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Sample records for accurate collision detection

  1. Detecting Cancer Quickly and Accurately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul; McDonald, Anthony; Hendricks, Judy; Copeland, Guild; Hunter, John; Akhil, Ohmar; Capps, Heather; Curry, Marc; Skirboll, Steve

    2000-03-01

    We present a new technique for high throughput screening of tumor cells in a sensitive nanodevice that has the potential to quickly identify a cell population that has begun the rapid protein synthesis and mitosis characteristic of cancer cell proliferation. Currently, pathologists rely on microscopic examination of cell morphology using century-old staining methods that are labor-intensive, time-consuming and frequently in error. New micro-analytical methods for automated, real time screening without chemical modification are critically needed to advance pathology and improve diagnoses. We have teamed scientists with physicians to create a microlaser biochip (based upon our R&D award winning bio-laser concept)1 which evaluates tumor cells by quantifying their growth kinetics. The key new discovery was demonstrating that the lasing spectra are sensitive to the biomolecular mass in the cell, which changes the speed of light in the laser microcavity. Initial results with normal and cancerous human brain cells show that only a few hundred cells -- the equivalent of a billionth of a liter -- are required to detect abnormal growth. The ability to detect cancer in such a minute tissue sample is crucial for resecting a tumor margin or grading highly localized tumor malignancy. 1. P. L. Gourley, NanoLasers, Scientific American, March 1998, pp. 56-61. This work supported under DOE contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  2. Detecting cancer quickly and accurately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Hendricks, Judy K.; Copeland, G. C.; Hunter, John A.; Akhil, O.; Cheung, D.; Cox, Jimmy D.; Capps, H.; Curry, Mark S.; Skirboll, Steven K.

    2000-03-01

    We present a new technique for high throughput screening of tumor cells in a sensitive nanodevice that has the potential to quickly identify a cell population that has begun the rapid protein synthesis and mitosis characteristic of cancer cell proliferation. Currently, pathologists rely on microscopic examination of cell morphology using century-old staining methods that are labor-intensive, time-consuming and frequently in error. New micro-analytical methods for automated, real time screening without chemical modification are critically needed to advance pathology and improve diagnoses. We have teamed scientists with physicians to create a microlaser biochip (based upon our R&D award winning bio- laser concept) which evaluates tumor cells by quantifying their growth kinetics. The key new discovery was demonstrating that the lasing spectra are sensitive to the biomolecular mass in the cell, which changes the speed of light in the laser microcavity. Initial results with normal and cancerous human brain cells show that only a few hundred cells -- the equivalent of a billionth of a liter -- are required to detect abnormal growth. The ability to detect cancer in such a minute tissue sample is crucial for resecting a tumor margin or grading highly localized tumor malignancy.

  3. Fast swept-volume distance for robust collision detection

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.

    1997-04-01

    The need for collision detection arises in several robotics areas, including motion-planning, online collision avoidance, and simulation. At the heart of most current methods are algorithms for interference detection and/or distance computation. A few recent algorithms and implementations are very fast, but to use them for accurate collision detection, very small step sizes can be necessary, reducing their effective efficiency. We present a fast, implemented technique for doing exact distance computation and interference detection for translationally-swept bodies. For rotationally swept bodies, we adapt this technique to improve accuracy, for any given step size, in distance computation and interference detection. We present preliminary experiments that show that the combination of basic and swept-body calculations holds much promise for faster accurate collision detection.

  4. Collision detection for moving polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Canny, J

    1986-02-01

    We consider the collision-detection problem for a three-dimensional solid object moving among polyhedral obstacles. The configuration space for this problem is six-dimensional, and the traditional representation of the space uses three translational parameters and three angles (typically Euler angles). The constraints between the object and obstacles then involve trigonometric functions. We show that a quaternion representation of rotation yields constraints which are purely algebraic in a seven-dimensional space. By simple manipulation, the constraints may be projected down into a six-dimensional space with no increase in complexity. The algebraic form of the constraints greatly simplifies computation of collision points, and allows us to derive an efficient exact intersection test for an object which is translating and rotating among obstacles. PMID:21869338

  5. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  6. Robust High-Resolution Cloth Using Parallelism, History-Based Collisions and Accurate Friction

    PubMed Central

    Selle, Andrew; Su, Jonathan; Irving, Geoffrey; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we simulate high resolution cloth consisting of up to 2 million triangles which allows us to achieve highly detailed folds and wrinkles. Since the level of detail is also influenced by object collision and self collision, we propose a more accurate model for cloth-object friction. We also propose a robust history-based repulsion/collision framework where repulsions are treated accurately and efficiently on a per time step basis. Distributed memory parallelism is used for both time evolution and collisions and we specifically address Gauss-Seidel ordering of repulsion/collision response. This algorithm is demonstrated by several high-resolution and high-fidelity simulations. PMID:19147895

  7. A collision detection algorithm for telerobotic arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Doan Minh; Bartholomew, Maureen Obrien

    1991-01-01

    The telerobotic manipulator's collision detection algorithm is described. Its applied structural model of the world environment and template representation of objects is evaluated. Functional issues that are required for the manipulator to operate in a more complex and realistic environment are discussed.

  8. Collision detection for spacecraft proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin M.; Bergmann, Edward V.; Walker, Bruce K.

    1991-01-01

    A new collision detection algorithm has been developed for use when two spacecraft are operating in the same vicinity. The two spacecraft are modeled as unions of convex polyhedra, where the resulting polyhedron many be either convex or nonconvex. The relative motion of the two spacecraft is assumed to be such that one vehicle is moving with constant linear and angular velocity with respect to the other. Contacts between the vertices, faces, and edges of the polyhedra representing the two spacecraft are shown to occur when the value of one or more of a set of functions is zero. The collision detection algorithm is then formulated as a search for the zeros (roots) of these functions. Special properties of the functions for the assumed relative trajectory are exploited to expedite the zero search. The new algorithm is the first algorithm that can solve the collision detection problem exactly for relative motion with constant angular velocity. This is a significant improvement over models of rotational motion used in previous collision detection algorithms.

  9. Behavioral training to improve collision detection

    PubMed Central

    DeLoss, Denton J.; Bian, Zheng; Watanabe, Takeo; Andersen, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Young drivers are a high-risk group for vehicle crashes due to inexperience in detecting an impending collision and are one group that may benefit from perceptual learning (PL) training. The present study assessed whether PL could be used to improve performance in collision detection. Ten college-aged subjects participated in the first experiment, which consisted of seven 1-hr sessions conducted on separate days. Thresholds at three observer/object speeds were measured prior to training using a two-alternative forced choice procedure during which they indicated whether an approaching object would result in a collision or noncollision event. Participants were then trained near threshold at one of these speeds for 5 days. After training, participants showed a significant reduction in the time needed to detect a collision at the trained speed. This improvement was also found to transfer to the higher observer speed condition. A second experiment was conducted to determine whether this improvement was due to training near threshold or whether this improvement was merely due to practice with the task. Training with stimuli well above threshold showed no significant improvement in performance, indicating that the improvement seen in the first experiment was not solely due to task practice. PMID:26230917

  10. Accurate calculation of phase shifts for electron collisions with positive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gien, T. T.

    2003-06-01

    The Harris-Nesbet variational method was considered for the calculation of phase shifts of electron collisions with hydrogen-like ions (Li2+, Be3+, and B4+). Calculations were carried out for both singlet and triplet scattering. Very accurate results of phase shift of electron collisions with these ionic targets were obtained for the first time for partial waves of L up to six. The phase shifts that we obtained for low partial wave (S, P, and D) scattering were compared with those available in the literature by a few other research groups employing different numerical methods.

  11. Threat detection system for intersection collision avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocoy, Edward H.; Pierowicz, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Calspan SRL Corporation is currently developing an on- vehicle threat detection system for intersection collision avoidance (ICA) as part of its ICA program with the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. Crash scenarios were previously defined and an on-board radar sensor was designed. This paper describes recent efforts that include the development of a simulation of a multitarget tracker and collision avoidance algorithm used to predict system performance in a variety of target configurations in the various ICA crash scenarios. In addition, a current headway radar was mounted on the Calspan Instrumented Vehicle and in-traffic data were recorded for two limited crash scenarios. Warning functions were developed through the simulation and applied to the recorded data.

  12. Accurate Determination of Comet and Asteroid Orbits Leading to Collision With Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Kay-Bunnell, Linda; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Seywald, Hans; Hausman, Matthew A.

    2005-01-01

    Movements of the celestial bodies in our solar system inspired Isaac Newton to work out his profound laws of gravitation and motion; with one or two notable exceptions, all of those objects move as Newton said they would. But normally harmonious orbital motion is accompanied by the risk of collision, which can be cataclysmic. The Earth s moon is thought to have been produced by such an event, and we recently witnessed magnificent bombardments of Jupiter by several pieces of what was once Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. Other comets or asteroids may have met the Earth with such violence that dinosaurs and other forms of life became extinct; it is this possibility that causes us to ask how the human species might avoid a similar catastrophe, and the answer requires a thorough understanding of orbital motion. The two red square flags with black square centers displayed are internationally recognized as a warning of an impending hurricane. Mariners and coastal residents who know the meaning of this symbol and the signs evident in the sky and ocean can act in advance to try to protect lives and property; someone who is unfamiliar with the warning signs or chooses to ignore them is in much greater jeopardy. Although collisions between Earth and large comets or asteroids occur much less frequently than landfall of a hurricane, it is imperative that we learn to identify the harbingers of such collisions by careful examination of an object s path. An accurate determination of the orbit of a comet or asteroid is necessary in order to know if, when, and where on the Earth s surface a collision will occur. Generally speaking, the longer the warning time, the better the chance of being able to plan and execute action to prevent a collision. The more accurate the determination of an orbit, the less likely such action will be wasted effort or, what is worse, an effort that increases rather than decreases the probability of a collision. Conditions necessary for a collision to occur are

  13. Accurately Detecting Students' Lies regarding Relational Aggression by Correctional Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickhauser, Oliver; Reinhard, Marc-Andre; Marksteiner, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of correctional instructions when detecting lies about relational aggression. Based on models from the field of social psychology, we predict that correctional instruction will lead to a less pronounced lie bias and to more accurate lie detection. Seventy-five teachers received videotapes of students' true denial…

  14. New Accurate Oscillator Strengths and Electron Excitation Collision Strengths for N1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The nonorthogonal orbitals technique in a multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities of N(I) lines. The relativistic effects are allowed by means of Breit-Pauli operators. The length and velocity forms of oscillator strengths show good agreement for most transitions. The B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates approach has been used to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. The nonorthogonal orbitals are used for an accurate description of both target wave functions and the R-matrix basis functions. The 24 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states together with 15 pseudostates are included in the close-coupling expansion. The collision strengths for transitions between fine-structure levels are calculated by transforming the LS-coupled K-matrices to K-matrices in an intermediate coupling scheme. Thermally averaged collision strengths have been determined by integrating collision strength over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies over a temperature range suitable for the modeling of astrophysical plasmas. The oscillator strengths and thermally averaged collision strengths are presented for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s(sup 2)p(sup 3) (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0), 2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s (sup 4)P, and (sup 2)P terms and from these levels to the levels of the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3p (sup 2)S(sup 0), (sup 4)D(sup 0), (sup 4)P(sup 0), (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0),2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s(sup 2)D, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F,(sup 2)F,(sup 4)P, (sup 4)D, and (sup 2)D terms. Thermally averaged collision strengths are tabulated over a temperature range from 500 to 50,000 K.

  15. A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Wei; Lin Haibo; Plastaras, John P.; Wang Huanshu; Bui, Viet; Vapiwala, Neha; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Potential collision between the patient/couch and the gantry could delay the start of the treatment and reduce clinical efficiency. The ability to accurately detect possible collisions during the treatment planning phase is desired. Such collision detection should account for the specific proton gantry design, the treatment beam configuration, couch orientation, and the patient specific geometry. In this paper the authors developed an approach to detect possible patient-machine collisions using patient treatment plan data. Methods: The geometry of the machine and the patient was reconstructed relative to the isocenter of the proton treatment room. The surface contour of the gantry was first captured from the proton computer aided design and reconstructed to account for specific gantry rotation, snout position, collimator rotation, and range compensator dimensions based on the patient treatment plan data. The patient body and couch contours were captured from the patient's CT DICOM structure file. They were reconstructed relative to the isocenter taking into account treatment couch rotation. For potential collision that occurs at body portions where no CT images exist, scout images are used to construct the body contour. A software program was developed using a ray casting algorithm that was applied to detect collisions by determining if any of the patient and couch contour points fall into the spatial polygons formed by the proton gantry surfaces. Results: Twenty-four patient plans with or without potential collisions were retrospectively identified and analyzed using the collision detection software. In addition, five collision cases were artificially generated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The program successfully detected the collisions in all cases. The calculation time for each case was within 20 s. The software program was implemented in the authors' clinic to detect patient-gantry or gantry-couch collisions in the treatment planning phase

  16. A fast and accurate FPGA based QRS detection system.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ashish; Macchiarulo, Luca

    2008-01-01

    An accurate Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based ECG Analysis system is described in this paper. The design, based on a popular software based QRS detection algorithm, calculates the threshold value for the next peak detection cycle, from the median of eight previously detected peaks. The hardware design has accuracy in excess of 96% in detecting the beats correctly when tested with a subset of five 30 minute data records obtained from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database. The design, implemented using a proprietary design tool (System Generator), is an extension of our previous work and uses 76% resources available in a small-sized FPGA device (Xilinx Spartan xc3s500), has a higher detection accuracy as compared to our previous design and takes almost half the analysis time in comparison to software based approach. PMID:19163797

  17. Accurate mobile malware detection and classification in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Yang, Yuexiang; Zeng, Yingzhi

    2015-01-01

    As the dominator of the Smartphone operating system market, consequently android has attracted the attention of s malware authors and researcher alike. The number of types of android malware is increasing rapidly regardless of the considerable number of proposed malware analysis systems. In this paper, by taking advantages of low false-positive rate of misuse detection and the ability of anomaly detection to detect zero-day malware, we propose a novel hybrid detection system based on a new open-source framework CuckooDroid, which enables the use of Cuckoo Sandbox's features to analyze Android malware through dynamic and static analysis. Our proposed system mainly consists of two parts: anomaly detection engine performing abnormal apps detection through dynamic analysis; signature detection engine performing known malware detection and classification with the combination of static and dynamic analysis. We evaluate our system using 5560 malware samples and 6000 benign samples. Experiments show that our anomaly detection engine with dynamic analysis is capable of detecting zero-day malware with a low false negative rate (1.16 %) and acceptable false positive rate (1.30 %); it is worth noting that our signature detection engine with hybrid analysis can accurately classify malware samples with an average positive rate 98.94 %. Considering the intensive computing resources required by the static and dynamic analysis, our proposed detection system should be deployed off-device, such as in the Cloud. The app store markets and the ordinary users can access our detection system for malware detection through cloud service. PMID:26543718

  18. Detection and accurate localization of harmonic chipless tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dardari, Davide

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the detection and localization properties of harmonic tags working at microwave frequencies. A two-tone interrogation signal and a dedicated signal processing scheme at the receiver are proposed to eliminate phase ambiguities caused by the short signal wavelength and to provide accurate distance/position estimation even in the presence of clutter and multipath. The theoretical limits on tag detection and localization accuracy are investigated starting from a concise characterization of harmonic backscattered signals. Numerical results show that accuracies in the order of centimeters are feasible within an operational range of a few meters in the RFID UHF band.

  19. Accurate measurements of the collision stopping powers for 5 to 30 MeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, Miller Shawn

    Accurate knowledge of electron stopping powers is crucial for accurate radiation dosimetry and radiation transport calculations. Current values for stopping powers are based on a theoretical model, with estimated uncertainties of 0.5-1% (1σ) for electron energies greater than 100 keV. This work presents the first measurements of electron collision stopping powers capable of testing the theoretical values within these stated uncertainties. A large NaI spectrometer was used to measure the change in electron energy when an absorbing disk of known thickness was placed in an electron beam. Monte Carlo simulations of the experiment were performed to account for the effects of surrounding materials. Energy differences between the calculated and measured spectra were used to determine corrections to the soft collision component of the theoretical stopping powers employed by the Monte Carlo simulations. Four different elemental materials were studied: Be, Al, Cu, and Ta. This provided a wide range of atomic numbers and densities over which to test the theory. In addition, stopping powers were measured for graphite (both standard and pyrolytic), A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, C-552 air equivalent plastic, and water. The incident electron energies ranged from 5 to 30 MeV. Generally, the measured stopping powers agree with the theoretical values within the experimental uncertainties, which range from 0.4% to 0.7% (1σ). Aluminum, however, exhibits a 0.7% discrepancy at higher electron energies. Furthermore, these measurements have established that the grain density stopping power is appropriate for graphite, contrary to the recommendations of ICRU Report 37. This removes a 0.2% uncertainty in air kerma calibrations, and impacts on dosimetric quantities determined via graphite calorimetry, such as ɛG for Fricke dosimetry and (W/ e)air for ion chamber measurements.

  20. Population variability complicates the accurate detection of climate change responses.

    PubMed

    McCain, Christy; Szewczyk, Tim; Bracy Knight, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    The rush to assess species' responses to anthropogenic climate change (CC) has underestimated the importance of interannual population variability (PV). Researchers assume sampling rigor alone will lead to an accurate detection of response regardless of the underlying population fluctuations of the species under consideration. Using population simulations across a realistic, empirically based gradient in PV, we show that moderate to high PV can lead to opposite and biased conclusions about CC responses. Between pre- and post-CC sampling bouts of modeled populations as in resurvey studies, there is: (i) A 50% probability of erroneously detecting the opposite trend in population abundance change and nearly zero probability of detecting no change. (ii) Across multiple years of sampling, it is nearly impossible to accurately detect any directional shift in population sizes with even moderate PV. (iii) There is up to 50% probability of detecting a population extirpation when the species is present, but in very low natural abundances. (iv) Under scenarios of moderate to high PV across a species' range or at the range edges, there is a bias toward erroneous detection of range shifts or contractions. Essentially, the frequency and magnitude of population peaks and troughs greatly impact the accuracy of our CC response measurements. Species with moderate to high PV (many small vertebrates, invertebrates, and annual plants) may be inaccurate 'canaries in the coal mine' for CC without pertinent demographic analyses and additional repeat sampling. Variation in PV may explain some idiosyncrasies in CC responses detected so far and urgently needs more careful consideration in design and analysis of CC responses. PMID:26725404

  1. Effective Echo Detection and Accurate Orbit Estimation Algorithms for Space Debris Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoda, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

    Orbit estimation of space debris, objects of no inherent value orbiting the earth, is a task that is important for avoiding collisions with spacecraft. The Kamisaibara Spaceguard Center radar system was built in 2004 as the first radar facility in Japan devoted to the observation of space debris. In order to detect the smaller debris, coherent integration is effective in improving SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio). However, it is difficult to apply coherent integration to real data because the motions of the targets are unknown. An effective algorithm is proposed for echo detection and orbit estimation of the faint echoes from space debris. The characteristics of the evaluation function are utilized by the algorithm. Experiments show the proposed algorithm improves SNR by 8.32dB and enables estimation of orbital parameters accurately to allow for re-tracking with a single radar.

  2. Accurate Detection of Rifampicin-Resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Strains.

    PubMed

    Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Kim, Hee Jin; Yang, Jeongseong; Kim, Taisun

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 alone, the death rate among the 9.0 million people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) worldwide was around 14%, which is unacceptably high. An empiric treatment of patients infected with TB or drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) strain can also result in the spread of MDR-TB. The diagnostic tools which are rapid, reliable, and have simple experimental protocols can significantly help in decreasing the prevalence rate of MDR-TB strain. We report the evaluation of the 9G technology based 9G DNAChips that allow accurate detection and discrimination of TB and MDR-TB-RIF. One hundred and thirteen known cultured samples were used to evaluate the ability of 9G DNAChip in the detection and discrimination of TB and MDR-TB-RIF strains. Hybridization of immobilized probes with the PCR products of TB and MDR-TB-RIF strains allow their detection and discrimination. The accuracy of 9G DNAChip was determined by comparing its results with sequencing analysis and drug susceptibility testing. Sequencing analysis showed 100% agreement with the results of 9G DNAChip. The 9G DNAChip showed very high sensitivity (95.4%) and specificity (100%). PMID:26999135

  3. Accurate Detection of Rifampicin-Resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Kim, Hee Jin; Yang, Jeongseong; Kim, Taisun

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 alone, the death rate among the 9.0 million people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) worldwide was around 14%, which is unacceptably high. An empiric treatment of patients infected with TB or drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) strain can also result in the spread of MDR-TB. The diagnostic tools which are rapid, reliable, and have simple experimental protocols can significantly help in decreasing the prevalence rate of MDR-TB strain. We report the evaluation of the 9G technology based 9G DNAChips that allow accurate detection and discrimination of TB and MDR-TB-RIF. One hundred and thirteen known cultured samples were used to evaluate the ability of 9G DNAChip in the detection and discrimination of TB and MDR-TB-RIF strains. Hybridization of immobilized probes with the PCR products of TB and MDR-TB-RIF strains allow their detection and discrimination. The accuracy of 9G DNAChip was determined by comparing its results with sequencing analysis and drug susceptibility testing. Sequencing analysis showed 100% agreement with the results of 9G DNAChip. The 9G DNAChip showed very high sensitivity (95.4%) and specificity (100%). PMID:26999135

  4. A bioinspired collision detection algorithm for VLSI implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadri, J.; Linan, G.; Stafford, R.; Keil, M. S.; Roca, E.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a bioinspired algorithm for collision detection is proposed, based on previous models of the locust (Locusta migratoria) visual system reported by F.C. Rind and her group, in the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The algorithm is suitable for VLSI implementation in standard CMOS technologies as a system-on-chip for automotive applications. The working principle of the algorithm is to process a video stream that represents the current scenario, and to fire an alarm whenever an object approaches on a collision course. Moreover, it establishes a scale of warning states, from no danger to collision alarm, depending on the activity detected in the current scenario. In the worst case, the minimum time before collision at which the model fires the collision alarm is 40 msec (1 frame before, at 25 frames per second). Since the average time to successfully fire an airbag system is 2 msec, even in the worst case, this algorithm would be very helpful to more efficiently arm the airbag system, or even take some kind of collision avoidance countermeasures. Furthermore, two additional modules have been included: a "Topological Feature Estimator" and an "Attention Focusing Algorithm". The former takes into account the shape of the approaching object to decide whether it is a person, a road line or a car. This helps to take more adequate countermeasures and to filter false alarms. The latter centres the processing power into the most active zones of the input frame, thus saving memory and processing time resources.

  5. Fast and Accurate Detection of Multiple Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Nettelblad, Carl; Holmgren, Sverker

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present a new computational scheme that enables efficient and reliable quantitative trait loci (QTL) scans for experimental populations. Using a standard brute-force exhaustive search effectively prohibits accurate QTL scans involving more than two loci to be performed in practice, at least if permutation testing is used to determine significance. Some more elaborate global optimization approaches, for example, DIRECT have been adopted earlier to QTL search problems. Dramatic speedups have been reported for high-dimensional scans. However, since a heuristic termination criterion must be used in these types of algorithms, the accuracy of the optimization process cannot be guaranteed. Indeed, earlier results show that a small bias in the significance thresholds is sometimes introduced. Our new optimization scheme, PruneDIRECT, is based on an analysis leading to a computable (Lipschitz) bound on the slope of a transformed objective function. The bound is derived for both infinite- and finite-size populations. Introducing a Lipschitz bound in DIRECT leads to an algorithm related to classical Lipschitz optimization. Regions in the search space can be permanently excluded (pruned) during the optimization process. Heuristic termination criteria can thus be avoided. Hence, PruneDIRECT has a well-defined error bound and can in practice be guaranteed to be equivalent to a corresponding exhaustive search. We present simulation results that show that for simultaneous mapping of three QTLS using permutation testing, PruneDIRECT is typically more than 50 times faster than exhaustive search. The speedup is higher for stronger QTL. This could be used to quickly detect strong candidate eQTL networks. PMID:23919387

  6. Accurate single-molecule FRET studies using multiparameter fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Sisamakis, Evangelos; Valeri, Alessandro; Kalinin, Stanislav; Rothwell, Paul J; Seidel, Claus A M

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decade, single-molecule (sm) spectroscopy has come of age and is providing important insight into how biological molecules function. So far our view of protein function is formed, to a significant extent, by traditional structure determination showing many beautiful static protein structures. Recent experiments by single-molecule and other techniques have questioned the idea that proteins and other biomolecules are static structures. In particular, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies of single molecules have shown that biomolecules may adopt many conformations as they perform their function. Despite the success of sm-studies, interpretation of smFRET data are challenging since they can be complicated due to many artifacts arising from the complex photophysical behavior of fluorophores, dynamics, and motion of fluorophores, as well as from small amounts of contaminants. We demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of a maximum of fluorescence parameters by multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) allows for a robust assessment of all possible artifacts arising from smFRET and offers unsurpassed capabilities regarding the identification and analysis of individual species present in a population of molecules. After a short introduction, the data analysis procedure is described in detail together with some experimental considerations. The merits of MFD are highlighted further with the presentation of some applications to proteins and nucleic acids, including accurate structure determination based on FRET. A toolbox is introduced in order to demonstrate how complications originating from orientation, mobility, and position of fluorophores have to be taken into account when determining FRET-related distances with high accuracy. Furthermore, the broad time resolution (picoseconds to hours) of MFD allows for kinetic studies that resolve interconversion events between various subpopulations as a biomolecule of interest explores its

  7. DETECTION OF LOW-VELOCITY COLLISIONS IN SATURN'S F RING

    SciTech Connect

    Attree, N. O.; Murray, C. D.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G. A.

    2012-08-20

    Jets of material extending several hundred kilometers from Saturn's F ring are thought to be caused by collisions at speeds of several tens of ms{sup -1} between {approx}10 km diameter objects such as S/2004 S 6 and the core of the ring. The subsequent effects of Keplerian shear give rise to the multi-stranded nature of the F ring. Observations of the ring by the Imaging Science Subsystem experiment on the Cassini spacecraft have provided evidence that some smaller protrusions from the ring's core are the result of low-velocity collisions with nearby objects. We refer to these protrusions as 'mini-jets' and one such feature has been observed for {approx}7.5 hr as its length changed from {approx}75 km to {approx}250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse into the core. Orbit determinations suggest that such mini-jets consist of ring material displaced by a {approx}1 ms{sup -1} collision with a nearby moonlet, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of Keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. Detections of mini-jets in the Cassini images suggest that it may now be possible to understand most small-scale F ring structure as the result of such collisions. A study of these mini-jets will therefore put constraints on the properties of the colliding population as well as improve our understanding of low-velocity collisions between icy objects.

  8. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  9. Fast and Exact Continuous Collision Detection with Bernstein Sign Classification

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Min; Tong, Ruofeng; Wang, Zhendong; Manocha, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    We present fast algorithms to perform accurate CCD queries between triangulated models. Our formulation uses properties of the Bernstein basis and Bézier curves and reduces the problem to evaluating signs of polynomials. We present a geometrically exact CCD algorithm based on the exact geometric computation paradigm to perform reliable Boolean collision queries. Our algorithm is more than an order of magnitude faster than prior exact algorithms. We evaluate its performance for cloth and FEM simulations on CPUs and GPUs, and highlight the benefits. PMID:25568589

  10. Accurate feature detection and estimation using nonlinear and multiresolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Leonid; Osher, Stanley

    1994-11-01

    A program for feature detection and estimation using nonlinear and multiscale analysis was completed. The state-of-the-art edge detection was combined with multiscale restoration (as suggested by the first author) and robust results in the presence of noise were obtained. Successful applications to numerous images of interest to DOD were made. Also, a new market in the criminal justice field was developed, based in part, on this work.

  11. Geometric Algorithms for Modeling, Motion, and Animation (GAMMA): Collision Detection Videos from the University of North Carolina GAMMA Research Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    Collision detection has been a fundamental problem in computer animation, physically-based modeling, geometric modeling, and robotics. In these applications, interactions between moving objects are modeled by dynamic constraints and contact analysis. The objects' motions are constrained by various interactions, including collisions. A virtual environment, like a walkthrough, creates a computer-generated world, filled with virtual objects. Such an environment should give the user a feeling of presence, which includes making the images of both the user and the surrounding objects feel solid. For example, the objects should not pass through each other, and things should move as expected when pushed, pulled or grasped. Such actions require accurate collision detection, if they are to achieve any degree of realism. However, there may be hundreds, even thousands of objects in the virtual world, so a naive algorithm could take a long time just to check for possible collisions as the user moves. This is not acceptable for virtual environments, where the issues of interactivity impose fundamental constraints on the system. A fast and interactive collision detection algorithm is a fundamental component of a complex virtual environment. Physically based modeling simulations depend highly on the physical interaction between objects in a scene. Complex physics engines require fast, accurate, and robust proximity queries to maintain a realistic simulation at interactive rates. We couple our proximity query research with physically based modeling to ensure that our packages provide the capabilities of today's physics engines.[Copied from http://www.cs.unc.edu/~geom/collide/index.shtml

  12. Novel Cortical Thickness Pattern for Accurate Detection of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weihao; Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hanshu; Moore, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Brain network occupies an important position in representing abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Currently, most studies only focused on morphological features of regions of interest without exploring the interregional alterations. In order to investigate the potential discriminative power of a morphological network in AD diagnosis and to provide supportive evidence on the feasibility of an individual structural network study, we propose a novel approach of extracting the correlative features from magnetic resonance imaging, which consists of a two-step approach for constructing an individual thickness network with low computational complexity. Firstly, multi-distance combination is utilized for accurate evaluation of between-region dissimilarity; and then the dissimilarity is transformed to connectivity via calculation of correlation function. An evaluation of the proposed approach has been conducted with 189 normal controls, 198 MCI subjects, and 163 AD patients using machine learning techniques. Results show that the observed correlative feature suggests significant promotion in classification performance compared with cortical thickness, with accuracy of 89.88% and area of 0.9588 under receiver operating characteristic curve. We further improved the performance by integrating both thickness and apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele information with correlative features. New achieved accuracies are 92.11% and 79.37% in separating AD from normal controls and AD converters from non-converters, respectively. Differences between using diverse distance measurements and various correlation transformation functions are also discussed to explore an optimal way for network establishment. PMID:26444768

  13. Accurate, Automated Detection of Atrial Fibrillation in Ambulatory Recordings.

    PubMed

    Linker, David T

    2016-06-01

    A highly accurate, automated algorithm would facilitate cost-effective screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation. This study analyzed a new algorithm and compared it to existing techniques. The incremental benefit of each step in refinement of the algorithm was measured, and the algorithm was compared to other methods using the Physionet atrial fibrillation and normal sinus rhythm databases. When analyzing segments of 21 RR intervals or less, the algorithm had a significantly higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) than the other algorithms tested. At analysis segment sizes of up to 101 RR intervals, the algorithm continued to have a higher AUC than any of the other methods tested, although the difference from the second best other algorithm was no longer significant, with an AUC of 0.9992 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.9986-0.9998, vs. 0.9986 (CI 0.9978-0.9994). With identical per-subject sensitivity, per-subject specificity of the current algorithm was superior to the other tested algorithms even at 101 RR intervals, with no false positives (CI 0.0-0.8%) vs. 5.3% false positives for the second best algorithm (CI 3.4-7.9%). The described algorithm shows great promise for automated screening for atrial fibrillation by reducing false positives requiring manual review, while maintaining high sensitivity. PMID:26850411

  14. Final Report for "Accurate Numerical Models of the Secondary Electron Yield from Grazing-incidence Collisions".

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2008-10-21

    Effects of stray electrons are a main factor limiting performance of many accelerators. Because heavy-ion fusion (HIF) accelerators will operate in regimes of higher current and with walls much closer to the beam than accelerators operating today, stray electrons might have a large, detrimental effect on the performance of an HIF accelerator. A primary source of stray electrons is electrons generated when halo ions strike the beam pipe walls. There is some research on these types of secondary electrons for the HIF community to draw upon, but this work is missing one crucial ingredient: the effect of grazing incidence. The overall goal of this project was to develop the numerical tools necessary to accurately model the effect of grazing incidence on the behavior of halo ions in a HIF accelerator, and further, to provide accurate models of heavy ion stopping powers with applications to ICF, WDM, and HEDP experiments.

  15. A real-time robot arm collision detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Clifford A.; Herb, Gregory M.

    1990-01-01

    A data structure and update algorithm are presented for a prototype real time collision detection safety system for a multi-robot environment. The data structure is a variant of the octree, which serves as a spatial index. An octree recursively decomposes 3-D space into eight equal cubic octants until each octant meets some decomposition criteria. The octree stores cylspheres (cylinders with spheres on each end) and rectangular solids as primitives (other primitives can easily be added as required). These primitives make up the two seven degrees-of-freedom robot arms and environment modeled by the system. Octree nodes containing more than a predetermined number N of primitives are decomposed. This rule keeps the octree small, as the entire environment for the application can be modeled using a few dozen primitives. As robot arms move, the octree is updated to reflect their changed positions. During most update cycles, any given primitive does not change which octree nodes it is in. Thus, modification to the octree is rarely required. Incidents in which one robot arm comes too close to another arm or an object are reported. Cycle time for interpreting current joint angles, updating the octree, and detecting/reporting imminent collisions averages 30 milliseconds on an Intel 80386 processor running at 20 MHz.

  16. Multi-sensor Doppler radar for machine tool collision detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächter, T. J.; Siart, U.; Eibert, T. F.; Bonerz, S.

    2014-11-01

    Machine damage due to tool collisions is a widespread issue in milling production. These collisions are typically caused by human errors. A solution for this problem is proposed based on a low-complexity 24 GHz continuous wave (CW) radar system. The developed monitoring system is able to detect moving objects by evaluating the Doppler shift. It combines incoherent information from several spatially distributed Doppler sensors and estimates the distance between an object and the sensors. The specially designed compact prototype contains up to five radar sensor modules and amplifiers yet fits into the limited available space. In this first approach we concentrate on the Doppler-based positioning of a single moving target. The recorded signals are preprocessed in order to remove noise and interference from the machinery hall. We conducted and processed system measurements with this prototype. The Doppler frequency estimation and the object position obtained after signal conditioning and processing with the developed algorithm were in good agreement with the reference coordinates provided by the machine's control unit.

  17. Fast and accurate circle detection using gradient-direction-based segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Chen, Ke; Gao, Xiaohui

    2013-06-01

    We present what is to our knowledge the first-ever fitting-based circle detection algorithm, namely, the fast and accurate circle (FACILE) detection algorithm, based on gradient-direction-based edge clustering and direct least square fitting. Edges are segmented into sections based on gradient directions, and each section is validated separately; valid arcs are then fitted and further merged to extract more accurate circle information. We implemented the algorithm with the C++ language and compared it with four other algorithms. Testing on simulated data showed FACILE was far superior to the randomized Hough transform, standard Hough transform, and fast circle detection using gradient pair vectors with regard to processing speed and detection reliability. Testing on publicly available standard datasets showed FACILE outperformed robust and precise circular detection, a state-of-art arc detection method, by 35% with regard to recognition rate and is also a significant improvement over the latter in processing speed. PMID:24323106

  18. Improved Collision-Detection Method for Robotic Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Chris

    2003-01-01

    An improved method has been devised for the computational prediction of a collision between (1) a robotic manipulator and (2) another part of the robot or an external object in the vicinity of the robot. The method is intended to be used to test commanded manipulator trajectories in advance so that execution of the commands can be stopped before damage is done. The method involves utilization of both (1) mathematical models of the robot and its environment constructed manually prior to operation and (2) similar models constructed automatically from sensory data acquired during operation. The representation of objects in this method is simpler and more efficient (with respect to both computation time and computer memory), relative to the representations used in most prior methods. The present method was developed especially for use on a robotic land vehicle (rover) equipped with a manipulator arm and a vision system that includes stereoscopic electronic cameras. In this method, objects are represented and collisions detected by use of a previously developed technique known in the art as the method of oriented bounding boxes (OBBs). As the name of this technique indicates, an object is represented approximately, for computational purposes, by a box that encloses its outer boundary. Because many parts of a robotic manipulator are cylindrical, the OBB method has been extended in this method to enable the approximate representation of cylindrical parts by use of octagonal or other multiple-OBB assemblies denoted oriented bounding prisms (OBPs), as in the example of Figure 1. Unlike prior methods, the OBB/OBP method does not require any divisions or transcendental functions; this feature leads to greater robustness and numerical accuracy. The OBB/OBP method was selected for incorporation into the present method because it offers the best compromise between accuracy on the one hand and computational efficiency (and thus computational speed) on the other hand.

  19. Distributed Pedestrian Detection Alerts Based on Data Fusion with Accurate Localization

    PubMed Central

    García, Fernando; Jiménez, Felipe; Anaya, José Javier; Armingol, José María; Naranjo, José Eugenio; de la Escalera, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Among Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) pedestrian detection is a common issue due to the vulnerability of pedestrians in the event of accidents. In the present work, a novel approach for pedestrian detection based on data fusion is presented. Data fusion helps to overcome the limitations inherent to each detection system (computer vision and laser scanner) and provides accurate and trustable tracking of any pedestrian movement. The application is complemented by an efficient communication protocol, able to alert vehicles in the surroundings by a fast and reliable communication. The combination of a powerful location, based on a GPS with inertial measurement, and accurate obstacle localization based on data fusion has allowed locating the detected pedestrians with high accuracy. Tests proved the viability of the detection system and the efficiency of the communication, even at long distances. By the use of the alert communication, dangerous situations such as occlusions or misdetections can be avoided. PMID:24008284

  20. Distributed pedestrian detection alerts based on data fusion with accurate localization.

    PubMed

    García, Fernando; Jiménez, Felipe; Anaya, José Javier; Armingol, José María; Naranjo, José Eugenio; de la Escalera, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Among Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) pedestrian detection is a common issue due to the vulnerability of pedestrians in the event of accidents. In the present work, a novel approach for pedestrian detection based on data fusion is presented. Data fusion helps to overcome the limitations inherent to each detection system (computer vision and laser scanner) and provides accurate and trustable tracking of any pedestrian movement. The application is complemented by an efficient communication protocol, able to alert vehicles in the surroundings by a fast and reliable communication. The combination of a powerful location, based on a GPS with inertial measurement, and accurate obstacle localization based on data fusion has allowed locating the detected pedestrians with high accuracy. Tests proved the viability of the detection system and the efficiency of the communication, even at long distances. By the use of the alert communication, dangerous situations such as occlusions or misdetections can be avoided. PMID:24008284

  1. Accurate Mass MS/MS/MS Analysis of Siderophores Ferrioxamine B and E1 by Collision-Induced Dissociation Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidebottom, Ashley M.; Karty, Jonathan A.; Carlson, Erin E.

    2015-11-01

    Siderophores are bacterially secreted, small molecule iron chelators that facilitate the binding of insoluble iron (III) for reuptake and use in various biological processes. These compounds are classified by their iron (III) binding geometry, as dictated by subunit composition and include groups such as the trihydroxamates (hexadentate ligand) and catecholates (bidentate). Small modifications to the core structure such as acetylation, lipid tail addition, or cyclization, make facile characterization of new siderophores difficult by molecular ion detection alone (MS1). We have expanded upon previous fragmentation-directed studies using electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS/MS) and identified diagnostic MS3 features from the trihydroxamate siderophore class for ferrioxamine B and E1 by accurate mass. Diagnostic features for MS3 include C-C, C-N, amide, and oxime cleavage events with proposed losses of water and -CO from the iron (III) coordination sites. These insights will facilitate the discovery of novel trihydroxamate siderophores from complex sample matrices.

  2. Accurate LC Peak Boundary Detection for 16O/18O Labeled LC-MS Data

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Petritis, Konstantinos; Tegeler, Tony; Petritis, Brianne; Ma, Xuepo; Jin, Yufang; Gao, Shou-Jiang (SJ); Zhang, Jianqiu (Michelle)

    2013-01-01

    In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), parts of LC peaks are often corrupted by their co-eluting peptides, which results in increased quantification variance. In this paper, we propose to apply accurate LC peak boundary detection to remove the corrupted part of LC peaks. Accurate LC peak boundary detection is achieved by checking the consistency of intensity patterns within peptide elution time ranges. In addition, we remove peptides with erroneous mass assignment through model fitness check, which compares observed intensity patterns to theoretically constructed ones. The proposed algorithm can significantly improve the accuracy and precision of peptide ratio measurements. PMID:24115998

  3. Airborne Collision Detection and Avoidance for Small UAS Sense and Avoid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahawneh, Laith Rasmi

    The increasing demand to integrate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the national airspace is motivated by the rapid growth of the UAS industry, especially small UAS weighing less than 55 pounds. Their use however has been limited by the Federal Aviation Administration regulations due to collision risk they pose, safety and regulatory concerns. Therefore, before civil aviation authorities can approve routine UAS flight operations, UAS must be equipped with sense-and-avoid technology comparable to the see-and-avoid requirements for manned aircraft. The sense-and-avoid problem includes several important aspects including regulatory and system-level requirements, design specifications and performance standards, intruder detecting and tracking, collision risk assessment, and finally path planning and collision avoidance. In this dissertation, our primary focus is on developing an collision detection, risk assessment and avoidance framework that is computationally affordable and suitable to run on-board small UAS. To begin with, we address the minimum sensing range for the sense-and-avoid (SAA) system. We present an approximate close form analytical solution to compute the minimum sensing range to safely avoid an imminent collision. The approach is then demonstrated using a radar sensor prototype that achieves the required minimum sensing range. In the area of collision risk assessment and collision prediction, we present two approaches to estimate the collision risk of an encounter scenario. The first is a deterministic approach similar to those been developed for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) in manned aviation. We extend the approach to account for uncertainties of state estimates by deriving an analytic expression to propagate the error variance using Taylor series approximation. To address unanticipated intruders maneuvers, we propose an innovative probabilistic approach to quantify likely intruder trajectories and estimate the probability of

  4. Accurate band-to-band registration of AOTF imaging spectrometer using motion detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pengwei; Zhao, Huijie; Jin, Shangzhong; Li, Ningchuan

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the problem of platform vibration induced band-to-band misregistration with acousto-optic imaging spectrometer in spaceborne application. Registrating images of different bands formed at different time or different position is difficult, especially for hyperspectral images form acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer. In this study, a motion detection method is presented using the polychromatic undiffracted beam of AOTF. The factors affecting motion detect accuracy are analyzed theoretically, and calculations show that optical distortion is an easily overlooked factor to achieve accurate band-to-band registration. Hence, a reflective dual-path optical system has been proposed for the first time, with reduction of distortion and chromatic aberration, indicating the potential of higher registration accuracy. Consequently, a spectra restoration experiment using additional motion detect channel is presented for the first time, which shows the accurate spectral image registration capability of this technique.

  5. An accurate assay for HCV based on real-time fluorescence detection of isothermal RNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuping; Wang, Jianfang; Song, Jinyun; Li, Jiayan; Yang, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the common reasons of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Early, rapid and accurate HCV RNA detection is important to prevent and control liver disease. A simultaneous amplification and testing (SAT) assay, which is based on isothermal amplification of RNA and real-time fluorescence detection, was designed to optimize routine HCV RNA detection. In this study, HCV RNA and an internal control (IC) were amplified and analyzed simultaneously by SAT assay and detection of fluorescence using routine real-time PCR equipment. The assay detected as few as 10 copies of HCV RNA transcripts. We tested 705 serum samples with SAT, among which 96.4% (680/705) showed consistent results compared with routine real-time PCR. About 92% (23/25) discordant samples were confirmed to be same results as SAT-HCV by using a second real-time PCR. The sensitivity and specificity of SAT-HCV assay were 99.6% (461/463) and 100% (242/242), respectively. In conclusion, the SAT assay is an accurate test with a high specificity and sensitivity which may increase the detection rate of HCV. It is therefore a promising tool to diagnose HCV infection. PMID:27283884

  6. Airborne Collision Detection and Avoidance for Small UAS Sense and Avoid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahawneh, Laith Rasmi

    The increasing demand to integrate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the national airspace is motivated by the rapid growth of the UAS industry, especially small UAS weighing less than 55 pounds. Their use however has been limited by the Federal Aviation Administration regulations due to collision risk they pose, safety and regulatory concerns. Therefore, before civil aviation authorities can approve routine UAS flight operations, UAS must be equipped with sense-and-avoid technology comparable to the see-and-avoid requirements for manned aircraft. The sense-and-avoid problem includes several important aspects including regulatory and system-level requirements, design specifications and performance standards, intruder detecting and tracking, collision risk assessment, and finally path planning and collision avoidance. In this dissertation, our primary focus is on developing an collision detection, risk assessment and avoidance framework that is computationally affordable and suitable to run on-board small UAS. To begin with, we address the minimum sensing range for the sense-and-avoid (SAA) system. We present an approximate close form analytical solution to compute the minimum sensing range to safely avoid an imminent collision. The approach is then demonstrated using a radar sensor prototype that achieves the required minimum sensing range. In the area of collision risk assessment and collision prediction, we present two approaches to estimate the collision risk of an encounter scenario. The first is a deterministic approach similar to those been developed for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) in manned aviation. We extend the approach to account for uncertainties of state estimates by deriving an analytic expression to propagate the error variance using Taylor series approximation. To address unanticipated intruders maneuvers, we propose an innovative probabilistic approach to quantify likely intruder trajectories and estimate the probability of

  7. Giant African pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) that work on tilled soil accurately detect land mines.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Timothy L; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Tewelde, Tesfazghi; Poling, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Pouched rats were employed as mine-detection animals in a quality-control application where they searched for mines in areas previously processed by a mechanical tiller. The rats located 58 mines and fragments in this 28,050-m(2) area with a false indication rate of 0.4 responses per 100 m(2) . Humans with metal detectors found no mines that were not located by the rats. These findings indicate that pouched rats can accurately detect land mines in disturbed soil and suggest that they can play multiple roles in humanitarian demining. PMID:25962550

  8. Comparison of methods for accurate end-point detection of potentiometric titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villela, R. L. A.; Borges, P. P.; Vyskočil, L.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the end point in potentiometric titrations has wide application on experiments that demand very low measurement uncertainties mainly for certifying reference materials. Simulations of experimental coulometric titration data and consequential error analysis of the end-point values were conducted using a programming code. These simulations revealed that the Levenberg-Marquardt method is in general more accurate than the traditional second derivative technique used currently as end-point detection for potentiometric titrations. Performance of the methods will be compared and presented in this paper.

  9. Accurate Automatic Detection of Densely Distributed Cell Nuclei in 3D Space.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yu; Tokunaga, Terumasa; Hirose, Osamu; Kanamori, Manami; Teramoto, Takayuki; Jang, Moon Sun; Kuge, Sayuri; Ishihara, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo; Iino, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    To measure the activity of neurons using whole-brain activity imaging, precise detection of each neuron or its nucleus is required. In the head region of the nematode C. elegans, the neuronal cell bodies are distributed densely in three-dimensional (3D) space. However, no existing computational methods of image analysis can separate them with sufficient accuracy. Here we propose a highly accurate segmentation method based on the curvatures of the iso-intensity surfaces. To obtain accurate positions of nuclei, we also developed a new procedure for least squares fitting with a Gaussian mixture model. Combining these methods enables accurate detection of densely distributed cell nuclei in a 3D space. The proposed method was implemented as a graphical user interface program that allows visualization and correction of the results of automatic detection. Additionally, the proposed method was applied to time-lapse 3D calcium imaging data, and most of the nuclei in the images were successfully tracked and measured. PMID:27271939

  10. Accurate Automatic Detection of Densely Distributed Cell Nuclei in 3D Space

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Terumasa; Kanamori, Manami; Teramoto, Takayuki; Jang, Moon Sun; Kuge, Sayuri; Ishihara, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo; Iino, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    To measure the activity of neurons using whole-brain activity imaging, precise detection of each neuron or its nucleus is required. In the head region of the nematode C. elegans, the neuronal cell bodies are distributed densely in three-dimensional (3D) space. However, no existing computational methods of image analysis can separate them with sufficient accuracy. Here we propose a highly accurate segmentation method based on the curvatures of the iso-intensity surfaces. To obtain accurate positions of nuclei, we also developed a new procedure for least squares fitting with a Gaussian mixture model. Combining these methods enables accurate detection of densely distributed cell nuclei in a 3D space. The proposed method was implemented as a graphical user interface program that allows visualization and correction of the results of automatic detection. Additionally, the proposed method was applied to time-lapse 3D calcium imaging data, and most of the nuclei in the images were successfully tracked and measured. PMID:27271939

  11. Collision detection and modeling of rigid and deformable objects in laparoscopic simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dy, Mary-Clare; Tagawa, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Hiromi T.; Komori, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    Laparoscopic simulators are viable alternatives for surgical training and rehearsal. Haptic devices can also be incorporated with virtual reality simulators to provide additional cues to the users. However, to provide realistic feedback, the haptic device must be updated by 1kHz. On the other hand, realistic visual cues, that is, the collision detection and deformation between interacting objects must be rendered at least 30 fps. Our current laparoscopic simulator detects the collision between a point on the tool tip, and on the organ surfaces, in which haptic devices are attached on actual tool tips for realistic tool manipulation. The triangular-mesh organ model is rendered using a mass spring deformation model, or finite element method-based models. In this paper, we investigated multi-point-based collision detection on the rigid tool rods. Based on the preliminary results, we propose a method to improve the collision detection scheme, and speed up the organ deformation reaction. We discuss our proposal for an efficient method to compute simultaneous multiple collision between rigid (laparoscopic tools) and deformable (organs) objects, and perform the subsequent collision response, with haptic feedback, in real-time.

  12. Label-Free Detection of Single Living Bacteria via Electrochemical Collision Event.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kang, Mijeong; Park, Jun Hui

    2016-01-01

    We detected single living bacterial cells on ultramicroelectrode (UME) using a single-particle collision method and optical microscopic methods. The number of collision events involving the bacterial cells indicated in current-time (i-t) curves corresponds to the number of bacterial cells (i.e., Escherichia coli) on the UME surface, as observed visually. Simulations were performed to determine the theoretical current response (75 pA) and frequency (0.47 pM(-1) s(-1)) of single Escherichia coli collisions. The experimental current response (83 pA) and frequency (0.26 pM(-1) s(-1)) were on the same order of magnitude as the theoretical values. This single-particle collision approach facilitates detecting living bacteria and determining their concentration in solution and could be widely applied to studying other bacteria and biomolecules. PMID:27435527

  13. Label-Free Detection of Single Living Bacteria via Electrochemical Collision Event

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kang, Mijeong; Park, Jun Hui

    2016-01-01

    We detected single living bacterial cells on ultramicroelectrode (UME) using a single-particle collision method and optical microscopic methods. The number of collision events involving the bacterial cells indicated in current-time (i-t) curves corresponds to the number of bacterial cells (i.e., Escherichia coli) on the UME surface, as observed visually. Simulations were performed to determine the theoretical current response (75 pA) and frequency (0.47 pM−1 s−1) of single Escherichia coli collisions. The experimental current response (83 pA) and frequency (0.26 pM−1 s−1) were on the same order of magnitude as the theoretical values. This single-particle collision approach facilitates detecting living bacteria and determining their concentration in solution and could be widely applied to studying other bacteria and biomolecules. PMID:27435527

  14. Label-Free Detection of Single Living Bacteria via Electrochemical Collision Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kang, Mijeong; Park, Jun Hui

    2016-07-01

    We detected single living bacterial cells on ultramicroelectrode (UME) using a single-particle collision method and optical microscopic methods. The number of collision events involving the bacterial cells indicated in current-time (i-t) curves corresponds to the number of bacterial cells (i.e., Escherichia coli) on the UME surface, as observed visually. Simulations were performed to determine the theoretical current response (75 pA) and frequency (0.47 pM‑1 s‑1) of single Escherichia coli collisions. The experimental current response (83 pA) and frequency (0.26 pM‑1 s‑1) were on the same order of magnitude as the theoretical values. This single-particle collision approach facilitates detecting living bacteria and determining their concentration in solution and could be widely applied to studying other bacteria and biomolecules.

  15. Fast and Accurate Large-Scale Detection of β-Lactamase Genes Conferring Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Jin; Lee, Jung Hun; Kwon, Dae Beom; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Park, Kwang Seung; Lee, Chang-Ro

    2015-01-01

    Fast detection of β-lactamase (bla) genes allows improved surveillance studies and infection control measures, which can minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although several molecular diagnostic methods have been developed to detect limited bla gene types, these methods have significant limitations, such as their failure to detect almost all clinically available bla genes. We developed a fast and accurate molecular method to overcome these limitations using 62 primer pairs, which were designed through elaborate optimization processes. To verify the ability of this large-scale bla detection method (large-scaleblaFinder), assays were performed on previously reported bacterial control isolates/strains. To confirm the applicability of the large-scaleblaFinder, the assays were performed on unreported clinical isolates. With perfect specificity and sensitivity in 189 control isolates/strains and 403 clinical isolates, the large-scaleblaFinder detected almost all clinically available bla genes. Notably, the large-scaleblaFinder detected 24 additional unreported bla genes in the isolates/strains that were previously studied, suggesting that previous methods detecting only limited types of bla genes can miss unexpected bla genes existing in pathogenic bacteria, and our method has the ability to detect almost all bla genes existing in a clinical isolate. The ability of large-scaleblaFinder to detect bla genes on a large scale enables prompt application to the detection of almost all bla genes present in bacterial pathogens. The widespread use of the large-scaleblaFinder in the future will provide an important aid for monitoring the emergence and dissemination of bla genes and minimizing the spread of resistant bacteria. PMID:26169415

  16. Fast and Accurate Large-Scale Detection of β-Lactamase Genes Conferring Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Jin; Lee, Jung Hun; Kwon, Dae Beom; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Park, Kwang Seung; Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-10-01

    Fast detection of β-lactamase (bla) genes allows improved surveillance studies and infection control measures, which can minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although several molecular diagnostic methods have been developed to detect limited bla gene types, these methods have significant limitations, such as their failure to detect almost all clinically available bla genes. We developed a fast and accurate molecular method to overcome these limitations using 62 primer pairs, which were designed through elaborate optimization processes. To verify the ability of this large-scale bla detection method (large-scaleblaFinder), assays were performed on previously reported bacterial control isolates/strains. To confirm the applicability of the large-scaleblaFinder, the assays were performed on unreported clinical isolates. With perfect specificity and sensitivity in 189 control isolates/strains and 403 clinical isolates, the large-scaleblaFinder detected almost all clinically available bla genes. Notably, the large-scaleblaFinder detected 24 additional unreported bla genes in the isolates/strains that were previously studied, suggesting that previous methods detecting only limited types of bla genes can miss unexpected bla genes existing in pathogenic bacteria, and our method has the ability to detect almost all bla genes existing in a clinical isolate. The ability of large-scaleblaFinder to detect bla genes on a large scale enables prompt application to the detection of almost all bla genes present in bacterial pathogens. The widespread use of the large-scaleblaFinder in the future will provide an important aid for monitoring the emergence and dissemination of bla genes and minimizing the spread of resistant bacteria. PMID:26169415

  17. Spectroscopic Method for Fast and Accurate Group A Streptococcus Bacteria Detection.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Dillon; Aviv, Hagit; Rosenbaum, Efraim; Tischler, Yaakov R

    2016-02-16

    Rapid and accurate detection of pathogens is paramount to human health. Spectroscopic techniques have been shown to be viable methods for detecting various pathogens. Enhanced methods of Raman spectroscopy can discriminate unique bacterial signatures; however, many of these require precise conditions and do not have in vivo replicability. Common biological detection methods such as rapid antigen detection tests have high specificity but do not have high sensitivity. Here we developed a new method of bacteria detection that is both highly specific and highly sensitive by combining the specificity of antibody staining and the sensitivity of spectroscopic characterization. Bacteria samples, treated with a fluorescent antibody complex specific to Streptococcus pyogenes, were volumetrically normalized according to their Raman bacterial signal intensity and characterized for fluorescence, eliciting a positive result for samples containing Streptococcus pyogenes and a negative result for those without. The normalized fluorescence intensity of the Streptococcus pyogenes gave a signal that is up to 16.4 times higher than that of other bacteria samples for bacteria stained in solution and up to 12.7 times higher in solid state. This method can be very easily replicated for other bacteria species using suitable antibody-dye complexes. In addition, this method shows viability for in vivo detection as it requires minute amounts of bacteria, low laser excitation power, and short integration times in order to achieve high signal. PMID:26752013

  18. Parente2: a fast and accurate method for detecting identity by descent

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jesse M.; Bercovici, Sivan; Huang, Lin; Frostig, Roy; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2015-01-01

    Identity-by-descent (IBD) inference is the problem of establishing a genetic connection between two individuals through a genomic segment that is inherited by both individuals from a recent common ancestor. IBD inference is an important preceding step in a variety of population genomic studies, ranging from demographic studies to linking genomic variation with phenotype and disease. The problem of accurate IBD detection has become increasingly challenging with the availability of large collections of human genotypes and genomes: Given a cohort’s size, a quadratic number of pairwise genome comparisons must be performed. Therefore, computation time and the false discovery rate can also scale quadratically. To enable accurate and efficient large-scale IBD detection, we present Parente2, a novel method for detecting IBD segments. Parente2 is based on an embedded log-likelihood ratio and uses a model that accounts for linkage disequilibrium by explicitly modeling haplotype frequencies. Parente2 operates directly on genotype data without the need to phase data prior to IBD inference. We evaluate Parente2’s performance through extensive simulations using real data, and we show that it provides substantially higher accuracy compared to previous state-of-the-art methods while maintaining high computational efficiency. PMID:25273070

  19. Methodological Guidelines for Accurate Detection of Viruses in Wild Plant Species.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Christelle; Renner, Kurra; Cole, Ellen; Seabloom, Eric W; Borer, Elizabeth T; Malmstrom, Carolyn M

    2016-03-01

    Ecological understanding of disease risk, emergence, and dynamics and of the efficacy of control strategies relies heavily on efficient tools for microorganism identification and characterization. Misdetection, such as the misclassification of infected hosts as healthy, can strongly bias estimates of disease prevalence and lead to inaccurate conclusions. In natural plant ecosystems, interest in assessing microbial dynamics is increasing exponentially, but guidelines for detection of microorganisms in wild plants remain limited, particularly so for plant viruses. To address this gap, we explored issues and solutions associated with virus detection by serological and molecular methods in noncrop plant species as applied to the globally important Barley yellow dwarf virus PAV (Luteoviridae), which infects wild native plants as well as crops. With enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), we demonstrate how virus detection in a perennial wild plant species may be much greater in stems than in leaves, although leaves are most commonly sampled, and may also vary among tillers within an individual, thereby highlighting the importance of designing effective sampling strategies. With reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), we demonstrate how inhibitors in tissues of perennial wild hosts can suppress virus detection but can be overcome with methods and products that improve isolation and amplification of nucleic acids. These examples demonstrate the paramount importance of testing and validating survey designs and virus detection methods for noncrop plant communities to ensure accurate ecological surveys and reliable assumptions about virus dynamics in wild hosts. PMID:26773088

  20. Accurate Optical Detection of Amphiphiles at Liquid-Crystal-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Piotr; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Jákli, Antal

    2014-04-01

    Liquid-crystal-based biosensors utilize the high sensitivity of liquid-crystal alignment to the presence of amphiphiles adsorbed to one of the liquid-crystal surfaces from water. They offer inexpensive, easy optical detection of biologically relevant molecules such as lipids, proteins, and cells. Present techniques use linear polarizers to analyze the alignment of the liquid crystal. The resulting images contain information not only about the liquid-crystal tilt with respect to the surface normal, the quantity which is controlled by surface adsorption, but also on the uncontrolled in-plane liquid-crystal alignment, thus making the detection largely qualitative. Here we show that detecting the liquid-crystal alignment between circular polarizers, which are only sensitive to the liquid-crystal tilt with respect to the interface normal, makes possible quantitative detection by measuring the transmitted light intensity with a spectrophotometer. Following a new procedure, not only the concentration dependence of the optical path difference but also the film thickness and the effective birefringence can be determined accurately. We also introduce a new "dynamic" mode of sensing, where (instead of the conventional "steady" mode, which detects the concentration dependence of the steady-state texture) we increase the concentration at a constant rate.

  1. One at a time: counting single-nanoparticle/electrode collisions for accurate particle sizing by overcoming the instability of gold nanoparticles under electrolytic conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Danfeng; Wang, Song; Zheng, Yuanqin; Deng, Zhaoxiang

    2013-12-20

    In response to an increasing demand for understanding electrochemical processes on the nanometer scale, it now becomes possible to monitor electron transfer reactions at the single-nanoparticle level, namely particle collision electrochemistry. This technique has great potential in the development of research tools towards single-particle electrocatalysis and selective and multiplexed particle sizing. However, one existing problem that may discourage these applications is the relatively weak colloidal stability of nanoparticles in an electrolytic solution. Here we report on a facile but efficient way to achieve a good stability of gold nanoparticles in an acidic media so that 'zero-aggregation' collisions can be achieved at a carbon ultramicroelectrode. This allows us to obtain anodic dissolution currents from individual nanoparticles in a 'one particle at a time' manner, based on which accurate particle sizing with a resolution of 1-2 nm can be achieved. Our work strongly suggests that to maintain a well dispersed nanoparticle solution during a particle impact electrochemical experiment is critically important for accurate particle sizing, as well as other applications that require information to be extracted from individual nanoparticles (not their aggregates). PMID:24269991

  2. Detection of Orbital Debris Collision Risks for the Automated Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peret, L.; Legendre, P.; Delavault, S.; Martin, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general collision risk assessment method, which has been applied through numerical simulations to the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) case. During ATV ascent towards the International Space Station, close approaches between the ATV and objects of the USSTRACOM catalog will be monitored through collision rosk assessment. Usually, collision risk assessment relies on an exclusion volume or a probability threshold method. Probability methods are more effective than exclusion volumes but require accurate covariance data. In this work, we propose to use a criterion defined by an adaptive exclusion area. This criterion does not require any probability calculation but is more effective than exclusion volume methods as demonstrated by our numerical experiments. The results of these studies, when confirmed and finalized, will be used for the ATV operations.

  3. Fast and accurate border detection in dermoscopy images using statistical region merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebi, M. Emre; Kingravi, Hassan A.; Iyatomi, Hitoshi; Lee, JeongKyu; Aslandogan, Y. Alp; Van Stoecker, William; Moss, Randy; Malters, Joseph M.; Marghoob, Ashfaq A.

    2007-03-01

    As a result of advances in skin imaging technology and the development of suitable image processing techniques during the last decade, there has been a significant increase of interest in the computer-aided diagnosis of melanoma. Automated border detection is one of the most important steps in this procedure, since the accuracy of the subsequent steps crucially depends on it. In this paper, a fast and unsupervised approach to border detection in dermoscopy images of pigmented skin lesions based on the Statistical Region Merging algorithm is presented. The method is tested on a set of 90 dermoscopy images. The border detection error is quantified by a metric in which a set of dermatologist-determined borders is used as the ground-truth. The proposed method is compared to six state-of-the-art automated methods (optimized histogram thresholding, orientation-sensitive fuzzy c-means, gradient vector flow snakes, dermatologist-like tumor extraction algorithm, meanshift clustering, and the modified JSEG method) and borders determined by a second dermatologist. The results demonstrate that the presented method achieves both fast and accurate border detection in dermoscopy images.

  4. Accurate moving cast shadow suppression based on local color constancy detection.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ariel; Mozerov, Mikhail G; Bagdanov, Andrew D; Gonzàlez, Jordi

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes a novel framework for detection and suppression of properly shadowed regions for most possible scenarios occurring in real video sequences. Our approach requires no prior knowledge about the scene, nor is it restricted to specific scene structures. Furthermore, the technique can detect both achromatic and chromatic shadows even in the presence of camouflage that occurs when foreground regions are very similar in color to shadowed regions. The method exploits local color constancy properties due to reflectance suppression over shadowed regions. To detect shadowed regions in a scene, the values of the background image are divided by values of the current frame in the RGB color space. We show how this luminance ratio can be used to identify segments with low gradient constancy, which in turn distinguish shadows from foreground. Experimental results on a collection of publicly available datasets illustrate the superior performance of our method compared with the most sophisticated, state-of-the-art shadow detection algorithms. These results show that our approach is robust and accurate over a broad range of shadow types and challenging video conditions. PMID:21435975

  5. A simplified and accurate detection of the genetically modified wheat MON71800 with one calibrator plasmid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Saet-Byul; Roh, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Sunghoon; Shin, Min-Ki; Moon, Gui Im; Hong, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2015-06-01

    With the increasing number of genetically modified (GM) events, unauthorized GMO releases into the food market have increased dramatically, and many countries have developed detection tools for them. This study described the qualitative and quantitative detection methods of unauthorized the GM wheat MON71800 with a reference plasmid (pGEM-M71800). The wheat acetyl-CoA carboxylase (acc) gene was used as the endogenous gene. The plasmid pGEM-M71800, which contains both the acc gene and the event-specific target MON71800, was constructed as a positive control for the qualitative and quantitative analyses. The limit of detection in the qualitative PCR assay was approximately 10 copies. In the quantitative PCR assay, the standard deviation and relative standard deviation repeatability values ranged from 0.06 to 0.25 and from 0.23% to 1.12%, respectively. This study supplies a powerful and very simple but accurate detection strategy for unauthorized GM wheat MON71800 that utilizes a single calibrator plasmid. PMID:25624198

  6. Accurate Monitoring and Fault Detection in Wind Measuring Devices through Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Komal Saifullah; Tariq, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Many wind energy projects report poor performance as low as 60% of the predicted performance. The reason for this is poor resource assessment and the use of new untested technologies and systems in remote locations. Predictions about the potential of an area for wind energy projects (through simulated models) may vary from the actual potential of the area. Hence, introducing accurate site assessment techniques will lead to accurate predictions of energy production from a particular area. We solve this problem by installing a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) to periodically analyze the data from anemometers installed in that area. After comparative analysis of the acquired data, the anemometers transmit their readings through a WSN to the sink node for analysis. The sink node uses an iterative algorithm which sequentially detects any faulty anemometer and passes the details of the fault to the central system or main station. We apply the proposed technique in simulation as well as in practical implementation and study its accuracy by comparing the simulation results with experimental results to analyze the variation in the results obtained from both simulation model and implemented model. Simulation results show that the algorithm indicates faulty anemometers with high accuracy and low false alarm rate when as many as 25% of the anemometers become faulty. Experimental analysis shows that anemometers incorporating this solution are better assessed and performance level of implemented projects is increased above 86% of the simulated models. PMID:25421739

  7. Joint iris boundary detection and fit: a real-time method for accurate pupil tracking.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marconi; James, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    A range of applications in visual science rely on accurate tracking of the human pupil's movement and contraction in response to light. While the literature for independent contour detection and fitting of the iris-pupil boundary is vast, a joint approach, in which it is assumed that the pupil has a given geometric shape has been largely overlooked. We present here a global method for simultaneously finding and fitting of an elliptic or circular contour against a dark interior, which produces consistently accurate results even under non-ideal recording conditions, such as reflections near and over the boundary, droopy eye lids, or the sudden formation of tears. The specific form of the proposed optimization problem allows us to write down closed analytic formulae for the gradient and the Hessian of the objective function. Moreover, both the objective function and its derivatives can be cast into vectorized form, making the proposed algorithm significantly faster than its closest relative in the literature. We compare methods in multiple ways, both analytically and numerically, using real iris images as well as idealizations of the iris for which the ground truth boundary is precisely known. The method proposed here is illustrated under challenging recording conditions and it is shown to be robust. PMID:25136477

  8. ROM Plus®: accurate point-of-care detection of ruptured fetal membranes

    PubMed Central

    McQuivey, Ross W; Block, Jon E

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of fetal membranes is imperative to inform and guide gestational age-specific interventions to optimize perinatal outcomes and reduce the risk of serious complications, including preterm delivery and infections. The ROM Plus is a rapid, point-of-care, qualitative immunochromatographic diagnostic test that uses a unique monoclonal/polyclonal antibody approach to detect two different proteins found in amniotic fluid at high concentrations: alpha-fetoprotein and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1. Clinical study results have uniformly demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy and performance characteristics with this point-of-care test that exceeds conventional clinical testing with external laboratory evaluation. The description, indications for use, procedural steps, and laboratory and clinical characterization of this assay are presented in this article. PMID:27274316

  9. ROM Plus(®): accurate point-of-care detection of ruptured fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    McQuivey, Ross W; Block, Jon E

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of fetal membranes is imperative to inform and guide gestational age-specific interventions to optimize perinatal outcomes and reduce the risk of serious complications, including preterm delivery and infections. The ROM Plus is a rapid, point-of-care, qualitative immunochromatographic diagnostic test that uses a unique monoclonal/polyclonal antibody approach to detect two different proteins found in amniotic fluid at high concentrations: alpha-fetoprotein and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1. Clinical study results have uniformly demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy and performance characteristics with this point-of-care test that exceeds conventional clinical testing with external laboratory evaluation. The description, indications for use, procedural steps, and laboratory and clinical characterization of this assay are presented in this article. PMID:27274316

  10. Medical Image Watermarking Technique for Accurate Tamper Detection in ROI and Exact Recovery of ROI

    PubMed Central

    Eswaraiah, R.; Sreenivasa Reddy, E.

    2014-01-01

    In telemedicine while transferring medical images tampers may be introduced. Before making any diagnostic decisions, the integrity of region of interest (ROI) of the received medical image must be verified to avoid misdiagnosis. In this paper, we propose a novel fragile block based medical image watermarking technique to avoid embedding distortion inside ROI, verify integrity of ROI, detect accurately the tampered blocks inside ROI, and recover the original ROI with zero loss. In this proposed method, the medical image is segmented into three sets of pixels: ROI pixels, region of noninterest (RONI) pixels, and border pixels. Then, authentication data and information of ROI are embedded in border pixels. Recovery data of ROI is embedded into RONI. Results of experiments conducted on a number of medical images reveal that the proposed method produces high quality watermarked medical images, identifies the presence of tampers inside ROI with 100% accuracy, and recovers the original ROI without any loss. PMID:25328515

  11. Tissue resonance interaction accurately detects colon lesions: A double-blind pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Maria P; Tufano, Marcello O; Pes, Giovanni M; Cuccu, Marianna; Farina, Valentina; Manca, Alessandra; Graham, David Y

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigated the performance of the tissue resonance interaction method (TRIM) for the non-invasive detection of colon lesions. METHODS: We performed a prospective single-center blinded pilot study of consecutive adults undergoing colonoscopy at the University Hospital in Sassari, Italy. Before patients underwent colonoscopy, they were examined by the TRIMprobe which detects differences in electromagnetic properties between pathological and normal tissues. All patients had completed the polyethylene glycol-containing bowel prep for the colonoscopy procedure before being screened. During the procedure the subjects remained fully dressed. A hand-held probe was moved over the abdomen and variations in electromagnetic signals were recorded for 3 spectral lines (462-465 MHz, 930 MHz, and 1395 MHz). A single investigator, blind to any clinical information, performed the test using the TRIMprob system. Abnormal signals were identified and recorded as malignant or benign (adenoma or hyperplastic polyps). Findings were compared with those from colonoscopy with histologic confirmation. Statistical analysis was performed by χ2 test. RESULTS: A total of 305 consecutive patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled over a period of 12 months. The most frequent indication for colonoscopy was abdominal pain (33%). The TRIMprob was well accepted by all patients; none spontaneously complained about the procedure, and no adverse effects were observed. TRIM proved inaccurate for polyp detection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and they were excluded leaving 281 subjects (mean age 59 ± 13 years; 107 males). The TRIM detected and accurately characterized all 12 adenocarcinomas and 135/137 polyps (98.5%) including 64 adenomatous (100%) found. The method identified cancers and polyps with 98.7% sensitivity, 96.2% specificity, and 97.5% diagnostic accuracy, compared to colonoscopy and histology analyses. The positive predictive value was 96.7% and the

  12. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  13. Accurate and reliable high-throughput detection of copy number variation in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Fiegler, Heike; Redon, Richard; Andrews, Dan; Scott, Carol; Andrews, Robert; Carder, Carol; Clark, Richard; Dovey, Oliver; Ellis, Peter; Feuk, Lars; French, Lisa; Hunt, Paul; Kalaitzopoulos, Dimitrios; Larkin, James; Montgomery, Lyndal; Perry, George H.; Plumb, Bob W.; Porter, Keith; Rigby, Rachel E.; Rigler, Diane; Valsesia, Armand; Langford, Cordelia; Humphray, Sean J.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Lee, Charles; Hurles, Matthew E.; Carter, Nigel P.

    2006-01-01

    This study describes a new tool for accurate and reliable high-throughput detection of copy number variation in the human genome. We have constructed a large-insert clone DNA microarray covering the entire human genome in tiling path resolution that we have used to identify copy number variation in human populations. Crucial to this study has been the development of a robust array platform and analytic process for the automated identification of copy number variants (CNVs). The array consists of 26,574 clones covering 93.7% of euchromatic regions. Clones were selected primarily from the published “Golden Path,” and mapping was confirmed by fingerprinting and BAC-end sequencing. Array performance was extensively tested by a series of validation assays. These included determining the hybridization characteristics of each individual clone on the array by chromosome-specific add-in experiments. Estimation of data reproducibility and false-positive/negative rates was carried out using self–self hybridizations, replicate experiments, and independent validations of CNVs. Based on these studies, we developed a variance-based automatic copy number detection analysis process (CNVfinder) and have demonstrated its robustness by comparison with the SW-ARRAY method. PMID:17122085

  14. Detection and accurate identification of new or emerging bacteria in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bittar, F; Rolain, J-M

    2010-07-01

    Respiratory infections remain a major threat to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The detection and correct identification of the bacteria implicated in these infections is critical for the therapeutic management of patients. The traditional methods of culture and phenotypic identification of bacteria lack both sensitivity and specificity because many bacteria can be missed and/or misidentified. Molecular analyses have recently emerged as useful means to resolve these problems, including molecular methods for accurate identification or detection of bacteria and molecular methods for evaluation of microbial diversity. These recent molecular technologies have increased the list of new and/or emerging pathogens and epidemic strains associated with CF patients. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of intact cells has also emerged recently as a powerful and rapid method for the routine identification of bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories and will certainly represent the method of choice also for the routine identification of bacteria in the context of CF. Finally, recent data derived from molecular culture-independent analyses indicate the presence of a previously underestimated, complex microbial community in sputa from CF patients. Interestingly, full genome sequencing of some bacteria frequently recovered from CF patients has highlighted the fact that the lungs of CF patients are hotspots for lateral gene transfer and the adaptation of these ecosystems to a specific chronic condition. PMID:20880410

  15. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-05-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  16. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (BiologTM) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  17. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (Biolog(TM)) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  18. Guided resonances on lithium niobate for extremely small electric field detection investigated by accurate sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wentao; Ndao, Abdoulaye; Lu, Huihui; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Baida, Fadi Issam

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of guided resonances (GR) on a thin film lithium niobate rectangular lattice photonic crystal by band diagram calculations and 3D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) transmission investigations which cover a broad range of parameters. A photonic crystal with an active zone as small as 13μm×13μm×0.7μm can be easily designed to obtain a resonance Q value in the order of 1000. These resonances are then employed in electric field (E-field) sensing applications exploiting the electro optic (EO) effect of lithium niobate. A local field factor that is calculated locally for each FDTD cell is proposed to accurately estimate the sensitivity of GR based E-field sensor. The local field factor allows well agreement between simulations and reported experimental data therefore providing a valuable method in optimizing the GR structure to obtain high sensitivities. When these resonances are associated with sub-picometer optical spectrum analyzer and high field enhancement antenna design, an E-field probe with a sensitivity of 50 μV/m could be achieved. The results of our simulations could be also exploited in other EO based applications such as EEG (Electroencephalography) or ECG (Electrocardiography) probe and E-field frequency detector with an 'invisible' probe to the field being detected etc. PMID:27607627

  19. Granular gas of ellipsoids: analytical collision detection implemented on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Lind, P. G.; Maza, D.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2015-06-01

    We present a hybrid GPU-CPU implementation of an accurate discrete element model for a system of ellipsoids. The ellipsoids have three translational degrees of freedom, their rotational motion being described through quaternions and the contact interaction between two ellipsoids is described by a force which accounts for the elastic and dissipative interactions. Further we combine the exact derivation of contact points between ellipsoids (Wang et al. in Computing 72(1-2):235-246, 2004) with the advantages of the GPU-NVIDIA parallelization strategy (Owens et al. in Comput Graph Forum 26:80-113, 2007). This novelty makes the analytical algorithm computationally feasible when dealing with several thousands of particles. As a benchmark, we simulate a granular gas of frictionless ellipsoids identifying a classical homogeneous cooling state for ellipsoids. For low dissipative systems, the behavior of the granular temperature indicates that the cooling dynamics is governed by the elongation of the ellipsoids and the restitution coefficient. Our outcomes comply with the statistical mechanical laws and the results are in agreement with previous findings for hard ellipsoids (Bereolos et al. in J Chem Phys 99:6087, 1993; Villemot and Talbot in Granul Matter 14:91-97, 2012). Additionally, new insight is provided namely suggesting that the mean field description of the cooling dynamics of elongated particles is conditioned by the particle shape and the degree of energy equipartition.

  20. Collision detection for spacecraft proximity operations. Ph.D. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin M.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a new collision detection algorithm to be used when two spacecraft are operating in the same vicinity is described. The two spacecraft are modeled as unions of convex polyhedra, where the polyhedron resulting from the union may be either convex or nonconvex. The relative motion of the two spacecraft is assumed to be such that one vehicle is moving with constant linear and angular velocity with respect to the other. The algorithm determines if a collision is possible and, if so, predicts the time when the collision will take place. The theoretical basis for the new collision detection algorithm is the C-function formulation of the configuration space approach recently introduced by researchers in robotics. Three different types of C-functions are defined that model the contacts between the vertices, edges, and faces of the polyhedra representing the two spacecraft. The C-functions are shown to be transcendental functions of time for the assumed trajectory of the moving spacecraft. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated for several example cases.

  1. Aging and the detection of imminent collisions under simulated fog conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Rui; Bian, Zheng; Guindon, Amy; Andersen, George J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined age-related differences in collision detection performance when contrast of the driving scene was reduced by simulated fog. Older and younger drivers were presented with a collision detection scenario in a simulator in which an object moved at a constant speed on a linear trajectory towards the driver. Drivers were shown part of the motion path of an approaching object that would eventually either collide with or pass by the driver and were required to determine whether or not the object would collide with the driver. Driver motion was either stationary or moving along a linear path down the roadway. A no fog condition and three different levels of fog were examined. Detection performance decreased when dense fog was simulated for older but not for younger observers. An age-related decrement was also found with shorter display durations (longer time to contact). When the vehicle was moving decrements in performance were observed for both younger and older drivers. These results suggest that under inclement weather conditions with reduced visibility, such as fog, older drivers may have an increased crash risk due to a decreased ability to detect impending collision events. PMID:23036430

  2. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  3. MIDAS robust trend estimator for accurate GPS station velocities without step detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey; Kreemer, Corné; Hammond, William C.; Gazeaux, Julien

    2016-03-01

    Automatic estimation of velocities from GPS coordinate time series is becoming required to cope with the exponentially increasing flood of available data, but problems detectable to the human eye are often overlooked. This motivates us to find an automatic and accurate estimator of trend that is resistant to common problems such as step discontinuities, outliers, seasonality, skewness, and heteroscedasticity. Developed here, Median Interannual Difference Adjusted for Skewness (MIDAS) is a variant of the Theil-Sen median trend estimator, for which the ordinary version is the median of slopes vij = (xj-xi)/(tj-ti) computed between all data pairs i > j. For normally distributed data, Theil-Sen and least squares trend estimates are statistically identical, but unlike least squares, Theil-Sen is resistant to undetected data problems. To mitigate both seasonality and step discontinuities, MIDAS selects data pairs separated by 1 year. This condition is relaxed for time series with gaps so that all data are used. Slopes from data pairs spanning a step function produce one-sided outliers that can bias the median. To reduce bias, MIDAS removes outliers and recomputes the median. MIDAS also computes a robust and realistic estimate of trend uncertainty. Statistical tests using GPS data in the rigid North American plate interior show ±0.23 mm/yr root-mean-square (RMS) accuracy in horizontal velocity. In blind tests using synthetic data, MIDAS velocities have an RMS accuracy of ±0.33 mm/yr horizontal, ±1.1 mm/yr up, with a 5th percentile range smaller than all 20 automatic estimators tested. Considering its general nature, MIDAS has the potential for broader application in the geosciences.

  4. Advanced Whale Detection Methods to Improve Whale-Ship Collision Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillivary, P. A.; Tougher, B.

    2010-12-01

    Collisions between whales and ships are now estimated to account for fully a third of all whale deaths worldwide. Such collisions can incur costly ship repairs, and may damage or disable ship steering requiring costly response efforts from state and federal agencies. While collisions with rare whale species are problematic in further reducing their low population numbers, collisions with some of the more abundant whale species are also becoming more common as their populations increase. The problem is compounded as ship traffic likewise continues to grow, thus posing a growing risk to both whales and ships. Federal agencies are considering policies to alter shipping lanes to minimize whale-ship collisions off California and elsewhere. Similar efforts have already been undertaken for the Boston Harbor ship approach, where a bend in the shipping lane was introduced to reduce ship traffic through a favorite area of the highly endangered North Atlantic Right Whale. The Boston shipping approach lane was also flanked with a system of moorings with whale detection hydrophones which broadcast the presence of calling whales in or near the ship channel to approaching ships in real time. When so notified, ships can post lookouts to avoid whale collisions, and reduce speed to reduce the likelihood of whale death, which is highly speed dependent. To reduce the likelihood and seriousness of whale-ship collisions off California and Alaska in particular, there is a need to better know areas of particularly high use by whales, and consider implementation of reduced ship speeds in these areas. There is also an ongoing discussion of altering shipping lanes in the Santa Barbara Channel to avoid habitual Blue whales aggregation areas in particular. However, unlike the case for Boston Harbor, notification of ships that whales are nearby to reduce or avoid collisions is complicated because many California and Alaska whale species do not call regularly, and would thus be undetected by

  5. Error Analysis in a Stereo Vision-Based Pedestrian Detection Sensor for Collision Avoidance Applications

    PubMed Central

    Llorca, David F.; Sotelo, Miguel A.; Parra, Ignacio; Ocaña, Manuel; Bergasa, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the depth estimation error of a stereo vision-based pedestrian detection sensor for automotive applications such as pedestrian collision avoidance and/or mitigation. The sensor comprises two synchronized and calibrated low-cost cameras. Pedestrians are detected by combining a 3D clustering method with Support Vector Machine-based (SVM) classification. The influence of the sensor parameters in the stereo quantization errors is analyzed in detail providing a point of reference for choosing the sensor setup according to the application requirements. The sensor is then validated in real experiments. Collision avoidance maneuvers by steering are carried out by manual driving. A real time kinematic differential global positioning system (RTK-DGPS) is used to provide ground truth data corresponding to both the pedestrian and the host vehicle locations. The performed field test provided encouraging results and proved the validity of the proposed sensor for being used in the automotive sector towards applications such as autonomous pedestrian collision avoidance. PMID:22319323

  6. Error analysis in a stereo vision-based pedestrian detection sensor for collision avoidance applications.

    PubMed

    Llorca, David F; Sotelo, Miguel A; Parra, Ignacio; Ocaña, Manuel; Bergasa, Luis M

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the depth estimation error of a stereo vision-based pedestrian detection sensor for automotive applications such as pedestrian collision avoidance and/or mitigation. The sensor comprises two synchronized and calibrated low-cost cameras. Pedestrians are detected by combining a 3D clustering method with Support Vector Machine-based (SVM) classification. The influence of the sensor parameters in the stereo quantization errors is analyzed in detail providing a point of reference for choosing the sensor setup according to the application requirements. The sensor is then validated in real experiments. Collision avoidance maneuvers by steering are carried out by manual driving. A real time kinematic differential global positioning system (RTK-DGPS) is used to provide ground truth data corresponding to both the pedestrian and the host vehicle locations. The performed field test provided encouraging results and proved the validity of the proposed sensor for being used in the automotive sector towards applications such as autonomous pedestrian collision avoidance. PMID:22319323

  7. Conformal prediction for anomaly detection and collision alert in space surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huimin; Chen, Genshe; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh

    2013-05-01

    Anomaly detection has been considered as an important technique for detecting critical events in a wide range of data rich applications where a majority of the data is inconsequential and/or uninteresting. We study the detection of anomalous behaviors among space objects using the theory of conformal prediction for distribution-independent on-line learning to provide collision alerts with a desirable confidence level. We exploit the fact that conformal predictors provide valid forecasted sets at specified confidence levels under the relatively weak assumption that the normal training data, together with the normal testing data, are generated from the same distribution. If the actual observation is not included in the conformal prediction set, it is classified as anomalous at the corresponding significance level. Interpreting the significance level as an upper bound of the probability that a normal observation is mistakenly classified as anomalous, we can conveniently adjust the sensitivity to anomalies while controlling the false alarm rate without having to find the application specific threshold. The proposed conformal prediction method was evaluated for a space surveillance application using the open source North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) catalog data. The validity of the prediction sets is justified by the empirical error rate that matches the significance level. In addition, experiments with simulated anomalous data indicate that anomaly detection sensitivity with conformal prediction is superior to that of the existing methods in declaring potential collision events.

  8. Detecting Children's Lies: Are Parents Accurate Judges of Their Own Children's Lies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talwar, Victoria; Renaud, Sarah-Jane; Conway, Lauryn

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated whether parents are accurate judges of their own children's lie-telling behavior. Participants included 250 mother-child dyads. Children were between three and 11 years of age. A temptation resistance paradigm was used to elicit a minor transgressive behavior from the children involving peeking at a forbidden toy and…

  9. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Measurement of the Collision Products of Carbamate Anions Derived from CO2 Capture Sorbents: Paving the Way for Accurate Quantitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Phil; Fisher, Keith J.; Attalla, Moetaz Ibrahim

    2011-08-01

    The reaction between CO2 and aqueous amines to produce a charged carbamate product plays a crucial role in post-combustion capture chemistry when primary and secondary amines are used. In this paper, we report the low energy negative-ion CID results for several anionic carbamates derived from primary and secondary amines commonly used as post-combustion capture solvents. The study was performed using the modern equivalent of a triple quadrupole instrument equipped with a T-wave collision cell. Deuterium labeling of 2-aminoethanol (1,1,2,2,-d4-2-aminoethanol) and computations at the M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level were used to confirm the identity of the fragmentation products for 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate (derived from 2-aminoethanol), in particular the ions CN-, NCO- and facile neutral losses of CO2 and water; there is precedent for the latter in condensed phase isocyanate chemistry. The fragmentations of 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate were generalized for carbamate anions derived from other capture amines, including ethylenediamine, diethanolamine, and piperazine. We also report unequivocal evidence for the existence of carbamate anions derived from sterically hindered amines ( Tris(2-hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and 2-methyl-2-aminopropanol). For the suite of carbamates investigated, diagnostic losses include the decarboxylation product (-CO2, 44 mass units), loss of 46 mass units and the fragments NCO- ( m/z 42) and CN- ( m/z 26). We also report low energy CID results for the dicarbamate dianion (-O2CNHC2H4NHCO{2/-}) commonly encountered in CO2 capture solution utilizing ethylenediamine. Finally, we demonstrate a promising ion chromatography-MS based procedure for the separation and quantitation of aqueous anionic carbamates, which is based on the reported CID findings. The availability of accurate quantitation methods for ionic CO2 capture products could lead to dynamic operational tuning of CO2 capture-plants and, thus, cost-savings via real-time manipulation of solvent

  10. Electrochemical Detection of Single Phospholipid Vesicle Collisions at a Pt Ultramicroelectrode.

    PubMed

    Lebègue, Estelle; Anderson, Cari M; Dick, Jeffrey E; Webb, Lauren J; Bard, Allen J

    2015-10-27

    We report the collision behavior of single unilamellar vesicles, composed of a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM), on a platinum (Pt) ultramicroelectrode (UME) by two electrochemical detection methods. In the first method, the blocking of a solution redox reaction, induced by the single vesicle adsorption on the Pt UME, can be observed in the amperometric i-t response as current steps during the electrochemical oxidation of ferrocyanide. In the second technique, the ferrocyanide redox probe is directly encapsulated inside vesicles and can be oxidized during the vesicle collision on the UME if the potential is poised positive enough for ferrocyanide oxidation to occur. In the amperometric i-t response for the latter experiment, a current spike is observed. Here, we report the vesicle blocking (VB) method as a relevant technique for determining the vesicle solution concentration from the collisional frequency and also for observing the vesicle adhesion on the Pt surface. In addition, vesicle reactor (VR) experiments show clear evidence that the lipid bilayer membrane does not collapse or break open at the Pt UME during the vesicle collision. Because the bilayer is too thick for electron tunneling to occur readily, an appropriate concentration of a surfactant, such as Triton X-100 (TX100), was added in the VR solution to induce loosening of the bilayer (transfection conditions), allowing the electrode to oxidize the contents of the vesicle. With this technique, the TX100 effect on the vesicle lipid bilayer permeability can be evaluated through the current spike charge and frequency corresponding to redox vesicle collisions. PMID:26474107

  11. Development of a High Throughput Assay for Rapid and Accurate 10-Plex Detection of Citrus Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need to reliably detect and identify multiple plant pathogens simultaneously, especially in woody perennial hosts, has led to development of new molecular diagnostic approaches. In this study, a Luminex-based system was developed that provided a robust and sensitive test for simultaneous detect...

  12. Molecular Detection of Foodborne Pathogens: A Rapid and Accurate Answer to Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Manisha; Bansal, Sangita; Sharma, Satish K; Gupta, Ram K

    2016-07-01

    Food safety is a global health concern. For the prevention and recognition of problems related to health and safety, detection of foodborne pathogen is of utmost importance at all levels of food production chain. For several decades, a lot of research has been targeted at the development of rapid methodology as reducing the time needed to complete pathogen detection tests has been the primary goal of food microbiologists. With the result, food microbiology laboratories now have a wide array of detection methods and automated technologies such as enzyme immunoassay, polymerase chain reaction, and microarrays, which can cut test times considerably. Nucleic acid amplification strategies and advances in amplicon detection methodologies have been the key factors in the progress of molecular microbiology. A comprehensive literature survey has been carried out to give an overview in the field of foodborne pathogen detection. In this paper, we describe the conventional methods, as well as recent developments in food pathogen detection, identification, and quantification, with a major emphasis on molecular detection methods. PMID:25830555

  13. Towards Accurate Node-Based Detection of P2P Botnets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Botnets are a serious security threat to the current Internet infrastructure. In this paper, we propose a novel direction for P2P botnet detection called node-based detection. This approach focuses on the network characteristics of individual nodes. Based on our model, we examine node's flows and extract the useful features over a given time period. We have tested our approach on real-life data sets and achieved detection rates of 99-100% and low false positives rates of 0–2%. Comparison with other similar approaches on the same data sets shows that our approach outperforms the existing approaches. PMID:25089287

  14. Towards accurate node-based detection of P2P botnets.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chunyong

    2014-01-01

    Botnets are a serious security threat to the current Internet infrastructure. In this paper, we propose a novel direction for P2P botnet detection called node-based detection. This approach focuses on the network characteristics of individual nodes. Based on our model, we examine node's flows and extract the useful features over a given time period. We have tested our approach on real-life data sets and achieved detection rates of 99-100% and low false positives rates of 0-2%. Comparison with other similar approaches on the same data sets shows that our approach outperforms the existing approaches. PMID:25089287

  15. Combining CRF and multi-hypothesis detection for accurate lesion segmentation in breast sonograms.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhihui; Wang, Qiang; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Lee, Jong-Ha; Ren, Haibing; Kim, Ji-yeun

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of lesion segmentation for breast ultrasound image relies on several diagnostic rules on intensity, texture, etc. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm to achieve a comprehensive decision upon these rules by incorporating image over-segmentation and lesion detection in a pairwise CRF model, rather than a term-by-term translation. Multiple detection hypotheses are used to propagate object-level cues to segments and a unified classifier is trained based on the concatenated features. The experimental results show that our algorithm can avoid the drawbacks of separate detection or bottom-up segmentation, and can deal with very complicated cases. PMID:23285589

  16. An accurate tongue tissue strain synthesis using pseudo-wavelet reconstruction-based tagline detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaohui; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Chi-Fishman, Gloria

    2007-03-01

    This paper describe our work on tagline detection and tissue strain synthesis. The tagline detection method extends our previous work 16 using pseudo-wavelet reconstruction. The novelty in tagline detection is that we integrated an active contour model and successfully improved the detection and indexing performance. Using pseudo-wavelet reconstruction-based method, prominent wavelet coefficients were retained while others were eliminated. Taglines were then extracted from the reconstructed images using thresholding. Due to noise and artifacts, a tagline can be broken into segments. We employed an active contour model that tracks the most likely segments and bridges them. Experiments demonstrated that our method extracts taglines automatically with greater robustness. Tissue strain was also reconstructed using extracted taglines.

  17. Is Commercially Available Point Finder Accurate and Reliable in Detecting Active Auricular Acupuncture Points?

    PubMed Central

    Maranets, Inna; Lin, Eric C.; DeZinno, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study was done to determine the specificity and sensitivity of a commercial Pointer Plus (Point finder) in detecting a region of low skin resistance on the ear. Design This was a prospective blinded study. Setting/location The study was done at the Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT. Subjects The subjects were men and women who work at Yale New Haven Hospital. Interventions There were no interventions. Outcome measures Correlations were made between self-reported musculoskeletal pain and the detection of low skin resistance on the ear. Results The positive predictive value for Pointer Plus detecting low skin resistance correlating to the neck region of French auricular map is 0.76 (76%). The positive predictive value for Pointer Plus to detect low skin resistance area correlating to the low back region of French auricular map is 0.25. The positive predictive value for Pointer Plus in detecting any low in skin resistance on the external auricles in patients who complained of more than two musculoskeletal pains is 0.29. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a commercial Pointer Plus (point finder) in detecting a region of low skin resistance on the ear being unreliable, depending on the correlating area based on a published auricular map. Additional assessments are needed to support the clinical practice. PMID:22834870

  18. Enabling accurate photodiode detection of multiple optical traps by spatial filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Dino; Reihani, S. Nader S.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2014-09-01

    Dual and multiple beam optical tweezers allow for advanced trapping geometries beyond single traps, however, these increased manipulation capabilities, usually complicate the detection of position and force. The accuracy of position and force measurements is often compromised by crosstalk between the detected signals, this crosstalk leading to a systematic error on the measured forces and distances. In dual-beam optical trapping setups, the two traps are typically orthogonal polarized and crosstalk can be minimized by inserting polarization optics in front of the detector, however, this method is not perfect because of the de-polarization of the trapping beam introduced by the required high numerical aperture optics. Moreover, the restriction to two orthogonal polarisation states limits the number of detectable traps to two. Here, we present an easy-to-implement simple method to efficiently eliminate cross-talk in dual beam setups.1 The technique is based on spatial filtering and is highly compatible with standard back-focal-plane photodiode based detection. The reported method significantly improves the accuracy of force-distance measurements, e.g., of single molecules, hence providing much more scientific value for the experimental efforts. Furthermore, it opens the possibility for fast and simultaneous photodiode based detection of multiple holographically generated optical traps.

  19. Accurate and reproducible detection of proteins in water using an extended-gate type organic transistor biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamiki, Tsukuru; Minami, Tsuyoshi; Kurita, Ryoji; Niwa, Osamu; Wakida, Shin-ichi; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, we describe an accurate antibody detection method using a fabricated extended-gate type organic field-effect-transistor (OFET), which can be operated at below 3 V. The protein-sensing portion of the designed device is the gate electrode functionalized with streptavidin. Streptavidin possesses high molecular recognition ability for biotin, which specifically allows for the detection of biotinylated proteins. Here, we attempted to detect biotinylated immunoglobulin G (IgG) and observed a shift of threshold voltage of the OFET upon the addition of the antibody in an aqueous solution with a competing bovine serum albumin interferent. The detection limit for the biotinylated IgG was 8 nM, which indicates the potential utility of the designed device in healthcare applications.

  20. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom-molecule collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-04-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom-molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X1Σ+g ground state 85Rb2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom-molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85Rb2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 1011 cm-3.

  1. How Accurately Can Your Wrist Device Recognize Daily Activities and Detect Falls?

    PubMed Central

    Gjoreski, Martin; Gjoreski, Hristijan; Luštrek, Mitja; Gams, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    Although wearable accelerometers can successfully recognize activities and detect falls, their adoption in real life is low because users do not want to wear additional devices. A possible solution is an accelerometer inside a wrist device/smartwatch. However, wrist placement might perform poorly in terms of accuracy due to frequent random movements of the hand. In this paper we perform a thorough, large-scale evaluation of methods for activity recognition and fall detection on four datasets. On the first two we showed that the left wrist performs better compared to the dominant right one, and also better compared to the elbow and the chest, but worse compared to the ankle, knee and belt. On the third (Opportunity) dataset, our method outperformed the related work, indicating that our feature-preprocessing creates better input data. And finally, on a real-life unlabeled dataset the recognized activities captured the subject’s daily rhythm and activities. Our fall-detection method detected all of the fast falls and minimized the false positives, achieving 85% accuracy on the first dataset. Because the other datasets did not contain fall events, only false positives were evaluated, resulting in 9 for the second, 1 for the third and 15 for the real-life dataset (57 days data). PMID:27258282

  2. How Accurately Can Your Wrist Device Recognize Daily Activities and Detect Falls?

    PubMed

    Gjoreski, Martin; Gjoreski, Hristijan; Luštrek, Mitja; Gams, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    Although wearable accelerometers can successfully recognize activities and detect falls, their adoption in real life is low because users do not want to wear additional devices. A possible solution is an accelerometer inside a wrist device/smartwatch. However, wrist placement might perform poorly in terms of accuracy due to frequent random movements of the hand. In this paper we perform a thorough, large-scale evaluation of methods for activity recognition and fall detection on four datasets. On the first two we showed that the left wrist performs better compared to the dominant right one, and also better compared to the elbow and the chest, but worse compared to the ankle, knee and belt. On the third (Opportunity) dataset, our method outperformed the related work, indicating that our feature-preprocessing creates better input data. And finally, on a real-life unlabeled dataset the recognized activities captured the subject's daily rhythm and activities. Our fall-detection method detected all of the fast falls and minimized the false positives, achieving 85% accuracy on the first dataset. Because the other datasets did not contain fall events, only false positives were evaluated, resulting in 9 for the second, 1 for the third and 15 for the real-life dataset (57 days data). PMID:27258282

  3. Unique pentafluorobenzylation and collision-induced dissociation for specific and accurate GC-MS/MS quantification of the catecholamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) in human urine.

    PubMed

    Zoerner, Alexander A; Heusser, Karsten; Gutzki, Frank M; Mitschke, Anja; Tank, Jens; Stichtenoth, Dirk O; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2011-05-15

    In the human body, the catecholamine norepinephrine is mainly metabolized to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) which therefore serves as an important biomarker for norepinephrine's metabolism. Most data on DHPG concentrations in human plasma and urine has been generated by using HPLC-ECD or GC-MS technologies. Here, we describe a stable-isotope dilution GC-MS/MS method for the quantitative determination of DHPG in human urine using trideutero-DHPG (d(3)-DHPG) as internal standard and a two-step derivatization process with pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFB-Br) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). Two pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives were obtained and identified, i.e., two isomeric DHPG-PFB-(TMS)(3) derivatives and the later eluting DHPG-tetrafluorobenzyl-(TMS)(2) derivative, i.e., DHPG-TFB-(TMS)(2). To our knowledge the DHPG-TFB-(TMS)(2) derivative and the underlying reaction have not been reported previously. In this reaction both vicinal aromatic hydroxyl groups of DHPG react with PFB-Br to form a heterocyclic seven-membered [1,4]dioxepin compound. The DHPG-TFB-(TMS)(2) derivative was used for quantitative GC-MS/MS analysis in the electron-capturing negative-ion chemical ionization mode by selected-reaction monitoring of m/z 351 from m/z 401 for DHPG and of m/z 352 from m/z 404 for d(3)-DHPG. Validation experiments on human urine samples spiked with DHPG in a narrow (0-33 nM) and a wide range (0-901 nM) revealed high recovery (86-104%) and low imprecision (RSD; 0.01-2.8%). LOD and relative LLOQ (rLLOQ) values of the method for DHPG were determined to be 76 amol and 9.4%, respectively. In urine of 28 patients suffering from chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, DHPG was measured at a mean concentration of 238 nM (38.3 μg/g creatinine). The DHPG concentration in the respective control group of 40 healthy subjects was measured to be 328 nM (39.2 μg/g creatinine). Given the unique derivatization reaction and collision

  4. GUIDANCE2: accurate detection of unreliable alignment regions accounting for the uncertainty of multiple parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Itamar; Ashkenazy, Haim; Katoh, Kazutaka; Pupko, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Inference of multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is a critical part of phylogenetic and comparative genomics studies. However, from the same set of sequences different MSAs are often inferred, depending on the methodologies used and the assumed parameters. Much effort has recently been devoted to improving the ability to identify unreliable alignment regions. Detecting such unreliable regions was previously shown to be important for downstream analyses relying on MSAs, such as the detection of positive selection. Here we developed GUIDANCE2, a new integrative methodology that accounts for: (i) uncertainty in the process of indel formation, (ii) uncertainty in the assumed guide tree and (iii) co-optimal solutions in the pairwise alignments, used as building blocks in progressive alignment algorithms. We compared GUIDANCE2 with seven methodologies to detect unreliable MSA regions using extensive simulations and empirical benchmarks. We show that GUIDANCE2 outperforms all previously developed methodologies. Furthermore, GUIDANCE2 also provides a set of alternative MSAs which can be useful for downstream analyses. The novel algorithm is implemented as a web-server, available at: http://guidance.tau.ac.il. PMID:25883146

  5. RT-PCR is a more accurate diagnostic tool for detection of BCR-ABL rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Zehnbauer, B.A.; Allen, A.P.; McGrath, S.D.

    1994-09-01

    Detection of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1) or genomic Southern hybridization for clonal gene rearrangement (GSH-R) has provided very specific identification of BCR-ABL gene rearrangement. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is diagnostic for patterns of BCR-ABL expression which are undetected by GSH-R and/or Ph1 and provides increased sensitivity both at diagnosis and in detection of minimal residual leukemia. Fifty-three specimens (of 150 tested from 119 consecutive leukemia patients) were RT-PCR positive for BCR-ABL gene expression confirmed by hybridization of PCR products with b{sub 3}a{sub 2}, b{sub 2}a{sub 2}, or e{sub 1}a{sub 2} junction-specific oligonucleotides. In 6 cases of CML with GSH-R{sup {minus}}at diagnosis, RT-PCR provided specific BCR-ABL identification. Deletion of BCR regions, low mitotic index, or e{sub 1}a{sub 2} expression caused failure to detect GSH-R or Ph1 translocation.

  6. Avoiding incidental predation by mammalian herbivores: accurate detection and efficient response in aphids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gish, Moshe; Dafni, Amots; Inbar, Moshe

    2011-09-01

    Mammalian herbivores eat plants that may also provide food and shelter for insects. The direct trophic effect of the browsing and grazing of mammalian herbivory on insects, which is probably prevalent in terrestrial ecosystems, has been mostly neglected by ecologists. We examined how the aphid Uroleucon sonchi L. deals with the danger of incidental predation by mammalian herbivores. We found that most (76%) of the aphids in a colony survive the ingestion of the plant by a feeding herbivore. They do so by sensing the combination of heat and humidity in the herbivore's breath and immediately dropping off the plant in large numbers. Their ability to sense the herbivore's breath or their tendency to drop off the plant weakens as ambient temperature rises. This could indicate a limitation of the aphids' sensory system or an adaptation that enables them to avoid the hostile conditions on a hot ground. Once on the ground, U. sonchi is highly mobile and capable of locating a new host plant by advancing in a pattern that differs significantly from random movement. The accurate and efficient defense mechanism of U. sonchi emphasizes the significance of incidental predation as a danger to plant-dwelling invertebrates.

  7. A MATLAB-based tool for accurate detection of perfect overlapping and nested inverted repeats in DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Sreeskandarajan, Sutharzan; Flowers, Michelle M.; Karro, John E.; Liang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Palindromic sequences, or inverted repeats (IRs), in DNA sequences involve important biological processes such as DNA–protein binding, DNA replication and DNA transposition. Development of bioinformatics tools that are capable of accurately detecting perfect IRs can enable genome-wide studies of IR patterns in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Different from conventional string-comparison approaches, we propose a novel algorithm that uses a cumulative score system based on a prime number representation of nucleotide bases. We then implemented this algorithm as a MATLAB-based program for perfect IR detection. In comparison with other existing tools, our program demonstrates a high accuracy in detecting nested and overlapping IRs. Availability and implementation: The source code is freely available on (http://bioinfolab.miamioh.edu/bioinfolab/palindrome.php) Contact: liangc@miamioh.edu or karroje@miamioh.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24215021

  8. Accurate, multi-kb reads resolve complex populations and detect rare microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Itai; Kertesz, Michael; Hug, Laura A.; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Blauwkamp, Timothy A.; Castelle, Cindy J.; Amirebrahimi, Mojgan; Thomas, Brian C.; Burstein, David; Tringe, Susannah G.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of microbial communities is essential for understanding global biogeochemical processes and can guide bioremediation and medical treatments. Metagenomics is most commonly used to analyze microbial diversity and metabolic potential, but assemblies of the short reads generated by current sequencing platforms may fail to recover heterogeneous strain populations and rare organisms. Here we used short (150-bp) and long (multi-kb) synthetic reads to evaluate strain heterogeneity and study microorganisms at low abundance in complex microbial communities from terrestrial sediments. The long-read data revealed multiple (probably dozens of) closely related species and strains from previously undescribed Deltaproteobacteria and Aminicenantes (candidate phylum OP8). Notably, these are the most abundant organisms in the communities, yet short-read assemblies achieved only partial genome coverage, mostly in the form of short scaffolds (N50 = ∼2200 bp). Genome architecture and metabolic potential for these lineages were reconstructed using a new synteny-based method. Analysis of long-read data also revealed thousands of species whose abundances were <0.1% in all samples. Most of the organisms in this “long tail” of rare organisms belong to phyla that are also represented by abundant organisms. Genes encoding glycosyl hydrolases are significantly more abundant than expected in rare genomes, suggesting that rare species may augment the capability for carbon turnover and confer resilience to changing environmental conditions. Overall, the study showed that a diversity of closely related strains and rare organisms account for a major portion of the communities. These are probably common features of many microbial communities and can be effectively studied using a combination of long and short reads. PMID:25665577

  9. Abdominal MRI without Enteral Contrast Accurately Detects Intestinal Fibrostenosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jeremy G; Kalb, Bobby; Martin, Diego; Dhere, Tanvi; Perez, Sebastian D; Srinivasan, Jahnavi K

    2015-11-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presenting for surgical evaluation require thorough small bowel surveillance as it improves accuracy of diagnosis (ulcerative colitis versus Crohn's) and differentiates those who may respond to nonoperative therapy, preserving bowel length. MRI has not been validated conclusively against histopathology in IBD. Most protocols require enteral contrast. This study aimed to 1) evaluate the accuracy of MRI for inflammation, fibrosis, and extraluminal complications and 2) compare MRI without enteral contrast to standard magnetic resonance enterography. Adults with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis who underwent abdominal MRI and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Of 65 patients evaluated, 55 met inclusion criteria. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI for disease involvement localized by segment were 93 per cent (95% confidence interval = 89.4-95.0) and 95 per cent (95% confidence interval = 92.3-97.0), respectively (positive predictive value was 86%, negative predictive value was 98%). Sensitivity and specificity between MRI with and without oral and rectal contrast were similar (96% vs 91% and 99% vs 94%, P > 0.10). As were positive predictive value and negative predictive value (85% vs 96%, P = 0.16; 97% vs 99%, P = 0.42). Magnetic resonance is highly sensitive and specific for localized disease involvement and extraluminal abdominal sequelae of IBD. It accurately differentiates patients who have chronic transmural (fibrotic) disease and thus may require an operation from those with acute inflammation, whose symptoms may improve with aggressive medical therapy alone. MRI without contrast had comparable diagnostic yield to standard magnetic resonance enterography. PMID:26672581

  10. High-throughput baggage scanning employing x-ray diffraction for accurate explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael C.; Partain, Larry D.

    2003-07-01

    X-ray systems dominate the installed base of airport baggage scanning systems for explosives detection. The majority are conveyer systems with projection line scanners. These systems can achieve a high throughput but exhibit a high false positive rate and require significant operator involvement. Systems employing computed tomography (CT) are currently being installed at a rapid rate. These can provide good discrimination of levels of xray absorption coefficient and can largely circumvent superimposition effects. Nonetheless CT measures only x-ray absorption coefficient per voxel which does not provide a means of specific material identification resulting in many false positives, and it is relatively straightforward to configure explosive materials so that they are undetectable by CT systems. Diffraction-based x-ray systems present a solution to this problem. They detect and measure atomic layer spacings in crystalline and microcrystalline materials with high sensitivity. This provides a means of specific material identification. The majority of explosive compounds are well crystallized solids at room temperature. X-ray diffraction systems using both conventional wavelength-dispersive diffraction and fixed-angle, multi-wavelength diffraction for improved throughput are described. Large-area, flat-panel x-ray detector technology coupled with an extended x-ray source will permit a full 3D volumetric x-ray diffraction scan of a bag in a single pass, (patent pending).

  11. Obtaining Accurate Change Detection Results from High-Resolution Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N.; Bunch, W.; Fretz, R.; Kim, P.; Logan, T.; Smyth, M.; Zobrist, A.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-date acquisitions of high-resolution imaging satellites (e.g. GeoEye and WorldView), can display local changes of current economic interest. However, their large data volume precludes effective manual analysis, requiring image co-registration followed by image-to-image change detection, preferably with minimal analyst attention. We have recently developed an automatic change detection procedure that minimizes false-positives. The processing steps include: (a) Conversion of both the pre- and post- images to reflectance values (this step is of critical importance when different sensors are involved); reflectance values can be either top-of-atmosphere units or have full aerosol optical depth calibration applied using bi-directional reflectance knowledge. (b) Panchromatic band image-to-image co-registration, using an orthorectified base reference image (e.g. Digital Orthophoto Quadrangle) and a digital elevation model; this step can be improved if a stereo-pair of images have been acquired on one of the image dates. (c) Pan-sharpening of the multispectral data to assure recognition of change objects at the highest resolution. (d) Characterization of multispectral data in the post-image ( i.e. the background) using unsupervised cluster analysis. (e) Band ratio selection in the post-image to separate surface materials of interest from the background. (f) Preparing a pre-to-post change image. (g) Identifying locations where change has occurred involving materials of interest.

  12. Region-Based Convolutional Networks for Accurate Object Detection and Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Girshick, Ross; Donahue, Jeff; Darrell, Trevor; Malik, Jitendra

    2016-01-01

    Object detection performance, as measured on the canonical PASCAL VOC Challenge datasets, plateaued in the final years of the competition. The best-performing methods were complex ensemble systems that typically combined multiple low-level image features with high-level context. In this paper, we propose a simple and scalable detection algorithm that improves mean average precision (mAP) by more than 50 percent relative to the previous best result on VOC 2012-achieving a mAP of 62.4 percent. Our approach combines two ideas: (1) one can apply high-capacity convolutional networks (CNNs) to bottom-up region proposals in order to localize and segment objects and (2) when labeled training data are scarce, supervised pre-training for an auxiliary task, followed by domain-specific fine-tuning, boosts performance significantly. Since we combine region proposals with CNNs, we call the resulting model an R-CNN or Region-based Convolutional Network. Source code for the complete system is available at http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~rbg/rcnn. PMID:26656583

  13. Conceptual model for collision detection and avoidance for runway incursion prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, Bridgette A.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), National Transportation and Safety Board (NTSB), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), numerous corporate entities, and research facilities have each come together to determine ways to make air travel safer and more efficient. These efforts have resulted in the development of a concept known as the Next Generation (Next Gen) of Aircraft or Next Gen. The Next Gen concept promises to be a clear departure from the way in which aircraft operations are performed today. The Next Gen initiatives require that modifications are made to the existing National Airspace System (NAS) concept of operations, system level requirements, software (SW) and hardware (HW) requirements, SW and HW designs and implementations. A second example of the changes in the NAS is the shift away from air traffic controllers having the responsibility for separation assurance. In the proposed new scheme of free flight, each aircraft would be responsible for assuring that it is safely separated from surrounding aircraft. Free flight would allow the separation minima for enroute aircraft to be reduced from 2000 nautical miles (nm) to 1000 nm. Simply put "Free Flight is a concept of air traffic management that permits pilots and controllers to share information and work together to manage air traffic from pre-flight through arrival without compromising safety [107]." The primary goal of this research project was to create a conceptual model that embodies the essential ingredients needed for a collision detection and avoidance system. This system was required to operate in two modes: air traffic controller's perspective and pilot's perspective. The secondary goal was to demonstrate that the technologies, procedures, and decision logic embedded in the conceptual model were able to effectively detect and avoid collision risks from both perspectives. Embodied in the conceptual model are five distinct software modules: Data Acquisition, State

  14. Simple, Sensitive and Accurate Multiplex Detection of Clinically Important Melanoma DNA Mutations in Circulating Tumour DNA with SERS Nanotags

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Eugene J.H.; Wang, Yuling; Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and accurate identification of specific DNA mutations can influence clinical decisions. However accurate diagnosis from limiting samples such as circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is challenging. Current approaches based on fluorescence such as quantitative PCR (qPCR) and more recently, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) have limitations in multiplex detection, sensitivity and the need for expensive specialized equipment. Herein we describe an assay capitalizing on the multiplexing and sensitivity benefits of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with the simplicity of standard PCR to address the limitations of current approaches. This proof-of-concept method could reproducibly detect as few as 0.1% (10 copies, CV < 9%) of target sequences thus demonstrating the high sensitivity of the method. The method was then applied to specifically detect three important melanoma mutations in multiplex. Finally, the PCR/SERS assay was used to genotype cell lines and ctDNA from serum samples where results subsequently validated with ddPCR. With ddPCR-like sensitivity and accuracy yet at the convenience of standard PCR, we believe this multiplex PCR/SERS method could find wide applications in both diagnostics and research. PMID:27446486

  15. Optimizing photon fluence measurements for the accurate determination of detective quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Molly; Zhang, Da; Rong, John; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2009-10-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the error contributed by photon fluence measurements to the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of an x-ray imaging system. The investigation consisted of separate error analyses for the exposure and spectrum measurements that determine the photon fluence. Methods were developed for each to determine the number of measurements required to achieve an acceptable error. A new method for calculating the magnification factor in the exposure measurements was presented and compared to the existing method. The new method not only produces much lower error at small source-to-image distances (SIDs) such as clinical systems, but is also independent of SID. The exposure and spectra results were combined to determine the photon fluence error contribution to the DQE of 4%. The error in this study is small because the measurements resulted from precisely controlled experimental procedures designed to minimize the error. However, these procedures are difficult to follow in clinical environments, and application of this method on clinical systems could therefore provide important insight into error reduction. This investigation was focused on the error in the photon fluence contribution to the DQE, but the error analysis method can easily be extended to a wide range of applications.

  16. Accurate determination of the diffusion coefficient of proteins by Fourier analysis with whole column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Zarabadi, Atefeh S; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-02-17

    Analysis in the frequency domain is considered a powerful tool to elicit precise information from spectroscopic signals. In this study, the Fourier transformation technique is employed to determine the diffusion coefficient (D) of a number of proteins in the frequency domain. Analytical approaches are investigated for determination of D from both experimental and data treatment viewpoints. The diffusion process is modeled to calculate diffusion coefficients based on the Fourier transformation solution to Fick's law equation, and its results are compared to time domain results. The simulations characterize optimum spatial and temporal conditions and demonstrate the noise tolerance of the method. The proposed model is validated by its application for the electropherograms from the diffusion path of a set of proteins. Real-time dynamic scanning is conducted to monitor dispersion by employing whole column imaging detection technology in combination with capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) and the imaging plug flow (iPF) experiment. These experimental techniques provide different peak shapes, which are utilized to demonstrate the Fourier transformation ability in extracting diffusion coefficients out of irregular shape signals. Experimental results confirmed that the Fourier transformation procedure substantially enhanced the accuracy of the determined values compared to those obtained in the time domain. PMID:25607375

  17. Blood Pressure over Height Ratios: Simple and Accurate Method of Detecting Elevated Blood Pressure in Children.

    PubMed

    Galescu, Ovidiu; George, Minu; Basetty, Sudhakar; Predescu, Iuliana; Mongia, Anil; Ten, Svetlana; Bhangoo, Amrit

    2012-01-01

    Background. Blood pressure (BP) percentiles in childhood are assessed according to age, gender, and height. Objective. To create a simple BP/height ratio for both systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP). To study the relationship between BP/height ratios and corresponding BP percentiles in children. Methods. We analyzed data on height and BP from 2006-2007 NHANES data. BP percentiles were calculated for 3775 children. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to calculate sensitivity and specificity of BP/height ratios as diagnostic tests for elevated BP (>90%). Correlation analysis was performed between BP percentiles and BP/height ratios. Results. The average age was 12.54 ± 2.67 years. SBP/height and DBP/height ratios strongly correlated with SBP & DBP percentiles in both boys (P < 0.001, R(2) = 0.85, R(2) = 0.86) and girls (P < 0.001, R(2) = 0.85, R(2) = 0.90). The cutoffs of SBP/height and DBP/height ratios in boys were ≥0.75 and ≥0.46, respectively; in girls the ratios were ≥0.75 and ≥0.48, respectively with sensitivity and specificity in range of 83-100%. Conclusion. BP/height ratios are simple with high sensitivity and specificity to detect elevated BP in children. These ratios can be easily used in routine medical care of children. PMID:22577400

  18. Blood Pressure over Height Ratios: Simple and Accurate Method of Detecting Elevated Blood Pressure in Children

    PubMed Central

    Galescu, Ovidiu; George, Minu; Basetty, Sudhakar; Predescu, Iuliana; Mongia, Anil; Ten, Svetlana; Bhangoo, Amrit

    2012-01-01

    Background. Blood pressure (BP) percentiles in childhood are assessed according to age, gender, and height. Objective. To create a simple BP/height ratio for both systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP). To study the relationship between BP/height ratios and corresponding BP percentiles in children. Methods. We analyzed data on height and BP from 2006-2007 NHANES data. BP percentiles were calculated for 3775 children. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to calculate sensitivity and specificity of BP/height ratios as diagnostic tests for elevated BP (>90%). Correlation analysis was performed between BP percentiles and BP/height ratios. Results. The average age was 12.54 ± 2.67 years. SBP/height and DBP/height ratios strongly correlated with SBP & DBP percentiles in both boys (P < 0.001, R2 = 0.85, R2 = 0.86) and girls (P < 0.001, R2 = 0.85, R2 = 0.90). The cutoffs of SBP/height and DBP/height ratios in boys were ≥0.75 and ≥0.46, respectively; in girls the ratios were ≥0.75 and ≥0.48, respectively with sensitivity and specificity in range of 83–100%. Conclusion. BP/height ratios are simple with high sensitivity and specificity to detect elevated BP in children. These ratios can be easily used in routine medical care of children. PMID:22577400

  19. A new hybrid intelligent system for accurate detection of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, M; Polat, Kemal; Sindhu, R

    2014-03-01

    Elderly people are commonly affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) which is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders due to the loss of dopamine-producing brain cells. People with PD's (PWP) may have difficulty in walking, talking or completing other simple tasks. Variety of medications is available to treat PD. Recently, researchers have found that voice signals recorded from the PWP is becoming a useful tool to differentiate them from healthy controls. Several dysphonia features, feature reduction/selection techniques and classification algorithms were proposed by researchers in the literature to detect PD. In this paper, hybrid intelligent system is proposed which includes feature pre-processing using Model-based clustering (Gaussian mixture model), feature reduction/selection using principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), sequential forward selection (SFS) and sequential backward selection (SBS), and classification using three supervised classifiers such as least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM), probabilistic neural network (PNN) and general regression neural network (GRNN). PD dataset was used from University of California-Irvine (UCI) machine learning database. The strength of the proposed method has been evaluated through several performance measures. The experimental results show that the combination of feature pre-processing, feature reduction/selection methods and classification gives a maximum classification accuracy of 100% for the Parkinson's dataset. PMID:24485390

  20. Distance fields on unstructured grids: Stable interpolation, assumed gradients, collision detection and gap function

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Sebastian; Bucher, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a novel approach to collision detection based on distance fields. A novel interpolation ensures stability of the distances in the vicinity of complex geometries. An assumed gradient formulation is introduced leading to a C1-continuous distance function. The gap function is re-expressed allowing penalty and Lagrange multiplier formulations. The article introduces a node-to-element integration for first order elements, but also discusses signed distances, partial updates, intermediate surfaces, mortar methods and higher order elements. The algorithm is fast, simple and robust for complex geometries and self contact. The computed tractions conserve linear and angular momentum even in infeasible contact. Numerical examples illustrate the new algorithm in three dimensions. PMID:23888088

  1. PLIF: A rapid, accurate method to detect and quantitatively assess protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Ceccato, Laurie; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Nahoum, Virginie; Pons, Véronique; Payrastre, Bernard; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frédérique; Viaud, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are a type of cellular phospholipid that regulate signaling in a wide range of cellular and physiological processes through the interaction between their phosphorylated inositol head group and specific domains in various cytosolic proteins. These lipids also influence the activity of transmembrane proteins. Aberrant phosphoinositide signaling is associated with numerous diseases, including cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Thus, identifying phosphoinositide-binding partners and the aspects that define their specificity can direct drug development. However, current methods are costly, time-consuming, or technically challenging and inaccessible to many laboratories. We developed a method called PLIF (for "protein-lipid interaction by fluorescence") that uses fluorescently labeled liposomes and tethered, tagged proteins or peptides to enable fast and reliable determination of protein domain specificity for given phosphoinositides in a membrane environment. We validated PLIF against previously known phosphoinositide-binding partners for various proteins and obtained relative affinity profiles. Moreover, PLIF analysis of the sorting nexin (SNX) family revealed not only that SNXs bound most strongly to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P or PI3P), which is known from analysis with other methods, but also that they interacted with other phosphoinositides, which had not previously been detected using other techniques. Different phosphoinositide partners, even those with relatively weak binding affinity, could account for the diverse functions of SNXs in vesicular trafficking and protein sorting. Because PLIF is sensitive, semiquantitative, and performed in a high-throughput manner, it may be used to screen for highly specific protein-lipid interaction inhibitors. PMID:27025878

  2. Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy is accurate for detecting gastric intestinal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Edoardo; Corbo, Marina; Dulbecco, Pietro; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Giambruno, Elisa; Mastracci, Luca; Grillo, Federica; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the predictive value of narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME) for identifying gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) in unselected patients. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated consecutive patients undergoing upper endoscopy for various indications, such as epigastric discomfort/pain, anaemia, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, suspicion of peptic ulcer disease, or chronic liver diseases. Patients underwent NBI-ME, which was performed by three blinded, experienced endoscopists. In addition, five biopsies (2 antrum, 1 angulus, and 2 corpus) were taken and examined by two pathologists unaware of the endoscopic findings to determine the presence or absence of GIM. The correlation between light blue crest (LBC) appearance and histology was measured. Moreover, we quantified the degree of LBC appearance as less than 20% (+), 20%-80% (++) and more than 80% (+++) of an image field, and the semiquantitative evaluation of LBC appearance was correlated with IM percentage from the histological findings. RESULTS: We enrolled 100 (58 F/42 M) patients who were mainly referred for gastro-esophageal reflux disease/dyspepsia (46%), cancer screening/anaemia (34%), chronic liver disease (9%), and suspected celiac disease (6%); the remaining patients were referred for other indications. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection detected from the biopsies was 31%, while 67% of the patients used proton pump inhibitors. LBCs were found in the antrum of 33 patients (33%); 20 of the cases were classified as LBC+, 9 as LBC++, and 4 as LBC+++. LBCs were found in the gastric body of 6 patients (6%), with 5 of them also having LBCs in the antrum. The correlation between the appearance of LBCs and histological GIM was good, with a sensitivity of 80% (95%CI: 67-92), a specificity of 96% (95%CI: 93-99), a positive predictive value of 84% (95%CI: 73-96), a negative predictive value of 95% (95%CI: 92-98), and an accuracy of 93% (95%CI: 90-97). The

  3. Graphene fluorescence switch-based cooperative amplification: a sensitive and accurate method to detection microRNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyun; Li, Lu; Wang, Qian; Duan, Lili; Tang, Bo

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play significant roles in a diverse range of biological progress and have been regarded as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in cancer treatment. Sensitive and accurate detection of miRNAs is crucial for better understanding their roles in cancer cells and further validating their function in clinical diagnosis. Here, we developed a stable, sensitive, and specific miRNAs detection method on the basis of cooperative amplification combining with the graphene oxide (GO) fluorescence switch-based circular exponential amplification and the multimolecules labeling of SYBR Green I (SG). First, the target miRNA is adsorbed on the surface of GO, which can protect the miRNA from enzyme digest. Next, the miRNA hybridizes with a partial hairpin probe and then acts as a primer to initiate a strand displacement reaction to form a complete duplex. Finally, under the action of nicking enzyme, universal DNA fragments are released and used as triggers to initiate next reaction cycle, constituting a new circular exponential amplification. In the proposed strategy, a small amount of target miRNA can be converted to a large number of stable DNA triggers, leading to a remarkable amplification for the target. Moreover, compared with labeling with a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio, multimolecules binding of intercalating dye SG to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) can induce significant enhancement of fluorescence signal and further improve the detection sensitivity. The extraordinary fluorescence quenching of GO used here guarantees the high signal-to-noise ratio. Due to the protection for target miRNA by GO, the cooperative amplification, and low fluorescence background, sensitive and accurate detection of miRNAs has been achieved. The strategy proposed here will offer a new approach for reliable quantification of miRNAs in medical research and early clinical diagnostics. PMID:24823448

  4. Chaotic Extension Neural Network Theory-Based XXY Stage Collision Fault Detection Using a Single Accelerometer Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chin-Tsung; Yau, Her-Terng; Wu, Shang-Yi; Lin, Huo-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The collision fault detection of a XXY stage is proposed for the first time in this paper. The stage characteristic signals are extracted and imported into the master and slave chaos error systems by signal filtering from the vibratory magnitude of the stage. The trajectory diagram is made from the chaos synchronization dynamic error signals E1 and E2. The distance between characteristic positive and negative centers of gravity, as well as the maximum and minimum distances of trajectory diagram, are captured as the characteristics of fault recognition by observing the variation in various signal trajectory diagrams. The matter-element model of normal status and collision status is built by an extension neural network. The correlation grade of various fault statuses of the XXY stage was calculated for diagnosis. The dSPACE is used for real-time analysis of stage fault status with an accelerometer sensor. Three stage fault statuses are detected in this study, including normal status, Y collision fault and X collision fault. It is shown that the scheme can have at least 75% diagnosis rate for collision faults of the XXY stage. As a result, the fault diagnosis system can be implemented using just one sensor, and consequently the hardware cost is significantly reduced. PMID:25405512

  5. An investigation of the effects of the common cold on simulated driving performance and detection of collisions: a laboratory study

    PubMed Central

    Jamson, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present research was to investigate whether individuals with a common cold showed impaired ability on a simulated driving task and the ability to detect potential collisions between moving objects. Design The study involved comparison of a healthy group with a group with colds. These scores were adjusted for individual differences by collecting further data when both groups were healthy and using these scores as covariates. On both occasions, volunteers rated their symptoms and carried out a simulated driving session. On the first occasion, volunteers also carried out a collision detection task. Setting University of Leeds Institute for Transport Studies. Sample Twenty-five students from the University of Leeds. Ten volunteers were healthy on both occasions and 15 had a cold on the first session and were healthy on the second. Main outcome measures In the collision detection task, the main outcomes were correct detections and response to a secondary identification task. In the simulated driving task, the outcomes were speed, lateral control, gap acceptance, overtaking behaviour, car following, vigilance and traffic light violations. Results Those with a cold detected fewer collisions and had a higher divided attention error than those who were healthy. Many basic driving skills were unimpaired by the illness. However, those with a cold were slower at responding to unexpected events and spent a greater percentage of time driving at a headway of <2 s. Conclusions The finding that having a common cold is associated with reduced ability to detect collisions and respond quickly to unexpected events is of practical importance. Further research is now required to examine the efficacy of information campaigns and countermeasures such as caffeine. PMID:22761287

  6. Accurate sensitivity of quantum dots for detection of HER2 expression in breast cancer cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei-Panah, Akram-Sadat; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Ghods, Roya; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi; Mojtabavi, Nazanin; Mahmoudi, Ahmad-Reza; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Shojaeian, Sorour; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2013-03-01

    Here we introduce novel optical properties and accurate sensitivity of Quantum dot (QD)-based detection system for tracking the breast cancer marker, HER2. QD525 was used to detect HER2 using home-made HER2-specific monoclonal antibodies in fixed and living HER2(+) SKBR-3 cell line and breast cancer tissues. Additionally, we compared fluorescence intensity (FI), photostability and staining index (SI) of QD525 signals at different exposure times and two excitation wavelengths with those of the conventional organic dye, FITC. Labeling signals of QD525 in both fixed and living breast cancer cells and tissue preparations were found to be significantly higher than those of FITC at 460-495 nm excitation wavelengths. Interestingly, when excited at 330-385 nm, the superiority of QD525 was more highlighted with at least 4-5 fold higher FI and SI compared to FITC. Moreover, QDs exhibited exceptional photostability during continuous illumination of cancerous cells and tissues, while FITC signal faded very quickly. QDs can be used as sensitive reporters for in situ detection of tumor markers which in turn could be viewed as a novel approach for early detection of cancers. To take comprehensive advantage of QDs, it is necessary that their optimal excitation wavelength is employed. PMID:23212129

  7. A novel biosensor based on competitive SERS immunoassay and magnetic separation for accurate and sensitive detection of chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kang; Hu, Yongjun; Dong, Ning

    2016-06-15

    The accurate and sensitive detection of chloramphenicol (CAP) is particularly imperative to public health and safety. Here, we present a novel sensor for residual CAP detection based on competitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) immunoassay and magnetic separation. In this nanosensor, functionalized Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) were labeled with the Raman reporter molecule (e.g. 4,4'-dipyridyl). With the addition of free CAP, a competitive immune reaction was initiated between free CAP and above AuNPs for conjugating with CAP antibody-modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Instead of the solid substrate, the antibody conjugated-magnetic beads were used as supporting materials and separation tools in the present sensor. With the aid of a magnet, the mixture was removed from the supernatant for concentration effects. This caused obvious change of SERS signal intensity obtained from supernatant. The SERS signals were collected from the supernatant directly, which made the SERS measurements more stable, repeatable and reliable. The proposed SERS-based magnetic immunosensor allows us to detect CAP in a fast, selective and sensitive (1.0 pg/mL) manner over a wide concentration range ( 1-1 × 10(4)pg/mL). In addition, these results demonstrate that this immunosensor holds great potential for the detection of antibiotics in real aquatic environment, which is crucial to our life. PMID:26866562

  8. Creation of an Accurate Algorithm to Detect Snellen Best Documented Visual Acuity from Ophthalmology Electronic Health Record Notes

    PubMed Central

    French, Dustin D; Gill, Manjot; Mitchell, Christopher; Jackson, Kathryn; Kho, Abel; Bryar, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Background Visual acuity is the primary measure used in ophthalmology to determine how well a patient can see. Visual acuity for a single eye may be recorded in multiple ways for a single patient visit (eg, Snellen vs. Jäger units vs. font print size), and be recorded for either distance or near vision. Capturing the best documented visual acuity (BDVA) of each eye in an individual patient visit is an important step for making electronic ophthalmology clinical notes useful in research. Objective Currently, there is limited methodology for capturing BDVA in an efficient and accurate manner from electronic health record (EHR) notes. We developed an algorithm to detect BDVA for right and left eyes from defined fields within electronic ophthalmology clinical notes. Methods We designed an algorithm to detect the BDVA from defined fields within 295,218 ophthalmology clinical notes with visual acuity data present. About 5668 unique responses were identified and an algorithm was developed to map all of the unique responses to a structured list of Snellen visual acuities. Results Visual acuity was captured from a total of 295,218 ophthalmology clinical notes during the study dates. The algorithm identified all visual acuities in the defined visual acuity section for each eye and returned a single BDVA for each eye. A clinician chart review of 100 random patient notes showed a 99% accuracy detecting BDVA from these records and 1% observed error. Conclusions Our algorithm successfully captures best documented Snellen distance visual acuity from ophthalmology clinical notes and transforms a variety of inputs into a structured Snellen equivalent list. Our work, to the best of our knowledge, represents the first attempt at capturing visual acuity accurately from large numbers of electronic ophthalmology notes. Use of this algorithm can benefit research groups interested in assessing visual acuity for patient centered outcome. All codes used for this study are currently

  9. Liquid Hybridization and Solid Phase Detection: A Highly Sensitive and Accurate Strategy for MicroRNA Detection in Plants and Animals.

    PubMed

    Li, Fosheng; Mei, Lanju; Zhan, Cheng; Mao, Qiang; Yao, Min; Wang, Shenghua; Tang, Lin; Chen, Fang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in nearly every aspect of biology, including physiological, biochemical, developmental and pathological processes. Therefore, a highly sensitive and accurate method of detection of miRNAs has great potential in research on theory and application, such as the clinical approach to medicine, animal and plant production, as well as stress response. Here, we report a strategic method to detect miRNAs from multicellular organisms, which mainly includes liquid hybridization and solid phase detection (LHSPD); it has been verified in various species and is much more sensitive than traditional biotin-labeled Northern blots. By using this strategy and chemiluminescent detection with digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled or biotin-labeled oligonucleotide probes, as low as 0.01-0.25 fmol [for DIG-CDP Star (disodium2-chloro-5-(4-methoxyspiro{1,2-dioxetane-3,2'-(5'-chloro)tricyclo[3.3.1.13,7]decan}-4-yl)phenyl phosphate) system], 0.005-0.1 fmol (for biotin-CDP Star system), or 0.05-0.5 fmol (for biotin-luminol system) of miRNA can be detected and one-base difference can be distinguished between miRNA sequences. Moreover, LHSPD performed very well in the quantitative analysis of miRNAs, and the whole process can be completed within about 9 h. The strategy of LHSPD provides an effective solution for rapid, accurate, and sensitive detection and quantitative analysis of miRNAs in plants and animals. PMID:27598139

  10. Accurate Point-of-Care Detection of Ruptured Fetal Membranes: Improved Diagnostic Performance Characteristics with a Monoclonal/Polyclonal Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda C.; Scott, Laurie; Block, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of membranes (ROM) is imperative to allow for gestational age-specific interventions. This study compared the diagnostic performance characteristics between two methods used for the detection of ROM as measured in the same patient. METHODS Vaginal secretions were evaluated using the conventional fern test as well as a point-of-care monoclonal/polyclonal immunoassay test (ROM Plus®) in 75 pregnant patients who presented to labor and delivery with complaints of leaking amniotic fluid. Both tests were compared to analytical confirmation of ROM using three external laboratory tests. Diagnostic performance characteristics were calculated including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy. RESULTS Diagnostic performance characteristics uniformly favored ROM detection using the immunoassay test compared to the fern test: sensitivity (100% vs. 77.8%), specificity (94.8% vs. 79.3%), PPV (75% vs. 36.8%), NPV (100% vs. 95.8%), and accuracy (95.5% vs. 79.1%). CONCLUSIONS The point-of-care immunoassay test provides improved diagnostic accuracy for the detection of ROM compared to fern testing. It has the potential of improving patient management decisions, thereby minimizing serious complications and perinatal morbidity. PMID:27199579

  11. BlueDetect: An iBeacon-Enabled Scheme for Accurate and Energy-Efficient Indoor-Outdoor Detection and Seamless Location-Based Service

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Luo, Yiwen; Zhu, Jianjie; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Xie, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    The location and contextual status (indoor or outdoor) is fundamental and critical information for upper-layer applications, such as activity recognition and location-based services (LBS) for individuals. In addition, optimizations of building management systems (BMS), such as the pre-cooling or heating process of the air-conditioning system according to the human traffic entering or exiting a building, can utilize the information, as well. The emerging mobile devices, which are equipped with various sensors, become a feasible and flexible platform to perform indoor-outdoor (IO) detection. However, power-hungry sensors, such as GPS and WiFi, should be used with caution due to the constrained battery storage on mobile device. We propose BlueDetect: an accurate, fast response and energy-efficient scheme for IO detection and seamless LBS running on the mobile device based on the emerging low-power iBeacon technology. By leveraging the on-broad Bluetooth module and our proposed algorithms, BlueDetect provides a precise IO detection service that can turn on/off on-board power-hungry sensors smartly and automatically, optimize their performances and reduce the power consumption of mobile devices simultaneously. Moreover, seamless positioning and navigation services can be realized by it, especially in a semi-outdoor environment, which cannot be achieved by GPS or an indoor positioning system (IPS) easily. We prototype BlueDetect on Android mobile devices and evaluate its performance comprehensively. The experimental results have validated the superiority of BlueDetect in terms of IO detection accuracy, localization accuracy and energy consumption. PMID:26907295

  12. BlueDetect: An iBeacon-Enabled Scheme for Accurate and Energy-Efficient Indoor-Outdoor Detection and Seamless Location-Based Service.

    PubMed

    Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Luo, Yiwen; Zhu, Jianjie; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Xie, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    The location and contextual status (indoor or outdoor) is fundamental and critical information for upper-layer applications, such as activity recognition and location-based services (LBS) for individuals. In addition, optimizations of building management systems (BMS), such as the pre-cooling or heating process of the air-conditioning system according to the human traffic entering or exiting a building, can utilize the information, as well. The emerging mobile devices, which are equipped with various sensors, become a feasible and flexible platform to perform indoor-outdoor (IO) detection. However, power-hungry sensors, such as GPS and WiFi, should be used with caution due to the constrained battery storage on mobile device. We propose BlueDetect: an accurate, fast response and energy-efficient scheme for IO detection and seamless LBS running on the mobile device based on the emerging low-power iBeacon technology. By leveraging the on-broad Bluetooth module and our proposed algorithms, BlueDetect provides a precise IO detection service that can turn on/off on-board power-hungry sensors smartly and automatically, optimize their performances and reduce the power consumption of mobile devices simultaneously. Moreover, seamless positioning and navigation services can be realized by it, especially in a semi-outdoor environment, which cannot be achieved by GPS or an indoor positioning system (IPS) easily. We prototype BlueDetect on Android mobile devices and evaluate its performance comprehensively. The experimental results have validated the superiority of BlueDetect in terms of IO detection accuracy, localization accuracy and energy consumption. PMID:26907295

  13. Three-dimensional accurate detection of lung emphysema in rats using ultra-short and zero echo time MRI.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Andrea; Tibiletti, Marta; Kjørstad, Åsmund; Birk, Gerald; Schad, Lothar R; Stierstorfer, Birgit; Rasche, Volker; Stiller, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    Emphysema is a life-threatening pathology that causes irreversible destruction of alveolar walls. In vivo imaging techniques play a fundamental role in the early non-invasive pre-clinical and clinical detection and longitudinal follow-up of this pathology. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using high resolution radial three-dimensional (3D) zero echo time (ZTE) and 3D ultra-short echo time (UTE) MRI to accurately detect lung pathomorphological changes in a rodent model of emphysema.Porcine pancreas elastase (PPE) was intratracheally administered to the rats to produce the emphysematous changes. 3D ZTE MRI, low and high definition 3D UTE MRI and micro-computed tomography images were acquired 4 weeks after the PPE challenge. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in PPE-treated and control rats. T2* values were computed from low definition 3D UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements were made after euthanizing the animals. Both ZTE and UTE MR images showed a significant decrease in the SNR measured in PPE-treated lungs compared with controls, due to the pathomorphological changes taking place in the challenged lungs. A significant decrease in T2* values in PPE-challenged animals compared with controls was measured using UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements showed a significant increase in the mean linear intercept in PPE-treated lungs. UTE yielded significantly higher SNR compared with ZTE (14% and 30% higher in PPE-treated and non-PPE-treated lungs, respectively).This study showed that optimized 3D radial UTE and ZTE MRI can provide lung images of excellent quality, with high isotropic spatial resolution (400 µm) and SNR in parenchymal tissue (>25) and negligible motion artifacts in freely breathing animals. These techniques were shown to be useful non-invasive instruments to accurately and reliably detect the pathomorphological alterations taking place in emphysematous lungs, without incurring the risks of cumulative radiation

  14. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  15. Application of collision detection to assess implant insertion in elbow replacement surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutunea-Fatan, O. Remus; Bernick, Joshua H.; Lalone, Emily; King, Graham J. W.; Johnson, James A.

    2010-02-01

    An important aspect of implant replacement of the human joint is the fit achieved between the implant and bone canal. As the implant is inserted within the medullary canal, its position and orientation is subjected to a variety of constraints introduced either by the external forces and moments applied by the surgeon or by the interaction of the implant with the cortical wall of the medullary canal. This study evaluated the implant-bone interaction of a humeral stem in elbow replacement surgery as an example, but the principles can also be applied to other joints. After converting CT scan data of the humerus to the parametric NURBS-based representation, a collision detection procedure based on existing Computer-Aided Engineering techniques was employed to control the instantaneous kinematics and dynamics of the insertion of a humeral implant in an attempt to determine its final posture within the canal. By measuring the misalignment between the native flexion-extension (FE) axis of the distal humerus and the prosthesis, a prediction was made regarding the fit between the canal and the implant. This technique was shown to be effective in predicting the final misalignment of the implant axis with respect to the native FE axis of the distal humerus using a cadaver specimen for in-vitro validation.

  16. Collision avoidance of two moving objects using the anticipated path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Seung Hak; Ahmad, Muhammad Bilal; Park, Seung-Jin; Beak, Kyoung-Ju; Park, Jong An

    2004-03-01

    Collision avoidance is one of the most important problems in autonomous vehicles, ship navigation, and robot manipulators, etc. Image processing technique could be applied for solving the collision avoidance of moving objects. The collision could be avoided if the direction of the moving object could be accurately anticipated. The problem is how to anticipate the expected path of the moving object, so that the other moving objects in the expected path should be detected and avoided for collision avoidance. Collisions could be avoided by searching the obstacles and moving objects in the expected path, but the moving objects, which would come inside the expected path, should also be detected for fully collision avoidance. In this paper, the expected path of the moving object is determined from the previous history of the moving object using the statistical measurements.

  17. An accurate and inexpensive color-based assay for detecting severe anemia in a limited-resource setting.

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick T; Tyburski, Erika A; de Oliveira, Vysolela; Santos, Brigida; Ware, Russell E; Lam, Wilbur A

    2015-12-01

    Severe anemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children in resource-poor settings, but laboratory diagnostics are often limited in these locations. To address this need, we developed a simple, inexpensive, and color-based point-of-care (POC) assay to detect severe anemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this novel POC assay to detect moderate and severe anemia in a limited-resource setting. The study was a cross-sectional study conducted on children with sickle cell anemia in Luanda, Angola. The hemoglobin concentrations obtained by the POC assay were compared to reference values measured by a calibrated automated hematology analyzer. A total of 86 samples were analyzed (mean hemoglobin concentration 6.6 g/dL). There was a strong correlation between the hemoglobin concentrations obtained by the POC assay and reference values obtained from an automated hematology analyzer (r=0.88, P<0.0001). The POC assay demonstrated excellent reproducibility (r=0.93, P<0.0001) and the reagents appeared to be durable in a tropical setting (r=0.93, P<0.0001). For the detection of severe anemia that may require blood transfusion (hemoglobin <5 g/dL), the POC assay had sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 98.7%. These data demonstrate that an inexpensive (<$0.25 USD) POC assay accurately estimates low hemoglobin concentrations and has the potential to become a transformational diagnostic tool for severe anemia in limited-resource settings. PMID:26317494

  18. Ultra-low power anti-crosstalk collision avoidance light detection and ranging using chaotic pulse position modulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Hao; Ma-li, Gong; Peng-fei, Du; Bao-jie, Lu; Fan, Zhang; Hai-tao, Zhang; Xing, Fu

    2016-07-01

    A novel concept of collision avoidance single-photon light detection and ranging (LIDAR) for vehicles has been demonstrated, in which chaotic pulse position modulation is applied on the transmitted laser pulses for robust anti-crosstalk purposes. Besides, single-photon detectors (SPD) and time correlated single photon counting techniques are adapted, to sense the ultra-low power used for the consideration of compact structure and eye safety. Parameters including pulse rate, discrimination threshold, and number of accumulated pulses have been thoroughly analyzed based on the detection requirements, resulting in specified receiver operating characteristics curves. Both simulation and indoor experiments were performed to verify the excellent anti-crosstalk capability of the presented collision avoidance LIDAR despite ultra-low transmitting power. Project supported by Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program, China (Grant No. 2014z21035).

  19. Highly Accurate Antibody Assays for Early and Rapid Detection of Tuberculosis in African and Asian Elephants ▿

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Rena; Lyashchenko, Olena; Esfandiari, Javan; Miller, Michele; Mikota, Susan; Olsen, John H.; Ball, Ray; Dumonceaux, Genevieve; Schmitt, Dennis; Moller, Torsten; Payeur, Janet B.; Harris, Beth; Sofranko, Denise; Waters, W. Ray; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in elephants is a reemerging zoonotic disease caused primarily by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Current methods for screening and diagnosis rely on trunk wash culture, which has serious limitations due to low test sensitivity, slow turnaround time, and variable sample quality. Innovative and more efficient diagnostic tools are urgently needed. We describe three novel serologic techniques, the ElephantTB Stat-Pak kit, multiantigen print immunoassay, and dual-path platform VetTB test, for rapid antibody detection in elephants. The study was performed with serum samples from 236 captive African and Asian elephants from 53 different locations in the United States and Europe. The elephants were divided into three groups based on disease status and history of exposure: (i) 26 animals with culture-confirmed TB due to M. tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis, (ii) 63 exposed elephants from known-infected herds that had never produced a culture-positive result from trunk wash samples, and (iii) 147 elephants without clinical symptoms suggestive of TB, with consistently negative trunk wash culture results, and with no history of potential exposure to TB in the past 5 years. Elephants with culture-confirmed TB and a proportion of exposed but trunk wash culture-negative elephants produced robust antibody responses to multiple antigens of M. tuberculosis, with seroconversions detectable years before TB-positive cultures were obtained from trunk wash specimens. ESAT-6 and CFP10 proteins were immunodominant antigens recognized by elephant antibodies during disease. The serologic assays demonstrated 100% sensitivity and 95 to 100% specificity. Rapid and accurate antibody tests to identify infected elephants will likely allow earlier and more efficient treatment, thus limiting transmission of infection to other susceptible animals and to humans. PMID:19261770

  20. RNA-Based Detection Does not Accurately Enumerate Living Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells on Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenting; Moyne, Anne-Laure; Marco, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to distinguish between living and dead cells is an important, but often unrealized, attribute of rapid detection methods for foodborne pathogens. In this study, the numbers of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 after inoculation onto Romaine lettuce plants and on plastic (abiotic) surfaces were measured over time by culturing, and quantitative PCR (qPCR), propidium monoazide (PMA)-qPCR, and reverse transcriptase (RT)-qPCR targeting E. coli O157:H7 gapA, rfbE, eae, and lpfA genes and gene transcripts. On Romaine lettuce plants incubated at low relative humidity, E. coli O157:H7 cell numbers declined 107-fold within 96 h according to culture-based assessments. In contrast, there were no reductions in E. coli levels according to qPCR and only 100- and 1000-fold lower numbers per leaf by RT-qPCR and PMA-qPCR, respectively. Similar results were obtained upon exposure of E. coli O157:H7 to desiccation conditions on a sterile plastic surface. Subsequent investigation of mixtures of living and dead E. coli O157:H7 cells strongly indicated that PMA-qPCR detection was subject to false-positive enumerations of viable targets when in the presence of 100-fold higher numbers of dead cells. RT-qPCR measurements of killed E. coli O157:H7 as well as for RNaseA-treated E. coli RNA confirmed that transcripts from dead cells and highly degraded RNA were also amplified by RT-qPCR. These findings show that neither PMA-qPCR nor RT-qPCR provide accurate estimates of bacterial viability in environments where growth and survival is limited. PMID:26955370

  1. Accurate detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae ciprofloxacin susceptibility directly from genital and extragenital clinical samples: towards genotype-guided antimicrobial therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Marcus J.; Hall, Catherine L.; Miari, Victoria F.; Cole, Michelle; Laing, Ken G.; Jagatia, Heena; Harding-Esch, Emma; Monahan, Irene M.; Planche, Timothy; Hinds, Jason; Ison, Catherine A.; Chisholm, Stephanie; Butcher, Philip D.; Sadiq, Syed Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increasing use of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) as the primary means of diagnosing gonococcal infection has resulted in diminished availability of Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibility data. We conducted a prospective diagnostic assessment of a real-time PCR assay (NGSNP) enabling direct detection of gonococcal ciprofloxacin susceptibility from a range of clinical sample types. Methods NGSNP, designed to discriminate an SNP associated with ciprofloxacin resistance within the N. gonorrhoeae genome, was validated using a characterized panel of geographically diverse isolates (n = 90) and evaluated to predict ciprofloxacin susceptibility directly on N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT lysates derived from genital (n = 174) and non-genital (n = 116) samples (n = 290), from 222 culture-confirmed clinical episodes of gonococcal infection. Results NGSNP correctly genotyped all phenotypically susceptible (n = 49) and resistant (n = 41) panel isolates. Ciprofloxacin-resistant N. gonorrhoeae was responsible for infection in 29.7% (n = 66) of clinical episodes evaluated. Compared with phenotypic susceptibility testing, NGSNP demonstrated sensitivity and specificity of 95.8% (95% CI 91.5%–98.3%) and 100% (95% CI 94.7%–100%), respectively, for detecting ciprofloxacin-susceptible N. gonorrhoeae, with a positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI 97.7%–100%). Applied to urogenital (n = 164), rectal (n = 40) and pharyngeal samples alone (n = 30), positive predictive values were 100% (95% CI 96.8%–100%), 100% (95% CI 87.2%–100%) and 100% (95% CI 82.4%–100%), respectively. Conclusions Genotypic prediction of N. gonorrhoeae ciprofloxacin susceptibility directly from clinical samples was highly accurate and, in the absence of culture, will facilitate use of tailored therapy for gonococcal infection, sparing use of current empirical treatment regimens and enhancing acquisition of susceptibility data for

  2. RNA-Based Detection Does not Accurately Enumerate Living Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells on Plants.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wenting; Moyne, Anne-Laure; Marco, Maria L

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to distinguish between living and dead cells is an important, but often unrealized, attribute of rapid detection methods for foodborne pathogens. In this study, the numbers of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 after inoculation onto Romaine lettuce plants and on plastic (abiotic) surfaces were measured over time by culturing, and quantitative PCR (qPCR), propidium monoazide (PMA)-qPCR, and reverse transcriptase (RT)-qPCR targeting E. coli O157:H7 gapA, rfbE, eae, and lpfA genes and gene transcripts. On Romaine lettuce plants incubated at low relative humidity, E. coli O157:H7 cell numbers declined 10(7)-fold within 96 h according to culture-based assessments. In contrast, there were no reductions in E. coli levels according to qPCR and only 100- and 1000-fold lower numbers per leaf by RT-qPCR and PMA-qPCR, respectively. Similar results were obtained upon exposure of E. coli O157:H7 to desiccation conditions on a sterile plastic surface. Subsequent investigation of mixtures of living and dead E. coli O157:H7 cells strongly indicated that PMA-qPCR detection was subject to false-positive enumerations of viable targets when in the presence of 100-fold higher numbers of dead cells. RT-qPCR measurements of killed E. coli O157:H7 as well as for RNaseA-treated E. coli RNA confirmed that transcripts from dead cells and highly degraded RNA were also amplified by RT-qPCR. These findings show that neither PMA-qPCR nor RT-qPCR provide accurate estimates of bacterial viability in environments where growth and survival is limited. PMID:26955370

  3. Magnetically controlled single-nanoparticle detection via particle-electrode collisions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Germano P; Melo, Antonio F A A; Crespilho, Frank N

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports the magnetic control of nanoparticle collisions on gold ultramicroelectrode surface. Magnetite nanoparticles with diameters of 10 nm and modified with Prussian blue (Fe3O4-NPs-PB) were directed by gravitational force on the electrode surface, and spikes in current-time transients were observed. By modulating a magnetic field parallel to the electrode surface, the number of nanoparticle collisions and the nanoparticle positions could be controlled. PMID:24647862

  4. Fiber-optic immuno-biosensor for rapid and accurate detection of nerve growth factor in human blood.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Cha, Yong-Mei; Li, Hongmei; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2006-01-01

    An accurate and rapid assay of cardiac nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in blood can provide physicians with critical information regarding myocardial injury and neural remodeling in cardiac tissues to identify patients at risk of impending heart attack, thereby enabling them to receive appropriate lifesaving treatment more quickly. Currently used assay methods, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are usually time-consuming (hours to days), expensive and technically complicated. In this paper, we described the development and clinical study of a rapid and sensitive method for detection and quantification of NGF in human blood plasma. This method utilizes a fiber-optic, immuno-biosensing system which performs a fluorophore-mediated sandwich immunoassay on the surface of an optical fiber. Physiological concentrations of NGF could be quantified in both buffer and human blood plasma samples within 5 minutes. The NGF concentrations determined by the fiberoptic sensor were comparable to those by the gold standard, ELISA. Preliminary study of NGF assay in cardiac patient plasma samples showed a great potential of the fiber-optic sensor as a rapid diagnostic and prognostic tool in clinical applications. PMID:17946002

  5. SU-E-J-23: An Accurate Algorithm to Match Imperfectly Matched Images for Lung Tumor Detection Without Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Rozario, T; Bereg, S; Chiu, T; Liu, H; Kearney, V; Jiang, L; Mao, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In order to locate lung tumors on projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is created and compared with projection images. Since lung tumors always move and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs, a special DRR (background DRR) is generated based on modified anatomy from which lung tumors are removed. In addition, global discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image originations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported. Methods: This method divides global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities will be evaluated by calculating normalized cross correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) will be automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single tile which has bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel based linear transformation will be determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The DRR will be transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contains only the tumor. A DRR of the tumor is registered to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. Results: This method has been successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (Brainlab) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers are implanted and used as ground truth for tumor positions. Although, other organs and bony structures introduce strong signals superimposed on tumors at some angles, this method accurately locates tumors on every projection over 12 gantry angles. The maximum error is less than 2.6 mm while the total average error is 1.0 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting tumor without markers despite strong background signals.

  6. Design and performance simulation of a segmented-absorber based muon detection system for high energy heavy ion collision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Bhaduri, P. P.; Jahan, H.; Senger, A.; Adak, R.; Samanta, S.; Prakash, A.; Dey, K.; Lebedev, A.; Kryshen, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Senger, P.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Ghosh, S. K.; Raha, S.; Irfan, M.; Ahmad, N.; Farooq, M.; Singh, B.

    2015-03-01

    A muon detection system (MUCH) based on a novel concept using a segmented and instrumented absorber has been designed for high-energy heavy-ion collision experiments. The system consists of 6 hadron absorber blocks and 6 tracking detector triplets. Behind each absorber block a detector triplet is located which measures the tracks of charged particles traversing the absorber. The performance of such a system has been simulated for the CBM experiment at FAIR (Germany) that is scheduled to start taking data in heavy ion collisions in the beam energy range of 6-45 A GeV from 2019. The muon detection system is mounted downstream to a Silicon Tracking System (STS) that is located in a large aperture dipole magnet which provides momentum information of the charged particle tracks. The reconstructed tracks from the STS are to be matched to the hits measured by the muon detector triplets behind the absorber segments. This method allows the identification of muon tracks over a broad range of momenta including tracks of soft muons which do not pass through all the absorber layers. Pairs of oppositely charged muons identified by MUCH could therefore be combined to measure the invariant masses in a wide range starting from low mass vector mesons (LMVM) up to charmonia. The properties of the absorber (material, thickness, position) and of the tracking chambers (granularity, geometry) have been varied in simulations of heavy-ion collision events generated with the UrQMD generator and propagated through the setup using the GEANT3, the particle transport code. The tracks are reconstructed by a Cellular Automaton algorithm followed by a Kalman Filter. The simulations demonstrate that low mass vector mesons and charmonia can be clearly identified in central Au+Au collisions at beam energies provided by the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR).

  7. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M.; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2014-12-15

    was no significant difference in the performance of any device between gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 3%/3 mm, and 5%/3 mm. Finally, optimal cutoffs (e.g., percent of pixels passing gamma) were determined for each device and while clinical practice commonly uses a threshold of 90% of pixels passing for most cases, these results showed variability in the optimal cutoff among devices. Conclusions: IMRT QA devices have differences in their ability to accurately detect dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable plans. Field-by-field analysis with a MapCheck device and use of the MapCheck with a MapPhan phantom while delivering at planned rotational gantry angles resulted in a significantly poorer ability to accurately sort acceptable and unacceptable plans compared with the other techniques examined. Patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in general should be thoroughly evaluated for their ability to correctly differentiate acceptable and unacceptable plans. Additionally, optimal agreement thresholds should be identified and used as common clinical thresholds typically worked very poorly to identify unacceptable plans.

  8. Algorithms for Collision Detection Between a Point and a Moving Polygon, with Applications to Aircraft Weather Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkawicz, Anthony; Hagen, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes mathematical definitions of functions that can be used to detect future collisions between a point and a moving polygon. The intended application is weather avoidance, where the given point represents an aircraft and bounding polygons are chosen to model regions with bad weather. Other applications could possibly include avoiding other moving obstacles. The motivation for the functions presented here is safety, and therefore they have been proved to be mathematically correct. The functions are being developed for inclusion in NASA's Stratway software tool, which allows low-fidelity air traffic management concepts to be easily prototyped and quickly tested.

  9. Laser mass spectrometric detection of AlH molecules as collision-free excimer laser photoproducts from aluminum alkyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Stuke, M.

    1988-08-01

    Aluminum hydride molecules AlH are detected and identified by tunable dye-laser mass spectroscopy as collision-free UV excimer laser photoproducts of the Al alkyls TEA (triethylaluminum (C 2H 5) 3Al) and TIBA (triisobutylaluminum ( i-C 4H 9) 3Al) at 248 and 193 nm. An internal energy distribution analysis of the photoproducts shows only minor vibrational excitation of ν″ = 1 and a Boltzmann-type rotational energy distribution with a temperature of about 0.03 eV, compared to the incoming photon energy of 5.0 or 6.42 eV.

  10. Multiplexing of Motor Information in the Discharge of a Collision Detecting Neuron during Escape Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Fotowat, Haleh; Harrison, Reid R; Gabbiani, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Locusts possess an identified neuron, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD), conveying visual information about impending collision from the brain to thoracic motor centers. We built a telemetry system to simultaneously record, in freely behaving animals, the activity of the DCMD and of motoneurons involved in jump execution. Co-contraction of antagonistic leg muscles, a required preparatory phase, was triggered after the DCMD firing rate crossed a threshold. Thereafter, the number of DCMD spikes predicted precisely motoneuron activity and jump occurrence. Additionally, the time of DCMD peak firing rate predicted that of jump. Ablation experiments suggest that the DCMD, together with a nearly identical ipsilateral descending neuron, is responsible for the timely execution of the escape. Thus, three distinct features that are multiplexed in a single neuron’s sensory response to impending collision – firing rate threshold, peak firing time, and spike count – likely control three distinct motor aspects of escape behaviors. PMID:21220105

  11. Multiplexing of motor information in the discharge of a collision detecting neuron during escape behaviors.

    PubMed

    Fotowat, Haleh; Harrison, Reid R; Gabbiani, Fabrizio

    2011-01-13

    Locusts possess an identified neuron, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD), conveying visual information about impending collision from the brain to thoracic motor centers. We built a telemetry system to simultaneously record, in freely behaving animals, the activity of the DCMD and of motoneurons involved in jump execution. Cocontraction of antagonistic leg muscles, a required preparatory phase, was triggered after the DCMD firing rate crossed a threshold. Thereafter, the number of DCMD spikes predicted precisely motoneuron activity and jump occurrence. Additionally, the time of DCMD peak firing rate predicted that of jump. Ablation experiments suggest that the DCMD, together with a nearly identical ipsilateral descending neuron, is responsible for the timely execution of the escape. Thus, three distinct features that are multiplexed in a single neuron's sensory response to impending collision-firing rate threshold, peak firing time, and spike count-probably control three distinct motor aspects of escape behaviors. PMID:21220105

  12. The importance of accurate adiabatic interaction potentials for the correct description of electronically nonadiabatic vibrational energy transfer: A combined experimental and theoretical study of NO(v = 3) collisions with a Au(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Shirhatti, Pranav R.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bartels, Christof; Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen 37077 ; Rahinov, Igor; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen 37077; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106

    2014-01-28

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of NO(v = 3 → 3, 2, 1) scattering from a Au(111) surface at incidence translational energies ranging from 0.1 to 1.2 eV. Experimentally, molecular beam–surface scattering is combined with vibrational overtone pumping and quantum-state selective detection of the recoiling molecules. Theoretically, we employ a recently developed first-principles approach, which employs an Independent Electron Surface Hopping (IESH) algorithm to model the nonadiabatic dynamics on a Newns-Anderson Hamiltonian derived from density functional theory. This approach has been successful when compared to previously reported NO/Au scattering data. The experiments presented here show that vibrational relaxation probabilities increase with incidence energy of translation. The theoretical simulations incorrectly predict high relaxation probabilities at low incidence translational energy. We show that this behavior originates from trajectories exhibiting multiple bounces at the surface, associated with deeper penetration and favored (N-down) molecular orientation, resulting in a higher average number of electronic hops and thus stronger vibrational relaxation. The experimentally observed narrow angular distributions suggest that mainly single-bounce collisions are important. Restricting the simulations by selecting only single-bounce trajectories improves agreement with experiment. The multiple bounce artifacts discovered in this work are also present in simulations employing electronic friction and even for electronically adiabatic simulations, meaning they are not a direct result of the IESH algorithm. This work demonstrates how even subtle errors in the adiabatic interaction potential, especially those that influence the interaction time of the molecule with the surface, can lead to an incorrect description of electronically nonadiabatic vibrational energy transfer in molecule-surface collisions.

  13. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Accurately Detects Malaria DNA from Filter Paper Blood Samples of Low Density Parasitaemias

    PubMed Central

    González, Iveth J.; Polley, Spencer D.; Bell, David; Shakely, Delér; Msellem, Mwinyi I.; Björkman, Anders; Mårtensson, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) provides an opportunity for improved, field-friendly detection of malaria infections in endemic areas. However data on the diagnostic accuracy of LAMP for active case detection, particularly low-density parasitaemias, are lacking. We therefore evaluated the performance of a new LAMP kit compared with PCR using DNA from filter paper blood spots. Methods and Findings Samples from 865 fever patients and 465 asymptomatic individuals collected in Zanzibar were analysed for Pan (all species) and Pf (P. falciparum) DNA with the Loopamp MALARIA Pan/Pf kit. Samples were amplified at 65°C for 40 minutes in a real-time turbidimeter and results were compared with nested PCR. Samples with discordant results between LAMP and nested PCR were analysed with real-time PCR. The real-time PCR corrected nested PCR result was defined as gold standard. Among the 117 (13.5%) PCR detected P. falciparum infections from fever patients (mean parasite density 7491/µL, range 6–782,400) 115, 115 and 111 were positive by Pan-LAMP, Pf-LAMP and nested PCR, respectively. The sensitivities were 98.3% (95%CI 94–99.8) for both Pan and Pf-LAMP. Among the 54 (11.6%) PCR positive samples from asymptomatic individuals (mean parasite density 10/µL, range 0–4972) Pf-LAMP had a sensitivity of 92.7% (95%CI 80.1–98.5) for detection of the 41 P. falciparum infections. Pan-LAMP had sensitivities of 97% (95%CI 84.2–99.9) and 76.9% (95%CI 46.2–95) for detection of P. falciparum and P. malariae, respectively. The specificities for both Pan and Pf-LAMP were 100% (95%CI 99.1–100) in both study groups. Conclusion Both components of the Loopamp MALARIA Pan/Pf detection kit revealed high diagnostic accuracy for parasite detection among fever patients and importantly also among asymptomatic individuals of low parasite densities from minute blood volumes preserved on filter paper. These data support LAMPs potential role for improved detection of low

  14. COPS: a sensitive and accurate tool for detecting somatic Copy Number Alterations using short-read sequence data from paired samples.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Neeraja M; Gaur, Prakhar; Chaudhary, Rakshit; Rao, Arjun A; Panda, Binay

    2012-01-01

    Copy Number Alterations (CNAs) such as deletions and duplications; compose a larger percentage of genetic variations than single nucleotide polymorphisms or other structural variations in cancer genomes that undergo major chromosomal re-arrangements. It is, therefore, imperative to identify cancer-specific somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs), with respect to matched normal tissue, in order to understand their association with the disease. We have devised an accurate, sensitive, and easy-to-use tool, COPS, COpy number using Paired Samples, for detecting SCNAs. We rigorously tested the performance of COPS using short sequence simulated reads at various sizes and coverage of SCNAs, read depths, read lengths and also with real tumor:normal paired samples. We found COPS to perform better in comparison to other known SCNA detection tools for all evaluated parameters, namely, sensitivity (detection of true positives), specificity (detection of false positives) and size accuracy. COPS performed well for sequencing reads of all lengths when used with most upstream read alignment tools. Additionally, by incorporating a downstream boundary segmentation detection tool, the accuracy of SCNA boundaries was further improved. Here, we report an accurate, sensitive and easy to use tool in detecting cancer-specific SCNAs using short-read sequence data. In addition to cancer, COPS can be used for any disease as long as sequence reads from both disease and normal samples from the same individual are available. An added boundary segmentation detection module makes COPS detected SCNA boundaries more specific for the samples studied. COPS is available at ftp://115.119.160.213 with username "cops" and password "cops". PMID:23110103

  15. Are the Original and Second Edition of the California Verbal Learning Test Equally Accurate in Detecting Malingering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greve, Kevin W.; Curtis, Kelly L.; Bianchini, Kevin J.; Ord, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    This two-part study sought to determine the equivalence of the California Verbal Learning Tests (CVLT-1 and CVLT-2) in the detection of malingering in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and chronic pain. Part 1 compared a variety of scores from the two versions in carefully matched patient groups. Part 2 used criterion groups (known-groups) methodology…

  16. Real-Time Cellular Analysis Coupled with a Specimen Enrichment Accurately Detects and Quantifies Clostridium difficile Toxins in Stool

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Jin, Dazhi; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Janet Y.; Wang, Xiaobo; Stiles, Jeffrey; Xu, Xiao; Kamboj, Mini; Babady, N. Esther

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the use of an immunomagnetic separation enrichment process coupled with a modified real-time cellular analysis (RTCA) system (RTCA version 2) for the detection of C. difficile toxin (CDT) in stool. The limit of CDT detection by RTCA version 2 was 0.12 ng/ml. Among the consecutively collected 401 diarrheal stool specimens, 53 (13.2%) were toxin-producing C. difficile strains by quantitative toxigenic culture (qTC); bacterial loads ranged from 3.00 × 101 to 3.69 × 106 CFU/ml. The RTCA version 2 method detected CDT in 51 samples, resulting in a sensitivity of 96.2%, a specificity of 99.7%, and positive and negative predictive values of 98.1% and 99.4%, respectively. The positive step time ranged from 1.43 to 35.85 h, with <24 h for 80% of the samples. The CDT concentrations in stool samples determined by RTCA version 2 correlated with toxigenic C. difficile bacterial load (R2 = 0.554, P = 0.00002) by qTC as well as the threshold cycle (R2 = 0.343, P = 0.014) by real-time PCR. A statistically significant correlation between the CDT concentrations and the clinical severity of CDI was observed (P = 0.015). The sensitivity of the RTCA version 2 assay for the detection of functional toxins in stool specimens was significantly improved when the immunomagnetic separation enrichment process was incorporated. More than 80% positive results can be obtained within 24 h. The stool specimen CDT concentration derived using the RTCA version 2 assay correlates with clinical severity and may be used as a marker for monitoring the status of CDI. PMID:24452160

  17. Real-time cellular analysis coupled with a specimen enrichment accurately detects and quantifies Clostridium difficile toxins in stool.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Jin, Dazhi; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Janet Y; Wang, Xiaobo; Stiles, Jeffrey; Xu, Xiao; Kamboj, Mini; Babady, N Esther; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2014-04-01

    We describe here the use of an immunomagnetic separation enrichment process coupled with a modified real-time cellular analysis (RTCA) system (RTCA version 2) for the detection of C. difficile toxin (CDT) in stool. The limit of CDT detection by RTCA version 2 was 0.12 ng/ml. Among the consecutively collected 401 diarrheal stool specimens, 53 (13.2%) were toxin-producing C. difficile strains by quantitative toxigenic culture (qTC); bacterial loads ranged from 3.00 × 10(1) to 3.69 × 10(6) CFU/ml. The RTCA version 2 method detected CDT in 51 samples, resulting in a sensitivity of 96.2%, a specificity of 99.7%, and positive and negative predictive values of 98.1% and 99.4%, respectively. The positive step time ranged from 1.43 to 35.85 h, with <24 h for 80% of the samples. The CDT concentrations in stool samples determined by RTCA version 2 correlated with toxigenic C. difficile bacterial load (R(2) = 0.554, P = 0.00002) by qTC as well as the threshold cycle (R(2) = 0.343, P = 0.014) by real-time PCR. A statistically significant correlation between the CDT concentrations and the clinical severity of CDI was observed (P = 0.015). The sensitivity of the RTCA version 2 assay for the detection of functional toxins in stool specimens was significantly improved when the immunomagnetic separation enrichment process was incorporated. More than 80% positive results can be obtained within 24 h. The stool specimen CDT concentration derived using the RTCA version 2 assay correlates with clinical severity and may be used as a marker for monitoring the status of CDI. PMID:24452160

  18. Questioning the Specificity of ASRS-v1.1 to Accurately Detect ADHD in Substance Abusing Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiasson, Jean-Pierre; Stavro, Katherine; Rizkallah, Elie; Lapierre, Luc; Dussault, Maxime; Legault, Louis; Potvin, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the specificity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) in detecting ADHD among individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs). Method: A chart review of 183 SUD patients was conducted. Patients were screened for ADHD with the ASRS-v1.1 and were later assessed by a psychiatrist specialized in ADHD. Results: Among SUD…

  19. An N-targeting real-time PCR strategy for the accurate detection of spring viremia of carp virus.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ling; Xiao, Yu; He, Zhengkan; Gao, Longying

    2016-03-01

    Spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) is a highly pathogenic agent of several economically important Cyprinidae fish species. Currently, there are no effective vaccines or drugs for this virus, and prevention of the disease mostly relies on prompt diagnosis. Previously, nested RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detection methods based on the glycoprotein gene G have been developed. However, the high genetic diversity of the G gene seriously limits the reliability of those methods. Compared with the G gene, phylogenetic analyses indicate that the nucleoprotein gene N is more conserved. Furthermore, studies in other members of the Rhabdoviridae family reveals that their gene transcription level follows the order N>P>M>G>L, indicating that an N gene based RT-PCR should have higher sensitivity. Therefore, two pairs of primers and two corresponding probes targeting the conserved regions of the N gene were designed. RT-qPCR assays demonstrated all primers and probes could detect phylogenetically distant isolates specifically and efficiently. Moreover, in artificially infected fish, the detected copy numbers of the N gene were much higher than those of the G gene in all tissues, and both the N and G gene copy numbers were highest in the kidney and spleen. Testing in 1100 farm-raised fish also showed that the N-targeting strategy was more reliable than the G-targeting methods. The method developed in this study provides a reliable tool for the rapid diagnosis of SVCV. PMID:26717888

  20. Comparison of Methodologies to Detect Low Levels of Hemolysis in Serum for Accurate Assessment of Serum microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jaynish S.; Soon, Patsy S.; Marsh, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs have emerged as powerful regulators of many biological processes, and their expression in many cancer tissues has been shown to correlate with clinical parameters such as cancer type and prognosis. Present in a variety of biological fluids, microRNAs have been described as a ‘gold mine’ of potential noninvasive biomarkers. Release of microRNA content of blood cells upon hemolysis dramatically alters the microRNA profile in blood, potentially affecting levels of a significant number of proposed biomarker microRNAs and, consequently, accuracy of serum or plasma-based tests. Several methods to detect low levels of hemolysis have been proposed; however, a direct comparison assessing their sensitivities is currently lacking. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivities of four methods to detect hemolysis in serum (listed in the order of sensitivity): measurement of hemoglobin using a Coulter® AcT diff™ Analyzer, visual inspection, the absorbance of hemoglobin measured by spectrophotometry at 414 nm and the ratio of red blood cell-enriched miR-451a to the reference microRNA miR-23a-3p. The miR ratio detected hemolysis down to approximately 0.001%, whereas the Coulter® AcT diff™ Analyzer was unable to detect hemolysis lower than 1%. The spectrophotometric method could detect down to 0.004% hemolysis, and correlated with the miR ratio. Analysis of hemolysis in a cohort of 86 serum samples from cancer patients and healthy controls showed that 31 of 86 (36%) were predicted by the miR ratio to be hemolyzed, whereas only 8 of these samples (9%) showed visible pink discoloration. Using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses, we identified absorbance cutoffs of 0.072 and 0.3 that could identify samples with low and high levels of hemolysis, respectively. Overall, this study will assist researchers in the selection of appropriate methodologies to test for hemolysis in serum samples prior to quantifying expression of microRNAs. PMID:27054342

  1. Comparison of Methodologies to Detect Low Levels of Hemolysis in Serum for Accurate Assessment of Serum microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jaynish S; Soon, Patsy S; Marsh, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs have emerged as powerful regulators of many biological processes, and their expression in many cancer tissues has been shown to correlate with clinical parameters such as cancer type and prognosis. Present in a variety of biological fluids, microRNAs have been described as a 'gold mine' of potential noninvasive biomarkers. Release of microRNA content of blood cells upon hemolysis dramatically alters the microRNA profile in blood, potentially affecting levels of a significant number of proposed biomarker microRNAs and, consequently, accuracy of serum or plasma-based tests. Several methods to detect low levels of hemolysis have been proposed; however, a direct comparison assessing their sensitivities is currently lacking. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivities of four methods to detect hemolysis in serum (listed in the order of sensitivity): measurement of hemoglobin using a Coulter® AcT diff™ Analyzer, visual inspection, the absorbance of hemoglobin measured by spectrophotometry at 414 nm and the ratio of red blood cell-enriched miR-451a to the reference microRNA miR-23a-3p. The miR ratio detected hemolysis down to approximately 0.001%, whereas the Coulter® AcT diff™ Analyzer was unable to detect hemolysis lower than 1%. The spectrophotometric method could detect down to 0.004% hemolysis, and correlated with the miR ratio. Analysis of hemolysis in a cohort of 86 serum samples from cancer patients and healthy controls showed that 31 of 86 (36%) were predicted by the miR ratio to be hemolyzed, whereas only 8 of these samples (9%) showed visible pink discoloration. Using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses, we identified absorbance cutoffs of 0.072 and 0.3 that could identify samples with low and high levels of hemolysis, respectively. Overall, this study will assist researchers in the selection of appropriate methodologies to test for hemolysis in serum samples prior to quantifying expression of microRNAs. PMID:27054342

  2. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  3. Full automatic fiducial marker detection on coil arrays for accurate instrumentation placement during MRI guided breast interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippatos, Konstantinos; Boehler, Tobias; Geisler, Benjamin; Zachmann, Harald; Twellmann, Thorsten

    2010-02-01

    With its high sensitivity, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) of the breast is today one of the first-line tools for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, particularly in the dense breast of young women. However, many relevant findings are very small or occult on targeted ultrasound images or mammography, so that MRI guided biopsy is the only option for a precise histological work-up [1]. State-of-the-art software tools for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer in DCE-MRI data offer also means for image-based planning of biopsy interventions. One step in the MRI guided biopsy workflow is the alignment of the patient position with the preoperative MR images. In these images, the location and orientation of the coil localization unit can be inferred from a number of fiducial markers, which for this purpose have to be manually or semi-automatically detected by the user. In this study, we propose a method for precise, full-automatic localization of fiducial markers, on which basis a virtual localization unit can be subsequently placed in the image volume for the purpose of determining the parameters for needle navigation. The method is based on adaptive thresholding for separating breast tissue from background followed by rigid registration of marker templates. In an evaluation of 25 clinical cases comprising 4 different commercial coil array models and 3 different MR imaging protocols, the method yielded a sensitivity of 0.96 at a false positive rate of 0.44 markers per case. The mean distance deviation between detected fiducial centers and ground truth information that was appointed from a radiologist was 0.94mm.

  4. Isothermal microcalorimetry accurately detects bacteria, tumorous microtissues, and parasitic worms in a label-free well-plate assay

    PubMed Central

    Braissant, Olivier; Keiser, Jennifer; Meister, Isabel; Bachmann, Alexander; Wirz, Dieter; Göpfert, Beat; Bonkat, Gernot; Wadsö, Ingemar

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry is a label-free assay that allows monitoring of enzymatic and metabolic activities. The technique has strengths, but most instruments have a low throughput, which has limited their use for bioassays. Here, an isothermal microcalorimeter, equipped with a vessel holder similar to a 48-well plate, was used. The increased throughput of this microcalorimeter makes it valuable for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our results show that the sensitivity of the instrument allows the detection of 3 × 104 bacteria per vial. Growth of P. mirabilis in Luria Broth medium was detected between 2 and 9 h with decreasing inoculum. The culture released 2.1J with a maximum thermal power of 76 μW. The growth rate calculated using calorimetric and spectrophotometric data were 0.60 and 0.57 h–1, respectively. Additional insight on protease activities of P. mirabilis matching the last peak in heat production could be gathered as well. Growth of tumor microtissues releasing a maximum thermal power of 2.1 μW was also monitored and corresponds to a diameter increase of the microtissues from ca. 100 to 428 μm. This opens new research avenues in cancer research, diagnostics, and development of new antitumor drugs. For parasitic worms, the technique allows assessment of parasite survival using motor and metabolic activities even with a single worm. PMID:25511812

  5. Isothermal microcalorimetry accurately detects bacteria, tumorous microtissues, and parasitic worms in a label-free well-plate assay.

    PubMed

    Braissant, Olivier; Keiser, Jennifer; Meister, Isabel; Bachmann, Alexander; Wirz, Dieter; Göpfert, Beat; Bonkat, Gernot; Wadsö, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry is a label-free assay that allows monitoring of enzymatic and metabolic activities. The technique has strengths, but most instruments have a low throughput, which has limited their use for bioassays. Here, an isothermal microcalorimeter, equipped with a vessel holder similar to a 48-well plate, was used. The increased throughput of this microcalorimeter makes it valuable for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our results show that the sensitivity of the instrument allows the detection of 3 × 10(4) bacteria per vial. Growth of P. mirabilis in Luria Broth medium was detected between 2 and 9 h with decreasing inoculum. The culture released 2.1J with a maximum thermal power of 76 μW. The growth rate calculated using calorimetric and spectrophotometric data were 0.60 and 0.57 h(-1) , respectively. Additional insight on protease activities of P. mirabilis matching the last peak in heat production could be gathered as well. Growth of tumor microtissues releasing a maximum thermal power of 2.1 μW was also monitored and corresponds to a diameter increase of the microtissues from ca. 100 to 428 μm. This opens new research avenues in cancer research, diagnostics, and development of new antitumor drugs. For parasitic worms, the technique allows assessment of parasite survival using motor and metabolic activities even with a single worm. PMID:25511812

  6. An Optimized Method for Accurate Fetal Sex Prediction and Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Detection in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibo; Ding, Jie; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Xiang, Jingjing; Li, Qiong; Xuan, Liming; Kong, Lingyin; Mao, Yan; Zhu, Yijun; Shen, Jingjing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) combined with bioinformatic analysis has been widely applied to detect fetal chromosomal aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, 18, 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) by sequencing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) from maternal plasma, so-called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, many technical challenges, such as dependency on correct fetal sex prediction, large variations of chromosome Y measurement and high sensitivity to random reads mapping, may result in higher false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate (FPR) in fetal sex prediction as well as in SCAs detection. Here, we developed an optimized method to improve the accuracy of the current method by filtering out randomly mapped reads in six specific regions of the Y chromosome. The method reduces the FNR and FPR of fetal sex prediction from nearly 1% to 0.01% and 0.06%, respectively and works robustly under conditions of low fetal DNA concentration (1%) in testing and simulation of 92 samples. The optimized method was further confirmed by large scale testing (1590 samples), suggesting that it is reliable and robust enough for clinical testing. PMID:27441628

  7. An Optimized Method for Accurate Fetal Sex Prediction and Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Detection in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; He, Quanze; Li, Haibo; Ding, Jie; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Xiang, Jingjing; Li, Qiong; Xuan, Liming; Kong, Lingyin; Mao, Yan; Zhu, Yijun; Shen, Jingjing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) combined with bioinformatic analysis has been widely applied to detect fetal chromosomal aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, 18, 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) by sequencing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) from maternal plasma, so-called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, many technical challenges, such as dependency on correct fetal sex prediction, large variations of chromosome Y measurement and high sensitivity to random reads mapping, may result in higher false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate (FPR) in fetal sex prediction as well as in SCAs detection. Here, we developed an optimized method to improve the accuracy of the current method by filtering out randomly mapped reads in six specific regions of the Y chromosome. The method reduces the FNR and FPR of fetal sex prediction from nearly 1% to 0.01% and 0.06%, respectively and works robustly under conditions of low fetal DNA concentration (1%) in testing and simulation of 92 samples. The optimized method was further confirmed by large scale testing (1590 samples), suggesting that it is reliable and robust enough for clinical testing. PMID:27441628

  8. DNA extraction techniques compared for accurate detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products.

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Kazan, Hande; Karacanli, Burçin; Lucas, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, DNA extraction methods have been evaluated to detect the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products commercialised in Turkey. All the extraction methods tested performed well for the majority of maize foods and feed products analysed. However, the highest DNA content was achieved by the Wizard, Genespin or the CTAB method, all of which produced optimal DNA yield and purity for different maize food and feed products. The samples were then screened for the presence of GM elements, along with certified reference materials. Of the food and feed samples, 8 % tested positive for the presence of one GM element (NOS terminator), of which half (4 % of the total) also contained a second element (the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter). The results obtained herein clearly demonstrate the presence of GM maize in the Turkish market, and that the Foodproof GMO Screening Kit provides reliable screening of maize food and feed products. PMID:26243938

  9. A rapid method of accurate detection and differentiation of Newcastle disease virus pathotypes by demonstrating multiple bands in degenerate primer based nested RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Desingu, P A; Singh, S D; Dhama, K; Kumar, O R Vinodh; Singh, R; Singh, R K

    2015-02-01

    A rapid and accurate method of detection and differentiation of virulent and avirulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) pathotypes was developed. The NDV detection was carried out for different domestic avian field isolates and pigeon paramyxo virus-1 (25 field isolates and 9 vaccine strains) by using APMV-I "fusion" (F) gene Class II specific external primer A and B (535bp), internal primer C and D (238bp) based reverses transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). The internal degenerative reverse primer D is specific for F gene cleavage position of virulent strain of NDV. The nested RT-PCR products of avirulent strains showed two bands (535bp and 424bp) while virulent strains showed four bands (535bp, 424bp, 349bp and 238bp) on agar gel electrophoresis. This is the first report regarding development and use of degenerate primer based nested RT-PCR for accurate detection and differentiation of NDV pathotypes by demonstrating multiple PCR band patterns. Being a rapid, simple, and economical test, the developed method could serve as a valuable alternate diagnostic tool for characterizing NDV isolates and carrying out molecular epidemiological surveillance studies for this important pathogen of poultry. PMID:25449112

  10. New Method for Accurate Calibration of Micro-Channel Plate based Detection Systems and its use in the Fast Plasma Investigation of NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliese, U.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A.; Kujawski, J. T.; Mariano, A. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Chornay, D. J.; Cao, N. T.; Zeuch, M.; Pollock, C. J.; Jacques, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) of the NASA Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission employs 16 Dual Electron Spectrometers (DESs) and 16 Dual Ion Spectrometers (DISs) with 4 of each type on each of 4 spacecraft to enable fast (30ms for electrons; 150ms for ions) and spatially differentiated measurements of full the 3D particle velocity distributions. This approach presents a new and challenging aspect to the calibration and operation of these instruments on ground and in flight. The response uniformity and reliability of their calibration and the approach to handling any temporal evolution of these calibrated characteristics all assume enhanced importance in this application, where we attempt to understand the meaning of particle distributions within the ion and electron diffusion regions. Traditionally, the micro-channel plate (MCP) based detection systems for electrostatic particle spectrometers have been calibrated by setting a fixed detection threshold and, subsequently, measuring a detection system count rate plateau curve to determine the MCP voltage that ensures the count rate has reached a constant value independent of further variation in the MCP voltage. This is achieved when most of the MCP pulse height distribution (PHD) is located at higher values (larger pulses) than the detection amplifier threshold. This method is adequate in single-channel detection systems and in multi-channel detection systems with very low crosstalk between channels. However, in dense multi-channel systems, it can be inadequate. Furthermore, it fails to fully and individually characterize each of the fundamental parameters of the detection system. We present a new detection system calibration method that enables accurate and repeatable measurement and calibration of MCP gain, MCP efficiency, signal loss due to variation in gain and efficiency, crosstalk from effects both above and below the MCP, noise margin, and stability margin in one single measurement. The fundamental

  11. Experimental Study of Collision Detection Schema Used by Pilots During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1996-01-01

    An experimental flight simulator study was conducted to examine the mental alerting logic and thresholds used by subjects to issue an alert and execute an avoidance maneuver. Subjects flew a series of autopilot landing approaches with traffic on a closely-spaced parallel approach; during some runs, the traffic would deviate towards the subject and the subject was to indicate the point when they recognized the potential traffic conflict, and then indicate a direction of flight for an avoidance maneuver. A variety of subjects, including graduate students, general aviation pilots and airline pilots, were tested. Five traffic displays were evaluated, with a moving map TCAS-type traffic display as a baseline. A side-task created both high and low workload situations. Subjects appeared to use the lateral deviation of the intruder aircraft from its approach path as the criteria for an alert regardless of the display available. However, with displays showing heading and/or trend information, their alerting thresholds were significantly lowered. This type of range-only schema still resulted in many near misses, as a high convergence rate was often established by the time of the subject's alert. Therefore, the properties of the intruder's trajectory had the greatest effect on the resultant near miss rate; no display system reliably caused alerts timely enough for certain collision avoidance. Subjects' performance dropped significantly on a side-task while they analyzed the need for an alert, showing alert generation can be a high workload situation at critical times. No variation was found between subjects with and with out piloting experience. These results suggest the design of automatic alerting systems should take into account the range-type alerting schema used by the human, such that the rationale for the automatic alert should be obvious to, and trusted by, the operator. Although careful display design may help generate pilot/automation trust, issues such as user non

  12. The Complex Trial Protocol (CTP): a new, countermeasure-resistant, accurate, P300-based method for detection of concealed information.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, J Peter; Labkovsky, Elena; Winograd, Michael; Lui, Ming A; Vandenboom, Catherine; Chedid, Erica

    2008-11-01

    A new P300-based concealed information test is described. A rare probe or frequent irrelevant stimulus appears in the same trial in which a target or nontarget later appears. One response follows the first stimulus and uses the same button press regardless of stimulus type. A later second stimulus then appears: target or nontarget. The subject presses one button for a target, another for a nontarget. A P300 to the first stimulus indicates probe recognition. One group was tested in 3 weeks for denied recognition of familiar information. Weeks 1 and 3 were guilty conditions; Week 2 was a countermeasure (CM) condition. The probe-irrelevant differences were significant in all weeks, and percent hits were >90%. Attempted CM use was detectable via elevated reaction time to the first stimulus. In a replication, results were similar. False positive rates for both studies varied from 0 to .08, yielding J. B. Grier (1971) A' values from .9 to 1.0. PMID:18823418

  13. Accurate classification of 29 objects detected in the 39 month Palermo Swift/BAT hard X-ray catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, P.; Masetti, N.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Chavushyan, V.; Palazzi, E.; Landi, R.; Malizia, A.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Charles, P. A.; Galaz, G.; Mason, E.; McBride, V. A.; Minniti, D.; Morelli, L.; Schiavone, F.; Ubertini, P.

    2012-09-01

    Through an optical campaign performed at four telescopes located in the northern and the southern hemispheres, plus archival data from two on-line sky surveys, we obtained optical spectroscopy for 29 counterparts of unclassified or poorly studied hard X-ray emitting objects detected with Swift /Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and listed in the 39 month Palermo catalogue. All these objects also have observations taken with Swift /X-ray Telescope (XRT) or XMM-European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) which not only allow us to pinpoint their optical counterpart, but also study their X-ray spectral properties (column density, power law photon index, and F2-10 keV flux). We find that 28 sources in our sample are active galactic nuclei (AGNs); 7 are classified as type 1, while 21 are of type 2; the remaining object is a Galactic cataclysmic variable. Among our type 1 AGNs, we find 5 objects of intermediate Seyfert type (1.2-1.9) and one narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy; for 4 out of 7 sources, we are able to estimate the central black hole mass. Three of the type 2 AGNs of our sample display optical features typical of low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINER) and one is a likely Compton thick AGN. All galaxies classified in this work are relatively nearby objects since their redshifts lie in the range 0.008-0.075; the only Galactic object found lies at an estimated distance of 90 pc. We also investigate the optical versus X-ray emission ratio of the galaxies of our sample to test the AGN unified model. For these galaxies, we also compare the X-ray absorption (caused by gas) with the optical reddening (caused by dust): we find that for most of our sources, specifically those of type 1.9-2.0 the former is higher than the latter confirming early results of Maiolino and collaborators; this is possibly due to the properties of dust in the circumnuclear obscuring torus of the AGN. Based on observations obtained from the following observatories: the Astronomical Observatory of

  14. Fraction of space debris collisions that are catastrophic

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Analytic calculations estimate the fraction of catalog collisions that are catastrophic by a modification of collision rates. Most catalog collisions are catastrophic. Impactors of 60 kg or larger participate in about half of the catastrophic collisions. Analytic estimates give accurate values for catastrophic collisions, which are complicated numerically.

  15. Dual-particle imaging system based on simultaneous detection of photon and neutron collision events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson-Rivière, Alexis; Hamel, Michael C.; Polack, J. Kyle; Flaska, Marek; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-10-01

    A dual-particle imaging (DPI) system capable of simultaneously detecting and imaging fast neutrons and photons has been designed and built. Imaging fast neutrons and photons simultaneously is particularly desirable for nuclear nonproliferation and/or safeguards applications because typical sources of interest (special nuclear material) emit both particle types. The DPI system consists of three detection planes: the first two planes consist of organic-liquid scintillators and the third plane consists of NaI(Tl) inorganic scintillators. Pulse shape discrimination technique(s) may be used for the liquid scintillators to differentiate neutron and photon pulses whereas the NaI(Tl) scintillators are highly insensitive to neutrons. A prototype DPI system was set up using a digital data acquisition system as a proof of concept. Initial measurements showed potential for use of the DPI system with special nuclear material. The DPI system has efficiencies of the order of 10-4 correlated counts per incident particles for both neutron and photon correlated counts, with simple-backprojection images displaying peaks within a few degrees of the source location. This uncertainty is expected to decrease with more extensive data interpretation.

  16. High resolution/accurate mass (HRMS) detection of anatoxin-a in lake water using LDTD-APCI coupled to a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Solliec, Morgan; Sinotte, Marc; Deblois, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    A new innovative analytical method combining ultra-fast analysis time with high resolution/accurate mass detection was developed to eliminate the misidentification of anatoxin-a (ANA-a), a cyanobacterial toxin, from the natural amino acid phenylalanine (PHE). This was achieved by using the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to the Q-Exactive, a high resolution/accurate mass spectrometer (HRMS). This novel combination, the LDTD-APCI-HRMS, allowed for an ultra-fast analysis time (<15 s/sample). A comparison of two different acquisition modes (full scan and targeted ion fragmentation) was made to determine the most rigorous analytical method using the LDTD-APCI interface. Method development focused toward selectivity and sensitivity improvement to reduce the possibility of false positives and to lower detection limits. The Q-Exactive mass spectrometer operates with resolving powers between 17500 and 140000 FWHM (m/z 200). Nevertheless, a resolution of 17500FWHM is enough to dissociate ANA-a and PHE signals. Mass accuracy was satisfactory with values below 1 ppm reaching precision to the fourth decimal. Internal calibration with standard addition was achieved with the isotopically-labeled (D5) phenylalanine with good linearity (R(2)>0.999). Enhancement of signal to noise ratios relative to a standard triple-quadrupole method was demonstrated with lower detection and quantification limit values of 0.2 and 0.6 μg/L using the Q-Exactive. Accuracy and interday/intraday relative standard deviations were below 15%. The new method was applied to 8 different lake water samples with signs of cyanobacterial blooms. This work demonstrates the possibility of using an ultra-fast LDTD-APCI sample introduction system with an HRMS hybrid instrument for quantitative purposes with high selectivity in complex environmental matrices. PMID:25476385

  17. COMPLEMENTARY MOLECULAR AND ELEMENTAL DETECTION OF SPECIATED THIOARSENICALS USING ESI-MS IN COMBINATION WITH A XENON-BASED COLLISION-CELL ICP-MS WITH APPLICATION TO FORTIFIED NIST FREEZE-DRIED URINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The simultaneous detection of arsenic and sulfur in thio-arsenicals was achieved using xenonbased collision cell ICP-MS in combination with HPLC. In an attempt to minimize the 16O16O+ interference at m/z 32, both sample introduction and collision cell experimental parameters were...

  18. Helicopter Based Magnetic Detection Of Wells At The Teapot Dome (Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Oilfield: Rapid And Accurate Geophysical Algorithms For Locating Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, W.; Hammack, R.; Veloski, G.; Hodge, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this study Airborne magnetic data was collected by Fugro Airborne Surveys from a helicopter platform (Figure 1) using the Midas II system over the 39 km2 NPR3 (Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3) oilfield in east-central Wyoming. The Midas II system employs two Scintrex CS-2 cesium vapor magnetometers on opposite ends of a transversely mounted, 13.4-m long horizontal boom located amidships (Fig. 1). Each magnetic sensor had an in-flight sensitivity of 0.01 nT. Real time compensation of the magnetic data for magnetic noise induced by maneuvering of the aircraft was accomplished using two fluxgate magnetometers mounted just inboard of the cesium sensors. The total area surveyed was 40.5 km2 (NPR3) near Casper, Wyoming. The purpose of the survey was to accurately locate wells that had been drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood to enhance oil recovery, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells that are missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The well location method used combined an input dataset (for example, leveled total magnetic field reduced to the pole), combined with first and second horizontal spatial derivatives of this input dataset, which were then analyzed using focal statistics and finally combined using a fuzzy combination operation. Analytic signal and the Shi and Butt (2004) ZS attribute were also analyzed using this algorithm. A parameter could be adjusted to determine sensitivity. Depending on the input dataset 88% to 100% of the wells were located, with typical values being 95% to 99% for the NPR3 field site.

  19. Detection of partial melt in continental collision zones using different magnetotelluric tensor relationships: Results from synthetic models and real data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LLovet, Joan Campanya i.; Ledo, Juanjo; Jones, Alan G.; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Liesa, Montserrat; Antón Muñoz, Josep

    2014-05-01

    Three magnetotelluric (MT) tensor relationships - the single-station MT impedance tensor (Z), the single-station vertical geomagnetic transfer function (GTF) and the multiple-station horizontal geomagnetic transfer function (HGTF) - were investigated for their effectiveness in detecting the presence of partial melt in continental collision zones. Realistic synthetic models, based on prior field studies, were used to characterize the sensitivity of each tensor relationship constraining the presence of partial melt at lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths. From the MT response of the synthetic models, each type of data was inverted separately and jointly with the others, thus determining the properties and advantages of each when modeling the subsurface. Non-linear sensitivity tests were carried out to determine the resolution that can be expected in constraining electrical resistivity anomalies associated with the presence of partial melt. Results obtained show which configuration of the HGTF is more sensitive to partial melt. The analysis of partial melt sensitivity was also performed using real data from a MT survey carried out in the Pyrenees. The data comprise a total of 82 broadband MT sites and 29 long period MT sites distributed along four profiles across the Pyrenean mountain range between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Using the results from the synthetic models, real MT data in the Eastern Pyrenees were used to constrain if the partial melting area associated with the Iberian subducted lower crust observed below the Western, the West-central and the Central Pyrenees continues to the East. A non-linear sensitivity test was undertaken to determine the boundary to the east of this geoelectrical anomaly associated with partial melt.

  20. Accurate mass determination, quantification and determination of detection limits in liquid chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: challenges and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Joos, Pieter; Demeestere, Kristof

    2013-07-30

    Uniform guidelines for the data processing and validation of qualitative and quantitative multi-residue analysis using full-spectrum high-resolution mass spectrometry are scarce. Through systematic research, optimal mass accuracy and sensitivity are obtained after refining the post-processing of the HRMS data. For qualitative analysis, transforming the raw profile spectra to centroid spectra is recommended resulting in a 2.3 fold improved precision on the accurate mass determination of spectrum peaks. However, processing centroid data for quantitative purposes could lead to signal interruption when too narrow mass windows are applied for the construction of extracted ion chromatograms. Therefore, peak integration on the raw profile data is recommended. An optimal width of the mass window of 50 ppm, which is a trade-off between sensitivity and selectivity, was obtained for a TOF instrument providing a resolving power of 20,000 at full width at half maximum (FWHM). For the validation of HRMS analytical methods, widespread concepts such as the signal-to-noise ratios for the determination of decision limits and detection capabilities have shown to be not always applicable because in some cases almost no noise can be detected anymore. A statistical methodology providing a reliable alternative is extended and applied. PMID:23856232

  1. Accurate detection for a wide range of mutation and editing sites of microRNAs from small RNA high-throughput sequencing profiles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun; Ji, Bo; Song, Renhua; Wang, Shengpeng; Li, Ting; Zhang, Xiaotuo; Chen, Kun; Li, Tianqing; Li, Jinyan

    2016-08-19

    Various types of mutation and editing (M/E) events in microRNAs (miRNAs) can change the stabilities of pre-miRNAs and/or complementarities between miRNAs and their targets. Small RNA (sRNA) high-throughput sequencing (HTS) profiles can contain many mutated and edited miRNAs. Systematic detection of miRNA mutation and editing sites from the huge volume of sRNA HTS profiles is computationally difficult, as high sensitivity and low false positive rate (FPR) are both required. We propose a novel method (named MiRME) for an accurate and fast detection of miRNA M/E sites using a progressive sequence alignment approach which refines sensitivity and improves FPR step-by-step. From 70 sRNA HTS profiles with over 1.3 billion reads, MiRME has detected thousands of statistically significant M/E sites, including 3'-editing sites, 57 A-to-I editing sites (of which 32 are novel), as well as some putative non-canonical editing sites. We demonstrated that a few non-canonical editing sites were not resulted from mutations in genome by integrating the analysis of genome HTS profiles of two human cell lines, suggesting the existence of new editing types to further diversify the functions of miRNAs. Compared with six existing studies or methods, MiRME has shown much superior performance for the identification and visualization of the M/E sites of miRNAs from the ever-increasing sRNA HTS profiles. PMID:27229138

  2. Identification of a 251 Gene Expression Signature That Can Accurately Detect M. tuberculosis in Patients with and without HIV Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dawany, Noor; Showe, Louise C.; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Chang, Celia; Ive, Prudence; Conradie, Francesca; Stevens, Wendy; Sanne, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Background Co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. However, diagnosis of TB, especially in the presence of an HIV co-infection, can be limiting due to the high inaccuracy associated with the use of conventional diagnostic methods. Here we report a gene signature that can identify a tuberculosis infection in patients co-infected with HIV as well as in the absence of HIV. Methods We analyzed global gene expression data from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples of patients that were either mono-infected with HIV or co-infected with HIV/TB and used support vector machines to identify a gene signature that can distinguish between the two classes. We then validated our results using publically available gene expression data from patients mono-infected with TB. Results Our analysis successfully identified a 251-gene signature that accurately distinguishes patients co-infected with HIV/TB from those infected with HIV only, with an overall accuracy of 81.4% (sensitivity = 76.2%, specificity = 86.4%). Furthermore, we show that our 251-gene signature can also accurately distinguish patients with active TB in the absence of an HIV infection from both patients with a latent TB infection and healthy controls (88.9–94.7% accuracy; 69.2–90% sensitivity and 90.3–100% specificity). We also demonstrate that the expression levels of the 251-gene signature diminish as a correlate of the length of TB treatment. Conclusions A 251-gene signature is described to (a) detect TB in the presence or absence of an HIV co-infection, and (b) assess response to treatment following anti-TB therapy. PMID:24587128

  3. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, Laura; Pearson, Erik A.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  4. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  5. Mean Polyp per Patient Is an Accurate and Readily Obtainable Surrogate for Adenoma Detection Rate: Results from an Opportunistic Screening Colonoscopy Program

    PubMed Central

    Delavari, Alireza; Salimzadeh, Hamideh; Bishehsari, Faraz; Sobh Rakhshankhah, Elham; Delavari, Farnaz; Moossavi, Shirin; Khosravi, Pejman; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Merat, Shahin; Ansari, Reza; Vahedi, Homayoon; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of colorectal cancer is rising in several developing countries. In the absence of integrated endoscopy and pathology databases, adenoma detection rate (ADR), as a validated quality indicator of screening colonoscopy, is generally difficult to obtain in practice. We aimed to measure the correlation of polyp-related indicators with ADR in order to identify the most accurate surrogate(s) of ADR in routine practice. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed the endoscopic and histopathological findings of patients who underwent colonoscopy at a tertiary gastrointestinal clinic. The overall ADR and advanced-ADR were calculated using patient-level data. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) was applied to measure the strength of the correlation between the quality metrics obtained by endoscopists. RESULTS A total of 713 asymptomatic adults aged 50 and older who underwent their first-time screening colonoscopy were included in this study. The ADR and advanced-ADR were 33.00% (95% CI: 29.52-36.54) and 13.18% (95% CI: 10.79-15.90), respectively. We observed good correlations between polyp detection rate (PDR) and ADR (r=0.93), and mean number of polyp per patient (MPP) and ADR (r=0.88) throughout the colon. There was a positive, yet insignificant correlation between advanced ADRs and non-advanced ADRs (r=0.42, p=0.35). CONCLUSION MPP is strongly correlated with ADR, and can be considered as a reliable and readily obtainable proxy for ADR in opportunistic screening colonoscopy programs. PMID:26609349

  6. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  7. Investigation of the collision line broadening problem as applicable to the NASA Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Timothy C.; Ventrice, Carl A.

    1995-05-01

    As a final report for phase 1 of the project, the researchers are submitting to the Tennessee Tech Office of Research the following two papers (reprinted in this report): 'Collision Line Broadening Effects on Spectrometric Data from the Optical Plume Anomaly System (OPAD),' presented at the 30th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, 27-29 June 1994, and 'Calculation of Collision Cross Sections for Atomic Line Broadening in the Plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME),' presented at the IEEE Southeastcon '95, 26-29 March 1995. These papers fully state the problem and the progress made up to the end of NASA Fiscal Year 1994. The NASA OPAD system was devised to predict concentrations of anomalous species in the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) through analysis of spectrometric data. The self absorption of the radiation of these plume anomalies is highly dependent on the line shape of the atomic transition of interest. The Collision Line Broadening paper discusses the methods used to predict line shapes of atomic transitions in the environment of a rocket plume. The Voigt profile is used as the line shape factor since both Doppler and collisional line broadening are significant. Methods used to determine the collisional cross sections are discussed and the results are given and compared with experimental data. These collisional cross sections are then incorporated into the current self absorbing radiative model and the predicted spectrum is compared to actual spectral data collected from the Stennis Space Center Diagnostic Test Facility rocket engine. The second paper included in this report investigates an analytical method for determining the cross sections for collision line broadening by molecular perturbers, using effective central force interaction potentials. These cross sections are determined for several atomic species with H2, one of the principal constituents of the SSME plume environment, and compared with experimental data.

  8. Investigation of the collision line broadening problem as applicable to the NASA Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Timothy C.; Ventrice, Carl A.

    1995-01-01

    As a final report for phase 1 of the project, the researchers are submitting to the Tennessee Tech Office of Research the following two papers (reprinted in this report): 'Collision Line Broadening Effects on Spectrometric Data from the Optical Plume Anomaly System (OPAD),' presented at the 30th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, 27-29 June 1994, and 'Calculation of Collision Cross Sections for Atomic Line Broadening in the Plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME),' presented at the IEEE Southeastcon '95, 26-29 March 1995. These papers fully state the problem and the progress made up to the end of NASA Fiscal Year 1994. The NASA OPAD system was devised to predict concentrations of anomalous species in the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) through analysis of spectrometric data. The self absorption of the radiation of these plume anomalies is highly dependent on the line shape of the atomic transition of interest. The Collision Line Broadening paper discusses the methods used to predict line shapes of atomic transitions in the environment of a rocket plume. The Voigt profile is used as the line shape factor since both Doppler and collisional line broadening are significant. Methods used to determine the collisional cross sections are discussed and the results are given and compared with experimental data. These collisional cross sections are then incorporated into the current self absorbing radiative model and the predicted spectrum is compared to actual spectral data collected from the Stennis Space Center Diagnostic Test Facility rocket engine. The second paper included in this report investigates an analytical method for determining the cross sections for collision line broadening by molecular perturbers, using effective central force interaction potentials. These cross sections are determined for several atomic species with H2, one of the principal constituents of the SSME plume environment, and compared with experimental data.

  9. Comparison of cross sections from the quasi-classical trajectory method and the j(z)-conserving centrifugal sudden approximation with accurate quantum results for an atom-rigid nonlinear polyatomic collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a series of calculations of state-to-state integral cross sections for collisions between O and nonvibrating H2O in the gas phase on a model nonreactive potential energy surface. The dynamical methods used include converged quantum mechanical scattering calculations, the j(z) conserving centrifugal sudden (j(z)-CCS) approximation, and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations. We consider three total energies 0.001, 0.002, and 0.005 E(h) and the nine initial states with rotational angular momentum less than or equal to 2 (h/2 pi). The j(z)-CCS approximation gives good results, while the QCT method can be quite unreliable for transitions to specific rotational sublevels. However, the QCT cross sections summed over final sublevels and averaged over initial sublevels are in better agreement with the quantum results.

  10. Detection of 15NNH+ in L1544: non-LTE modelling of dyazenilium hyperfine line emission and accurate 14N/15N values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Caselli, P.; Leonardo, E.; Dore, L.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Samples of pristine solar system material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles are highly enriched in 15N. Conspicuous nitrogen isotopic anomalies have also been measured in comets, and the 14N/15N abundance ratio of the Earth is itself higher than the recognised presolar value by almost a factor of two. Low-temperature ion/molecule reactions in the proto-solar nebula have been repeatedly indicated as being responsible for these 15N-enhancements. Aims: We have searched for 15N variants of the N2H+ ion in L1544, a prototypical starless cloud core that is one of the best candidate sources for detection owing to its low central core temperature and high CO depletion. The goal is to evaluate accurate and reliable 14N/15N ratio values for this species in the interstellar gas. Methods: A deep integration of the 15NNH+(1-0) line at 90.4 GHz was obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelling was performed on the J = 1-0 emissions of the parent and 15N-containing dyazenilium ions, using a Bonnor-Ebert sphere as a model for the source. Results: A high-quality fit of the N2H+(1-0) hyperfine spectrum has allowed us to derive a revised value of the N2H+ column density in L1544. Analysis of the observed N15NH+ and 15NNH+ spectra yielded an abundance ratio N(N15NH+)/N(15NNH+) = 1.1 ± 0.3. The obtained 14N/15N isotopic ratio is ~1000 ± 200, suggestive of a sizeable 15N depletion in this molecular ion. Such a result is not consistent with the prediction of the current nitrogen chemical models. Conclusions: Since chemical models predict high 15N fractionation of N2H+, we suggest that 15N14N, or 15N in some other molecular form, tends to deplete onto dust grains. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Full Tables B.1-B.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http

  11. Penning type of ionizing energy transfer collisions in a Hg-Ar discharge detected by the optogalvanic effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, B. R.; Venkateswarlu, P.; George, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the optogalvanic signals has been investigated in detail in a Hg-argon discharge by irradiating it with an excimer pumped dye laser. The signals at 4510.7, 4596 and 4628.4 A exhibited anomalous behavior. Analysis of the data revealed that the excited Ar and Hg atoms respectively in the 1P1 and 3P1 states participated in energy transfer collisions, causing atomic mercury to excite to an ionized energy state, while simultaneously the argon atom relaxes to its ground state.

  12. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  13. Simulating immersed particle collisions: the Devil's in the details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegert, Edward; Vowinckel, Bernhard; Meiburg, Eckart

    2015-11-01

    Simulating densely-packed particle-laden flows with any degree of confidence requires accurate modeling of particle-particle collisions. To this end, we investigate a few collision models from the fluids and granular flow communities using sphere-wall collisions, which have been studied by a number of experimental groups. These collisions involve enough complexities--gravity, particle-wall lubrication forces, particle-wall contact stresses, particle-wake interactions--to challenge any collision model. Evaluating the successes and shortcomings of the collision models, we seek improvements in order to obtain more consistent results. We will highlight several implementation details that are crucial for obtaining accurate results.

  14. Accurate method for measurement of pipe wall thickness using a circumferential guided wave generated and detected by a pair of noncontact transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, H.; Taniguchi, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    2012-05-01

    A noncontact method of an accurate estimation of a pipe wall thickness using a circumferential (C-) Lamb wave is presented. The C-Lamb waves circling along the circumference of pipes are transmitted and received by the critical angle method using a pair of noncontact air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. For the accurate estimation of a pipe wall thickness, the accurate measurement of the angular wave number that changes minutely owing to the thickness must be achieved. To achieve the accurate measurement, a large number of tone-burst cycles are used so as to superpose the C-Lamb wave on itself along its circumferential orbit. In this setting, the amplitude of the superposed region changes considerably with the angular wave number, from which the wall thickness can be estimated. This paper presents the principle of the method and experimental verifications. As results of the experimental verifications, it was confirmed that the maximum error between the estimates and the theoretical model was less than 10 micrometers.

  15. Linear Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, T. A.; Newby, N. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of linear collisions between two or three objects is related to a junior-level course in analytical mechanics. The theoretical discussion uses a geometrical approach that treats elastic and inelastic collisions from a unified point of view. Experiments with a linear air track are described. (Author/TS)

  16. A non-contact method based on multiple signal classification algorithm to reduce the measurement time for accurately heart rate detection.

    PubMed

    Bechet, P; Mitran, R; Munteanu, M

    2013-08-01

    Non-contact methods for the assessment of vital signs are of great interest for specialists due to the benefits obtained in both medical and special applications, such as those for surveillance, monitoring, and search and rescue. This paper investigates the possibility of implementing a digital processing algorithm based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) parametric spectral estimation in order to reduce the observation time needed to accurately measure the heart rate. It demonstrates that, by proper dimensioning the signal subspace, the MUSIC algorithm can be optimized in order to accurately assess the heart rate during an 8-28 s time interval. The validation of the processing algorithm performance was achieved by minimizing the mean error of the heart rate after performing simultaneous comparative measurements on several subjects. In order to calculate the error the reference value of heart rate was measured using a classic measurement system through direct contact. PMID:24007088

  17. A non-contact method based on multiple signal classification algorithm to reduce the measurement time for accurately heart rate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechet, P.; Mitran, R.; Munteanu, M.

    2013-08-01

    Non-contact methods for the assessment of vital signs are of great interest for specialists due to the benefits obtained in both medical and special applications, such as those for surveillance, monitoring, and search and rescue. This paper investigates the possibility of implementing a digital processing algorithm based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) parametric spectral estimation in order to reduce the observation time needed to accurately measure the heart rate. It demonstrates that, by proper dimensioning the signal subspace, the MUSIC algorithm can be optimized in order to accurately assess the heart rate during an 8-28 s time interval. The validation of the processing algorithm performance was achieved by minimizing the mean error of the heart rate after performing simultaneous comparative measurements on several subjects. In order to calculate the error the reference value of heart rate was measured using a classic measurement system through direct contact.

  18. Fine and distributed subcellular retinotopy of excitatory inputs to the dendritic tree of a collision-detecting neuron.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Gabbiani, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    Individual neurons in several sensory systems receive synaptic inputs organized according to subcellular topographic maps, yet the fine structure of this topographic organization and its relation to dendritic morphology have not been studied in detail. Subcellular topography is expected to play a role in dendritic integration, particularly when dendrites are extended and active. The lobula giant movement detector (LGMD) neuron in the locust visual system is known to receive topographic excitatory inputs on part of its dendritic tree. The LGMD responds preferentially to objects approaching on a collision course and is thought to implement several interesting dendritic computations. To study the fine retinotopic mapping of visual inputs onto the excitatory dendrites of the LGMD, we designed a custom microscope allowing visual stimulation at the native sampling resolution of the locust compound eye while simultaneously performing two-photon calcium imaging on excitatory dendrites. We show that the LGMD receives a distributed, fine retinotopic projection from the eye facets and that adjacent facets activate overlapping portions of the same dendritic branches. We also demonstrate that adjacent retinal inputs most likely make independent synapses on the excitatory dendrites of the LGMD. Finally, we show that the fine topographic mapping can be studied using dynamic visual stimuli. Our results reveal the detailed structure of the dendritic input originating from individual facets on the eye and their relation to that of adjacent facets. The mapping of visual space onto the LGMD's dendrites is expected to have implications for dendritic computation. PMID:27009157

  19. A novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon-based two-phase hybridization assay for accurate and high-throughput detection of multiple drug resistance-conferring point mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qinghai; Wu, Nan; Xie, Meng; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianjun; Zhuo, Lisha; Kuang, Hong; Fu, Weiling

    2012-01-01

    Summary The accurate and high-throughput detection of drug resistance-related multiple point mutations remains a challenge. Although the combination of molecular beacons with bio-immobilization technology, such as microarray, is promising, its application is difficult due to the ineffective immobilization of molecular beacons on the chip surface. Here, we propose a novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon in which the loop consists of 2 parts. One is complementary to a target, while the other is complementary to an oligonucleotide probe immobilized on the chip surface. With this novel probe, a two-phase hybridization assay can be used for simultaneously detecting multiple point mutations. This assay will have advantages, such as easy probe availability, multiplex detection, low background, and high-efficiency hybridization, and may provide a new avenue for the immobilization of molecular beacons and high-throughput detection of point mutations. PMID:22460100

  20. Calculation of the Trubnikov and Nanbu Collision Kernels: Implications for Numerical Modeling of Coulomb Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A M; Wang, C; Caflisch, R; Cohen, B I; Huang, Y

    2008-08-06

    We investigate the accuracy of and assumptions underlying the numerical binary Monte-Carlo collision operator due to Nanbu [K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55 (1997)]. The numerical experiments that resulted in the parameterization of the collision kernel used in Nanbu's operator are argued to be an approximate realization of the Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle scattering process, for which an analytical solution for the collision kernel is available. It is demonstrated empirically that Nanbu's collision operator quite accurately recovers the effects of Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle collisions, or processes that approximate these (such interspecies Coulomb collisions with very small mass ratio) even for very large values of the collisional time step. An investigation of the analytical solution shows that Nanbu's parameterized kernel is highly accurate for small values of the normalized collision time step, but loses some of its accuracy for larger values of the time step. Careful numerical and analytical investigations are presented, which show that the time dependence of the relaxation of a temperature anisotropy by Coulomb-Lorentz collisions has a richer structure than previously thought, and is not accurately represented by an exponential decay with a single decay rate. Finally, a practical collision algorithm is proposed that for small-mass-ratio interspecies Coulomb collisions improves on the accuracy of Nanbu's algorithm.

  1. QuantiSNP: an Objective Bayes Hidden-Markov Model to detect and accurately map copy number variation using SNP genotyping data.

    PubMed

    Colella, Stefano; Yau, Christopher; Taylor, Jennifer M; Mirza, Ghazala; Butler, Helen; Clouston, Penny; Bassett, Anne S; Seller, Anneke; Holmes, Christopher C; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2007-01-01

    Array-based technologies have been used to detect chromosomal copy number changes (aneuploidies) in the human genome. Recent studies identified numerous copy number variants (CNV) and some are common polymorphisms that may contribute to disease susceptibility. We developed, and experimentally validated, a novel computational framework (QuantiSNP) for detecting regions of copy number variation from BeadArray SNP genotyping data using an Objective Bayes Hidden-Markov Model (OB-HMM). Objective Bayes measures are used to set certain hyperparameters in the priors using a novel re-sampling framework to calibrate the model to a fixed Type I (false positive) error rate. Other parameters are set via maximum marginal likelihood to prior training data of known structure. QuantiSNP provides probabilistic quantification of state classifications and significantly improves the accuracy of segmental aneuploidy identification and mapping, relative to existing analytical tools (Beadstudio, Illumina), as demonstrated by validation of breakpoint boundaries. QuantiSNP identified both novel and validated CNVs. QuantiSNP was developed using BeadArray SNP data but it can be adapted to other platforms and we believe that the OB-HMM framework has widespread applicability in genomic research. In conclusion, QuantiSNP is a novel algorithm for high-resolution CNV/aneuploidy detection with application to clinical genetics, cancer and disease association studies. PMID:17341461

  2. Influence of storage time on DNA of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for accurate detection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Rong, C Z; Zhao, J Y; Lao, X J; Xie, L; Li, S; Qin, X

    2016-01-01

    The shipment and storage conditions of clinical samples pose a major challenge to the detection accuracy of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) when using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of storage time at 4°C on the DNA of these pathogens and its effect on their detection by qRT-PCR. CT, NG, and UU positive genital swabs from 70 patients were collected, and DNA of all samples were extracted and divided into eight aliquots. One aliquot was immediately analyzed with qRT-PCR to assess the initial pathogen load, whereas the remaining samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. No significant differences in CT, NG, and UU DNA loads were observed between baseline (day 0) and the subsequent time points (days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28) in any of the 70 samples. Although a slight increase in DNA levels was observed at day 28 compared to day 0, paired sample t-test results revealed no significant differences between the mean DNA levels at different time points following storage at 4°C (all P>0.05). Overall, the CT, UU, and NG DNA loads from all genital swab samples were stable at 4°C over a 28-day period. PMID:27580005

  3. Trimodal color-fluorescence-polarization endoscopy aided by a tumor selective molecular probe accurately detects flat lesions in colitis-associated cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charanya, Tauseef; York, Timothy; Bloch, Sharon; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Garcia, Missael; Akers, Walter J.; Rubin, Deborah; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) arises from premalignant flat lesions of the colon, which are difficult to detect with current endoscopic screening approaches. We have developed a complementary fluorescence and polarization reporting strategy that combines the unique biochemical and physical properties of dysplasia and cancer for real-time detection of these lesions. Using azoxymethane-dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) treated mice, which recapitulates human CAC and dysplasia, we show that an octapeptide labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye selectively identified all precancerous and cancerous lesions. A new thermoresponsive sol-gel formulation allowed topical application of the molecular probe during endoscopy. This method yielded high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between adenomatous tumors (20.6±1.65) and flat lesions (12.1±1.03) and surrounding uninvolved colon tissue versus CNR of inflamed tissues (1.62±0.41). Incorporation of nanowire-filtered polarization imaging into NIR fluorescence endoscopy shows a high depolarization contrast in both adenomatous tumors and flat lesions in CAC, reflecting compromised structural integrity of these tissues. Together, the real-time polarization imaging provides real-time validation of suspicious colon tissue highlighted by molecular fluorescence endoscopy.

  4. Influence of storage time on DNA of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for accurate detection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y.; Rong, C.Z.; Zhao, J.Y.; Lao, X.J.; Xie, L.; Li, S.; Qin, X.

    2016-01-01

    The shipment and storage conditions of clinical samples pose a major challenge to the detection accuracy of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) when using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of storage time at 4°C on the DNA of these pathogens and its effect on their detection by qRT-PCR. CT, NG, and UU positive genital swabs from 70 patients were collected, and DNA of all samples were extracted and divided into eight aliquots. One aliquot was immediately analyzed with qRT-PCR to assess the initial pathogen load, whereas the remaining samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. No significant differences in CT, NG, and UU DNA loads were observed between baseline (day 0) and the subsequent time points (days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28) in any of the 70 samples. Although a slight increase in DNA levels was observed at day 28 compared to day 0, paired sample t-test results revealed no significant differences between the mean DNA levels at different time points following storage at 4°C (all P>0.05). Overall, the CT, UU, and NG DNA loads from all genital swab samples were stable at 4°C over a 28-day period. PMID:27580005

  5. Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) in clinical samples: Evolving methods and strategies for the accurate determination of HPV status of head and neck carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Westra, William H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Much recent attention has highlighted a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) related to human papillomavirus (HPV) that has an epidemiologic, demographic, molecular and clinical profile which is distinct from non-HPV-related HNSCC. The clinical significance of detecting HPV in a HNSCC has resulted in a growing expectation for HPV testing of HNSCCs. Although the growing demand for routine testing is understandable and appropriate, it has impelled an undisciplined approach that has been largely unsystematic. The current state of the art has now arrived at a point where a better understanding of HPV-related tumorigenesis and a growing experience with HPV testing can now move wide scale, indiscriminant and non-standardized testing towards a more directed, clinically relevant and standardized approach. This review will address the current state of HPV detection; and will focus on why HPV testing is important, when HPV testing is appropriate, and how to test for the presence of HPV in various clinical samples. As no single test has been universally accepted as a best method, this review will consider the strengths and weaknesses of some of the more commonly used assays, and will emphasize some emerging techniques that may improve the efficiency of HPV testing of clinical samples including cytologic specimens. PMID:24932529

  6. Trimodal color-fluorescence-polarization endoscopy aided by a tumor selective molecular probe accurately detects flat lesions in colitis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charanya, Tauseef; York, Timothy; Bloch, Sharon; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Garcia, Missael; Akers, Walter J.; Rubin, Deborah; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) arises from premalignant flat lesions of the colon, which are difficult to detect with current endoscopic screening approaches. We have developed a complementary fluorescence and polarization reporting strategy that combines the unique biochemical and physical properties of dysplasia and cancer for real-time detection of these lesions. Using azoxymethane-dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) treated mice, which recapitulates human CAC and dysplasia, we show that an octapeptide labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye selectively identified all precancerous and cancerous lesions. A new thermoresponsive sol-gel formulation allowed topical application of the molecular probe during endoscopy. This method yielded high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between adenomatous tumors (20.6±1.65) and flat lesions (12.1±1.03) and surrounding uninvolved colon tissue versus CNR of inflamed tissues (1.62±0.41). Incorporation of nanowire-filtered polarization imaging into NIR fluorescence endoscopy shows a high depolarization contrast in both adenomatous tumors and flat lesions in CAC, reflecting compromised structural integrity of these tissues. Together, the real-time polarization imaging provides real-time validation of suspicious colon tissue highlighted by molecular fluorescence endoscopy. PMID:25473883

  7. An epigenetic biomarker combination of PCDH17 and POU4F2 detects bladder cancer accurately by methylation analyses of urine sediment DNA in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaoling; An, Dan; Fang, Lu; Lin, Youcheng; Hou, Yong; Xu, Abai; Fu, Yu; Lu, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Mingwei; Zhang, Meng; Jiang, Huiling; Zhang, Chuanxia; Dong, Pei; Li, Chong; Chen, Jun; Yang, Guosheng; Liu, Chunxiao; Cai, Zhiming; Zhou, Fangjian; Wu, Song

    2016-01-01

    To develop a routine and effectual procedure of detecting bladder cancer (BlCa), an optimized combination of epigenetic biomarkers that work synergistically with high sensitivity and specificity is necessary. In this study, methylation levels of seven biomarkers (EOMES, GDF15, NID2, PCDH17, POU4F2, TCF21, and ZNF154) in 148 individuals—which including 58 urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) patients, 20 infected urinary calculi (IUC) patients, 20 kidney cancer (KC) patients,20 prostate cancer (PC) patients, and 30 healthy volunteers (HV)—were quantified by qMSP using the urine sediment DNA. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for each biomarker. The combining predictors of possible combinations were calculated through logistic regression model. Subsequently, ROC curves of the three best performing combinations were constructed. Then, we validated the three best performing combinations and POU4F2 in another 72 UCC, 21 IUC, 26 KC and 22 PC, and 23 HV urine samples. The combination of POU4F2/PCDH17 has yielded the highest sensitivity and specificity of 90.00% and 93.96% in all the 312 individuals, showing the capability of detecting BlCa effectively among pathologically varied sample groups. PMID:26700620

  8. Fast and accurate metrology of multi-layered ceramic materials by an automated boundary detection algorithm developed for optical coherence tomography data

    PubMed Central

    Ekberg, Peter; Su, Rong; Chang, Ernest W.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Mattsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is useful for materials defect analysis and inspection with the additional possibility of quantitative dimensional metrology. Here, we present an automated image-processing algorithm for OCT analysis of roll-to-roll multilayers in 3D manufacturing of advanced ceramics. It has the advantage of avoiding filtering and preset modeling, and will, thus, introduce a simplification. The algorithm is validated for its capability of measuring the thickness of ceramic layers, extracting the boundaries of embedded features with irregular shapes, and detecting the geometric deformations. The accuracy of the algorithm is very high, and the reliability is better than 1 µm when evaluating with the OCT images using the same gauge block step height reference. The method may be suitable for industrial applications to the rapid inspection of manufactured samples with high accuracy and robustness. PMID:24562018

  9. Improved Detection System Description and New Method for Accurate Calibration of Micro-Channel Plate Based Instruments and Its Use in the Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliese, U.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Kujawski, J. T.; Mariano, A. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Chornay, D. J.; Cao, N. T.; Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J. C.; Zeuch, M. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Jacques, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    system calibration method that enables accurate and repeatable measurement and calibration of MCP gain, MCP efficiency, signal loss due to variation in gain and efficiency, crosstalk from effects both above and below the MCP, noise margin, and stability margin in one single measurement. More precise calibration is highly desirable as the instruments will produce higher quality raw data that will require less post-acquisition data correction using results from in-flight pitch angle distribution measurements and ground calibration measurements. The detection system description and the fundamental concepts of this new calibration method, named threshold scan, will be presented. It will be shown how to derive all the individual detection system parameters and how to choose the optimum detection system operating point. This new method has been successfully applied to achieve a highly accurate calibration of the DESs and DISs of the MMS mission. The practical application of the method will be presented together with the achieved calibration results and their significance. Finally, it will be shown that, with further detailed modeling, this method can be extended for use in flight to achieve and maintain a highly accurate detection system calibration across a large number of instruments during the mission.

  10. The Facts Are on the Table: Analyzing the Geometry of Coin Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theilmann, Florian

    2014-01-01

    In a typical high school course, the complex physics of collisions is broken up into the dichotomy of perfectly elastic versus completely inelastic collisions. Real-life collisions, however, generally fall between these two extremes. An accurate treatment is still possible, as demonstrated in an investigation of coin collisions. Simple…

  11. Accurate, rapid and high-throughput detection of strain-specific polymorphisms in Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis by next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the event of biocrimes or infectious disease outbreaks, high-resolution genetic characterization for identifying the agent and attributing it to a specific source can be crucial for an effective response. Until recently, in-depth genetic characterization required expensive and time-consuming Sanger sequencing of a few strains, followed by genotyping of a small number of marker loci in a panel of isolates at or by gel-based approaches such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis, which by necessity ignores most of the genome. Next-generation, massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technology (specifically the Applied Biosystems sequencing by oligonucleotide ligation and detection (SOLiD™) system) is a powerful investigative tool for rapid, cost-effective and parallel microbial whole-genome characterization. Results To demonstrate the utility of MPS for whole-genome typing of monomorphic pathogens, four Bacillus anthracis and four Yersinia pestis strains were sequenced in parallel. Reads were aligned to complete reference genomes, and genomic variations were identified. Resequencing of the B. anthracis Ames ancestor strain detected no false-positive single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and mapping of reads to the Sterne strain correctly identified 98% of the 133 SNPs that are not clustered or associated with repeats. Three geographically distinct B. anthracis strains from the A branch lineage were found to have between 352 and 471 SNPs each, relative to the Ames genome, and one strain harbored a genomic amplification. Sequencing of four Y. pestis strains from the Orientalis lineage identified between 20 and 54 SNPs per strain relative to the CO92 genome, with the single Bolivian isolate having approximately twice as many SNPs as the three more closely related North American strains. Coverage plotting also revealed a common deletion in two strains and an amplification in the Bolivian strain that appear to be due to insertion element-mediated recombination

  12. The role of different magnetotelluric tensor relationships in detecting partial melt in continental collision zones: Results from synthetic models and real data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanya i Llovet, J.; Ledo, J.; Jones, A. G.; Queralt, P.; Marcuello, A.; Liesa, M.; Muñoz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Three magnetotelluric (MT) tensor relationships - the single-station MT impedance tensor, the single-station vertical geomagnetic transfer function (GTF) and the multiple-station horizontal geomagnetic transfer function (HGTF) - were investigated for their role in detecting the presence of partial melting in continental collision zones. Synthetic models based on previous studies were used to characterize the sensitivity of each tensor relationship constraining the presence of partial melt at lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths. From the MT response of the synthetic models, each type of data has been inverted separately and jointly with the others, thus determining the properties and advantages of each when modeling the subsurface. Non-linear sensitivity tests have been carried out to determine the resolution that can be expected when constraining electrical resistivity anomalies associated with the presence of partial melt. The electrical resistivity anomalies associated with different amounts of partial melt were calculated using the two phases of Archie's law and Hashin Shtrikman extremal bounds. The results have been compared with the sensitivity of the MT tensor relationships, thus determining the resolution that can be expected in the detection of partial melt at lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths. Equivalent analyses have been performed using real MT data from a survey carried out in the Pyrenees. The data comprise a total of 82 broadband MT sites and 29 long period MT sites distributed along four profiles across the Pyrenean mountain range between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. The results show the presence of a low-electrical-resistivity structure that has been associated with partial melting of the Iberian subducted lower crust. This anomaly has been constrained below three of the MT profiles but seems to be absent below the Eastern Pyrenees MT profile. A non-linear sensitivity tests was undertaken to ensure that the absence of this

  13. Fast transient analysis and first-stage collision-induced dissociation with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ionization source to improve analyte detection and identification.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Jacob T; Hieftje, Gary M

    2010-04-01

    The recent development of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has enabled fast, simple analysis of many different sample types. The ADI-MS sources have numerous advantages, including little or no required sample pre-treatment, simple mass spectra, and direct analysis of solids and liquids. However, problems of competitive ionization and limited fragmentation require sample-constituent separation, high mass accuracy, and/or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to detect, identify, and quantify unknown analytes. To maintain the inherent high throughput of ADI-MS, it is essential for the ion source/mass analyzer combination to measure fast transient signals and provide structural information. In the current study, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source is coupled with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) to analyze fast transient signals (<500 ms FWHM). It was found that gas chromatography (GC) coupled with the FAPA source resulted in a reproducible (<5% RSD) and sensitive (detection limits of <6 fmol for a mixture of herbicides) system with analysis times of ca. 5 min. Introducing analytes to the FAPA in a transient was also shown to significantly reduce matrix effects caused by competitive ionization by minimizing the number and amount of constituents introduced into the ionization source. Additionally, MS/MS with FAPA-TOF-MS, enabling analyte identification, was performed via first-stage collision-induced dissociation (CID). Lastly, molecular and structural information was obtained across a fast transient peak by modulating the conditions that caused the first-stage CID. PMID:20349535

  14. Integrated Collision Avoidance System for Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Collision with ground/water/terrain and midair obstacles is one of the common causes of severe aircraft accidents. The various data from the coremicro AHRS/INS/GPS Integration Unit, terrain data base, and object detection sensors are processed to produce collision warning audio/visual messages and collision detection and avoidance of terrain and obstacles through generation of guidance commands in a closed-loop system. The vision sensors provide more information for the Integrated System, such as, terrain recognition and ranging of terrain and obstacles, which plays an important role to the improvement of the Integrated Collision Avoidance System.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles-cooperated fluorescence sensor for sensitive and accurate detection of DNA methyltransferase activity coupled with exonuclease III-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Zhang, Youna; Xu, Shuling; Li, Haibo; Wang, Lei; Li, Rui; Zhang, Yuanfu; Yue, Qiaoli; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Huaisheng

    2015-11-21

    A fluorescence magnetic biosensor for the DNA methyltransferase activity was developed based on the cooperative amplification by combining the magnetic nanoparticles synergistic exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted circular exponential amplification and a supramolecular structure ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex. First, a duplex DNA probe, which was constructed by the hybridization of a quadruplex-forming oligomer with a molecular beacon, was assembled on the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a reporter. A hairpin probe (HP)-containing sequence of GATC was used as the methylation substrate of DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM). Once HP was methylated by DAM, it could be recognized and cleaved by Dpn I, which allows the release of a single-stranded DNA. The DNA (tDNA1) then hybridizes to the MNP probe, which then triggers the exonuclease III-mediated target exponential recycling reaction. Simultaneously, numerous quadruplex forming oligomers are liberated and folded into the G-quadruplex-ZnPPIX complexes with the help of zinc(ii)-protoporphyrin IX(ZnPPIX) on the MNP surface to give a remarkable fluorescence response. In the developed sensor, a small amount of target DAM can be converted to a large number of stable DNA triggers, leading to remarkable amplification of the target. Moreover, using MNPs as a vector of the sensor may reduce the interference from the real samples, which increases the anti-interference of the sensing system. Based on this unique amplification strategy, a very low detection limit down to 2.0 × 10(-4) U mL(-1) was obtained. Furthermore, the sensor could be used to evaluate the DAM activity in different growth stages of E. coli cells and screen Dam MTase inhibitors. Therefore, the strategy proposed here provides a promising platform for monitoring the activity and inhibition of DNA MTases and has great potential to be applied further in early clinical diagnostics and medical research. PMID:26421322

  16. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  17. A novel “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method: Event-by-event detection of neutral and charged fragments in collision induced dissociation of mass selected ions

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssier, C.; Fillol, R.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.

    2014-01-15

    A new tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method based on time of flight measurements performed on an event-by-event detection technique is presented. This “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method allows to explore Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) fragmentation processes by directly identifying not only all ions and neutral fragments produced but also their arrival time correlations within each single fragmentation event from a dissociating molecular ion. This constitutes a new step in the characterization of molecular ions. The method will be illustrated here for a prototypical case involving CID of protonated water clusters H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n=1–5} upon collisions with argon atoms.

  18. Detection of high-velocity material from the wind-wind collision zone of Eta Carinae across the 2009.0 periastron passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, J. H.; Nielsen, K. E.; Damineli, A.; Gull, T. R.; Madura, T. I.; Hillier, D. J.; Teodoro, M.; Driebe, T.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.; Kerber, F.; Okazaki, A. T.; Owocki, S. P.; Millour, F.; Murakawa, K.; Kraus, S.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.

    2010-07-01

    We report near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the Eta Carinae massive binary system during 2008-2009 using the CRIRES spectrograph mounted on the 8 m UT 1 Very Large Telescope (VLT Antu). We detect a strong, broad absorption wing in He i λ10833 extending up to -1900 km s-1 across the 2009.0 spectroscopic event. Analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet and optical data identifies a similar high-velocity absorption (up to -2100 km s-1) in the ultraviolet resonance lines of Si iv λλ1394, 1403 across the 2003.5 event. Ultraviolet resonance lines from low-ionization species, such as Si ii λλ1527, 1533 and C ii λλ1334, 1335, show absorption only up to -1200 km s-1, indicating that the absorption with velocities -1200 to -2100 km s-1 originates in a region markedly more rapidly moving and more ionized than the nominal wind of the primary star. Seeing-limited observations obtained at the 1.6 m OPD/LNA telescope during the last four spectroscopic cycles of Eta Carinae (1989-2009) also show high-velocity absorption in He i λ10833 during periastron. Based on the large OPD/LNA dataset, we determine that material with velocities more negative than -900 km s-1 is present in the phase range 0.976 ≤ ϕ ≤ 1.023 of the spectroscopic cycle, but absent in spectra taken at ϕ ≤ 0.94 and ϕ ≥ 1.049. Therefore, we constrain the duration of the high-velocity absorption to be 95 to 206 days (or 0.047 to 0.102 in phase). We propose that the high-velocity absorption component originates in shocked gas in the wind-wind collision zone, at distances of 15 to 45 AU in the line-of-sight to the primary star. With the aid of three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-wind collision zone, we find that the dense high-velocity gas is along the line-of-sight to the primary star only if the binary system is oriented in the sky such that the companion is behind the primary star during periastron, corresponding to a

  19. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  20. Puck collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauge, E. H.

    2012-09-01

    Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

  1. Accurate momentum transfer cross section for the attractive Yukawa potential

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.

    2014-04-15

    Accurate expression for the momentum transfer cross section for the attractive Yukawa potential is proposed. This simple analytic expression agrees with the numerical results better than to within ±2% in the regime relevant for ion-particle collisions in complex (dusty) plasmas.

  2. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  3. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  4. A Distonic Radical-Ion for Detection of Traces of Adventitious Molecular Oxygen (O2) in Collision Gases Used in Tandem Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jariwala, Freneil B.; Hibbs, John A.; Weisbecker, Carl S.; Ressler, John; Khade, Rahul L.; Zhang, Yong; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2014-09-01

    We describe a diagnostic ion that enables rapid semiquantitative evaluation of the degree of oxygen contamination in the collision gases used in tandem mass spectrometers. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the m/z 359 positive ion generated from the analgesic etoricoxib undergoes a facile loss of a methyl sulfone radical [•SO2(CH3); 79-Da] to produce a distonic radical cation of m/z 280. The product-ion spectrum of this m/z 280 ion, recorded under low-energy activation on tandem-in-space QqQ or QqTof mass spectrometers using nitrogen from a generator as the collision gas, or tandem-in-time ion-trap (LCQ, LTQ) mass spectrometers using purified helium as the buffer gas, showed two unexpected peaks at m/z 312 and 295. This enigmatic m/z 312 ion, which bears a mass-to-charge ratio higher than that of the precursor ion, represented an addition of molecular oxygen (O2) to the precursor ion. The exceptional affinity of the m/z 280 radical cation towards oxygen was deployed to develop a method to determine the oxygen content in collision gases.

  5. Dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmeier, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report is a compilation of lecture notes of a series of lectures held at Argonne National Laboratory in October and November 1984. The lectures are a discussion of dissipative phenomena as observed in collisions of atomic nuclei. The model is based on a system which has initially zero temperature and the initial energy is kinetic and binding energy. Collisions excite the nuclei, and outgoing fragments or the compound system deexcite before they are detected. Brownian motion is used to introduce the concept of dissipation. The master equation and the Fokker-Planck equation are derived. 73 refs., 59 figs. (WRF)

  6. The study of the phase structure of hadronic matter by searching for the deconfined quark-gluon phase transition using 2 TeV [bar p]p collisions; and by searching for critical phenomena in an exclusive study of multifragmentation using 1 GeV/nucleon heavy ion collisions. [Detect ionization of charged particles directly in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Scharenberg, R.P.; Hirsch, A.S.; Tincknell, M.L.

    1992-09-15

    An experiment to search for the production of quark[endash]gluon plasma in proton[endash]antiproton interactions is described with emphasis on 1992 results. Next, a search for critical phenomena using the EOS Time Projection Chamber is similarly described, including the results of 1992 test runs, nucleus[endash]nucleus collision simulations, and the extraction of critical indices from small percolation lattices. Analysis of results from experiments to detect the possible production of anomalous photons in the central rapidity region with transverse momentum between 5 and 50 MeV/c are discussed. Initial work on an experiment to study the high-density, high-temperature state of matter formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at relativistic energies, planned to begin in fall 1997, is related. Finally, work on a research and development project to investigate silicon avalanche diodes as time-of-flight detectors for nuclear and particle physics applications is reviewed. The principle is to detect the ionization of charged particles directly in the Si; feasibility has been demonstrated.

  7. Accurate measurement of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-07-01

    The paper discusses current methods for accurate measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.

  8. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  9. Electron Collisions with Large Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKoy, Vincent

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, interest in electron-molecule collisions has increasingly shifted to large molecules. Applications within the semiconductor industry, for example, require electron collision data for molecules such as perfluorocyclobutane, while almost all biological applications involve macromolecules such as DNA. A significant development in recent years has been the realization that slow electrons can directly damage DNA. This discovery has spurred studies of low-energy collisions with the constituents of DNA, including the bases, deoxyribose, the phosphate, and larger moieties assembled from them. In semiconductor applications, a key goal is development of electron cross section sets for plasma chemistry modeling, while biological studies are largely focused on understanding the role of localized resonances in inducing DNA strand breaks. Accurate calculations of low-energy electron collisions with polyatomic molecules are computationally demanding because of the low symmetry and inherent many-electron nature of the problem; moreover, the computational requirements scale rapidly with the size of the molecule. To pursue such studies, we have adapted our computational procedure, known as the Schwinger multichannel method, to run efficiently on highly parallel computers. In this talk, we will present some of our recent results for fluorocarbon etchants used in the semiconductor industry and for constituents of DNA and RNA. In collaboration with Carl Winstead, California Institute of Technology.

  10. Ternary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterbichler, Hannes; Planchette, Carole; Brenn, Günter

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently proposed to use drop collisions for producing advanced particles or well-defined capsules, or to perform chemical reactions where the merged drops constitute a micro-reactor. For all these promising applications, it is essential to determine whether the merged drops remain stable after the collision, forming a single entity, or if they break up. This topic, widely investigated for binary drop collisions of miscible and immiscible liquid, is quite unexplored for ternary drop collisions. The current study aims to close this gap by experimentally investigating collisions between three equal-sized drops of the same liquid arranged centri-symmetrically. Three drop generators are simultaneously operated to obtain controlled ternary drop collisions. The collision outcomes are observed via photographs and compared to those of binary collisions. Similar to binary collisions, a regime map is built, showing coalescence and bouncing as well as reflexive and stretching separation. Significant differences are observed in the transitions between these regimes.

  11. Alignment and orientation in ion/endash/atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M.; Lane, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the theoretical study of alignment and orientation in atom-atom and ion-atom collisions at intermediate energies is reviewed. Recent systematic studies of the alignment and orientation of electronic charge cloud distributions of excited states resulting from such collisions clearly have provided more detailed information about the underlying collision dynamics. However, since accurate determination of these parameters is quite difficult, both theoretically and experimentally, a close collaboration between theory and experiment is necessary for a deeper understanding of the collision dynamics. A more complete approach, where the full density matrix is determined, is also discussed.

  12. A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L.; Maslakowski, J.E.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.

  13. Collision-free motion of two robot arms in a common workspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basta, Robert A.; Mehrotra, Rajiv; Varanasi, Murali R.

    1987-01-01

    Collision-free motion of two robot arms in a common workspace is investigated. A collision-free motion is obtained by detecting collisions along the preplanned trajectories using a sphere model for the wrist of each robot and then modifying the paths and/or trajectories of one or both robots to avoid the collision. Detecting and avoiding collisions are based on the premise that: preplanned trajectories of the robots follow a straight line; collisions are restricted to between the wrists of the two robots (which corresponds to the upper three links of PUMA manipulators); and collisions never occur between the beginning points or end points on the straight line paths. The collision detection algorithm is described and some approaches to collision avoidance are discussed.

  14. Collision experiments with fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. E. B.; Ehlich, R.; Westerburg, M.; Hertel, I. V.

    1993-12-01

    Relative fragmentation cross sections for fullerene ion collisions with rare gas atoms and SF6 are presented over a range of collision energies. Structure in the cross sections and threshold energy determinations can shed some light on the fragmentation dynamics. Cluster cluster collisions with fullerenes are also described which show evidence of fusion reactions.

  15. Scientists Track Collision of Powerful Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have tracked the motion of a violent region where the powerful winds of two giant stars slam into each other. The collision region moves as the stars, part of a binary pair, orbit each other, and the precise measurement of its motion was the key to unlocking vital new information about the stars and their winds. WR 140 Image Sequence Motion of Wind Collision Region Graphic superimposes VLBA images of wind collision region on diagram of orbit of Wolf-Rayet (WR) star and its giant (O) companion. Click on image for larger version (412K) CREDIT: Dougherty et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF In Motion: Shockwave File Animated Gif File AVI file Both stars are much more massive than the Sun -- one about 20 times the mass of the Sun and the other about 50 times the Sun's mass. The 20-solar-mass star is a type called a Wolf-Rayet star, characterized by a very strong wind of particles propelled outward from its surface. The more massive star also has a strong outward wind, but one less intense than that of the Wolf-Rayet star. The two stars, part of a system named WR 140, circle each other in an elliptical orbit roughly the size of our Solar System. "The spectacular feature of this system is the region where the stars' winds collide, producing bright radio emission. We have been able to track this collision region as it moves with the orbits of the stars," said Sean Dougherty, an astronomer at the Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics in Canada. Dougherty and his colleagues presented their findings in the April 10 edition of the Astrophysical Journal. The supersharp radio "vision" of the continent-wide VLBA allowed the scientists to measure the motion of the wind collision region and then to determine the details of the stars' orbits and an accurate distance to the system. "Our new calculations of the orbital details and the distance are vitally important to understanding the nature of these

  16. Estimating collision efficiencies from contact freezing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-04-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH Collision Ice Nucleation Chamber CLINCH. Freely falling 80 μm water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500-5000 cm-3, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The chamber is kept at ice saturation in the temperature range from 236-261 K leading to slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency of 0.13 is around one order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is to the authors knowledge the first dataset of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and particle diameters are needed to improve our understanding of collision processes acting together.

  17. Elastic Collisions and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Steven

    2009-04-01

    Elastic collisions are fascinating demonstrations of conservation principles. The mediating force must be conservative in an elastic collision. Truly elastic collisions take place only when the objects in collision do not touch, e.g. magnetic bumpers on low friction carts. This requires that we define a collision as a momentum transfer. Elastic collisions in 1-D can be solved in general and the implications are quite remarkable. For example, a heavy object moving initially towards a light object followed by an elastic collision results in a final velocity of the light object greater than either initial velocity. This is easily demonstrated with low friction carts. Gravitational elastic collisions involving a light spacecraft and an extremely massive body like a moon or planet can be approximated as 1-D collisions, such as the ``free return'' trajectory of Apollo 13 around the moon. The most fascinating gravitational collisions involve the gravitational slingshot effect used to boost spacecraft velocities. The maximum gravitational slingshot effect occurs when approaching a nearly 1-D collision, revealing that the spacecraft can be boosted to greater than twice the planet velocity, enabling the spacecraft to travel much further away from the Sun.

  18. Vortex-Surface Collisions^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlisk, A. T.

    1998-11-01

    The interaction of vortices with solid surfaces occurs in many different situations including, but not limited to tornadoes, propeller wakes, flows over swept wings and missile forebodies, turbomachinery flows, blade-vortex interactions and tip vortex-surface interactions on helicopters. Often, parts of a system must operate within such flows and thus encounter these vortices. In the present paper we discuss the nature of a particular subset of interactions called ``collisions''. A ``collision'' is characterized by the fact that the core of the vortex is permanently altered; usually the core is locally destroyed. The focus is on fully three-dimensional collisions although two-dimensional collisions are discussed as well. Examples of collisions in helicopter aerodynamics and turbomachinery flows are discussed and the dynamics of the vortex core during a collision process are illustrated for a 90^o collision. ^Supported by the US Army Research Office

  19. Calculation Of The Nanbu-Trubnikov Kernel: Implications For Numerical Modeling Of Coulomb Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A; Cohen, B I; Wang, C; Caflisch, R; Huang, Y

    2009-07-02

    We investigate the accuracy of and assumptions underlying the numerical binary Monte-Carlo collision operator due to Nanbu [K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55 (1997)]. The numerical experiments that resulted in Nanbu's parameterized collision kernel are approximate realizations of the Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle scattering process, for which an analytical solution is available. It is demonstrated empirically that Nanbu's collision operator quite accurately recovers the effects of Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle collisions, or processes that approximate these even for very large values of the collisional time step. An investigation of the analytical solution shows that Nanbu's parameterized kernel is highly accurate for small values of the normalized collision time step, but loses some of its accuracy for larger values of the time step. Finally, a practical collision algorithm is proposed that for small-mass-ratio Coulomb collisions improves on the accuracy of Nanbu's algorithm.

  20. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  1. Disequilibration by Planetary Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Jutzi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Molten planets equilibrate gravitationally, chemically, and thermally. Large scale collisions (a.k.a. giant impacts, similar-sized collisions) can upset the apple cart by bringing core material, late in the game, into mixture with mantle products, and by shredding stratified planets into strands of mantle and clumps of core (c.g. Asphaug et al. Nature 2006). Atmophiles and volatiles come along for the ride, and can find themselves in disequilibrium mixtures not anticipated by one-dimensional models of planetary evolution, or by planet growth models in which planets stick, merge, and mix perfectly in the aftermath of a collision. We present very high resolution case studies of such collisions.

  2. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  3. The facts are on the table: analyzing the geometry of coin collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilmann, Florian

    2014-09-01

    In a typical high school course, the complex physics of collisions is broken up into the dichotomy of perfectly elastic versus completely inelastic collisions. Real-life collisions, however, generally fall between these two extremes. An accurate treatment is still possible, as demonstrated in an investigation of coin collisions. Simple trigonometry is applied to Newton diagrams of the initial and final momenta. The transition from fully to partially elastic collisions entails a transformation from right triangles to obtuse triangles. Here, the deviation from the right angle is a measure of the relative energy loss. The evaluation of sliding distances independently confirms the trigonometric approach. A set of coin collisions is analyzed with respect to relative energy loss and internal consistency. The relevant data can be extracted from a single snapshot after the collision. The outcome of a complex collision is analyzed using simple geometric arguments and basic physics, making it well suited for high school students.

  4. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  5. Particle collision in Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Arezoo

    2009-11-01

    Particle-particle and particle-wall collision occurs in many natural and industrial applications such as sedimentation, crystal growth, suspension rheology, and microfluidic devices such as those used in mechanical cell lysis. To accurately predict the behavior of particulate flows, fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms of single collision is required. In this work, particle-wall collision in Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids is numerically and experimentally studied. The effect of Stokes number, surface roughness, and Deborah number on the rebound velocity of a colliding spherical particle on a wall is considered. The experimental study of particle-wall collision in poly(ethylene-oxide) mixed with water shows that the results for the coefficient of restitution in polymeric liquids can be collapsed together with the Newtonian fluid behavior if one defines the Stokes number based on the local strain rate. In addition, the effects of particle interaction and collision on the droplet breakup in a particulate shear flow are studied. The presence of particles leads to larger droplet deformation and a perforation in the center of the droplet. It is found that the critical Stokes number above which a perforation occurs increases linearly with the inverse of the capillary number and viscosity ratio.

  6. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  7. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  8. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  9. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  10. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  11. Evaluation and validation of an accurate mass screening method for the analysis of pesticides in fruits and vegetables using liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry with automated detection.

    PubMed

    López, Mónica García; Fussell, Richard J; Stead, Sara L; Roberts, Dominic; McCullagh, Mike; Rao, Ramesh

    2014-12-19

    This study reports the development and validation of a screening method for the detection of pesticides in 11 different fruit and vegetable commodities. The method was based on ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). The objective was to validate the method in accordance with the SANCO guidance document (12571/2013) on analytical quality control and validation procedures for pesticide residues analysis in food and feed. Samples were spiked with 199 pesticides, each at two different concentrations (0.01 and 0.05 mg kg(-1)) and extracted using the QuEChERS approach. Extracts were analysed by UPLC-QTOF-MS using generic acquisition parameters. Automated detection and data filtering were performed using the UNIFI™ software and the peaks detected evaluated against a proprietary scientific library containing information for 504 pesticides. The results obtained using different data processing parameters were evaluated for 4378 pesticide/commodities combinations at 0.01 and 0.05 mg kg(-1). Using mass accuracy (± 5 ppm) with retention time (± 0.2 min) and a low response threshold (100 counts) the validated Screening Detection Limits (SDLs) were 0.01 mg kg(-1) and 0.05 mg kg(-1) for 57% and 79% of the compounds tested, respectively, with an average of 10 false detects per sample analysis. Excluding the most complex matrices (onion and leek) the detection rates increased to 69% and 87%, respectively. The use of additional parameters such as isotopic pattern and fragmentation information further reduced the number of false detects but compromised the detection rates, particularly at lower residue concentrations. The challenges associated with the validation and subsequent implementation of a pesticide multi-residue screening method are also discussed. PMID:25465001

  12. Generalized regressive motion: a visual cue to collision.

    PubMed

    Chalupka, Krzysztof; Dickinson, Michael; Perona, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Brains and sensory systems evolved to guide motion. Central to this task is controlling the approach to stationary obstacles and detecting moving organisms. Looming has been proposed as the main monocular visual cue for detecting the approach of other animals and avoiding collisions with stationary obstacles. Elegant neural mechanisms for looming detection have been found in the brain of insects and vertebrates. However, looming has not been analyzed in the context of collisions between two moving animals. We propose an alternative strategy, generalized regressive motion (GRM), which is consistent with recently observed behavior in fruit flies. Geometric analysis proves that GRM is a reliable cue to collision among conspecifics, whereas agent-based modeling suggests that GRM is a better cue than looming as a means to detect approach, prevent collisions and maintain mobility. PMID:27427952

  13. Direct numerical simulations of collision efficiency of cohesive sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Maa, Jerome P.-Y.; Zhang, Qing-He; Shen, Xiao-Teng

    2016-09-01

    A clear understanding of the collision efficiency of cohesive sediment particles is critical for more accurate simulation of the flocculation processes. It is difficult, if not impossible, to carry out laboratory experiments to determine the collision efficiency for small particles. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is a relatively feasible approach to describe the motion of spherical particles under gravity in calm water, and thus, to study the collision efficiency of these particles. In this study, the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is used to calculate the relative trajectories of two approaching particles with different ratios of sizes and densities. Results show that the inter-molecular forces (i.e., van der Waals attractive force, electrostatic repulsive/attractive force, and displacement force), which are usually neglected in previous studies, would affect the trajectories, and thus, lead to an overestimation of the collision efficiency. It is found that to increase the particle size ratio from 0.1 to 0.8 only slightly increases the collision efficiency, since the force caused by fluid-solid interaction between these two particles is reduced. To increase the submerged particle density ratio from 1 to 22, however, would significantly decrease the collision efficiency. Earlier analytical formulations of collision efficiency, which only consider the effects of particle size ratio, have significantly overestimated the collision efficiency (change from 0.01 to 0.6) when the particle size ratio is around 0.5.

  14. A first collision source method for ATTILA, an unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code

    SciTech Connect

    Wareing, T.A.; Morel, J.E.; Parsons, D.K.

    1998-12-01

    A semi-analytic first collision source method is developed for the transport code, ATTILA, a three-dimensional, unstructured tetrahedral mesh, discrete-ordinates code. This first collision source method is intended to mitigate ray effects due to point sources. The method is third-order accurate, which is the same order of accuracy as the linear-discontinuous spatial differencing scheme used in ATTILA. Numerical results are provided to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the first collision source method.

  15. Ion-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon collisions: kinetic energy releases for specific fragmentation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitsma, G.; Zettergren, H.; Boschman, L.; Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report on 30 keV He2 + collisions with naphthalene (C10H8) molecules, which leads to very extensive fragmentation. To unravel such complex fragmentation patterns, we designed and constructed an experimental setup, which allows for the determination of the full momentum vector by measuring charged collision products in coincidence in a recoil ion momentum spectrometer type of detection scheme. The determination of fragment kinetic energies is found to be considerably more accurate than for the case of mere coincidence time-of-flight spectrometers. In fission reactions involving two cationic fragments, typically kinetic energy releases of 2-3 eV are observed. The results are interpreted by means of density functional theory calculations of the reverse barriers. It is concluded that naphthalene fragmentation by collisions with keV ions clearly is much more violent than the corresponding photofragmentation with energetic photons. The ion-induced naphthalene fragmentation provides a feedstock of various small hydrocarbonic species of different charge states and kinetic energy, which could influence several molecule formation processes in the cold interstellar medium and facilitates growth of small hydrocarbon species on pre-existing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  16. On the Nature of Debris and Collision Growth Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combs, R.; Koch, J.; Vandrey, N.

    2013-09-01

    Orbital debris growth estimates are used for a variety of purposes, including resource allocation for debris field tracking, allocation of research and development funds, as well as considerations on collision risk and debris elimination. More accurate projections would enable better resource allocation. Contemporary estimates and models of debris growth take a linear form where growth is a constant number of objects per year, or they take a geometric growth rate of about 1-2%. Examination of empirical data reveals that growth is not linear, but geometric, and that historical projections have underestimated growth and debris by wide margins. Measurements reveal that debris field growth rates appear to be closer to 5% than 2%. Measurements of debris size and population reveal an inverse log-log relationship, so it is possible to estimate the debris population of any size by measuring the population at a given size. The U.S. Space Catalog is the most reliable measure of the objects with a minimum diameter on the order of 50 cm. The space catalog has grown at an average rate of 3.5% per annum in the last decade, and 3.8% per annum since 1980. Space Catalog growth rate is only loosely correlated (0.55) with the global launch rate. New detection methods are being fielded like Space Based Space Surveillance and the Space Fence, objects as small as 5 cm will be reliably tracked in the near future. In 2010, the space catalog was estimated to grow from a current 20,000 object catalog to a 100,000 object catalog by 2023, yielding an 8.5% per year. Given that debris growth rates exceed contemporary estimates, it is not surprising collision rates exceed estimates as well. The number of known or suspected collisions exceeds the numbers projected by Kessler in 1978. Modern and brute-force collision projection methods reveal the use of a flat or linear rate of >100cm object conjunctions. The actual conjunction rate appears to grow geometrically as well.

  17. Newton's Strange Collisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    1995-01-01

    Discusses Newton's apparent oversight of the role of energy considerations in collisions between two spherical bodies related to the third corollary of his "Laws of Motion." Investigates several theories that provide solutions to the mysterious oversight. (LZ)

  18. Time rate collision matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-02-01

    The collision integral terms in Boltzmann equation are reformulated numerically leading to the substitution of the multiple integrals with a multiplicative matrix of the two colliding species velocity distribution functions which varies with the differential collision cross section. A matrix of lower rank may be constructed when one of the distribution functions is specified, in which case the matrix elements represent kinetic transition probabilities in the velocity space and the multiplication of the time rate collision matrix with the unknown velocity distribution function expresses the time rate of change of the distribution. The collision matrix may be used to describe the time evolution of systems in nonequilibrium conditions, to evaluate the rate of momentum and energy transfer between given species, or to generate validity criteria for linearized kinetic equations.

  19. Design and validation of a qPCR assay for accurate detection and initial serogrouping of Legionella pneumophila in clinical specimens by the ESCMID Study Group for Legionella Infections (ESGLI).

    PubMed

    Mentasti, M; Kese, D; Echahidi, F; Uldum, S A; Afshar, B; David, S; Mrazek, J; De Mendonça, R; Harrison, T G; Chalker, V J

    2015-07-01

    Prompt detection of Legionella pneumophila is essential for rapid investigation of legionellosis. Furthermore, as the majority of L. pneumophila infections are caused by serogroup 1 (sg1) strains, rapid identification of such strains can be critical in both routine and outbreak scenarios. The ESCMID Study Group for Legionella Infections (ESGLI) was established in 2012 and immediately identified as a priority the validation of a reliable, easy to perform and interpret, cost-effective qPCR assay to standardise the detection of L. pneumophila DNA amongst members. A novel L. pneumophila assay targeting the mip gene was designed and combined with previously published methodologies amplifying the sg1 marker (wzm) and the green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) internal process control. The resulting triplex assay was validated internationally on the three qPCR platforms used by the majority of European Legionella reference laboratories: ABI 7500 (Life Technologies), LightCycler 480 Instrument II (Roche) and Rotor-Gene Q (Qiagen). Clinical and EQA specimens were tested together with a large panel of strains (251 in total) to validate the assay. The assay proved to be 100% specific for L. pneumophila and sg1 DNA both in silico and in vitro. Efficiency values for mip and wzm assays ranged between 91.97 and 97.69%. Limit of detection values estimated with 95% confidence were adopted for mip and wzm assays on all three qPCR platforms. Inhibition was not observed. This study describes a robust assay that could be widely implemented to standardise the molecular detection of L. pneumophila among ESGLI laboratories and beyond. PMID:25851812

  20. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  1. Preheating in bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Piao Yunsong

    2010-08-15

    In a landscape with metastable minima, the bubbles will inevitably nucleate. We show that when the bubbles collide, due to the dramatic oscillation of the field at the collision region, the energy deposited in the bubble walls can be efficiently released by the explosive production of the particles. In this sense, the collision of bubbles is actually highly inelastic. The cosmological implications of this result are discussed.

  2. Launch Collision Probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D.

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes the probability of a launch vehicle colliding with one of the nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the Earth, given that an object on a near-collision course with the launch vehicle has been identified. Knowledge of the probability of collision throughout the launch window can be used to avoid launching at times when the probability of collision is unacceptably high. The analysis in this report assumes that the positions of the orbiting objects and the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time and therefore that any tracked object which comes close to the launch vehicle can be identified. The analysis further assumes that the position uncertainty of the launch vehicle and the approaching space object can be described with position covariance matrices. With these and some additional simplifying assumptions, a closed-form solution is developed using two approaches. The solution shows that the probability of collision is a function of position uncertainties, the size of the two potentially colliding objects, and the nominal separation distance at the point of closest approach. ne impact of the simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of the final result is assessed and the application of the results to the Cassini mission, launched in October 1997, is described. Other factors that affect the probability of collision are also discussed. Finally, the report offers alternative approaches that can be used to evaluate the probability of collision.

  3. Influence of pre-collision occupant parameters on injury outcome in a frontal collision.

    PubMed

    Bose, D; Crandall, J R; Untaroiu, C D; Maslen, E H

    2010-07-01

    Optimal performance of adaptive restraint systems in the vehicle requires an accurate assessment of occupant characteristics including physical properties and pre-collision response of the occupant. To provide a feasible framework for incorporating occupant characteristics into adaptive restraint schemes, this study evaluates the sensitivity of injury risk in frontal collisions to four occupant parameters: mass, stature, posture and bracing level. The numerical approach includes using commercial multi-body software to develop occupant models that span a range of occupant parameters representative of the real-world driver population. Coupled with a multi-body model of the vehicle interior and standard restraint system, risk of occupant injuries within specific body regions are predicted through numerical simulations in conjunction with established injury risk functions. The results show occupant posture to be the most significant parameter affecting the overall risk of injury in frontal collisions. The causal relationship as predicted using the numerical model has been compared to the traffic injury epidemiology findings, and the feasibility of an analytical methodology to provide real-time estimates of injury severity has been discussed. Preliminary estimates from the study indicate that the proposed methodology will provide a framework to optimize restraint performance and potentially reduce the risk of injuries up to 35% (based on parameter-specific optimization), using accurate information regarding the pre-collision occupant characteristics. PMID:20441858

  4. Networks based on collisions among mobile agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Marta C.; Lind, Pedro G.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2006-12-01

    We investigate in detail a recent model of colliding mobile agents [M.C. González, P.G. Lind, H.J. Herrmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 088702. cond-mat/0602091], used as an alternative approach for constructing evolving networks of interactions formed by collisions governed by suitable dynamical rules. The system of mobile agents evolves towards a quasi-stationary state which is, apart from small fluctuations, well characterized by the density of the system and the residence time of the agents. The residence time defines a collision rate, and by varying this collision rate, the system percolates at a critical value, with the emergence of a giant cluster whose critical exponents are the ones of two-dimensional percolation. Further, the degree and clustering coefficient distributions, and the average path length, show that the network associated with such a system presents non-trivial features which, depending on the collision rules, enables one not only to recover the main properties of standard networks, such as exponential, random and scale-free networks, but also to obtain other topological structures. To illustrate, we show a specific example where the obtained structure has topological features which characterize the structure and evolution of social networks accurately in different contexts, ranging from networks of acquaintances to networks of sexual contacts.

  5. Algorithm Plans Collision-Free Path for Robotic Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul; Diaz-Calderon, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to enable a computer aboard a robot to autonomously plan the path of the manipulator arm of the robot to avoid collisions between the arm and any obstacle, which could be another part of the robot or an external object in the vicinity of the robot. In simplified terms, the algorithm generates trial path segments and tests each segment for potential collisions in an iterative process that ends when a sequence of collision-free segments reaches from the starting point to the destination. The main advantage of this algorithm, relative to prior such algorithms, is computational efficiency: the algorithm is designed to make minimal demands upon the limited computational resources available aboard a robot. This path-planning algorithm utilizes a modified version of the collision-detection method described in "Improved Collision-Detection Method for Robotic Manipulator" (NPO-30356), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 3 (June 2003), page 72. The method involves utilization of mathematical models of the robot constructed prior to operation and similar models of external objects constructed automatically from sensory data acquired during operation. This method incorporates a previously developed method, known in the art as the method of oriented bounding boxes (OBBs), in which an object is represented approximately, for computational purposes, by a box that encloses its outer boundary. Because many parts of a robotic manipulator are cylindrical, the OBB method has been extended in this method to enable the approximate representation of cylindrical parts by use of octagonal or other multiple-OBB assemblies denoted oriented bounding prisms (OBPs). A multiresolution OBB/OBP representation of the robot and its manipulator arm and a multiresolution OBB representation of external objects (including terrain) are constructed and used in a process in which collisions at successively finer resolutions are detected through computational detection of overlaps

  6. GEO Collision Avoidance using a Service Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M.; Concha, M.

    2013-09-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is defined as the knowledge and characterization of all aspects of space. SSA is now a fundamental and critical component of space operations. The increased dependence on our space assets has in turn lead to a greater need for accurate, near real-time knowledge of all space activities. Key areas of SSA include improved tracking of small objects, determining the intent of maneuvering spacecraft, identifying all potential high risk conjunction events, and leveraging non-traditional sensors in support of the SSA mission. As the size of the space object population grows, the number of collision avoidance maneuvers grows. Moreover, as the SSA mission evolves to near real-time assessment and analysis, the need for new, more sophisticated collision avoidance methods are required. This paper demonstrates the utility of using a service vehicle to perform collision avoidance maneuver for GEO satellites. We present the planning and execution details required to successfully execute a maneuver; given the traditional conjunction analysis timelines. Various operational constraints and scenarios are considered as part of the demonstration. Development of the collision avoidance strategy is created using SpaceNav's collision risk management tool suite. This study aims to determine the agility required of any proposed servicing capability to provide collision avoidance within traditional conjunction analysis and collision avoidance operations timelines. Key trades and analysis items are given to be: 1. How do we fuse the spacecraft state data with the tracking data collected from the proximity sensor that resides on the servicing spacecraft? 2. How do we deal with the possibility that the collision threat for the event may change as the time to close approach is reduced? 3. Perform trade space of maneuver/thrust time versus achievable change in the spacecraft's orbit. 4. Perform trade space of proximity of service vehicle to spacecraft versus time

  7. Experimental observation of the collision of three vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, R. H.; Monsalve, E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate for the first time the motion, interaction and simultaneous collision between three initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically, making an angle of 120 degrees between their straight path lines. We report results with laminar vortex rings in air and water obtained through measurements of the ring velocity field with a hot-wire anemometer, both in free flight and during the entire collision. In the air experiment, our flow visualizations allowed us to identify two main collision stages. A first ring-dominated stage where the rings slowdown progressively, increasing their diameter rapidly, followed by secondary vortex structures resulting after the rings make contact. Local portions of the vortex tubes of opposite circulation are coupled together thus creating local arm-like vortex structures moving radially in outward directions, rapidly dissipating kinetic energy. From a similar water experiment, we provide detailed shadowgraph visualizations of both the ring bubble and the full size collision, showing clearly the final expanding vortex structure. It is accurately resolved that the physical contact between vortex ring tubes gives rise to three symmetric expanding vortex arms but also the vortex reconnection of the top and lower vortex tubes. The central collision zone was found to have the lowest kinetic energy during the entire collision and therefore it can be identified as a safe zone. The preserved collision symmetries leading to the weak kinematic activity in the safe zone is the first step into the development of an intermittent hydrodynamic trap for small and lightweight particles.

  8. Long-range consequences of interplanetary collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Ostro, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    As Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 races toward its mid-July collision with the planet Jupiter, considerable public attention is focused on catastrophic impacts with the Earth -- in the past and in the future. In recent years calls have been made to develop technologies that could deflect any asteroid or comet on a collision course. Careful consideration must be given to the nature and time scale of the risk and to the cost-effectiveness and possible problems in the suggested solutions. Risk assessment, threat removal, and resources misuse are examined. The greatest concern is to have a poorly informed public -- exerting pressure for means to mitigate even non-existent threats. The only foreseeable solution is a combination of accurate orbit estimation, realistic threat assessment, and effective public education.

  9. Autonomous manoeuvring systems for collision avoidance on single carriageway roads.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Felipe; Naranjo, José Eugenio; Gómez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    The accurate perception of the surroundings of a vehicle has been the subject of study of numerous automotive researchers for many years. Although several projects in this area have been successfully completed, very few prototypes have actually been industrialized and installed in mass produced cars. This indicates that these research efforts must continue in order to improve the present systems. Moreover, the trend to include communication systems in vehicles extends the potential of these perception systems transmitting their information via wireless to other vehicles that may be affected by the surveyed environment. In this paper we present a forward collision warning system based on a laser scanner that is able to detect several potential danger situations. Decision algorithms try to determine the most convenient manoeuvre when evaluating the obstacles' positions and speeds, road geometry, etc. Once detected, the presented system can act on the actuators of the ego-vehicle as well as transmit this information to other vehicles circulating in the same area using vehicle-to-vehicle communications. The system has been tested for overtaking manoeuvres under different scenarios and the correct actions have been performed. PMID:23443391

  10. Autonomous Manoeuvring Systems for Collision Avoidance on Single Carriageway Roads

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Felipe; Naranjo, José Eugenio; Gómez, Óscar

    2012-01-01

    The accurate perception of the surroundings of a vehicle has been the subject of study of numerous automotive researchers for many years. Although several projects in this area have been successfully completed, very few prototypes have actually been industrialized and installed in mass produced cars. This indicates that these research efforts must continue in order to improve the present systems. Moreover, the trend to include communication systems in vehicles extends the potential of these perception systems transmitting their information via wireless to other vehicles that may be affected by the surveyed environment. In this paper we present a forward collision warning system based on a laser scanner that is able to detect several potential danger situations. Decision algorithms try to determine the most convenient manoeuvre when evaluating the obstacles’ positions and speeds, road geometry, etc. Once detected, the presented system can act on the actuators of the ego-vehicle as well as transmit this information to other vehicles circulating in the same area using vehicle-to-vehicle communications. The system has been tested for overtaking manoeuvres under different scenarios and the correct actions have been performed. PMID:23443391

  11. Ion Collision, Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.

    2013-09-11

    The outcome of a collision between an ion and neutral species depends on the chemical and physical properties of the two reactants, their relative velocities, and the impact parameter of their trajectories. These include elastic and inelastic scattering of the colliding particles, charge transfer (including dissociative charge transfer), atom abstraction, complex formation and dissociation of the colliding ion. Each of these reactions may be characterized in terms of their energy-dependent rate coefficients, cross sections and reaction kinetics. A theoretical framework that emphasizes simple models and classical mechanics is presented for these processes. Collision processes are addressed in two categories of low-energy and high-energy collisions. Experiments under thermal or quasi-thermal conditions–swarms, drift tubes, chemical ionization and ion cyclotron resonance are strongly influenced by long-range forces and often involve collisions in which atom exchange and extensive energy exchange are common characteristics. High-energy collisions are typically impulsive, involve short-range intermolecular forces and are direct, fast processes.

  12. Molecular collisions coming into focus.

    PubMed

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Vogels, Sjoerd N; von Zastrow, Alexander; Parker, David H; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2014-08-14

    The Stark deceleration method exploits the concepts of charged particle accelerator physics to produce beams of neutral polar molecules with an almost perfect quantum state purity, a tunable velocity and a narrow velocity distribution. These monochromatic molecular beams offer interesting perspectives for precise studies of molecular scattering processes, in particular when used in conjunction with state-of-the-art laser-based detection techniques such as velocity map imaging. Here, we describe crossed beam scattering experiments in which the Stark deceleration method is combined with the velocity map imaging technique. The narrow velocity spread of Stark-decelerated molecular beams results in scattering images with unprecedented velocity and angular resolution. We demonstrate this by resolving quantum diffraction oscillations in state-to-state inelastic differential scattering cross sections for collisions between NO radicals and rare gas atoms. We describe the future prospects of this "best-of-two-worlds" combination, ranging from scattering studies at low collision energies to bimolecular scattering using two decelerators, and discuss the challenges that lie ahead to achieve these goals. PMID:24967721

  13. Collision of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2008-03-15

    We study the formation of three-string junctions between (p,q)-cosmic superstrings, and collisions between such strings and show that kinematic constraints analogous to those found previously for collisions of Nambu-Goto strings apply here too, with suitable modifications to take account of the additional requirements of flux conservation. We examine in detail several examples involving collisions between strings with low values of p and q, and also examine the rates of growth or shrinkage of strings at a junction. Finally, we briefly discuss the formation of junctions for strings in a warped space, specifically with a Klebanov-Strassler throat, and show that similar constraints still apply with changes to the parameters taking account of the warping and the background flux.

  14. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  15. Affordable MMW aircraft collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almsted, Larry D.; Becker, Robert C.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    1997-06-01

    Collision avoidance is of concern to all aircraft, requiring the detection and identification of hazardous terrain or obstacles in sufficient time for clearance maneuvers. The collision avoidance requirement is even more demanding for helicopters, as their unique capabilities result in extensive operations at low-altitude, near to terrain and other hazardous obstacles. TO augment the pilot's visual collision avoidance abilities, some aircraft are equipped with 'enhanced-vision' systems or terrain collision warning systems. Enhanced-vision systems are typically very large and costly systems that are not very covert and are also difficult to install in a helicopter. The display is typically raw images from infrared or radar sensors, and can require a high degree of pilot interpretation and attention. Terrain collision warning system that rely on stored terrain maps are often of low resolution and accuracy and do not represent hazards to the aircraft placed after map sampling. Such hazards could include aircraft parked on runway, man- made towers or buildings and hills. In this paper, a low cost dual-function scanning pencil-beam, millimeter-wave radar forward sensor is used to determine whether an aircraft's flight path is clear of obstructions. Due to the limited space and weight budget in helicopters, the system is a dual function system that is substituted in place of the existing radar altimeter. The system combines a 35 GHz forward looking obstacle avoidance radar and a 4.3 GHz radar altimeter. The forward looking 35 GHz 3D radar's returns are used to construct a terrain and obstruction database surrounding an aircraft, which is presented to the pilot as a synthetic perspective display. The 35 GHz forward looking radar and the associated display was evaluated in a joint NASA Honeywell flight test program in 1996. The tests were conducted on a NASA/Army test helicopter. The test program clearly demonstrated the systems potential usefulness for collision avoidance.

  16. Comparison of measured and calculated collision efficiencies at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH CoLlision Ice Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH). Freely falling 80 μm diameter water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 and 400 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500 to 5000 and 500 to 2000 cm-3, respectively, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The experimental data used to derive collision efficiency are in a temperature range of 238-245 K, where each collision of silver iodide particles with droplets can be assumed to result in the freezing of the droplet. An upper and lower limit of collision efficiency is also estimated for 800 nm diameter kaolinite particles. The chamber is kept at ice saturation at a temperature range of 236 to 261 K, leading to the slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency values of 0.13, 0.07 and 0.047-0.11 for 200, 400 and 800 nm particles are around 1 order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first data set of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and

  17. Predict amine solution properties accurately

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Meisen, A.; Chakma, A.

    1996-02-01

    Improved process design begins with using accurate physical property data. Especially in the preliminary design stage, physical property data such as density viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat can affect the overall performance of absorbers, heat exchangers, reboilers and pump. These properties can also influence temperature profiles in heat transfer equipment and thus control or affect the rate of amine breakdown. Aqueous-amine solution physical property data are available in graphical form. However, it is not convenient to use with computer-based calculations. Developed equations allow improved correlations of derived physical property estimates with published data. Expressions are given which can be used to estimate physical properties of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), monoethanolamine (MEA) and diglycolamine (DGA) solutions.

  18. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  19. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  20. Total Probability of Collision as a Metric for Finite Conjunction Assessment and Collision Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigm, R.; Johnson, L.

    The Probability of Collision (Pc) has become a universal metric and statement of on-orbit collision risk. Although several flavors of the computation exist and are well-documented in the literature, the basic calculation requires the same input: estimates for the position, position uncertainty, and sizes of the two objects involved. The Pc is used operationally to make decisions on whether a given conjunction poses significant collision risk to the primary object (or space asset of concern). It is also used to determine necessity and degree of mitigative action (typically in the form of an orbital maneuver) to be performed. The predicted post-maneuver Pc also informs the maneuver planning process into regarding the timing, direction, and magnitude of the maneuver needed to mitigate the collision risk. Although the data sources, techniques, decision calculus, and workflows vary for different agencies and organizations, they all have a common thread. The standard conjunction assessment and collision risk concept of operations (CONOPS) predicts conjunctions, assesses the collision risk (typically, via the Pc), and plans and executes avoidance activities for conjunctions as a discrete events. As the space debris environment continues to increase and improvements are made to remote sensing capabilities and sensitivities to detect, track, and predict smaller debris objects, the number of conjunctions will in turn continue to increase. The expected order-of-magnitude increase in the number of predicted conjunctions will challenge the paradigm of treating each conjunction as a discrete event. The challenge will not be limited to workload issues, such as manpower and computing performance, but also the ability for satellite owner/operators to successfully execute their mission while also managing on-orbit collision risk. Executing a propulsive maneuver occasionally can easily be absorbed into the mission planning and operations tempo; whereas, continuously planning evasive

  1. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  2. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  4. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  5. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception. PMID:24549293

  6. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740]. PMID:22707921

  7. Rotational excitation of CO by collisions with He, H, and H2 under conditions in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Thaddeus, P.

    1976-01-01

    Cross sections for rotational excitation of small molecules by low-energy collisions with helium and hydrogen can currently be obtained via accurate numerical solution of the quantum equations that describe both intermolecular forces and collision dynamics. The relevant methods are discussed in some detail and applied to compute excitation rates for carbon monoxide. These calculations also predict collision-induced spectral pressure-broadening constants which are in excellent agreement with available experimental data.

  8. Fluid moments of the nonlinear Landau collision operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvijoki, E.; Lingam, M.; Pfefferlé, D.; Comisso, L.; Candy, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-08-01

    An important problem in plasma physics is the lack of an accurate and complete description of Coulomb collisions in associated fluid models. To shed light on the problem, this Letter introduces an integral identity involving the multivariate Hermite tensor polynomials and presents a method for computing exact expressions for the fluid moments of the nonlinear Landau collision operator. The proposed methodology provides a systematic and rigorous means of extending the validity of fluid models that have an underlying inverse-square force particle dynamics to arbitrary collisionality and flow.

  9. Pyrosequencing: an accurate detection platform for single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Fakhrai-Rad, Hossein; Pourmand, Nader; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2002-05-01

    Pyrosequencing, a non-electrophoretic method for DNA sequencing, is emerging as a popular platform for analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This technology has the advantage of accuracy, ease-of-use, and high flexibility for different applications. Here, we review the methodology and the use of this technique for SNP genotyping, SNP discovery, haplotyping, and allelic frequency studies. In addition, we describe new schemes for template preparation and multiplexing as an effort for cost reduction in large-scale studies. PMID:11968080

  10. A virtual simulator designed for collision prevention in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hyunuk; Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Jin Sung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, collisions between the patient and nozzle potentially occur because of the large nozzle structure and efforts to minimize the air gap. Thus, software was developed to predict such collisions between the nozzle and patient using treatment virtual simulation. Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a gantry inner-floor, nozzle, and robotic-couch was performed using SolidWorks based on the manufacturer’s machine data. To obtain patient body information, a 3D-scanner was utilized right before CT scanning. Using the acquired images, a 3D-image of the patient’s body contour was reconstructed. The accuracy of the image was confirmed against the CT image of a humanoid phantom. The machine components and the virtual patient were combined on the treatment-room coordinate system, resulting in a virtual simulator. The simulator simulated the motion of its components such as rotation and translation of the gantry, nozzle, and couch in real scale. A collision, if any, was examined both in static and dynamic modes. The static mode assessed collisions only at fixed positions of the machine’s components, while the dynamic mode operated any time a component was in motion. A collision was identified if any voxels of two components, e.g., the nozzle and the patient or couch, overlapped when calculating volume locations. The event and collision point were visualized, and collision volumes were reported. Results: All components were successfully assembled, and the motions were accurately controlled. The 3D-shape of the phantom agreed with CT images within a deviation of 2 mm. Collision situations were simulated within minutes, and the results were displayed and reported. Conclusions: The developed software will be useful in improving patient safety and clinical efficiency of proton therapy.

  11. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  12. A rapid method of estimating the collision frequencies between the earth and the earth-crossing bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Shin-Yi; Kessler, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study examines a very fast method of calculating the collision frequency between two low-eccentricity orbiting bodies for evaluating the evolution of earth-orbiting objects such as space debris. The results are very accurate and the required computer time is negligible. The method is now applied without modification to calculate the collision frequencies for moderately and highly eccentric orbits.

  13. Three-Body Collision Contributions to Recombination and Collision-Induced Dissociation. II. Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian; Pack, Russell T.; Walker, Robert B.

    1998-04-10

    Detailed rate constants for the reaction Ne + Ne + H {r_equilibrium} Ne{sub 2} + H are generated, and the master equations governing collision-induced dissociation (CID) and recombination are accurately solved numerically. The temperature and pressure dependence are explored. At all pressures, three-body (3B) collisions dominate. The sequential two-body energy-transfer (ET) mechanism gives a rate that is more than a factor of two too small at low pressures and orders of magnitude too small at high pressures. Simpler models are explored; to describe the kinetics they must include direct 3B rates connecting the continuum to the bound states and to the quasibound states. The relevance of the present reaction to more general CID/recombination reactions is discussed. For atomic fragments, the 3B mechanism usually dominates. For diatomic fragments,the 3B and ET mechanism are competitive, and for polyatomic fragments the ET mechanism usually dominates.

  14. Molecular Dissociation Induced by Electron Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    Free electrons can efficiently break molecules or molecular ions in low-energy collisions by the processes of dissociative recombination or attachment. These processes make slow electrons efficient chemical agents in many environments. For dissociative recombination, in particular, studies of the underlying reaction paths and mechanisms have become possible on a uniquely elementary level in recent years both for theory and experiment. On the experimental side, collisions can be prepared at resolved collision energies down to the meV (10 Kelvin) level, increasingly gaining control also over the initial molecular quantum level, and individual events are detected and kinematically analyzed by fast-beam coincidence fragment imaging. Experiments are reported from the ion cooler ring TSR in Heidelberg. Stored beams of molecular ions cooled in their external and internal degrees of freedom are collinearly merged with intense and cold electron beams from cryogenic GaAs photocathodes, recently shown to yield fast cooling of the center-of-mass motion also for heavy and correspondingly slow molecular ion beams. To reconstruct the molecular fragmentation events multiparticle imaging can now be used systematically with collision energies set a wide range, especially aiming at specific electron capture resonances. Thus, for CF^+ it is found that the electronic state of the C fragment (^3P or ^1D) switches resonantly when the collision energy is changed by only a small fraction. As a new powerful tool, an energy-sensitive multi-strip surface-barrier detector (EMU) has been set up to measure with near-unity efficiency the masses of all fragments together with their hit positions in high-multiplicity events. Among many uses, this device allows internal molecular excitations to be derived for individual chemical channels in polyatomic fragmentation. New results will be presented in particular on the breakup of the hydronium ion (D3O^+).

  15. High energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation covers three broad topics: a brief introduction to the field of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies; a discussion of several topics illustrating what`s been learned after more than a decade of fixed target experiments; and an indication of what the future may bring at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) planned at CERN.

  16. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  17. Interstellar Cloud Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, J. C.; Monaghan, J. J.; Pongracic, H.; Schwarz, M. P.

    1985-07-01

    We describe the results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of isothermal interstellar clouds in the absence of magnetic fields. A wide variety of high and low Mach number, head-on and off-centre collisions of clouds with mass ratios 1, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.1 have been studied. The results show that a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the gravitational instability of a substantial fraction of the matter is that the initial clouds should be either marginally stable or unstable according to the usual Jeans criterion. The collisions, in general, do not result in one or more clouds. Instead we find, in most cases, that the matter disperses in an irregular way. The calculations therefore suggest that if the initial state of the interstellar medium is one of cool dense clouds in a hotter more tenuous background, collisions will rapidly mix the medium rather than produce a steady-state spectrum of cool clouds.

  18. Collision and mountain building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial, chronological, and genetic relationships of recent (Late Alpine) collisions to mountain building are considered at three levels of scale: (i) in separate zones of the Arabian-Caucasus segment of the Alpine-Himalayan Orogenic Belt, (ii) throughout the central segment of this belt from the Alps to the Himalalayas, and (iii) in Central Asia and other mountain belts of continents. Three stages of mountain building are distinguished at all three levels. The first stage starts with widespread collision and similar plate interactions from the end of the Eocene to the middle Miocene and is expressed in the formation of uplifts, commonly no higher than the moderately elevated level in regions that concentrate deformations of transverse shortening induced by compression. The second short stage, which embraces the Pliocene-Quaternary and occasionally the end of the Miocene, differs in general, though differentiated in the value and intensification of vertical movements, when the height of mountains increases by 2-3 times. Elevations are spread over certain platform territories and even frameworks of rift zones. This is related not so much to the intensity of compression and shortening as to the compositional transformation of the upper mantle and the lower crust, leading to their decompaction. Comparison with the Hercynian and Caledonian orogenic stages shows that the second phase, predetermined by widespread collision, reflects a more important geodynamic event expressed in a change of the global plate interaction system and its deep-seated sources.

  19. Planning 3-D collision-free paths using spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Susan; Kelley, Robert B.

    1989-01-01

    A scheme for the representation of objects, the Successive Spherical Approximation (SSA), facilitates the rapid planning of collision-free paths in a 3-D, dynamic environment. The hierarchical nature of the SSA allows collision-free paths to be determined efficiently while still providing for the exact representation of dynamic objects. The concept of a freespace cell is introduced to allow human 3-D conceptual knowledge to be used in facilitating satisfying choices for paths. Collisions can be detected at a rate better than 1 second per environment object per path. This speed enables the path planning process to apply a hierarchy of rules to create a heuristically satisfying collision-free path.

  20. Shoemaker-Levy 9/JUPITER Collision Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    There are many signs that the upcoming collision between comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and giant planet Jupiter is beginning to catch the imagination of the public. Numerous reports in the various media describe the effects expected during this unique event which according to the latest calculations will start in the evening of July 16 and end in the morning of July 22, 1994. (The times in this Press Release are given in Central European Summer Time (CEST), i.e., Universal Time (UT) + 2 hours. The corresponding local time in Chile is CEST - 6 hours.) Astronomers all over the world are now preparing to observe the associated phenomena with virtually all major telescopes. There will be no less than 12 different investigations at the ESO La Silla observatory during this period. This Press Release updates the information published in ESO PR 02/94 (27 January 1994) and provides details about the special services which will be provided by ESO to the media around this rare astronomical event. SCIENTIFIC EXPECTATIONS The nucleus of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 broke into many smaller pieces during a near passage of Jupiter in July 1992. They are now moving in parallel orbits around this planet and recent calculations show with close to 100 % certainty that they will all collide with it, just two months from now. At some time, more than 20 individual nuclei were observed. This Press Release is accompanied by a photo that shows this formation, the famous "string of pearls", as it looked like in early May 1994. Both Jupiter and these nuclei have been extensively observed during the past months. A large, coordinated observing programme at La Silla has been active since early April and the first results have become available. However, while we now possess more accurate information about the comet's motion and the times of impact, there is still great uncertainty about the effects which may actually be observed at the time of the impacts. This is first of all due to the fact that it has not

  1. Predictive Potential Field-Based Collision Avoidance for Multicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuisen, M.; Schadler, M.; Behnke, S.

    2013-08-01

    Reliable obstacle avoidance is a key to navigating with UAVs in the close vicinity of static and dynamic obstacles. Wheel-based mobile robots are often equipped with 2D or 3D laser range finders that cover the 2D workspace sufficiently accurate and at a high rate. Micro UAV platforms operate in a 3D environment, but the restricted payload prohibits the use of fast state-of-the-art 3D sensors. Thus, perception of small obstacles is often only possible in the vicinity of the UAV and a fast collision avoidance system is necessary. We propose a reactive collision avoidance system based on artificial potential fields, that takes the special dynamics of UAVs into account by predicting the influence of obstacles on the estimated trajectory in the near future using a learned motion model. Experimental evaluation shows that the prediction leads to smoother trajectories and allows to navigate collision-free through passageways.

  2. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  3. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  4. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  5. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  6. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  7. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  8. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize phytochemicals in plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. New methods a...

  9. Characterization of acoustic emissions resulting from particle collision with a stationary bubble.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Spencer, Steven J; Coghill, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The present work characterizes the acoustic emissions resulting from the collision of a particle driven under gravity with a captive bubble. Conventional methods to investigate the bubble particle collision interaction model measure a descriptive parameter known as the collision time. During such a collision, particle impact may cause a strong deformation and a following oscillation of the bubble-particle interface generates detectable passive acoustic emissions (AE). Experiments and models presented show that the AE frequency monotonically decreases with the particle radius and is independent of the impact velocity, whereas the AE amplitude has a more complicated relationship with impact parameters. PMID:23654360

  10. Quantifying the physical demands of collision sports: does microsensor technology measure what it claims to measure?

    PubMed

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2013-08-01

    The physical demands of rugby league, rugby union, and American football are significantly increased through the large number of collisions players are required to perform during match play. Because of the labor-intensive nature of coding collisions from video recordings, manufacturers of wearable microsensor (e.g., global positioning system [GPS]) units have refined the technology to automatically detect collisions, with several sport scientists attempting to use these microsensors to quantify the physical demands of collision sports. However, a question remains over the validity of these microtechnology units to quantify the contact demands of collision sports. Indeed, recent evidence has shown significant differences in the number of "impacts" recorded by microtechnology units (GPSports) and the actual number of collisions coded from video. However, a separate study investigated the validity of a different microtechnology unit (minimaxX; Catapult Sports) that included GPS and triaxial accelerometers, and also a gyroscope and magnetometer, to quantify collisions. Collisions detected by the minimaxX unit were compared with video-based coding of the actual events. No significant differences were detected in the number of mild, moderate, and heavy collisions detected via the minimaxX units and those coded from video recordings of the actual event. Furthermore, a strong correlation (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) was observed between collisions recorded via the minimaxX units and those coded from video recordings of the event. These findings demonstrate that only one commercially available and wearable microtechnology unit (minimaxX) can be considered capable of offering a valid method of quantifying the contact loads that typically occur in collision sports. Until such validation research is completed, sport scientists should be circumspect of the ability of other units to perform similar functions. PMID:23090320

  11. Relativistic nuclear collisions: theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1980-07-01

    Some of the recent theoretical developments in relativistic (0.5 to 2.0-GeV/nucleon) nuclear collisions are reviewed. The statistical model, hydrodynamic model, classical equation of motion calculations, billiard ball dynamics, and intranuclear cascade models are discussed in detail. Inclusive proton and pion spectra are analyzed for a variety of reactions. Particular attention is focused on how the complex interplay of the basic reaction mechanism hinders attempts to deduce the nuclear matter equation of state from data. 102 references, 19 figures.

  12. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  13. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  14. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant.

    PubMed

    Truong, G-W; Anstie, J D; May, E F; Stace, T M; Luiten, A N

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  15. Development of an in-vehicle intersection collision countermeasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierowicz, John

    1997-02-01

    Intersection collisions constitute approximately twenty-six percent of all accidents in the United States. Because of their complexity, and demands on the perceptual and decision making abilities of the driver, intersections present an increased risk of collisions between automobiles. This situation provides an opportunity to apply advanced sensor and processing capabilities to prevent these collisions. A program to determine the characteristics of intersection collisions and identify potential countermeasures will be described. This program, sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, utilized accident data to develop a taxonomy of intersection crashes. This taxonomy was used to develop a concept for an intersection collision avoidance countermeasure. The concept utilizes in-vehicle position, dynamic status, and millimeter wave radar system and an in-vehicle computer system to provide inputs to an intersection collision avoidance algorithm. Detection of potential violation of traffic control device, or proceeding into the intersection with inadequate gap will lead to the presentation of a warning to the driver. These warnings are presented to the driver primarily via a head-up display and haptic feedback. Roadside to vehicle communication provides information regarding phased traffic signal information. Active control of the vehicle's brake and steering systems are described. Progress in the development of the systems will be presented along with the schedule of future activities.

  16. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  17. Collision in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    On June 25, 1997, the Russian supply spacecraft Progress 234 collided with the Mir space station, rupturing Mir's pressure hull, throwing it into an uncontrolled attitude drift, and nearly forcing evacuation of the station. Like many high-profile accidents, this collision was the consequence of a chain of events leading to the final piloting errors that were its immediate cause. The discussion in this article does not resolve the relative contributions of the actions and decisions in this chain. Neither does it suggest corrective measures, many of which are straightforward and have already been implemented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency. Rather, its purpose is to identify the human factors that played a pervasive role in the incident. Workplace stress, fatigue, and sleep deprivation were identified by NASA as contributory factors in the Mir-Progress collision (Culbertson, 1997; NASA, forthcoming), but other contributing factors, such as requiring crew to perform difficult tasks for which their training is not current, could potentially become important factors in future situations.

  18. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  19. Collision geometry and flow in uranium + uranium collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Andy; Qiu, Zhi; Shen, Chun; Heinz, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Using event-by-event viscous fluid dynamics to evolve fluctuating initial density profiles from the Monte Carlo-Glauber model for U+U collisions, we study the predicted "knee"-like structure in the elliptic flow as a function of collision centrality. The knee arises in the two-component Monte Carlo-Glauber model when the initial source ellipticity is plotted as a function of centrality. It results from the preferential selection of tip-on-tip collision geometries by a high-multiplicity trigger. We find that the knee survives hydrodynamic evolution, and that it is located around the 0.5% most central collisions as measured by the final charged multiplicity. Such a knee structure is not seen in the STAR data. This rules out the two-component MC-Glauber model for initial energy and entropy production. Hence an enrichment of tip-tip configurations by triggering solely on high-multiplicity in the U+U collisions does not work. On the other hand, by using zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs) coupled with event-shape engineering such a selection is possible. We identify the selection purity of body-body and tip-tip events in full-overlap U+U collisions. By additionally constraining the asymmetry of the ZDC signals we can further increase the probability of selecting tip-tip events in U+U collisions.

  20. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  1. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  2. Collision avoidance sensor skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to totally eliminate the possibility of a robot (or any mechanism for that matter) inducing a collision in space operations. We were particularly concerned that human beings were safe under all circumstances. This was apparently accomplished, and it is shown that GSFC has a system that is ready for space qualification and flight. However, it soon became apparent that much more could be accomplished with this technology. Payloads could be made invulnerable to collision avoidance and the blind spots behind them eliminated. This could be accomplished by a simple, non-imaging set of 'Capaciflector' sensors on each payload. It also is evident that this system could be used to align and dock the system with a wide margin of safety. Throughout, lighting problems could be ignored, and unexpected events and modeling errors taken in stride. At the same time, computational requirements would be reduced. This can be done in a simple, rugged, reliable manner that will not disturb the form factor of space systems. It will be practical for space applications. The lab experiments indicate we are well on the way to accomplishing this. Still, the research trail goes deeper. It now appears that the sensors can be extended to end effectors to provide precontact information and make robot docking (or any docking connection) very smooth, with minimal loads impacted back into the mating structures. This type of ability would be a major step forward in basic control techniques in space. There are, however, baseline and restructuring issues to be tackled. The payloads must get power and signals to them from the robot or from the astronaut servicing tool. This requires a standard electromechanical interface. Any of several could be used. The GSFC prototype shown in this presentation is a good one. Sensors with their attendant electronics must be added to the payloads, end effectors, and robot arms and integrated into the system.

  3. Collision cross sections for structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Erik G; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Robinson, Carol V; Baldwin, Andrew J; Benesch, Justin L P

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) allows the structural interrogation of biomolecules by reporting their collision cross sections (CCSs). The major bottleneck for exploiting IM-MS in structural proteomics lies in the lack of speed at which structures and models can be related to experimental data. Here we present IMPACT (Ion Mobility Projection Approximation Calculation Tool), which overcomes these twin challenges, providing accurate CCSs up to 10(6) times faster than alternative methods. This allows us to assess the CCS space presented by the entire structural proteome, interrogate ensembles of protein conformers, and monitor molecular dynamics trajectories. Our data demonstrate that the CCS is a highly informative parameter and that IM-MS is of considerable practical value to structural biologists. PMID:25800554

  4. Duration of an elastic collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-07-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding with the planar surface allows us to determine the duration of the elastic collision. In order to check the theoretical model, an experiment is proposed to measure the duration of the collision. A more refined model built with masses and springs gives good agreement between theoretical and experimental values.

  5. Collisions in the Oort Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.A.

    1988-03-01

    The present assessment of the consequentiality of physical collisions between Oort Cloud objects by a first-generation model indicates that natural power-law population structures produce significant numbers of collisions between each comet and smaller objects over the age of the solar system. These collisions are held to constitute a feedback mechanism for small debris production. The impacts yield extensive comet surface evolution in the cloud, in conditions where the number of small orbiting objects conforms to the standard power-law populations. 16 references.

  6. Challenges in the Accurate Surveillance of Booster Seat and Bicycle Helmet Usage by Children: Lessons from the Field.

    PubMed

    Pankratz, Curt; Warda, Lynne; Piotrowski, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions and bicycle collisions and falls are a leading cause of death by preventable injury for children. In order to design, implement and evaluate campaigns and programs aimed at improving child safety, accurate surveillance is needed. This paper examined the challenges that confront efforts to collect surveillance data relevant to child traffic safety, including observation, interview, and focus group methods. Strategies to address key challenges in order to improve the efficiency and accuracy of surveillance methods were recommended. The potential for new technology to enhance existing surveillance methods was also explored. PMID:27399749

  7. Challenges in the Accurate Surveillance of Booster Seat and Bicycle Helmet Usage by Children: Lessons from the Field

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Curt; Warda, Lynne; Piotrowski, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions and bicycle collisions and falls are a leading cause of death by preventable injury for children. In order to design, implement and evaluate campaigns and programs aimed at improving child safety, accurate surveillance is needed. This paper examined the challenges that confront efforts to collect surveillance data relevant to child traffic safety, including observation, interview, and focus group methods. Strategies to address key challenges in order to improve the efficiency and accuracy of surveillance methods were recommended. The potential for new technology to enhance existing surveillance methods was also explored. PMID:27399749

  8. An experimental evaluation of potential scavenger effects on snake road mortality detections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, Kaylan A.; Chalfoun, Anna D.

    2012-01-01

    As road networks expand and collisions between vehicles and wildlife become more common, accurately quantifying mortality rates for the taxa that are most impacted will be critical. Snakes are especially vulnerable to collisions with vehicles because of their physiology and behavior. Reptile road mortality is typically quantified using driving or walking surveys; however, scavengers can rapidly remove carcasses from the road and cause underestimation of mortality. Our objective was to determine the effect that scavengers might have had on our ability to accurately detect reptile road mortality during over 150 h and 4,000 km of driving surveys through arid shrublands in southwest Wyoming, which resulted in only two observations of mortality. We developed unique simulated snake carcasses out of Burbot (Lota lota), a locally invasive fish species, and examined removal rates across three different road types at three study sites. Carcass size was not a significant predictor of time of removal, and carcass removal was comparable during the daytime and nighttime hours. However, removal of simulated carcasses was higher on paved roads than unpaved or two-track roads at all study sites, with an average of 75% of the carcasses missing within 60 h compared to 34% and 31%, respectively. Scavengers may therefore negatively impact the ability of researchers to accurately detect herpetofaunal road mortality, especially for paved roads where road mortality is likely the most prevalent.

  9. Milky Way's Head On Collision

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the collision between our Milky Way galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. Hubble Space Telescope observations indicate that the two galaxies, pulled together by their mutual gravi...

  10. Theoretical studies of molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) total integral reactive cross sections and vibrationally resolved reaction probabilities for F + H2 = HF + H; (2) a theoretical study of inelastic O + N2 collisions; (3) body frame close coupling wave packet approach to gas phase atom-rigit rotor inelastic collisions; (4) wave packet study of gas phase atom-rigit motor scattering; (5) the application of optical potentials for reactive scattering; (6) time dependent, three dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction; (7) a time dependent wave packet approach to atom-diatom reactive collision probabilities; (8) time dependent wave packet for the complete determination of s-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions; (9) a comparison of three time dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron-atom elastic scattering cross sections; and (10) a numerically exact full wave packet approach to molecule-surface scattering.

  11. Galaxy collisions - A preliminary study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    Collisions of spherical galaxies were studied in a series of numerical experiments to see what happens when galaxies collide. Each experiment starts with two model galaxies, each consisting of 50,000 stars, moving toward each other along a specified orbit. The series of experiments provides a systematic sampling of the parameter space spanned by the initial orbital energy and the initial angular momentum. Deeply penetrating collisions are emphasized. The collisions reported here scale to relative velocities as great as 500 km/s, well into the range for collisions within clusters of galaxies. It is found that: (1) the galaxies contract momentarily to about half their original sizes shortly after close passage; and (2) the initial galaxies blend into a single dynamical system while they are near each other.

  12. Theory of slow atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, E. E.; Umanskii, S. Ia.

    The theory presented in this book is self-contained. It can be applied to the interpretation of various processes occurring in atomic collisions over a relatively wide energy range, from thermal energies to hundreds of eV. The general formulation of the scattering problem under quasi-classical conditions is discussed, taking into account scattering amplitudes and cross sections, scattering equations, collisions of two many-electron atoms, and integral cross sections for isotropic collisions. Other topics explored are related to diatomic electronic states, approximate calculations of the electronic states of diatoms, elastic scattering, approximate calculations of a multichannel quasi-classical scattering matrix, the two-state scattering problem, the linear two-state Landau-Zener model, nonlinear two-state models of nonadiabatic coupling, multistate models of nonadiabatic coupling, and a case study involving intramultiplet mixing and depolarization of alkalis in collisions with noble gases.

  13. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  14. Longitudinal driver model and collision warning and avoidance algorithms based on human driving databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kangwon

    Intelligent vehicle systems, such as Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) or Collision Warning/Collision Avoidance (CW/CA), are currently under development, and several companies have already offered ACC on selected models. Control or decision-making algorithms of these systems are commonly evaluated under extensive computer simulations and well-defined scenarios on test tracks. However, they have rarely been validated with large quantities of naturalistic human driving data. This dissertation utilized two University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute databases (Intelligent Cruise Control Field Operational Test and System for Assessment of Vehicle Motion Environment) in the development and evaluation of longitudinal driver models and CW/CA algorithms. First, to examine how drivers normally follow other vehicles, the vehicle motion data from the databases were processed using a Kalman smoother. The processed data was then used to fit and evaluate existing longitudinal driver models (e.g., the linear follow-the-leader model, the Newell's special model, the nonlinear follow-the-leader model, the linear optimal control model, the Gipps model and the optimal velocity model). A modified version of the Gipps model was proposed and found to be accurate in both microscopic (vehicle) and macroscopic (traffic) senses. Second, to examine emergency braking behavior and to evaluate CW/CA algorithms, the concepts of signal detection theory and a performance index suitable for unbalanced situations (few threatening data points vs. many safe data points) are introduced. Selected existing CW/CA algorithms were found to have a performance index (geometric mean of true-positive rate and precision) not exceeding 20%. To optimize the parameters of the CW/CA algorithms, a new numerical optimization scheme was developed to replace the original data points with their representative statistics. A new CW/CA algorithm was proposed, which was found to score higher than 55% in the

  15. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  16. Remote balance weighs accurately amid high radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggenberger, D. N.; Shuck, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    Commercial beam-type balance, modified and outfitted with electronic controls and digital readout, can be remotely controlled for use in high radiation environments. This allows accurate weighing of breeder-reactor fuel pieces when they are radioactively hot.

  17. Understanding the Code: keeping accurate records.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In his continuing series looking at the legal and professional implications of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's revised Code of Conduct, Richard Griffith discusses the elements of accurate record keeping under Standard 10 of the Code. This article considers the importance of accurate record keeping for the safety of patients and protection of district nurses. The legal implications of records are explained along with how district nurses should write records to ensure these legal requirements are met. PMID:26418404

  18. Gaussian Process Model for Collision Dynamics of Complex Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.

    2015-08-01

    We show that a Gaussian process model can be combined with a small number (of order 100) of scattering calculations to provide a multidimensional dependence of scattering observables on the experimentally controllable parameters (such as the collision energy or temperature) as well as the potential energy surface (PES) parameters. For the case of Ar -C6H6 collisions, we show that 200 classical trajectory calculations are sufficient to provide a ten-dimensional hypersurface, giving the dependence of the collision lifetimes on the collision energy, internal temperature, and eight PES parameters. This can be used for solving the inverse scattering problem, for the efficient calculation of thermally averaged observables, for reducing the error of the molecular dynamics calculations by averaging over the PES variations, and for the analysis of the sensitivity of the observables to individual parameters determining the PES. Trained by a combination of classical and quantum calculations, the model provides an accurate description of the quantum scattering cross sections, even near scattering resonances.

  19. Scattering resonances in slow NH3-He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbels, Koos B.; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; Meijer, Gerard; van der Avoird, Ad

    2012-02-01

    We theoretically study slow collisions of NH3 molecules with He atoms, where we focus in particular on the observation of scattering resonances. We calculate state-to-state integral and differential cross sections for collision energies ranging from 10-4 cm-1 to 130 cm-1, using fully converged quantum close-coupling calculations. To describe the interaction between the NH3 molecules and the He atoms, we present a four-dimensional potential energy surface, based on an accurate fit of 4180 ab initio points. Prior to collision, we consider the ammonia molecules to be in their antisymmetric umbrella state with angular momentum j = 1 and projection k = 1, which is a suitable state for Stark deceleration. We find pronounced shape and Feshbach resonances, especially for inelastic collisions into the symmetric umbrella state with j = k = 1. We analyze the observed resonant structures in detail by looking at scattering wavefunctions, phase shifts, and lifetimes. Finally, we discuss the prospects for observing the predicted scattering resonances in future crossed molecular beam experiments with a Stark-decelerated NH3 beam.

  20. Electron-Nitrogen Collision Processes Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Electron-N2 collisions play an important role in the nitrogen-rich upper atmospheres of Titan, Triton, and Earth. Modeling these processes requires accurate laboratory data. Despite the recognized importance of such data, there remained an unsatisfactory degree of consensus among much of the available laboratory collision cross section data. To address this situation, our group has devoted considerable effort over the past decade to improve the status of low energy electron collision data. In doing so, we have measured direct excitation cross sections for at least 17 electronic states of neutral N2 and a variety of key UV emission cross sections. Here we review the result of this effort, highlighting how the picture of electron collision processes has evolved, where consensus has been reached and where discrepancies still exist. New electron energy-loss measurements will be presented for excitation of the valence states, with finely spaced (<1eV) impact energy increments in the threshold-to-peak region where excitation is not in proportion to the Franck-Condon factors. These data are novel in that they include measurements at fixed electron scattering angles, differential in impact energy over a range of scattering angle. Also, new near-threshold integral cross sections are provided and compared to existing data.

  1. Rotational Orientation Effects in NO(X) + Ar Inelastic Collisions.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Gordon, S D S; Hornung, B; Nichols, B; Aoiz, F J; Stolte, S

    2015-12-17

    Rotational angular momentum orientation effects in the rotationally inelastic collisions of NO(X) with Ar have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically at a collision energy of 530 cm(-1). The collision-induced orientation has been determined experimentally using a hexapole electric field to select the ϵ = -1 Λ-doublet level of the NO(X) j = 1/2 initial state. Fully quantum state resolved polarization-dependent differential cross sections were recorded experimentally using a crossed molecular beam apparatus coupled with a (1 + 1') resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization detection scheme and subsequent velocity-map imaging. To determine the NO sense of rotation, the probe radiation was circularly polarized. Experimental orientation polarization-dependent differential cross sections are compared with those obtained from quantum mechanical scattering calculations and are found to be in good agreement. The origin of the collision-induced orientation has been investigated by means of close-coupled quantum mechanical, quantum mechanical hard shell, quasi-classical trajectory (QCT), and classical hard shell calculations at the same collision energy. Although there is evidence for the operation of limiting classical mechanisms, the rotational orientation cannot be accounted for by QCT calculations and is found to be strongly influenced by quantum mechanical effects. PMID:26413997

  2. Interactions among Drosophila larvae before and during collision.

    PubMed

    Otto, Nils; Risse, Benjamin; Berh, Dimitri; Bittern, Jonas; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Klämbt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In populations of Drosophila larvae, both, an aggregation and a dispersal behavior can be observed. However, the mechanisms coordinating larval locomotion in respect to other animals, especially in close proximity and during/after physical contacts are currently only little understood. Here we test whether relevant information is perceived before or during larva-larva contacts, analyze its influence on behavior and ask whether larvae avoid or pursue collisions. Employing frustrated total internal reflection-based imaging (FIM) we first found that larvae visually detect other moving larvae in a narrow perceptive field and respond with characteristic escape reactions. To decipher larval locomotion not only before but also during the collision we utilized a two color FIM approach (FIM(2c)), which allowed to faithfully extract the posture and motion of colliding animals. We show that during collision, larval locomotion freezes and sensory information is sampled during a KISS phase (german: Kollisions Induziertes Stopp Syndrom or english: collision induced stop syndrome). Interestingly, larvae react differently to living, dead or artificial larvae, discriminate other Drosophila species and have an increased bending probability for a short period after the collision terminates. Thus, Drosophila larvae evolved means to specify behaviors in response to other larvae. PMID:27511760

  3. Interactions among Drosophila larvae before and during collision

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Nils; Risse, Benjamin; Berh, Dimitri; Bittern, Jonas; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Klämbt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In populations of Drosophila larvae, both, an aggregation and a dispersal behavior can be observed. However, the mechanisms coordinating larval locomotion in respect to other animals, especially in close proximity and during/after physical contacts are currently only little understood. Here we test whether relevant information is perceived before or during larva-larva contacts, analyze its influence on behavior and ask whether larvae avoid or pursue collisions. Employing frustrated total internal reflection-based imaging (FIM) we first found that larvae visually detect other moving larvae in a narrow perceptive field and respond with characteristic escape reactions. To decipher larval locomotion not only before but also during the collision we utilized a two color FIM approach (FIM2c), which allowed to faithfully extract the posture and motion of colliding animals. We show that during collision, larval locomotion freezes and sensory information is sampled during a KISS phase (german: Kollisions Induziertes Stopp Syndrom or english: collision induced stop syndrome). Interestingly, larvae react differently to living, dead or artificial larvae, discriminate other Drosophila species and have an increased bending probability for a short period after the collision terminates. Thus, Drosophila larvae evolved means to specify behaviors in response to other larvae. PMID:27511760

  4. Electric fields and chiral magnetic effect in Cu + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-03-01

    The non-central Cu + Au collisions can create strong out-of-plane magnetic fields and in-plane electric fields. By using the HIJING model, we study the general properties of the electromagnetic fields in Cu + Au collisions at 200 GeV and their impacts on the charge-dependent two-particle correlator γq1q2 = < cos ⁡ (ϕ1 +ϕ2 - 2ψRP) > (see main text for definition) which was used for the detection of the chiral magnetic effect (CME). Compared with Au + Au collisions, we find that the in-plane electric fields in Cu + Au collisions can strongly suppress the two-particle correlator or even reverse its sign if the lifetime of the electric fields is long. Combining with the expectation that if γq1q2 is induced by elliptic-flow driven effects we would not see such strong suppression or reversion, our results suggest to use Cu + Au collisions to test CME and understand the mechanisms that underlie γq1q2.

  5. Accurate Collisional Cross-Sections: Important Non-Lte Input Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L.

    2010-11-01

    Non-LTE modelling for a particular atom requires accurate collisional excitation and ionization cross-sections for the entire system of transitions in the atom. This review concerns with inelastic collisions with electrons and neutral hydrogen atoms. For the selected atoms, H i and Ca ii, comparisons are made between electron impact excitation rates from ab initio calculations and various theoretical approximations. The effect of the use of modern data on non-LTE modelling is shown. For most transitions and most atoms, hydrogen collisional rates are calculated using a semi-empirical modification of the classical Thomson formula for ionization by electrons. Approaches used to estimate empirically the efficiency of hydrogenic collisions in the statistical equilibrium of atoms are reviewed. This research was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft with grant 436 RUS 17/13/07.

  6. Asymmetry in the Collision Judgments of People With Homonymous Field Defects and Left Hemispatial Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Kevin E.; Woods, Russell L.; Goldstein, Robert B.; Peli, Eli; Luo, Gang; Bowers, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although the impact of homonymous visual field defects (HFDs) on mobility has been investigated previously, the emphasis has been on obstacle detection. Relatively little is known about HFD patients' ability to judge collisions once an obstacle is detected. We investigated this using a walking simulator. Methods. Patients with HFDs (n = 29) and subjects with normal vision (NV; n = 21) were seated in front of a large screen on which a visual simulation of walking was displayed. They made collision judgments for a human figure that appeared for 1 second at lateral offsets from the virtual walking path. A perceived-collision threshold was calculated for right and left sides. Results. Symmetrical collision thresholds (same on left and right sides) were measured for participants with NV (n = 21), and right (n = 9) and left (n = 7) HFD without hemispatial neglect. Participants with left neglect (n = 10) showed significant asymmetry with thresholds smaller (compared to the NV group and other HFD groups) on the blind (P < 0.001) and larger on the seeing (P = 0.05) sides. Despite the asymmetry, the overall width of the zone of perceived collision risk was not different, suggesting a relatively uniform rightward deviation in judgments of the left neglect group. Conclusions. Left neglect was associated with rightward asymmetry in collision judgments, which may cause collisions on the left side even when an obstacle is detected. These behaviors may represent the spatial misperceptions in body midline described previously in patients with left neglect. PMID:26120818

  7. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Holman, Jerry D.; Chen, Kan; Liebler, Daniel; Orton, Daniel J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chung, Chang Y.; et al

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of chargedmore » peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.« less

  8. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Holman, Jerry D.; Chen, Kan; Liebler, Daniel; Orton, Daniel J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chung, Chang Y.; Rose, Kristie L.; Tabb, David L.

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of charged peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.

  9. Total Probability of Collision as a Metric for Finite Conjunction Assessment and Collision Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigm, Ryan C.; Hejduk, Matthew D.; Johnson, Lauren C.; Plakalovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    On-orbit collision risk is becoming an increasing mission risk to all operational satellites in Earth orbit. Managing this risk can be disruptive to mission and operations, present challenges for decision-makers, and is time-consuming for all parties involved. With the planned capability improvements to detecting and tracking smaller orbital debris and capacity improvements to routinely predict on-orbit conjunctions, this mission risk will continue to grow in terms of likelihood and effort. It is very real possibility that the future space environment will not allow collision risk management and mission operations to be conducted in the same manner as it is today. This paper presents the concept of a finite conjunction assessment-one where each discrete conjunction is not treated separately but, rather, as a continuous event that must be managed concurrently. The paper also introduces the Total Probability of Collision as an analogous metric for finite conjunction assessment operations and provides several options for its usage in a Concept of Operations.

  10. A TCAS-II Resolution Advisory Detection Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar; Narkawicz, Anthony; Chamberlain, James

    2013-01-01

    The Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) is a family of airborne systems designed to reduce the risk of mid-air collisions between aircraft. TCASII, the current generation of TCAS devices, provides resolution advisories that direct pilots to maintain or increase vertical separation when aircraft distance and time parameters are beyond designed system thresholds. This paper presents a mathematical model of the TCASII Resolution Advisory (RA) logic that assumes accurate aircraft state information. Based on this model, an algorithm for RA detection is also presented. This algorithm is analogous to a conflict detection algorithm, but instead of predicting loss of separation, it predicts resolution advisories. It has been formally verified that for a kinematic model of aircraft trajectories, this algorithm completely and correctly characterizes all encounter geometries between two aircraft that lead to a resolution advisory within a given lookahead time interval. The RA detection algorithm proposed in this paper is a fundamental component of a NASA sense and avoid concept for the integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems in civil airspace.

  11. Accurate mass fragment library for rapid analysis of pesticides on produce using ambient pressure desorption ionization with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kern, Sara E; Lin, Lora A; Fricke, Frederick L

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]⁺) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]⁺ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]⁺ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli

  12. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  13. High temperature transport properties of air - N-O interaction energies and collision integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, E.; Partridge, Harry; Stallcop, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Potential curves for the higher-lying states of NO are used together with a general scattering code to compute accurate values of transport collision integrals for N(4S/0/)-O(3P) interactions. It is found that the major contribution to the collision integrals comes from these higher-lying states of NO. New values of the collision integrals for N(4S/0/)-N(4S/0/) and O(3P)-O(3P) interactions are computed as well. The tabulations of the collision integrals cover a broad range of temperatures from 250 to 100,000 K and can be used to determine transport properties such as viscosity, thermal conductivity, and the diffusion coefficient to the second order.

  14. Mixed Quantum/Classical Approach for Description of Molecular Collisions in Astrophysical Environments.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2015-05-21

    An efficient and accurate mixed quantum/classical theory approach for computational treatment of inelastic scattering is extended to describe collision of an atom with a general asymmetric-top rotor polyatomic molecule. Quantum mechanics, employed to describe transitions between the internal states of the molecule, and classical mechanics, employed for description of scattering of the atom, are used in a self-consistent manner. Such calculations for rotational excitation of HCOOCH3 in collisions with He produce accurate results at scattering energies above 15 cm(-1), although resonances near threshold, below 5 cm(-1), cannot be reproduced. Importantly, the method remains computationally affordable at high scattering energies (here up to 1000 cm(-1)), which enables calculations for larger molecules and at higher collision energies than was possible previously with the standard full-quantum approach. Theoretical prediction of inelastic cross sections for a number of complex organic molecules observed in space becomes feasible using this new computational tool. PMID:26263260

  15. Relaxation rates in the Maxwellian collision model and its variable hard sphere surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The variable hard sphere and related models have proven to be accurate and computationally convenient replacements for the inverse power law model of classical kinetic theory in direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. We attempt to provide theoretical support for this remarkable success by comparing the relaxation rates in the linearized Boltzmann equation for the Maxwellian collision model with those of its variable hard sphere surrogate. The comparison demonstrates that the linearized collision operator with variable hard sphere interactions can accurately approximate the linearized collision operator with Maxwellian inverse power law interactions under well-defined and broadly applicable conditions. Extensions of the analysis to the general inverse power law model and to more realistic intermolecular potentials are briefly discussed.

  16. Positron production in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    The ATLAS Positron Experiment APEX was built to study positron emission in collisions between very heavy ions. Narrow peaks were observed in such collisions at GSI, Darmstadt in the spectra of positrons and in the sum-energy spectra of electron-positron coincidences. APEX is a second-generation experiment which was specifically designed to look for the coincidence events and measure the opening angle between electrons and positrons. The first beam-induced positrons were detected using APEX in March 1993, and since then three additional runs were carried out. The first results for the collision system {sup 238}U + {sup 181}Ta show no evidence for sharp peaks in the electron-positron sum-energy spectrum. The current emphasis in this work is to obtain a complete understanding of the APEX apparatus. The atomic group is studying events involving coincidences between heavy ions and electrons. Since APEX measures the laboratory angles and energies of both electrons and heavy ions, it is possible to make an event-by-event Doppler correction of the electron spectra. These Doppler-corrected spectra show a number of lines which are attributed to conversion electrons which are emitted when a nuclear excited state decays by ejecting an inner-shell electron. The study of these spectra provide an important confirmation of the proper functioning of APEX. We are particularly concerned with the atomic physics aspects of this process. In order to understand the electron spectra, it is necessary to account for the change in binding energy of the inner-shell electrons as a function of ionic charge. We are utilizing the GRASP relativistic atomic structure program to calculate the binding energies. This information, together with the measured gamma-ray energies, allows us to calculate the expected energies of the conversion electrons which we can then compare with the observed Doppler-corrected conversion electron energies.

  17. Production of Pions in pA-collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, I. V.; Mashnik, S. G.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of pion production cross section in PA-collisions is of interest for astrophysics, CR physics, and space radiation studies. Meanwhile, pion production in pA-reactions is often accounted for by simple scaling of that for pp-collisions, which is not enough for many real applications. We evaluate the quality of existing parameterizations using the data and simulations with the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model code LAQGSM and the improved Cascade-Exciton Model code CEM2k. The LAQGSM and CEM2k models have been shown to reproduce well nuclear reactions and hadronic data in the range 0.01-800 GeV/nucleon.

  18. Collision rates and the determination of atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielfiedel, A.; Feautrier, N.; Guitou, M.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Non-LTE modelisation of stellar atmospheres requires an accurate knowledge of collisional rate coefficients (mainly with H atoms) that compete with radiative rates to populate the atomic levels. In the framework of the SAM-GAIA project, we carry out, with colleagues from Uppsala, St. Petersburg and Nice, an interdisciplinary work combining quantum chemistry, collision physics and astrophysical modeling. Present studies concern collisional excitation of Mg and O by H-atoms. In the particular case of Mg, 15 electronic states of the MgH molecule as well as the associated couplings that mix the states during the collision were calculated. The resulting cross sections and rate coefficients point out the sensitivity of the results with the quantum chemistry data. Our detailed calculations show that the usual approximate formulae (Drawin, Kaulakys) lead to errors by factors up to 10^6. Consequences on atmospheric parameters are analyzed.

  19. Accurate and robust estimation of camera parameters using RANSAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuqiang; Cui, Yi; Wang, Yexin; Liu, Liu; Gao, He

    2013-03-01

    Camera calibration plays an important role in the field of machine vision applications. The popularly used calibration approach based on 2D planar target sometimes fails to give reliable and accurate results due to the inaccurate or incorrect localization of feature points. To solve this problem, an accurate and robust estimation method for camera parameters based on RANSAC algorithm is proposed to detect the unreliability and provide the corresponding solutions. Through this method, most of the outliers are removed and the calibration errors that are the main factors influencing measurement accuracy are reduced. Both simulative and real experiments have been carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method and the results show that the proposed method is robust under large noise condition and quite efficient to improve the calibration accuracy compared with the original state.

  20. Note-accurate audio segmentation based on MPEG-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellhausen, Jens

    2003-12-01

    Segmenting audio data into the smallest musical components is the basis for many further meta data extraction algorithms. For example, an automatic music transcription system needs to know where the exact boundaries of each tone are. In this paper a note accurate audio segmentation algorithm based on MPEG-7 low level descriptors is introduced. For a reliable detection of different notes, both features in the time and the frequency domain are used. Because of this, polyphonic instrument mixes and even melodies characterized by human voices can be examined with this alogrithm. For testing and verification of the note accurate segmentation, a simple music transcription system was implemented. The dominant frequency within each segment is used to build a MIDI file representing the processed audio data.

  1. Collision model for fully resolved simulations of flows laden with finite-size particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro; Boersma, Bendiks Jan; Westerweel, Jerry; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present a collision model for particle-particle and particle-wall interactions in interface-resolved simulations of particle-laden flows. Three types of interparticle interactions are taken into account: (1) long- and (2) short-range hydrodynamic interactions, and (3) solid-solid contact. Long-range interactions are incorporated through an efficient and second-order-accurate immersed boundary method (IBM). Short-range interactions are also partly reproduced by the IBM. However, since the IBM uses a fixed grid, a lubrication model is needed for an interparticle gap width smaller than the grid spacing. The lubrication model is based on asymptotic expansions of analytical solutions for canonical lubrication interactions between spheres in the Stokes regime. Roughness effects are incorporated by making the lubrication correction independent of the gap width for gap widths smaller than ˜1 % of the particle radius. This correction is applied until the particles reach solid-solid contact. To model solid-solid contact we use a variant of a linear soft-sphere collision model capable of stretching the collision time. This choice is computationally attractive because it allows us to reduce the number of time steps required for integrating the collision force accurately and is physically realistic, provided that the prescribed collision time is much smaller than the characteristic time scale of particle motion. We verified the numerical implementation of our collision model and validated it against several benchmark cases for immersed head-on particle-wall and particle-particle collisions, and oblique particle-wall collisions. The results show good agreement with experimental data.

  2. High-resolution spectroscopic probes of collisions and half-collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program explores the dynamics of gas phase collisions and photodissociation by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. Simultaneous state and velocity detection frequently permits a determination of scalar or vector correlations among products. The correlated product distributions are always more informative, and often easier to interpret than the uncorrelated product state distributions. The authors have recently built an apparatus to record transient absorption spectra with 50 nS time resolution and 20 MHz frequency resolution using a single frequency Ti:sapphire laser. The photodissociation of NCCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SCN at 193 nm is discussed.

  3. Parameterization of spectral distributions for pion and kaon production in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, John P.; Norbury, John W.; Cucinotta, Frank A.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate semi-empirical parameterizations of the energy-differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production from proton-proton collisions are presented at energies relevant to cosmic rays. The parameterizations depend on the outgoing meson momentum and also the proton energy, and are able to be reduced to very simple analytical formulas suitable for cosmic-ray transport.

  4. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  5. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  6. On efficiency of collisions` simulation via particles-in-cells technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchenkov, P.A.; Sigov, Yu.S.

    1995-12-31

    Macro-particle technique is widely used to simulate kinetic processes in plasmas and plasma-like media. The common feature of various versions of this technique is tracing phase particles trajectories and detection of macro-characteristics system under modelling as average by particles band. The method is rather costly from the point of view of computer resources needed (as compared with flid calculations) but it permits to simulate complex kinetic processes in cases whet their precise theoretical description is impossible. In particular, the PIC technique allows to simulate spatial-nonuniform (SNU) non-equilibrium systems with self-consistent fields. The pair collisions between macro-particles are often used to model collisions in the frame of particle simulation technique. In so doing the SNU problems are not eliminated. By {open_quotes}pair collisions{close_quotes} we mean the collisions` simulation techniques witch is characterize by use of a collision act between two macro-particles. Such a method is commonly used in molecular dynamic technique. The collision can be treated as either determinate (solid sphere technique) or probabilistic one. There with, as the second interaction agent can be used both the same particle and a hypotetic {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} particle with properties derived from averaging over particles` ensemble. In the first case the technique must include the procedure of choice of pairs for collisions, the second one must include some averaging procedure. In this paper we propose one more method of pair collisions.

  7. Accurate lifetime measurements for the noble gases by the electron beam alignment technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorny, M. B.; Kazantsev, S. A.; Matisov, B. G.; Polezhaevs, N. T.

    1985-03-01

    Accurate lifetime measurement for the 41 P 1, 41 D 2, 51 D 2 helium and the atomic 2 p and 3 p states of other noble gases was performed by the low energy electron beam alignment technique. An account of the influence of magnetic field on the electron path was made to obtain the real Hanle signal shape. The influence of the radiation trapping in the collision chamber was analysed with regard to the metastables diffusion. The experimental data were compared with the results of other methods of the lifetime determination.

  8. A problem of collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Cliff, E. M.; Grantham, W. J.; Peng, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Collision avoidance between two vehicles of constant speed with limited turning radii, moving in a horizontal plane is investigated. Collision avoidance is viewed as a game by assuming that the operator of one vehicle has perfect knowledge of the state of the other, whereas the operator of the second vehicle is unaware of any impending danger. The situation envisioned is that of an encounter between a commercial aircraft and a small light aircraft. This worse case situation is examined to determine the conditions under which the commercial aircraft should execute a collision avoidance maneuver. Three different zones of vulnerability are defined and the boundaries, or barriers, between these zones are determined for a typical aircraft encounter. A discussion of the methods used to obtain the results as well as some of the salient features associated with the resultant barriers is included.

  9. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  10. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  11. Amplitude modulation of alpha-band rhythm caused by mimic collision: MEG study.

    PubMed

    Yokosawa, Koichi; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kikuzawa, Daichi; Aoyama, Gakuto; Takahashi, Makoto; Kuriki, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Detection of a collision risk and avoiding the collision are important for survival. We have been investigating neural responses when humans anticipate a collision or intend to take evasive action by applying collision-simulating images in a predictable manner. Collision-simulating images and control images were presented in random order to 9 healthy male volunteers. A cue signal was also given visually two seconds before each stimulus to enable each participant to anticipate the upcoming stimulus. Magnetoencephalograms (MEG) were recorded with a 76-ch helmet system. The amplitude of alpha band (8-13 Hz) rhythm when anticipating the upcoming collision-simulating image was significantly smaller than that when anticipating control images even just after the cue signal. This result demonstrates that anticipating a negative (dangerous) event induced event-related desynchronization (ERD) of alpha band activity, probably caused by attention. The results suggest the feasibility of detecting endogenous brain activities by monitoring alpha band rhythm and its possible applications to engineering systems, such as an automatic collision evasion system for automobiles. PMID:24111153

  12. Collision recognition and direction changes for small scale fish robots by acceleration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Seung Y.; Shin, Daejung; Kim, Jin Y.; Lee, Bae-Ho

    2005-05-01

    Typical obstacles are walls, rocks, water plants and other nearby robots for a group of small scale fish robots and submersibles that have been constructed in our lab. Sonar sensors are not employed to make the robot structure simple enough. All of circuits, sensors and processor cards are contained in a box of 9 x 7 x 4 cm dimension except motors, fins and external covers. Therefore, image processing results are applied to avoid collisions. However, it is useful only when the obstacles are located far enough to give images processing time for detecting them. Otherwise, acceleration sensors are used to detect collision immediately after it happens. Two of 2-axes acceleration sensors are employed to measure the three components of collision angles, collision magnitudes, and the angles of robot propulsion. These data are integrated to calculate the amount of propulsion direction change. The angle of a collision incident upon an obstacle is the fundamental value to obtain a direction change needed to design a following path. But there is a significant amount of noise due to a caudal fin motor. Because caudal fin provides the main propulsion for a fish robot, there is a periodic swinging noise at the head of a robot. This noise provides a random acceleration effect on the measured acceleration data at the collision. We propose an algorithm which shows that the MEMS-type accelerometers are very effective to provide information for direction changes in spite of the intrinsic noise after the small scale fish robots have made obstacle collision.

  13. Modeling and Simulation of an UAS Collision Avoidance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliveros, Edgardo V.; Murray, A. Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a Modeling and Simulation of an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Collision Avoidance System, capable of representing different types of scenarios for UAS collision avoidance. Commercial and military piloted aircraft currently utilize various systems for collision avoidance such as Traffic Alert and Collision A voidance System (TCAS), Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), Radar and ElectroOptical and Infrared Sensors (EO-IR). The integration of information from these systems is done by the pilot in the aircraft to determine the best course of action. In order to operate optimally in the National Airspace System (NAS) UAS have to work in a similar or equivalent manner to a piloted aircraft by applying the principle of "detect-see and avoid" (DSA) to other air traffic. Hence, we have taken these existing sensor technologies into consideration in order to meet the challenge of researching the modeling and simulation of an approximated DSA system. A Schematic Model for a UAS Collision Avoidance System (CAS) has been developed ina closed loop block diagram for that purpose. We have found that the most suitable software to carry out this task is the Satellite Tool Kit (STK) from Analytical Graphics Inc. (AGI). We have used the Aircraft Mission Modeler (AMM) for modeling and simulation of a scenario where a UAS is placed on a possible collision path with an initial intruder and then with a second intruder, but is able to avoid them by executing a right tum maneuver and then climbing. Radars have also been modeled with specific characteristics for the UAS and both intruders. The software provides analytical, graphical user interfaces and data controlling tools which allow the operator to simulate different conditions. Extensive simulations have been carried out which returned excellent results.

  14. A stereo vision-based obstacle detection system in vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Kunsoo; Park, Jaehak; Hwang, Junyeon; Hong, Daegun

    2008-02-01

    Obstacle detection is a crucial issue for driver assistance systems as well as for autonomous vehicle guidance function and it has to be performed with high reliability to avoid any potential collision with the front vehicle. The vision-based obstacle detection systems are regarded promising for this purpose because they require little infrastructure on a highway. However, the feasibility of these systems in passenger car requires accurate and robust sensing performance. In this paper, an obstacle detection system using stereo vision sensors is developed. This system utilizes feature matching, epipoplar constraint and feature aggregation in order to robustly detect the initial corresponding pairs. After the initial detection, the system executes the tracking algorithm for the obstacles. The proposed system can detect a front obstacle, a leading vehicle and a vehicle cutting into the lane. Then, the position parameters of the obstacles and leading vehicles can be obtained. The proposed obstacle detection system is implemented on a passenger car and its performance is verified experimentally.

  15. ACAT Ground Collision Avoidance Flight Tests Over

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has concluded flight tests of an Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) under the joint U.S. Air Force/NASA F-16D Automatic Collision Avoidance...

  16. 46 CFR 171.085 - Collision bulkhead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... forward perpendicular if the space forward of the collision bulkhead is not subject to damage stability... forward of the collision bulkhead is subject to damage stability requirements. ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL...

  17. 46 CFR 171.085 - Collision bulkhead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... forward perpendicular if the space forward of the collision bulkhead is not subject to damage stability... forward of the collision bulkhead is subject to damage stability requirements. ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL...

  18. Space debris collision and production analytic estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Analytic estimates provide useful estimates of collision rates, fragment production rates, and average collision masses and numbers in good agreement with analytic and numerical estimates for the principal quantities of interest.

  19. Experimental and theoretical studies of the O(3P) + C2H4 reaction dynamics: Collision energy dependence of branching ratios and extent of intersystem crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bina; Han, Yong-Chang; Bowman, Joel M.; Leonori, Francesca; Balucani, Nadia; Angelucci, Luca; Occhiogrosso, Angela; Petrucci, Raffaele; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2012-12-01

    The reaction of O(3P) with C2H4, of importance in combustion and atmospheric chemistry, stands out as paradigm reaction involving not only the indicated triplet state potential energy surface (PES) but also an interleaved singlet PES that is coupled to the triplet surface. This reaction poses great challenges for theory and experiment, owing to the ruggedness and high dimensionality of these potentials, as well as the long lifetimes of the collision complexes. Crossed molecular beam (CMB) scattering experiments with soft electron ionization detection are used to disentangle the dynamics of this polyatomic multichannel reaction at a collision energy Ec of 8.4 kcal/mol. Five different primary products have been identified and characterized, which correspond to the five exothermic competing channels leading to H + CH2CHO, H + CH3CO, CH3 + HCO, CH2 + H2CO, and H2 + CH2CO. These experiments extend our previous CMB work at higher collision energy (Ec ˜ 13 kcal/mol) and when the results are combined with the literature branching ratios from kinetics experiments at room temperature (Ec ˜ 1 kcal/mol), permit to explore the variation of the branching ratios over a wide range of collision energies. In a synergistic fashion, full-dimensional, QCT surface hopping calculations of the O(3P) + C2H4 reaction using ab initio PESs for the singlet and triplet states and their coupling, are reported at collision energies corresponding to the CMB and the kinetics ones. Both theory and experiment find almost an equal contribution from the triplet and singlet surfaces to the reaction, as seen from the collision energy dependence of branching ratios of product channels and extent of intersystem crossing (ISC). Further detailed comparisons at the level of angular distributions and translational energy distributions are made between theory and experiment for the three primary radical channel products, H + CH2CHO, CH3 + HCO, and CH2 + H2CO. The very good agreement between theory and

  20. Experimental and theoretical studies of the O(3P) + C2H4 reaction dynamics: collision energy dependence of branching ratios and extent of intersystem crossing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bina; Han, Yong-Chang; Bowman, Joel M; Leonori, Francesca; Balucani, Nadia; Angelucci, Luca; Occhiogrosso, Angela; Petrucci, Raffaele; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2012-12-14

    The reaction of O((3)P) with C(2)H(4), of importance in combustion and atmospheric chemistry, stands out as paradigm reaction involving not only the indicated triplet state potential energy surface (PES) but also an interleaved singlet PES that is coupled to the triplet surface. This reaction poses great challenges for theory and experiment, owing to the ruggedness and high dimensionality of these potentials, as well as the long lifetimes of the collision complexes. Crossed molecular beam (CMB) scattering experiments with soft electron ionization detection are used to disentangle the dynamics of this polyatomic multichannel reaction at a collision energy E(c) of 8.4 kcal∕mol. Five different primary products have been identified and characterized, which correspond to the five exothermic competing channels leading to H + CH(2)CHO, H + CH(3)CO, CH(3) + HCO, CH(2) + H(2)CO, and H(2) + CH(2)CO. These experiments extend our previous CMB work at higher collision energy (E(c) ∼ 13 kcal∕mol) and when the results are combined with the literature branching ratios from kinetics experiments at room temperature (E(c) ∼ 1 kcal∕mol), permit to explore the variation of the branching ratios over a wide range of collision energies. In a synergistic fashion, full-dimensional, QCT surface hopping calculations of the O((3)P) + C(2)H(4) reaction using ab initio PESs for the singlet and triplet states and their coupling, are reported at collision energies corresponding to the CMB and the kinetics ones. Both theory and experiment find almost an equal contribution from the triplet and singlet surfaces to the reaction, as seen from the collision energy dependence of branching ratios of product channels and extent of intersystem crossing (ISC). Further detailed comparisons at the level of angular distributions and translational energy distributions are made between theory and experiment for the three primary radical channel products, H + CH(2)CHO, CH(3) + HCO, and CH(2) + H(2)CO

  1. Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yuan; Son, Dam T; Stephanov, Mikhail A

    2015-07-10

    Using a covariant formalism, we construct a chiral kinetic theory Lorentz invariant to order O(ℏ), which includes collisions. We find a new contribution to the particle number current due to the side jumps required by the conservation of angular momentum during collisions. We also find a conserved symmetric stress-energy tensor as well as the H function obeying Boltzmann's H theorem. We demonstrate their use by finding a general equilibrium solution and the values of the anomalous transport coefficients characterizing the chiral vortical effect. PMID:26207458

  2. Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases Lecture: Electron and Photon Collisions with Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Philip G.

    2012-06-01

    After a brief historical introduction this talk will review the broad range of collision processes involving electron and photon collisions with atoms and molecules that are now being considered. Their application in the analysis of astronomical spectra, atmospheric observations and laboratory plasmas will be considered. The talk will review the R-matrix computational method which has been widely used by international collaborations and by other scientists in the field to obtain accurate scattering amplitudes and cross sections of importance in these applications. Results of some recent calculations of electron and photon collisions with atoms and molecules will be presented. In conclusion some challenges for future research will be briefly discussed.

  3. Simulation of dental collisions and occlusal dynamics in the virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Stavness, I K; Hannam, A G; Tobias, D L; Zhang, X

    2016-04-01

    Semi-adjustable articulators have often been used to simulate occlusal dynamics, but advances in intra-oral scanning and computer software now enable dynamics to be modelled mathematically. Computer simulation of occlusal dynamics requires accurate virtual casts, records to register them and methods to handle mesh collisions during movement. Here, physical casts in a semi-adjustable articulator were scanned with a conventional clinical intra-oral scanner. A coordinate measuring machine was used to index their positions in intercuspation, protrusion, right and left laterotrusion, and to model features of the articulator. Penetrations between the indexed meshes were identified and resolved using restitution forces, and the final registrations were verified by distance measurements between dental landmarks at multiple sites. These sites were confirmed as closely approximating via measure-ments made from homologous transilluminated vinylpolysiloxane interocclusal impressions in the mounted casts. Movements between the indexed positions were simulated with two models in a custom biomechanical software platform. In model DENTAL, 6 degree-of-freedom movements were made to minimise deviation from a straight line path and also shaped by dynamic mesh collisions detected and resolved mathematically. In model ARTIC, the paths were further constrained by surfaces matching the control settings of the articulator. Despite these differences, the lower mid-incisor point paths were very similar in both models. The study suggests that mathematical simulation utilising interocclusal 'bite' registrations can closely replicate the primary movements of casts mounted in a semi-adjustable articulator. Additional indexing positions and appropriate software could, in some situations, replace the need for mechanical semi-adjustable articulation and/or its virtual representation. PMID:26685912

  4. Cold collisions between boson or fermion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically investigate collisions between electrostatically trapped cold polar molecules and compare boson and fermion isotopes. Evaporative cooling seems possible for fermion molecules as the ratio of the collision loss cross section to the elastic collision cross section (R) gets smaller as the molecular temperature T lowers. With boson molecules, R gets larger as T lowers, which makes evaporative cooling difficult. The elastic collision cross section between fermion molecules can be larger than that for boson molecules with certain conditions.

  5. Electron-electron collisions at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Siegfried; Reyzl, Ingrid

    2001-07-01

    Electron-electron collisions at the future TESLA linear collider is a promising complement to e+e- collisions. A critical issue for the physics potential of this option is the achievable luminosity. For e+e- collisions, the pinch effect enhances the luminosity, while due to the repelling forces for e-e- collisions, the luminosity is significantly reduced and is more sensitive to beam separations. This report discusses the e-e- option for TESLA and the expected luminosity.

  6. Convergent Close-Coupling Approach to Electron-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Igor; Stelbovics, Andris

    2007-01-01

    It was with great pleasure and honour to accept the invitation to make a presentation at the symposium celebrating the life-long work of Aaron Temkin and Richard Drachman. The work of Aaron Temkin was particularly influential on our own during the development of the CCC method for electron-atom collisions. There are a number of key problems that need to be dealt with when developing a general computational approach to such collisions. Traditionally, the electron energy range was subdivided into the low, intermediate, and high energies. At the low energies only a finite number of channels are open and variational or close-coupling techniques could be used to obtain accurate results. At high energies an infinite number of discrete channels and the target continuum are open, but perturbative techniques are able to yield accurate results. However, at the intermediate energies perturbative techniques fail and computational approaches need to be found for treating the infinite number of open channels. In addition, there are also problems associated with the identical nature of electrons and the difficulty of implementing the boundary conditions for ionization processes. The beauty of the Temkin-Poet model of electron-hydrogen scattering is that it simplifies the full computational problem by neglecting any non-zero orbital angular momenta in the partial-wave expansion, without loosing the complexity associated with the above-mentioned problems. The unique nature of the problem allowed for accurate solution leading to benchmark results which could then be used to test the much more general approaches to electron-atom collision problems. The immense value of the Temkin-Poet model is readily summarised by the fact that the initial papers of Temkin and Poet have been collectively cited around 250 times to date and are still being cited in present times. Many of the citations came from our own work during the course of the development of the CCC method, which we now describe.

  7. Electron capture and fragmentation in Ar11+ + CO collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Wells, E.; Stöckli, M. P.; Tawara, H.; Carnes, K. D.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between 32.2, 130.5 and 570.5 keV Ar11+ ions and CO molecules have been studied using the Macdonald Laboratory CRYEBIS. Coincidence time of flight was used to detect all recoil ions originating from each molecule and a position sensitive detector was used to determine final projectile charge states. Single-and double-electron capture cross-sections are much larger than those for ionization at these collision energies. The dominant recoil channel associated with the Ar10+ final charge state is the CO+ molecular ion. The main ion-pair channel is the C+ + O+ dissociation of CO2+ while the relative yields of higher charge states of the transient COq+ fall off rapidly. The dissociated ions corresponding to charge states up to CO4+ were detected in coincidence with Ar10+ (and Ar9+), indicating that multielectron capture followed by autoionization occurs.

  8. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  9. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  10. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  11. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  12. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  13. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    DOEpatents

    Lembke, J.R.

    1989-04-18

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are doweled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector. 3 figs.

  14. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    DOEpatents

    Lembke, J.R.

    1988-03-15

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are dowelled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector. 3 figs.

  15. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    DOEpatents

    Lembke, John R.

    1989-04-18

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are dowelled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector.

  16. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  17. Theory of transfer reactions in peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rapisarda, A. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Corso Italia 57, I-95129 Catania, Italy ); Baldo, M. ); Broglia, R.A. The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark ); Winther, A. )

    1990-03-01

    The total absorption from the elastic channel due to transfer and inelastic processes in peripheral heavy-ion collisions at low bombarding energies is calculated in a microscopic coupled-channel approach. It is demonstrated for the first time that considering the depopulation of the entrance channel as an incoherent depopulation due to transfer processes is a good approximation. Using the corresponding absorptive potential within the framework of the Born approximation to calculate the transfer to individual channels, the results of full coupled-channels calculations are accurately reproduced.

  18. Multiparticle collision dynamics for diffusion-influenced signaling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehl, R.; Rohlf, K.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient yet accurate simulation method for modeling diffusion-influenced reaction networks is presented. The method extends existing reactive multiparticle collision dynamics by incorporating species-dependent diffusion coefficients, and developing theoretical expressions for the reactant-dependent diffusion control. This off-lattice particle-based mesoscopic simulation tool is particularly suited for problems in which detailed descriptions of particle trajectories and local reactions are required. Numerical simulations of an intracellular signaling pathway for bacterial chemotaxis are carried out to validate our approach, and to demonstrate its efficiency.

  19. Numerical parameter constraints for accurate PIC-DSMC simulation of breakdown from arc initiation to stable arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Hopkins, Matthew; Moore, Stan; Boerner, Jeremiah; Cartwright, Keith

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of breakdown is important for understanding and designing a variety of applications such as mitigating undesirable discharge events. Such simulations need to be accurate through early time arc initiation to late time stable arc behavior. Here we examine constraints on the timestep and mesh size required for arc simulations using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) collisions. Accurate simulation of electron avalanche across a fixed voltage drop and constant neutral density (reduced field of 1000 Td) was found to require a timestep ~ 1/100 of the mean time between collisions and a mesh size ~ 1/25 the mean free path. These constraints are much smaller than the typical PIC-DSMC requirements for timestep and mesh size. Both constraints are related to the fact that charged particles are accelerated by the external field. Thus gradients in the electron energy distribution function can exist at scales smaller than the mean free path and these must be resolved by the mesh size for accurate collision rates. Additionally, the timestep must be small enough that the particle energy change due to the fields be small in order to capture gradients in the cross sections versus energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  1. Probing GPDs in ultraperipheral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D.Yu.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wagner, J.

    2015-04-10

    Ultraperipheral collisions in hadron colliders give new opportunities to investigate the hadron structure through exclusive photoproduction processes. We describe the possibility of measuring the Generalized Parton Distributions in the Timelike Compton Scattering process and in the production of heavy vector meson.

  2. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.; Schuler, G.A.; Sridhar, K.

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies.

  3. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  4. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  5. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  6. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  7. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  8. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  9. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  10. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  11. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  12. Application of JAERI quantum molecular dynamics model for collisions of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji

    2016-06-01

    The quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) model incorporated into the general-purpose radiation transport code PHITS was revised for accurate prediction of fragment yields in peripheral collisions. For more accurate simulation of peripheral collisions, stability of the nuclei at their ground state was improved and the algorithm to reject invalid events was modified. In-medium correction on nucleon-nucleon cross sections was also considered. To clarify the effect of this improvement on fragmentation of heavy nuclei, the new QMD model coupled with a statistical decay model was used to calculate fragment production cross sections of Ag and Au targets and compared with the data of earlier measurement. It is shown that the revised version can predict cross section more accurately.

  13. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  14. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  15. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  16. Lightwave-driven quasiparticle collisions on a subcycle timescale.

    PubMed

    Langer, F; Hohenleutner, M; Schmid, C P; Poellmann, C; Nagler, P; Korn, T; Schüller, C; Sherwin, M S; Huttner, U; Steiner, J T; Koch, S W; Kira, M; Huber, R

    2016-05-12

    Ever since Ernest Rutherford scattered α-particles from gold foils, collision experiments have revealed insights into atoms, nuclei and elementary particles. In solids, many-body correlations lead to characteristic resonances--called quasiparticles--such as excitons, dropletons, polarons and Cooper pairs. The structure and dynamics of quasiparticles are important because they define macroscopic phenomena such as Mott insulating states, spontaneous spin- and charge-order, and high-temperature superconductivity. However, the extremely short lifetimes of these entities make practical implementations of a suitable collider challenging. Here we exploit lightwave-driven charge transport, the foundation of attosecond science, to explore ultrafast quasiparticle collisions directly in the time domain: a femtosecond optical pulse creates excitonic electron-hole pairs in the layered dichalcogenide tungsten diselenide while a strong terahertz field accelerates and collides the electrons with the holes. The underlying dynamics of the wave packets, including collision, pair annihilation, quantum interference and dephasing, are detected as light emission in high-order spectral sidebands of the optical excitation. A full quantum theory explains our observations microscopically. This approach enables collision experiments with various complex quasiparticles and suggests a promising new way of generating sub-femtosecond pulses. PMID:27172045

  17. Lightwave-driven quasiparticle collisions on a subcycle timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, F.; Hohenleutner, M.; Schmid, C. P.; Poellmann, C.; Nagler, P.; Korn, T.; Schüller, C.; Sherwin, M. S.; Huttner, U.; Steiner, J. T.; Koch, S. W.; Kira, M.; Huber, R.

    2016-05-01

    Ever since Ernest Rutherford scattered α-particles from gold foils, collision experiments have revealed insights into atoms, nuclei and elementary particles. In solids, many-body correlations lead to characteristic resonances—called quasiparticles—such as excitons, dropletons, polarons and Cooper pairs. The structure and dynamics of quasiparticles are important because they define macroscopic phenomena such as Mott insulating states, spontaneous spin- and charge-order, and high-temperature superconductivity. However, the extremely short lifetimes of these entities make practical implementations of a suitable collider challenging. Here we exploit lightwave-driven charge transport, the foundation of attosecond science, to explore ultrafast quasiparticle collisions directly in the time domain: a femtosecond optical pulse creates excitonic electron–hole pairs in the layered dichalcogenide tungsten diselenide while a strong terahertz field accelerates and collides the electrons with the holes. The underlying dynamics of the wave packets, including collision, pair annihilation, quantum interference and dephasing, are detected as light emission in high-order spectral sidebands of the optical excitation. A full quantum theory explains our observations microscopically. This approach enables collision experiments with various complex quasiparticles and suggests a promising new way of generating sub-femtosecond pulses.

  18. Defining the Collision Avoidance Region for DAA Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thipphavong, David; Cone, Andrew; Park, Chunki; Lee, Seung Man; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) will be required to equip with a detect-­-and-­-avoid (DAA) system in order to satisfy the federal aviation regulations to maintain well clear of other aircraft, some of which may be equipped with a Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) to mitigate the possibility of mid-­-air collisions. As such, the minimum operational performance standards (MOPS) for UAS DAA systems are being designed with TCAS interoperability in mind by a group of industry, government, and academic institutions named RTCA Special Committee-228 (SC-228). This document will discuss the development of the spatial-­-temporal volume known as the collision avoidance region in which the DAA system is not allowed to provide vertical guidance to maintain or regain DAA well clear that could conflict with resolution advisories (RAs) issued by the intruder aircraft's TCAS system. Three collision avoidance region definition candidates were developed based on the existing TCAS RA and DAA alerting definitions. They were evaluated against each other in terms of their interoperability with TCAS RAs and DAA alerts in an unmitigated factorial encounter analysis of 1.3 million simulated pairs.

  19. Accurate deterministic solutions for the classic Boltzmann shock profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yubei

    The Boltzmann equation or Boltzmann transport equation is a classical kinetic equation devised by Ludwig Boltzmann in 1872. It is regarded as a fundamental law in rarefied gas dynamics. Rather than using macroscopic quantities such as density, temperature, and pressure to describe the underlying physics, the Boltzmann equation uses a distribution function in phase space to describe the physical system, and all the macroscopic quantities are weighted averages of the distribution function. The information contained in the Boltzmann equation is surprisingly rich, and the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics can be derived from it using series expansions. Moreover, the Boltzmann equation can reach regimes far from the capabilities of fluid dynamical equations, such as the realm of rarefied gases---the topic of this thesis. Although the Boltzmann equation is very powerful, it is extremely difficult to solve in most situations. Thus the only hope is to solve it numerically. But soon one finds that even a numerical simulation of the equation is extremely difficult, due to both the complex and high-dimensional integral in the collision operator, and the hyperbolic phase-space advection terms. For this reason, until few years ago most numerical simulations had to rely on Monte Carlo techniques. In this thesis I will present a new and robust numerical scheme to compute direct deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation, and I will use it to explore some classical gas-dynamical problems. In particular, I will study in detail one of the most famous and intrinsically nonlinear problems in rarefied gas dynamics, namely the accurate determination of the Boltzmann shock profile for a gas of hard spheres.

  20. Simple and accurate optical height sensor for wafer inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Kei; Nakai, Naoya; Taniguchi, Koichi; Itoh, Masahide

    2016-02-01

    An accurate method for measuring the wafer surface height is required for wafer inspection systems to adjust the focus of inspection optics quickly and precisely. A method for projecting a laser spot onto the wafer surface obliquely and for detecting its image displacement using a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector is known, and a variety of methods have been proposed for improving the accuracy by compensating the measurement error due to the surface patterns. We have developed a simple and accurate method in which an image of a reticle with eight slits is projected on the wafer surface and its reflected image is detected using an image sensor. The surface height is calculated by averaging the coordinates of the images of the slits in both the two directions in the captured image. Pattern-related measurement error was reduced by applying the coordinates averaging to the multiple-slit-projection method. Accuracy of better than 0.35 μm was achieved for a patterned wafer at the reference height and ±0.1 mm from the reference height in a simple configuration.

  1. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A; van Duin, Adri C T; Zhu, Tong

    2014-12-21

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N2(Σg+1)-N2(Σg+1) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections. PMID:25527935

  2. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Neal Levin, Deborah A.; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Zhu, Tong

    2014-12-21

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N{sub 2}({sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +})-N{sub 2}({sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections.

  3. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  4. Reduction of discretization error for ray tracing of MOC through a correction on collision probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tabuchi, M.; Tatsumi, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Endo, T.

    2013-07-01

    A new correction model for ray tracing of the method of characteristics is proposed in order to reduce discretization error. As the ray tracing parameters such as azimuthal angle division, polar angle division and ray separation are considered in this study. In the method of characteristics, region average scalar fluxes can be implicitly expressed by collision probabilities, although these collision probabilities are not directly treated in the ordinary calculation scheme. From this viewpoint, difference between a coarse ray tracing condition and a detailed one can be interpreted as the difference in the estimation of collision probabilities. In other words, the discretization error for ray tracing can be recognized as a consequence of inaccurate collision probabilities caused by coarse ray tracing. This discussion suggests that accurate region average scalar flux can be obtained through an appropriate correction on collision probabilities. In this paper, a correction model on collision probabilities is theoretically derived based on the neutron balance equation, and its validity is confirmed through typical single assembly calculations. The effectiveness of the present correction method is also discussed in this paper. It is confirmed that discretization error for ray tracing can be significantly reduced by the present correction method in a multi-assembly calculation, though the correction factor is estimated in single assembly geometry. (authors)

  5. Simulation of binary droplet collisions with the entropic lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloomi Moqaddam, Ali; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya V.

    2016-02-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann method (ELBM) for multiphase flows is extended here to simulation of droplet collisions. Thermodynamically consistent, non-linearly stable ELBM together with a novel polynomial equation of state is proposed for simulation large Weber and Reynolds number collisions of two droplets. Extensive numerical investigations show that ELBM is capable of accurately capturing the dynamics and complexity of droplet collision. Different types of the collision outcomes such as coalescence, reflexive separation, and stretching separation are identified. Partition of the parameter plane is compared to the experiments and excellent agreement is observed. Moreover, the evolution of the shape of a stable lamella film is quantitatively compared with experimental results. The end pinching and the capillary-wave instability are shown to be the main mechanisms behind formation of satellite droplets for near head-on and off-center collisions with high impact parameter, respectively. It is shown that the number of satellite drops increases with increasing Weber number, as predicted by experiments. Also, it is demonstrated that the rotational motion due to angular momentum and elongation of the merged droplet play essential roles in formation of satellite droplets in off-center collisions with an intermediate impact parameter.

  6. Inclusive jet production in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepelitsa, Dennis V.

    High-pT processes in proton- and deuteron-nucleus collisions at TeV energies are the best presently available way to study the partonic structure of the nucleus in a high-density regime. Jet production over a wide range of phase space can significantly constrain the current knowledge of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs), which are substantially less well understood than the corresponding PDFs in protons and which have only recently begun to be treated in a spatially-dependent way. An accurate knowledge of nPDFs is crucial for a definitive control of perturbative processes in a cold nuclear environment, since high-pT probes are used to quantitatively investigate the hot QCD matter created in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Furthermore, jets from low Bjorken-x partons can probe the transition from the dilute to saturated nuclear regimes. Jet production is investigated in d+Au collisions at √s = 200 GeV with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and in p+Pb collisions at √s = 5.02 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The measurements shown here utilize ∫Ldt = 23 nb-1 and 0.2 pb-1 of 200 GeV d+Au and pp data, respectively, recorded in 2007-8 at RHIC and ∫Ldt = 31 nb -1 and 4.1 pb-1 of 5.02 TeV p+Pb and 2.76 TeV pp data, respectively, recorded in 2013 at the LHC. Jets are reconstructed using the sigma=0.3 Gaussian filter and R=0.4, 0.6 anti-kT algorithms. Inclusive, centrality-dependent jet yields within |eta| < 0.35 and 10 GeV < p T < 40 GeV in 200 GeV d+Au and pp collisions are presented. The jet yield in d+Au collisions relative to the geometric expectation is found to be slightly suppressed (≍0.9) in central events and moderately enhanced (≍1.3) in peripheral events, with no modification when averaged over all d+Au events. Separately, inclusive, centrality-dependent jet yields within |y *| < 4.4 and 25 GeV < pT < 800 GeV in 5.02 TeV p+Pb and 2.76 TeV pp collisions are

  7. A review of the kinetic detail required for accurate predictions of normal shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntz, E. P.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Pham-Van-diep, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    Several aspects of the kinetic models used in the collision phase of Monte Carlo direct simulations have been studied. Accurate molecular velocity distribution function predictions require a significantly increased number of computational cells in one maximum slope shock thickness, compared to predictions of macroscopic properties. The shape of the highly repulsive portion of the interatomic potential for argon is not well modeled by conventional interatomic potentials; this portion of the potential controls high Mach number shock thickness predictions, indicating that the specification of the energetic repulsive portion of interatomic or intermolecular potentials must be chosen with care for correct modeling of nonequilibrium flows at high temperatures. It has been shown for inverse power potentials that the assumption of variable hard sphere scattering provides accurate predictions of the macroscopic properties in shock waves, by comparison with simulations in which differential scattering is employed in the collision phase. On the other hand, velocity distribution functions are not well predicted by the variable hard sphere scattering model for softer potentials at higher Mach numbers.

  8. Non-Parametric Collision Probability for Low-Velocity Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    2007-01-01

    An implicit, but not necessarily obvious, assumption in all of the current techniques for assessing satellite collision probability is that the relative position uncertainty is perfectly correlated in time. If there is any mis-modeling of the dynamics in the propagation of the relative position error covariance matrix, time-wise de-correlation of the uncertainty will increase the probability of collision over a given time interval. The paper gives some examples that illustrate this point. This paper argues that, for the present, Monte Carlo analysis is the best available tool for handling low-velocity encounters, and suggests some techniques for addressing the issues just described. One proposal is for the use of a non-parametric technique that is widely used in actuarial and medical studies. The other suggestion is that accurate process noise models be used in the Monte Carlo trials to which the non-parametric estimate is applied. A further contribution of this paper is a description of how the time-wise decorrelation of uncertainty increases the probability of collision.

  9. Toward accurate and fast iris segmentation for iris biometrics.

    PubMed

    He, Zhaofeng; Tan, Tieniu; Sun, Zhenan; Qiu, Xianchao

    2009-09-01

    Iris segmentation is an essential module in iris recognition because it defines the effective image region used for subsequent processing such as feature extraction. Traditional iris segmentation methods often involve an exhaustive search of a large parameter space, which is time consuming and sensitive to noise. To address these problems, this paper presents a novel algorithm for accurate and fast iris segmentation. After efficient reflection removal, an Adaboost-cascade iris detector is first built to extract a rough position of the iris center. Edge points of iris boundaries are then detected, and an elastic model named pulling and pushing is established. Under this model, the center and radius of the circular iris boundaries are iteratively refined in a way driven by the restoring forces of Hooke's law. Furthermore, a smoothing spline-based edge fitting scheme is presented to deal with noncircular iris boundaries. After that, eyelids are localized via edge detection followed by curve fitting. The novelty here is the adoption of a rank filter for noise elimination and a histogram filter for tackling the shape irregularity of eyelids. Finally, eyelashes and shadows are detected via a learned prediction model. This model provides an adaptive threshold for eyelash and shadow detection by analyzing the intensity distributions of different iris regions. Experimental results on three challenging iris image databases demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art methods in both accuracy and speed. PMID:19574626

  10. Electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Accurately modeling electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid (TGLF) equations has been a major challenge. Insights gained from numerically solving the gyrokinetic equation have lead to a significant improvement of the low order TGLF model. The theoretical motivation and verification of this model with the velocity-space gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] will be presented. The improvement in the fidelity of TGLF to GYRO is shown to also lead to better prediction of experimental temperature profiles by TGLF for a dedicated collision frequency scan.

  11. Electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.

    2010-12-15

    Accurately modeling electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid (TGLF) equations has been a major challenge. Insights gained from numerically solving the gyrokinetic equation have lead to a significant improvement of the low order TGLF model. The theoretical motivation and verification of this model with the velocity-space gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] will be presented. The improvement in the fidelity of TGLF to GYRO is shown to also lead to better prediction of experimental temperature profiles by TGLF for a dedicated collision frequency scan.

  12. Speed-dependent collision effects on radar back-scattering from the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theimer, O.

    1981-01-01

    A computer code to accurately compute the fluctuation spectrum for linearly speed dependent collision frequencies was developed. The effect of ignoring the speed dependence on the estimates of ionospheric parameters was determined. It is shown that disagreements between the rocket and the incoherent scatter estimates could be partially resolved if the correct speed dependence of the i-n collision frequency is not ignored. This problem is also relevant to the study of ionospheric irregularities in the auroral E-region and their effects on the radio communication with satellites.

  13. Quantum mechanical algebraic variational methods for inelastic and reactive molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Haug, Kenneth; Zhao, Meishan; Truhlar, Donald G.; Sun, Yan

    1988-01-01

    The quantum mechanical problem of reactive or nonreactive scattering of atoms and molecules is formulated in terms of square-integrable basis sets with variational expressions for the reactance matrix. Several formulations involving expansions of the wave function (the Schwinger variational principle) or amplitude density (a generalization of the Newton variational principle), single-channel or multichannel distortion potentials, and primitive or contracted basis functions are presented and tested. The test results, for inelastic and reactive atom-diatom collisions, suggest that the methods may be useful for a variety of collision calculations and may allow the accurate quantal treatment of systems for which other available methods would be prohibitively expensive.

  14. Determination of Energy-Transfer Distributions in Ionizing Ion-Molecule Collisions.

    PubMed

    Maclot, S; Delaunay, R; Piekarski, D G; Domaracka, A; Huber, B A; Adoui, L; Martín, F; Alcamí, M; Avaldi, L; Bolognesi, P; Díaz-Tendero, S; Rousseau, P

    2016-08-12

    The ionization and fragmentation of the nucleoside thymidine in the gas phase has been investigated by combining ion collision with state-selected photoionization experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. The comparison between the mass spectra measured in both types of experiments allows us to accurately determine the distribution of the energy deposited in the ionized molecule as a result of the collision. The relation of two experimental techniques and theory shows a strong correlation between the excited states of the ionized molecule with the computed dissociation pathways, as well as with charge localization or delocalization. PMID:27563959

  15. Determination of Energy-Transfer Distributions in Ionizing Ion-Molecule Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Piekarski, D. G.; Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A.; Adoui, L.; Martín, F.; Alcamí, M.; Avaldi, L.; Bolognesi, P.; Díaz-Tendero, S.; Rousseau, P.

    2016-08-01

    The ionization and fragmentation of the nucleoside thymidine in the gas phase has been investigated by combining ion collision with state-selected photoionization experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. The comparison between the mass spectra measured in both types of experiments allows us to accurately determine the distribution of the energy deposited in the ionized molecule as a result of the collision. The relation of two experimental techniques and theory shows a strong correlation between the excited states of the ionized molecule with the computed dissociation pathways, as well as with charge localization or delocalization.

  16. Application of exterior complex scaling to positron-hydrogen collisions including rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2008-03-01

    The application of an exterior complex scaling method to an atomic scattering problem with distinct rearrangement channels is reported. Calculations are performed for positron-hydrogen collisions in an s -wave model employing an electron-positron potential of V12=-[8+(r1-r2)2]-1/2 , using the time-independent propagating exterior complex scaling method. This potential has the correct long-range Coulomb tail of the full problem and the results demonstrate that exterior-complex-scaling-based methods can accurately calculate scattering, ionization,and positronium formation cross sections in this three-body rearrangement collision.

  17. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-06-28

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society. PMID:27317740

  18. Results from Cu+Au collisions at 200 GeV in PHENIX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, Ya. A.; Ivanishchev, D. A.; Kotov, D. O.; Riabov, V. G.; Riabov, Yu. G.; Samsonov, V. M.; Safonov, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Collisions of asymmetric nuclei (Cu+Au) differ essentially from the case of symmetric nuclei (Cu+Cu, Au+Au) collisions in the geometry of overlap region. This leads to a number of consequences, which provide more absolute and accurate information about fundamental properties of matter under extreme conditions. Nuclear modification factors for π-mesons in Cu+Au interactions at 200 GeV were measured in PHENIX Experiment at RHIC. New experimental data on measurement of flows of different order (v1, v2) for light hadrons in Cu+Au interactions at 200 GeV will be discussed in this paper.

  19. Shoemaker-Levy 9/JUPITER Collision Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    There are many signs that the upcoming collision between comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and giant planet Jupiter is beginning to catch the imagination of the public. Numerous reports in the various media describe the effects expected during this unique event which according to the latest calculations will start in the evening of July 16 and end in the morning of July 22, 1994. (The times in this Press Release are given in Central European Summer Time (CEST), i.e., Universal Time (UT) + 2 hours. The corresponding local time in Chile is CEST - 6 hours.) Astronomers all over the world are now preparing to observe the associated phenomena with virtually all major telescopes. There will be no less than 12 different investigations at the ESO La Silla observatory during this period. This Press Release updates the information published in ESO PR 02/94 (27 January 1994) and provides details about the special services which will be provided by ESO to the media around this rare astronomical event. SCIENTIFIC EXPECTATIONS The nucleus of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 broke into many smaller pieces during a near passage of Jupiter in July 1992. They are now moving in parallel orbits around this planet and recent calculations show with close to 100 % certainty that they will all collide with it, just two months from now. At some time, more than 20 individual nuclei were observed. This Press Release is accompanied by a photo that shows this formation, the famous "string of pearls", as it looked like in early May 1994. Both Jupiter and these nuclei have been extensively observed during the past months. A large, coordinated observing programme at La Silla has been active since early April and the first results have become available. However, while we now possess more accurate information about the comet's motion and the times of impact, there is still great uncertainty about the effects which may actually be observed at the time of the impacts. This is first of all due to the fact that it has not

  20. Monitoring Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions in the Information Age: How Smartphones Can Improve Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Daniel D.; Bissonette, John A.; Cramer, Patricia C.; Green, Ashley D.; Davis, Scott T.; Jackson, Patrick J.; Coster, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently there is a critical need for accurate and standardized wildlife-vehicle collision data, because it is the underpinning of mitigation projects that protect both drivers and wildlife. Gathering data can be challenging because wildlife-vehicle collisions occur over broad areas, during all seasons of the year, and in large numbers. Collecting data of this magnitude requires an efficient data collection system. Presently there is no widely adopted system that is both efficient and accurate. Methodology/Principal Findings Our objective was to develop and test an integrated smartphone-based system for reporting wildlife-vehicle collision data. The WVC Reporter system we developed consisted of a mobile web application for data collection, a database for centralized storage of data, and a desktop web application for viewing data. The smartphones that we tested for use with the application produced accurate locations (median error = 4.6–5.2 m), and reduced location error 99% versus reporting only the highway/marker. Additionally, mean times for data entry using the mobile web application (22.0–26.5 s) were substantially shorter than using the pen/paper method (52 s). We also found the pen/paper method had a data entry error rate of 10% and those errors were virtually eliminated using the mobile web application. During the first year of use, 6,822 animal carcasses were reported using WVC Reporter. The desktop web application improved access to WVC data and allowed users to easily visualize wildlife-vehicle collision patterns at multiple scales. Conclusions/Significance The WVC Reporter integrated several modern technologies into a seamless method for collecting, managing, and using WVC data. As a result, the system increased efficiency in reporting, improved accuracy, and enhanced visualization of data. The development costs for the system were minor relative to the potential benefits of having spatially accurate and temporally current wildlife

  1. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  2. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  3. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  4. Are Kohn-Sham conductances accurate?

    PubMed

    Mera, H; Niquet, Y M

    2010-11-19

    We use Fermi-liquid relations to address the accuracy of conductances calculated from the single-particle states of exact Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory. We demonstrate a systematic failure of this procedure for the calculation of the conductance, and show how it originates from the lack of renormalization in the KS spectral function. In certain limits this failure can lead to a large overestimation of the true conductance. We also show, however, that the KS conductances can be accurate for single-channel molecular junctions and systems where direct Coulomb interactions are strongly dominant. PMID:21231333

  5. Accurate density functional thermochemistry for larger molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-06-20

    Density functional methods are combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. Seven different density functionals are assessed for the evaluation of heats of formation, Delta H 0 (298 K), for a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O and N. The use of bond separation energies results in a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of all the density functionals. The B3-LYP functional has the smallest mean absolute deviation from experiment (1.5 kcal mol/f).

  6. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  7. Analysis of diffusion-controlled stochastic events of iridium oxide single nanoparticle collisions by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seong Jung; Bard, Allen J

    2012-04-25

    We investigated the electrochemical detection of single iridium oxide nanoparticle (IrO(x) NP) collisions at the NaBH(4)-treated Pt ultramicroelectrode (UME) in a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) over an insulating surface. The NP collision events were monitored by observing the electrocatalytic water oxidation reaction at potentials where it does not take place on the Pt UME. These collisions occurred stochastically, resulting in a transient response ("blip") for each collision. The frequency of the collisions is proportional to the flux of NPs to the UME tip, and thus equivalent to the SECM current. A plot of collision frequency versus distance followed the theoretical approach curve behavior for negative feedback for a high concentration of mediator, demonstrating that the collisions were diffusion-controlled and that single-particle measurements of mass transport are equivalent to ensemble ones. When the SECM was operated with a Pt substrate at the same potential as the tip, the behavior followed that expected of the shielding mode. These studies and additional ones result in a model where the IrO(x) NP collision on the Pt UME is adsorptive, with oxygen produced by the catalyzed water oxidation causing a current decay. This results in a blip current response, with the current decay diminished in the presence of the oxygen scavenger, sulfite ion. Random walk and theoretical bulk simulations agreed with the proposed mechanism of IrO(x) NP collision, adsorption, and subsequent deactivation. PMID:22452267

  8. Complex correspondence between families and collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, A.; Knežević, Z.; Spoto, F.

    2015-10-01

    Asteroid families are identified as statistically significant concentrations of asteroids in the space of proper elements. The purpose of family classifications is meant to be the identification of the largest collisional events occurred during the history of the asteroid main belt. However, are the families as found in 1-1 correspondence with ancient collisional events? A recent analysis of larger classifications, based on larger and more accurate datasets of proper elements, indicates that this is not the case. There are multiple cratering events on the same parent body. There are collisional families split into two by the YORP effect. There are subfamilies arising fromsecondary collisions after the one forming a larger family, and this is not limited to recent events. There are families overlapping in proper elements space but with composition incompatible with a common parent body. There are cases not yet understood, but pointing to a complex collisional history. In total at least 10 cases of complex correpondence between families and collisional events have been identified, more are suspected but not yet supported by enough evidence. Finally, some information can be obtained even from the absence of a family, as in the case of Ceres. The disentagling of these complex collisional histories is an essential step towards the understanding of the asteroid collisional evolution.

  9. Feathering collisions in beating reed simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Tamara; Abel, Jonathan S.; Smith, Julius O.

    2003-10-01

    Pressure controlled valves are the primary sound production mechanisms for woodwind and brass musical instruments, as well as for many bioacoustic vocal systems such as the larynx and syrinx (the vocal organ in birds). During sound production, air flow sets a reed or membrane into motion creating a variable height in the valve channel and, potentially, periodically closing the channel completely. Depending on how this event is handled, an abrupt termination of air flow between open and closed states can cause undesirable discontinuities and inaccuracies in a discrete-time simulation-particularly at relatively low audio sampling rates. A solution was developed by re-examining the behavior of the differential equation governing volume flow through a pressure-controlled valve, paying particular attention to this rather troublesome transition. A closed-form solution for the time evolution of volume flow is given and used to derive an update for volume flow. The result is a smoother, more accurate, and nearly alias-free transition from open to closed. ``Feathered collisions'' of this nature can refine the sound quality produced by the numerical simulation of beating reeds, such as in clarinets, at typical audio sampling rates.

  10. Improved molecular collision models for nonequilibrium rarefied gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Neal

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used to model thermochemical nonequilibrium rarefied gases requires accurate total collision cross sections, reaction probabilities, and molecular internal energy exchange models. However, the baseline total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, reaction probabilities are defined such that experimentally determined equilibrium reaction rates are replicated, and internal energy relaxation models are phenomenological in nature. Therefore, these models have questionable validity in modeling strongly nonequilibrium gases with temperatures greater than those possible in experimental test facilities. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method can be used to accurately compute total collision cross sections, reaction probabilities, and internal energy exchange models based on first principles for hypervelocity collision conditions. In this thesis, MD/QCT-based models were used to improve simulations of two unique nonequilibrium rarefied gas systems: the Ionian atmosphere and hypersonic shocks in Earth's atmosphere. The Jovian plasma torus flows over Io at ≈ 57 km/s, inducing high-speed collisions between atmospheric SO2 and the hypervelocity plasma's O atoms and ions. The DSMC method is well-suited to model the rarefied atmosphere, so MD/QCT studies are therefore conducted to improve DSMC collision models of the critical SO2-O collision pair. The MD/QCT trajectory simulations employed a new potential energy surface that was developed using a ReaxFF fit to a set of ab initio calculations. Compared to the MD/QCT results, the baseline DSMC models are found to significantly under-predict total cross sections, use reaction probabilities that are unrealistically high, and give unphysical internal energies above the dissociation energy for non-reacting inelastic collisions and under-predicts post

  11. Electron transfer and bond-forming reactions following collisions of I2+ with CO and CS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, James D.; Parkes, Michael A.; Price, Stephen D.

    2015-08-01

    Collisions between I2+ and CO have been investigated using time-of-flight mass spectrometry at a range of centre-of-mass collision energies between 0.5 and 3.0 eV. Following I2++CO collisions, we detect I++CO+ from a single-electron transfer reaction and IO++C+ from bond-forming reactivity. Reaction-window calculations, based on Landau-Zener theory, have been used to rationalise the electron transfer reactivity and computational chemistry has been used to explore the [I-CO]2+ potential energy surface to account for the observation of IO+. In addition, collisions between I2+ and CS2 have been investigated over a range of centre-of-mass collision energies between 0.8 and 6.0 eV. Both single- and double-electron transfer reactions are observed in the I2+/CS2 collision system, an observation again rationalised by reaction-window theory. The monocations IS+ and IC+ are also detected following collisions of I2+ with CS2, and these ions are clearly products from a bond-forming reaction. We present a simple model based on the structure of the [I-CS2]2+ collision complex to rationalise the significantly larger yield of IS+ than IC+ in this bond-forming process.

  12. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  13. Accurate radiative transfer calculations for layered media.

    PubMed

    Selden, Adrian C

    2016-07-01

    Simple yet accurate results for radiative transfer in layered media with discontinuous refractive index are obtained by the method of K-integrals. These are certain weighted integrals applied to the angular intensity distribution at the refracting boundaries. The radiative intensity is expressed as the sum of the asymptotic angular intensity distribution valid in the depth of the scattering medium and a transient term valid near the boundary. Integrated boundary equations are obtained, yielding simple linear equations for the intensity coefficients, enabling the angular emission intensity and the diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of the scattering layer to be calculated without solving the radiative transfer equation directly. Examples are given of half-space, slab, interface, and double-layer calculations, and extensions to multilayer systems are indicated. The K-integral method is orders of magnitude more accurate than diffusion theory and can be applied to layered scattering media with a wide range of scattering albedos, with potential applications to biomedical and ocean optics. PMID:27409700

  14. Fast and accurate propagation of coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R. D.; Beylkin, G.; Monzón, L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a fast algorithm to propagate, for any user-specified accuracy, a time-harmonic electromagnetic field between two parallel planes separated by a linear, isotropic and homogeneous medium. The analytical formulation of this problem (ca 1897) requires the evaluation of the so-called Rayleigh–Sommerfeld integral. If the distance between the planes is small, this integral can be accurately evaluated in the Fourier domain; if the distance is very large, it can be accurately approximated by asymptotic methods. In the large intermediate region of practical interest, where the oscillatory Rayleigh–Sommerfeld kernel must be applied directly, current numerical methods can be highly inaccurate without indicating this fact to the user. In our approach, for any user-specified accuracy ϵ>0, we approximate the kernel by a short sum of Gaussians with complex-valued exponents, and then efficiently apply the result to the input data using the unequally spaced fast Fourier transform. The resulting algorithm has computational complexity , where we evaluate the solution on an N×N grid of output points given an M×M grid of input samples. Our algorithm maintains its accuracy throughout the computational domain. PMID:24204184

  15. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  16. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  17. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  18. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  19. Grazing Ion-Surface Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.

    Electron emission after grazing ion-surface collisions is studied for high impact velocities. We have focused on glancing angles of electron emission where the dominant mechanism is the ionization from atomic bound states. To describe this process, we introduce a quantum model called field distorted-wave (FDW) approximation, which takes into account the effect of the surface interaction on the electronic transition. The FDW model is applied to analyze electron distributions produced by impact of protons on Al and LiF surfaces, which are metal and insulator materials respectively. In the case of metals, we also evaluate the contibution coming from the valence band by employing the binary collisional formalism. Calculated electron emission yields are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. We find that the maximum of the convoy electron distribution is accelerated for Al and decelerated for LiF, with respect to its position in ion-atom collisions, in quantitative accordance with experiments.

  20. COLLIDE: Collisions into Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    1999-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) was completed and flew on STS-90 in April and May of 1998. After the experiment was returned to Earth, the data and experiment were analyzed. Some anomalies occurred during the flight which prevented a complete set of data from being obtained. However, the experiment did meet its criteria for scientific success and returned surprising results on the outcomes of very low energy collisions into powder. The attached publication, "Low Velocity Microgravity Impact Experiments into Simulated Regolith," describes in detail the scientific background, engineering, and scientific results of COLLIDE. Our scientific conclusions, along with a summary of the anomalies which occurred during flight, are contained in that publication. We offer it as our final report on this grant.

  1. Collision strengths for the intercombination lines of S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The collision strengths of intercombination lines of S III ions observed in the Io torus are calculated on the basis of data gathered by Voyager instruments, the IUE and the Faint Object Telescope. The doubly ionized ions are excited by electron impacts and move from the 3P2P(3) ground state to excited 3s3P3(1)PO, (1)DO, 3p3d(1)PO, and 3p4s(1)PO states. Excitational cross sections are calculated with a two-state close-coupling approximation for the energy range up to 1,000,000 K, with target states being represented by multiconfiguration interaction wave functions. The close-coupling approximation regarded as an accurate technique because of the dominance of the Coulomb factor in the ionized state. The wave function calculations are estimated to yield values accurate to within 30 percent. Further work is need to quantify the magnitude of error introduced by resonance contributions to the collision strengths.

  2. Status of recent developments in collision avoidance using motion detectors based on insect vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Derek; Moini, Alireza; Yakovleff, Andre; Nguyen, X. Thong; Beare, R.; Kim, W.; Bouzerdoum, Abdesselam; Bogner, Robert E.; Eshraghian, Kamran

    1997-02-01

    Insects tend to detect motion rather than images and this together with inherent parallelism in their visual architecture, leads to an efficient and compact means of collision avoidance. A VLSI implementation of a smart microsensor that mimics the early visual processing stage in insects has been developed. The system employs the `smart sensor' paradigm in that the detectors and processing circuitry are integrated on one chip. The IC is ideal for motion detectors, particularly collision avoidance tasks, as it essentially detects the speed, bearing and time-to-impact of a moving object. The Horridge model for insect vision has been directly mapped into VLSI and therefore the IC truly exploits the beauty of nature in that the insect eye is so compact with parallel processing, enabling compact motion detection without the computational overhead of intensive imaging, full image extraction and interpretation. This world-first has exciting applications in areas such as anti- collision for automobiles and autonomous robots.

  3. Observation of Single Pt Nanoparticle Collisions: Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity on a Pd Ultramicroelectrode.

    PubMed

    Shin, Changhwan; Park, Tae Eun; Park, Changki; Kwon, Seong Jung

    2016-06-01

    Single Pt nanoparticle (NP) collisions on an electrode surface were detected by using an electrocatalytic amplification method with a Pd ultramicroelectrode (UME). Pd is not a preferred material for UMEs for the detection of single Pt NP collisions, because Pd shows similar electrocatalytic activity compared with Pt for hydrazine oxidation, thus resulting in a high background current level. However, a Pt NP colliding on the Pd UME shows greatly enhanced activity compared with a Pt NP on an inert UME, such as a Au UME, which is usually used for the detection of single Pt NP collisions. The use of an electroactive UME material instead of an inert one facilitated the study of single-NP activity on the various solid supports, which is important in many NP applications. PMID:26955784

  4. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  5. QCD studies in ep collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  6. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  7. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  8. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  9. The thermodynamic cost of accurate sensory adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yuhai

    2015-03-01

    Living organisms need to obtain and process environment information accurately in order to make decisions critical for their survival. Much progress have been made in identifying key components responsible for various biological functions, however, major challenges remain to understand system-level behaviors from the molecular-level knowledge of biology and to unravel possible physical principles for the underlying biochemical circuits. In this talk, we will present some recent works in understanding the chemical sensory system of E. coli by combining theoretical approaches with quantitative experiments. We focus on addressing the questions on how cells process chemical information and adapt to varying environment, and what are the thermodynamic limits of key regulatory functions, such as adaptation.

  10. Accurate numerical solutions of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Nasir Uddin, Khan; Nadeem Alam, Khan

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an investigation to analyze the vibration of a conservative nonlinear oscillator in the form u" + lambda u + u^(2n-1) + (1 + epsilon^2 u^(4m))^(1/2) = 0 for any arbitrary power of n and m. This method converts the differential equation to sets of algebraic equations and solve numerically. We have presented for three different cases: a higher order Duffing equation, an equation with irrational restoring force and a plasma physics equation. It is also found that the method is valid for any arbitrary order of n and m. Comparisons have been made with the results found in the literature the method gives accurate results.

  11. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  12. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  13. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  14. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  15. Stability and Degradation of Caffeoylquinic Acids under Different Storage Conditions Studied by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photo Diode Array Detection and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Electrospray Ionization Collision-Induced Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meng; Shi, Hang; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Qing-Quan; Guan, Jun; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Ma, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) are main constituents in many herbal medicines with various biological and pharmacological effects. However, CQAs will degrade or isomerize when affected by temperature, pH, light, etc. In this study, high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-PDA) and high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was utilized to study the stability and degradation of CQAs (three mono-acyl CQAs and four di-acyl CQAs) under various ordinary storage conditions (involving different temperatures, solvents, and light irradiation). The results indicated that the stability of CQAs was mainly affected by temperature and light irradiation, while solvents did not affect it in any obvious way under the conditions studied. Mono-acyl CQAs were generally much more stable than di-acyl CQAs under the same conditions. Meanwhile, the chemical structures of 30 degradation products were also characterized by HPLC-MS(n), inferring that isomerization, methylation, and hydrolysis were three major degradation pathways. The result provides a meaningful clue for the storage conditions of CQAs standard substances and samples. PMID:27455213

  16. Avian collision risk at an offshore wind farm

    PubMed Central

    Desholm, Mark; Kahlert, Johnny

    2005-01-01

    We have been the first to investigate whether long-lived geese and ducks can detect and avoid a large offshore wind farm by tracking their diurnal migration patterns with radar. We found that the percentage of flocks entering the wind farm area decreased significantly (by a factor 4.5) from pre-construction to initial operation. At night, migrating flocks were more prone to enter the wind farm but counteracted the higher risk of collision in the dark by increasing their distance from individual turbines and flying in the corridors between turbines. Overall, less than 1% of the ducks and geese migrated close enough to the turbines to be at any risk of collision. PMID:17148191

  17. Avian collision risk at an offshore wind farm.

    PubMed

    Desholm, Mark; Kahlert, Johnny

    2005-09-22

    We have been the first to investigate whether long-lived geese and ducks can detect and avoid a large offshore wind farm by tracking their diurnal migration patterns with radar. We found that the percentage of flocks entering the wind farm area decreased significantly (by a factor 4.5) from pre-construction to initial operation. At night, migrating flocks were more prone to enter the wind farm but counteracted the higher risk of collision in the dark by increasing their distance from individual turbines and flying in the corridors between turbines. Overall, less than 1% of the ducks and geese migrated close enough to the turbines to be at any risk of collision. PMID:17148191

  18. A real-time robot arm collision avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Clifford A.; Herb, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    A data structure and update algorithm are presented for a prototype real-time collision avoidance safety system simulating a multirobot workspace. The data structure is a variant of the octree, which serves as a spatial index. An octree recursively decomposes 3D space into eight equal cubic octants until each octant meets some decomposition criteria. The N-objects octree, which indexes a collection of 3D primitive solids is used. These primitives make up the two (seven-degrees-of-freedom) robot arms and workspace modeled by the system. As robot arms move, the octree is updated to reflect their changed positions. During most update cycles, any given primitive does not change which octree nodes it is in. Thus, modification to the octree is rarely required. Cycle time for interpreting current arm joint angles, updating the octree to reflect new positions, and detecting/reporting imminent collisions averages 30 ms on an Intel 80386 processor running at 20 MHz.

  19. D0 Detector Collision Hall Oxygen Deficiancy Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1992-08-06

    EN-258, D0 Platform ODH Analysts. provided the oxygen deficiency hazard analysts for the D0 detector in the Assembly Hall. This note covers the same analysis. but revised for the Collision Hall. Liquid cryogens. released and warming to atmosphere conditions, expand to, on average, seven hundred times their liquid volume, and displace vital atmospheric oxygen. An oxygen deficiency hazard analysis assesses the increased risk to personnel in areas containing cryogenic systems. The D0 detector Collision Hall ODH analysis has been approached five different ways using established methods. If the low beta quad magnets are powered, and the exhaust rate is below 4220 scfm, the area is ODH class 1. In any other case, the analysis shows the area to be ODH class 0 as equipped (with ventilation fans) and requiring no special safety provisions. System designers have provided for a reduced oxygen level detection and warning system as well as emergency procedures to address fault conditions.

  20. Border collisions inside the stability domain of a fixed point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrutin, Viktor; Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai T.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies on a power electronic DC/AC converter (inverter) have demonstrated that such systems may undergo a transition from regular dynamics (associated with a globally attracting fixed point of a suitable stroboscopic map) to chaos through an irregular sequence of border-collision events. Chaotic dynamics of an inverter is not suitable for practical purposes. However, the parameter domain in which the stroboscopic map has a globally attracting fixed point has generally been considered to be uniform and suitable for practical use. In the present paper we show that this domain actually has a complicated interior structure formed by boundaries defined by persistence border collisions. We describe a simple approach that is based on symbolic dynamics and makes it possible to detect such boundaries numerically. Using this approach we describe several regions in the parameter space leading to qualitatively different output signals of the inverter although all associated with globally attracting fixed points of the corresponding stroboscopic map.

  1. Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Spacecraft Collision Avoidance Maneuver Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses sequential probability ratio tests that explicitly allow decision-makers to incorporate false alarm and missed detection risks, and are potentially less sensitive to modeling errors than a procedure that relies solely on a probability of collision threshold. Recent work on constrained Kalman filtering has suggested an approach to formulating such a test for collision avoidance maneuver decisions: a filter bank with two norm-inequality-constrained epoch-state extended Kalman filters. One filter models the null hypotheses that the miss distance is inside the combined hard body radius at the predicted time of closest approach, and one filter models the alternative hypothesis. The epoch-state filter developed for this method explicitly accounts for any process noise present in the system. The method appears to work well using a realistic example based on an upcoming, highly elliptical orbit formation flying mission.

  2. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  3. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities. PMID:12747164

  4. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  5. A Fast and Accurate Unconstrained Face Detector.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengcai; Jain, Anil K; Li, Stan Z

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method to address challenges in unconstrained face detection, such as arbitrary pose variations and occlusions. First, a new image feature called Normalized Pixel Difference (NPD) is proposed. NPD feature is computed as the difference to sum ratio between two pixel values, inspired by the Weber Fraction in experimental psychology. The new feature is scale invariant, bounded, and is able to reconstruct the original image. Second, we propose a deep quadratic tree to learn the optimal subset of NPD features and their combinations, so that complex face manifolds can be partitioned by the learned rules. This way, only a single soft-cascade classifier is needed to handle unconstrained face detection. Furthermore, we show that the NPD features can be efficiently obtained from a look up table, and the detection template can be easily scaled, making the proposed face detector very fast. Experimental results on three public face datasets (FDDB, GENKI, and CMU-MIT) show that the proposed method achieves state-of-the-art performance in detecting unconstrained faces with arbitrary pose variations and occlusions in cluttered scenes. PMID:26761729

  6. Modified algesimeter provides accurate depth measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Algesimeter which incorporates a standard sensory needle with a sensitive micrometer, measures needle point depth penetration in pain tolerance research. This algesimeter provides an inexpensive, precise instrument with assured validity of recordings in those biomedical areas with a requirement for repeated pain detection or ascertaining pain sensitivity.

  7. Analyzing Collisions in Terms of Newton's Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, John L.

    2003-02-01

    Although the principle of momentum conservation is a consequence of Newton's second and third laws of motion, as recognized by Newton himself, this principle is typically applied in analyzing collisions as if it is a separate concept of its own. This year I sought to integrate my treatment of collisions with my coverage of Newton's laws by asking students to calculate the effect on the motion of two particles due to the forces they exerted for a specified time interval on each other. For example, "A 50-kg crate slides across the ice at 3 m/s and collides with a 25-kg crate at rest. During the collision process the 50-kg crate exerts a 500 N time-averaged force on the 25 kg for 0.1 s. What are the accelerations of the crates during the collision, and what are their velocities after the collision? What are the momenta of the crates before and after collision?"

  8. A Collective Collision Operator for DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    GALLIS,MICHAIL A.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-06-21

    A new scheme to simulate elastic collisions in particle simulation codes is presented. The new scheme aims at simulating the collisions in the highly collisional regime, in which particle simulation techniques typically become computationally expensive.The new scheme is based on the concept of a grid-based collision field. According to this scheme, the particles perform a single collision with the background grid during a time step. The properties of the background field are calculated from the moments of the distribution function accumulated on the grid. The collision operator is based on the Langevin equation. Based on comparisons with other methods, it is found that the Langevin method overestimates the collision frequency for dilute gases.

  9. An accurate method of extracting fat droplets in liver images for quantitative evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Naoki; Komagata, Hideki; Shinoda, Kazuma; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Abe, Tokiya; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2015-03-01

    The steatosis in liver pathological tissue images is a promising indicator of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the possible risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The resulting values are also important for ensuring the automatic and accurate classification of HCC images, because the existence of many fat droplets is likely to create errors in quantifying the morphological features used in the process. In this study we propose a method that can automatically detect, and exclude regions with many fat droplets by using the feature values of colors, shapes and the arrangement of cell nuclei. We implement the method and confirm that it can accurately detect fat droplets and quantify the fat droplet ratio of actual images. This investigation also clarifies the effective characteristics that contribute to accurate detection.

  10. The Photodetachment of Ps ion and Low-Energy e(+) -H Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Two calculations in the area of positron collisions are presented. The first is the calculation of the photodetachment cross section of the positronium negative ion (Ps-) using accurate variational wave functions for both the initial bound-state and the final P continuum state. The second is the calculation of partial wave cross sections for Ps(1s)-formation in ef -H(ls) collisions using the hyperspherical hidden crossing method. Since the S-wave Stiickelberg phase is close to pi, the very small S-wave Ps(1s) formation cross section can be understood in terms of destructive interference. Other examples in positron collisions are given where it is either known or expected that destructive interference is the cause of the small S-wave Ps(1s) formation cross section. In addition, examples are presented of processes in atomic physics where the Stiickelberg phase is a multiple of pi/2.

  11. Validation of pedestrian throw equations by video footage of real life pedestrian/vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuk-Ki; Wong, Koon-Hung; Tam, Cheok-Ning; Tam, Yiu-Yan; Wong, Tai-Wai; Tao, Chi-Hang

    2015-12-01

    A total of 11 real life vehicle/pedestrian collisions in 2012-2014 were captured by CCTV cameras/car cameras in Hong Kong. Some of the footage was recorded in HD format at 30 frames per second, enabling accurate determinations of impact speeds with pedestrians, exact points of impacts and final rest positions of pedestrians as well as kinematics of the collisions. The calculated impact speeds from footage analysis were used to validate the published empirical and semi-empirical pedestrian throw equations. The applicability of these equations to collisions on sloped carriageways was discussed. The presented results, including 6 forward projection trajectory cases, enrich the existing limited real life data from footage analysis for further validation of the published methodologies. PMID:26562788

  12. Collision dynamics of polyatomic molecules containing carbon rings at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhiying; Heller, Eric J.; Krems, Roman V.

    2014-09-14

    We explore the collision dynamics of complex hydrocarbon molecules (benzene, coronene, adamantane, and anthracene) containing carbon rings in a cold buffer gas of {sup 3}He. For benzene, we present a comparative analysis of the fully classical and fully quantum calculations of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at collision energies between 1 and 10 cm{sup −1}. The quantum calculations are performed using the time-independent coupled channel approach and the coupled-states approximation. We show that the coupled-states approximation is accurate at collision energies between 1 and 20 cm{sup −1}. For the classical dynamics calculations, we develop an approach exploiting the rigidity of the carbon rings and including low-energy vibrational modes without holonomic constraints. Our results illustrate the effect of the molecular shape and the vibrational degrees of freedom on the formation of long-lived resonance states that lead to low-temperature clustering.

  13. Analysis of angular distribution of fragments in relativistic heavy-ion collisions by quantum molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Niita, Koji

    2016-05-01

    To predict angular distribution of fragments produced in nucleusnucleus collisions, JAERI quantum molecular dynamics model (JQMD) was improved. Because JQMD underestimated fragments in the forward angle, which were mainly produced by peripheral collisions, JQMD was revised so as to simulate peripheral collisions accurately. Density-dependent in-medium effect and relativistic effect on nucleonnucleon interactions were incorporated for this purpose. The revised version of JQMD coupled with a statistical decay model was used to calculate differential fragment production cross sections measured in earlier studies. Comparison of the measured data and calculation by the revised and old JQMD showed that the revised JQMD can predict fragment angular distribution better than old JQMD. Particularly, agreement of fragment yield in the forward angle is substantially improved.

  14. Computer simulations and experimental study on crash box of automobile in low speed collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanjie; Ding, Lin; Yan, Shengyuan; Yang, Yongsheng

    2008-11-01

    Based on the problems of energy-absorbing components in the automobile low speed collision process, according to crash box frontal crash test in low speed as the example, the simulation analysis of crash box impact process was carried out by Hyper Mesh and LS-DYNA. Each parameter on the influence modeling was analyzed by mathematics analytical solution and test comparison, which guaranteed that the model was accurate. Combination of experiment and simulation result had determined the weakness part of crash box structure crashworthiness aspect, and improvement method of crash box crashworthiness was discussed. Through numerical simulation of the impact process of automobile crash box, the obtained analysis result was used to optimize the design of crash box. It was helpful to improve the vehicles structure and decrease the collision accident loss at most. And it was also provided a useful method for the further research on the automobile collision.

  15. Collision dynamics of polyatomic molecules containing carbon rings at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V.; Heller, Eric J.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the collision dynamics of complex hydrocarbon molecules (benzene, coronene, adamantane, and anthracene) containing carbon rings in a cold buffer gas of 3He. For benzene, we present a comparative analysis of the fully classical and fully quantum calculations of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at collision energies between 1 and 10 cm-1. The quantum calculations are performed using the time-independent coupled channel approach and the coupled-states approximation. We show that the coupled-states approximation is accurate at collision energies between 1 and 20 cm-1. For the classical dynamics calculations, we develop an approach exploiting the rigidity of the carbon rings and including low-energy vibrational modes without holonomic constraints. Our results illustrate the effect of the molecular shape and the vibrational degrees of freedom on the formation of long-lived resonance states that lead to low-temperature clustering.

  16. A New Apparatus for Studies of Low Energy Electron Collisions with Nucleotide Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duron, Jessica; Hargreaves, Leigh

    Low-energy electrons, the most copiously produced by-product of radiation cancer therapy, have been shown to be a strong driver of DNA damage in living cells [1]. Quantitative data describing these collisions are presently rare due to technological challenges in performing electron scattering measurements from the nucleobases, e.g. uracil, thymine, guanine, etc. These challenges include the low-vapor pressure of commercial samples (which are powders at room temperature), and the difficulty in making accurate flow measurements from heated gas sources, required to establish the absolute scale of the measured data. Based on techniques pioneered in positron collision physics [2], a new apparatus is presently undergoing commissioning at the California State University Fullerton, which aims to address these issues. We will make the first cross-section measurements for slow (E0 < 30eV) electron collisions with nucleotides. We will report design parameters and ongoing progress in the commissioning of this new experiment.

  17. A Novel Multiobject Tracking Approach in the Presence of Collision and Division

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Andong; Jiang, Zhengqiang; Zhu, Peiyi; Shi, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a general framework for accurately tracking and quantitatively characterizing multiple cells (objects) when collision and division between cells arise. Through introducing three types of interaction events among cells, namely, independence, collision, and division, the corresponding dynamic models are defined and an augmented interacting multiple model particle filter tracking algorithm is first proposed for spatially adjacent cells with varying size. In addition, to reduce the ambiguity of correspondence between frames, both the estimated cell dynamic parameters and cell size are further utilized to identify cells of interest. The experiments have been conducted on two real cell image sequences characterized with cells collision, division, or number variation, and the resulting dynamic parameters such as instant velocity, turn rate were obtained and analyzed. PMID:26075015

  18. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  19. Highly Accurate Inverse Consistent Registration: A Robust Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Martin; Rosas, H. Diana; Fischl, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The registration of images is a task that is at the core of many applications in computer vision. In computational neuroimaging where the automated segmentation of brain structures is frequently used to quantify change, a highly accurate registration is necessary for motion correction of images taken in the same session, or across time in longitudinal studies where changes in the images can be expected. This paper, inspired by Nestares and Heeger (2000), presents a method based on robust statistics to register images in the presence of differences, such as jaw movement, differential MR distortions and true anatomical change. The approach we present guarantees inverse consistency (symmetry), can deal with different intensity scales and automatically estimates a sensitivity parameter to detect outlier regions in the images. The resulting registrations are highly accurate due to their ability to ignore outlier regions and show superior robustness with respect to noise, to intensity scaling and outliers when compared to state-of-the-art registration tools such as FLIRT (in FSL) or the coregistration tool in SPM. PMID:20637289

  20. Quality metric for accurate overlay control in <20nm nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Dana; Amit, Eran; Cohen, Guy; Amir, Nuriel; Har-Zvi, Michael; Huang, Chin-Chou Kevin; Karur-Shanmugam, Ramkumar; Pierson, Bill; Kato, Cindy; Kurita, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is moving toward 20nm nodes and below. As the Overlay (OVL) budget is getting tighter at these advanced nodes, the importance in the accuracy in each nanometer of OVL error is critical. When process owners select OVL targets and methods for their process, they must do it wisely; otherwise the reported OVL could be inaccurate, resulting in yield loss. The same problem can occur when the target sampling map is chosen incorrectly, consisting of asymmetric targets that will cause biased correctable terms and a corrupted wafer. Total measurement uncertainty (TMU) is the main parameter that process owners use when choosing an OVL target per layer. Going towards the 20nm nodes and below, TMU will not be enough for accurate OVL control. KLA-Tencor has introduced a quality score named `Qmerit' for its imaging based OVL (IBO) targets, which is obtained on the-fly for each OVL measurement point in X & Y. This Qmerit score will enable the process owners to select compatible targets which provide accurate OVL values for their process and thereby improve their yield. Together with K-T Analyzer's ability to detect the symmetric targets across the wafer and within the field, the Archer tools will continue to provide an independent, reliable measurement of OVL error into the next advanced nodes, enabling fabs to manufacture devices that meet their tight OVL error budgets.