine clinical use, bringing many changes to all phases of the cancer care continuum. For example, new technologies such as: (1) The next generation Internet; (2) Real-time clinical decision support systems; (3) Off-line, population-based systems; (4) Large, integrated, individual patient-level phenotypic and genotypic databases with intelligent data mining capabilities; (5) Wireless, invasive and non-invasive physiologic monitoring devices; (6) Natural Language Processing (NLP) systems; and (7) Mathematical models of complex biological systems all have the potential to impact significantly the provision of cancer care throughout its continuum. While new information management and communication techniques and technologies will reduce many of the inefficiencies and inaccuracies of our present systems, there will be an equal, and potentially far more dangerous, set of unintended consequences. Informatics investigators, cancer specialists, and health system administrators must focus on the study of what is working and what is not, as well as, on development and testing of the new clinical information management and communication technologies, if we are to be ready for the future. PMID:16783609

  14. Potential impact of advanced clinical information technology on healthcare in 2015.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F

    2004-01-01

    Clinical information technologies now sporadically available will soon be in routine clinical use, bringing many changes to healthcare. For example, 1) The next generation Internet; 2) Real-time clinical decision support systems; 3) Off-line, population-based systems; 4) Large, integrated, individual patient-level phenotypic and genotypic databases with intelligent data mining capabilities; 5) Wireless, invasive and non-invasive physiologic monitoring devices; 6) Natural Language Processing (NLP) systems; and 7) Mathematical models of complex biological systems have the potential to impact significantly the future healthcare delivery system. While new information management and communication techniques and technologies will reduce many of the inefficiencies and inaccuracies of our present systems, there will be an equal, and potentially far more dangerous, set of unintended consequences. Informatics investigators and health system administrators must focus on the study of what is working and what is not, as well as, on development and testing of the new clinical information management and communication technologies, if we are to be ready for the future. PMID:15361041

  15. Reporting Device Observations for semantic interoperability of surgical devices and clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Björn; Ulrich, Hannes; Rehmann, Daniel; Kock, Ann-Kristin; Wrage, Jan-Hinrich; Ingenerf, Josef

    2015-08-01

    Service-oriented medical device architectures make the progress from interdisciplinary research projects to international standardisation: A new set of IEEE 11073 proposals shall pave the way to industry acceptance. This expected availability of device observations in a standardised representation enables secondary usage if interoperability with clinical information systems can be achieved. The Device Observation Reporter (DOR) described in this work is a gateway that connects these realms. After a user chooses a selection of signals from different devices in the digital operating room, the DOR records these semantically described values for a specified duration. Upon completion, the signals descriptions and values are transformed to Health Level Seven version 2 messages and sent to a hospital information system/electronic health record system within the clinical IT network. The successful integration of device data for documentation and usage in clinical information systems can further leverage the novel device communication standard proposals. Complementing these, an Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise profile will aid commercial implementers in achieving interoperability. Their solutions could incorporate clinical knowledge to autonomously select signal combinations and generate reports of diagnostic and interventional procedures, thus saving time and effort for surgical documentation.

  16. Care episode retrieval: distributional semantic models for information retrieval in the clinical domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patients' health related information is stored in electronic health records (EHRs) by health service providers. These records include sequential documentation of care episodes in the form of clinical notes. EHRs are used throughout the health care sector by professionals, administrators and patients, primarily for clinical purposes, but also for secondary purposes such as decision support and research. The vast amounts of information in EHR systems complicate information management and increase the risk of information overload. Therefore, clinicians and researchers need new tools to manage the information stored in the EHRs. A common use case is, given a - possibly unfinished - care episode, to retrieve the most similar care episodes among the records. This paper presents several methods for information retrieval, focusing on care episode retrieval, based on textual similarity, where similarity is measured through domain-specific modelling of the distributional semantics of words. Models include variants of random indexing and the semantic neural network model word2vec. Two novel methods are introduced that utilize the ICD-10 codes attached to care episodes to better induce domain-specificity in the semantic model. We report on experimental evaluation of care episode retrieval that circumvents the lack of human judgements regarding episode relevance. Results suggest that several of the methods proposed outperform a state-of-the art search engine (Lucene) on the retrieval task. PMID:26099735

  17. Development of patient centric virtual organizations (PCVOs) in clinical environment for patient information management.

    PubMed

    Mohyuddin; Gray, W A; Bailey, Hazel; Jones, Wendy; Morrey, David

    2007-01-01

    A novel Virtual Organization framework which incorporates wireless technology support is presented in the research work. The Virtual Organization is designed for a clinical environment to provide better patient information management and enhanced collaborative working of multidisciplinary care teams. The analysis studies the current clinical practices and looks at the general patient information resource structure currently in use for patient care. Based on this problem analysis and current requirements of the multi-disciplinary care team members, we propose a generic and sustainable Patient Centric Virtual Organization (PCVO) framework to complement the functionality of the existing infrastructure by incorporating wireless technologies support for improved patient information provision at the point of care. The preliminary results of the study identify and classify the specific point of care tasks suited to appropriate information resources needed by the care team members. This paper concentrates on the patient information management aspects brought in by incorporating wireless technologies at the point of care using patient information resources in a decentralized and distributed computing environment. This applied research is carried out in the secondary and tertiary care sector in the cancer domain. For the analysis and results of the pilot project, we have used a case study of a local NHS Cancer Hospital.

  18. Care episode retrieval: distributional semantic models for information retrieval in the clinical domain.

    PubMed

    Moen, Hans; Ginter, Filip; Marsi, Erwin; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Salakoski, Tapio; Salanterä, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Patients' health related information is stored in electronic health records (EHRs) by health service providers. These records include sequential documentation of care episodes in the form of clinical notes. EHRs are used throughout the health care sector by professionals, administrators and patients, primarily for clinical purposes, but also for secondary purposes such as decision support and research. The vast amounts of information in EHR systems complicate information management and increase the risk of information overload. Therefore, clinicians and researchers need new tools to manage the information stored in the EHRs. A common use case is, given a--possibly unfinished--care episode, to retrieve the most similar care episodes among the records. This paper presents several methods for information retrieval, focusing on care episode retrieval, based on textual similarity, where similarity is measured through domain-specific modelling of the distributional semantics of words. Models include variants of random indexing and the semantic neural network model word2vec. Two novel methods are introduced that utilize the ICD-10 codes attached to care episodes to better induce domain-specificity in the semantic model. We report on experimental evaluation of care episode retrieval that circumvents the lack of human judgements regarding episode relevance. Results suggest that several of the methods proposed outperform a state-of-the art search engine (Lucene) on the retrieval task.

  19. Using Language Models to Identify Relevant New Information in Inpatient Clinical Notes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Pakhomov, Serguei V.; Lee, Janet T.; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2014-01-01

    Redundant information in clinical notes within electronic health record (EHR) systems is ubiquitous and may negatively impact the use of these notes by clinicians, and, potentially, the efficiency of patient care delivery. Automated methods to identify redundant versus relevant new information may provide a valuable tool for clinicians to better synthesize patient information and navigate to clinically important details. In this study, we investigated the use of language models for identification of new information in inpatient notes, and evaluated our methods using expert-derived reference standards. The best method achieved precision of 0.743, recall of 0.832 and F1-measure of 0.784. The average proportion of redundant information was similar between inpatient and outpatient progress notes (76.6% (SD=17.3%) and 76.7% (SD=14.0%), respectively). Advanced practice providers tended to have higher rates of redundancy in their notes compared to physicians. Future investigation includes the addition of semantic components and visualization of new information. PMID:25954438

  20. Organophosphate and carbamate pesticide poisoning: the usefulness of a computerized clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Y; Hirshberg, A; Shteger, Z

    1984-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate poisoning are still a worldwide health problem causing numerous fatalities in humans. Physicians who have no clinical toxicological experience with these compounds may have difficulties in promptly identifying the etiologic agent and managing the acute phase of the poisoning. We describe the potential use of a computerized medical information system that includes clinical data on 236 cases of OP and carbamate poisoning, and may improve the management of such poisoning. The methods of constructing the system, the first results of using the system, and the medical institutions that can benefit from such systems are discussed.

  1. Readability of informed consent forms in clinical trials conducted in a skin research center.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Aniseh; Asghari, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining informed consents is one of the most fundamental principles in conducting a clinical trial. In order for the consent to be informed, the patient must receive and comprehend the information appropriately. Complexity of the consent form is a common problem that has been shown to be a major barrier to comprehension for many patients. The objective of this study was to assess the readability of different templates of informed consent forms (ICFs) used in clinical trials in the Center for Research and Training in Skin Diseases and Leprosy (CRTSDL), Tehran, Iran. This study was conducted on ICFs of 45 clinical trials of the CRTSDL affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences. ICFs were tested for reading difficulty, using the readability assessments formula adjusted for the Persian language including the Flesch-Kincaid reading ease score, Flesch-Kincaid grade level, and Gunning fog index. Mean readability score of the whole text of ICFs as well as their 7 main information parts were calculated. The mean ± SD Flesch Reading Ease score for all ICFs was 31.96 ± 5.62 that is in the difficult range. The mean ± SD grade level was calculated as 10.71 ± 1.8 (8.23-14.09) using the Flesch-Kincaid formula and 14.64 ± 1.22 (12.67-18.27) using the Gunning fog index. These results indicate that the text is expected to be understandable for an average student in the 11(th) grade, while the ethics committee recommend grade level 8 as the standard readability level for ICFs. The results showed that the readability scores of ICFs assessed in our study were not in the acceptable range. This means they were too complex to be understood by the general population. Ethics committees must examine the simplicity and readability of ICFs used in clinical trials. PMID:27471590

  2. Readability of informed consent forms in clinical trials conducted in a skin research center

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Aniseh; Asghari, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining informed consents is one of the most fundamental principles in conducting a clinical trial. In order for the consent to be informed, the patient must receive and comprehend the information appropriately. Complexity of the consent form is a common problem that has been shown to be a major barrier to comprehension for many patients. The objective of this study was to assess the readability of different templates of informed consent forms (ICFs) used in clinical trials in the Center for Research and Training in Skin Diseases and Leprosy (CRTSDL), Tehran, Iran. This study was conducted on ICFs of 45 clinical trials of the CRTSDL affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences. ICFs were tested for reading difficulty, using the readability assessments formula adjusted for the Persian language including the Flesch–Kincaid reading ease score, Flesch–Kincaid grade level, and Gunning fog index. Mean readability score of the whole text of ICFs as well as their 7 main information parts were calculated. The mean ± SD Flesch Reading Ease score for all ICFs was 31.96 ± 5.62 that is in the difficult range. The mean ± SD grade level was calculated as 10.71 ± 1.8 (8.23–14.09) using the Flesch–Kincaid formula and 14.64 ± 1.22 (12.67–18.27) using the Gunning fog index. These results indicate that the text is expected to be understandable for an average student in the 11th grade, while the ethics committee recommend grade level 8 as the standard readability level for ICFs. The results showed that the readability scores of ICFs assessed in our study were not in the acceptable range. This means they were too complex to be understood by the general population. Ethics committees must examine the simplicity and readability of ICFs used in clinical trials. PMID:27471590

  3. MEG-EEG Information Fusion and Electromagnetic Source Imaging: From Theory to Clinical Application in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Rasheda Arman; Zerouali, Younes; Hedrich, Tanguy; Heers, Marcel; Kobayashi, Eliane; Lina, Jean-Marc; Grova, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and quantitatively assess whether fusion of EEG and MEG (MEEG) data within the maximum entropy on the mean (MEM) framework increases the spatial accuracy of source localization, by yielding better recovery of the spatial extent and propagation pathway of the underlying generators of inter-ictal epileptic discharges (IEDs). The key element in this study is the integration of the complementary information from EEG and MEG data within the MEM framework. MEEG was compared with EEG and MEG when localizing single transient IEDs. The fusion approach was evaluated using realistic simulation models involving one or two spatially extended sources mimicking propagation patterns of IEDs. We also assessed the impact of the number of EEG electrodes required for an efficient EEG-MEG fusion. MEM was compared with minimum norm estimate, dynamic statistical parametric mapping, and standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography. The fusion approach was finally assessed on real epileptic data recorded from two patients showing IEDs simultaneously in EEG and MEG. Overall the localization of MEEG data using MEM provided better recovery of the source spatial extent, more sensitivity to the source depth and more accurate detection of the onset and propagation of IEDs than EEG or MEG alone. MEM was more accurate than the other methods. MEEG proved more robust than EEG and MEG for single IED localization in low signal-to-noise ratio conditions. We also showed that only few EEG electrodes are required to bring additional relevant information to MEG during MEM fusion.

  4. Benchmarking Clinical Speech Recognition and Information Extraction: New Data, Methods, and Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liyuan; Hanlen, Leif; Ferraro, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Background Over a tenth of preventable adverse events in health care are caused by failures in information flow. These failures are tangible in clinical handover; regardless of good verbal handover, from two-thirds to all of this information is lost after 3-5 shifts if notes are taken by hand, or not at all. Speech recognition and information extraction provide a way to fill out a handover form for clinical proofing and sign-off. Objective The objective of the study was to provide a recorded spoken handover, annotated verbatim transcriptions, and evaluations to support research in spoken and written natural language processing for filling out a clinical handover form. This dataset is based on synthetic patient profiles, thereby avoiding ethical and legal restrictions, while maintaining efficacy for research in speech-to-text conversion and information extraction, based on realistic clinical scenarios. We also introduce a Web app to demonstrate the system design and workflow. Methods We experiment with Dragon Medical 11.0 for speech recognition and CRF++ for information extraction. To compute features for information extraction, we also apply CoreNLP, MetaMap, and Ontoserver. Our evaluation uses cross-validation techniques to measure processing correctness. Results The data provided were a simulation of nursing handover, as recorded using a mobile device, built from simulated patient records and handover scripts, spoken by an Australian registered nurse. Speech recognition recognized 5276 of 7277 words in our 100 test documents correctly. We considered 50 mutually exclusive categories in information extraction and achieved the F1 (ie, the harmonic mean of Precision and Recall) of 0.86 in the category for irrelevant text and the macro-averaged F1 of 0.70 over the remaining 35 nonempty categories of the form in our 101 test documents. Conclusions The significance of this study hinges on opening our data, together with the related performance benchmarks and some

  5. Evaluating the Quality of Website Information of Private-Practice Clinics Offering Cell Therapies in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Takeo; Hatta, Taichi; Takahashi, Naomi; Fujita, Misao

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the safety and effectiveness of stem cell therapies are yet to be proven, recent studies show that such therapies are being advertised with some questionable marketing techniques to effect positive portrayal of the therapies on the webpages of private-practice clinics to sell their therapies worldwide. In such context, those clinics communicate directly with consumers (patients and their family members) via the clinics’ websites. Meanwhile, the Health Science Council at the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare (MHLW) in Japan has pointed out noncompliance of some local clinics with the provisions concerning medical advertising in the Medical Care Act in the past. However, locally little is known about the current status of those clinics including the quality of their webpage information disseminated. Objective To evaluate the quality of website information of private-practice clinics offering cell therapies in Japan. Methods Twenty-four websites with 77 treatments from the Google search were identified for evaluation. The following three exploratory analyses were performed: first in order to ascertain web-based portrayal of private-practice clinics offering cell therapies, a descriptive analysis was conducted using a coding frame; second we evaluated the quality of the target website information from the viewpoint of the level of consideration taken for patients and their family members, using 10 quality criteria (“the Minimum Standard”) from the e-Health Code of Ethics 2.0; third we counted and coded expressions that matched set categories for “name-dropping” and “personalized medicine” in the information posted on these websites. Results Analysis on the treatments (N=77) revealed 126 indications (multiple response): the top three indications were “cancer,” “skin-rejuvenation/antiaging/anti–skin aging,” and “breast augmentation/buttock augmentation.” As for the portrayal of treatment risks and benefits, 78% (60

  6. Clinics and home-based care organisations: an interface between theformal and informal health sectors.

    PubMed

    Boros, Adam Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    The article outlines the findings of a study designed to explore the working relationship between home-based caregivers and clinic nurses at locations in two informal settlements in Johannesburg, South Africa. By considering the views and experiences of both sponsored and unsponsored caregivers, the research focused on how degrees of informality affect this relationship. The nurse/caregiver relationship represents a primary interface between the formal and informal health sectors and is an important part of the country's primary healthcare system. Despite the attention given to linking home-based care (HBC) with the formal health system, very little research has examined the functionality of this link at the ground level. Through a number of qualitative, semi-structured interviews with nurses, home-based caregivers, and staff from the Department of Health, information was collected to better understand what systems are in place to facilitate the relationship between clinics and HBC organisations, and whether these systems are helping to create the desired results. Do the formal and informal health sectors complement and strengthen or do they distract and damage each other? By examining the influence of degrees of informality, the research also lends insight into how this distinction plays a role in healthcare provision. For instance, how does state support impact the link between the formal and informal health sectors and the ultimate quality of care? And what steps can be taken to improve the health system in this regard, as a whole? The findings point to a number of problems and challenges with integrating HBC into the formal health sector. Degrees of informality are found to have a profound impact on the work of home-based caregivers in some respects, but a surprising lack of impact in others. These issues need to be confronted in order to improve the existing system and, ultimately, health outcomes in South Africa. PMID:25875880

  7. Case two: A Kantian approach to the morality of blood substitute clinical trials without informed consent.

    PubMed

    Fields, Keota

    2008-01-01

    Clinical trials in a number of countries are now underway to evaluate experimental, non-human blood substitute. One scenario calls for the blood substitute to be available on board emergency vehicles. This allows first responders the opportunity to provide transfusion support at an accident site and on the way to the hospital. However, many of the patients who would most benefit from the use of this material may be unconscious and unable to comprehend or sign an informed consent. One possible solution would be to eliminate the need for informed consent. PMID:18507310

  8. A Rule-Based Expert System as an Integrated Resource in an Outpatient Clinic Information System

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Richard

    1990-01-01

    A rule-based expert system can be integrated in a useful way into a microcomputer-based clinical information system by using symmetric data-communication methods and intuitive user-interface design. To users of the computer system, the expert system appears as one of several distributed information resources, among which are database management systems and a gateway to a mainframe computing system. Transparent access to the expert system is based on the use of both commercial and public-domain data-communication standards.

  9. Residential accessibility to information technology retailers and self reported computer use among patients attending community clinics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul; Shaheen, Madga; Smith, James; Ryan, Daniel; Baker, Richard

    2009-11-14

    The actual mechanisms that maintain the individual disparities in home computer use and internet access that are collectively termed "the digital divide" remain unclear. We hypothesized that geographic accessibility to IT retailers would independently influence community clinic patients self reported use of computers at home thus limiting their ability to access health related information via the internet. To test this we obtained information on the locations of IT retailers in Los Angeles County, California and generated accessibility scores for the patient's home residence. Geographic measures of accessibility to IT retailers independently predicted clinic patient's self reported use of computers at home, and this effect was driven by low income individuals. Our results indicate that the causes of the digital divide are influenced by less commonly considered factors such as local IT retailer availability.

  10. Analyzing Statistical Mediation with Multiple Informants: A New Approach with an Application in Clinical Psychology.

    PubMed

    Papa, Lesther A; Litson, Kaylee; Lockhart, Ginger; Chassin, Laurie; Geiser, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Testing mediation models is critical for identifying potential variables that need to be targeted to effectively change one or more outcome variables. In addition, it is now common practice for clinicians to use multiple informant (MI) data in studies of statistical mediation. By coupling the use of MI data with statistical mediation analysis, clinical researchers can combine the benefits of both techniques. Integrating the information from MIs into a statistical mediation model creates various methodological and practical challenges. The authors review prior methodological approaches to MI mediation analysis in clinical research and propose a new latent variable approach that overcomes some limitations of prior approaches. An application of the new approach to mother, father, and child reports of impulsivity, frustration tolerance, and externalizing problems (N = 454) is presented. The results showed that frustration tolerance mediated the relationship between impulsivity and externalizing problems. The new approach allows for a more comprehensive and effective use of MI data when testing mediation models. PMID:26617536

  11. Information warehouse - a comprehensive informatics platform for business, clinical, and research applications.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Jyoti; Liu, Jianhua; Ostrander, Michael; Santangelo, Jennifer; Dyta, Ravi; Rogers, Patrick; Mekhjian, Hagop S

    2010-11-13

    Since its inception in 1997, the IW (Information Warehouse) at the Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) has gradually transformed itself from a single purpose business decision support system to a comprehensive informatics platform supporting basic, clinical, and translational research. The IW today is the combination of four integrated components: a clinical data repository containing over a million patients; a research data repository housing various research specific data; an application development platform for building business and research enabling applications; a business intelligence environment assisting in reporting in all function areas. The IW is structured and encoded using standard terminologies such as SNOMED-CT, ICD, and CPT. The IW is an important component of OSUMC's Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) informatics program.

  12. A knowledge discovery and reuse pipeline for information extraction in clinical notes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dung H M; Wang, Yefeng; Li, Min

    2011-01-01

    Objective Information extraction and classification of clinical data are current challenges in natural language processing. This paper presents a cascaded method to deal with three different extractions and classifications in clinical data: concept annotation, assertion classification and relation classification. Materials and Methods A pipeline system was developed for clinical natural language processing that includes a proofreading process, with gold-standard reflexive validation and correction. The information extraction system is a combination of a machine learning approach and a rule-based approach. The outputs of this system are used for evaluation in all three tiers of the fourth i2b2/VA shared-task and workshop challenge. Results Overall concept classification attained an F-score of 83.3% against a baseline of 77.0%, the optimal F-score for assertions about the concepts was 92.4% and relation classifier attained 72.6% for relationships between clinical concepts against a baseline of 71.0%. Micro-average results for the challenge test set were 81.79%, 91.90% and 70.18%, respectively. Discussion The challenge in the multi-task test requires a distribution of time and work load for each individual task so that the overall performance evaluation on all three tasks would be more informative rather than treating each task assessment as independent. The simplicity of the model developed in this work should be contrasted with the very large feature space of other participants in the challenge who only achieved slightly better performance. There is a need to charge a penalty against the complexity of a model as defined in message minimalisation theory when comparing results. Conclusion A complete pipeline system for constructing language processing models that can be used to process multiple practical detection tasks of language structures of clinical records is presented. PMID:21737844

  13. Protecting the privacy of patient information in clinical networks: regulatory effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Brannigan, V M

    1992-12-17

    Patient privacy is one of the major issues in the development of modern clinical information system networks. Such networks will have to demonstrate an appropriate concern for privacy as a precondition of operation. Regulatory effectiveness analysis is a novel technique for measuring compliance with a technological regulatory system. By examining the public policies, legal structures, and technical tools involved in the regulatory system, it is possible to discover discontinuities that may result in noncompliance with the regulatory system.

  14. [Perinatal Information System. Incorporation latency and impact on perinatal clinical registry].

    PubMed

    Simini, F; Fernández, A; Sosa, C; Díaz Rossello, J L

    2001-10-01

    The Perinatal Information System (SIP) is a clinical record, local management and quality assurance software standard in Latin America and the Caribbean. The time to implement SIP in a Maternity Hospital is evaluated as well as the effect of statistics on perinatal health indicators in subsequent years. In the sample of 20 Maternity Hospitals (5 Countries, 40% Private and 60% Public) 85% had a reliable information system by the third year of use of SIP. 15% of hospitals still had problems at that time that were already clear during the second year, a time corrective measures can still be taken. The evaluation of the impact of yearly reports shows that 58% of recommendations were fulfilled, specially those regarding the complete filling-in of clinical records (62%) and to a lesser extent variables that reflect clinical practices and organization of services (52%). The conclusion is that Maternity Hospitals in Latin America and the Caribbean have the capacity to adopt a complex tool of computerized clinical records for quality assurance of perinatal care and monitoring of health indicators.

  15. [Perinatal Information System. Incorporation latency and impact on perinatal clinical registry].

    PubMed

    Simini, F; Fernández, A; Sosa, C; Díaz Rossello, J L

    2001-10-01

    The Perinatal Information System (SIP) is a clinical record, local management and quality assurance software standard in Latin America and the Caribbean. The time to implement SIP in a Maternity Hospital is evaluated as well as the effect of statistics on perinatal health indicators in subsequent years. In the sample of 20 Maternity Hospitals (5 Countries, 40% Private and 60% Public) 85% had a reliable information system by the third year of use of SIP. 15% of hospitals still had problems at that time that were already clear during the second year, a time corrective measures can still be taken. The evaluation of the impact of yearly reports shows that 58% of recommendations were fulfilled, specially those regarding the complete filling-in of clinical records (62%) and to a lesser extent variables that reflect clinical practices and organization of services (52%). The conclusion is that Maternity Hospitals in Latin America and the Caribbean have the capacity to adopt a complex tool of computerized clinical records for quality assurance of perinatal care and monitoring of health indicators. PMID:11816526

  16. How to extract clinically useful information from large amount of dialysis related stored data.

    PubMed

    Vito, Domenico; Casagrande, Giustina; Bianchi, Camilla; Costantino, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    The basic storage infrastructure used to gather data from the technological evolution also in the healthcare field was leading to the storing into public or private repository of even higher quantities of data related to patients and their pathological evolution. Big data techniques are spreading also in medical research. By these techniques is possible extract information from complex heterogeneous sources, realizing longitudinal studies focused to correlate the patient status with biometric parameters. In our work we develop a common data infrastructure involving 4 clinical dialysis centers between Lombardy and Switzerland. The common platform has been build to store large amount of clinical data related to 716 dialysis session of 70 patient. The platform is made up by a combination of a MySQL(®) database (Dialysis Database) and a MATLAB-based mining library (Dialysis MATlib). A statistical analysis of these data has been performed on the data gathered. These analyses led to the development of two clinical indexes, representing an example of transformation of big data into clinical information. PMID:26737858

  17. Ubiquitous Diabetes Management System via Interactive Communication Based on Information Technologies: Clinical Effects and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Hun-Sung; Han, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Ah; Choi, Yoon-Hee

    2010-01-01

    New diabetes management systems based on interactive communication have been introduced recently, accompanying rapid advances in information technology; these systems are referred to as "ubiquitous diabetes management systems." In such ubiquitous systems, patients and medical teams can communicate via Internet or telecommunications, with patients uploading their glucose data and personal information, and medical teams sending optimal feedback. Clinical evidence from both long-term and short-term trials has been reported by some researchers. Such systems appear to be effective not only in reducing the levels of HbA1c but also in stabilizing glucose control. However, most notably, evidence for the cost-effectiveness of such a system should be demonstrated before it can be propagated out to the general population in actual clinical practice. To establish a cost-effective model, various types of clinical decision supporting software designed to reduce the labor time of physicians must first be developed. A number of sensors and devices for monitoring patients' data are expected to be available in the near future; thus, methods for automatic interconnections between devices and web charts were also developed. Further investigations to demonstrate the clinical outcomes of such a system should be conducted, hopefully leading to a new paradigm of diabetes management. PMID:21076573

  18. How Missing Information in Diagnosis Can Lead to Disparities in the Clinical Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Alegría, Margarita; Nakash, Ora; Lapatin, Sheri; Oddo, Vanessa; Gao, Shan; Lin, Julia; Normand, Sharon-Lise

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented diagnostic bias and noted that its reduction could eliminate misdiagnosis and improve mental health service delivery. Few studies have investigated clinicians' methods of obtaining and using information during the initial clinical encounter. We describe a study examining contributions to clinician bias during diagnostic assessment of ethnic/racial minority patients. A total of 129 mental health intakes were videotaped, involving 47 mental health clinicians from 8 primarily safety-net clinics. Videos were coded by another clinician using an information checklist, blind to the diagnoses provided by the original clinician. We found high levels of concordance between clinicians for substance-related disorders, low levels for depressive disorders, and anxiety disorders except panic. Most clinicians rely on patients' mention of depression, anxiety, or substance use to identify disorders, without assessing specific criteria. With limited diagnostic information, clinicians can optimize the clinical intake time to establish rapport with patients. We found Latino ethnicity to be a modifying factor of the association between symptom reports and likelihood of a depression diagnosis. Differential discussion of symptom areas, depending on patient ethnicity, may lead to differential diagnosis and increased likelihood of diagnostic bias. PMID:18843234

  19. SU-D-BRD-04: A Logical Organizational Approach to Clinical Information Management

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, W; Kupelian, P; Wang, J; Low, D; Ruan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinical information management system (CIMS) that collects, organizes physician inputs logically and supports analysis functionality. Methods: In a conventional electronic medical record system (EMR), the document manager component stores data in a pool of standalone .docx or .pdf files. The lack of a content-based logical organization makes cross-checking, reference or automatic inheritance of information challenging. We have developed an information-oriented clinical record system that addresses this shortcoming. In CIMS, a parent library predefines a set of available questions along with the data types of their expected answers. The creation of a questionnaire template is achieved by selecting questions from this parent library to form a virtual group. Instances of the same data field in different documents are linked by their question identifier. This design allows for flexible data sharing and inheritance among various forms using a longitudinal lineage of data indexed according to the modification time stamps of the documents. CIMS is designed with a web portal to facilitate querying, data entry and modification, aggregate report generation, and data adjudication. The current implementation addresses diagnostic data, medical history, vital signs, and various quantities in consult note and treatment summaries. Results: CIMS is currently storing treatment summary information of over 1,000 patients who have received treatment at UCLA Radiation Oncology between March 1, 2013 and January 31, 2014. We are in the process of incorporating a DICOM-RT dosimetry parser and patient reporting applications into CIMS, as well as continuing to define document templates to support additional forms. Conclusion: We are able to devise an alternative storage paradigm which results in an improvement in the accuracy and organizational structure of clinical information.

  20. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  1. How Can Viral Dynamics Models Inform Endpoint Measures in Clinical Trials of Therapies for Acute Viral Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Cori, Anne; de Wolf, Frank; Anderson, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute viral infections pose many practical challenges for the accurate assessment of the impact of novel therapies on viral growth and decay. Using the example of influenza A, we illustrate how the measurement of infection-related quantities that determine the dynamics of viral load within the human host, can inform investigators on the course and severity of infection and the efficacy of a novel treatment. We estimated the values of key infection-related quantities that determine the course of natural infection from viral load data, using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The data were placebo group viral load measurements collected during volunteer challenge studies, conducted by Roche, as part of the oseltamivir trials. We calculated the values of the quantities for each patient and the correlations between the quantities, symptom severity and body temperature. The greatest variation among individuals occurred in the viral load peak and area under the viral load curve. Total symptom severity correlated positively with the basic reproductive number. The most sensitive endpoint for therapeutic trials with the goal to cure patients is the duration of infection. We suggest laboratory experiments to obtain more precise estimates of virological quantities that can supplement clinical endpoint measurements. PMID:27367230

  2. Understanding managerial behaviour during initial steps of a clinical information system adoption

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While the study of the information technology (IT) implementation process and its outcomes has received considerable attention, the examination of pre-adoption and pre-implementation stages of configurable IT uptake appear largely under-investigated. This paper explores managerial behaviour during the periods prior the effective implementation of a clinical information system (CIS) by two Canadian university multi-hospital centers. Methods Adopting a structurationist theoretical stance and a case study research design, the processes by which CIS managers' patterns of discourse contribute to the configuration of the new technology in their respective organizational contexts were longitudinally examined over 33 months. Results Although managers seemed to be aware of the risks and organizational impact of the adoption of a new clinical information system, their decisions and actions over the periods examined appeared rather to be driven by financial constraints and power struggles between different groups involved in the process. Furthermore, they largely emphasized technological aspects of the implementation, with organizational dimensions being put aside. In view of these results, the notion of 'rhetorical ambivalence' is proposed. Results are further discussed in relation to the significance of initial decisions and actions for the subsequent implementation phases of the technology being configured. Conclusions Theoretical and empirically grounded, the paper contributes to the underdeveloped body of literature on information system pre-implementation processes by revealing the crucial role played by managers during the initial phases of a CIS adoption. PMID:21682885

  3. Comprehensive temporal information detection from clinical text: medical events, time, and TLINK identification

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sunghwan; Wagholikar, Kavishwar B; Li, Dingcheng; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R; Tao, Cui; Komandur Elayavilli, Ravikumar; Liu, Hongfang

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporal information detection systems have been developed by the Mayo Clinic for the 2012 i2b2 Natural Language Processing Challenge. Objective To construct automated systems for EVENT/TIMEX3 extraction and temporal link (TLINK) identification from clinical text. Materials and methods The i2b2 organizers provided 190 annotated discharge summaries as the training set and 120 discharge summaries as the test set. Our Event system used a conditional random field classifier with a variety of features including lexical information, natural language elements, and medical ontology. The TIMEX3 system employed a rule-based method using regular expression pattern match and systematic reasoning to determine normalized values. The TLINK system employed both rule-based reasoning and machine learning. All three systems were built in an Apache Unstructured Information Management Architecture framework. Results Our TIMEX3 system performed the best (F-measure of 0.900, value accuracy 0.731) among the challenge teams. The Event system produced an F-measure of 0.870, and the TLINK system an F-measure of 0.537. Conclusions Our TIMEX3 system demonstrated good capability of regular expression rules to extract and normalize time information. Event and TLINK machine learning systems required well-defined feature sets to perform well. We could also leverage expert knowledge as part of the machine learning features to further improve TLINK identification performance. PMID:23558168

  4. Formalize clinical processes into electronic health information systems: Modelling a screening service for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Eguzkiza, Aitor; Trigo, Jesús Daniel; Martínez-Espronceda, Miguel; Serrano, Luis; Andonegui, José

    2015-08-01

    Most healthcare services use information and communication technologies to reduce and redistribute the workload associated with follow-up of chronic conditions. However, the lack of normalization of the information handled in and exchanged between such services hinders the scalability and extendibility. The use of medical standards for modelling and exchanging information, especially dual-model based approaches, can enhance the features of screening services. Hence, the approach of this paper is twofold. First, this article presents a generic methodology to model patient-centered clinical processes. Second, a proof of concept of the proposed methodology was conducted within the diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening service of the Health Service of Navarre (Spain) in compliance with a specific dual-model norm (openEHR). As a result, a set of elements required for deploying a model-driven DR screening service has been established, namely: clinical concepts, archetypes, termsets, templates, guideline definition rules, and user interface definitions. This model fosters reusability, because those elements are available to be downloaded and integrated in any healthcare service, and interoperability, since from then on such services can share information seamlessly.

  5. Formalize clinical processes into electronic health information systems: Modelling a screening service for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Eguzkiza, Aitor; Trigo, Jesús Daniel; Martínez-Espronceda, Miguel; Serrano, Luis; Andonegui, José

    2015-08-01

    Most healthcare services use information and communication technologies to reduce and redistribute the workload associated with follow-up of chronic conditions. However, the lack of normalization of the information handled in and exchanged between such services hinders the scalability and extendibility. The use of medical standards for modelling and exchanging information, especially dual-model based approaches, can enhance the features of screening services. Hence, the approach of this paper is twofold. First, this article presents a generic methodology to model patient-centered clinical processes. Second, a proof of concept of the proposed methodology was conducted within the diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening service of the Health Service of Navarre (Spain) in compliance with a specific dual-model norm (openEHR). As a result, a set of elements required for deploying a model-driven DR screening service has been established, namely: clinical concepts, archetypes, termsets, templates, guideline definition rules, and user interface definitions. This model fosters reusability, because those elements are available to be downloaded and integrated in any healthcare service, and interoperability, since from then on such services can share information seamlessly. PMID:26049092

  6. Accurate cloud-based smart IMT measurement, its validation and stroke risk stratification in carotid ultrasound: A web-based point-of-care tool for multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Saba, Luca; Banchhor, Sumit K; Suri, Harman S; Londhe, Narendra D; Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Viskovic, Klaudija; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Gupta, Ajay; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-08-01

    . Statistical tests were performed to demonstrate consistency, reliability and accuracy of the results. The proposed AtheroCloud™ system is completely reliable, automated, fast (3-5 seconds depending upon the image size having an internet speed of 180Mbps), accurate, and an intelligent, web-based clinical tool for multi-center clinical trials and routine telemedicine clinical care. PMID:27318571

  7. Accurate cloud-based smart IMT measurement, its validation and stroke risk stratification in carotid ultrasound: A web-based point-of-care tool for multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Saba, Luca; Banchhor, Sumit K; Suri, Harman S; Londhe, Narendra D; Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Viskovic, Klaudija; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Gupta, Ajay; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-08-01

    . Statistical tests were performed to demonstrate consistency, reliability and accuracy of the results. The proposed AtheroCloud™ system is completely reliable, automated, fast (3-5 seconds depending upon the image size having an internet speed of 180Mbps), accurate, and an intelligent, web-based clinical tool for multi-center clinical trials and routine telemedicine clinical care.

  8. Clinic expert information extraction based on domain model and block importance model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanpeng; Wang, Li; Qian, Danmin; Geng, Xingyun; Yao, Dengfu; Dong, Jiancheng

    2015-11-01

    To extract expert clinic information from the Deep Web, there are two challenges to face. The first one is to make a judgment on forms. A novel method based on a domain model, which is a tree structure constructed by the attributes of query interfaces is proposed. With this model, query interfaces can be classified to a domain and filled in with domain keywords. Another challenge is to extract information from response Web pages indexed by query interfaces. To filter the noisy information on a Web page, a block importance model is proposed, both content and spatial features are taken into account in this model. The experimental results indicate that the domain model yields a precision 4.89% higher than that of the rule-based method, whereas the block importance model yields an F1 measure 10.5% higher than that of the XPath method. PMID:26231612

  9. Data extraction and archiving for nursing research using a bedside clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Saville, J; Goodwin, L; Bryars, D

    1997-01-01

    Institution wide use of an intensive care bedside information system creates the opportunity to make available vast amounts of clinical data to support research and quality improvement activities. Acting on this opportunity has required the development of several innovative approaches to transform this raw data into usable information. The process described herein uses commercially available software and hardware tools to extract on a daily basis, process and archive data for 7 intensive care units. Once this procedure is complete, attention is turned to using individual and combinations of data elements to build a higher level of information that more directly relates to the kinds of inquiries that help to address questions of outcome, and care quality.

  10. Information mining over heterogeneous and high-dimensional time-series data in clinical trials databases.

    PubMed

    Altiparmak, Fatih; Ferhatosmanoglu, Hakan; Erdal, Selnur; Trost, Donald C

    2006-04-01

    An effective analysis of clinical trials data involves analyzing different types of data such as heterogeneous and high dimensional time series data. The current time series analysis methods generally assume that the series at hand have sufficient length to apply statistical techniques to them. Other ideal case assumptions are that data are collected in equal length intervals, and while comparing time series, the lengths are usually expected to be equal to each other. However, these assumptions are not valid for many real data sets, especially for the clinical trials data sets. An addition, the data sources are different from each other, the data are heterogeneous, and the sensitivity of the experiments varies by the source. Approaches for mining time series data need to be revisited, keeping the wide range of requirements in mind. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for information mining that involves two major steps: applying a data mining algorithm over homogeneous subsets of data, and identifying common or distinct patterns over the information gathered in the first step. Our approach is implemented specifically for heterogeneous and high dimensional time series clinical trials data. Using this framework, we propose a new way of utilizing frequent itemset mining, as well as clustering and declustering techniques with novel distance metrics for measuring similarity between time series data. By clustering the data, we find groups of analytes (substances in blood) that are most strongly correlated. Most of these relationships already known are verified by the clinical panels, and, in addition, we identify novel groups that need further biomedical analysis. A slight modification to our algorithm results an effective declustering of high dimensional time series data, which is then used for "feature selection." Using industry-sponsored clinical trials data sets, we are able to identify a small set of analytes that effectively models the state of normal health.

  11. Accurate and Accidental Empathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Michael

    The author offers two controversial criticisms of what are rapidly becoming standard assessment procedures for the measurement of empathic skill. First, he asserts that assessment procedures which attend exclusively to the accuracy with which subjects are able to characterize other people's feelings provide little or no useful information about…

  12. Informed consent procedure for clinical trials in emergency settings: the Polish perspective.

    PubMed

    Iwanowski, Piotr S

    2007-09-01

    Setting reasonable and fair limits of emergency research acceptability in ethical norms and legal regulations must still adhere to the premise of well-being of the research subject over the interests of science and society. Informed consent of emergency patients to be enrolled in clinical trials is a particularly difficult issue due to impaired competencies of patients' to give consent, short diagnostic and therapeutic windows, as well as the requirement to provide detailed information to participants. Whereas the Declaration of Helsinki, Good Clinical Practice guideline, Additional Protocol to the European Bioethical Convention concerning Biomedical Research, as well as appropriate regulations adopted by the Food and Drugs Administration (USA) allow waivers from participants' consent or deferred consent for emergency research, the regulations of most European Community countries following the Clinical Trial Directive (2001/20/EC) do not give space for a deferred consent or a waiver from consent for adult patients (unless surrogate consent is made use of). This is even more confusing in case of Poland, where conflicting regulations on a waiver from a participant's consent in emergency research exist and the regulations on surrogate consent of temporarily incompetent adults are too restrictive and authorise only the guardianship courts to consent, which is not or hardly feasible in practice. European Community regulations need to be amended to allow for implementation of the deferred consent or waivers from consent for emergency research in order to enable ethical research of emergency conditions that should become a large part of important public health priorities. PMID:18210227

  13. An integrated data-warehouse-concept for clinical and biological information.

    PubMed

    Brammen, Dominik; Katzer, Christian; Röhrig, Rainer; Weismüller, Katja; Maier, Michael; Hossain, Hamid; Menges, Thilo; Hempelmann, Gunter; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2005-01-01

    The development of medical research networks within the framework of translational research has fostered interest in the integration of clinical and biological research data in a common database. The building of one single database integrating clinical data and biological research data requires a concept which enables scientists to retrieve information and to connect known facts to new findings. Clinical parameters are collected by a Patient Data Management System and viewed in a database which also includes genomic data. This database is designed as an Entity Attribute Value model, which implicates the development of a data warehouse concept. For the realization of this project, various requirements have to be taken into account which has to be fulfilled sufficiently in order to align with international standards. Data security and protection of data privacy are most important parts of the data warehouse concept. It has to be clear how patient pseudonymization has to be carried out in order to be within the scope of data security law. To be able to evaluate the data stored in a database consisting of clinical data collected by a Patient Data Management System and genomic research data easily, a data warehouse concept based on an Entity Attribute Value datamodel has been developed.

  14. Correlates of depression and burden for informal caregivers of patients in a geriatrics referral clinic.

    PubMed

    Drinka, T J; Smith, J C; Drinka, P J

    1987-06-01

    Caregiver burden has been associated with patient dementia. In this study we tested the hypothesis that caregiver burden and depression are related to patient cognitive impairment. We analyzed records of 127 elderly male patients from a Veterans hospital geriatrics referral clinic. The patients and their informal caregivers had been referred to the clinic because the complexity and multiplicity of their problems were beyond the treatment capability of other clinics. There was a high prevalence of dementia (73%) and depression (69%) in these patients according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-III) criteria. Quantitative measures of patient dementia and dependency in activities of daily living were not statistically associated with measures of caregiver depression or burden. In contrast, measures of patient depression were significantly correlated with measures of caregiver depression and burden. We hypothesize that caregivers of chronically ill, elderly men cope better with physical and cognitive incapacity than with affective symptoms. Because caregiver support is the most important factor in maintaining a disabled elder in the community, we suggest evaluating patients and caregivers for depression as part of standard practice in geriatric clinical settings. PMID:3553288

  15. Informed Practice: Students' Clinical Experiences in the Undergraduate Phase of an Accelerated Physician Assistant Program.

    PubMed

    Dereczyk, Amy; DeWitt, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical experiences of students in an accelerated physician assistant (PA) program. The participants were either certified nursing assistants (CNAs) or emergency medical technicians-basic (EMTs-B). The study was designed to elicit (1) how the participants perceived their older patients and (2) how the participants' experiences might affect their own future communications, bedside manner, and clinical preparedness as PAs. This study used a focus group to explore students' clinical experiences before the graduate phase of their accelerated PA program. Five female and 2 male PA students (N = 7) participated in the study. All participants were 23 years old and worked as either a CNA or an EMT-B. Results fell into 2 basic themes: informing practice and forming relationships. Regarding the first theme, participants felt that their experience as entry-level health care providers allowed them to improve their communication skills and bedside manner and to provide greater comfort to patients. Regarding the second theme, participants gained appreciation for older people and began to recognize the knowledge deficits and learning needs of their patients. The results suggested that a student's clinical experience as a CNA or an EMT-B before entering a PA program has a positive effect on the student's personal and professional development. The participants acquired greater appreciation and respect for older patients and members of the health care team. PMID:27123599

  16. The Need for Clinical Decision Support Integrated with the Electronic Health Record for the Clinical Application of Whole Genome Sequencing Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is rapidly approaching widespread clinical application. Technology advancements over the past decade, since the first human genome was decoded, have made it feasible to use WGS for clinical care. Future advancements will likely drive down the price to the point wherein WGS is routinely available for care. However, were this to happen today, most of the genetic information available to guide clinical care would go unused due to the complexity of genetics, limited physician proficiency in genetics, and lack of genetics professionals in the clinical workforce. Furthermore, these limitations are unlikely to change in the future. As such, the use of clinical decision support (CDS) to guide genome-guided clinical decision-making is imperative. In this manuscript, we describe the barriers to widespread clinical application of WGS information, describe how CDS can be an important tool for overcoming these barriers, and provide clinical examples of how genome-enabled CDS can be used in the clinical setting. PMID:25411643

  17. Using comparative clinical information to understand practice patterns and affect organizational change.

    PubMed

    Adams, S W; Schultz, S; Elias, A; Jordon, T; Duke, J; Lieber, A

    1991-01-01

    The University Hospital Consortium is collecting clinical, administrative and financial data from its members to develop a Clinical Information Network. The value of this collective data lies in how comparative information about peer hospitals and physicians in the same specialty can be used to influence practice. The raw data from each hospital is analyzed, classified, normalized and stored in a data repository which is easily accessible. This data becomes information when it is presented in a variety of ways, and is supported by a knowledge-base of health care rules. The "drilling down" technique to progressive levels of detail serves the needs of all levels in the organization--executives, managers, and analysts. The system combines the power of a mainframe for the data repository with the ease of use of a PC-based workstation. With an open-ended approach, the users can ask a variety of questions of the data, as well as perform statistical analysis, create graphical presentations and generate explanations of the analysis techniques. PMID:1807758

  18. Identifying adverse drug event information in clinical notes with distributional semantic representations of context.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Aron; Kvist, Maria; Dalianis, Hercules; Duneld, Martin

    2015-10-01

    For the purpose of post-marketing drug safety surveillance, which has traditionally relied on the voluntary reporting of individual cases of adverse drug events (ADEs), other sources of information are now being explored, including electronic health records (EHRs), which give us access to enormous amounts of longitudinal observations of the treatment of patients and their drug use. Adverse drug events, which can be encoded in EHRs with certain diagnosis codes, are, however, heavily underreported. It is therefore important to develop capabilities to process, by means of computational methods, the more unstructured EHR data in the form of clinical notes, where clinicians may describe and reason around suspected ADEs. In this study, we report on the creation of an annotated corpus of Swedish health records for the purpose of learning to identify information pertaining to ADEs present in clinical notes. To this end, three key tasks are tackled: recognizing relevant named entities (disorders, symptoms, drugs), labeling attributes of the recognized entities (negation, speculation, temporality), and relationships between them (indication, adverse drug event). For each of the three tasks, leveraging models of distributional semantics - i.e., unsupervised methods that exploit co-occurrence information to model, typically in vector space, the meaning of words - and, in particular, combinations of such models, is shown to improve the predictive performance. The ability to make use of such unsupervised methods is critical when faced with large amounts of sparse and high-dimensional data, especially in domains where annotated resources are scarce.

  19. Modeling the acceptance of clinical information systems among hospital medical staff: an extended TAM model.

    PubMed

    Melas, Christos D; Zampetakis, Leonidas A; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Moustakis, Vassilis

    2011-08-01

    Recent empirical research has utilized the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to advance the understanding of doctors' and nurses' technology acceptance in the workplace. However, the majority of the reported studies are either qualitative in nature or use small convenience samples of medical staff. Additionally, in very few studies moderators are either used or assessed despite their importance in TAM based research. The present study focuses on the application of TAM in order to explain the intention to use clinical information systems, in a random sample of 604 medical staff (534 physicians) working in 14 hospitals in Greece. We introduce physicians' specialty as a moderator in TAM and test medical staff's information and communication technology (ICT) knowledge and ICT feature demands, as external variables. The results show that TAM predicts a substantial proportion of the intention to use clinical information systems. Findings make a contribution to the literature by replicating, explaining and advancing the TAM, whereas theory is benefited by the addition of external variables and medical specialty as a moderator. Recommendations for further research are discussed.

  20. Identifying adverse drug event information in clinical notes with distributional semantic representations of context.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Aron; Kvist, Maria; Dalianis, Hercules; Duneld, Martin

    2015-10-01

    For the purpose of post-marketing drug safety surveillance, which has traditionally relied on the voluntary reporting of individual cases of adverse drug events (ADEs), other sources of information are now being explored, including electronic health records (EHRs), which give us access to enormous amounts of longitudinal observations of the treatment of patients and their drug use. Adverse drug events, which can be encoded in EHRs with certain diagnosis codes, are, however, heavily underreported. It is therefore important to develop capabilities to process, by means of computational methods, the more unstructured EHR data in the form of clinical notes, where clinicians may describe and reason around suspected ADEs. In this study, we report on the creation of an annotated corpus of Swedish health records for the purpose of learning to identify information pertaining to ADEs present in clinical notes. To this end, three key tasks are tackled: recognizing relevant named entities (disorders, symptoms, drugs), labeling attributes of the recognized entities (negation, speculation, temporality), and relationships between them (indication, adverse drug event). For each of the three tasks, leveraging models of distributional semantics - i.e., unsupervised methods that exploit co-occurrence information to model, typically in vector space, the meaning of words - and, in particular, combinations of such models, is shown to improve the predictive performance. The ability to make use of such unsupervised methods is critical when faced with large amounts of sparse and high-dimensional data, especially in domains where annotated resources are scarce. PMID:26291578

  1. How Qualitative Research Informs Clinical and Policy Decision Making in Transplantation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Morton, Rachael L; Webster, Angela C

    2016-09-01

    Patient-centered care is no longer just a buzzword. It is now widely touted as a cornerstone in delivering quality care across all fields of medicine. However, patient-centered strategies and interventions necessitate evidence about patients' decision-making processes, values, priorities, and needs. Qualitative research is particularly well suited to understanding the experience and perspective of patients, donors, clinicians, and policy makers on a wide range of transplantation-related topics including organ donation and allocation, adherence to prescribed therapy, pretransplant and posttransplant care, implementation of clinical guidelines, and doctor-patient communication. In transplantation, evidence derived from qualitative research has been integrated into strategies for shared decision-making, patient educational resources, process evaluations of trials, clinical guidelines, and policies. The aim of this article is to outline key concepts and methods used in qualitative research, guide the appraisal of qualitative studies, and assist clinicians to understand how qualitative research may inform their practice and policy. PMID:27479165

  2. What is culturally informed psychiatry? Cultural understanding and withdrawal in the clinical encounter

    PubMed Central

    Leseth, Anne Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    What is culturally informed psychiatry? What does it mean, and why is it important? These questions are discussed with a focus on the cultural aspects of the clinical encounter. The DSM-5 Outline for Cultural Formulation was developed as a method of assessing the cultural factors affecting the clinical encounter. It calls for the assessment of the cultural features of the relationship between the patient and the clinician; however, there is a lack of debate about what this means in practice. Clinicians run the risk of withdrawal rather than cultural understanding when facing patients with different cultural backgrounds. Using ethnographic material from anthropological fieldwork, I suggest that the encounter with cultural differences could be a useful point of departure for the clinician to develop cultural understanding. It is argued that recognising the experiences of differences is crucial in strengthening transcultural communication and preventing misdiagnosis in the clinician–patient encounter. PMID:26755952

  3. Principles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking and echocardiographic speckle tracking for informed clinical use.

    PubMed

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Claus, Piet; Kilner, Philip J; Nagel, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Tissue tracking technology of routinely acquired cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) cine acquisitions has increased the apparent ease and availability of non-invasive assessments of myocardial deformation in clinical research and practice. Its widespread availability thanks to the fact that this technology can in principle be applied on images that are part of every CMR or echocardiographic protocol. However, the two modalities are based on very different methods of image acquisition and reconstruction, each with their respective strengths and limitations. The image tracking methods applied are not necessarily directly comparable between the modalities, or with those based on dedicated CMR acquisitions for strain measurement such as tagging or displacement encoding. Here we describe the principles underlying the image tracking methods for CMR and echocardiography, and the translation of the resulting tracking estimates into parameters suited to describe myocardial mechanics. Technical limitations are presented with the objective of suggesting potential solutions that may allow informed and appropriate use in clinical applications. PMID:27561421

  4. How Qualitative Research Informs Clinical and Policy Decision Making in Transplantation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Morton, Rachael L; Webster, Angela C

    2016-09-01

    Patient-centered care is no longer just a buzzword. It is now widely touted as a cornerstone in delivering quality care across all fields of medicine. However, patient-centered strategies and interventions necessitate evidence about patients' decision-making processes, values, priorities, and needs. Qualitative research is particularly well suited to understanding the experience and perspective of patients, donors, clinicians, and policy makers on a wide range of transplantation-related topics including organ donation and allocation, adherence to prescribed therapy, pretransplant and posttransplant care, implementation of clinical guidelines, and doctor-patient communication. In transplantation, evidence derived from qualitative research has been integrated into strategies for shared decision-making, patient educational resources, process evaluations of trials, clinical guidelines, and policies. The aim of this article is to outline key concepts and methods used in qualitative research, guide the appraisal of qualitative studies, and assist clinicians to understand how qualitative research may inform their practice and policy.

  5. Event Detection: A Clinical Notification Service on a Health Information Exchange Platform

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Thomas; Shapiro, Jason S.; Doles, Luke; Calman, Neil; Camhi, Eli; Check, Thomas; Onyile, Arit; Kuperman, Gilad

    2012-01-01

    Notifying ambulatory providers when their patients visit the hospital is a simple concept but potentially a powerful tool for improving care coordination. A health information exchange (HIE) can provide automatic notifications to its members by building services on top of their existing infrastructure. NYCLIX, Inc., a functioning HIE in New York City, has developed a system that detects hospital admissions, discharges and emergency department visits and notifies their providers. The system has been in use since November 2010. Out of 63,305 patients enrolled 6,913 (11%) had one or more events in the study period and on average there were 238 events per day. While event notifications have a clinical value, their use also involves non-clinical care coordination; new workflows should be designed to incorporate a broader care team in their use. This paper describes the user requirements for the notification system, system design, current status, lessons learned and future directions. PMID:23304336

  6. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  7. Performance of online drug information databases as clinical decision support tools in infectious disease medication management.

    PubMed

    Polen, Hyla H; Zapantis, Antonia; Clauson, Kevin A; Clauson, Kevin Alan; Jebrock, Jennifer; Paris, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Infectious disease (ID) medication management is complex and clinical decision support tools (CDSTs) can provide valuable assistance. This study evaluated scope and completeness of ID drug information found in online databases by evaluating their ability to answer 147 question/answer pairs. Scope scores produced highest rankings (%) for: Micromedex (82.3), Lexi-Comp/American Hospital Formulary Service (81.0), and Medscape Drug Reference (81.0); lowest includes: Epocrates Online Premium (47.0), Johns Hopkins ABX Guide (45.6), and PEPID PDC (40.8). PMID:18999059

  8. [The analytical reliability of clinical laboratory information and role of the standards in its support].

    PubMed

    Men'shikov, V V

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with the factors impacting the reliability of clinical laboratory information. The differences of qualities of laboratory analysis tools produced by various manufacturers are discussed. These characteristics are the causes of discrepancy of the results of laboratory analyses of the same analite. The role of the reference system in supporting the comparability of laboratory analysis results is demonstrated. The project of national standard is presented to regulate the requirements to standards and calibrators for analysis of qualitative and non-metrical characteristics of components of biomaterials.

  9. A rapid usability assessment methodology to support the choice of clinical information systems: a case study.

    PubMed

    Beuscart-Zéphir, M C; Watbled, L; Carpentier, A M; Degroisse, M; Alao, O

    2002-01-01

    We present here an adapted methodology integrating usability engineering and early evaluation procedures to support the choice of a Clinical Information System in the context of a standard Call for Tender. We illustrate the application of this methodology with a case study. We integrated a standard 'contextual task and activity analysis' into the choice process and then drew up usability recommendations for the choice of an application. We organized a one-week on-site exhibition and test for each candidate company. During the test sessions, we performed a rapid usability assessment. The final choice of the application is strongly and positively influenced by the results of the usability assessment. PMID:12463784

  10. Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) Outpatient Clinical Information System Implemented in a Faculty General Medicine Practice

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Steven; Clark, Anthony S.; Clayton, Paul D.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a clinical information system for hospital-based ambulatory care implemented in the context of the institution's IAIMS Phase III effort. Key features of this application are physician data entry to maintain summary clinical profiles that include medication lists, problem lists, and preventive care, and integration with other components of the Clinical Information System at the levels of the database, the user interface, and data sharing. A goal of this application is to provide coded data as a substrate for computer-based decision support.

  11. Rates of provision of clinical information in the skin biopsy requisition form and corresponding encounter visit note

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Meredith A.; Lohse, Christine M.; Comfere, Nneka I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The skin biopsy requisition form (RF) serves as a key communication tool for transfer of relevant information related to skin biopsy between clinicians and pathologists. Clinical information in the skin biopsy RF is frequently missing or incomplete. Objective: To determine the rates of provision of critical clinical information necessary for histopathologic interpretation in the skin biopsy RF and encounter visit note (EVN). Methods: A retrospective review of 300 RFs and corresponding EVNs from May 1 to 7, 2012, in a tertiary care dermatology practice. Results: Age (100%), lesion location (100%), and clinical impression (93%) were the most commonly supplied elements in the RF and EVN. Clinical elements that were commonly not provided in the RF but present in the EVN included sampling method – partial versus complete (46%), duration of lesion (54%), morphology of lesion (97%), clinical symptoms (63%), clinical photos (63%), previous clinical (97%), and dermatopathologic diagnoses (82%). Limitations: Retrospective study design. Conclusions: These data suggest that while missing critical clinical information in the RF is often present in the EVN, some information is still not present in either source.

  12. Information Seeking Behaviour of Parents of Paediatric Patients for Clinical Decision Making: The Central Role of Information Literacy in a Participatory Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostagiolas, Petros; Martzoukou, Konstantina; Georgantzi, Georgia; Niakas, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the information seeking behaviour and needs of parents of paediatric patients and their motives for seeking Internet-based information. Method: A questionnaire survey of 121 parents was conducted in a paediatric clinic of a Greek university hospital. Analysis: The data were analysed using SPSS; descriptive…

  13. OpenTrials: towards a collaborative open database of all available information on all clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Goldacre, Ben; Gray, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    OpenTrials is a collaborative and open database for all available structured data and documents on all clinical trials, threaded together by individual trial. With a versatile and expandable data schema, it is initially designed to host and match the following documents and data for each trial: registry entries; links, abstracts, or texts of academic journal papers; portions of regulatory documents describing individual trials; structured data on methods and results extracted by systematic reviewers or other researchers; clinical study reports; and additional documents such as blank consent forms, blank case report forms, and protocols. The intention is to create an open, freely re-usable index of all such information and to increase discoverability, facilitate research, identify inconsistent data, enable audits on the availability and completeness of this information, support advocacy for better data and drive up standards around open data in evidence-based medicine. The project has phase I funding. This will allow us to create a practical data schema and populate the database initially through web-scraping, basic record linkage techniques, crowd-sourced curation around selected drug areas, and import of existing sources of structured and documents. It will also allow us to create user-friendly web interfaces onto the data and conduct user engagement workshops to optimise the database and interface designs. Where other projects have set out to manually and perfectly curate a narrow range of information on a smaller number of trials, we aim to use a broader range of techniques and attempt to match a very large quantity of information on all trials. We are currently seeking feedback and additional sources of structured data. PMID:27056367

  14. Improving documentation of clinical care within a clinical information network: an essential initial step in efforts to understand and improve care in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tuti, Timothy; Bitok, Michael; Malla, Lucas; Paton, Chris; Muinga, Naomi; Gathara, David; Gachau, Susan; Mbevi, George; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Ogero, Morris; Julius, Thomas; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2016-01-01

    In many low income countries health information systems are poorly equipped to provide detailed information on hospital care and outcomes. Information is thus rarely used to support practice improvement. We describe efforts to tackle this challenge and to foster learning concerning collection and use of information. This could improve hospital services in Kenya. We are developing a Clinical Information Network, a collaboration spanning 14 hospitals, policy makers and researchers with the goal of improving information available on the quality of inpatient paediatric care across common childhood illnesses in Kenya. Standardised data from hospitals’ paediatric wards are collected using non-commercial and open source tools. We have implemented procedures for promoting data quality which are performed prior to a process of semi-automated analysis and routine report generation for hospitals in the network. In the first phase of the Clinical Information Network, we collected data on over 65 000 admission episodes. Despite clinicians’ initial unfamiliarity with routine performance reporting, we found that, as an initial focus, both engaging with each hospital and providing them information helped improve the quality of data and therefore reports. The process has involved mutual learning and building of trust in the data and should provide the basis for collaborative efforts to improve care, to understand patient outcome, and to evaluate interventions through shared learning. We have found that hospitals are willing to support the development of a clinically focused but geographically dispersed Clinical Information Network in a low-income setting. Such networks show considerable promise as platforms for collaborative efforts to improve care, to provide better information for decision making, and to enable locally relevant research. PMID:27398232

  15. [From library to clinical decision support systems: access of general practitioner to quality information].

    PubMed

    Fauquert, B

    2012-09-01

    Since 2003, the following tools have been implemented in Belgium for improving the access of general practioners to the EBM literature: the Digital Library for Health and the evidence-linker of the CEBAM, the portal EBMPracticeNet.be and the multidimensional electronic clinical decision support EBMeDS. The aim of this article is to show the progress achieved in the information dissemination toward the belgian general practioners, particularly the access from the electronic health record. From the literature published these last years, the opportunities cited by the users are for using EBM and the strong willingness for using these literature access in the future; the limits are the medical data coding, the irrelevance of the search results, the alerts fatigue induced by EBMeDS. The achievements done and planned for the new EBMPracticeNet guidelines portal and the EBMeDS system are explained in the aim of informing belgian healthcare professionals. These projects are claiming for lauching a participatory process in the production and dissemination of EBM information. The discussion is focused on the belgian healthcare system advantages, the solutions for a reasonable implementation of these projects and for increasing the place of an evidence-based information in the healthcare decision process. Finally the input of these projects to the continuing medical education and to the healthcare quality are discussed, in a context of multifactorial interaction healthcare design (complexity design).

  16. “There Are Too Many, but Never Enough": Qualitative Case Study Investigating Routine Coding of Clinical Information in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Kathrin; Morrison, Zoe; Sheikh, Aziz; Kalra, Dipak

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to understand how clinical information relating to the management of depression is routinely coded in different clinical settings and the perspectives of and implications for different stakeholders with a view to understanding how these may be aligned. Materials and Methods Qualitative investigation exploring the views of a purposefully selected range of healthcare professionals, managers, and clinical coders spanning primary and secondary care. Results Our dataset comprised 28 semi-structured interviews, a focus group, documents relating to clinical coding standards and participant observation of clinical coding activities. We identified a range of approaches to coding clinical information including templates and order entry systems. The challenges inherent in clearly establishing a diagnosis, identifying appropriate clinical codes and possible implications of diagnoses for patients were particularly prominent in primary care. Although a range of managerial and research benefits were identified, there were no direct benefits from coded clinical data for patients or professionals. Secondary care staff emphasized the role of clinical coders in ensuring data quality, which was at odds with the policy drive to increase real-time clinical coding. Conclusions There was overall no evidence of clear-cut direct patient care benefits to inform immediate care decisions, even in primary care where data on patients with depression were more extensively coded. A number of important secondary uses were recognized by healthcare staff, but the coding of clinical data to serve these ends was often poorly aligned with clinical practice and patient-centered considerations. The current international drive to encourage clinical coding by healthcare professionals during the clinical encounter may need to be critically examined. PMID:22937106

  17. Supporting positive experiences and sustained participation in clinical trials: looking beyond information provision.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Kate; Entwistle, Vikki A

    2012-12-01

    Recruitment processes for clinical trials are governed by guidelines and regulatory systems intended to ensure participation is informed and voluntary. Although the guidelines and systems provide some protection to potential participants, current recruitment processes often result in limited understanding and experiences of inadequate decision support. Many trials also have high drop-out rates among participants, which are ethically troubling because they can be indicative of poor experiences and they limit the usefulness of the knowledge the trials were designed to generate. Drawing on recent social-psychological and philosophical-ethical research on trial recruitment and patient participation in treatment decision-making, this paper identifies possibilities for improving communicative support for both initial decisions and ongoing participation in clinical trials. It highlights the potential of a shift in thinking about 'voluntariness', underpinned by relational understandings of autonomy, to encourage more nuanced judgements about the ethics of communication between trial staff and (potential) participants. The paper suggests that the idea of responsively enabling people to consider invitations or requests to participate in particular trials could serve as a general guide to communication. This might help ensure decisions about trial participation are meaningfully informed and voluntary, and that relationships between trial staff and participants contribute to positive experiences of trial participation and ultimately to the generation of the robust knowledge.

  18. Timing invitations to participate in clinical research: preliminary versus informed consent.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Ana Smith

    2005-02-01

    This article addresses the impact of the potential conflict between the roles of physicians who are both clinicians and researchers on the recruitment of persons into research trials. It has been proposed (1) that a physician breaches inter-role confidentiality when he or she uses information gathered in his or her clinical role to inform patients about trials for which they may be eligible and (2) that clinician-researchers should adopt a model of preliminary consent to be approached about research prior to commencing a clinical relationship. This article argues that even if we grant the legitimacy of inter-role confidentiality (which is open to question), there are circumstances in which other obligations physicians bear override the obligation of inter-role confidentiality. Moreover, it is argued that the practice of preliminary consent is morally suspect and that such consent cannot be deemed valid. The article concludes with a series of recommendations of ways in which the legitimate concern regarding the conflicting roles of clinician-researchers can be addressed in the recruitment stage of research.

  19. Use of national clinical databases for informing and for evaluating health care policies.

    PubMed

    Black, Nick; Tan, Stefanie

    2013-02-01

    Policy-makers and analysts could make use of national clinical databases either to inform or to evaluate meso-level (organisation and delivery of health care) and macro-level (national) policies. Reviewing the use of 15 of the best established databases in England, we identify and describe four published examples of each use. These show that policy-makers can either make use of the data itself or of research based on the database. For evaluating policies, the major advantages are the huge sample sizes available, the generalisability of the data, its immediate availability and historic information. The principal methodological challenges involve the need for risk adjustment and time-series analysis. Given their usefulness in the policy arena, there are several reasons why national clinical databases have not been used more, some due to a lack of 'push' by their custodians and some to the lack of 'pull' by policy-makers. Greater exploitation of these valuable resources would be facilitated by policy-makers' and custodians' increased awareness, minimisation of legal restrictions on data use, improvements in the quality of databases and a library of examples of applications to policy.

  20. An approach to 'dynamic--DDD (defined daily dose) monitoring' to reduce adverse clinical outcomes and increase patient safety: information repositories and event triggers in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Eryilmaz, Esat N

    2011-01-01

    The goal of every effort and actions/interventions in almost all healthcare settings throughout the world's health systems -primary care, inpatient, outpatient encounters, diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, peri-operative settings- is and has been to achieve a well defined outcome (a kind of improvement in health status of the patient under consideration, an observable and significant change(s) in selected set(s) of clinical parameters confirmed by laboratory results and pathology findings, improvements in clinical outcomes). Clinical inefficiencies, in this context, should be addressed very systematically and scientifically. This is achieved through a continuously monitoring approach to adverse drug events based on information repositories and evidence-based rule sets. For monitoring drug-related outcomes and clinical outcomes in general, the concept of DDD (Defined Daily Dose) compliance is explained in this article to eliminate and avoid adverse clinical outcomes.

  1. Informed Conditioning on Clinical Covariates Increases Power in Case-Control Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlen, Noah; Lindström, Sara; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Cornelis, Marilyn; Genovese, Giulio; Pollack, Samuela; Barton, Anne; Bickeböller, Heike; Bowden, Donald W.; Eyre, Steve; Freedman, Barry I.; Friedman, David J.; Field, John K.; Groop, Leif; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Henderson, Brian E.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Langefeld, Carl D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Meister, Michael; Morgan, Ann W.; Raji, Olaide Y.; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Scherf, David; Steer, Sophia; Walshaw, Martin; Waters, Kevin M.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wordsworth, Paul; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Haiman, Christopher; Hunter, David J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Christiani, David C.; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Altshuler, David; Voight, Benjamin; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic case-control association studies often include data on clinical covariates, such as body mass index (BMI), smoking status, or age, that may modify the underlying genetic risk of case or control samples. For example, in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios for established variants estimated from low–BMI cases are larger than those estimated from high–BMI cases. An unanswered question is how to use this information to maximize statistical power in case-control studies that ascertain individuals on the basis of phenotype (case-control ascertainment) or phenotype and clinical covariates (case-control-covariate ascertainment). While current approaches improve power in studies with random ascertainment, they often lose power under case-control ascertainment and fail to capture available power increases under case-control-covariate ascertainment. We show that an informed conditioning approach, based on the liability threshold model with parameters informed by external epidemiological information, fully accounts for disease prevalence and non-random ascertainment of phenotype as well as covariates and provides a substantial increase in power while maintaining a properly controlled false-positive rate. Our method outperforms standard case-control association tests with or without covariates, tests of gene x covariate interaction, and previously proposed tests for dealing with covariates in ascertained data, with especially large improvements in the case of case-control-covariate ascertainment. We investigate empirical case-control studies of type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and end-stage kidney disease over a total of 89,726 samples. In these datasets, informed conditioning outperforms logistic regression for 115 of the 157 known associated variants investigated (P-value = 1×10−9). The improvement varied across diseases with a 16% median increase in χ2 test statistics and a

  2. Pediatric Brain Tumors: Innovative Genomic Information Is Transforming the Diagnostic and Clinical Landscape.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Amar; Bowers, Daniel C; Karajannis, Matthias A; Leary, Sarah; Witt, Hendrik; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2015-09-20

    Pediatric neuro-oncology has undergone an exciting and dramatic transformation during the past 5 years. This article summarizes data from collaborative group and institutional trials that have advanced the science of pediatric brain tumors and survival of patients with these tumors. Advanced genomic analysis of the entire spectrum of pediatric brain tumors has heralded an era in which stakeholders in the pediatric neuro-oncology community are being challenged to reconsider their current research and diagnostic and treatment strategies. The incorporation of this new information into the next-generation treatment protocols will unleash new challenges. This review succinctly summarizes the key advances in our understanding of the common pediatric brain tumors (ie, medulloblastoma, low- and high-grade gliomas, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, and ependymoma) and some selected rare tumors (ie, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor and CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The potential impact of this new information on future clinical protocols also is discussed. Cutting-edge genomics technologies and the information gained from such studies are facilitating the identification of molecularly defined subgroups within patients with particular pediatric brain tumors. The number of evaluable patients in each subgroup is small, particularly in the subgroups of rare diseases. Therefore, international collaboration will be crucial to draw meaningful conclusions about novel approaches to treating pediatric brain tumors.

  3. Clinical information systems end user satisfaction: the expectations and needs congruencies effects.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Faezeh; Poo, Danny C C; Tan, Yung Ming

    2015-02-01

    Prior research on information systems (IS) shows that users' attitudes and continuance intentions are associated with their satisfaction with information systems. As such, the increasing amount of investments in clinical information systems (CIS) signifies the importance of understanding CIS end users' (i.e., clinicians) satisfaction. In this study, we develop a conceptual framework to identify the cognitive determinants of clinicians' satisfaction formation. The disconfirmation paradigm serves as the core of the framework. The expectations and needs congruency models are the two models of this paradigm, and perceived performance is the basis of the comparisons in the models. The needs and expectations associated with the models are also specified. The survey methodology is adopted in this study to empirically validate the proposed research model. The survey is conducted at a public hospital and results in 112 and 203 valid responses (56% and 98% response rates) from doctors and nurses respectively. The partial least squares (PLS) method is used to analyze the data. The results of the study show that perceived CIS performance is the most influential factor on clinicians' (i.e., doctors and nurses) satisfaction. Doctors' expectations congruency is the next significant determinant of their satisfaction. Contrary to most previous findings, nurses' expectations and expectations congruency do not show a significant effect on their satisfaction. However, the needs congruency is found to significantly affect nurses' satisfaction. PMID:25542853

  4. Pediatric Brain Tumors: Innovative Genomic Information Is Transforming the Diagnostic and Clinical Landscape.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Amar; Bowers, Daniel C; Karajannis, Matthias A; Leary, Sarah; Witt, Hendrik; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2015-09-20

    Pediatric neuro-oncology has undergone an exciting and dramatic transformation during the past 5 years. This article summarizes data from collaborative group and institutional trials that have advanced the science of pediatric brain tumors and survival of patients with these tumors. Advanced genomic analysis of the entire spectrum of pediatric brain tumors has heralded an era in which stakeholders in the pediatric neuro-oncology community are being challenged to reconsider their current research and diagnostic and treatment strategies. The incorporation of this new information into the next-generation treatment protocols will unleash new challenges. This review succinctly summarizes the key advances in our understanding of the common pediatric brain tumors (ie, medulloblastoma, low- and high-grade gliomas, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, and ependymoma) and some selected rare tumors (ie, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor and CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The potential impact of this new information on future clinical protocols also is discussed. Cutting-edge genomics technologies and the information gained from such studies are facilitating the identification of molecularly defined subgroups within patients with particular pediatric brain tumors. The number of evaluable patients in each subgroup is small, particularly in the subgroups of rare diseases. Therefore, international collaboration will be crucial to draw meaningful conclusions about novel approaches to treating pediatric brain tumors. PMID:26304884

  5. Clinical information systems end user satisfaction: the expectations and needs congruencies effects.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Faezeh; Poo, Danny C C; Tan, Yung Ming

    2015-02-01

    Prior research on information systems (IS) shows that users' attitudes and continuance intentions are associated with their satisfaction with information systems. As such, the increasing amount of investments in clinical information systems (CIS) signifies the importance of understanding CIS end users' (i.e., clinicians) satisfaction. In this study, we develop a conceptual framework to identify the cognitive determinants of clinicians' satisfaction formation. The disconfirmation paradigm serves as the core of the framework. The expectations and needs congruency models are the two models of this paradigm, and perceived performance is the basis of the comparisons in the models. The needs and expectations associated with the models are also specified. The survey methodology is adopted in this study to empirically validate the proposed research model. The survey is conducted at a public hospital and results in 112 and 203 valid responses (56% and 98% response rates) from doctors and nurses respectively. The partial least squares (PLS) method is used to analyze the data. The results of the study show that perceived CIS performance is the most influential factor on clinicians' (i.e., doctors and nurses) satisfaction. Doctors' expectations congruency is the next significant determinant of their satisfaction. Contrary to most previous findings, nurses' expectations and expectations congruency do not show a significant effect on their satisfaction. However, the needs congruency is found to significantly affect nurses' satisfaction.

  6. Patients’ perceived purpose of clinical informed consent: Mill’s individual autonomy model is preferred

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although informed consent is an integral part of clinical practice, its current doctrine remains mostly a matter of law and mainstream ethics rather than empirical research. There are scarce empirical data on patients’ perceived purpose of informed consent, which may include administrative routine/courtesy gesture, simple honest permission, informed permission, patient-clinician shared decision-making, and enabling patient’s self decision-making. Different purposes require different processes. Methods We surveyed 488 adults who were planning to undergo or had recently undergone written informed consent-requiring procedures. Perceptions of informed consent purpose (from norm and current practice perspectives) were explored by asking respondents to rank (1 = most reflective) 10 randomly-presented statements: “meaningless routine”, “courtesy gesture” “litigation protection”, “take away compensation rights”, “inform patient’, “make sure patient understand”, “document patient’s decision”, “discover patient’s preferences”, “have shared decision”, and “help patient decide”. Results Respondents’ mean (SD) age was 38.3 (12.5); 50.4% were males, 56.8% had ≥ college education, and 37.3% had undergone a procedure. From the norm perspective, the least reflective statement was “meaningless routine” (ranked 1–3 by 2.6% of respondents) and the most reflective statements were “help patient decide”, “make sure patient understand”, and “inform patient” (ranked 1–3 by 65%, 60%, and 48% of respondents with median [25%,75%] ranking scores of 2 [1,5], 3 [2,4], and 4 [2,5], respectively). Compared to their counterparts, males and pre-procedure respondents ranked “help patient decide” better, whereas females and post-procedure respondents ranked “inform patient” better (p = 0.007 to p < 0.001). Age was associated with better ranking of “help patient decide” and “make sure

  7. Informing egg donors of the potential for embryonic research: A survey of consent forms from US IVF clinics

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, G. Owen; Sinaii, Ninet; Grady, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand whether and to what extent US in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics inform egg donors that resultant embryos initially intended to be implanted for reproductive purposes may in fact be used for research instead. Design 470 US IVF were asked to respond to a questionnaire and provide a copy of the egg donor consent form(s) used at the clinic. Setting 470 US IVF clinics listed in a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention database; only forms from clinics that both accepted donor eggs and provided excess embryos for research were analyzed for content. Main Outcome Measures Responses to the questionnaire, demographic data from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention database and the content of egg donor consent forms. Results Of 222 US IVF clinics who responded to our query, 100 clinics both accepted donor eggs and provided some excess embryos for research. We received 66 consent forms from these 100 clinics, which showed that although most egg donor consent forms inform donors that they will not have control over embryos resulting from their eggs, 30% inform them that some embryos may be used for research, and even fewer mention stem cell research. Conclusion Egg donors in the US, including some who may have a moral objection to research and stem cell research, are not being informed that embryos created with their donated eggs may in fact be used for these purposes. This can be corrected with the inclusion of succinct, non-technical language in egg donor consent forms. PMID:22196714

  8. Simulating the contribution of a biospecimen and clinical data repository in a phase II clinical trial: A value of information analysis.

    PubMed

    Craig, Benjamin M; Han, Gang; Munkin, Murat K; Fenstermacher, David

    2016-08-01

    The potential contributions of a centralized data warehouse or repository in clinical research include the expedited accrual of subjects for phase II trials. Understanding the contribution of data warehouses that integrate clinical, biospecimen, and molecular data for the conduct of clinical trials is essential to inform private and public decisions on resource allocation and investment. We conducted a value of information analysis using data from recent trials at the Moffitt Cancer Center and simulated the potential reductions in trial size due to possible alternative scenarios of expedited accrual. In this study, we compared alternative data sets using a single model to assess value of information. Our findings suggest that the reductions in trial size range from 0% to 43%, depending on the amount of censoring in overall survival. The ability to expedite the accrual of patients for clinical trial studies using large data repositories that store data on inclusion/exclusion criteria and response to standard of care therapies demonstrated significant improvement in reducing the number of subjects needed to achieve similar end-results, as evaluated using value of information analysis with a limited number of parameters and a parsimonious model of overall survival.

  9. Pharmacogenetics informed decision making in adolescent psychiatric treatment: a clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Teri; Sharp, Susan; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2015-01-01

    Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology), cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry. PMID:25710722

  10. The case for randomized controlled trials to assess the impact of clinical information systems

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    There is a persistent view of a significant minority in the medical informatics community that the randomized controlled trial (RCT) has a limited role to play in evaluating clinical information systems. A common reason voiced by skeptics is that these systems are fundamentally different from drug interventions, so the RCT is irrelevant. There is an urgent need to promote the use of RCTs, given the shift to evidence-based policy and the need to demonstrate cost-effectiveness of these systems. The authors suggest returning to first principles and argue that what is required is clarity about how to match methods to evaluation questions. The authors address common concerns about RCTs, and the extent to which they are fallacious, and also discuss the challenges of conducting RCTs in informatics and alternative study designs when randomized trials are infeasible. While neither a perfect nor universal evaluation method, RCTs form an important part of an evaluator's toolkit. PMID:21270132

  11. Pharmacogenetics Informed Decision Making in Adolescent Psychiatric Treatment: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Teri; Sharp, Susan; Manzardo, Ann M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology), cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry. PMID:25710722

  12. Accessibility and Quality of Online Cancer-Related Clinical Trial Information for Naïve Searchers.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gregory A; Cronin, Angel M; Earles, Kristofer; Gray, Stacy W

    2015-10-01

    Although the Internet may help to increase cancer patients' awareness of clinical trials, little is known about the accessibility and quality of online clinical trial information. We simulated the experience of a naïve cancer patient without clinical trial knowledge by searching three popular search engines for treatment information for breast, lung, and prostate cancer, and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two coders independently evaluated website content for accessibility and quality. We screened 120 websites and identified 40 unique sites for analysis. Overall, 85% [95% confidence interval (CI), 70%-94%] of sites mentioned clinical trials on the landing page and 68% (51%-81%) included links to specific trials. Overall readability was poor. Approximately half of websites (36%-68%) included information on the potential benefits and risks of clinical trials and 40% provided information about when the site had been updated (25%-57%). Among sites with links to specific clinical trials, only 44% (25%-65%) provided an interactive interface that would allow patients to customize search results; breast (100%) and prostate (50%) sites were more interactive than lung (25%) and MDS (14%; P = 0.007). Although cancer clinical trial information is widely available on the Internet, its quality is highly variable. Given the fact that many emerging cancer therapeutics are personalized based on disease or genomic characteristics, interactive web-based interfaces could serve as powerful vehicles to help patients locate appropriate clinical trials. Without enhanced efforts to ensure greater interactivity of cancer treatment websites, patient awareness of relevant clinical trials may remain low. PMID:26265204

  13. Measuring Information Processing Speed in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Clinical Versus Research Dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Judy; Phillips, Michelle; Newson, Margaret; Rogers, Peter J; Torrens-Burton, Anna; Tales, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of research evidence is indicative of disproportionately slowed information processing speed in a wide range of multi-trial, computer-based, neuroimaging- and electroencephalography-based reaction time (RT) tests in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, in what is arguably a dichotomy between research evidence and clinical practice, RT associated with different brain functions is rarely assessed as part of their diagnosis. Indeed, often only the time taken to perform a single, specific task, commonly the Trail making test (TMT), is measured. In clinical practice therefore, there can be a failure to assess adequately the integrity of the rapid, serial information processing and response, necessary for efficient, appropriate, and safe interaction with the environment. We examined whether a typical research-based RT task could at least match the TMT in differentiating amnestic MCI (aMCI) from cognitively healthy aging at group level. As aMCI is a heterogeneous group, typically containing only a proportion of individuals for whom aMCI represents the early stages of dementia, we examined the ability of each test to provide intra-group performance variation. The results indicate that as well as significant slowing in performance of the operations involved in TMT part B (but not part A), individuals with aMCI also experience significant slowing in RT compared to controls. The results also suggest that research-typical RT tests may be superior to the TMT in differentiating between cognitively healthy aging and aMCI at group level and in revealing the performance variability one would expect from an etiologically heterogeneous disorder such as aMCI. PMID:26836171

  14. Measuring Information Processing Speed in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Clinical Versus Research Dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Judy; Phillips, Michelle; Newson, Margaret; Rogers, Peter J; Torrens-Burton, Anna; Tales, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of research evidence is indicative of disproportionately slowed information processing speed in a wide range of multi-trial, computer-based, neuroimaging- and electroencephalography-based reaction time (RT) tests in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, in what is arguably a dichotomy between research evidence and clinical practice, RT associated with different brain functions is rarely assessed as part of their diagnosis. Indeed, often only the time taken to perform a single, specific task, commonly the Trail making test (TMT), is measured. In clinical practice therefore, there can be a failure to assess adequately the integrity of the rapid, serial information processing and response, necessary for efficient, appropriate, and safe interaction with the environment. We examined whether a typical research-based RT task could at least match the TMT in differentiating amnestic MCI (aMCI) from cognitively healthy aging at group level. As aMCI is a heterogeneous group, typically containing only a proportion of individuals for whom aMCI represents the early stages of dementia, we examined the ability of each test to provide intra-group performance variation. The results indicate that as well as significant slowing in performance of the operations involved in TMT part B (but not part A), individuals with aMCI also experience significant slowing in RT compared to controls. The results also suggest that research-typical RT tests may be superior to the TMT in differentiating between cognitively healthy aging and aMCI at group level and in revealing the performance variability one would expect from an etiologically heterogeneous disorder such as aMCI.

  15. Clinical characteristics of mephedrone toxicity reported to the UK National Poisons Information Service

    PubMed Central

    James, D; Adams, R D; Spears, R; Cooper, G; Lupton, D J; Thompson, J P

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe the patterns and clinical features of toxicity related to recreational use of mephedrone and other cathinones in the UK using data collected by the National Poisons Information Service (NPIS). Methods The number of accesses to TOXBASE, the NPIS online poisons information database, details of consecutive cases uploaded onto TOXBASE and the number and details of telephone enquiries made to the NPIS by health professionals in the UK were collected for the period March 2009 to February 2010. Results Over the year of study there were 2901 TOXBASE accesses and 188 telephone enquiries relating to cathinones, the majority relating to mephedrone (TOXBASE 1664, telephone 157), with a month-on-month increase in numbers. In 131 telephone enquiries concerning mephedrone, alone or in combination with alcohol, common clinical features reported included agitation or aggression (n=32, 24%, 95% CI 18% to 33%), tachycardia (n=29, 22%, 95% CI 16% to 30%), confusion or psychosis (n=18, 14%, 95% CI 9% to 21%), chest pain (n=17, 13%, 95% CI 8% to 20%), nausea (n=15, 11%, 95% CI 7% to 18%), palpitations (n=14, 11%, 95% CI 6% to 18%), peripheral vasoconstriction (n=10, 8%, 95% CI 4% to 14%) and headache (n=7, 5%, 95% CI 2% to 11%). Convulsions were reported in four cases (3%, 95% CI 1% to 8%). One exposed person died following cardiac arrest (1%, 95% CI 0% to 4%), although subsequent investigation suggested that mephedrone was not responsible. Conclusions Toxicity associated with recreational mephedrone use is increasingly common in the UK. Sympathomimetic adverse effects are common and severe effects are also reported. Structured data collected by the NPIS may be of use in identifying trends in poisoning and in establishing toxidromes for new drugs of abuse. PMID:20798084

  16. Measuring Information Processing Speed in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Clinical Versus Research Dichotomy

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Judy; Phillips, Michelle; Newson, Margaret; Rogers, Peter J.; Torrens-Burton, Anna; Tales, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of research evidence is indicative of disproportionately slowed information processing speed in a wide range of multi-trial, computer-based, neuroimaging- and electroencephalography-based reaction time (RT) tests in Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, in what is arguably a dichotomy between research evidence and clinical practice, RT associated with different brain functions is rarely assessed as part of their diagnosis. Indeed, often only the time taken to perform a single, specific task, commonly the Trail making test (TMT), is measured. In clinical practice therefore, there can be a failure to assess adequately the integrity of the rapid, serial information processing and response, necessary for efficient, appropriate, and safe interaction with the environment. We examined whether a typical research-based RT task could at least match the TMT in differentiating amnestic MCI (aMCI) from cognitively healthy aging at group level. As aMCI is a heterogeneous group, typically containing only a proportion of individuals for whom aMCI represents the early stages of dementia, we examined the ability of each test to provide intra-group performance variation. The results indicate that as well as significant slowing in performance of the operations involved in TMT part B (but not part A), individuals with aMCI also experience significant slowing in RT compared to controls. The results also suggest that research-typical RT tests may be superior to the TMT in differentiating between cognitively healthy aging and aMCI at group level and in revealing the performance variability one would expect from an etiologically heterogeneous disorder such as aMCI. PMID:26836171

  17. Healthcare information systems: data mining methods in the creation of a clinical recommender system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, L.; Street, W. N.; Xu, E.

    2011-05-01

    Recommender systems have been extensively studied to present items, such as movies, music and books that are likely of interest to the user. Researchers have indicated that integrated medical information systems are becoming an essential part of the modern healthcare systems. Such systems have evolved to an integrated enterprise-wide system. In particular, such systems are considered as a type of enterprise information systems or ERP system addressing healthcare industry sector needs. As part of efforts, nursing care plan recommender systems can provide clinical decision support, nursing education, clinical quality control, and serve as a complement to existing practice guidelines. We propose to use correlations among nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions to create a recommender system for constructing nursing care plans. In the current study, we used nursing diagnosis data to develop the methodology. Our system utilises a prefix-tree structure common in itemset mining to construct a ranked list of suggested care plan items based on previously-entered items. Unlike common commercial systems, our system makes sequential recommendations based on user interaction, modifying a ranked list of suggested items at each step in care plan construction. We rank items based on traditional association-rule measures such as support and confidence, as well as a novel measure that anticipates which selections might improve the quality of future rankings. Since the multi-step nature of our recommendations presents problems for traditional evaluation measures, we also present a new evaluation method based on average ranking position and use it to test the effectiveness of different recommendation strategies.

  18. Continuous safety monitoring for randomized controlled clinical trials with blinded treatment information. Part 3: Design considerations.

    PubMed

    Ball, Greg; Silverman, Michael H

    2011-09-01

    Ongoing safety monitoring of clinical trials of investigational treatments must operate at levels that range from the minute and detailed - namely, mathematical treatment of trial data - to the philosophical and societal - namely, ethical concerns for individuals and populations. Between those two poles lies a realm of environmental and pragmatic considerations that reflect the goals, biases, risk-tolerance, and constraints of study sponsors and organizers. These factors, while more difficult to quantify or, at times, to justify, also have a meaningful impact on the approach to safety monitoring and the resulting actions and outcomes. This paper considers the influence and interaction of two such factors, study design and statistical framework, on continuous safety monitoring procedures. Group sequential designs have been generally preferred for clinical trials over continuous sequential designs because of practical considerations. The group means and greater time for deliberation when using a group sequential procedure, as opposed to a continuous sequential procedure, can improve the quality of the analyses with minimal loss in sensitivity. However, undertaking any sequential analysis within a frequentist framework provokes considerable theoretical and practical difficulties. Continuous monitoring with a likelihood based method, on the other hand, has the advantages that all available information, including new data, can be used; sample sizes need not be fixed; and decisions can be made at any time without statistical penalty, irrespective of trial design. Such responsive statistical rules are needed to provide guidance to the human beings charged with trial monitoring.

  19. Recruit--An Ontology Based Information Retrieval System for Clinical Trials Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Patrão, Diogo F C; Oleynik, Michel; Massicano, Felipe; Morassi Sasso, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials are studies designed to assess whether a new intervention is better than the current alternatives. However, most of them fail to recruit participants on schedule. It is hard to use Electronic Health Record (EHR) data to find eligible patients, therefore studies rely on manual assessment, which is time consuming, inefficient and requires specialized training. In this work we describe the design and development of an information retrieval system with the objective of finding eligible patients for cancer trials. The Recruit system has been in use at A. C. Camargo Cancer Center since August/2014 and contains data from more than 500,000 patients and 9 databases. It uses ontologies to integrate data from several sources and represent medical knowledge, which helps enhance results. One can search both in structured data and inside free text reports. The preliminary quality assessments shows excellent recall rates. Recruit proved to be an useful tool for researchers and its modular design could be applied to other clinical conditions and hospitals.

  20. Building a common ground on the clinical case: design, implementation and evaluation of an information model for a Handover EHR.

    PubMed

    Flemming, Daniel; Paul, Mareike; Hübner, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Handovers need a common ground on the clinical cases between the members of the successive shifts to establish continuity of care. Conventional electronic patient record systems (EHR) proved to be only insufficiently suitable for supporting the grounding process. Against this background we proposed a basic concept for a handover EHR that extends general EHRs in particular openEHR based systems. The resulting handover information model was implemented in a database and evaluated based on 120 clinical cases. The information items of these cases could be mapped successfully to the model, however, the new class "anticipatory guidance" needed to be introduced. The evaluation also demonstrated the importance of highly aggregated information on the clinical case, opinions and meta-information such as the relevance of an item during handovers. Based on these findings, in particular the handover database, handover EHR applications are currently developed to support the grounding process.

  1. Atlas-based neuroinformatics via MRI: harnessing information from past clinical cases and quantitative image analysis for patient care.

    PubMed

    Mori, Susumu; Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Miller, Michael I

    2013-01-01

    With the ever-increasing amount of anatomical information radiologists have to evaluate for routine diagnoses, computational support that facilitates more efficient education and clinical decision making is highly desired. Despite the rapid progress of image analysis technologies for magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain, these methods have not been widely adopted for clinical diagnoses. To bring computational support into the clinical arena, we need to understand the decision-making process employed by well-trained clinicians and develop tools to simulate that process. In this review, we discuss the potential of atlas-based clinical neuroinformatics, which consists of annotated databases of anatomical measurements grouped according to their morphometric phenotypes and coupled with the clinical informatics upon which their diagnostic groupings are based. As these are indexed via parametric representations, we can use image retrieval tools to search for phenotypes along with their clinical metadata. The review covers the current technology, preliminary data, and future directions of this field.

  2. Budget goal commitment, clinical managers' use of budget information and performance.

    PubMed

    Macinati, Manuela S; Rizzo, Marco G

    2014-08-01

    Despite the importance placed on accounting as a means to influence performance in public healthcare, there is still a lot to be learned about the role of management accounting in clinical managers' work behavior and their link with organizational performance. The article aims at analyzing the motivational role of budgetary participation and the intervening role of individuals' mental states and behaviors in influencing the relationship between budgetary participation and performance. According to the goal-setting theory, SEM technique was used to test the relationships among variables. The data were collected by a survey conducted in an Italian hospital. The results show that: (i) budgetary participation does not directly influence the use of budget information, but the latter is encouraged by the level of budget goal commitment which, as a result, is influenced by the positive motivational consequences of participative budgeting; (ii) budget goal commitment does not directly influence performance, but the relationship is mediated by the use of budget information. This study contributes to health policy and management accounting literature and has significant policy implications. Mainly, the findings prove that the introduction of business-like techniques in the healthcare sector can improve performance if attitudinal and behavioral variables are adequately stimulated.

  3. Budget goal commitment, clinical managers' use of budget information and performance.

    PubMed

    Macinati, Manuela S; Rizzo, Marco G

    2014-08-01

    Despite the importance placed on accounting as a means to influence performance in public healthcare, there is still a lot to be learned about the role of management accounting in clinical managers' work behavior and their link with organizational performance. The article aims at analyzing the motivational role of budgetary participation and the intervening role of individuals' mental states and behaviors in influencing the relationship between budgetary participation and performance. According to the goal-setting theory, SEM technique was used to test the relationships among variables. The data were collected by a survey conducted in an Italian hospital. The results show that: (i) budgetary participation does not directly influence the use of budget information, but the latter is encouraged by the level of budget goal commitment which, as a result, is influenced by the positive motivational consequences of participative budgeting; (ii) budget goal commitment does not directly influence performance, but the relationship is mediated by the use of budget information. This study contributes to health policy and management accounting literature and has significant policy implications. Mainly, the findings prove that the introduction of business-like techniques in the healthcare sector can improve performance if attitudinal and behavioral variables are adequately stimulated. PMID:24929475

  4. The effects of clinical information presentation on physicians' and nurses' decision-making in ICUs.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anne; Scheinkestel, Carlos; Steele, Cathie

    2009-07-01

    This research evaluated physicians' agreement about patients' diagnoses and nurses' ability to detect patient change using traditional charts (TC) and a work domain analysis-based paper prototype (PP) and also sought to determine whether differences persisted when the PP was represented as an electronic prototype (EP). Nurses' change detection improved using the PP and EP compared to TC (PP vs TC, t((df=6))=1.94, p<0.03; EP vs TC, t((df=6))=3.14, p<0.01) and detection was better using the EP compared with the PP (t((df=6))=5.96, p<0.001). Physicians were more likely to agree about failed physiological systems using the EP compared with the PP (t((df=10))=3.14, p<0.01), but agreement about patient diagnoses was higher using the PP compared with the EP (t((df=10))=2.23; p<0.02). These results are attributed to information grouping around physiological functions and the direct association of cause-and-effect relations in clinical information design.

  5. Enhancement of CLAIM (clinical accounting information) for a localized Chinese version.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Niu, Tie; He, Miao; Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Suzuki, Muneou; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Daimon, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Yusei; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2005-10-01

    CLinical Accounting InforMation (CLAIM) is a standard for the exchange of data between patient accounting systems and electronic medical record (EMR) systems. It uses eXtensible Markup Language (XML) as a meta-language and was developed in Japan. CLAIM is subordinate to the Medical Markup Language (MML) standard, which allows the exchange of medical data between different medical institutions. It has inherited the basic structure of MML 2.x and the current version, version 2.1, contains two modules and nine data definition tables. In China, no data exchange standard yet exists that links EMR systems to accounting systems. Taking advantage of CLAIM's flexibility, we created a localized Chinese version based on CLAIM 2.1. Since Chinese receipt systems differ from those of Japan, some information such as prescription formats, etc. are also different from those in Japan. Two CLAIM modules were re-engineered and six data definition tables were either added or redefined. The Chinese version of CLAIM takes local needs into account, and consequently it is now possible to transfer data between the patient accounting systems and EMR systems of Chinese medical institutions effectively.

  6. Evaluation of the clinical process in a critical care information system using the Lean method: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are numerous applications for Health Information Systems (HIS) that support specific tasks in the clinical workflow. The Lean method has been used increasingly to optimize clinical workflows, by removing waste and shortening the delivery cycle time. There are a limited number of studies on Lean applications related to HIS. Therefore, we applied the Lean method to evaluate the clinical processes related to HIS, in order to evaluate its efficiency in removing waste and optimizing the process flow. This paper presents the evaluation findings of these clinical processes, with regards to a critical care information system (CCIS), known as IntelliVue Clinical Information Portfolio (ICIP), and recommends solutions to the problems that were identified during the study. Methods We conducted a case study under actual clinical settings, to investigate how the Lean method can be used to improve the clinical process. We used observations, interviews, and document analysis, to achieve our stated goal. We also applied two tools from the Lean methodology, namely the Value Stream Mapping and the A3 problem-solving tools. We used eVSM software to plot the Value Stream Map and A3 reports. Results We identified a number of problems related to inefficiency and waste in the clinical process, and proposed an improved process model. Conclusions The case study findings show that the Value Stream Mapping and the A3 reports can be used as tools to identify waste and integrate the process steps more efficiently. We also proposed a standardized and improved clinical process model and suggested an integrated information system that combines database and software applications to reduce waste and data redundancy. PMID:23259846

  7. Treatment of African children with severe malaria - towards evidence-informed clinical practice using GRADE

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Severe malaria is a major contributor of deaths in African children up to five years of age. One valuable tool to support health workers in the management of diseases is clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) developed using robust methods. A critical assessment of the World Health Organization (WHO) and Kenyan paediatric malaria treatment guidelines with quinine was undertaken, with a focus on the quality of the evidence and transparency of the shift from evidence to recommendations. Methods Systematic reviews of the literature were conducted using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) tool to appraise included studies. The findings were used to evaluate the WHO and Kenyan recommendations for the management of severe childhood malaria. Results The WHO 2010 malaria guidance on severe malaria in children, which informed the Kenyan guidelines, only evaluated the evidence on one topic on paediatric care using the GRADE tool. Using the GRADE tool, this work explicitly demonstrated that despite the established use of quinine in the management of paediatric cases of severe malaria for decades, low or very low quality evidence of important outcomes, but not critical outcomes such as mortality, have informed national and international guidance on the paediatric quinine dosing, route of administration and adverse effects. Conclusions Despite the foreseeable shift to artesunate as the primary drug for treatment of severe childhood malaria, the findings reported here reflect that the particulars of quinine therapeutics for the management of severe malaria in African children have historically been a neglected research priority. This work supports the application of the GRADE tool to make transparent recommendations and to inform advocacy efforts for a greater research focus in priority areas in paediatric care in Africa and other low-income settings. PMID:21777441

  8. Using historical control information for the design and analysis of clinical trials with overdispersed count data.

    PubMed

    Gsteiger, Sandro; Neuenschwander, Beat; Mercier, Francois; Schmidli, Heinz

    2013-09-20

    Results from clinical trials are never interpreted in isolation. Previous studies in a similar setting provide valuable information for designing a new trial. For the analysis, however, the use of trial-external information is challenging and therefore controversial, although it seems attractive from an ethical or efficiency perspective. Here, we consider the formal use of historical control data on lesion counts in a multiple sclerosis trial. The approach to incorporating historical data is Bayesian, in that historical information is captured in a prior that accounts for between-trial variability and hence leads to discounting of historical data. We extend the meta-analytic-predictive approach, a random-effects meta-analysis of historical data combined with the prediction of the parameter in the new trial, from normal to overdispersed count data of individual-patient or aggregate-trial format. We discuss the prior derivation for the lesion mean count in the control group of the new trial for two populations. For the general population (without baseline enrichment), with 1936 control patients from nine historical trials, between-trial variability was moderate to substantial, leading to a prior effective sample size of about 45 control patients. For the more homogenous population (with enrichment), with 412 control patients from five historical trials, the prior effective sample size was approximately 63 patients. Although these numbers are small relative to the historical data, they are fairly typical in settings where between-trial heterogeneity is moderate. For phase II, reducing the number of control patients by 45 or by 63 may be an attractive option in many multiple sclerosis trials.

  9. Distilling clinically interpretable information from data collected on next-generation wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Bryan; Gordhandas, Ankit; Ricciardi, Catherine; Verghese, George; Heldt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Medical electronic systems are generating ever larger data sets from a variety of sensors and devices. Such systems are also being packaged in wearable designs for easy and broad use. The large volume of data and the constraints of low-power, extended-duration, and wireless monitoring impose the need for on-chip processing to distill clinically relevant information from the raw data. The higher-level information, rather than the raw data, is what needs to be transmitted. We present one example of information processing for continuous, high-sampling-rate data collected from wearable and portable devices. A wearable cardiac and motion monitor designed by colleagues at MIT simultaneously records electrocardiogram (ECG) and 3-axis acceleration to onboard memory, in an ambulatory setting. The acceleration data is used to generate a continuous estimate of physical activity. Additionally, we use a Portapres continuous blood pressure monitor to concurrently record the arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform. To help reduce noise, which is an increased challenge in ambulatory monitoring, we use both the ECG and ABP waveforms to generate a robust measure of heart rate from noisy data. We also generate an overall signal abnormality index to aid in the interpretation of the results. Two important cardiovascular quantities, namely cardiac output (CO) and total peripheral resistance (TPR), are then derived from this data over a sequence of physical activities. CO and TPR can be estimated (to within a scale factor) from heart rate, pulse pressure and mean arterial blood pressure, which in turn are directly obtained from the ECG and ABP signals. Data was collected on 10 healthy subjects. The derived quantities vary in a manner that is consistent with known physiology. Further work remains to correlate these values with the cardiac health state.

  10. Building a medical multimedia database system to integrate clinical information: an application of high-performance computing and communications technology.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Buchanan, B G; Cooper, G F; Vries, J K

    1995-01-01

    The rapid growth of diagnostic-imaging technologies over the past two decades has dramatically increased the amount of nontextual data generated in clinical medicine. The architecture of traditional, text-oriented, clinical information systems has made the integration of digitized clinical images with the patient record problematic. Systems for the classification, retrieval, and integration of clinical images are in their infancy. Recent advances in high-performance computing, imaging, and networking technology now make it technologically and economically feasible to develop an integrated, multimedia, electronic patient record. As part of The National Library of Medicine's Biomedical Applications of High-Performance Computing and Communications program, we plan to develop Image Engine, a prototype microcomputer-based system for the storage, retrieval, integration, and sharing of a wide range of clinically important digital images. Images stored in the Image Engine database will be indexed and organized using the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus and will be dynamically linked to data in a text-based, clinical information system. We will evaluate Image Engine by initially implementing it in three clinical domains (oncology, gastroenterology, and clinical pathology) at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. PMID:7703940

  11. Building a medical multimedia database system to integrate clinical information: an application of high-performance computing and communications technology.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Buchanan, B G; Cooper, G F; Vries, J K

    1995-01-01

    The rapid growth of diagnostic-imaging technologies over the past two decades has dramatically increased the amount of nontextual data generated in clinical medicine. The architecture of traditional, text-oriented, clinical information systems has made the integration of digitized clinical images with the patient record problematic. Systems for the classification, retrieval, and integration of clinical images are in their infancy. Recent advances in high-performance computing, imaging, and networking technology now make it technologically and economically feasible to develop an integrated, multimedia, electronic patient record. As part of The National Library of Medicine's Biomedical Applications of High-Performance Computing and Communications program, we plan to develop Image Engine, a prototype microcomputer-based system for the storage, retrieval, integration, and sharing of a wide range of clinically important digital images. Images stored in the Image Engine database will be indexed and organized using the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus and will be dynamically linked to data in a text-based, clinical information system. We will evaluate Image Engine by initially implementing it in three clinical domains (oncology, gastroenterology, and clinical pathology) at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

  12. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S.; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R.; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E.; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M. Eileen; Kogan, Scott C.; Downing, James R.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients. PMID:19339691

  13. Informed consent for clinical trials in acute coronary syndromes and stroke following the European Clinical Trials Directive: investigators' experiences and attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowski, Piotr; Budaj, Andrzej; Członkowska, Anna; Wąsek, Wojciech; Kozłowska-Boszko, Beata; Olędzka, Urszula; Masełbas, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Background During clinical trials in emergency medicine, providing appropriate oral and written information to a patient is usually a challenge. There is little published information regarding patients' opinions and competence to provide informed consent, nor on physicians' attitudes towards the process. We have investigated the problem of obtaining consent from patients in emergency-setting clinical trials (such as acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stroke) from a physicians' perspective. Methods A standardised anonymous 14-item questionnaire was distributed to Polish cardiac and stroke centres. Results Two hundred and fourteen informative investigator responses were received. Of these investigators, 73.8% had experience with ACS and 25.2% had experience with acute stroke trials (and 1% with both fields). The complete model of informed consent (embracing all aspects required by Good Clinical Practice (GCP) and law) was used in 53.3% of cases in emergency settings, whereas the legal option of proxy consent was not used at all. While less than 15% of respondents considered written information to have been fully read by patients, 80.4% thought that the amount of information being given to emergency patients is too lengthy. Although there is no legal obligation, more than half of the investigators sought parallel consent (assent) from patients' relatives. Most investigators confirmed that they would adopt the model proposed by the GCP guidelines: abbreviated verbal and written consent in emergency conditions with obligatory "all-embracing" deferred consent to continue the trial once the patient is able to provide it. However, this model would not follow current Polish and European legislation. Conclusion An update of national and European regulations is required to enable implementation of the emergency trial consent model referred to in GCP guidelines. PMID:18644120

  14. [The evidence base of clinical practice guidelines, health technology assessments and patient information as a basis for clinical decision-making].

    PubMed

    Antes, Gerd

    2004-05-01

    Valid assessments of benefit and harm of health care interventions are derived from unbiased patient-based clinical trials. Bias sources may affect different study types in different ways, leading to varying validity of study results. The efficient transfer of relevant study results into medical practice is the main objective of evidence-based medicine. To archive this, systematic reviews summarising the study results with respect to a focussed question have proved a powerful tool. They can be used for decision making by individuals as well as evidence source for clinical practice guidelines, health technology assessment and patient information.

  15. Informed consent as an ethical requirement in clinical trials: an old, but still unresolved issue. An observational study to evaluate patient's informed consent comprehension.

    PubMed

    Sanchini, Virginia; Reni, Michele; Calori, Giliola; Riva, Elisabetta; Reichlin, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    We explored the comprehension of the informed consent in 77 cancer patients previously enrolled in randomised phase II or phase III clinical trials, between March and July 2011, at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milano. We asked participants to complete an ad hoc questionnaire and analysed their answers. Sixty-two per cent of the patients understood the purpose and nature of the trial they were participating in; 44% understood the study procedures and 40% correctly listed at least one of the major risks or complications related to their participation in the trial. We identified three factors associated with comprehension of the informed consent: age, education and type of tumour/investigator team. We suggest several possible improvements of how to obtain informed consent that will increase patient awareness, as well as the validity and effectiveness of the clinical trials.

  16. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  17. Review of information and communication technology devices for monitoring functional and cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Jagan A; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Detecting and monitoring early cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a significant need in the field of AD therapeutics. Successful AD clinical trial designs have to overcome challenges related to the subtle nature of early cognitive changes. Continuous unobtrusive assessments using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) devices to capture markers of intra-individual change over time to assess cognitive and functional disability therefore offers significant benefits. We review the literature and provide an overview on randomized clinical trials in AD that use intelligent systems to monitor functional decline, as well as strengths, weaknesses, and future directions for the use of ICTs in a new generation of AD clinical trials. PMID:25708378

  18. ‘Trial Exegesis’: Methods for Synthesizing Clinical and Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) Data in Trials to Inform Clinical Practice. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Rhiannon C.; Blencowe, Natalie S.; Brookes, Sara T.; Blazeby, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The CONSORT extension for patient reported outcomes (PROs) aims to improve reporting, but guidance on the optimal integration with clinical data is lacking. This study examines in detail the reporting of PROs and clinical data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in gastro-intestinal cancer to inform design and reporting of combined PRO and clinical data from trials to improve the ‘take home’ message for clinicians to use in practice. Materials and Methods The case study was undertaken in gastro-intestinal cancer trials. Well-conducted RCTs reporting PROs with validated instruments were identified and categorized into those combining PRO and clinical data in a single paper, or those separating data into linked primary and supplemental papers. Qualitative methods were developed to examine reporting of the critical interpretation of the trial results (trial exegesis) in the papers in relation of the PRO and clinical outcomes and applied to each publication category. Results were used to inform recommendations for practice. Results From 1917 screened abstracts, 49 high quality RCTs were identified reported in 36 combined and 15 linked primary and supplemental papers. In-depth analysis of manuscript text identified three categories for understanding trial exegesis: where authors reported a “detailed”, “general”, or absent PRO rationale and integrated interpretation of clinical and PRO results. A total of 11 (30%) and 6 (16%) combined papers reported “detailed” PRO rationale and integrated interpretation of results although only 2 (14%) and 1 (7%) primary papers achieved the same standard respectively. Supplemental papers provide better information with 11 (73%) and 3 (20%) achieving “detailed” rationale and integrated interpretation of results. Supplemental papers, however, were published a median of 20 months after the primary RCT data in lower impact factor journals (median 16.8 versus 5.2). Conclusion It is recommended that single

  19. [Local information systems at the Pediatric Clinic at the University Clinical Center in Sarajevo--experience and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Buljina, A; Zubcević, S; Hadziselimović, E; Zecević, E; Dzumhur, Z

    1999-01-01

    Computer were first introduced at Pediatric hospital in Sarajevo in 1989 and since 1990 first programs for managing data have been started. They were used for administration of patients and history taking, as well as for collecting clinical data of them. In the beginning, introduction was slow because lot of doctors and nurses were reluctant in using new techniques. But, in a year most of them realized all the advantages PC offers. At that time all the PCs were separated, that has limited their full facilitated data gathering especially in the periods when we lacked all other office materials (paper, typing machines ... even pencils). Thanks to them we have preserved all medical data about patients in 4 years war period. After the end of the War we started project of making clinical network and program that should run most of the work that is performed at Pediatric Hospital in Sarajevo. Everything that is done at hospital and could be helped by the use of the computers was recorded and algorithms were made. The network consists of 15 PC units. Program was developed through several phases from the admittance of the patients and administration regarding it to the discharge letter. Outpatient work was incorporated, as well as gathering all the medical findings of the patients at one place. First experiences are extremely positive. We have speeded up "paper work" and freed much time that medical stuff can spend with patients. The main problems that we encounter are need for permanent education in working with system, lack of more powerful server that can handle more data and introducing of the pictures in the medical records. We conclude that clinical network with the use of good program for managing all the data gathered in the hospital is essential for today's work. PMID:10870623

  20. The Shared Health Research Information Network (SHRINE): a prototype federated query tool for clinical data repositories.

    PubMed

    Weber, Griffin M; Murphy, Shawn N; McMurry, Andrew J; Macfadden, Douglas; Nigrin, Daniel J; Churchill, Susanne; Kohane, Isaac S

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed a prototype Shared Health Research Information Network (SHRINE) to identify the technical, regulatory, and political challenges of creating a federated query tool for clinical data repositories. Separate Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) at Harvard's three largest affiliated health centers approved use of their data, and the Harvard Medical School IRB approved building a Query Aggregator Interface that can simultaneously send queries to each hospital and display aggregate counts of the number of matching patients. Our experience creating three local repositories using the open source Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) platform can be used as a road map for other institutions. The authors are actively working with the IRBs and regulatory groups to develop procedures that will ultimately allow investigators to obtain identified patient data and biomaterials through SHRINE. This will guide us in creating a future technical architecture that is scalable to a national level, compliant with ethical guidelines, and protective of the interests of the participating hospitals.

  1. [Health information systems: integrating clinical data in different scenarios and users].

    PubMed

    Plazzotta, Fernando; Luna, Daniel; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    Despite the technological advances of recent decades and the many documented benefits, the implementation of information and communication technologies (ICT) in health remains a major challenge for healthcare organizations. Looking to contribute to the analysis of multiple variables involved at the time of achieving successful implementation, we apply a sociotechnical model to analyze the experience of computerization of the clinical layer in the Italian Hospital of Buenos Aires. The conceptual framework applied consists of eight interconnected dimensions that allow the review of different aspects to consider at the time of design, development, implementation, use and evaluation of the application of ICT. Considering the evolution of our project, we divided it into three stages, so that each of the dimensions is analyzed in each of the stages. The socio-technical model applied resulted in an appropriate tool for assessing our implementation of ICT in health, allowing us the analysis of the eight dimensions, including retrospectively. Applying this analysis to each of the stages of the evolution of our institutional project we were able to show that by taking into account all aspects together, its execution was facilitated and allowed us to identify areas for improvement. PMID:26338397

  2. Magnetic resonance microscopy of prostate tissue: How basic science can inform clinical imaging development

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, Roger

    2013-03-15

    This commentary outlines how magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy studies of prostate tissue samples and whole organs have shed light on a number of clinical imaging mysteries and may enable more effective development of new clinical imaging methods.

  3. Understanding Clinician Information Demands and Synthesis of Clinical Documents in Electronic Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farri, Oladimeji Feyisetan

    2012-01-01

    Large quantities of redundant clinical data are usually transferred from one clinical document to another, making the review of such documents cognitively burdensome and potentially error-prone. Inadequate designs of electronic health record (EHR) clinical document user interfaces probably contribute to the difficulties clinicians experience while…

  4. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  5. Conceptual Model of Clinical Governance Information System for Statistical Indicators by Using UML in Two Sample Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Farzandipoor, Mehrdad; Arabfard, Masoud; Hosseini, Azam Haj Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was investigating situation and presenting a conceptual model for clinical governance information system by using UML in two sample hospitals. Background: However, use of information is one of the fundamental components of clinical governance; but unfortunately, it does not pay much attention to information management. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in October 2012- May 2013. Data were gathered through questionnaires and interviews in two sample hospitals. Face and content validity of the questionnaire has been confirmed by experts. Data were collected from a pilot hospital and reforms were carried out and Final questionnaire was prepared. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and SPSS 16 software. Results: With the scenario derived from questionnaires, UML diagrams are presented by using Rational Rose 7 software. The results showed that 32.14 percent Indicators of the hospitals were calculated. Database was not designed and 100 percent of the hospital’s clinical governance was required to create a database. Conclusion: Clinical governance unit of hospitals to perform its mission, do not have access to all the needed indicators. Defining of Processes and drawing of models and creating of database are essential for designing of information systems. PMID:27147804

  6. An automated tuberculosis screening strategy combining X-ray-based computer-aided detection and clinical information

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Jaime; Sánchez, Clara I.; Philipsen, Rick H. H. M.; Maduskar, Pragnya; Dawson, Rodney; Theron, Grant; Dheda, Keertan; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Lack of human resources and radiological interpretation expertise impair tuberculosis (TB) screening programmes in TB-endemic countries. Computer-aided detection (CAD) constitutes a viable alternative for chest radiograph (CXR) reading. However, no automated techniques that exploit the additional clinical information typically available during screening exist. To address this issue and optimally exploit this information, a machine learning-based combination framework is introduced. We have evaluated this framework on a database containing 392 patient records from suspected TB subjects prospectively recruited in Cape Town, South Africa. Each record comprised a CAD score, automatically computed from a CXR, and 12 clinical features. Comparisons with strategies relying on either CAD scores or clinical information alone were performed. Our results indicate that the combination framework outperforms the individual strategies in terms of the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (0.84 versus 0.78 and 0.72), specificity at 95% sensitivity (49% versus 24% and 31%) and negative predictive value (98% versus 95% and 96%). Thus, it is believed that combining CAD and clinical information to estimate the risk of active disease is a promising tool for TB screening. PMID:27126741

  7. A system architecture for sharing de-identified, research-ready brain scans and health information across clinical imaging centers.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Ann L; van Erp, Theo G M; Kesselman, Carl; D'Arcy, Mike; Sobell, Janet; Keator, David; Dahm, Lisa; Murry, Jim; Law, Meng; Hasso, Anton; Ames, Joseph; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of brain scans benefits from compare and contrast analyses of scans from patients with similar, and sometimes rare, demographic, diagnostic, and treatment status. A solution to both needs is to acquire standardized, research-ready clinical brain scans and to build the information technology infrastructure to share such scans, along with other pertinent information, across hospitals. This paper describes the design, deployment, and operation of a federated imaging system that captures and shares standardized, de-identified clinical brain images in a federation across multiple institutions. In addition to describing innovative aspects of the system architecture and our initial testing of the deployed infrastructure, we also describe the Standardized Imaging Protocol (SIP) developed for the project and our interactions with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) regarding handling patient data in the federated environment. PMID:22941984

  8. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  9. [The clinical informativeness of detection of antibodies to citrullinated proteins under rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Cherkasova, M V; Novikov, A A; Alexndrova, E N; Karateev, D E; Popkova, T V; Luchikhina, E L; Avdeeva, A S; Nasonov, E L

    2015-02-01

    .8) and antibodies to modified citrullinated vimentin (ratio of likelihood of positive and negative results of test was correspondingly 4.4 and 0.2; area under ROC curve 0.9) surpassed the same in analysis of IgM rheumatoid factor (ratio of likelihood of positive results--3.2, ratio of likelihood of negative results--0.4, area under ROC curve--0.8). The weak positive correlation relationship was established between concentration of antibodies to cyclic citrillinatedpeptide/antibodies to modified citrullinated vimentin in blood serum and indicators of clinical laboratory activity of rheumatoid arthritis (ESR, CRP DAS 28, (r-0.2. p < 0.05). The high positive levels of antibodies to modified citrullinated vimentin associated with expressed destructive affection of joints (p < 0.02). The antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide are the most highly specific and clinically informative laboratory diagnostic marker of rheumatoid arthritis. The detection of antibodies to modified citrullinated vimentin is an important additional serological test to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis in IgM rheumatoid factor-negative and/or antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide-negative patients and to forecast severe destructive affection of joints under the given disease. The joint study of IgM rheumatoid factor, antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide and antibodies to modified citrullinated vimentin under rheumatoid arthritis has higher diagnostic sensitivity as compared with isolated antibodies to citrullinated proteins.

  10. An emergency medicine clinical problem-solving system.

    PubMed

    Papa, F J

    1985-07-01

    The availability of complete, accurate, and current medical information is an important aspect of clinical problem solving. As the body of medical information grows and increasingly is reformatted into problem-oriented references, information processing by physicians will grow in importance. The most popular clinical problem-solving method, the Weed problem-oriented medical record, primarily records information; it does not provide an explicit information-processing model. An emergency medicine clinical problem-solving system containing information recording and processing methodologies is presented. The information processing methodology of this system is highlighted.

  11. [Local communalization of clinical records between the municipal community hospital and local medical institutes by using information technology].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shohei; Shinoki, Keiji; Ibata, Takeshi; Nakashita, Chisako; Doi, Seiko; Hidaka, Kumi; Hata, Akiko; Matsuoka, Mio; Waguchi, Hideko; Mito, Saori; Komuro, Ryutaro

    2012-12-01

    We introduced the electronic health record system in 2002. We produced a community medical network system to consolidate all medical treatment information from the local institute in 2010. Here, we report on the present status of this system that has been in use for the previous 2 years. We obtained a private server, set up a virtual private network(VPN)in our hospital, and installed dedicated terminals to issue an electronic certificate in 50 local institutions. The local institute applies for patient agreement in the community hospital(hospital designation style). They are then entitled to access the information of the designated patient via this local network server for one year. They can access each original medical record, sorted on the basis of the medical attendant and the chief physician; a summary of hospital stay; records of medication prescription; and the results of clinical examinations. Currently, there are approximately 80 new registrations and accesses per month. Information is provided in real time allowing up to date information, helping prescribe the medical treatment at the local institute. However, this information sharing system is read-only, and there is no cooperative clinical pass system. Therefore, this system has a limit to meet the demand for cooperation with the local clinics.

  12. Informed consent for whole-genome sequencing studies in the clinical setting. Proposed recommendations on essential content and process

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Carmen; Millán, José M; Mancheño, Marta; Dal-Ré, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The development of new massive sequencing techniques has now made it possible to significantly reduce the time and costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS). Although WGS will soon become a routine testing tool, new ethical issues have surfaced. In light of these concerns, a systematic review of papers published by expert authors on IC or specific ethical issues related to IC for WGS analysis in the clinical setting has been conducted using the Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. Additionally, a search was conducted for international ethical guidelines for genetic studies published by scientific societies and ethical boards. Based on these documents, a minimum set of information to be provided to patients in the IC form was determined. Fourteen and seven documents from the database search and from scientific societies, respectively, were selected. A very high level of consistency between them was found regarding the recommended IC form content. Pre-test counselling and general information common to all genetic tests should be included in the IC form for WGS for diagnostic purposes, but additional information addressing specific issues on WGS are proposed, such as a plan for the ethical, clinically oriented return of incidental findings. Moreover, storage of additional information for future use should also be agreed upon with the patient in advance. Recommendations for WGS studies in the clinical setting concerning both the elements of information and the process of obtaining the IC as well as how to handle the results obtained are proposed. PMID:23321621

  13. Outcomes of Health System Structures, Highly Pertinent Clinical Information, Idea Stimulators, Clinical Reviews, and Prediction Tools: JABFM Exemplified.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria; Seehusen, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    This issue exemplifies the types of articles that JABFM publishes to advance family medicine. We have articles on the implications of health system organizational structures. Three of these are international articles at the level of the national health system (1 from China) and systematic local health interventions (1 from Canada and 1 from Netherlands). Inside the United States, where there are more family physicians, there is less obesity, and designation as a Patient Centered Medical Home is related to increased rates of colorectal cancer screening. Review articles on common clinical topics discuss treatments that are changing (acne in pregnancy) or lack consensus (distal radial fractures). We have articles on making life easier in the office, such as for predicting Vitamin D levels, osteoporosis, and pre-diabetes in normal weight adults. There are articles to raise awareness of the "newest" testing or treatments, that is, auditory brainstem implants. "Reminder" articles highlight known entities that need to be reinforced to prevent over-/underdiagnosis or treatment, for example, "cotton fever." Another article discusses the increased risk for postoperative complications with sleep apnea. We also provide "thought" pieces, in this case about the terminology we are using to extend our concept of patient-centered medical homes.

  14. Outcomes of Health System Structures, Highly Pertinent Clinical Information, Idea Stimulators, Clinical Reviews, and Prediction Tools: JABFM Exemplified.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria; Seehusen, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    This issue exemplifies the types of articles that JABFM publishes to advance family medicine. We have articles on the implications of health system organizational structures. Three of these are international articles at the level of the national health system (1 from China) and systematic local health interventions (1 from Canada and 1 from Netherlands). Inside the United States, where there are more family physicians, there is less obesity, and designation as a Patient Centered Medical Home is related to increased rates of colorectal cancer screening. Review articles on common clinical topics discuss treatments that are changing (acne in pregnancy) or lack consensus (distal radial fractures). We have articles on making life easier in the office, such as for predicting Vitamin D levels, osteoporosis, and pre-diabetes in normal weight adults. There are articles to raise awareness of the "newest" testing or treatments, that is, auditory brainstem implants. "Reminder" articles highlight known entities that need to be reinforced to prevent over-/underdiagnosis or treatment, for example, "cotton fever." Another article discusses the increased risk for postoperative complications with sleep apnea. We also provide "thought" pieces, in this case about the terminology we are using to extend our concept of patient-centered medical homes. PMID:26957371

  15. A model of clinical query management that supports integration of biomedical information over the World Wide Web.

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, W. M.; Shortliffe, E. H.

    1995-01-01

    A model of clinical query management is described that supports the integration of various types of biomedical information and the delivery of that information through a common interface. The model extends the architecture of the World Wide Web to include a Common Gateway Interface (CGI) mediator, which takes in user queries, performs syntactic and semantic processing to transform the input to a canonical form, selects the appropriate information sources to answer the query, translates the canonical query statement into a query of each information resource, queries the chosen information sources in parallel, and controls the analysis and display of results. We describe WebMedline, a CGI mediator that implements portions of this model, and discuss the benefits and limitations of this approach. PMID:8563422

  16. A model of clinical query management that supports integration of biomedical information over the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Detmer, W M; Shortliffe, E H

    1995-01-01

    A model of clinical query management is described that supports the integration of various types of biomedical information and the delivery of that information through a common interface. The model extends the architecture of the World Wide Web to include a Common Gateway Interface (CGI) mediator, which takes in user queries, performs syntactic and semantic processing to transform the input to a canonical form, selects the appropriate information sources to answer the query, translates the canonical query statement into a query of each information resource, queries the chosen information sources in parallel, and controls the analysis and display of results. We describe WebMedline, a CGI mediator that implements portions of this model, and discuss the benefits and limitations of this approach.

  17. [Management of Personal Information in Clinical Laboratory Medicine:--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shimetani, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine has been running its own Medical Safety Committee, and holding a symposium on medical safety during the annual meeting. The medical world is filled with a considerable amount of personal information, including genetic information, the ultimate personal information. We, as medical staff, have to manage such personal information not only in times of peace but also during disasters or emergency situations. In Japan, the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently being implemented, but a number of problems remain. Human beings have entered the information technology era, including electrical medical record systems, which is useful for research and education besides medical practice. This is why personal information must be more effectively protected from leakage, misconception, and abuse. We should create a sound system to manage personal information, with the spirit of protecting patient information that originated from the Oath of Hippocrates.

  18. [Management of Personal Information in Clinical Laboratory Medicine:--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shimetani, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine has been running its own Medical Safety Committee, and holding a symposium on medical safety during the annual meeting. The medical world is filled with a considerable amount of personal information, including genetic information, the ultimate personal information. We, as medical staff, have to manage such personal information not only in times of peace but also during disasters or emergency situations. In Japan, the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently being implemented, but a number of problems remain. Human beings have entered the information technology era, including electrical medical record systems, which is useful for research and education besides medical practice. This is why personal information must be more effectively protected from leakage, misconception, and abuse. We should create a sound system to manage personal information, with the spirit of protecting patient information that originated from the Oath of Hippocrates. PMID:27509731

  19. Implementation of DBT-Informed Therapy at a Rural University Training Clinic: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Patrick L.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Larsen, Margo Adams

    2009-01-01

    University training clinics offer state-of-the-art treatment opportunities for clients, particularly for underserved and underinsured client populations. Little has been published regarding the implementation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in settings such as a university training clinic, which may face challenges in utilizing such a…

  20. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  1. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  2. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  3. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  4. LiverTox: Clinical and Research Information on Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Information Resources Glossary Abbreviations SEARCH THE LIVERTOX DATABASE Search for a specific medication, herbal or supplement: ... About Us . Disclaimer. Information presented in the LiverTox database is derived from the scientific literature and public ...

  5. The CISQ: a tool to measure staff involvement in and attitudes toward the implementation of a clinical information system.

    PubMed Central

    Gugerty, B.; Wooldridge, P.; Brennan, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Clinical Information System Questionnaire (CISQ-15) is a new 15-item tool designed to measure staff involvement in and attitudes towards CIS implementations. It was developed during a clinical trial which tested the effects of a combined managerial and IT intervention on staff attitudes and patient outcomes. The CISQ-15 appears to have high construct validity and internal consistency, although further studies are needed. Such studies are under way, and an expanded 36-item version, the CISQ-36, is now being evaluated. PMID:11079897

  6. Developmental Foundations and Clinical Applications of Social Information Processing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Adrian, Molly; Lyon, Aaron R.; Oti, Rosalind; Tininenko, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Social information processing has emerged as an important construct in understanding children’s interpersonal functioning. This article reviews (a) the theoretical models guiding research, (b) the development of normative and atypical social problem solving, and (c) the connection between social information processing and individual differences in functioning. Finally, this review ends with a summary of efficacy of programs aimed at preventing social information processing biases or intervening with youth who display dysfunctional social information processing skills. PMID:21686067

  7. Predicting the Naturalistic Course of Major Depressive Disorder Using Clinical and Multimodal Neuroimaging Information: A Multivariate Pattern Recognition Study

    PubMed Central

    Schmaal, Lianne; Marquand, Andre F.; Rhebergen, Didi; van Tol, Marie-José; Ruhé, Henricus G.; van der Wee, Nic J.A.; Veltman, Dick J.; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background A chronic course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with profound alterations in brain volumes and emotional and cognitive processing. However, no neurobiological markers have been identified that prospectively predict MDD course trajectories. This study evaluated the prognostic value of different neuroimaging modalities, clinical characteristics, and their combination to classify MDD course trajectories. Methods One hundred eighteen MDD patients underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (emotional facial expressions and executive functioning) and were clinically followed-up at 2 years. Three MDD trajectories (chronic n = 23, gradual improving n = 36, and fast remission n = 59) were identified based on Life Chart Interview measuring the presence of symptoms each month. Gaussian process classifiers were employed to evaluate prognostic value of neuroimaging data and clinical characteristics (including baseline severity, duration, and comorbidity). Results Chronic patients could be discriminated from patients with more favorable trajectories from neural responses to various emotional faces (up to 73% accuracy) but not from structural MRI and functional MRI related to executive functioning. Chronic patients could also be discriminated from remitted patients based on clinical characteristics (accuracy 69%) but not when age differences between the groups were taken into account. Combining different task contrasts or data sources increased prediction accuracies in some but not all cases. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that the prediction of naturalistic course of depression over 2 years is improved by considering neuroimaging data especially derived from neural responses to emotional facial expressions. Neural responses to emotional salient faces more accurately predicted outcome than clinical data. PMID:25702259

  8. A novel model to combine clinical and pathway-based transcriptomic information for the prognosis prediction of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijia; Yee, Cameron; Ching, Travers; Yu, Herbert; Garmire, Lana X

    2014-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide. With the increasing awareness of heterogeneity in breast cancers, better prediction of breast cancer prognosis is much needed for more personalized treatment and disease management. Towards this goal, we have developed a novel computational model for breast cancer prognosis by combining the Pathway Deregulation Score (PDS) based pathifier algorithm, Cox regression and L1-LASSO penalization method. We trained the model on a set of 236 patients with gene expression data and clinical information, and validated the performance on three diversified testing data sets of 606 patients. To evaluate the performance of the model, we conducted survival analysis of the dichotomized groups, and compared the areas under the curve based on the binary classification. The resulting prognosis genomic model is composed of fifteen pathways (e.g., P53 pathway) that had previously reported cancer relevance, and it successfully differentiated relapse in the training set (log rank p-value = 6.25e-12) and three testing data sets (log rank p-value < 0.0005). Moreover, the pathway-based genomic models consistently performed better than gene-based models on all four data sets. We also find strong evidence that combining genomic information with clinical information improved the p-values of prognosis prediction by at least three orders of magnitude in comparison to using either genomic or clinical information alone. In summary, we propose a novel prognosis model that harnesses the pathway-based dysregulation as well as valuable clinical information. The selected pathways in our prognosis model are promising targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25233347

  9. Searching ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to inform systematic reviews: what are the optimal search approaches?*

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, Julie M.; Duffy, Steven; McCool, Rachael; Varley, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since 2005, International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) member journals have required that clinical trials be registered in publicly available trials registers before they are considered for publication. Objectives: The research explores whether it is adequate, when searching to inform systematic reviews, to search for relevant clinical trials using only public trials registers and to identify the optimal search approaches in trials registers. Methods: A search was conducted in ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for research studies that had been included in eight systematic reviews. Four search approaches (highly sensitive, sensitive, precise, and highly precise) were performed using the basic and advanced interfaces in both resources. Results: On average, 84% of studies were not listed in either resource. The largest number of included studies was retrieved in ClinicalTrials.gov and ICTRP when a sensitive search approach was used in the basic interface. The use of the advanced interface maintained or improved sensitivity in 16 of 19 strategies for Clinicaltrials.gov and 8 of 18 for ICTRP. No single search approach was sensitive enough to identify all studies included in the 6 reviews. Conclusions: Trials registers cannot yet be relied upon as the sole means to locate trials for systematic reviews. Trials registers lag behind the major bibliographic databases in terms of their search interfaces. Implications: For systematic reviews, trials registers and major bibliographic databases should be searched. Trials registers should be searched using sensitive approaches, and both the registers consulted in this study should be searched. PMID:25031558

  10. Atlas-based neuroinformatics via MRI: harnessing information from past clinical cases and quantitative image analysis for patient care.

    PubMed

    Mori, Susumu; Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Miller, Michael I

    2013-01-01

    With the ever-increasing amount of anatomical information radiologists have to evaluate for routine diagnoses, computational support that facilitates more efficient education and clinical decision making is highly desired. Despite the rapid progress of image analysis technologies for magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain, these methods have not been widely adopted for clinical diagnoses. To bring computational support into the clinical arena, we need to understand the decision-making process employed by well-trained clinicians and develop tools to simulate that process. In this review, we discuss the potential of atlas-based clinical neuroinformatics, which consists of annotated databases of anatomical measurements grouped according to their morphometric phenotypes and coupled with the clinical informatics upon which their diagnostic groupings are based. As these are indexed via parametric representations, we can use image retrieval tools to search for phenotypes along with their clinical metadata. The review covers the current technology, preliminary data, and future directions of this field. PMID:23642246

  11. Clinical information technology in hospitals: a comparison between the state of Iowa and two provinces in Canada.

    PubMed

    Jaana, Mirou; Ward, Marcia M; Paré, Guy; Wakefield, Douglas S

    2005-09-01

    Despite the growing interest in adopting information technology (IT) in healthcare, the degree of technology sophistication varies among healthcare organizations. Changes in the health care sector and continuous pressure to improve the quality of care have driven the evolution of IT in hospitals. This paper provides an overview of clinical IT sophistication in a sample of U.S. hospitals, and compares clinical IT capacities in this sample with a sample of Canadian hospitals. The instrument used for the comparison measures three clinical dimensions of IT sophistication: functional sophistication, technological sophistication and integration level. Clinical areas that were considered include patient management, patient care activities and clinical support activities. The comparison between hospitals in Iowa and Canada shows differences in clinical IT sophistication between the two settings. Hospitals in Iowa appear to have more technologies but fewer computerized processes and integration of patient management activities. Technological sophistication however, was low in both samples. Our findings confirm the construct validity of the measurement instrument and show initial evidence of its generalizability. More initiatives using the instrument would lead to enhancement in IT assessment tools that can be used for evaluation of IT in relation to patient management and quality outcomes.

  12. Clinical research using an information system: the multicenter perioperative outcomes group.

    PubMed

    Kheterpal, Sachin

    2011-09-01

    Clinical research using electronic medical record (EMR) data is an emerging source of scientific progress. Increasingly, researchers are using retrospective observational data acquired from EMRs as the substrate for their clinical research into comorbidities, procedures, situations, and outcomes that have historically presented significant challenges. Although EMR data collection is perceived to require fewer resources than manual chart review, there are many specific regulatory, privacy, data quality, and technique issues unique to clinical research using EMR data. This article discusses the use of EMRs for observational research.

  13. [Visualization and analysis of drug information on adverse reactions using data mining method, and its clinical application].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Junko

    2014-01-01

    Sources of drug information such as package inserts (PIs) and interview forms (IFs) and existing drug information databases provide primarily document-based and numerical information. For this reason, it is not easy to obtain a complete picture of the information concerning many drugs with similar effects or to understand differences among drugs. The visualization of drug information may help provide a large amount of information in a short period, relieve the burden on medical workers, facilitate a comprehensive understanding and comparison of drugs, and contribute to improvements in patients' QOL. At our department, we are developing an approach to convert information on side effects obtained from PIs of many drugs with similar effects into visual maps reflecting the data structure through competitive learning using the self-organizing map (SOM) technique of Kohonen, which is a powerful method for pattern recognition, to facilitate the grasping of all available information and differences among drugs, to anticipate the appearance of side effects; we are also evaluating the possibility of its clinical application. In this paper, this approach is described by taking the examples of antibiotics, antihypertensive drugs, and diabetes drugs.

  14. Taking part in a pharmacogenetic clinical trial: assessment of trial participants understanding of information disclosed during the informed consent process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study is the first to examine the understandings that participants have of the consent process in a pharmacogenetic trial of anti-depressant medication. Methods This was a qualitative cross sectional study. There were 76 participants residing in London, Mannheim, Arhuus and Poznan. Results Only one quarter of participants (none in Poznan) could articulate the concept of pharmacogenetics. Heritability and testing medication were also given as the purpose of the trial. Most participants had not appreciated harms that could derive from the trial. Even when shown the consent sheet, participants were confused about DNA profiling. There was evidence that participants appreciated weekly contact with researchers. Most said they would participate in a trial again but would like choice over the intervention they were assigned to. Conclusion Participants in this study showed a poor level of informed consent. Although this is not the first time this argument has been made, it is in the case of a pharmacogenetic trial. Further work should investigate the associations between extraneous factors such as information and social support on beneficial or untoward outcomes of antidepressant treatment. PMID:24025622

  15. Evidence of clinically significant change: the therapeutic alliance and the possibilities of outcomes-informed care.

    PubMed

    Manning, Walter H

    2010-11-01

    This article addresses the issue of clinically significant (or meaningful) change resulting from treatment for stuttering. Research in both medical and behavioral fields indicates that clients often have their own unique perspective of meaningful clinical change and that this perspective is often different from that of the professional administering the treatment. Among the variables that the client brings to the treatment session are their progression through stages of therapeutic change and the ways in which they believe they are capable of coping with their problem. Research has shown that how an individual interprets the meaning his or her therapeutic experience is central to clinically significant change. Procedures for obtaining feedback from clients concerning clinically significant change and the quality of the therapeutic alliance are described. PMID:21080293

  16. An application of cmaps in the description of clinical information structure and logic in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Allen; Helfgott, Maxwell A; Novak, Joseph; Schanhals, Rick

    2012-09-01

    The development and implementation of competent and cost-effective computerized medical records that profoundly improve physician productivity and knowledge management will require the development of a new paradigm for the representation and analysis of medical knowledge and logic. Medical knowledge is acquired inductively by observing, measuring, and eliciting information from patients in a process that is investigational rather than transactional. Most, if not all, current approaches to health information technology (HIT) rely on a logic and data structure that imposes significant limitations on the ability of physicians to thoroughly and efficiently document and access empiric patient data because the information is almost invariably organized in a way which presumes, rather than makes explicit, the relationships of concepts and their meaning. Cmapping provides a graphical method of capturing and displaying expert content knowledge that is simple to comprehend and modify and provides a foundation for a dynamic, inductive, and inclusive method of clinical documentation and research. The basis of medical decision analysis along with representative samples of medical knowledge modeling in the Cmap format is presented. The knowledge structures that are captured in Cmaps can be expressed directly in propositional logic, enabling the capability to convert Cmapped clinical expressions to be used to define a description logic for clinical evidence documentation and analysis that can in turn be mapped to multiple natural languages. The described description logic approach can be used to formulate digital messages and documents and to automate the process of converting description specifications formulated in propositional logic into operational electronic health record solutions for capture and reporting of clinical encounters. It has also been demonstrated that using Cmaps to elicit content knowledge from physicians to build point-of-care clinical documentation screens

  17. Comparison of good clinical practice compliance and readability ease of the informed consents between observational and interventional clinical studies in the Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar; Ibrahim, Halah; Askar, Omar Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Background: Expansion of clinical trials activity into emerging regions has raised concerns regarding participant rights and research ethics. Increasing numbers of observational studies are now conducted in developing economies, including the United Arab Emirates. Materials and Methods: This study compares the content of information provided, Good Clinical Practice (GCP) guideline compliance, and readability of informed consent forms (ICFs) for observational compared to interventional studies. Results: GCP compliance for observational studies averaged at 79.5% + 6.8%, significantly (P < 0.001) lower than 92.2 + 5.0 percent for interventional studies. Readability ease and readability-grade level were assessed with Flesch-Kincaid scales. Results indicated higher readability grade-level 12.4 + 0.4 (P < 0.001) and lower readability Flesch-Kincaid reading ease score 35.7 + 3.6 for observational studies, as compared to 10.3 + 1.6 and 47.8 + 7.4 for interventional studies. Conclusion: Mandatory training for investigators is essential to provide readability ease and GCP compliance for the ICFs for the local population. PMID:27453828

  18. Accurate, Fully-Automated NMR Spectral Profiling for Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Liu, Philip; Bjordahl, Trent C.; Mandal, Rupasri; Grant, Jason R.; Wilson, Michael; Eisner, Roman; Sinelnikov, Igor; Hu, Xiaoyu; Luchinat, Claudio; Greiner, Russell; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause significant changes to the concentrations of small molecules (a.k.a. metabolites) that appear in a person’s biofluids, which means such diseases can often be readily detected from a person’s “metabolic profile"—i.e., the list of concentrations of those metabolites. This information can be extracted from a biofluids Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. However, due to its complexity, NMR spectral profiling has remained manual, resulting in slow, expensive and error-prone procedures that have hindered clinical and industrial adoption of metabolomics via NMR. This paper presents a system, BAYESIL, which can quickly, accurately, and autonomously produce a person’s metabolic profile. Given a 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a complex biofluid (specifically serum or cerebrospinal fluid), BAYESIL can automatically determine the metabolic profile. This requires first performing several spectral processing steps, then matching the resulting spectrum against a reference compound library, which contains the “signatures” of each relevant metabolite. BAYESIL views spectral matching as an inference problem within a probabilistic graphical model that rapidly approximates the most probable metabolic profile. Our extensive studies on a diverse set of complex mixtures including real biological samples (serum and CSF), defined mixtures and realistic computer generated spectra; involving > 50 compounds, show that BAYESIL can autonomously find the concentration of NMR-detectable metabolites accurately (~ 90% correct identification and ~ 10% quantification error), in less than 5 minutes on a single CPU. These results demonstrate that BAYESIL is the first fully-automatic publicly-accessible system that provides quantitative NMR spectral profiling effectively—with an accuracy on these biofluids that meets or exceeds the performance of trained experts. We anticipate this tool will usher in high-throughput metabolomics and enable a wealth of new applications

  19. Accurate, fully-automated NMR spectral profiling for metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Liu, Philip; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Bjordahl, Trent C; Mandal, Rupasri; Grant, Jason R; Wilson, Michael; Eisner, Roman; Sinelnikov, Igor; Hu, Xiaoyu; Luchinat, Claudio; Greiner, Russell; Wishart, David S

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause significant changes to the concentrations of small molecules (a.k.a. metabolites) that appear in a person's biofluids, which means such diseases can often be readily detected from a person's "metabolic profile"-i.e., the list of concentrations of those metabolites. This information can be extracted from a biofluids Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. However, due to its complexity, NMR spectral profiling has remained manual, resulting in slow, expensive and error-prone procedures that have hindered clinical and industrial adoption of metabolomics via NMR. This paper presents a system, BAYESIL, which can quickly, accurately, and autonomously produce a person's metabolic profile. Given a 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a complex biofluid (specifically serum or cerebrospinal fluid), BAYESIL can automatically determine the metabolic profile. This requires first performing several spectral processing steps, then matching the resulting spectrum against a reference compound library, which contains the "signatures" of each relevant metabolite. BAYESIL views spectral matching as an inference problem within a probabilistic graphical model that rapidly approximates the most probable metabolic profile. Our extensive studies on a diverse set of complex mixtures including real biological samples (serum and CSF), defined mixtures and realistic computer generated spectra; involving > 50 compounds, show that BAYESIL can autonomously find the concentration of NMR-detectable metabolites accurately (~ 90% correct identification and ~ 10% quantification error), in less than 5 minutes on a single CPU. These results demonstrate that BAYESIL is the first fully-automatic publicly-accessible system that provides quantitative NMR spectral profiling effectively-with an accuracy on these biofluids that meets or exceeds the performance of trained experts. We anticipate this tool will usher in high-throughput metabolomics and enable a wealth of new applications of NMR in

  20. Using Medical Text Extraction, Reasoning and Mapping System (MTERMS) to Process Medication Information in Outpatient Clinical Notes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Plasek, Joseph M; Mahoney, Lisa M; Karipineni, Neelima; Chang, Frank; Yan, Xuemin; Chang, Fenny; Dimaggio, Dana; Goldman, Debora S.; Rocha, Roberto A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical information is often coded using different terminologies, and therefore is not interoperable. Our goal is to develop a general natural language processing (NLP) system, called Medical Text Extraction, Reasoning and Mapping System (MTERMS), which encodes clinical text using different terminologies and simultaneously establishes dynamic mappings between them. MTERMS applies a modular, pipeline approach flowing from a preprocessor, semantic tagger, terminology mapper, context analyzer, and parser to structure inputted clinical notes. Evaluators manually reviewed 30 free-text and 10 structured outpatient clinical notes compared to MTERMS output. MTERMS achieved an overall F-measure of 90.6 and 94.0 for free-text and structured notes respectively for medication and temporal information. The local medication terminology had 83.0% coverage compared to RxNorm’s 98.0% coverage for free-text notes. 61.6% of mappings between the terminologies are exact match. Capture of duration was significantly improved (91.7% vs. 52.5%) from systems in the third i2b2 challenge. PMID:22195230

  1. Communicating Effectively About Clinical Trials With African American Communities: A Comparison of African American and White Information Sources and Needs.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Andrea; Bergeron, Caroline D; Zheng, Yue; Friedman, Daniela B; Kim, Sei-Hill; Foster, Caroline B

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trial (CT) participation is low among African Americans (AAs). To better communicate with AAs about the importance of CTs, the purpose of this study was to explore the communication sources and perceived effective communication channels and strategies through which the general public, AAs, and White individuals receive CT information. A quantitative telephone survey was conducted with AAs and Whites in one Southern state (N = 511). The measures assessed CT sources of information, perceived effectiveness of communication channels and strategies, CT understanding, and CT participation. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were used to compare responses overall and by race. AAs reported being exposed to more CT information than Whites. AAs received CT information most often through television, social media, and doctors compared to Whites. Perceived effectiveness of communication strategies and channels varied by race. AAs preferred simple and easy-to-understand CT information distributed through faith-based organizations. Whites preferred to receive CT information through a trustworthy source (e.g., doctor). There were no significant differences between AAs and Whites in their perceived effectiveness of media sources (e.g., Internet). Recommendations are provided to help health promotion practitioners and CT recruiters tailor information and communicate it effectively to potential AA and White CT participants. PMID:26715695

  2. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  3. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  4. User Resistance and Trust in a Clinical RFID Employee Location Tracking Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    User resistance has been identified as a factor in information systems implementation failures in the health care industry. RFID, radio frequency identification, is being incorporated into new health care information systems in order to effect cost reductions by tracking, identifying and monitoring individuals and medical items. This is the first…

  5. Customized laboratory information management system for a clinical and research leukemia cytogenetics laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Sonal R; Shukla, Shilin N; Shah, Pankaj M

    2009-01-01

    We developed a Microsoft Access-based laboratory management system to facilitate database management of leukemia patients referred for cytogenetic tests in regards to karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The database is custom-made for entry of patient data, clinical details, sample details, cytogenetics test results, and data mining for various ongoing research areas. A number of clinical research laboratoryrelated tasks are carried out faster using specific "queries." The tasks include tracking clinical progression of a particular patient for multiple visits, treatment response, morphological and cytogenetics response, survival time, automatic grouping of patient inclusion criteria in a research project, tracking various processing steps of samples, turn-around time, and revenue generated. Since 2005 we have collected of over 5,000 samples. The database is easily updated and is being adapted for various data maintenance and mining needs. PMID:19252256

  6. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients.

  7. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients. PMID:26895996

  8. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  9. Accurate calculation of the absolute free energy of binding for drug molecules† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc02678d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Aldeghi, Matteo; Heifetz, Alexander; Bodkin, Michael J.; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of binding affinities has been a central goal of computational chemistry for decades, yet remains elusive. Despite good progress, the required accuracy for use in a drug-discovery context has not been consistently achieved for drug-like molecules. Here, we perform absolute free energy calculations based on a thermodynamic cycle for a set of diverse inhibitors binding to bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) and demonstrate that a mean absolute error of 0.6 kcal mol–1 can be achieved. We also show a similar level of accuracy (1.0 kcal mol–1) can be achieved in pseudo prospective approach. Bromodomains are epigenetic mark readers that recognize acetylation motifs and regulate gene transcription, and are currently being investigated as therapeutic targets for cancer and inflammation. The unprecedented accuracy offers the exciting prospect that the binding free energy of drug-like compounds can be predicted for pharmacologically relevant targets. PMID:26798447

  10. Building a Bridge or Digging a Pipeline? Clinical Data Mining in Evidence-Informed Knowledge Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    Challenging the "bridge metaphor" theme of this conference, this article contends that current practice-research integration strategies are more like research-to-practice "pipelines." The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the potential of clinical data-mining studies conducted by practitioners, practitioner-oriented PhD…

  11. A systematic review of the collaborative clinical education model to inform speech-language pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Briffa, Charmaine; Porter, Judi

    2013-12-01

    A shortage of clinical education placements for allied health students internationally has led to the need to explore innovative models of clinical education. The collaborative model where one clinical educator supervises two or more students completing a clinical placement concurrently is one model enabling expansion of student placements. The aims of this review were to investigate advantages and disadvantages of the collaborative model and to explore its implementation across allied health. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using three electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, and Embase). Two independent reviewers evaluated studies for methodological quality. Seventeen studies met inclusion/exclusion criteria. Advantages and disadvantages identified were consistent across disciplines. A key advantage of the model was the opportunity afforded for peer learning, whilst a frequently reported disadvantage was reduced time for individual supervision of students. The methodological quality of many included studies was poor, impacting on interpretation of the evidence base. Insufficient data were provided on how the model was implemented across studies. There is a need for high quality research to guide implementation of this model across a wider range of allied health disciplines and to determine educational outcomes using reliable and validated measures. PMID:23402324

  12. Information Technology and the Clinical Curriculum: Some Predictions and Their Implications for the Class of 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faughnan, John G.; Elson, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Drawing on academic studies and on personal clinical and industry experiences, argues that ubiquitous, simple network computing and "power tools" for managing medical knowledge are coming to medicine in the near future. Implications are drawn for how medical school curricula cover issues such as patient confidentiality, systems thinking and error…

  13. A systematic review of the collaborative clinical education model to inform speech-language pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Briffa, Charmaine; Porter, Judi

    2013-12-01

    A shortage of clinical education placements for allied health students internationally has led to the need to explore innovative models of clinical education. The collaborative model where one clinical educator supervises two or more students completing a clinical placement concurrently is one model enabling expansion of student placements. The aims of this review were to investigate advantages and disadvantages of the collaborative model and to explore its implementation across allied health. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using three electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, and Embase). Two independent reviewers evaluated studies for methodological quality. Seventeen studies met inclusion/exclusion criteria. Advantages and disadvantages identified were consistent across disciplines. A key advantage of the model was the opportunity afforded for peer learning, whilst a frequently reported disadvantage was reduced time for individual supervision of students. The methodological quality of many included studies was poor, impacting on interpretation of the evidence base. Insufficient data were provided on how the model was implemented across studies. There is a need for high quality research to guide implementation of this model across a wider range of allied health disciplines and to determine educational outcomes using reliable and validated measures.

  14. Proposed Design of a Clinical Information System for the Management of Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huq, S; Karras, BT; Wright, J; Lober, WB; Lozano, P; Zimmerman, FJ

    2002-01-01

    This poster categorizes the various applications to aid the management of Pediatric Bronchial Asthma. An attempt is made at classifying the various informatics approaches in this domain. Later, the approach of the proposed Asthma CAMS (Computer Aided Management System) project, being developed by the Child Health Institute and Clinical Informatics Research Group www.cirg.washington.edu at the University of Washington, is discussed.

  15. Reliability and Validity of the Clinical Dementia Rating for Community-Living Elderly Subjects without an Informant

    PubMed Central

    Nyunt, Ma Shwe Zin; Chong, Mei Sian; Lim, Wee Shiong; Lee, Tih Shih; Yap, Philip; Ng, Tze Pin

    2013-01-01

    Background The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale is widely used to assess cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. It requires collateral information from a reliable informant who is not available in many instances. We adapted the original CDR scale for use with elderly subjects without an informant (CDR-NI) and evaluated its reliability and validity for assessing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia among community-dwelling elderly subjects. Method At two consecutive visits 1 week apart, nurses trained in CDR assessment interviewed, observed and rated cognitive and functional performance according to a protocol in 90 elderly subjects with suboptimal cognitive performance [Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) <26 and/or Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA) <26] and without informants according to a protocol. CDR domains and global scores were assigned after the second visit based upon corroborative information from the subjects' responses to questions, role-play, and observed performance in specifically assigned tasks at home and within the community. Results The CDR-NI scores (0, 0.5, 1) showed good internal consistency (Crohnbach's α 0.83-0.84), inter-rater reliability (κ 0.77-1.00 for six domains and 0.95 for global rating) and test-retest reliability (κ 0.75-1.00 for six domains and 0.80 for global rating), good agreement (κ 0.79) with the clinical assessment status of MCI (n = 37) and dementia (n = 4) and significant differences in the mean scores for MMSE, MOCA and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ANOVA global p < 0.001). Conclusion Owing to the protocol of the interviews, assessments and structured observations gathered during the two visits, CDR-NI provides valid and reliable assessment of MCI and dementia in community-living elderly subjects without an informant. PMID:24348502

  16. Resourcing the clinical complementary medicine information needs of Australian medical students: Results of a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Templeman, Kate; Robinson, Anske; McKenna, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Australian medical students' complementary medicine information needs. Thirty medical students from 10 medical education faculties across Australian universities were recruited. Data were generated using in-depth semi-structured interviews and constructivist grounded theory method was used to analyze and construct data. Students sought complementary medicine information from a range of inadequate sources, such as pharmacological texts, Internet searches, peer-reviewed medical journals, and drug databases. The students identified that many complementary medicine resources may not be regarded as objective, reliable, differentiated, or comprehensive, leaving much that medical education needs to address. Most students sought succinct, easily accessible, evidence-based information to inform safe and appropriate clinical decisions about complementary medicines. A number of preferred resources were identified that can be recommended and actively promoted to medical students. Therefore, specific, evidence-based complementary medicine databases and secondary resources should be subscribed and recommended to medical schools and students, to assist meeting professional responsibilities regarding complementary medicines. These findings may help inform the development of appropriate medical information resources regarding complementary medicines.

  17. Resourcing the clinical complementary medicine information needs of Australian medical students: Results of a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Templeman, Kate; Robinson, Anske; McKenna, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Australian medical students' complementary medicine information needs. Thirty medical students from 10 medical education faculties across Australian universities were recruited. Data were generated using in-depth semi-structured interviews and constructivist grounded theory method was used to analyze and construct data. Students sought complementary medicine information from a range of inadequate sources, such as pharmacological texts, Internet searches, peer-reviewed medical journals, and drug databases. The students identified that many complementary medicine resources may not be regarded as objective, reliable, differentiated, or comprehensive, leaving much that medical education needs to address. Most students sought succinct, easily accessible, evidence-based information to inform safe and appropriate clinical decisions about complementary medicines. A number of preferred resources were identified that can be recommended and actively promoted to medical students. Therefore, specific, evidence-based complementary medicine databases and secondary resources should be subscribed and recommended to medical schools and students, to assist meeting professional responsibilities regarding complementary medicines. These findings may help inform the development of appropriate medical information resources regarding complementary medicines. PMID:26818009

  18. 78 FR 24750 - Scientific Information Request Therapies for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Systems, Linear Accelerator ; Radiotherapy Systems, and Proton Beam . Scientific information is being... conformal radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, proton beam therapy, and stereotactic... conformal radiation, proton beam, and stereotactic body radiation therapy), brachytherapy,...

  19. Caring for caregivers and patients: Research and clinical priorities for informal cancer caregiving.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erin E; Rowland, Julia H; Northouse, Laurel; Litzelman, Kristin; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Timura, Catherine; O'Mara, Ann; Huss, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Informal/family caregivers are a fundamental source of care for cancer patients in the United States, yet the population of caregivers and their tasks, psychosocial needs, and health outcomes are not well understood. Changes in the nature of cancer care and its delivery, along with the growing population of survivors and their caregivers, warrant increased attention to the roles and demands of caregiving. This article reviews current evidence presented at a 2-day meeting examining the state of the science of informal cancer caregiving that was convened by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Nursing Research. The meeting sought to define who is an informal cancer caregiver, summarize the state of the science in informal cancer caregiving, and describe both the kinds of interventions developed to address caregiving challenges and the various outcomes used to evaluate their impact. This article offers recommendations for moving science forward in 4 areas: 1) improving the estimation of the prevalence and burden of informal cancer caregiving; 2) advancing the development of interventions designed to improve outcomes for cancer patients, caregivers, and patient-caregiver dyads; 3) generating and testing strategies for integrating caregivers into formal health care settings; and 4) promoting the use of technology to support informal cancer caregivers. Cancer 2016;122:1987-95. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. Developing a provisional, international Minimal Dataset for Juvenile Dermatomyositis: for use in clinical practice to inform research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare but severe autoimmune inflammatory myositis of childhood. International collaboration is essential in order to undertake clinical trials, understand the disease and improve long-term outcome. The aim of this study was to propose from existing collaborative initiatives a preliminary minimal dataset for JDM. This will form the basis of the future development of an international consensus-approved minimum core dataset to be used both in clinical care and inform research, allowing integration of data between centres. Methods A working group of internationally-representative JDM experts was formed to develop a provisional minimal dataset. Clinical and laboratory variables contained within current national and international collaborative databases of patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies were scrutinised. Judgements were informed by published literature and a more detailed analysis of the Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort Biomarker Study and Repository, UK and Ireland. Results A provisional minimal JDM dataset has been produced, with an associated glossary of definitions. The provisional minimal dataset will request information at time of patient diagnosis and during on-going prospective follow up. At time of patient diagnosis, information will be requested on patient demographics, diagnostic criteria and treatments given prior to diagnosis. During on-going prospective follow-up, variables will include the presence of active muscle or skin disease, major organ involvement or constitutional symptoms, investigations, treatment, physician global assessments and patient reported outcome measures. Conclusions An internationally agreed minimal dataset has the potential to significantly enhance collaboration, allow effective communication between groups, provide a minimal standard of care and enable analysis of the largest possible number of JDM patients to provide a greater understanding of this disease. This

  1. Autism in toddlers: can observation in preschool yield the same information as autism assessment in a specialised clinic?

    PubMed

    Westman Andersson, Gunilla; Miniscalco, Carmela; Johansson, Ulrika; Gillberg, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    We wanted to know whether preschool observation of children suspected of suffering from autism can provide the same information about core autism symptoms as the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) performed in a clinic. Forty 2-4-year-old children (9 girls, 31 boys), referred for assessment of suspected autism spectrum disorder participated in the study. The symptom areas covered by the ADOS algorithm were scored by an education specialist after free-field observation of each child in the preschool without using the prescribed ADOS materials. The ADOS was then completed in a clinic setting by examiners blind to the preschool results. Excellent agreement across results obtained at the two different types/settings of observations was found. The only significant difference found was with regard to spontaneous initiation of joint attention. The present study does not address the issue of whether or not one of the methods used is superior to the other when it comes to determining the "true" level of "autism problems" in these children. However, it is of interest that free-field preschool observation of children with suspected autism using a structured checklist yields very similar information as that obtained at ADOS assessment performed in a clinic setting.

  2. Cultures in hospitals and their influence on attitudes to, and satisfaction with, the use of clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Callen, Joanne L; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2007-08-01

    Studies have identified the importance of hospitals' organisational culture in clinical information system diffusion, but few have quantified its role. This study measured organisational culture in two Australian hospitals to explore whether clinicians' perceptions of culture related to their attitudes to, and satisfaction with, a computerised provider order entry system (CPOE). Data were collected using the Organisational Culture Inventory and a user-satisfaction survey administered to a population of 249 clinicians from the two hospitals. One hospital used CPOE to order clinical laboratory and radiology tests and view results, and the other used the test viewing function only, the ordering facility being planned for later implementation. We found a relationship between culture and clinicians' attitudes, with those in the constructive culture hospital more likely to express positive attitudes towards CPOE, whereas those in the aggressive/defensive hospital were more likely to be negative. The relationship between culture and attitudes towards clinical information systems should be taken into account when planning for their adoption. PMID:17475380

  3. Physical rehabilitation for lung transplant candidates and recipients: An evidence-informed clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Wickerson, Lisa; Rozenberg, Dmitry; Janaudis-Ferreira, Tania; Deliva, Robin; Lo, Vincent; Beauchamp, Gary; Helm, Denise; Gottesman, Chaya; Mendes, Polyana; Vieira, Luciana; Herridge, Margaret; Singer, Lianne G; Mathur, Sunita

    2016-09-24

    Physical rehabilitation of lung transplant candidates and recipients plays an important in optimizing physical function prior to transplant and facilitating recovery of function post-transplant. As medical and surgical interventions in lung transplantation have evolved over time, there has been a demographic shift of individuals undergoing lung transplantation including older individuals, those with multiple co-morbidites, and candidates with respiratory failure requiring bridging to transplantation. These changes have an impact on the rehabilitation needs of lung transplant candidates and recipients. This review provides a practical approach to rehabilitation based on research and clinical practice at our transplant centre. It focuses on functional assessment and exercise prescription during an uncomplicated and complicated clinical course in the pre-transplant, early and late post-transplant periods. The target audience includes clinicians involved in pre- and post-transplant patient care and rehabilitation researchers. PMID:27683630

  4. The National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry: A Sustainable Model for the Information Age?

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesiologists care for patients of all ages, with all conceivable comorbidities, in every kind of health care facility. This leads to a significant challenge in the collection of data to describe the specialty, and in the development of evidence-based performance measures for anesthesiologists. Whereas narrowly defined medical specialties have developed registries based on manual abstraction of clinical data from the medical record (e.g., cardiac surgery), this approach would be prohibitively expensive for anesthesiology, and is unlikely to generate statistically useful data when major adverse outcomes occur a handful of times in tens of thousands of cases. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) addressed this challenge in 2008 by funding a related organization, the Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI), to develop the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR). The technical development of this registry and the approach taken to define the specialty of anesthesiology and the performance of anesthesiologists may serve as a model for other specialty society efforts. PMID:25848607

  5. Physical rehabilitation for lung transplant candidates and recipients: An evidence-informed clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Wickerson, Lisa; Rozenberg, Dmitry; Janaudis-Ferreira, Tania; Deliva, Robin; Lo, Vincent; Beauchamp, Gary; Helm, Denise; Gottesman, Chaya; Mendes, Polyana; Vieira, Luciana; Herridge, Margaret; Singer, Lianne G; Mathur, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation of lung transplant candidates and recipients plays an important in optimizing physical function prior to transplant and facilitating recovery of function post-transplant. As medical and surgical interventions in lung transplantation have evolved over time, there has been a demographic shift of individuals undergoing lung transplantation including older individuals, those with multiple co-morbidites, and candidates with respiratory failure requiring bridging to transplantation. These changes have an impact on the rehabilitation needs of lung transplant candidates and recipients. This review provides a practical approach to rehabilitation based on research and clinical practice at our transplant centre. It focuses on functional assessment and exercise prescription during an uncomplicated and complicated clinical course in the pre-transplant, early and late post-transplant periods. The target audience includes clinicians involved in pre- and post-transplant patient care and rehabilitation researchers.

  6. Physical rehabilitation for lung transplant candidates and recipients: An evidence-informed clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Wickerson, Lisa; Rozenberg, Dmitry; Janaudis-Ferreira, Tania; Deliva, Robin; Lo, Vincent; Beauchamp, Gary; Helm, Denise; Gottesman, Chaya; Mendes, Polyana; Vieira, Luciana; Herridge, Margaret; Singer, Lianne G; Mathur, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation of lung transplant candidates and recipients plays an important in optimizing physical function prior to transplant and facilitating recovery of function post-transplant. As medical and surgical interventions in lung transplantation have evolved over time, there has been a demographic shift of individuals undergoing lung transplantation including older individuals, those with multiple co-morbidites, and candidates with respiratory failure requiring bridging to transplantation. These changes have an impact on the rehabilitation needs of lung transplant candidates and recipients. This review provides a practical approach to rehabilitation based on research and clinical practice at our transplant centre. It focuses on functional assessment and exercise prescription during an uncomplicated and complicated clinical course in the pre-transplant, early and late post-transplant periods. The target audience includes clinicians involved in pre- and post-transplant patient care and rehabilitation researchers. PMID:27683630

  7. Information Technology Support for Clinical Genetic Testing within an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Samuel; Mahanta, Lisa; Ros, Lei Lei; Clark, Eugene; Babb, Lawrence; Oates, Michael; Rehm, Heidi; Lebo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Academic medical centers require many interconnected systems to fully support genetic testing processes. We provide an overview of the end-to-end support that has been established surrounding a genetic testing laboratory within our environment, including both laboratory and clinician facing infrastructure. We explain key functions that we have found useful in the supporting systems. We also consider ways that this infrastructure could be enhanced to enable deeper assessment of genetic test results in both the laboratory and clinic. PMID:26805890

  8. The Human Hazard Function: A Method for Extracting Parametric Information from Clinical Trial Mortality Data

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, John D.

    1984-01-01

    There is a lack of specific knowledge of the time-course of the human hazard function under the burden of aging, disease and treatment, despite the profusion of observations on mortality emerging from long-term clinical trials. The method developed is designed to test any parametric hazard function model against the censored survival data of clinical trials. Using data obtained over a 7-year period from a subpopulation of a hypertension trial, 1- and 2-parameter models were rejected, but an adequate fit was obtained with a specific 3-parameter function, the Gompertz-Makeham equation. Already validated in actuarial work, this equation is a promising candidate for a general-purpose hazard function for clinical populations. Its applicability has been explained in reliability-theoretic terms by a multicomponent model of the human system, where almost all components are wearing-out (aging). However, it fails to explain why effective treatment right-shifts the aging curve but leaves the rate of aging invariant. A further evolution of the multicomponent model is required, incorporating more detailed biological structure into components, specifically in terms of the cellular theory of aging.

  9. The reliability of manual reporting of clinical events in an anesthesia information management system (AIMS).

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Pruitt, Eric Y; Cook-Sather, Scott D; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2012-12-01

    Manual incident reports significantly under-report adverse clinical events when compared with automated recordings of intraoperative data. Our goal was to determine the reliability of AIMS and CQI reports of adverse clinical events that had been witnessed and recorded by research assistants. The AIMS and CQI records of 995 patients aged 2-12 years were analyzed to determine if anesthesia providers had properly documented the emesis events that were observed and recorded by research assistants who were present in the operating room at the time of induction. Research assistants recorded eight cases of emesis during induction that were confirmed with the attending anesthesiologist at the time of induction. AIMS yielded a sensitivity of 38 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 8.5-75.5 %), while the sensitivity of CQI reporting was 13 % (95 % CI 0.3-52.7 %). The low sensitivities of the AIMS and CQI reports suggest that user-reported AIMS and CQI data do not reliably include significant clinical events. PMID:22618299

  10. Prediction of postoperative liver regeneration from clinical information using a data-led mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N.; Ishii, Masatsugu; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Hirokawa, Fumitoshi; MacArthur, Ben D.; Nakamura, Akira; Haeno, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Although the capacity of the liver to recover its size after resection has enabled extensive liver resection, post-hepatectomy liver failure remains one of the most lethal complications of liver resection. Therefore, it is clinically important to discover reliable predictive factors after resection. In this study, we established a novel mathematical framework which described post-hepatectomy liver regeneration in each patient by incorporating quantitative clinical data. Using the model fitting to the liver volumes in series of computed tomography of 123 patients, we estimated liver regeneration rates. From the estimation, we found patients were divided into two groups: i) patients restored the liver to its original size (Group 1, n = 99); and ii) patients experienced a significant reduction in size (Group 2, n = 24). From discriminant analysis in 103 patients with full clinical variables, the prognosis of patients in terms of liver recovery was successfully predicted in 85–90% of patients. We further validated the accuracy of our model prediction using a validation cohort (prediction = 84–87%, n = 39). Our interdisciplinary approach provides qualitative and quantitative insights into the dynamics of liver regeneration. A key strength is to provide better prediction in patients who had been judged as acceptable for resection by current pragmatic criteria. PMID:27694914

  11. The reliability of manual reporting of clinical events in an anesthesia information management system (AIMS).

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Pruitt, Eric Y; Cook-Sather, Scott D; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2012-12-01

    Manual incident reports significantly under-report adverse clinical events when compared with automated recordings of intraoperative data. Our goal was to determine the reliability of AIMS and CQI reports of adverse clinical events that had been witnessed and recorded by research assistants. The AIMS and CQI records of 995 patients aged 2-12 years were analyzed to determine if anesthesia providers had properly documented the emesis events that were observed and recorded by research assistants who were present in the operating room at the time of induction. Research assistants recorded eight cases of emesis during induction that were confirmed with the attending anesthesiologist at the time of induction. AIMS yielded a sensitivity of 38 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 8.5-75.5 %), while the sensitivity of CQI reporting was 13 % (95 % CI 0.3-52.7 %). The low sensitivities of the AIMS and CQI reports suggest that user-reported AIMS and CQI data do not reliably include significant clinical events.

  12. Using circulating tumor cells to inform on prostate cancer biology and clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Gregory, Simon G.; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Armstrong, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Substantial advances in the molecular biology of prostate cancer have led to the approval of multiple new systemic agents to treat men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). These treatments encompass androgen receptor directed therapies, immunotherapies, bone targeting radiopharmaceuticals and cytotoxic chemotherapies. There is, however, great heterogeneity in the degree of patient benefit with these agents, thus fueling the need to develop predictive biomarkers that are able to rationally guide therapy. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have the potential to provide an assessment of tumor-specific biomarkers through a non-invasive, repeatable “liquid biopsy” of a patient’s cancer at a given point in time. CTCs have been extensively studied in men with mCRPC, where CTC enumeration using the Cellsearch® method has been validated and FDA approved to be used in conjunction with other clinical parameters as a prognostic biomarker in metastatic prostate cancer. In addition to enumeration, more sophisticated molecular profiling of CTCs is now feasible and may provide more clinical utility as it may reflect tumor evolution within an individual particularly under the pressure of systemic therapies. Here, we review technologies used to detect and characterize CTCs, and the potential biological and clinical utility of CTC molecular profiling in men with metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26079252

  13. Integration of Symptom Ratings from Multiple Informants in ADHD Diagnosis: A Psychometric Model with Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Michelle M.; Schimmack, Ulrich; Nikolas, Molly; Nigg, Joel T.

    2015-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder—Fifth Edition explicitly requires that Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms should be apparent across settings, taking into account reports from multiple informants. Yet, it provides no guidelines how information from different raters should be combined in ADHD diagnosis. We examined the validity of different approaches using structural equation modeling (SEM) for multiple-informant data. Participants were 725 children, 6 to 17 years old, and their primary caregivers and teachers, recruited from the community and completing a thorough research-based diagnostic assessment, including a clinician-administered diagnostic interview, parent and teacher standardized rating scales and cognitive testing. A best-estimate ADHD diagnosis was generated by a diagnostic team. An SEM model demonstrated convergent validity among raters. We found relatively weak symptom-specific agreement among raters, suggesting that a general average scoring algorithm is preferable to symptom-specific scoring algorithms such as the “or” and “and” algorithms. Finally, to illustrate the validity of this approach, we show that averaging makes it possible to reduce the number of items from 18 items to 8 items without a significant decrease in validity. In conclusion, information from multiple raters increases the validity of ADHD diagnosis, and averaging appears to be the optimal way to integrate information from multiple raters. PMID:25730162

  14. Information is Information”: A public perspective on incidental findings in clinical and research genome-based testing

    PubMed Central

    Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Driessnack, Martha; Hanish, Alyson; Johnson, Vanessa A.; Shah, Lisa L.; Simon, Christian M.; Williams, Janet K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential for genomic incidental findings is increasing with the use of genome-based testing. At the same time approaches to clinical decision making are shifting to shared decision-making models involving both the healthcare community and the public. The public’s voice has been nearly absent in discussions on managing incidental findings. Methods We conducted 9 focus groups and 9 interviews (N=63) with a broad cross-section of lay public groups to elucidate public viewpoints on incidental findings that could occur as a result of genome-based testing in clinical and research situations. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Participants wanted incidental findings disclosed to them whether or not these were clinical or research findings. Participants used different terms to define and describe incidental findings; they wanted to know that incidental findings are possible and be given a choice to learn about them. Personal utility was an important reason for disclosure, and participants believed that managing information is a shared responsibility between professionals and themselves. Conclusion Broad public input is needed in order to understand and incorporate the public’s perspective on management of incidental findings as disclosure guidelines and policies are developed in clinical and research settings. PMID:23590238

  15. ROM Plus(®): accurate point-of-care detection of ruptured fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    McQuivey, Ross W; Block, Jon E

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of fetal membranes is imperative to inform and guide gestational age-specific interventions to optimize perinatal outcomes and reduce the risk of serious complications, including preterm delivery and infections. The ROM Plus is a rapid, point-of-care, qualitative immunochromatographic diagnostic test that uses a unique monoclonal/polyclonal antibody approach to detect two different proteins found in amniotic fluid at high concentrations: alpha-fetoprotein and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1. Clinical study results have uniformly demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy and performance characteristics with this point-of-care test that exceeds conventional clinical testing with external laboratory evaluation. The description, indications for use, procedural steps, and laboratory and clinical characterization of this assay are presented in this article. PMID:27274316

  16. Dental health services research utilizing comprehensive clinical databases and information technology.

    PubMed

    Hayden, W J

    1997-01-01

    Marketplace pressures for accountability in dentistry have made clear dental delivery systems' weaknesses in information generation, management, and analysis methods. Without this type of information, dentistry is unable to quantify and document the outcomes of the dental care services it provides. The Pew Health Professions Commission and the Institute of Medicine both suggest that dental schools should be among the leaders in the development and teaching of dental information capabilities, as well as the source of fundamental dental health services research. This paper argues that dental schools are the logical location for the development of valid, reliable, and acceptable health services research methods and databases. It describes the development of an insurance claims database to demonstrate the types of investigations possible, as well as the weaknesses and shortcomings of pure administrative data. PMID:9024342

  17. Nurses' Information Seeking Behavior for Clinical Practice: A Case Study in a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Sarbaz, Masoumeh; Kimiafar, Khalil; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    We used a valid questionnaire to survey Iranian nurses' seeking information behavior and their confidence on different information sources. The frequently used sources were Internet" and "personal experiences" (54.8% and 48.2% respectively). "English medical journals" (61.9%) and "English textbooks" (41.3%) were the least frequently used sources. Nurses felt high confidence in sources such as "International instructions/guidelines" (58.6%) and "English medical textbooks" (50.4%). The main reasons for selecting sources were easy accessibility, being up to date and reliability. Google, Pubmed and Up to Date were the most used electronic sources. In addition, there were differences in terms of using some of these resources and nurse' age and gender. In developing information sources for nurses, factors such as reliability level, availability, and updatedness of resources should be more emphasized.

  18. Nurses' Information Seeking Behavior for Clinical Practice: A Case Study in a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Sarbaz, Masoumeh; Kimiafar, Khalil; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    We used a valid questionnaire to survey Iranian nurses' seeking information behavior and their confidence on different information sources. The frequently used sources were Internet" and "personal experiences" (54.8% and 48.2% respectively). "English medical journals" (61.9%) and "English textbooks" (41.3%) were the least frequently used sources. Nurses felt high confidence in sources such as "International instructions/guidelines" (58.6%) and "English medical textbooks" (50.4%). The main reasons for selecting sources were easy accessibility, being up to date and reliability. Google, Pubmed and Up to Date were the most used electronic sources. In addition, there were differences in terms of using some of these resources and nurse' age and gender. In developing information sources for nurses, factors such as reliability level, availability, and updatedness of resources should be more emphasized. PMID:27332155

  19. Information disclosure in clinical informed consent: “reasonable” patient’s perception of norm in high-context communication culture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The current doctrine of informed consent for clinical care has been developed in cultures characterized by low-context communication and monitoring-style coping. There are scarce empirical data on patients’ norm perception of information disclosure in other cultures. Methods We surveyed 470 adults who were planning to undergo or had recently undergone a written informed consent-requiring procedure in a tertiary healthcare hospital in Saudi Arabia. Perceptions of norm and current practice were explored using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly agree with disclosure) and 30 information items in 7 domains: practitioners’ details, benefits, risks, complications’ management, available alternatives, procedure’s description, and post-procedure’s issues. Results Respondents’ mean (SD) age was 38.4 (12.5); 50.2% were males, 57.2% had ≥ college education, and 37.9% had undergone a procedure. According to norm perception, strongly agree/agree responses ranged from 98.0% (major benefits) to 50.5% (assistant/trainee’s name). Overall, items related to benefits and post-procedure’s issues were ranked better (more agreeable) than items related to risks and available alternatives. Ranking scores were better in post-procedure respondents for 4 (13.3%) items (p < 0.001 to 0.001) and in males for 8 (26.7%) items (p = 0.008 to <0.001). Older age was associated with better ranking scores for 3 (10.0%) items and worse for one (p < 0.001 to 0.006). According to current practice perception, strongly agree/agree responses ranged from 93.3% (disclosure of procedure’s name) to 13.9% (lead practitioner’s training place), ranking scores were worse for all items compared to norm perception (p < 0.001), and post-procedure status, younger age, and lower educational level were associated with better ranking scores for 15 (50.0%), 12 (40.0%), and 4 (13.3%) items, respectively (p < 0.001 to 0.009). Conclusions 1) even in an overall high

  20. SPLASH: Accurate OH maser positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Andrew; Gomez, Jose F.; Jones, Paul; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Dawson, Joanne; Ellingsen, Simon; Breen, Shari; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Courtney

    2013-10-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that may trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. In this proposal, we request ATCA time to follow up OH maser candidates. This will give us accurate (~10") positions of the masers, which can be compared to other maser positions from HOPS, MMB and MALT-45 and will provide full polarisation measurements towards a sample of OH masers that have not been observed in MAGMO.

  1. An information retrieval service to support clinical decision-making at the point of care.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, F; Gardner, M; van Rijsbergen, K

    1999-01-01

    The information retrieval systems currently available in general practice, such as Medline, and web search engines are passive and relatively difficult to access during consultations. Emergent technologies, including the National Electronic Library for Health, offer opportunities for more active decision support. We examine the extent to which information retrieval could support primary care consultations by examining the impact of the new technology at different stages of the consultation. We advocate a system whereby professional organisations concerned with quality of care, such as the Royal College of General Practitioners, might contribute the the process. PMID:10824349

  2. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  3. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  4. Multi-National, Multi-Institutional Analysis of Clinical Decision Support Data Needs to Inform Development of the HL7 Virtual Medical Record Standard

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Strasberg, Howard R.; Hulse, Nathan; Curtis, Clayton; Cimino, James J.; Rocha, Beatriz H.; Maviglia, Saverio; Fry, Emory; Scherpbier, Harm J.; Huser, Vojtech; Redington, Patrick K.; Vawdrey, David K.; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Price, Morgan; Weber, Jens H.; White, Thomas; Hughes, Kevin S.; McClay, James C.; Wood, Carla; Eckert, Karen; Bolte, Scott; Shields, David; Tattam, Peter R.; Scott, Peter; Liu, Zhijing; McIntyre, Andrew K.

    2010-01-01

    An important barrier to the widespread dissemination of clinical decision support (CDS) is the heterogeneity of information models and terminologies used across healthcare institutions, health information systems, and CDS resources such as knowledge bases. To address this problem, the Health Level 7 (HL7) Virtual Medical Record project (an open, international standards development effort) is developing community consensus on the clinical information exchanged between CDS engines and clinical information systems. As a part of this effort, the HL7 CDS Work Group embarked on a multinational, collaborative effort to identify a representative set of clinical data elements required for CDS. Based on an analysis of CDS systems from 20 institutions representing 4 nations, 131 data elements were identified as being currently utilized for CDS. These findings will inform the development of the emerging HL7 Virtual Medical Record standard and will facilitate the achievement of scalable, standards-based CDS. PMID:21347004

  5. Multi-National, Multi-Institutional Analysis of Clinical Decision Support Data Needs to Inform Development of the HL7 Virtual Medical Record Standard.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Strasberg, Howard R; Hulse, Nathan; Curtis, Clayton; Cimino, James J; Rocha, Beatriz H; Maviglia, Saverio; Fry, Emory; Scherpbier, Harm J; Huser, Vojtech; Redington, Patrick K; Vawdrey, David K; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Price, Morgan; Weber, Jens H; White, Thomas; Hughes, Kevin S; McClay, James C; Wood, Carla; Eckert, Karen; Bolte, Scott; Shields, David; Tattam, Peter R; Scott, Peter; Liu, Zhijing; McIntyre, Andrew K

    2010-11-13

    An important barrier to the widespread dissemination of clinical decision support (CDS) is the heterogeneity of information models and terminologies used across healthcare institutions, health information systems, and CDS resources such as knowledge bases. To address this problem, the Health Level 7 (HL7) Virtual Medical Record project (an open, international standards development effort) is developing community consensus on the clinical information exchanged between CDS engines and clinical information systems. As a part of this effort, the HL7 CDS Work Group embarked on a multinational, collaborative effort to identify a representative set of clinical data elements required for CDS. Based on an analysis of CDS systems from 20 institutions representing 4 nations, 131 data elements were identified as being currently utilized for CDS. These findings will inform the development of the emerging HL7 Virtual Medical Record standard and will facilitate the achievement of scalable, standards-based CDS.

  6. An overview of translationally informed treatments for PTSD: animal models of Pavlovian fear conditioning to human clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Mallory E.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) manifests after exposure to a traumatic event and is characterized by avoidance/numbing, intrusive symptoms and flashbacks, mood and cognitive disruptions, and hyperarousal/reactivity symptoms. These symptoms reflect dysregulation of the fear system likely caused by poor fear inhibition/extinction, increased generalization, and/or enhanced consolidation or acquisition of fear. These phenotypes can be modeled in animal subjects using Pavlovian fear conditioning, allowing investigation of the underlying neurobiology of normative and pathological fear. Pre-clinical studies reveal a number of neurotransmitter systems and circuits critical for aversive learning and memory, which have informed the development of therapies used in human clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the evidence for a number of established and emerging pharmacotherapies and device-based treatments for PTSD that have been developed via a bench to bedside translational model. PMID:26238379

  7. Utilization of information and communication technology (ICT) among sexually transmitted disease clinics attendees with coexisting drinking problems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol misuse remains a major risk factor for contracting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) not typically addressed in STD clinic settings. Information and communication technology (ICT) can offer new avenues to deliver evidence-based screening and treatment for problematic drinking, however, few data exists regarding the utilization of ICT among STD clinic attendees with coexisting drinking problems. The objectives of this study are to identify STD clinics attendees with hazardous drinking, to examine socio-demographic factors associated with ICT use, and to explore individuals’ interests in engaging in ICT-based health interventions. Methods Cross-sectional questionnaires examining alcohol consumption and ICT use were administered to 396 persons attending two non-urban STD clinics. Descriptive statistics for ICT use were calculated for both hazardous drinkers and the entire sample. Multivariable logistic regression models among hazardous drinkers identified factors significantly associated with use of each kind of ICT. Results The mean age of the 396 participants was 25 years, 66% were females and 60% were African-Americans. One third of the sample met the criteria of hazardous drinking. ICT use in hazardous drinkers included 94% reporting having internet access at least monthly, 82% reporting having an email account, 85% reporting currently owning a cell phone, and 91% reporting use of any cell phone application. More than two thirds (73%) of hazardous drinkers were willing to play health-related video games during clinic waiting time, slightly higher than the entire sample (69%). Multivariable analyses indicated that younger age were significantly related to monthly internet use, and multifunction cell phone use, while being males and younger age were significantly associated with monthly video game playing. Conclusions Our study demonstrates commonality of ICT use among STD clinic attendees with hazardous drinking, indicating the viability of

  8. Information Resources in Clinical Medicine: Family Practice, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Surgery, Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwank, Jean; Allen, Joyce

    Designed for beginning health science librarians, this continuing education course syllabus presents a guide to information resources for answering physicians' questions about patient care. Sources from standard core lists, such as the Alfred Brandon list, are highlighted and described, along with additional titles. General resources covered…

  9. 77 FR 56846 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... tests) are ``simple'' and have ``an insignificant risk of an erroneous result'' under CLIA (69 FR 22849... tests that demonstrate the accuracy of the test in the hands of intended operators; and statistical... of FDA's functions, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) the...

  10. Temporal Information Processing as a Basis for Auditory Comprehension: Clinical Evidence from Aphasic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oron, Anna; Szymaszek, Aneta; Szelag, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Temporal information processing (TIP) underlies many aspects of cognitive functions like language, motor control, learning, memory, attention, etc. Millisecond timing may be assessed by sequencing abilities, e.g. the perception of event order. It may be measured with auditory temporal-order-threshold (TOT), i.e. a minimum time gap…

  11. 77 FR 50548 - Agency Information Collection: (PACT Clinical Innovation Study: Engaging Caregivers in the Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... Veterans With Dementia); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration, Department of Veterans... being requested for information needed to improve dementia care for patients and care givers. DATES...: Engaging Caregivers in the Care of Veterans with Dementia, VA Form 10-0537, Appendices a-u. OMB...

  12. Image processing, radiological, and clinical information fusion in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alto, Hilary; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Solaiman, Basel; Desautels, J. E. Leo; MacGregor, J. H.

    2002-03-01

    Screening mammography is the most efficient and cost-effective method available for detecting the signs of early breast cancer in asymptomatic women between the ages of 50 and 69. To improve the detection rate and reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies, many different computer-aided diagnosis techniques have been developed. Many of these techniques use image processing algorithms to automatically segment and classify the images. The decision-making process associated with the evaluation of mammograms is complex and incorporates multiple sources of information from standard medical knowledge and radiology to pathology. The use of this information combined with the results of image processing offers new challenges to the field of data and information fusion. In this paper, we describe the different information sources and their data as well as the framework that is needed to support this type of fusion. A database of breast cancer screening cases forms the basis of the resulting fusion model. The database and decision-level fusion techniques will facilitate unique and specialized approaches for efficient and sophisticated diagnosis of breast cancer.

  13. [Informed consent for standard procedures and for clinical research in paediatric anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Murat, I; Sabourdin, N; Balestrat, E; Louvet, N

    2013-01-01

    This short review is aimed at describing the particularities of consent in paediatric patients. For routine procedures, the consent of one of the parents is required whereas both parents should sign the consent for research protocols. In case of difficulties such as Jehovah witnesses or parental opposite opinions, doctors should ask the question to the judge in charge of protection of children. Consent or at least assent of minors enrolled in research protocols should be obtained provided their maturity is sufficient to understand correctly the purpose of clinical research. PMID:23183134

  14. Revising the ECRIN standard requirements for information technology and data management in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The pilot phase of the ECRIN (European Clinical Research Infrastructure Network) certification programme for European data centres, in late 2011, led to a substantial revision of the original ECRIN standards, completed by June 2012. The pilot phase, the conclusions drawn from it and the revised set of standards are described. Issues concerning the further development of standards and related material are discussed, as are the methods available to best support that development. A strategy is outlined based on short-lived specific task groups, established as necessary by a steering group drawn from ECRIN-ERIC. A final section discusses possible future developments. PMID:23561034

  15. Pathology is a necessary and informative tool in oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Nagtegaal, Iris D; West, Nicholas P; van Krieken, J Han J M; Quirke, Phil

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are essential for the improvement of cancer care. The complexity of modern cancer care and research require careful design, for which input from all disciplines is necessary. Pathologists should play a key role in the design and execution of modern cancer trials, with special attention to the eligibility, stratification and evaluation of response to therapy. In the current review all these aspects are discussed, with examples from colorectal cancer trials. We describe critical issues in biomarker evaluation and development and emphasize the importance of the role of the pathologist in quality control of cancer treatment.

  16. When is an optimization not an optimization? Evaluation of clinical implications of information content (signal-to-noise ratio) in optimization of cardiac resynchronization therapy, and how to measure and maximize it.

    PubMed

    Pabari, Punam A; Willson, Keith; Stegemann, Berthold; van Geldorp, Irene E; Kyriacou, Andreas; Moraldo, Michela; Mayet, Jamil; Hughes, Alun D; Francis, Darrel P

    2011-05-01

    Impact of variability in the measured parameter is rarely considered in designing clinical protocols for optimization of atrioventricular (AV) or interventricular (VV) delay of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). In this article, we approach this question quantitatively using mathematical simulation in which the true optimum is known and examine practical implications using some real measurements. We calculated the performance of any optimization process that selects the pacing setting which maximizes an underlying signal, such as flow or pressure, in the presence of overlying random variability (noise). If signal and noise are of equal size, for a 5-choice optimization (60, 100, 140, 180, 220 ms), replicate AV delay optima are rarely identical but rather scattered with a standard deviation of 45 ms. This scatter was overwhelmingly determined (ρ = -0.975, P < 0.001) by Information Content, [Formula: see text], an expression of signal-to-noise ratio. Averaging multiple replicates improves information content. In real clinical data, at resting, heart rate information content is often only 0.2-0.3; elevated pacing rates can raise information content above 0.5. Low information content (e.g. <0.5) causes gross overestimation of optimization-induced increment in VTI, high false-positive appearance of change in optimum between visits and very wide confidence intervals of individual patient optimum. AV and VV optimization by selecting the setting showing maximum cardiac function can only be accurate if information content is high. Simple steps to reduce noise such as averaging multiple replicates, or to increase signal such as increasing heart rate, can improve information content, and therefore viability, of any optimization process.

  17. CMDX©-based single source information system for simplified quality management and clinical research in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histopathological evaluation of prostatectomy specimens is crucial to decision-making and prediction of patient outcomes in prostate cancer (PCa). Topographical information regarding PCa extension and positive surgical margins (PSM) is essential for clinical routines, quality assessment, and research. However, local hospital information systems (HIS) often do not support the documentation of such information. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of integrating a cMDX-based pathology report including topographical information into the clinical routine with the aims of obtaining data, performing analysis and generating heat maps in a timely manner, while avoiding data redundancy. Methods We analyzed the workflow of the histopathological evaluation documentation process. We then developed a concept for a pathology report based on a cMDX data model facilitating the topographical documentation of PCa and PSM; the cMDX SSIS is implemented within the HIS of University Hospital Muenster. We then generated a heat map of PCa extension and PSM using the data. Data quality was assessed by measuring the data completeness of reports for all cases, as well as the source-to-database error. We also conducted a prospective study to compare our proposed method with recent retrospective and paper-based studies according to the time required for data analysis. Results We identified 30 input fields that were applied to the cMDX-based data model and the electronic report was integrated into the clinical workflow. Between 2010 and 2011, a total of 259 reports were generated with 100% data completeness and a source-to-database error of 10.3 per 10,000 fields. These reports were directly reused for data analysis, and a heat map based on the data was generated. PCa was mostly localized in the peripheral zone of the prostate. The mean relative tumor volume was 16.6%. The most PSM were localized in the apical region of the prostate. In the retrospective study, 1623 paper

  18. How Transdiagnostic Factors of Personality and Psychopathology Can Inform Clinical Assessment and Intervention.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Seijas, Craig; Eaton, Nicholas R; Krueger, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that many mental disorders-mood and anxiety, substance use, and personality psychopathology-are related through relatively few latent transdiagnostic factors. With regard to the comorbidity of personality disorders and common mental disorders, factor structures such as internalizing-externalizing have been replicated in numerous samples, across the life span, and around the globe. One critical feature of transdiagnostic factors is that they serve as a point of intersection between personality and psychopathology, making them particularly relevant phenomena for applied clinical work. Although numerous studies have supported the significance of transdiagnostic factors for research and classification purposes, there has been comparatively less articulation of how such factors might be of benefit to practicing assessment clinicians. Herein, we present an overview of transdiagnostic factor research findings, and we apply these findings to the clinical topics of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. For clinicians as well as researchers, the use of transdiagnostic constructs presents positive implications for efforts to understand, characterize, and ameliorate psychopathology-including its manifestations as personality disorder-in a valid, effective, and efficient way.

  19. Identifying and extracting patient smoking status information from clinical narrative texts in Spanish.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rosa L; Soto, Diego A; Pino, Esteban J

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a system to identify and extract patient's smoking status from clinical narrative text in Spanish. The clinical narrative text was processed using natural language processing techniques, and annotated by four people with a biomedical background. The dataset used for classification had 2,465 documents, each one annotated with one of the four smoking status categories. We used two feature representations: single word token and bigrams. The classification problem was divided in two levels. First recognizing between smoker (S) and non-smoker (NS); second recognizing between current smoker (CS) and past smoker (PS). For each feature representation and classification level, we used two classifiers: Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Bayesian Networks (BN). We split our dataset as follows: a training set containing 66% of the available documents that was used to build classifiers and a test set containing the remaining 34% of the documents that was used to test and evaluate the model. Our results show that SVM together with the bigram representation performed better in both classification levels. For S vs NS classification level performance measures were: ACC=85%, Precision=85%, and Recall=90%. For CS vs PS classification level performance measures were: ACC=87%, Precision=91%, and Recall=94%. PMID:25570550

  20. Magnetocardiograms in clinical medicine: unique information on cardiac ischemia, arrhythmias, and fetal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Satsuki; Yamaguchi, Iwao

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac diseases are the leading cause of death in population. Diagnostic tests to detect cardiac dysfunction at an early stage of the disease are desirable. The major focus has been centered on tests evaluating the perfusion of the heart with imaging techniques or detecting alterations in electrical or mechanical function of the heart. The heart generates magnetic fields that can be detected by body surface mapping utilizing super conducting quantum interference device sensors giving magnetocardiograms (MCGs). The advantages of MCG over traditional electrocardiograms (ECGs) are increased sensitivity to small signals and lack of conductivity in body tissues, presentation of direct component signals and primary currents. This review will highlight the basic principles and recent advantages of MCGs, and the application of MCG in clinical diagnosis, especially in cases whose ECGs are non-diagnostic or not specific, such as detecting baseline shift in ischemic heart disease, noninvasive His potential recording, detection of arrhythmic mechanism defining reentrant circuits vs non reentrant mechanism, diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias and prolongation of QT interval. Areas of future basic and clinical research are also discussed. PMID:15704657

  1. Identifying and extracting patient smoking status information from clinical narrative texts in Spanish.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rosa L; Soto, Diego A; Pino, Esteban J

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a system to identify and extract patient's smoking status from clinical narrative text in Spanish. The clinical narrative text was processed using natural language processing techniques, and annotated by four people with a biomedical background. The dataset used for classification had 2,465 documents, each one annotated with one of the four smoking status categories. We used two feature representations: single word token and bigrams. The classification problem was divided in two levels. First recognizing between smoker (S) and non-smoker (NS); second recognizing between current smoker (CS) and past smoker (PS). For each feature representation and classification level, we used two classifiers: Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Bayesian Networks (BN). We split our dataset as follows: a training set containing 66% of the available documents that was used to build classifiers and a test set containing the remaining 34% of the documents that was used to test and evaluate the model. Our results show that SVM together with the bigram representation performed better in both classification levels. For S vs NS classification level performance measures were: ACC=85%, Precision=85%, and Recall=90%. For CS vs PS classification level performance measures were: ACC=87%, Precision=91%, and Recall=94%.

  2. An Evaluation of a Natural Language Processing Tool for Identifying and Encoding Allergy Information in Emergency Department Clinical Notes

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Foster R.; Plasek, Joseph M.; Lau, Jason J.; Seger, Diane L.; Chang, Frank Y.; Zhou, Li

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) visits due to allergic reactions are common. Allergy information is often recorded in free-text provider notes; however, this domain has not yet been widely studied by the natural language processing (NLP) community. We developed an allergy module built on the MTERMS NLP system to identify and encode food, drug, and environmental allergies and allergic reactions. The module included updates to our lexicon using standard terminologies, and novel disambiguation algorithms. We developed an annotation schema and annotated 400 ED notes that served as a gold standard for comparison to MTERMS output. MTERMS achieved an F-measure of 87.6% for the detection of allergen names and no known allergies, 90% for identifying true reactions in each allergy statement where true allergens were also identified, and 69% for linking reactions to their allergen. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility using NLP to extract and encode allergy information from clinical notes. PMID:25954363

  3. Genetics of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Informing Clinical Conceptualizations and Promoting Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Nicole R.; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of genetic research involving post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). First, we summarize evidence for genetic influences on PTSD from family investigations. Second, we discuss the distinct contributions to our understanding of the genetics of PTSD permitted by twin studies. Finally, we summarize findings from molecular genetic studies, which have the potential to inform our understanding of underlying biological mechanisms for the development of PTSD. PMID:18412098

  4. Readability of informed consent documents (1987-2007) for clinical trials: a linguistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sand, K; Eik-Nes, N L; Loge, J H

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the readability of informed consent documents linguistically and compared old and new ICDs. Twenty ICDs (ten from 1987-1992 and ten from 2006-2007) were included. The Evaluative Linguistic Framework (ELF) was used to analyze the texts. The ELF evaluates the following items: main themes, order of themes, rhetorical functions, the relationship between reader and writer, metadiscourse, headings, expert terminology, and visual aspects. An ICD is considered readable if it achieves the goal of inviting the reader to participate and explaining the implication of participation. The new ICDs were more readable than the old ones, as they were more oriented towards research, contained instructions about how to consent, and provided clear contact information. Aspects that reduced the readability of the new ICDs were the large number of topics, details, and actors presented. The readability of the old ICDs was enhanced by fewer topics, a clear presentation of the involved actors, and brevity. However, their readability was reduced by the inclusion of a vast amount of information about the reader's diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Communicating Cancer Risk Information: The Challenges of Uncertainty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottorff, Joan L.; Ratner, Pamela A.; Johnson, Joy L.; Lovato, Chris Y.; Joab, S. Amanda

    1998-01-01

    Accurate and sensitive communication of cancer-risk information is important. Based on a literature review of 75 research reports, expert opinion papers, and clinical protocols, a synthesis of what is known about the communication of cancer-risk information is presented. Relevance of information to those not tested is discussed. (Author/EMK)

  6. Participants’ understanding of informed consent in clinical trials over three decades: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Thoa, Le Thi Bich; Long, Nguyen Phuoc; Trang, Nguyen Thi Huyen; Hirayama, Kenji; Karbwang, Juntra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the proportion of participants in clinical trials who understand different components of informed consent. Methods Relevant studies were identified by a systematic review of PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar and by manually reviewing reference lists for publications up to October 2013. A meta-analysis of study results was performed using a random-effects model to take account of heterogeneity. Findings The analysis included 103 studies evaluating 135 cohorts of participants. The pooled proportion of participants who understood components of informed consent was 75.8% for freedom to withdraw at any time, 74.7% for the nature of study, 74.7% for the voluntary nature of participation, 74.0% for potential benefits, 69.6% for the study’s purpose, 67.0% for potential risks and side-effects, 66.2% for confidentiality, 64.1% for the availability of alternative treatment if withdrawn, 62.9% for knowing that treatments were being compared, 53.3% for placebo and 52.1% for randomization. Most participants, 62.4%, had no therapeutic misconceptions and 54.9% could name at least one risk. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses identified covariates, such as age, educational level, critical illness, the study phase and location, that significantly affected understanding and indicated that the proportion of participants who understood informed consent had not increased over 30 years. Conclusion The proportion of participants in clinical trials who understood different components of informed consent varied from 52.1% to 75.8%. Investigators could do more to help participants achieve a complete understanding. PMID:25883410

  7. Curvelet-based sampling for accurate and efficient multimodal image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, M. N.; Freiman, M.; Werman, M.; Joskowicz, L.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new non-uniform adaptive sampling method for the estimation of mutual information in multi-modal image registration. The method uses the Fast Discrete Curvelet Transform to identify regions along anatomical curves on which the mutual information is computed. Its main advantages of over other non-uniform sampling schemes are that it captures the most informative regions, that it is invariant to feature shapes, orientations, and sizes, that it is efficient, and that it yields accurate results. Extensive evaluation on 20 validated clinical brain CT images to Proton Density (PD) and T1 and T2-weighted MRI images from the public RIRE database show the effectiveness of our method. Rigid registration accuracy measured at 10 clinical targets and compared to ground truth measurements yield a mean target registration error of 0.68mm(std=0.4mm) for CT-PD and 0.82mm(std=0.43mm) for CT-T2. This is 0.3mm (1mm) more accurate in the average (worst) case than five existing sampling methods. Our method has the lowest registration errors recorded to date for the registration of CT-PD and CT-T2 images in the RIRE website when compared to methods that were tested on at least three patient datasets.

  8. [THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF INFORMATION VALUE OF MAIN CLINICAL CRITERIA USED TO DIAGNOSE OF BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, A V; Murtazina, Z A; Markusheva, T V; Mavzutov, A R

    2015-05-01

    The bacterial vaginosis is one of the most frequent causes of women visiting gynecologist. The diagnostics of bacterial vaginosis is predominantly based on Amsel criteria (1983). Nowadays, the objectivity of these criteria is disputed more often. The analysis of excretion of mucous membranes of posterolateral fornix of vagina was applied to 640 women with clinical diagnosis bacterial vaginosis. The application of light microscopy to mounts of excretion confirmed in laboratory way the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis in 100 (15.63%) women. The complaints of burning and unpleasant smell and the Amsel criterion of detection of "key cells" against the background of pH > 4.5 were established as statistically significant for bacterial vaginosis. According study data, the occurrence of excretions has no statistical reliable obligation for differentiation of bacterial vaginosis form other inflammatory pathological conditions of female reproductive sphere. At the same time, detection of "key cells" in mount reliably correlated with bacterial vaginosis.

  9. Better informed in clinical practice - a brief overview of dental informatics.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P A; Harper, J; Dunne, S

    2008-03-22

    Uptake of dental informatics has been hampered by technical and user issues. Innovative systems have been developed, but usability issues have affected many. Advances in technology and artificial intelligence are now producing clinically useful systems, although issues still remain with adapting computer interfaces to the dental practice working environment. A dental electronic health record has become a priority in many countries, including the UK. However, experience shows that any dental electronic health record (EHR) system cannot be subordinate to, or a subset of, a medical record. Such a future dental EHR is likely to incorporate integrated care pathways. Future best dental practice will increasingly depend on computer-based support tools, although disagreement remains about the effectiveness of current support tools. Over the longer term, future dental informatics tools will incorporate dynamic, online evidence-based medicine (EBM) tools, and promise more adaptive, patient-focused and efficient dental care with educational advantages in training. PMID:18356882

  10. Informing sequential clinical decision-making through reinforcement learning: an empirical study

    PubMed Central

    Shortreed, Susan M.; Laber, Eric; Lizotte, Daniel J.; Stroup, T. Scott; Pineau, Joelle; Murphy, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights the role that reinforcement learning can play in the optimization of treatment policies for chronic illnesses. Before applying any off-the-shelf reinforcement learning methods in this setting, we must first tackle a number of challenges. We outline some of these challenges and present methods for overcoming them. First, we describe a multiple imputation approach to overcome the problem of missing data. Second, we discuss the use of function approximation in the context of a highly variable observation set. Finally, we discuss approaches to summarizing the evidence in the data for recommending a particular action and quantifying the uncertainty around the Q-function of the recommended policy. We present the results of applying these methods to real clinical trial data of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:21799585

  11. From Value Assessment to Value Cocreation: Informing Clinical Decision-Making with Medical Claims Data.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Steven; Varvel, Stephen; Sasinowski, Maciek; Burke, James P

    2016-09-01

    Big data and advances in analytical processes represent an opportunity for the healthcare industry to make better evidence-based decisions on the value generated by various tests, procedures, and interventions. Value-based reimbursement is the process of identifying and compensating healthcare providers based on whether their services improve quality of care without increasing cost of care or maintain quality of care while decreasing costs. In this article, we motivate and illustrate the potential opportunities for payers and providers to collaborate and evaluate the clinical and economic efficacy of different healthcare services. We conduct a case study of a firm that offers advanced biomarker and disease state management services for cardiovascular and cardiometabolic conditions. A value-based analysis that comprised a retrospective case/control cohort design was conducted, and claims data for over 7000 subjects who received these services were compared to a matched control cohort. Study subjects were commercial and Medicare Advantage enrollees with evidence of CHD, diabetes, or a related condition. Analysis of medical claims data showed a lower proportion of patients who received biomarker testing and disease state management services experienced a MI (p < 0.01) or diabetic complications (p < 0.001). No significant increase in cost of care was found between the two cohorts. Our results illustrate the opportunity healthcare payers such as Medicare and commercial insurance companies have in terms of identifying value-creating healthcare interventions. However, payers and providers also need to pursue system integration efforts to further automate the identification and dissemination of clinically and economically efficacious treatment plans to ensure at-risk patients receive the treatments and interventions that will benefit them the most. PMID:27642718

  12. From Value Assessment to Value Cocreation: Informing Clinical Decision-Making with Medical Claims Data.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Steven; Varvel, Stephen; Sasinowski, Maciek; Burke, James P

    2016-09-01

    Big data and advances in analytical processes represent an opportunity for the healthcare industry to make better evidence-based decisions on the value generated by various tests, procedures, and interventions. Value-based reimbursement is the process of identifying and compensating healthcare providers based on whether their services improve quality of care without increasing cost of care or maintain quality of care while decreasing costs. In this article, we motivate and illustrate the potential opportunities for payers and providers to collaborate and evaluate the clinical and economic efficacy of different healthcare services. We conduct a case study of a firm that offers advanced biomarker and disease state management services for cardiovascular and cardiometabolic conditions. A value-based analysis that comprised a retrospective case/control cohort design was conducted, and claims data for over 7000 subjects who received these services were compared to a matched control cohort. Study subjects were commercial and Medicare Advantage enrollees with evidence of CHD, diabetes, or a related condition. Analysis of medical claims data showed a lower proportion of patients who received biomarker testing and disease state management services experienced a MI (p < 0.01) or diabetic complications (p < 0.001). No significant increase in cost of care was found between the two cohorts. Our results illustrate the opportunity healthcare payers such as Medicare and commercial insurance companies have in terms of identifying value-creating healthcare interventions. However, payers and providers also need to pursue system integration efforts to further automate the identification and dissemination of clinically and economically efficacious treatment plans to ensure at-risk patients receive the treatments and interventions that will benefit them the most.

  13. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  14. Does kinematics add meaningful information to clinical assessment in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation? A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bigoni, Matteo; Baudo, Silvia; Cimolin, Veronica; Cau, Nicola; Galli, Manuela; Pianta, Lucia; Tacchini, Elena; Capodaglio, Paolo; Mauro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this case study were to: (a) quantify the impairment and activity restriction of the upper limb in a hemiparetic patient; (b) quantitatively evaluate rehabilitation program effectiveness; and (c) discuss whether more clinically meaningful information can be gained with the use of kinematic analysis in addition to clinical assessment. The rehabilitation program consisted of the combined use of different traditional physiotherapy techniques, occupational therapy sessions, and the so-called task-oriented approach. [Subject and Methods] Subject was a one hemiplegic patient. The patient was assessed at the beginning and after 1 month of daily rehabilitation using the Medical Research Council scale, Nine Hole Peg Test, Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, and Hand Grip Dynamometer test as well as a kinematic analysis using an optoelectronic system. [Results] After treatment, significant improvements were evident in terms of total movement duration, movement completion velocity, and some smoothness parameters. [Conclusion] Our case report showed that the integration of clinical assessment with kinematic evaluation appears to be useful for quantitatively assessing performance changes.

  15. Does kinematics add meaningful information to clinical assessment in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation? A case report.

    PubMed

    Bigoni, Matteo; Baudo, Silvia; Cimolin, Veronica; Cau, Nicola; Galli, Manuela; Pianta, Lucia; Tacchini, Elena; Capodaglio, Paolo; Mauro, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this case study were to: (a) quantify the impairment and activity restriction of the upper limb in a hemiparetic patient; (b) quantitatively evaluate rehabilitation program effectiveness; and (c) discuss whether more clinically meaningful information can be gained with the use of kinematic analysis in addition to clinical assessment. The rehabilitation program consisted of the combined use of different traditional physiotherapy techniques, occupational therapy sessions, and the so-called task-oriented approach. [Subject and Methods] Subject was a one hemiplegic patient. The patient was assessed at the beginning and after 1 month of daily rehabilitation using the Medical Research Council scale, Nine Hole Peg Test, Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, and Hand Grip Dynamometer test as well as a kinematic analysis using an optoelectronic system. [Results] After treatment, significant improvements were evident in terms of total movement duration, movement completion velocity, and some smoothness parameters. [Conclusion] Our case report showed that the integration of clinical assessment with kinematic evaluation appears to be useful for quantitatively assessing performance changes. PMID:27630445

  16. Does kinematics add meaningful information to clinical assessment in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation? A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bigoni, Matteo; Baudo, Silvia; Cimolin, Veronica; Cau, Nicola; Galli, Manuela; Pianta, Lucia; Tacchini, Elena; Capodaglio, Paolo; Mauro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this case study were to: (a) quantify the impairment and activity restriction of the upper limb in a hemiparetic patient; (b) quantitatively evaluate rehabilitation program effectiveness; and (c) discuss whether more clinically meaningful information can be gained with the use of kinematic analysis in addition to clinical assessment. The rehabilitation program consisted of the combined use of different traditional physiotherapy techniques, occupational therapy sessions, and the so-called task-oriented approach. [Subject and Methods] Subject was a one hemiplegic patient. The patient was assessed at the beginning and after 1 month of daily rehabilitation using the Medical Research Council scale, Nine Hole Peg Test, Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, and Hand Grip Dynamometer test as well as a kinematic analysis using an optoelectronic system. [Results] After treatment, significant improvements were evident in terms of total movement duration, movement completion velocity, and some smoothness parameters. [Conclusion] Our case report showed that the integration of clinical assessment with kinematic evaluation appears to be useful for quantitatively assessing performance changes. PMID:27630445

  17. Evaluating the quality of informed consent and contemporary clinical practices by medical doctors in South Africa: An empirical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Informed consent is a legal and ethical doctrine derived from the principle of respect for autonomy. Generally two rights derived from autonomy are accorded legal protection. The constitutional right to bodily integrity followed by the right to bodily well-being, protected by professional negligence rules. Therefore healthcare professionals treating patients' without valid consent may be guilty of infringing patients' rights. Many challenges are experienced by doctors obtaining informed consent in complex multicultural societies like South Africa. These include different cultural ethos, multilingualism, poverty, education, unfamiliarity with libertarian rights based autonomy, and power asymmetry between doctors and patients. All of which could impact on the ability of doctors to obtain legally valid informed consent. Methods The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the quality of informed consent obtained by doctors practicing in South Africa is consistent with international ethical standards and local regulations. Responses from 946 participants including doctors, nurses and patients was analyzed, using a semi-structured self-administered questionnaire and person triangulation in selected public hospitals in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Results The median age of 168 doctors participating was 30 years with 51% females, 28% interns, 16% medical officers, 26% registrars, 30% consultant/specialists. A broad range of clinical specialties were represented. Challenges to informed consent practice include language difficulties, lack of interpreters, workload, and time constraints. Doctors spent 5-10 minutes on consent, disclosed most information required to patients, however knowledge of essential local laws was inadequate. Informed consent aggregate scores (ICAS) showed that interns/registrars scored lower than consultants/specialists. ICAS scores were statistically significant by specialty (p = 0.005), with radiologists and anaesthetists

  18. Effects of an intervention addressing information, motivation, and behavioral skills on HIV care adherence in a southern clinic cohort.

    PubMed

    Konkle-Parker, Deborah J; Amico, K Rivet; McKinney, Venetra E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that subtherapeutic appointment adherence and medication adherence are associated with worse clinical outcomes for people living with HIV disease. Thus, poor appointment and medication adherence diminish individual and community HIV control and transmission. Yet not enough is known about interventions that can improve retention in HIV care. The purpose of this study was to test an intervention to improve retention and/or medication adherence in a public clinic in the Deep South. One hundred participants with retention or medication adherence difficulties were randomized to either a six-month intervention or usual care, and followed longitudinally for one year. The intervention was multidimensional, based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model. The intervention addressed information about HIV and the importance of retention/adherence, motivation to be retained and/or adhere to medications, and the behavioral skills needed to manage and maintain these healthy behaviors in a combination of face-to-face and telephone sessions. The proportion of those with at least one visit in each four-month block (third) of the year increased in those with minimal exposure to the intervention (three out of eight intervention contacts) as compared to those with less intervention exposure (p = 0.098). Those with at least this minimal exposure averaged a significantly higher number of thirds that included a clinic visit as compared to those with less intervention exposure (p = 0.013). The intervention did not demonstrate a significant effect on medication adherence, though this is contradictory to a previous study testing a version of this intervention designed to address only medication adherence. Further study to increase uptake of the intervention is needed to increase its efficacy.

  19. Full impact of laboratory information system requires direct use by clinical staff: cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sonya; Contreras, Carmen; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Asencios, Luis; Kim, Jihoon; Rodriguez, Pablo; Cegielski, Peter; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the time to communicate laboratory results to health centers (HCs) between the e-Chasqui web-based information system and the pre-existing paper-based system. Methods Cluster randomized controlled trial in 78 HCs in Peru. In the intervention group, 12 HCs had web access to results via e-Chasqui (point-of-care HCs) and forwarded results to 17 peripheral HCs. In the control group, 22 point-of-care HCs received paper results directly and forwarded them to 27 peripheral HCs. Baseline data were collected for 15 months. Post-randomization data were collected for at least 2 years. Comparisons were made between intervention and control groups, stratified by point-of-care versus peripheral HCs. Results For point-of-care HCs, the intervention group took less time to receive drug susceptibility tests (DSTs) (median 9 vs 16 days, p<0.001) and culture results (4 vs 8 days, p<0.001) and had a lower proportion of ‘late’ DSTs taking >60 days to arrive (p<0.001) than the control. For peripheral HCs, the intervention group had similar communication times for DST (median 22 vs 19 days, p=0.30) and culture (10 vs 9 days, p=0.10) results, as well as proportion of ‘late’ DSTs (p=0.57) compared with the control. Conclusions Only point-of-care HCs with direct access to the e-Chasqui information system had reduced communication times and fewer results with delays of >2 months. Peripheral HCs had no benefits from the system. This suggests that health establishments should have point-of-care access to reap the benefits of electronic laboratory reporting. PMID:21113076

  20. Non-targeted analysis of electronics waste by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry: Using accurate mass information and mass defect analysis to explore the data.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Masaaki; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Tao, Qingping; Hang, Jiliang; Wu, Zhanpin; Dane, A John; Cody, Robert B

    2015-05-22

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) offer the best possible separation of their respective techniques. Recent commercialization of combined GC×GC-HRMS systems offers new possibilities for the analysis of complex mixtures. However, such experiments yield enormous data sets that require new informatics tools to facilitate the interpretation of the rich information content. This study reports on the analysis of dust obtained from an electronics recycling facility by using GC×GC in combination with a new high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. New software tools for (non-traditional) Kendrick mass defect analysis were developed in this research and greatly aided in the identification of compounds containing chlorine and bromine, elements that feature in most persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In essence, the mass defect plot serves as a visual aid from which halogenated compounds are recognizable on the basis of their mass defect and isotope patterns. Mass chromatograms were generated based on specific ions identified in the plots as well as region of the plot predominantly occupied by halogenated contaminants. Tentative identification was aided by database searches, complementary electron-capture negative ionization experiments and elemental composition determinations from the exact mass data. These included known and emerging flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromobenzene, tetrabromo bisphenol A and tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), as well as other legacy contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs).