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Sample records for accurate diagnostic tests

  1. Optimizing odor identification testing as quick and accurate diagnostic tool for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahlknecht, Philipp; Pechlaner, Raimund; Boesveldt, Sanne; Volc, Dieter; Pinter, Bernardette; Reiter, Eva; Müller, Christoph; Krismer, Florian; Berendse, Henk W.; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Wuschitz, Albert; Schimetta, Wolfgang; Högl, Birgit; Djamshidian, Atbin; Nocker, Michael; Göbel, Georg; Gasperi, Arno; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Poewe, Werner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate odor identification testing as a quick, cheap, and reliable tool to identify PD. Methods Odor identification with the 16‐item Sniffin' Sticks test (SS‐16) was assessed in a total of 646 PD patients and 606 controls from three European centers (A, B, and C), as well as 75 patients with atypical parkinsonism or essential tremor and in a prospective cohort of 24 patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (center A). Reduced odor sets most discriminative for PD were determined in a discovery cohort derived from a random split of PD patients and controls from center A using L1‐regularized logistic regression. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed in the rest of the patients/controls as validation cohorts. Results Olfactory performance was lower in PD patients compared with controls and non‐PD patients in all cohorts (each P < 0.001). Both the full SS‐16 and a subscore of the top eight discriminating odors (SS‐8) were associated with an excellent discrimination of PD from controls (areas under the curve ≥0.90; sensitivities ≥83.3%; specificities ≥82.0%) and from non‐PD patients (areas under the curve ≥0.91; sensitivities ≥84.1%; specificities ≥84.0%) in all cohorts. This remained unchanged when patients with >3 years of disease duration were excluded from analysis. All 8 incident PD cases among patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder were predicted with the SS‐16 and the SS‐8 (sensitivity, 100%; positive predictive value, 61.5%). Conclusions Odor identification testing provides excellent diagnostic accuracy in the distinction of PD patients from controls and diagnostic mimics. A reduced set of eight odors could be used as a quick tool in the workup of patients presenting with parkinsonism and for PD risk indication. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and

  2. Accurate, fast and cost-effective diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36 using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5-0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs.

  3. Accurate, Fast and Cost-Effective Diagnostic Test for Monosomy 1p36 Using Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B.; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5–0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs. PMID:24839341

  4. Panel-based Genetic Diagnostic Testing for Inherited Eye Diseases is Highly Accurate and Reproducible and More Sensitive for Variant Detection Than Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga M.; Sousa, Maria E.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoë D.; Taub, Daniel G.; Janessian, Maria; Wang, Dan Yi; Au, Elizabeth D.; Sims, Katherine B.; Sweetser, David A.; Fulton, Anne B.; Liu, Qin; Wiggs, Janey L.; Gai, Xiaowu; Pierce, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods are being adopted broadly for genetic diagnostic testing, but the performance characteristics of these techniques have not been fully defined with regard to test accuracy and reproducibility. Methods We developed a targeted enrichment and NGS approach for genetic diagnostic testing of patients with inherited eye disorders, including inherited retinal degenerations, optic atrophy and glaucoma. In preparation for providing this Genetic Eye Disease (GEDi) test on a CLIA-certified basis, we performed experiments to measure the sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility as well as the clinical sensitivity of the test. Results The GEDi test is highly reproducible and accurate, with sensitivity and specificity for single nucleotide variant detection of 97.9% and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity for variant detection was notably better than the 88.3% achieved by whole exome sequencing (WES) using the same metrics, due to better coverage of targeted genes in the GEDi test compared to commercially available exome capture sets. Prospective testing of 192 patients with IRDs indicated that the clinical sensitivity of the GEDi test is high, with a diagnostic rate of 51%. Conclusion The data suggest that based on quantified performance metrics, selective targeted enrichment is preferable to WES for genetic diagnostic testing. PMID:25412400

  5. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria.

    PubMed

    Visser, Theodoor; Daily, Jennifer; Hotte, Nora; Dolkart, Caitlin; Cunningham, Jane; Yadav, Prashant

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining quality, competitiveness and innovation in global health technology is a constant challenge for manufacturers, while affordability, access and equity are challenges for governments and international agencies. In this paper we discuss these issues with reference to rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Strategies to control and eliminate malaria depend on early and accurate diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria require little training and equipment and can be performed by non-specialists in remote settings. Use of these tests has expanded significantly over the last few years, following recommendations to test all suspected malaria cases before treatment and the implementation of an evaluation programme to assess the performance of the malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these gains, challenges exist that, if not addressed, could jeopardize the progress made to date. We discuss recent developments in rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, highlight some of the challenges and provide suggestions to address them.

  6. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Daily, Jennifer; Hotte, Nora; Dolkart, Caitlin; Cunningham, Jane; Yadav, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Maintaining quality, competitiveness and innovation in global health technology is a constant challenge for manufacturers, while affordability, access and equity are challenges for governments and international agencies. In this paper we discuss these issues with reference to rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Strategies to control and eliminate malaria depend on early and accurate diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria require little training and equipment and can be performed by non-specialists in remote settings. Use of these tests has expanded significantly over the last few years, following recommendations to test all suspected malaria cases before treatment and the implementation of an evaluation programme to assess the performance of the malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these gains, challenges exist that, if not addressed, could jeopardize the progress made to date. We discuss recent developments in rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, highlight some of the challenges and provide suggestions to address them. PMID:26668438

  7. SOPROLIFE System: An Accurate Diagnostic Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeitouny, Mona; Feghali, Mireille; Nasr, Assaad; Abou-Samra, Philippe; Saleh, Nadine; Bourgeois, Denis; Farge, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate a light-emitting diode fluorescence tool, the SOPROLIFE light-induced fluorescence evaluator, and compare it to the international caries detection and assessment system-II (ICDAS-II) in the detection of occlusal caries. Methods. A total of 219 permanent posterior teeth in 21 subjects, with age ranging from 15 to 65 years, were examined. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was computed to assess the reliability between the two diagnostic methods. Results. The results showed a high reliability between the two methods (ICC = 0.92; IC = 0.901–0.940; P < 0.001). The SOPROLIFE blue fluorescence mode had a high sensitivity (87%) and a high specificity (99%) when compared to ICDAS-II. Conclusion. Compared to the most used visual method in the diagnosis of occlusal caries lesions, the finding from this study suggests that SOPROLIFE can be used as a reproducible and reliable assessment tool. At a cut-off point, categorizing noncarious lesions and visual change in enamel, SOPROLIFE shows a high sensitivity and specificity. We can conclude that financially ICDAS is better than SOPROLIFE. However SOPROLIFE is easier for clinicians since it is a simple evaluation of images. Finally in terms of efficiency SOPROLIFE is not superior to ICDAS but tends to be equivalent with the same advantages. PMID:25401161

  8. Diagnostic Testing Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David L.

    This paper presents an explanation of the program design of the three separate Pascal-language programs which comprise UCLA's Diagnostic Testing Package "DX." The three parts of the DX test package are three closely interrelated programs--Editest, Runtest, and Summary. Editest serves the following functions: (1) the creation of a suitable…

  9. Diagnosing the Diagnostic Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2009-01-01

    Scads of pseudodiagnostic tests are peddled by commercial vendors who recognize that desperate educators will do almost anything to dodge an impending accountability cataclysm. And this "almost anything" includes buying tests that promise to help a teacher raise test scores--even if they don't. Accordingly, today's educators need to be aware of…

  10. Using and interpreting diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Shawn L B; Dohoo, Ian R

    2006-03-01

    Diagnostic tests are invaluable to the practice of veterinary medicine. Using them correctly and interpreting the results appropriately depend on having a good understanding of the basic principles outlined in this article. Topics covered include sensitivity and specificity, agreement among tests, using multiple tests, and other issues related to the use and interpretation of diagnostic tests. The most important principle is recognition that the interpretation of test results varies across populations and requires an estimate of the prevalence of the infection (or disease) in the population being studied.

  11. Diagnostic tests for syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by Treponema pallidum. A total of 13,106 cases of primary and secondary syphilis were reported in the United States in 2011 and the rate of infection has increased in subgroups, particularly men who have sex with men. The disease is mainly diagnosed through clinical findings and serologic testing. However, no single serologic test of syphilis is sufficient. Hence, the serologic diagnosis of syphilis requires the detection of 2 types of antibodies (nontreponemal antibodies and treponemal antibodies). The paradigm in syphilis testing has recently shifted in many centers to screen with a treponemal antibody test, reflexing to a nontreponemal test if the treponemal antibody test is positive. This reverse of the traditional algorithm may not be widely recognized among clinicians.

  12. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions. 410.32 Section 410.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic...

  13. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions. 410.32 Section 410.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic...

  14. Appropriateness of diagnostics tests.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, P

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the concept of 'appropriateness', in the three past decades, from 'no harm' and 'no waste' to 'medical decision-making' and 'determining outcomes' highlights two main points: its foundation is evidence-based medicine, and it is a quality of every phase of the total testing process, not only for the selection of tests. Nevertheless, appropriateness in Laboratory Hematology, as well as in Laboratory Medicine, is an elusive concept: 'Appropriateness' interplays with 'patient's safety', 'healthcare costs', 'clinical decision-making', and 'effectiveness', and the criteria for appropriateness, mainly adherence to clinical guidelines, are often not evidence-based and not always consensus-based. Moreover, practising appropriateness is a complex issue because of the ambiguity of the criteria and targets, the never-ending work of implementing guidelines and their audit, and the uniqueness of the clinical situation of the individual patient. Authors agree on some practical rules: establishing a multidisciplinary and multiprofessional team, choosing carefully clinical targets, finding or building evidences, sharing guidelines with clinicians, choosing adequate tools for changing, working hard on implementation, identifying the 'right' laboratory methods and processes, checking progress indefinitely, providing information, interpretations, and consultations, and promoting feedback and audits. The success depends on the 'right' combination of educational, operative, and reinforcing interventions. Competences in organization, in implementation science, and in interpersonal relationship management are essential as well as knowledge and experience in Hematology, not only in Laboratory Hematology. PMID:27161094

  15. [Diagnostic protocol and special tests].

    PubMed

    Bellia, M; Pennarola, R

    2008-01-01

    Diagnostic protocol and special tests to ionizing radiations have a preventive function in the medical surveillance of the exposed worker. This protocol must be provided with laboratory and special test assessing fitness for working at the risk of ionizing radiations. The health of workers must be compatible with working conditions and radiation risk. This healthiness of workers is evalued in the time to give an assessment fitness for working at ionizing radiations. For this purpose the basic diagnostic protocol must guarantee minimum information about state of organs and apparatus in addition to the normality of the metabolisms. The diagnostic protocol of the exposed worker to ionizing radiations must be adapted to the specific clinical situation so as to finally make a costs-benefits balance sheet. PMID:19288808

  16. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Service Act, as implemented by 21 CFR part 900, subpart B. (d) Diagnostic laboratory tests—(1) Who may... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions. 410.32 Section 410.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  17. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Service Act, as implemented by 21 CFR part 900, subpart B. (d) Diagnostic laboratory tests—(1) Who may... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions. 410.32 Section 410.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  18. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... implemented by 21 CFR part 900, subpart B. (d) Diagnostic laboratory tests—(1) Who may furnish services... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions. 410.32 Section 410.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  19. Cochrane diagnostic test accuracy reviews.

    PubMed

    Leeflang, Mariska M G; Deeks, Jonathan J; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Macaskill, Petra

    2013-10-07

    In 1996, shortly after the founding of The Cochrane Collaboration, leading figures in test evaluation research established a Methods Group to focus on the relatively new and rapidly evolving methods for the systematic review of studies of diagnostic tests. Seven years later, the Collaboration decided it was time to develop a publication format and methodology for Diagnostic Test Accuracy (DTA) reviews, as well as the software needed to implement these reviews in The Cochrane Library. A meeting hosted by the German Cochrane Centre in 2004 brought together key methodologists in the area, many of whom became closely involved in the subsequent development of the methodological framework for DTA reviews. DTA reviews first appeared in The Cochrane Library in 2008 and are now an integral part of the work of the Collaboration.

  20. Basic principles on selection and use of diagnostic tests: properties of diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, A V

    2001-12-01

    In clinical practice, in order to design and implement a specific therapeutic plan, as well as communicating an appropriate prognosis, the doctor needs to establish a precise diagnosis of the condition. Sometimes all one needs is a clinical impression. More often, however, the definition of an accurate diagnosis will mandate the interpretation of specific diagnostic tests as well. The rational use of diagnostic tests in cardiology--whether laboratorial or imaging--should be based on three factors: 1) validity of results of studies on the test; 2) diagnostic properties of the test; and 3) applicability of the test in the clinical setting. The rational use and the correct interpretation of diagnostic tests are based on these three factors. In a previous article we presented the basic principles concerning the validity of the results from the study that defined the specific test, and what level of evidence that constitutes. In this article we present the diagnostic properties of tests (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios, odds). Finally, in a forthcoming paper we will discuss the applicability of the test in clinical cardiological practice. PMID:11865687

  1. Molecular Diagnostic Tests for Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kaya; Weiss, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    The Microsporidia are a ubiquitous group of eukaryotic obligate intracellular parasites which were recognized over 100 years ago with the description of Nosema bombycis, a parasite of silkworms. It is now appreciated that these organisms are related to the Fungi. Microsporidia infect all major animal groups most often as gastrointestinal pathogens; however they have been reported from every tissue and organ, and their spores are common in environmental sources such as ditch water. Several different genera of these organisms infect humans, but the majority of infections are due to either Enterocytozoon bieneusi or Encephalitozoon species. These pathogens can be difficult to diagnose, but significant progress has been made in the last decade in the development of molecular diagnostic reagents for these organisms. This report reviews the molecular diagnostic tests that have been described for the identification of the microsporidia that infect humans. PMID:19657457

  2. Myasthenia Gravis: Tests and Diagnostic Methods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affiliations Foundation Focus Newsletter E-Update Test & Diagnostic methods In addition to a complete medical and neurological ... How can I help? About MGFA Test & Diagnostic methods Treatment for MG FAQ's Upcoming Events Spring 2016 ...

  3. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... PRF By The Numbers Medical Database Cell & Tissue Bank Diagnostic Testing Research Funding Opportunities Scientific Meetings Scientific ... New in Progeria Research Medical Database Cell & Tissue Bank Diagnostic Testing Research Funding Opportunities Scientific Meetings Scientific ...

  4. How Accurate Are Oral Reading Tests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schell, Leo M.

    Errors in oral reading tests result from inaccuracies that tend to creep in because children are not totally consistent while taking a test and from inaccuracies caused when the examiner does not catch a word recognition error, giving credit for an answer that is more wrong than right or vice versa. Every test contains a standard error of…

  5. Accurate statistical tests for smooth classification images.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Alan; Worsley, Keith J; Schyns, Philippe G; Arguin, Martin; Gosselin, Frédéric

    2005-10-05

    Despite an obvious demand for a variety of statistical tests adapted to classification images, few have been proposed. We argue that two statistical tests based on random field theory (RFT) satisfy this need for smooth classification images. We illustrate these tests on classification images representative of the literature from F. Gosselin and P. G. Schyns (2001) and from A. B. Sekuler, C. M. Gaspar, J. M. Gold, and P. J. Bennett (2004). The necessary computations are performed using the Stat4Ci Matlab toolbox.

  6. Extremely Early Diagnostic Test for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    James, Veronica Jean

    2011-11-17

    This article reports the results of a blinded fiber diffraction study of skin samples taken from TRAMP mice and age-matched controls to determine whether changes noted in fiber diffraction studies of human skin were present in these TRAMP mice studies. These mice are bred to progress to Gleeson Type 3 to Type 5 prostate cancer. Small strips, 1 mm x 5 mm, cut from the mouse skin samples were loaded into cells in the same way as human samples and slightly stretched to remove the crimp. They remained fully hydrated throughout exposure to the synchrotron beam. The added change that was reported for prostate cancer in 2009 was obtained for all TRAMP mice samples, indicating that this change can be read as High Grade Cancer in human diagnostic tests. These changes were evident for all 3 and 7 week old TRAMP mice samples but not for any of the control samples. This indicates that the changes in the fibre diffraction patterns appear much earlier than in any other available prostate cancer diagnostic test, as none of these can verify the presence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mice before 10 weeks of age. The fiber diffraction test is therefore the most accurate and earliest test for high grade prostate cancer.

  7. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria ---Haiti, 2010.

    PubMed

    2010-10-29

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is endemic to Haiti and remains a major concern for residents, including displaced persons, and emergency responders in the aftermath of the January 12, 2010 earthquake. Microscopy has been the only test approved in the national policy for the diagnosis and management of malaria in Haiti; however, the use of microscopy often has been limited by lack of equipment or trained personnel. In contrast, malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) require less equipment or training to use. To assist in the timely diagnosis and treatment of malaria in Haiti, the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP), in collaboration with CDC, conducted a field assessment that guided the decision to approve the use of RDTs. This data-driven policy change greatly expands the opportunities for accurate malaria diagnosis across the country, allows for improved clinical management of febrile patients, and will improve the quality of malaria surveillance in Haiti.

  8. Gage tests tube flares quickly and accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, F. D.

    1966-01-01

    Flared tube gage with a test cone that is precisely made with a tapering surface to complement the tube flare is capable of determining the accuracy of a tube flare efficiently and economically. This device should improve the speed, efficiency, and accuracy of tube flare inspections.

  9. 9 CFR 93.406 - Diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Diagnostic tests. 93.406 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.406 Diagnostic tests. (a) Tuberculosis and brucellosis tests of cattle. Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section and in §§ 93.418, 93.427(d), and...

  10. 9 CFR 93.406 - Diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diagnostic tests. 93.406 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.406 Diagnostic tests. (a) Tuberculosis and brucellosis tests of cattle. Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section and in §§ 93.418, 93.427(d), and...

  11. How to appraise a diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N

    2011-10-01

    Urologists frequently encounter problems in making a clinical diagnosis whose resolution requires the use of diagnostic tests. With an ever increasing choice of investigations being available, the urologist often has to decide which diagnostic test(s) will best resolve the patient's diagnostic problem. In this article, we aim to help the urologist understand how to critically appraise studies on diagnostic tests and make a rational choice. This article presents the guiding principles in scientifically assessing studies on diagnostic tests by proposing a clinical scenario. The authors describe a standardized protocol to assess the validity of the test and its relevance to the clinical problem that can help the urologist in decision making. The three important issues to be considered when evaluating the validity of the study are to identify how the study population was chosen, how the test was performed and whether there is a comparison to the gold standard test so as to confirm or refute the diagnosis. Then, the urologist would need to know the probability of the test in providing the correct diagnosis in an individual patient in order to decide about its utility in solving the diagnostic dilemma. By performing the steps described in this article, the urologist would be able to critically appraise diagnostic studies and draw meaningful conclusions about the investigations in terms of validity, results and its applicability to the patient's problem. This would provide a scientific basis for using diagnostic tests for improving patient care.

  12. Accurate Point-of-Care Detection of Ruptured Fetal Membranes: Improved Diagnostic Performance Characteristics with a Monoclonal/Polyclonal Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda C.; Scott, Laurie; Block, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of membranes (ROM) is imperative to allow for gestational age-specific interventions. This study compared the diagnostic performance characteristics between two methods used for the detection of ROM as measured in the same patient. METHODS Vaginal secretions were evaluated using the conventional fern test as well as a point-of-care monoclonal/polyclonal immunoassay test (ROM Plus®) in 75 pregnant patients who presented to labor and delivery with complaints of leaking amniotic fluid. Both tests were compared to analytical confirmation of ROM using three external laboratory tests. Diagnostic performance characteristics were calculated including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy. RESULTS Diagnostic performance characteristics uniformly favored ROM detection using the immunoassay test compared to the fern test: sensitivity (100% vs. 77.8%), specificity (94.8% vs. 79.3%), PPV (75% vs. 36.8%), NPV (100% vs. 95.8%), and accuracy (95.5% vs. 79.1%). CONCLUSIONS The point-of-care immunoassay test provides improved diagnostic accuracy for the detection of ROM compared to fern testing. It has the potential of improving patient management decisions, thereby minimizing serious complications and perinatal morbidity. PMID:27199579

  13. 9 CFR 93.406 - Diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.406 Diagnostic tests. (a) Tuberculosis and brucellosis..., ages, markings, and tattoo and eartag numbers. (c) Further tests during quarantine. Ruminants that...

  14. 9 CFR 93.406 - Diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.406 Diagnostic tests. (a) Tuberculosis and brucellosis..., ages, markings, and tattoo and eartag numbers. (c) Further tests during quarantine. Ruminants that...

  15. 9 CFR 93.406 - Diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.406 Diagnostic tests. (a) Tuberculosis and brucellosis..., ages, markings, and tattoo and eartag numbers. (c) Further tests during quarantine. Ruminants that...

  16. [Basic principles of selection and use of diagnostic tests: analysis of the results of diagnostic studies].

    PubMed

    Carneiro, A V

    2001-11-01

    In clinical practice, in order to design and implement a specific therapeutic plan, as well as communicating an appropriate prognosis, the doctor needs to establish a precise diagnosis of the condition. Sometimes all one needs is a clinical impression. More often, however, the definition of an accurate diagnosis will need the interpretation of specific diagnostic tests as well. The rational use of diagnostic tests in cardiology--whether laboratorial or imagiologic--should be based on three factors: 1) validity of the study results about the test; 2) diagnostic properties of the test and 3) applicability of the test in the clinical setting. The rational use and correct interpretation of diagnostic tests are based on these three factors. In this article we present the basic principles concerning the validity of the results from the study that defined the specific test, and what level of evidence that constitutes. Other articles will address diagnostic properties of tests (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios) as well as the applicability of the test in clinical practice. PMID:11826705

  17. Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... PATIENT FACT SHEET Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility When a couple has trouble having a baby, ... to find out what may be causing your infertility. Semen analysis Semen analysis is probably the first ...

  18. Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... the uterus and ovaries for abnormalities such as fibroids and ovarian cysts. Ovarian Reserve Testing: When attempting ... of intrauterine problems such as endometrial polyps and fibroids compared with using transvaginal ultrasonography alone. If an ...

  19. Diagnostic Testing System: A Complete Diagnostic Multiple-Choice Test Package for the Apple II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David; And Others

    The Diagnostic Testing System (DX) is an integral system for developing and administering tests. The system can be utilized for testing in any subject matter, or any number of subject matters, at any level on scholastic or cognitive continuums. The major purpose of DX is to provide diagnostic data about the level at which a given student (or group…

  20. Diagnostic Performance of Visual Screening Tests in the Elderly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lança, Carla Costa; Carolino, Elisabete

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to determine and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of visual screening tests for detecting vision loss in elderly. This study is defined as study of diagnostic performance. The diagnostic accuracy of 5 visual tests -near convergence point, near accommodation point, stereopsis, contrast sensibility and amsler grid—was evaluated by means of the ROC method (receiver operating characteristics curves), sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+/LR-). Visual acuity was used as the reference standard. A sample of 44 elderly aged 76.7 years (±9.32), who were institutionalized, was collected. The curves of contrast sensitivity and stereopsis are the most accurate (area under the curves were 0.814-p = 0.001, C.I.95%[0.653;0.975]— and 0.713-p = 0.027, C.I.95%[0,540;0,887], respectively). The scores with the best diagnostic validity for the stereopsis test were 0.605 (sensitivity 0.87, specificity 0.54; LR+ 1.89, LR-0.24) and 0.610 (sensitivity 0.81, specificity 0.54; LR+ 1.75, LR-0.36). The scores with higher diagnostic validity for the contrast sensibility test were 0.530 (sensitivity 0.94, specificity 0.69; LR+ 3.04, LR-0.09). The contrast sensitivity and stereopsis test's proved to be clinically useful in detecting vision loss in the elderly.

  1. Instructional Implications of Diagnostic Reading Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Marianne C.

    This paper examines remedial programs in colleges and discusses the relationship of those programs to diagnostic testing. The Basic Skills Placement Test (BSPT) is required of all College freshman in New Jersey public colleges. Mercer County Community College, used as an example throughout this paper, uses the BSPT as a basis for placing students…

  2. Unexplained syncope: diagnostic value of tilt-table testing.

    PubMed

    Futterman, L G; Lemberg, L

    1994-07-01

    Vasovagal syncope is a common syncope in patients who have no structural heart disease and occurs more often in young adults. It typically occurs in the erect posture, either standing or sitting. Upon recognition of the prodrome associated with NCS, subjects may avert syncope by lying down or putting the head between the knees. Use of head-up tilting is a recognized diagnostic tool and widely used for the evaluation of vasovagal syncope. However, cardiac diagnostic tests are not 100% accurate. This fact was recently underscored by what occurred in the recent tragic loss, due to ventricular fibrillation, of basketball star Reggie Lewis of the Boston Celtics. It is alleged that the tilt-table test was positive but that he also had structural heart disease. The most important diagnostic tool is the physician's clinical judgment.

  3. Testing and Diagnostic Testing in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cresswell, M.

    1977-01-01

    The author outlines some of the ways in which published mathematics tests, particularly the general standardized type, can be used in a constructive way by teachers to learn more about their pupils. (MN)

  4. Instrument accurately measures small temperature changes on test surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Miller, H. B.

    1966-01-01

    Calorimeter apparatus accurately measures very small temperature rises on a test surface subjected to aerodynamic heating. A continuous thin sheet of a sensing material is attached to a base support plate through which a series of holes of known diameter have been drilled for attaching thermocouples to the material.

  5. Diagnostic testing for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, D O

    1992-09-01

    What can we expect in the next decade? In addition to the obviously anticipated clarification of normal values relating to erectile function and anatomy and refinement of examinations, tests, and procedures, there is still much to be discovered, refined, and defined. We can anticipate new medications being found to enhance penile erections. Maybe a pacemaker will be possible that will stimulate an erection. New methods will be developed to insert coils and scarring agents for veno-occlusive disorders. Drugs will be produced in the form of pills, creams, or injectables that will dilate, clean out, or prevent blockage in the arteries. Preventing erectile dysfunction should become the issue in the 1990s and the next century. Changes in life-style such as reducing stress, eating healthier, stopping smoking, exercising more, and reducing alcohol consumption will lead to better bodily functioning. Essentially, taking responsibility for our own well being will become important. Health promotion, instead of curing, will receive greater focus. Education will play an important part in realizing a goal of mature sexuality and improved general well-being. PMID:1529366

  6. Cost of carrying out clinical diagnostic tests.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, D J; Bingle, J P; Garratt, C J

    1978-01-01

    The total cost of performing diagnostic tests in a hospital laboratory during one year was assessed. The largest single item of expenditure was the cost of the salaries of the technical staff, while the cost of reagents (including radiopharmaceuticals) was relatively small. The total costs of carrying out diagnostic tests are much higher than is often recognised by those who request them. The use of relatively expensive, commercially available assay kits saves time and gives good value for money. It may be worth taking this into account when planning hospital budgets. PMID:647338

  7. Diagnostic methodology is critical for accurately determining the prevalence of ichthyophonus infections in wild fish populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; Dolan, H.; Hershberger, P.

    2011-01-01

    Several different techniques have been employed to detect and identify Ichthyophonus spp. in infected fish hosts; these include macroscopic observation, microscopic examination of tissue squashes, histological evaluation, in vitro culture, and molecular techniques. Examination of the peer-reviewed literature revealed that when more than 1 diagnostic method is used, they often result in significantly different results; for example, when in vitro culture was used to identify infected trout in an experimentally exposed population, 98.7% of infected trout were detected, but when standard histology was used to confirm known infected tissues from wild salmon, it detected ~50% of low-intensity infections and ~85% of high-intensity infections. Other studies on different species reported similar differences. When we examined a possible mechanism to explain the disparity between different diagnostic techniques, we observed non-random distribution of the parasite in 3-dimensionally visualized tissue sections from infected hosts, thus providing a possible explanation for the different sensitivities of commonly used diagnostic techniques. Based on experimental evidence and a review of the peer-reviewed literature, we have concluded that in vitro culture is currently the most accurate diagnostic technique for determining infection prevalence of Ichthyophonus, particularly when the exposure history of the population is not known.

  8. How accurate was GMENAC?--A retrospective review of supply projections for diagnostic radiologists.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, J H; Evens, R G; Chan, W C

    1992-02-01

    In 1982, the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee (GMENAC), a prominent national panel, predicted there would be 25,650 full-time equivalent (FTE) diagnostic radiologists, a 34% oversupply, by 1990. The radiologists involved in GMENAC, however, using models developed by the American College of Radiology, projected 19,800 FTE diagnostic radiologists in 1990, which was similar to the GMENAC estimate of need. The disagreement arose principally from different assumptions about residents entering the specialty. Recent data show there actually were approximately 21,900 FTE diagnostic radiologists in 1990. The radiologists' projection was 10% below this figure; the GMENAC projection was 17% above it. GMENAC erred principally in assuming diagnostic radiology residencies would not replace general radiology residencies, but rather be an addition to them. The radiologists erred principally in their assumption about the effects of the financial problems of hospitals on the number of residency positions. Accurate long-term projection of physician supply in individual specialties may well not be feasible.

  9. Analysis of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brogt, Erik; Sabers, Darrell; Prather, Edward E.; Deming, Grace L.; Hufnagel, Beth; Slater, Timothy F.

    2007-01-01

    Seventy undergraduate class sections were examined from the database of Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT) results of Deming and Hufnagel to determine if course format correlated with ADT normalized gain scores. Normalized gains were calculated for four different classroom scenarios: lecture, lecture with discussion, lecture with lab, and lecture…

  10. Computerized Diagnostic Testing: Problems and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David L.

    The use of computers to build diagnostic inferences is explored in two contexts. In computerized monitoring of liquid oxygen systems for the space shuttle, diagnoses are exact because they can be derived within a world which is closed. In computerized classroom testing of reading comprehension, programs deliver a constrained form of adaptive…

  11. 42 CFR 410.33 - Independent diagnostic testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... performs a test he or she is authorized by the State to perform, or an independent diagnostic testing... furnishes diagnostic procedures in a physician's office. (2) Exceptions. The following diagnostic tests that... Drug Administration. (ii) Diagnostic tests personally furnished by a qualified audiologist as...

  12. 42 CFR 410.33 - Independent diagnostic testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... performs a test he or she is authorized by the State to perform, or an independent diagnostic testing... furnishes diagnostic procedures in a physician's office. (2) Exceptions. The following diagnostic tests that... Drug Administration. (ii) Diagnostic tests personally furnished by a qualified audiologist as...

  13. 42 CFR 410.33 - Independent diagnostic testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... performs a test he or she is authorized by the State to perform, or an independent diagnostic testing... furnishes diagnostic procedures in a physician's office. (2) Exceptions. The following diagnostic tests that... Drug Administration. (ii) Diagnostic tests personally furnished by a qualified audiologist as...

  14. 42 CFR 410.33 - Independent diagnostic testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... performs a test he or she is authorized by the State to perform, or an independent diagnostic testing... furnishes diagnostic procedures in a physician's office. (2) Exceptions. The following diagnostic tests that... Drug Administration. (ii) Diagnostic tests personally furnished by a qualified audiologist as...

  15. 42 CFR 410.33 - Independent diagnostic testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... performs a test he or she is authorized by the State to perform, or an independent diagnostic testing... furnishes diagnostic procedures in a physician's office. (2) Exceptions. The following diagnostic tests that... Drug Administration. (ii) Diagnostic tests personally furnished by a qualified audiologist as...

  16. New Claus catalyst tests accurately reflect process conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Maglio, A.; Schubert, P.F.

    1988-09-12

    Methods for testing Claus catalysts are developed that more accurately represent the actual operating conditions in commercial sulfur recovery units. For measuring catalyst activity, an aging method has been developed that results in more meaningful activity data after the catalyst has been aged, because all catalysts undergo rapid initial deactivation in commercial units. An activity test method has been developed where catalysts can be compared at less than equilibrium conversion. A test has also been developed to characterize abrasion loss of Claus catalysts, in contrast to the traditional method of determining physical properties by measuring crush strengths. Test results from a wide range of materials correlated well with actual pneumatic conveyance attrition. Substantial differences in Claus catalyst properties were observed as a result of using these tests.

  17. Using Copula Distributions to Support More Accurate Imaging-Based Diagnostic Classifiers for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun; Liu, Jun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    Many investigators have tried to apply machine learning techniques to magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the brain in order to diagnose neuropsychiatric disorders. Usually the number of brain imaging measures (such as measures of cortical thickness and measures of local surface morphology) derived from the MRIs (i.e., their dimensionality) has been large (e.g. >10) relative to the number of participants who provide the MRI data (<100). Sparse data in a high dimensional space increases the variability of the classification rules that machine learning algorithms generate, thereby limiting the validity, reproducibility, and generalizability of those classifiers. The accuracy and stability of the classifiers can improve significantly if the multivariate distributions of the imaging measures can be estimated accurately. To accurately estimate the multivariate distributions using sparse data, we propose to estimate first the univariate distributions of imaging data and then combine them using a Copula to generate more accurate estimates of their multivariate distributions. We then sample the estimated Copula distributions to generate dense sets of imaging measures and use those measures to train classifiers. We hypothesize that the dense sets of brain imaging measures will generate classifiers that are stable to variations in brain imaging measures, thereby improving the reproducibility, validity, and generalizability of diagnostic classification algorithms in imaging datasets from clinical populations. In our experiments, we used both computer-generated and real-world brain imaging datasets to assess the accuracy of multivariate Copula distributions in estimating the corresponding multivariate distributions of real-world imaging data. Our experiments showed that diagnostic classifiers generated using imaging measures sampled from the Copula were significantly more accurate and more reproducible than were the classifiers generated using either the real-world imaging

  18. Immunochromatographic diagnostic test analysis using Google Glass.

    PubMed

    Feng, Steve; Caire, Romain; Cortazar, Bingen; Turan, Mehmet; Wong, Andrew; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-03-25

    We demonstrate a Google Glass-based rapid diagnostic test (RDT) reader platform capable of qualitative and quantitative measurements of various lateral flow immunochromatographic assays and similar biomedical diagnostics tests. Using a custom-written Glass application and without any external hardware attachments, one or more RDTs labeled with Quick Response (QR) code identifiers are simultaneously imaged using the built-in camera of the Google Glass that is based on a hands-free and voice-controlled interface and digitally transmitted to a server for digital processing. The acquired JPEG images are automatically processed to locate all the RDTs and, for each RDT, to produce a quantitative diagnostic result, which is returned to the Google Glass (i.e., the user) and also stored on a central server along with the RDT image, QR code, and other related information (e.g., demographic data). The same server also provides a dynamic spatiotemporal map and real-time statistics for uploaded RDT results accessible through Internet browsers. We tested this Google Glass-based diagnostic platform using qualitative (i.e., yes/no) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and quantitative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests. For the quantitative RDTs, we measured activated tests at various concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 ng/mL for free and total PSA. This wearable RDT reader platform running on Google Glass combines a hands-free sensing and image capture interface with powerful servers running our custom image processing codes, and it can be quite useful for real-time spatiotemporal tracking of various diseases and personal medical conditions, providing a valuable tool for epidemiology and mobile health.

  19. Immunochromatographic Diagnostic Test Analysis Using Google Glass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a Google Glass-based rapid diagnostic test (RDT) reader platform capable of qualitative and quantitative measurements of various lateral flow immunochromatographic assays and similar biomedical diagnostics tests. Using a custom-written Glass application and without any external hardware attachments, one or more RDTs labeled with Quick Response (QR) code identifiers are simultaneously imaged using the built-in camera of the Google Glass that is based on a hands-free and voice-controlled interface and digitally transmitted to a server for digital processing. The acquired JPEG images are automatically processed to locate all the RDTs and, for each RDT, to produce a quantitative diagnostic result, which is returned to the Google Glass (i.e., the user) and also stored on a central server along with the RDT image, QR code, and other related information (e.g., demographic data). The same server also provides a dynamic spatiotemporal map and real-time statistics for uploaded RDT results accessible through Internet browsers. We tested this Google Glass-based diagnostic platform using qualitative (i.e., yes/no) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and quantitative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests. For the quantitative RDTs, we measured activated tests at various concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 ng/mL for free and total PSA. This wearable RDT reader platform running on Google Glass combines a hands-free sensing and image capture interface with powerful servers running our custom image processing codes, and it can be quite useful for real-time spatiotemporal tracking of various diseases and personal medical conditions, providing a valuable tool for epidemiology and mobile health. PMID:24571349

  20. Use of Diagnostic Testing to Detect Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kathleen; Lipshultz, Larry I.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of the infertile male continues to be a clinical challenge of increasing significance with considerable emotional and financial burdens. Many physiological, environmental and genetic factors are implicated; however, the etiology of suboptimal semen quality is poorly understood. This review focuses on the diagnostic testing currently available, as well as future directions that will be helpful for the practicing urologist and other clinicians to fully evaluate the infertile male. PMID:21088937

  1. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  2. Google glass based immunochromatographic diagnostic test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Steve; Caire, Romain; Cortazar, Bingen; Turan, Mehmet; Wong, Andrew; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Integration of optical imagers and sensors into recently emerging wearable computational devices allows for simpler and more intuitive methods of integrating biomedical imaging and medical diagnostics tasks into existing infrastructures. Here we demonstrate the ability of one such device, the Google Glass, to perform qualitative and quantitative analysis of immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) using a voice-commandable hands-free software-only interface, as an alternative to larger and more bulky desktop or handheld units. Using the built-in camera of Glass to image one or more RDTs (labeled with Quick Response (QR) codes), our Glass software application uploads the captured image and related information (e.g., user name, GPS, etc.) to our servers for remote analysis and storage. After digital analysis of the RDT images, the results are transmitted back to the originating Glass device, and made available through a website in geospatial and tabular representations. We tested this system on qualitative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and quantitative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) RDTs. For qualitative HIV tests, we demonstrate successful detection and labeling (i.e., yes/no decisions) for up to 6-fold dilution of HIV samples. For quantitative measurements, we activated and imaged PSA concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 ng/mL and generated calibration curves relating the RDT line intensity values to PSA concentration. By providing automated digitization of both qualitative and quantitative test results, this wearable colorimetric diagnostic test reader platform on Google Glass can reduce operator errors caused by poor training, provide real-time spatiotemporal mapping of test results, and assist with remote monitoring of various biomedical conditions.

  3. Bioaccessibility tests accurately estimate bioavailability of lead to quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W. Nelson; Basta, Nicholas T; Chaney, Rufus L.; Henry, Paula F.; Mosby, David; Rattner, Barnett A.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Sprague, Dan; Weber, John

    2016-01-01

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with phosphorus significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. Bioaccessibility of Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter (24%), or present as Pb sulfate (18%). Additional Pb was associated with P (chloropyromorphite, hydroxypyromorphite and tertiary Pb phosphate), and with Pb carbonates, leadhillite (a lead sulfate carbonate hydroxide), and Pb sulfide. The formation of chloropyromorphite reduced the bioavailability of Pb and the amendment of Pb-contaminated soils with P may be a thermodynamically favored means to sequester Pb.

  4. Clonality Testing in Veterinary Medicine: A Review With Diagnostic Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Keller, S M; Vernau, W; Moore, P F

    2016-07-01

    The accurate distinction of reactive and neoplastic lymphoid proliferations can present challenges. Given the different prognoses and treatment strategies, a correct diagnosis is crucial. Molecular clonality assays assess rearranged lymphocyte antigen receptor gene diversity and can help differentiate reactive from neoplastic lymphoid proliferations. Molecular clonality assays are commonly used to assess atypical, mixed, or mature lymphoid proliferations; small tissue fragments that lack architecture; and fluid samples. In addition, clonality testing can be utilized to track neoplastic clones over time or across anatomic sites. Molecular clonality assays are not stand-alone tests but useful adjuncts that follow clinical, morphologic, and immunophenotypic assessment. Even though clonality testing provides valuable information in a variety of situations, the complexities and pitfalls of this method, as well as its dependency on the experience of the interpreter, are often understated. In addition, a lack of standardized terminology, laboratory practices, and interpretational guidelines hinders the reproducibility of clonality testing across laboratories in veterinary medicine. The objectives of this review are twofold. First, the review is intended to familiarize the diagnostic pathologist or interested clinician with the concepts, potential pitfalls, and limitations of clonality testing. Second, the review strives to provide a basis for future harmonization of clonality testing in veterinary medicine by providing diagnostic guidelines.

  5. Bioaccessibility tests accurately estimate bioavailability of lead to quail.

    PubMed

    Beyer, W Nelson; Basta, Nicholas T; Chaney, Rufus L; Henry, Paula F P; Mosby, David E; Rattner, Barnett A; Scheckel, Kirk G; Sprague, Daniel T; Weber, John S

    2016-09-01

    Hazards of soil-borne lead (Pb) to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, the authors measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from 5 Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33% to 63%, with a mean of approximately 50%. Treatment of 2 of the soils with phosphorus (P) significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. Bioaccessibility of Pb in the test soils was then measured in 6 in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability: the relative bioavailability leaching procedure at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the Ohio State University in vitro gastrointestinal method, the urban soil bioaccessible lead test, the modified physiologically based extraction test, and the waterfowl physiologically based extraction test. All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the relative bioavailability leaching procedure at pH 2.5 and Ohio State University in vitro gastrointestinal tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter (24%), or present as Pb sulfate (18%). Additional Pb was associated with P (chloropyromorphite, hydroxypyromorphite, and tertiary Pb phosphate) and with Pb carbonates, leadhillite (a lead sulfate carbonate hydroxide), and Pb sulfide. The formation of chloropyromorphite reduced the bioavailability of Pb, and the amendment of Pb-contaminated soils with P may be a thermodynamically favored means to sequester Pb. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2311-2319. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of

  6. Development of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, B.

    2001-12-01

    The starting point for questions in the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT) Version 2.0 was two precursor surveys, the STAR Evaluation by Philip M. Sadler and Michael Zeilik's Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 1.0. Questions were selected or developed for the new ADT which (1) addressed concepts included in most introductory astronomy courses for non-science majors, (2) included only concepts recognizable to most high-school graduates, (3) focused on one concept only, and (4) stressed concepts and not jargon. This version was administered to about 1000 students at four colleges and universities. The statistical results, e.g., item discrimination, guided re-writing and elimination of questions. Sixty student interviews at Montana State and the University of Maryland, as well as thirty written responses to the questions in open-ended format, were the basis for determining if the questions were interpreted by the students as intended. This student input was also the basis for distractors (wrong answers) reflecting the ideas and the words of the students themselves. After revision, the ADT was administered the next semester to 1557 students enrolled in 22 introductory classes, twenty students were interviewed, and comments solicited from the instructors of those classes. The result was the final ADT Version 2.0, which consists of 21 content and 12 student background multiple-choice questions. This work has been partly supported by NSF grant # DGE-9714489.

  7. New challenges for BRCA testing: a view from the diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Increased demand for BRCA testing is placing pressures on diagnostic laboratories to raise their mutation screening capacity and handle the challenges associated with classifying BRCA sequence variants for clinical significance, for example interpretation of pathogenic mutations or variants of unknown significance, accurate determination of large genomic rearrangements and detection of somatic mutations in DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumour samples. Many diagnostic laboratories are adopting next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to increase their screening capacity and reduce processing time and unit costs. However, migration to NGS introduces complexities arising from choice of components of the BRCA testing workflow, such as NGS platform, enrichment method and bioinformatics analysis process. An efficient, cost-effective accurate mutation detection strategy and a standardised, systematic approach to the reporting of BRCA test results is imperative for diagnostic laboratories. This review covers the challenges of BRCA testing from the perspective of a diagnostics laboratory.

  8. New challenges for BRCA testing: a view from the diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Increased demand for BRCA testing is placing pressures on diagnostic laboratories to raise their mutation screening capacity and handle the challenges associated with classifying BRCA sequence variants for clinical significance, for example interpretation of pathogenic mutations or variants of unknown significance, accurate determination of large genomic rearrangements and detection of somatic mutations in DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumour samples. Many diagnostic laboratories are adopting next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to increase their screening capacity and reduce processing time and unit costs. However, migration to NGS introduces complexities arising from choice of components of the BRCA testing workflow, such as NGS platform, enrichment method and bioinformatics analysis process. An efficient, cost-effective accurate mutation detection strategy and a standardised, systematic approach to the reporting of BRCA test results is imperative for diagnostic laboratories. This review covers the challenges of BRCA testing from the perspective of a diagnostics laboratory. PMID:27514839

  9. [Critical reading of articles about diagnostic tests (part II): Analyzing results].

    PubMed

    Moratalla Rodríguez, G

    2015-01-01

    A new diagnostic test needs to be validated through comparison with a reference standard in an appropriate spectrum of patients. Diagnostic tests are not perfectly accurate; on the contrary, there can be false-positive and false-negative findings. A good diagnostic test is that which provides an acceptable proportion of positive results when a determinate condition is present in patients and an acceptable proportion of negative results when it is absent. The best measure of the usefulness of a diagnostic test is the likelihood ratio, which informs us to what degree a particular result is more likely in a person in whom a condition is present than in a person in whom the condition is absent. The present article discusses the fundamental statistical concepts necessary to interpret the results section of an article about a diagnostic test; however, the approach is clearly oriented toward clinical practice, with emphasis on concepts rather than mathematics.

  10. RHIC electron lens test bench diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, D.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Miller, T.; Pikin, A.; Thieberger, P.

    2011-05-16

    An Electron Lens (E-Lens) system will be installed in RHIC to increase luminosity by counteracting the head-on beam-beam interaction. The proton beam collisions at the RHIC experimental locations will introduce a tune spread due to a difference of tune shifts between small and large amplitude particles. A low energy electron beam will be used to improve luminosity and lifetime of the colliding beams by reducing the betatron tune shift and spread. In preparation for the Electron Lens installation next year, a test bench facility will be used to gain experience with many sub-systems. This paper will discuss the diagnostics related to measuring the electron beam parameters.

  11. SSME Post Test Diagnostic System: Systems Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickmore, Timothy

    1995-01-01

    An assessment of engine and component health is routinely made after each test firing or flight firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Currently, this health assessment is done by teams of engineers who manually review sensor data, performance data, and engine and component operating histories. Based on review of information from these various sources, an evaluation is made as to the health of each component of the SSME and the preparedness of the engine for another test or flight. The objective of this project - the SSME Post Test Diagnostic System (PTDS) - is to develop a computer program which automates the analysis of test data from the SSME in order to detect and diagnose anomalies. This report primarily covers work on the Systems Section of the PTDS, which automates the analyses performed by the systems/performance group at the Propulsion Branch of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This group is responsible for assessing the overall health and performance of the engine, and detecting and diagnosing anomalies which involve multiple components (other groups are responsible for analyzing the behavior of specific components). The PTDS utilizes several advanced software technologies to perform its analyses. Raw test data is analyzed using signal processing routines which detect features in the data, such as spikes, shifts, peaks, and drifts. Component analyses are performed by expert systems, which use 'rules-of-thumb' obtained from interviews with the MSFC data analysts to detect and diagnose anomalies. The systems analysis is performed using case-based reasoning. Results of all analyses are stored in a relational database and displayed via an X-window-based graphical user interface which provides ranked lists of anomalies and observations by engine component, along with supporting data plots for each.

  12. Uncomplicated malaria in children: The place of rapid diagnostic test

    PubMed Central

    Elechi, Hassan Abdullahi; Rabasa, Adamu Ibrahim; Bashir, Muhammad Faruk; Gofama, Mustapha Modu; Ibrahim, Halima Abubakar; Askira, Umoru Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Malaria has remained a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the under-five children in Nigeria. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of malaria is necessary in controlling this high burden and preventing unnecessary use of anti-malarial drugs. Malaria rapid diagnostic test (MRDT) offers the hope of achieving this goal. However, the performance of these kits among the most vulnerable age group to malaria is inadequate. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 433 out-patients, aged <5 years with fever or history of fever were enrolled. Each candidate was tested for malaria parasitaemia using ACON; malaria pf. Thick and thin films were also prepared from the same finger prick blood for each candidate. Result: Malaria rapid diagnostic test had sensitivity of 8.3%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 74%. The sensitivity of MRDT increased with increasing age. This effect of age on sensitivity was statistically significant (P = 0.007). Similarly parasite density had significant effect on the sensitivity of MRDT (P = <0.001). Conclusion: Histidine-rich protein-2 based MRDT is not a reliable mean of diagnosing malaria in the under-five age children with acute uncomplicated malaria. PMID:25838621

  13. 40 CFR 85.2207 - Onboard diagnostic test standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... described in 40 CFR 86.1806. ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Onboard diagnostic test standards. 85... Tests § 85.2207 Onboard diagnostic test standards. (a) A vehicle shall fail the OBD test if it is a...

  14. Neural net diagnostics for VLSI test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T.; Tseng, H.; Wu, A.; Dogan, N.; Meador, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of neural network pattern analysis algorithms to the IC fault diagnosis problem. A fault diagnostic is a decision rule combining what is known about an ideal circuit test response with information about how it is distorted by fabrication variations and measurement noise. The rule is used to detect fault existence in fabricated circuits using real test equipment. Traditional statistical techniques may be used to achieve this goal, but they can employ unrealistic a priori assumptions about measurement data. Our approach to this problem employs an adaptive pattern analysis technique based on feedforward neural networks. During training, a feedforward network automatically captures unknown sample distributions. This is important because distributions arising from the nonlinear effects of process variation can be more complex than is typically assumed. A feedforward network is also able to extract measurement features which contribute significantly to making a correct decision. Traditional feature extraction techniques employ matrix manipulations which can be particularly costly for large measurement vectors. In this paper we discuss a software system which we are developing that uses this approach. We also provide a simple example illustrating the use of the technique for fault detection in an operational amplifier.

  15. Bioaccessibility tests accurately estimate bioavailability of lead to quail

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb, we incorporated Pb-contaminated soils or Pb acetate into diets for Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), fed the quail for 15 days, and ...

  16. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE BIOAVAILABILITY OF LEAD TO QUAIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contami...

  17. Comparing diagnostic tests: trials in people with discordant test results.

    PubMed

    Hooper, R; Díaz-Ordaz, K; Takeda, A; Khan, K

    2013-06-30

    Diagnostic tests are traditionally compared for accuracy against a gold standard but can also be compared prospectively in a trial. A conventional trial comparing two tests would randomize each participant to a testing strategy, but a more efficient alternative is to give both tests to all participants and follow up those with discordant results. Participants could be randomized before or after testing. The statistical analysis of such a trial has not previously been described. We investigated two estimates of the risk difference for a binary outcome: one based on analysing outcomes as if from a conventional trial and one combining estimates of different parameters in the manner of a decision analysis. We show that the trial estimate and decision analysis estimate are both unbiased and derive approximate formulae for their standard errors. By using the decision analysis estimate (but not the trial estimate), the same precision can be achieved by randomizing before testing as by randomizing after. To avoid destroying equipoise, and to allow consenting and randomizing to be carried out at the same visit, we recommend randomizing before testing. Giving both tests to all participants means fewer need to be recruited: in one example from the literature, the proposed design was nearly four times more efficient in this sense than a conventional trial design. PMID:23172716

  18. An accurate test for acute appendicitis: In-111 WBC imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dosRemedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.

    1985-05-01

    The decision to operate when acute appendicitis (APPY) is suspected is often difficult. Surgeons accept up to a 20% false positive rate to avoid any delay that may result in appendiceal rupture and peritonitis. The authors have successfully improved early diagnostic accuracy by using abdominal imaging beginning 2 hours after injecting In-111 labeled WBC. Patients with clear-cut (APPY) had laparotomy and were not studied. Those who were to be observed in the ER for possible (APPY) had their leukocytes harvested, labeled with In-111 oxine, and reinjected. Abnormal localized activity in the right lower quadrant (RLQ) imaged at 2 hours was graded relative to bone marrow activity (8M): 0, 1+BM. When available the surgical specimen was imaged for In-111 activity. Of 31 patients studied there were 13 with positive scans for (APPY) all surgically confirmed. There were 4 additional abnormal studies all demonstrating known diagnostic patterns, 2 of pertonitis and 2 of colitis. There were 14 negative studies in 8 of whom the clinical course was benign; the remaining 6 had laparotomy with 3 having (APPY) and 3 not. Thus there were no false positives and 3 false negatives. One case negative at 2 hours had appendiceal activity later. The 3 cases with 3+ activity all had apendiceal abscesses. This new application of In-111 oxine WBC imaging is safe, simple, sensitive and specific. It shortens the time to surgical intervention and should reduce the surgical false positive rate.

  19. Diagnostic value of the head-up tilt test and the R-test in patients with syncope

    PubMed Central

    RADDINO, RICCARDO; ZANINI, GREGORIANA; ROBBA, DEBORA; BONADEI, IVANO; CHIEPPA, FEDERICA; PEDRINAZZI, CLAUDIO; CARETTA, GIORGIO; MADURERI, ALBERTO; VIZZARDI, ENRICO; DEI CAS, LIVIO

    2006-01-01

    The diagnostic value of the head-up tilt test (HUTT) in discovering vasovagal syndrome depends on the pre-test probability. An accurate anamnesis and clinical examination screens the patients indicated for the HUTT. In patients with unexplained syncope, the R-test is an alternative procedure to discover its cause. In our study, we evaluated the diagnostic significance of the HUTT in a group of 211 patients and of the R-test in a subgroup of 45 patients with negative HUTT results and with negative traditional Holter ECG monitoring (24 hr). PMID:21977267

  20. Diagnostic value of exercise testing in asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zejda, J. )

    1989-01-01

    The diagnostic value of simple exercise testing was examined in 81 current male asbestos-cement workers, divided into four groups according to the International Labour Office (ILO) category of irregular opacities: 0/0, 25; 1/1, 24; 1/2, 22; and 2/2, 10 men. An increasing X-ray score was accompanied by more severe functional abnormality in keeping with the development of a restrictive defect. Symptom-limited oxygen uptake (VO2SL) did not depend on the X-ray grade and was 76.7, 71.9, 68.7, and 73.5% pv, respectively, for the four groups. Subjects with ILO score 1/1 had significantly higher exercise ventilation at O2 uptake of 1.01.min-1 (VE 1.0) than those with grade 0/0. End-exercise tidal volume (VTSL in 1) decreased with an increasing X-ray score: 2.14, 1.98, 1.85, and 1.62, respectively. VTSL standardized for vital capacity (VTSL/VC) followed the same pattern. Asbestosis was diagnosed in 25 men, in whom VE 1.0 was significantly higher (p less than .02) and VTSL lower (p less than .01) than in the 0/0 group. VO2SL was similar in both groups. The findings suggest that VE 1.0 and VTSL may be early functional indicators of asbestos-related interstitial lung fibrosis. The measurement of both exercise indices may increase the certainty of clinical diagnosis of asbestosis in subjects with less advanced disease.

  1. Diagnostic criteria and laboratory tests for disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideo; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Hatada, Tuyoshi

    2012-12-01

    Three diagnostic criteria for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) have been established by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH) and the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine. The diagnostic criteria involving global coagulation tests, such as the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare criteria and the ISTH overt diagnostic criteria, are first-generation DIC diagnostic criteria, those involving global coagulation tests and changes in these tests such as the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine criteria, are second-generation DIC diagnostic criteria, and those including non-overt DIC diagnostic criteria involving global coagulation tests, changes in these tests and hemostatic molecular markers will be the future (third-generation) DIC diagnostic criteria. There are no significant differences in the three diagnostic criteria with respect to predicting poor outcomes. Therefore, the third generation of diagnostic criteria including hemostatic molecular markers is expected to be established. Standardization and the determination of adequate cutoff values should be required for each laboratory test.

  2. Assessing Diagnostic Tests II: Grading on a Curve.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    In this Investigators' Corner, I continue discussing how to introduce and assess new diagnostic tests to replace older tests that are considered gold standards. Specifically, I talk about how to assess a "family" of diagnostics, and how to choose an optimal "family member."

  3. Diagnostic Testing at UK Universities: An E-Mail Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Jonathan; Levi, Margaret; Wilson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In July 2009, an e-mail survey was sent to various UK universities to gain information regarding current practices concerning mathematics diagnostic testing, and to provide an update from the review "Diagnostic Testing for Mathematics" published by the LTSN MathsTEAM Project in 2003. A total of 38 university departments were contacted and the…

  4. Clinical Utility of Prostate Carcinoma Molecular Diagnostic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Shappell, Scott B

    2008-01-01

    Instead of relying on serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to identify patients for prostate biopsy, new laboratory tests are needed that have improved specificity for prostate carcinoma (CaP), allow accurate classification of clinically insignificant CaPs, allow for detection of clinically significant CaP in patients without elevated serum PSA, and allow for identification of aggressive forms of CaP, which may warrant adjunctive or even molecularly targeted therapy in the future. Over the last several years, high-throughput gene expression profiling and proteinomics have led to the identification of genes and proteins that are specifically overexpressed in CaP. Molecular diagnostic techniques readily translated to the clinical laboratory have been incorporated into the development of new tests based on these novel molecular alterations in CaP. Some of these tests already have well-documented clinical utility, such as in facilitating prostate biopsy decisions, and are routinely available. The current review focuses on the biological, clinical, and laboratory aspects of the most promising of these current and near-future molecular CaP tests. PMID:18470278

  5. Astronomy Diagnostic Test Results Reflect Course Goals and Show Room for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    The results of administering the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT) to introductory astronomy students at Henry Ford Community College over three years have shown gains comparable with national averages. Results have also accurately corresponded to course goals, showing greater gains in topics covered in more detail, and lower gains in topics covered…

  6. PIC Reading and Spelling Diagnostic Test Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, N. J.

    This diagnostic skills checklist enables the methods and materials specialists to note the reading and spelling skills the child has mastered, those skills which are weak or not developed, and those skills which are clearly beyond the child's capability of mastering because of insufficiently developed abilities at lower, prerequisite levels. Also…

  7. Smartphone-Based Accurate Analysis of Retinal Vasculature towards Point-of-Care Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiayu; Ding, Wenxiang; Wang, Xuemin; Cao, Ruofan; Zhang, Maiye; Lv, Peilin; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vasculature analysis is important for the early diagnostics of various eye and systemic diseases, making it a potentially useful biomarker, especially for resource-limited regions and countries. Here we developed a smartphone-based retinal image analysis system for point-of-care diagnostics that is able to load a fundus image, segment retinal vessels, analyze individual vessel width, and store or uplink results. The proposed system was not only evaluated on widely used public databases and compared with the state-of-the-art methods, but also validated on clinical images directly acquired with a smartphone. An Android app is also developed to facilitate on-site application of the proposed methods. Both visual assessment and quantitative assessment showed that the proposed methods achieved comparable results to the state-of-the-art methods that require high-standard workstations. The proposed system holds great potential for the early diagnostics of various diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, for resource-limited regions and countries. PMID:27698369

  8. Better Tests, Better Care: Improved Diagnostics for Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Caliendo, Angela M.; Gilbert, David N.; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Hanson, Kimberly E.; May, Larissa; Quinn, Thomas C.; Tenover, Fred C.; Alland, David; Blaschke, Anne J.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Hirschhorn, Lisa R.; Joseph, W. Patrick; Karchmer, Tobi; MacIntyre, Ann T.; Reller, L. Barth; Jackson, Audrey F.

    2013-01-01

    In this IDSA policy paper, we review the current diagnostic landscape, including unmet needs and emerging technologies, and assess the challenges to the development and clinical integration of improved tests. To fulfill the promise of emerging diagnostics, IDSA presents recommendations that address a host of identified barriers. Achieving these goals will require the engagement and coordination of a number of stakeholders, including Congress, funding and regulatory bodies, public health agencies, the diagnostics industry, healthcare systems, professional societies, and individual clinicians. PMID:24200831

  9. 40 CFR 85.2231 - Onboard diagnostic test equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... interface to the vehicle shall include a plug that conforms to the requirements and specifications of 40 CFR... CFR 86.1806. ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Onboard diagnostic test...

  10. Concordance in diagnostic testing for respiratory pathogens of Bighorn Sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliable diagnostic tests are essential for disease investigation and management. This is particularly true for diseases of free-ranging wildlife where sampling is logistically difficult precluding retesting. Clinical assays for wildlife diseases frequently vary among laboratories because of lack ...

  11. The Feasibility of a Diagnostic Media Test System Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Alfred V.

    Research investigated the feasibility of a diagnostic media test system. Two distinct tests were developed for sixth grade and university populations, each having: 1) a main phase with three specific teaching sequences, one for each media form; 2) test items for each teaching sequence; and 3) a validation phase with one teaching sequence…

  12. Modules and supporting hardware for FASTBUS test and diagnostic purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolucci, B.

    1981-10-01

    This paper contains detailed descriptions and circuitry of some modules and supporting hardware for the FASTBUS System developed at SLAC. A fast slave-only Memory Module (PRIMO), a Dummy Module (U2), a FASTBUS Test Box (LAIKA), and a Bus Display Bar (BBD) have been built, tested and used for test and diagnostic purposes for FASTBUS.

  13. Raman Spectroscopy Provides a Powerful Diagnostic Tool for Accurate Determination of Albumin Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Horowitz, Gary L.; Kang, Jeon Woong; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Barman, Ishan

    2012-01-01

    We present the first demonstration of glycated albumin detection and quantification using Raman spectroscopy without the addition of reagents. Glycated albumin is an important marker for monitoring the long-term glycemic history of diabetics, especially as its concentrations, in contrast to glycated hemoglobin levels, are unaffected by changes in erythrocyte life times. Clinically, glycated albumin concentrations show a strong correlation with the development of serious diabetes complications including nephropathy and retinopathy. In this article, we propose and evaluate the efficacy of Raman spectroscopy for determination of this important analyte. By utilizing the pre-concentration obtained through drop-coating deposition, we show that glycation of albumin leads to subtle, but consistent, changes in vibrational features, which with the help of multivariate classification techniques can be used to discriminate glycated albumin from the unglycated variant with 100% accuracy. Moreover, we demonstrate that the calibration model developed on the glycated albumin spectral dataset shows high predictive power, even at substantially lower concentrations than those typically encountered in clinical practice. In fact, the limit of detection for glycated albumin measurements is calculated to be approximately four times lower than its minimum physiological concentration. Importantly, in relation to the existing detection methods for glycated albumin, the proposed method is also completely reagent-free, requires barely any sample preparation and has the potential for simultaneous determination of glycated hemoglobin levels as well. Given these key advantages, we believe that the proposed approach can provide a uniquely powerful tool for quantification of glycation status of proteins in biopharmaceutical development as well as for glycemic marker determination in routine clinical diagnostics in the future. PMID:22393405

  14. Regulating whole exome sequencing as a diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Lapin, Valentina; Mighion, Lindsey C; da Silva, Cristina P; Cuperus, Ymkje; Bean, Lora J H; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, there has been a flood of new technology in the sequencing arena. The onset of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has resulted in the vast increase in genetic diagnostic testing available to the ordering physician. Whole exome sequencing (WES) has become available as a diagnostic test performed in certified clinical laboratories. This has led to increased presence in the diagnostic marketplace, increased consumer awareness, and the question has been raised by various stakeholders to whether there is sufficient stringent regulation of WES and other NGS-based tests. We discuss the various WES services currently available in the marketplace, current regulation of WES as a laboratory developed test, the proposed FDA involvement in its oversight as well as the response of various laboratory groups that provide these diagnostic services. Overall, a rigorous process oversight and assessment of inter-lab reproducibility is strongly warranted for WES as it is used as a diagnostic test, but regulation should be mindful of the excessive administrative burden on academic and smaller diagnostic laboratories.

  15. Comparison of the Minnesota Percepto-Diagnostic Test-Revised and Bender-Gestalt in Predicting Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Gerald B.; Vance, Booney

    1993-01-01

    Investigated whether Minnesota Percepto-Diagnostic Test-Revised (MPD-R) or Bender-Gestalt Test (BG) would more accurately predict achievement at first-, third-, and fifth-grade levels. Administered both tests to 84 children in counterbalanced order. Results indicated that MPD-R was better predictor of achievement than BG, especially at first- and…

  16. Diagnostic tests in allergy to green coffee.

    PubMed

    Osterman, K; Johansson, S G; Zetterström, O

    1985-07-01

    Twenty-two coffee roastery workers with work-related symptoms of various degree from the eyes, nose or bronchi were tested with partly purified water-soluble extract from dust of green coffee beans (GCB). Eighteen persons had a positive prick test, eight a positive bronchial provocation test and seven a positive nasal provocation test. Fourteen had a positive methacholine test, indicating unspecific bronchial hyperreactivity. Specific IgE antibodies to GCB extract were found in sera of 11 workers and to castor bean (CB) extract in 16. The workers measured their lung function with an air flow meter, three times a day for 1 week, and the values were lower in the second half of the week for the workers with IgE antibodies to GCB, but not for the others. It is concluded that the case history, prick test, RAST, and simple lung function tests for one or a few weeks are the best tools when investigating occupational allergy. When the allergen is unknown, but the occurrence of an IgE-mediated allergy is suspected, serial lung function measurements and determinations of total serum IgE, in addition to taking a careful case history, are valuable methods with which to start the investigation.

  17. Improved diagnostic testing and malaria treatment practices in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Davidson H; Ndhlovu, Micky; Zurovac, Dejan; Fox, Matthew; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Chanda, Pascalina; Sipilinyambe, Naawa; Simon, Jonathon L; Snow, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Context Improving the accuracy of malaria diagnosis using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) has been proposed as an approach for reducing over-treatment of malaria in the current era of widespread implementation of artemisinin-based combination therapy in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective To assess the impact of microscopy and RDT use on prescription of antimalarials. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional, cluster sample survey of all sick outpatients seen at a health facility during one working day that included all public and mission health facilities in four sentinel districts in Zambia. Main Outcome Measures Proportions of patients undergoing malaria diagnostic procedures and receiving anti-malarial treatment. Results 17% of the 104 health facilities surveyed had functional microscopy, 63% had RDTs available, and 73% had at least one type of malaria diagnostics. 27.8% of subjects with fever (suspected malaria) seen in health facilities with malaria diagnostics were tested and 44.6% were positive. 58.4% of patients with negative blood smears were prescribed an antimalarial as were 35.5% of those with a negative RDT result. 65.9% of the subjects with fever who did not have diagnostic tests done were also prescribed antimalarials. In facilities with artemether-lumefantrine in stock, this antimalarial was prescribed to a larger proportion of febrile patients with a positive diagnostic test (blood smear 75.0%; RDT 70.4%) than those with a negative diagnostic test (blood smear 30.4%; RDT 26.7%). Conclusion Despite efforts to scale up the provision of malaria diagnostics in Zambia they continue to be under-utilized and patients with negative test results frequently receive antimalarials. The provision of new tools to reduce the inappropriate use of new expensive antimalarial treatments must be accompanied by a paradigm shift in clinical management of patients without evidence of malaria infection. PMID:17519412

  18. Whole Genome Sequencing Increases Molecular Diagnostic Yield Compared with Current Diagnostic Testing for Inherited Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ellingford, Jamie M.; Barton, Stephanie; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Williams, Simon G.; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; O'Sullivan, James; Lamb, Janine A.; Perveen, Rahat; Hall, Georgina; Newman, William G.; Bishop, Paul N.; Roberts, Stephen A.; Leach, Rick; Tearle, Rick; Bayliss, Stuart; Ramsden, Simon C.; Nemeth, Andrea H.; Black, Graeme C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of whole genome sequencing (WGS) with targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the diagnosis of inherited retinal disease (IRD). Design Case series. Participants A total of 562 patients diagnosed with IRD. Methods We performed a direct comparative analysis of current molecular diagnostics with WGS. We retrospectively reviewed the findings from a diagnostic NGS DNA test for 562 patients with IRD. A subset of 46 of 562 patients (encompassing potential clinical outcomes of diagnostic analysis) also underwent WGS, and we compared mutation detection rates and molecular diagnostic yields. In addition, we compared the sensitivity and specificity of the 2 techniques to identify known single nucleotide variants (SNVs) using 6 control samples with publically available genotype data. Main Outcome Measures Diagnostic yield of genomic testing. Results Across known disease-causing genes, targeted NGS and WGS achieved similar levels of sensitivity and specificity for SNV detection. However, WGS also identified 14 clinically relevant genetic variants through WGS that had not been identified by NGS diagnostic testing for the 46 individuals with IRD. These variants included large deletions and variants in noncoding regions of the genome. Identification of these variants confirmed a molecular diagnosis of IRD for 11 of the 33 individuals referred for WGS who had not obtained a molecular diagnosis through targeted NGS testing. Weighted estimates, accounting for population structure, suggest that WGS methods could result in an overall 29% (95% confidence interval, 15–45) uplift in diagnostic yield. Conclusions We show that WGS methods can detect disease-causing genetic variants missed by current NGS diagnostic methodologies for IRD and thereby demonstrate the clinical utility and additional value of WGS. PMID:26872967

  19. Understanding the incremental value of novel diagnostic tests for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Dowdy, David

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is a major source of global mortality caused by infection, partly because of a tremendous ongoing burden of undiagnosed disease. Improved diagnostic technology may play an increasingly crucial part in global efforts to end tuberculosis, but the ability of diagnostic tests to curb tuberculosis transmission is dependent on multiple factors, including the time taken by a patient to seek health care, the patient's symptoms, and the patterns of transmission before diagnosis. Novel diagnostic assays for tuberculosis have conventionally been evaluated on the basis of characteristics such as sensitivity and specificity, using assumptions that probably overestimate the impact of diagnostic tests on transmission. We argue for a shift in focus to the evaluation of such tests' incremental value, defining outcomes that reflect each test's purpose (for example, transmissions averted) and comparing systems with the test against those without, in terms of those outcomes. Incremental value can also be measured in units of outcome per incremental unit of resource (for example, money or human capacity). Using a novel, simplified model of tuberculosis transmission that addresses some of the limitations of earlier tuberculosis diagnostic models, we demonstrate that the incremental value of any novel test depends not just on its accuracy, but also on elements such as patient behaviour, tuberculosis natural history and health systems. By integrating these factors into a single unified framework, we advance an approach to the evaluation of new diagnostic tests for tuberculosis that considers the incremental value at the population level and demonstrates how additional data could inform more-effective implementation of tuberculosis diagnostic tests under various conditions.

  20. 76 FR 39110 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services... participate in the Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration. The Demonstration... complex diagnostic laboratory test under the Demonstration. The statute requires a Report to Congress...

  1. Alzheimer's disease dementia guidelines for diagnostic testing: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Arevalo-Rodriguez, Ingrid; Pedraza, Olga L; Rodríguez, Andrea; Sánchez, Erick; Gich, Ignasi; Solà, Ivan; Bonfill, Xavier; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease dementia (AD dementia) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases worldwide, with a growing incidence during the last decades. Clinical diagnosis of cognitive impairment and presence of AD biomarkers have become important issues for early and adequate treatment. We performed a systematic literature search and quality appraisal of AD dementia guidelines, published between 2005 and 2011, which contained diagnostic recommendations on AD dementia. We also analyzed diagnostic recommendations related to the use of brief cognitive tests, neuropsychological evaluation, and AD biomarkers. Of the 537 retrieved references, 15 met the selection criteria. We found that Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE)-II domains such as applicability and editorial independence had the lowest scores. The wide variability on assessment of quality of evidence and strength of recommendations were the main concerns identified regarding diagnostic testing. Although the appropriate methodology for clinical practice guideline development is well known, the quality of diagnostic AD dementia guidelines can be significantly improved. PMID:23288575

  2. Translating biological parameters into clinically useful diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Carney, Stuart; Boutros, Nash N

    2009-08-01

    Psychiatry has lagged behind other specialties in developing diagnostic laboratory tests for the purpose of confirming or ruling out a diagnosis. Biological research into the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders has, however, yielded some highly replicable abnormalities that have the potential for development into clinically useful diagnostic tests. To achieve this goal, a process for systematic translation must be developed and implemented. Building on our previous work, we review a proposed process using four clearly defined steps. We conclude that biological parameters currently face challenges in their pathways to becoming diagnostic tests because of both the premature release and premature abandonment of tests. Attention to a systematic translation process aided by these principles may help to avoid these problems.

  3. When is diagnostic testing inappropriate or irrational? Acceptable regret approach.

    PubMed

    Hozo, Iztok; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    The authors provide a new model within the framework of theories of bounded rationality for the observed physicians' behavior that their ordering of diagnostic tests may not be rational. Contrary to the prevailing thinking, the authors find that physicians do not act irrationally or inappropriately when they order diagnostic tests in usual clinical practice. When acceptable regret (i.e., regret that a decision maker finds tolerable upon making a wrong decision) is taken into account, the authors show that physicians tend to order diagnostic tests at a higher level of pretest probability of disease than predicted by expected utility theory. They also show why physicians tend to overtest when regret about erroneous decisions is extremely small. Finally, they explain variations in the practice of medicine. They demonstrate that in the same clinical situation, different decision makers might have different acceptable regret thresholds for withholding treatment, for ordering a diagnostic test, or for administering treatment. This in turn means that for some decision makers, the most rational strategy is to do nothing, whereas for others, it may be to order a diagnostic test, and still for others, choosing treatment may be the most rational course of action. PMID:18480041

  4. Psychoacoustic Assessment of Speech Communication Systems. The Diagnostic Discrimination Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grether, Craig Blaine

    The present report traces the rationale, development and experimental evaluation of the Diagnostic Discrimination Test (DDT). The DDT is a three-choice test of consonant discriminability of the perceptual/acoustic dimensions of consonant phonemes within specific vowel contexts. The DDT was created and developed in an attempt to provide a…

  5. The Hug-up Test: A New, Sensitive Diagnostic Test for Supraspinatus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Lei; Ao, Ying-Fang; Yan, Hui; Cui, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: The supraspinatus tendon is the most commonly affected tendon in rotator cuff tears. Early detection of a supraspinatus tear using an accurate physical examination is, therefore, important. However, the currently used physical tests for detecting supraspinatus tears are poor diagnostic indicators and involve a wide range of sensitivity and specificity values. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a new physical test for the diagnosis of supraspinatus tears and evaluate its accuracy in comparison with conventional tests. Methods: Between November 2012 and January 2014, 200 consecutive patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy were prospectively evaluated preoperatively. The hug-up test, empty can (EC) test, full can (FC) test, Neer impingement sign, and Hawkins-Kennedy impingement sign were used and compared statistically for their accuracy in terms of supraspinatus tears, with arthroscopic findings as the gold standard. Muscle strength was precisely quantified using an electronic digital tensiometer. Results: The prevalence of supraspinatus tears was 76.5%. The hug-up test demonstrated the highest sensitivity (94.1%), with a low negative likelihood ratio (NLR, 0.08) and comparable specificity (76.6%) compared with the other four tests. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the hug-up test was 0.854, with no statistical difference compared with the EC test (z = 1.438, P = 0.075) or the FC test (z = 1.498, P = 0.067). The hug-up test showed no statistical difference in terms of detecting different tear patterns according to the position (χ2 = 0.578, P = 0.898) and size (Fisher's exact test, P > 0.999) compared with the arthroscopic examination. The interobserver reproducibility of the hug-up test was high, with a kappa coefficient of 0.823. Conclusions: The hug-up test can accurately detect supraspinatus tears with a high sensitivity, comparable specificity, and low NLR compared with the conventional clinical tests and

  6. Safety of falciparum malaria diagnostic strategy based on rapid diagnostic tests in returning travellers and migrants: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (RDTs) allow accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment. Validation of their usefulness in travellers with fever was needed. The safety of a strategy to diagnose falciparum malaria based on RDT followed by immediate or delayed microscopy reading at first attendance was evaluated in one referral hospital in Switzerland. Methods A retrospective study was conducted in the outpatient clinic and emergency ward of University Hospital, covering a period of eight years (1999–2007). The study was conducted in the outpatient clinic and emergency ward of University Hospital. All adults suspected of malaria with a diagnostic test performed were included. RDT and microscopy as immediate tests were performed during working hours, and RDT as immediate test and delayed microscopy reading out of laboratory working hours. The main outcome measure was occurrence of specific complications in RDT negative and RDT positive adults. Results 2,139 patients were recruited. 1987 had both initial RDT and blood smear (BS) result negative. Among those, 2/1987 (0.1%) developed uncomplicated malaria with both RDT and BS positive on day 1 and day 6 respectively. Among the 152 patients initially malaria positive, 137 had both RDT and BS positive, four only BS positive and five only RDT positive (PCR confirmed) (six had only one test performed). None of the four initially RDT negative/BS positive and none of the five initially BS negative/RDT positive developed severe malaria while 6/137 of both RDT and BS positive did so. The use of RDT allowed a reduction of a median of 2.1 hours to get a first malaria test result. Conclusions A malaria diagnostic strategy based on RDTs and a delayed BS is safe in non-immune populations, and shortens the time to first malaria test result. PMID:23158019

  7. ACER Physics Unit Tests: Unit Tests, Diagnostic Aids, [and] Teachers Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    The Physics Unit Tests are designed to assist in the diagnostic evaluation of students' progress in the study of physics during the last two years of secondary schooling. They consist of a collection of 21 separate tests, each related to a different topic, and 21 diagnostic aids corresponding to the tests. The topics covered are: physical…

  8. Commercial Dengue Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Point-of-Care Application: Recent Evaluations and Future Needs?

    PubMed Central

    Blacksell, Stuart D.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome (DF/DHF/DSS) are tropical diseases that cause significant humanitarian and economic hardship. It is estimated that more than 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection and more than 100 countries have endemic dengue virus transmission. Laboratory tests are essential to provide an accurate diagnosis of dengue virus infection so that appropriate treatment and patient management may be administered. In many dengue endemic settings, laboratory diagnostic resources are limited and simple rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) provide opportunities for point-of-care diagnosis. This paper addresses current issues relating to the application of commercial dengue RDTs for the diagnosis of acute dengue virus infection, recent diagnostic evaluations, and identifies future needs. PMID:22654479

  9. Commercial dengue rapid diagnostic tests for point-of-care application: recent evaluations and future needs?

    PubMed

    Blacksell, Stuart D

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome (DF/DHF/DSS) are tropical diseases that cause significant humanitarian and economic hardship. It is estimated that more than 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection and more than 100 countries have endemic dengue virus transmission. Laboratory tests are essential to provide an accurate diagnosis of dengue virus infection so that appropriate treatment and patient management may be administered. In many dengue endemic settings, laboratory diagnostic resources are limited and simple rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) provide opportunities for point-of-care diagnosis. This paper addresses current issues relating to the application of commercial dengue RDTs for the diagnosis of acute dengue virus infection, recent diagnostic evaluations, and identifies future needs.

  10. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL's computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for MHD power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL's computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. 25 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Xpert Test in Tuberculosis Detection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ravdeep; Kachroo, Kavita; Sharma, Jitendar Kumar; Vatturi, Satyanarayana Murthy; Dang, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background: World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the use of Xpert MTB/RIF assay for rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and detection of rifampicin resistance. This systematic review was done to know about the diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, PUBMED, Scopus, Science Direct and Google Scholar for relevant studies for studies published between 2010 and December 2014. Studies given in the systematic reviews were accessed separately and used for analysis. Selection of studies, data extraction and assessment of quality of included studies was performed independently by two reviewers. Studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of Xpert MTB/RIF assay among adult or predominantly adult patients (≥14 years), presumed to have pulmonary TB with or without HIV infection were included in the review. Also, studies that had assessed the diagnostic accuracy of Xpert MTB/RIF assay using sputum and other respiratory specimens were included. Results: The included studies had a low risk of any form of bias, showing that findings are of high scientific validity and credibility. Quantitative analysis of 37 included studies shows that Xpert MTB/RIF is an accurate diagnostic test for TB and detection of rifampicin resistance. Conclusion: Xpert MTB/RIF assay is a robust, sensitive and specific test for accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis as compared to conventional tests like culture and microscopic examination. PMID:27013842

  13. Advances in diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Andrew J; Hirano, Ikuo

    2010-08-14

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) contributes substantially to morbidity and to costs in the United States health care system. The burden of this disease has resulted in attempts at improving diagnosis and characterizing patients. Numerous research and technical advances have enhanced our understanding of both the utility and limitations of a variety of diagnostic modalities. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in GERD diagnostic testing and to discuss their implications for use in clinical practice. Topics addressed include esophageal pH monitoring, impedance testing, symptom association analyses, narrow-band imaging, and histopathology. PMID:20698036

  14. [STARD 2015 for the evaluation of diagnostic tests].

    PubMed

    Korevaar, Daniël A; Bossuyt, Patrick M M

    2016-01-01

    Each year, many new diagnostic tests appear on the market that claim to be better, faster, cheaper, less invasive and more reliable than those already available. Diagnostic accuracy studies can assist in the objective assessment of such claims but, unfortunately, important information is often missing from the corresponding study reports. Authors are responsible for the completeness of their study reports, but they may not always be aware of the type of information that needs to be provided for an adequate appraisal of the study. To assist authors in writing informative reports, the STAndards for Reporting Diagnostic accuracy studies (STARD) were recently updated. The aim of STARD 2015 is to improve the ease of use of STARD, while also including several new crucial elements. Future initiatives to improve the uptake of STARD 2015 include the development of extensions for specific fields of testing and tools for specific user groups. PMID:27165460

  15. University students' perspectives on diagnostic testing in mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    fhloinn, Eabhnat Ní; Macan Bhaird, Ciarán; Nolan, Brien

    2014-01-01

    Many universities issue mathematical diagnostic tests to incoming first-year students, covering a range of the basic concepts with which they should be comfortable from secondary school. As far as many lecturers are concerned, the purpose of this test is to determine the students' mathematical knowledge on entry. It should also provide an early indication of which students are likely to need additional help, and hopefully encourage such students to avail of extra support mechanisms at an early stage. However, it is not clear that students recognize these intentions and there is a fear that students who score poorly in the test will have their confidence further damaged in relation to mathematics and will be reluctant to seek help. To this end, a questionnaire was developed to explore students' perspectives on diagnostic testing. Analysis of responses received to the questionnaire provided an interesting insight into students' perspectives including the optimum time to conduct such a test, their views on the aims of diagnostic testing, whether they feel that testing is a good idea, and their attitudes to the support systems put in place to help those who scored poorly in the test.

  16. Reference module selection criteria for accurate testing of photovoltaic (PV) panels

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, J.N.; Gariki, Govardhan Rao; Nagalakhsmi, V.

    2010-01-15

    It is shown that for accurate testing of PV panels the correct selection of reference modules is important. A detailed description of the test methodology is given. Three different types of reference modules, having different I{sub SC} (short circuit current) and power (in Wp) have been used for this study. These reference modules have been calibrated from NREL. It has been found that for accurate testing, both I{sub SC} and power of the reference module must be either similar or exceed to that of modules under test. In case corresponding values of the test modules are less than a particular limit, the measurements may not be accurate. The experimental results obtained have been modeled by using simple equivalent circuit model and associated I-V equations. (author)

  17. Diagnostic testing in extraesophageal GERD: another case of "furor medicus"?

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Brennan

    2013-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) work for most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). But when PPIs fail to work, or when there are atypical extra-esophageal symptoms, diagnostic and management decisions become much more difficult. Although atypical GERD is common, there are limited data about how best to approach these patients. The temptation is often to perform extensive diagnostic testing, sometimes to little avail. In this issue of The Journal, Francis et al. present a new study to help close the research gap in understanding the costs and benefits of testing in atypical GERD. The authors conclude that diagnostic testing is very expensive and real-life benefits are modest. This editorial reviews the findings, places them into clinical perspective, and concludes that diagnostic testing in atypical GERD may be another example of "furor medicus" - an old but descriptive term referring to the instinct of doctors to implore "don't just stand there, do something!" The data from Francis et al. suggest we might do the opposite in atypical GERD: "Don't just do something, stand there." PMID:23735914

  18. Comparison of Self-Instruction Methods for Teaching Diagnostic Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puskas, Jane C.

    1991-01-01

    Self-teaching booklets and computer media were evaluated for teaching diagnostic testing with first (n=49), second (n=41) and third year (n=71) dental students as a foundation for further development of clinical decision-making skills. Results found the media more effective than no instruction and equally effective to the traditional lecture…

  19. Advanced material testing in support of accurate sheet metal forming simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2013-05-01

    This presentation is a review of experimental methods for accurately measuring and modeling the anisotropic plastic deformation behavior of metal sheets under a variety of loading paths: biaxial compression test, hydraulic bulge test, biaxial tension test using a cruciform specimen, multiaxial tube expansion test using a closed-loop electrohydraulic testing machine for the measurement of forming limit strains and stresses, combined tension-shear test, and in-plane stress reversal test. Observed material responses are compared with predictions using phenomenological plasticity models to highlight the importance of accurate material testing. Special attention is paid to the plastic deformation behavior of sheet metals commonly used in industry, and to verifying the validity of constitutive models based on anisotropic yield functions at a large plastic strain range. The effects of using appropriate material models on the improvement of predictive accuracy for forming defects, such as springback and fracture, are also presented.

  20. Beam Diagnostics for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Peter; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Dawson, William; Degen, Chris; DellaPenna, Al; Gassner, David; Kesselman, Martin; Kewish, Jorg; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Mead, Joseph; Oerter, Brian; Russo, Tom; Vetter, Kurt; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2004-11-10

    An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) test facility is presently under construction at BNL. The goals of this test facility are first to demonstrate stable intense CW electron beam with parameters typical for the RHIC e-cooling project (and potentially for eRHIC), second to test novel elements of the ERL (high current CW photo-cathode, superconducting RF cavity with HOM dampers, and feedback systems), and finally to test lattice dependence of stability criteria. Planned diagnostics include position monitors, loss monitors, transverse profile monitors (both optical and wires), scrapers/halo monitors, a high resolution differential current monitor, phase monitors, an energy spread monitor, and a fast transverse monitor (for beam break-up studies and the energy feedback system). We discuss diagnostics challenges that are unique to this project, and present preliminary system specifications. In addition, we include a brief discussion of the timing system.

  1. Diagnostics of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Agostini, M.; Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Gazza, E.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Spolaore, M.; Zaniol, B.; Sonato, P.; De Muri, M.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G.

    2012-02-15

    The ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) injector, based on negative ions accelerated at 1 MV, will be tested and optimized in the SPIDER source and MITICA full injector prototypes, using a set of diagnostics not available on the ITER HNB. The RF source, where the H{sup -}/D{sup -} production is enhanced by cesium evaporation, will be monitored with thermocouples, electrostatic probes, optical emission spectroscopy, cavity ring down, and laser absorption spectroscopy. The beam is analyzed by cooling water calorimetry, a short pulse instrumented calorimeter, beam emission spectroscopy, visible tomography, and neutron imaging. Design of the diagnostic systems is presented.

  2. Diagnostics of the ITER neutral beam test facility.

    PubMed

    Pasqualotto, R; Serianni, G; Sonato, P; Agostini, M; Brombin, M; Croci, G; Dalla Palma, M; De Muri, M; Gazza, E; Gorini, G; Pomaro, N; Rizzolo, A; Spolaore, M; Zaniol, B

    2012-02-01

    The ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) injector, based on negative ions accelerated at 1 MV, will be tested and optimized in the SPIDER source and MITICA full injector prototypes, using a set of diagnostics not available on the ITER HNB. The RF source, where the H(-)∕D(-) production is enhanced by cesium evaporation, will be monitored with thermocouples, electrostatic probes, optical emission spectroscopy, cavity ring down, and laser absorption spectroscopy. The beam is analyzed by cooling water calorimetry, a short pulse instrumented calorimeter, beam emission spectroscopy, visible tomography, and neutron imaging. Design of the diagnostic systems is presented.

  3. Verification and validation of diagnostic laboratory tests in clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Rabenau, Holger F; Kessler, Harald H; Kortenbusch, Marhild; Steinhorst, Andreas; Raggam, Reinhard B; Berger, Annemarie

    2007-10-01

    This review summarizes major issues of verification and validation procedures and describes minimum requirements for verification and validation of diagnostic assays in clinical virology including instructions for CE/IVD-labeled as well as for self-developed ("home-brewed") tests or test systems. It covers techniques useful for detection of virus specific antibodies, for detection of viral antigens, for detection of viral nucleic acids, and for isolation of viruses on cell cultures in the routine virology laboratory.

  4. Accurate bs and w testing important for crude-oil custody transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J. )

    1990-11-12

    This paper discusses how monitoring crude-oil sediment and water content at the field production site is essential in accurate crude-oil custody transfer operations. This is accomplished by manual methods, or on-line devices like capacitance, density, or energy-absorption analyzers. For custody-transfer purposes, sediment and water is determined by a test which follows one of the API manuals of petroleum measurement standards (MPMS). Typically, this test is conducted in the field by the field centrifuge method which, if performed properly, yields very accurate results. Laboratory tests can be performed, but sample handling becomes even more critical.

  5. Diagnostic development and support of MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for HRSR support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with MHD Energy Center computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. MSU personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

  6. Saliva and dental caries: diagnostic tests for normal dental practice.

    PubMed

    Larmas, M

    1992-08-01

    Salivary diagnostics is now entering the surgery of the modern dentist, although no test yet available is so specific and sensitive that caries can be diagnosed from saliva samples only. The present tests are useful for estimating the caries activity due to bad dietary habits (salivary lactobacilli), establishing the presence of infection (salivary mutans streptococci), and identification of salivary yeasts for the determination of the medical condition of the patient. Buffer capacity reveals the most important host response factor acting against caries, while measures of flow rate form the diagnostic basis for treatment planning. These tests, alone or in combination, are now so easy to perform that they should be used in every dental practice.

  7. Retrospective screening of relevant pesticide metabolites in food using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry and accurate-mass databases of parent molecules and diagnostic fragment ions.

    PubMed

    Polgár, László; García-Reyes, Juan F; Fodor, Péter; Gyepes, Attila; Dernovics, Mihály; Abrankó, László; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, the detection and characterization of relevant pesticide metabolites in food is an important task in order to evaluate their formation, kinetics, stability, and toxicity. In this article, a methodology for the systematic screening of pesticides and their main metabolites in fruit and vegetable samples is described, using LC-HRMS and accurate-mass database search of parent compounds and their diagnostic fragment ions. The approach is based on (i) search for parent pesticide molecules; (ii) search for their metabolites in the positive samples, assuming common fragmentation pathways between the metabolites and parent pesticide molecules; and (iii) search for pesticide conjugates using the data from both parent species and diagnostic fragment ions. An accurate-mass database was constructed consisting of 1396 compounds (850 parent compounds, 447 fragment ions and 99 metabolites). The screening process was performed by the software in an automated fashion. The proposed methodology was evaluated with 29 incurred samples and the output obtained was compared to standard pesticide testing methods (targeted LC-MS/MS). Examples on the application of the proposed approach are shown, including the detection of several pesticide glycosides derivatives, which were found with significantly relevant intensities. Glucose-conjugated forms of parent compounds (e.g., fenhexamid-O-glucoside) and those of metabolites (e.g., despropyl-iprodione-N-glycoside) were detected. Facing the lack of standards for glycosylated pesticides, the study was completed with the synthesis of fenhexamid-O-glucoside for quantification purposes. In some cases the pesticide derivatives were found in a relatively high ratio, drawing the attention to these kinds of metabolites and showing that they should not be neglected in multi-residue methods. The global coverage obtained on the 29 analyzed samples showed the usefulness and benefits of the proposed approach and highlights the practical

  8. Chromosome microarrays in diagnostic testing: interpreting the genomic data.

    PubMed

    Peters, Greg B; Pertile, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    DNA-based Chromosome MicroArrays (CMAs) are now well established as diagnostic tools in clinical genetics laboratories. Over the last decade, the primary application of CMAs has been the genome-wide detection of a particular class of mutation known as copy number variants (CNVs). Since 2010, CMA testing has been recommended as a first-tier test for detection of CNVs associated with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, and/or multiple congenital anomalies…in the post-natal setting. CNVs are now regarded as pathogenic in 14-18 % of patients referred for these (and related) disorders.Through consideration of clinical examples, and several microarray platforms, we attempt to provide an appreciation of microarray diagnostics, from the initial inspection of the microarray data, to the composing of the patient report. In CMA data interpretation, a major challenge comes from the high frequency of clinically irrelevant CNVs observed within "patient" and "normal" populations. As might be predicted, the more common and clinically insignificant CNVs tend to be the smaller ones <100 kb in length, involving few or no known genes. However, this relationship is not at all straightforward: CNV length and gene content are only very imperfect indicators of CNV pathogenicity. Presently, there are no reliable means of separating, a priori, the benign from the pathological CNV classes.This chapter also considers sources of technical "noise" within CMA data sets. Some level of noise is inevitable in diagnostic genomics, given the very large number of data points generated in any one test. Noise further limits CMA resolution, and some miscalling of CNVs is unavoidable. In this, there is no ideal solution, but various strategies for handling noise are available. Even without solutions, consideration of these diagnostic problems per se is informative, as they afford critical insights into the biological and technical underpinnings of CNV discovery. These are indispensable

  9. Diagnostic Testing and Interpretation of Tests for Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Christine; Gourley, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory testing is of great value when evaluating a patient with a suspected autoimmune disease. The results can confirm a diagnosis, estimate disease severity, aid in assessing prognosis and are useful to follow disease activity. Components of the laboratory exam include complete blood count with differential, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, autoantibodies, and flow cytometry. This chapter discusses these components and includes a discussion about organ-specific immunologic diseases where immunological laboratory testing is employed. Comprehensive laboratory evaluation of a suspected autoimmune illness in conjunction with a thorough clinical evaluation provides a better understanding of a patient's immunologic disease. PMID:20061009

  10. Background review for diagnostic test development for Zika virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Charrel, Rémi N; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Pas, Suzan; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Koopmans, Marion; Reusken, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the state of knowledge about diagnostic testing for Zika virus infection and identify areas of research needed to address the current gaps in knowledge. Methods We made a non-systematic review of the published literature about Zika virus and supplemented this with information from commercial diagnostic test kits and personal communications with researchers in European preparedness networks. The review covered current knowledge about the geographical spread, pathogen characteristics, life cycle and infection kinetics of the virus. The available molecular and serological tests and biosafety issues are described and discussed in the context of the current outbreak strain. Findings We identified the following areas of research to address current knowledge gaps: (i) an urgent assessment of the laboratory capacity and capability of countries to detect Zika virus; (ii) rapid and extensive field validation of the available molecular and serological tests in areas with and without Zika virus transmission, with a focus on pregnant women; (iii) monitoring the genomic diversity of circulating Zika virus strains; (iv) prospective studies into the virus infection kinetics, focusing on diagnostic sampling (specimen types, combinations and timings); and (v) developing external quality assessments for molecular and serological testing, including differential diagnosis for similar viruses and symptom clusters. The availability of reagents for diagnostic development (virus strains and antigens, quantified viral ribonucleic acid) needs to be facilitated. Conclusion An international laboratory response is needed, including preparation of protocols for prospective studies to address the most pressing information needs. PMID:27516635

  11. Integrated rapid-diagnostic-test reader platform on a cellphone.

    PubMed

    Mudanyali, Onur; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Sikora, Uzair; Padmanabhan, Swati; Navruz, Isa; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate a cellphone-based rapid-diagnostic-test (RDT) reader platform that can work with various lateral flow immuno-chromatographic assays and similar tests to sense the presence of a target analyte in a sample. This compact and cost-effective digital RDT reader, weighing only ~65 g, mechanically attaches to the existing camera unit of a cellphone, where various types of RDTs can be inserted to be imaged in reflection or transmission modes under light-emitting diode (LED)-based illumination. Captured raw images of these tests are then digitally processed (within less than 0.2 s per image) through a smart application running on the cellphone for validation of the RDT, as well as for automated reading of its diagnostic result. The same smart application then transmits the resulting data, together with the RDT images and other related information (e.g., demographic data), to a central server, which presents the diagnostic results on a world map through geo-tagging. This dynamic spatio-temporal map of various RDT results can then be viewed and shared using internet browsers or through the same cellphone application. We tested this platform using malaria, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV RDTs by installing it on both Android-based smartphones and an iPhone. Providing real-time spatio-temporal statistics for the prevalence of various infectious diseases, this smart RDT reader platform running on cellphones might assist healthcare professionals and policymakers to track emerging epidemics worldwide and help epidemic preparedness.

  12. Advanced tests for early and accurate diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Zanusso, Gianluigi; Monaco, Salvatore; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Caughey, Byron

    2016-06-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a necessary to distinguish this untreatable disease from treatable rapidly progressive dementias, and to prevent iatrogenic transmission. Currently, definitive diagnosis of CJD requires detection of the abnormally folded, CJD-specific form of protease-resistant prion protein (PrP(CJD)) in brain tissue obtained postmortem or via biopsy; therefore, diagnosis of sporadic CJD in clinical practice is often challenging. Supporting investigations, including MRI, EEG and conventional analyses of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, are helpful in the diagnostic work-up, but do not allow definitive diagnosis. Recently, novel ultrasensitive seeding assays, based on the amplified detection of PrP(CJD), have improved the diagnostic process; for example, real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) is a sensitive method to detect prion-seeding activity in brain homogenate from humans with any subtype of sporadic CJD. RT-QuIC can also be used for in vivo diagnosis of CJD: its diagnostic sensitivity in detecting PrP(CJD) in CSF samples is 96%, and its specificity is 100%. Recently, we provided evidence that RT-QuIC of olfactory mucosa brushings is a 97% sensitive and 100% specific for sporadic CJD. These assays provide a basis for definitive antemortem diagnosis of prion diseases and, in doing so, improve prospects for reducing the risk of prion transmission. Moreover, they can be used to evaluate outcome measures in therapeutic trials for these as yet untreatable infections. PMID:27174240

  13. The ethics of testing a test: randomized trials of the health impact of diagnostic tests for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, David W; Gounder, Celine R; Corbett, Elizabeth L; Ngwira, Lucky G; Chaisson, Richard E; Merritt, Maria W

    2012-12-01

    In the last decade, many new rapid diagnostic tests for infectious diseases have been developed. In general, these new tests are developed with the intent to optimize feasibility and population health, not accuracy alone. However, unlike drugs or vaccines, diagnostic tests are evaluated and licensed on the basis of accuracy, not health impact (eg, reduced morbidity or mortality). Thus, these tests are sometimes recommended or scaled up for purposes of improving population health without randomized evidence that they do so. We highlight the importance of randomized trials to evaluate the health impact of novel diagnostics and note that such trials raise distinctive ethical challenges of equipoise, equity, and informed consent. We discuss the distinction between equipoise for patient-important outcomes versus diagnostic accuracy, the equity implications of evaluating health impact of diagnostics under routine conditions, and the importance of offering reasonable choices for informed consent in diagnostic trials.

  14. Practice Bulletin No. 162: Prenatal Diagnostic Testing for Genetic Disorders.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnostic testing is intended to determine, with as much certainty as possible, whether a specific genetic disorder or condition is present in the fetus. In contrast, prenatal genetic screening is designed to assess whether a patient is at increased risk of having a fetus affected by a genetic disorder. Originally, prenatal genetic testing focused primarily on Down syndrome (trisomy 21), but now it is able to detect a broad range of genetic disorders. Although it is necessary to perform amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) to definitively diagnose most genetic disorders, in some circumstances, fetal imaging with ultrasonography, echocardiography, or magnetic resonance imaging may be diagnostic of a particular structural fetal abnormality that is suggestive of an underlying genetic condition.The objective of prenatal genetic testing is to detect health problems that could affect the woman, fetus, or newborn and provide the patient and her obstetrician-gynecologist or other obstetric care provider with enough information to allow a fully informed decision about pregnancy management. Prenatal genetic testing cannot identify all abnormalities or problems in a fetus, and any testing should be focused on the individual patient's risks, reproductive goals, and preferences. It is important that patients understand the benefits and limitations of all prenatal screening and diagnostic testing, including the conditions for which tests are available and the conditions that will not be detected by testing. It also is important that patients realize that there is a broad range of clinical presentations, or phenotypes, for many genetic disorders and that results of genetic testing cannot predict all outcomes. Prenatal genetic testing has many benefits, including reassuring patients when results are normal, identifying disorders for which prenatal treatment may provide benefit, optimizing neonatal outcomes by ensuring the appropriate location for

  15. Advancing the development of diagnostic tests and biomarkers for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yasinskaya, Y; Plikaytis, B; Sizemore, C; Sacks, L

    2011-07-01

    High costs and limited returns on investment have hampered progress in developing new diagnostic tests and treatments for tuberculosis (TB). We need new biomarkers to develop assays that can rapidly, efficiently and reliably detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease, identify drug resistance and expedite drug and vaccine development. This can only be accomplished through cross-disciplinary collaborations to facilitate access to human specimens. The Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, the industry and academia experts came together in a June 2010 workshop to examine the field of TB diagnostic test development and biomarker discovery, identify areas of most urgent need and formulate strategies to address those needs.

  16. Diagnostic testing: a key component of high-value care.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Lucien J

    2016-01-01

    This is the fourth article of a series on fundamental concepts in biostatistics and research. In this article, the author reviews the fundamental concepts in diagnostic testing, sensitivity, and specificity and how they relate to the concept of high-value care. The topics are discussed in common language, with a minimum of jargon and mathematics, and with clinical examples. Emphasis is given to conceptual understanding. A companion article will follow focusing on predictive value and prior probability.

  17. Diagnostic testing: a key component of high-value care

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Lucien J.

    2016-01-01

    This is the fourth article of a series on fundamental concepts in biostatistics and research. In this article, the author reviews the fundamental concepts in diagnostic testing, sensitivity, and specificity and how they relate to the concept of high-value care. The topics are discussed in common language, with a minimum of jargon and mathematics, and with clinical examples. Emphasis is given to conceptual understanding. A companion article will follow focusing on predictive value and prior probability. PMID:27406456

  18. A general diagnostic model applied to language testing data.

    PubMed

    von Davier, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    Probabilistic models with one or more latent variables are designed to report on a corresponding number of skills or cognitive attributes. Multidimensional skill profiles offer additional information beyond what a single test score can provide, if the reported skills can be identified and distinguished reliably. Many recent approaches to skill profile models are limited to dichotomous data and have made use of computationally intensive estimation methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo, since standard maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques were deemed infeasible. This paper presents a general diagnostic model (GDM) that can be estimated with standard ML techniques and applies to polytomous response variables as well as to skills with two or more proficiency levels. The paper uses one member of a larger class of diagnostic models, a compensatory diagnostic model for dichotomous and partial credit data. Many well-known models, such as univariate and multivariate versions of the Rasch model and the two-parameter logistic item response theory model, the generalized partial credit model, as well as a variety of skill profile models, are special cases of this GDM. In addition to an introduction to this model, the paper presents a parameter recovery study using simulated data and an application to real data from the field test for TOEFL Internet-based testing.

  19. Diagnostic application of KRAS mutation testing in uterine microglandular proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Abi-Raad, Rita; Alomari, Ahmed K; Hui, Pei; Buza, Natalia

    2015-07-01

    Microglandular proliferations often pose a diagnostic challenge in small endocervical and endometrial biopsies. Microglandular hyperplasia (MGH) is one of the most common pseudoneoplastic glandular proliferations of uterine cervix, which can closely mimic endometrial adenocarcinomas (EAC) with a microglandular pattern (microglandular EAC). Although MGH is typically characterized by relatively uniform nuclei and rare to absent mitoses, atypical forms with architectural and/or cytologic deviation from the usual morphology have been previously described. Recently, a series of MGH with high mitotic activity has also been documented. Although careful morphological assessment and immunohistochemical workup can resolve the diagnostic dilemma in some cases, additional differential diagnostic tools are needed to separate both the common and atypical variants of MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern. Frequent KRAS mutation has been previously reported in endometrial complex mucinous lesions and endometrial mucinous carcinomas. However, the diagnostic utility of KRAS mutation analysis has not yet been explored in the context of cervical and endometrial microglandular lesions. Twelve mitotically active MGH cases and 15 cases of EAC with microglandular growth pattern were selected for the study. KRAS mutation analysis was performed in all cases by highly sensitive single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Clinical history and follow-up data were retrieved from electronic medical records. KRAS mutation was absent in all MGH cases, whereas 9 (60%) of 15 microglandular EAC cases tested positive for KRAS mutation. Our data indicate that KRAS mutation analysis may offer additional discriminatory power in separating benign MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern.

  20. Diagnostic testing during pregnancy: a descriptive analysis of utilisation data.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, R L; Bell, S M; Rob, M I; Taylor, P T

    1994-12-01

    To describe patterns of diagnostic testing during the antenatal period and to assess the potential benefit of using Medicare claims data in monitoring testing practice, we examined the matched claims data (with identifying details removed) on approximately 10,000 women having a confinement for which a Medicare benefit was claimed between 1 July and 30 September 1990. The results showed that almost all the women included in the study sample had an ultrasound and blood group and antibody examination. A smaller proportion had serological tests for syphilis (77 per cent), rubella (51 per cent) and hepatitis B carriage (73 per cent). Two-thirds had urine microscopy and culture, and under half (40 per cent) had serum alpha-fetoprotein estimation. Few (18 per cent) had a claim processed for microscopy and culture of a genital swab and fewer than 8 per cent claimed for any other pathology tests. There were differences in the proportions having tests, depending on whether the clinician managing the confinement was a specialist obstetrician or a general practitioner, and depending on geographic area and age group. While the data do not represent all women having a confinement in New South Wales, the selective use of antenatal diagnostic tests found in this study is of considerable public health importance and analysis of claims data can provide useful information for health professionals. PMID:7536479

  1. Results from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, G. L.

    2001-12-01

    During 2000 and 2001, the validity and reliability of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 2.0 (ADT 2.0) were formally investigated through the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project. The ADT 2.0 was administered as a pre-test to 5346 students and as a post-test to 3842 students. Student test results were collected from 97 classes that ranged in size from 4 to 320 students with 30 states represented. The 68 professors participating in the ADT National Project taught classes at universities (54%), 4-year colleges (27%), and 2-year colleges (19%). The database was analyzed for reliability at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. A pre-test value for Cronbach's alpha of 0.65 and post-test value of 0.76 demonstrate an acceptable degree of internal consistency. The average score for the 44 participating professors who completed the ADT as experts was 98%. Face and content validity were established by combining results from the experts with feedback from 60 student interviews. Student results from the National Project yielded an average score of 32.4% for the pre-test and 47.3% for the post-test. There is a gender discrepancy in favor of males that persists in both the pre-test (11% points) and the post-test (12% points) scores. The variations across geographic distribution and institution types were not significant. In addition to the 21 content items, the ADT 2.0 has 12 student background questions enabling instructors to have a better understanding of who takes introductory astronomy. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation through grants REC-0089239 (GD) and DGE-9714489 (BH).

  2. Grading Evidence for Laboratory Test Studies Beyond Diagnostic Accuracy: Application to Prognostic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Santaguida, Pasqualina L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence-based guideline development requires transparent methodology for gathering, synthesizing and grading the quality and strength of evidence behind recommendations. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) project has addressed diagnostic test use in many of their publications. Most of the work has been directed at diagnostic tests and no consensus has been reached for prognostic biomarkers. Aim of this paper The GRADE system for rating the quality of evidence and the strength of a recommendation is described. The application of GRADE to diagnostic testing is discussed and a description of application to prognostic testing is detailed. Some strengths and limitations of the GRADE process in relation to clinical laboratory testing are presented. Conclusions The GRADE system is applicable to clinical laboratory testing and if correctly applied should improve the reporting of recommendations for clinical laboratory tests by standardising the style of recommendation and by encouraging transparent reporting of the actual guideline process.

  3. Flight Test of Propulsion Monitoring and Diagnostic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabel, Steve; Elgersma, Mike

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this program was to perform flight tests of the propulsion monitoring and diagnostic system (PMDS) technology concept developed by Honeywell under the NASA Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiment (AGATE) program. The PMDS concept is intended to independently monitor the performance of the engine, providing continuous status to the pilot along with warnings if necessary as well as making the data available to ground maintenance personnel via a special interface. These flight tests were intended to demonstrate the ability of the PMDS concept to detect a class of selected sensor hardware failures, and the ability to successfully model the engine for the purpose of engine diagnosis.

  4. Temperature and the Field Stability of a Dengue Rapid Diagnostic Test in the Tropics

    PubMed Central

    Phommasone, Koukeo; Sengvilaipaseuth, Onanong; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Phonemixay, Ooyanong; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Newton, Paul N.; Dubot-Pérès, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The global incidence of dengue has increased significantly in recent decades, resulting in a large public health burden in tropical and subtropical countries. Dengue rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can provide accurate, rapid accessible diagnosis for patient management and may be easily used by health workers in rural areas. However, in dengue-endemic areas, ambient temperatures are often higher than manufacturer's recommendation. We therefore evaluated the effect of high temperature over time on the performance of one commonly used dengue RDT, the Standard Diagnostics Bioline Dengue Duo. RDTs were kept in five different conditions (at 4°C, 35°C, 45°C, 60°C, and at fluctuant ambient temperatures in a free-standing hut) for between 2 days and 2 years in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR). RDTs were tested with four control sera (negative, dengue nonstructural protein 1 [NS1], anti-dengue immunoglobulin [Ig] M, and anti-dengue IgG positive). The RDTs had 100% consistency over the 2-year study, despite high temperatures, including in the hut in which temperatures exceeded the manufacturer's recommendations for 29% of time points. These data suggest that the diagnostic accuracy of the SD Bioline Dengue Duo RDT remains stable even after long-term storage at high temperatures. Therefore, use at such ambient temperatures in tropical areas should not jeopardize the dengue diagnostic outcome. PMID:25962773

  5. Metagenomic abundance estimation and diagnostic testing on species level

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Martin S.; Renard, Bernhard Y.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of sequencing-based metagenomic community analysis is the quantitative taxonomic assessment of microbial community compositions. In particular, relative quantification of taxons is of high relevance for metagenomic diagnostics or microbial community comparison. However, the majority of existing approaches quantify at low resolution (e.g. at phylum level), rely on the existence of special genes (e.g. 16S), or have severe problems discerning species with highly similar genome sequences. Yet, problems as metagenomic diagnostics require accurate quantification on species level. We developed Genome Abundance Similarity Correction (GASiC), a method to estimate true genome abundances via read alignment by considering reference genome similarities in a non-negative LASSO approach. We demonstrate GASiC’s superior performance over existing methods on simulated benchmark data as well as on real data. In addition, we present applications to datasets of both bacterial DNA and viral RNA source. We further discuss our approach as an alternative to PCR-based DNA quantification. PMID:22941661

  6. Aptitude and Reading Tests for Consideration in Designing a Screening and Diagnostic Test Battery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Dorothy A.

    Aptitude and reading tests to be administered to technical college students are discussed in considering the design of a screening and diagnostic test battery. Diagnosis is condidered as a series of sequential steps: screening; testing; individualized program planning; program implementation; and investigation of the causes of reading difficulty.…

  7. Test verification and validation for molecular diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    Halling, Kevin C; Schrijver, Iris; Persons, Diane L

    2012-01-01

    With our ever-increasing understanding of the molecular basis of disease, clinical laboratories are implementing a variety of molecular diagnostic tests to aid in the diagnosis of hereditary disorders, detection and monitoring of cancer, determination of prognosis and guidance for cancer therapy, and detection and monitoring of infectious diseases. Before introducing any new test into the clinical laboratory, the performance characteristics of the assay must be "verified," if it is a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved or FDA-cleared test, or "validated," if it is a laboratory-developed test. Although guidelines exist for how validation and verification studies may be addressed for molecular assays, the specific details of the approach used by individual laboratories is rarely published. Many laboratories, especially those introducing new types of molecular assays, would welcome additional guidance, especially in the form of specific examples, on the process of preparing a new molecular assay for clinical use. PMID:22208481

  8. NREL Develops Diagnostic Test Cases to Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations in order to achieve more accurate energy use and savings predictions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Residential and Commercial Buildings research groups developed a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations. Eight test cases were developed to test surface conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes in building energy simulation programs. These algorithms are used to predict energy flow through external opaque surfaces such as walls, ceilings, and floors. The test cases consist of analytical and vetted numerical heat transfer solutions that have been available for decades, which increases confidence in test results. NREL researchers adapted these solutions for comparisons with building energy simulation results. Testing the new cases with EnergyPlus identified issues with the conduction finite difference (CondFD) heat transfer algorithm in versions 5 and 6. NREL researchers resolved these issues for EnergyPlus version 7. The new test cases will help users and developers of EnergyPlus and other building energy tools to identify and fix problems associated with solid conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes and their boundary conditions. In the long term, improvements to software algorithms will result in more accurate energy use and savings predictions. NREL researchers plan to document the set of test cases and make them available for future consideration by validation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 140: Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs. EnergyPlus users will also have access to the improved CondFD model in version 7 after its next scheduled release.

  9. How to Use the DX SYSTEM of Diagnostic Testing. Methodology Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David; Cabello, Beverly

    The DX SYSTEM of Diagnostic Testing is an easy-to-use computerized system for developing and administering diagnostic tests. A diagnostic test measures a student's mastery of a specific domain (skill or content area). It examines the necessary subskills hierarchically from the most to the least complex. The DX SYSTEM features tailored testing with…

  10. Integrated Rapid-Diagnostic-Test Reader Platform on a Cellphone

    PubMed Central

    Mudanyali, Onur; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Sikora, Uzair; Padmanabhan, Swati; Navruz, Isa; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a cellphone based Rapid-Diagnostic-Test (RDT) reader platform that can work with various lateral flow immuno-chromatographic assays and similar tests to sense the presence of a target analyte in a sample. This compact and cost-effective digital RDT reader, weighing only ~65 grams, mechanically attaches to the existing camera unit of a cellphone, where various types of RDTs can be inserted to be imaged in reflection or transmission modes under light-emitting-diode (LED) based illumination. Captured raw images of these tests are then digitally processed (within less than 0.2 sec/image) through a smart application running on the cellphone for validation of the RDT as well as for automated reading of its diagnostic result. The same smart application running on the cellphone then transmits the resulting data, together with the RDT images and other related information (e.g., demographic data) to a central server, which presents the diagnostic results on a world-map through geo-tagging. This dynamic spatio-temporal map of various RDT results can then be viewed and shared using internet browsers or through the same cellphone application. We tested this platform using malaria, tuberculosis (TB) as well as HIV RDTs by installing it on both Android based smart-phones as well as an iPhone. Providing real-time spatio-temporal statistics for the prevalence of various infectious diseases, this smart RDT reader platform running on cellphones might assist health-care professionals and policy makers to track emerging epidemics worldwide and help epidemic preparedness. PMID:22596243

  11. DiagTest3Grp: An R Package for Analyzing Diagnostic Tests with Three Ordinal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jingqin; Xiong, Chengjie

    2012-01-01

    Medical researchers endeavor to identify potentially useful biomarkers to develop marker-based screening assays for disease diagnosis and prevention. Useful summary measures which properly evaluate the discriminative ability of diagnostic markers are critical for this purpose. Literature and existing software, for example, R packages nicely cover summary measures for diagnostic markers used for the binary case (e.g., healthy vs. diseased). An intermediate population at an early disease stage usually exists between the healthy and the fully diseased population in many disease processes. Supporting utilities for three-group diagnostic tests are highly desired and important for identifying patients at the early disease stage for timely treatments. However, application packages which provide summary measures for three ordinal groups are currently lacking. This paper focuses on two summary measures of diagnostic accuracy—volume under the receiver operating characteristic surface and the extended Youden index, with three diagnostic groups. We provide the R package DiagTest3Grp to estimate, under both parametric and nonparametric assumptions, the two summary measures and the associated variances, as well as the optimal cut-points for disease diagnosis. An omnibus test for multiple markers and a Wald test for two markers, on independent or paired samples, are incorporated to compare diagnostic accuracy across biomarkers. Sample size calculation under the normality assumption can be performed in the R package to design future diagnostic studies. A real world application evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of neuropsychological markers for Alzheimer’s disease is used to guide readers through step-by-step implementation of DiagTest3Grp to demonstrate its utility. PMID:23504300

  12. A New Test Rig for Accurate Nonparametric Measurement and Characterization of Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecucco, Andrea; Buckle, James; Siviter, Jonathan; Knox, Andrew R.

    2013-07-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are increasingly employed in large-scale applications, therefore accurate performance data are necessary to permit precise designs and simulations. However, there is still no standardized method to test the electrical and thermal performance of TEGs. This paper presents an innovative test system to assess device performance in the "real world." The fixture allows the hot temperature to be increased up to 800°C with minimal thermal losses and thermal shock; the clamping load can be adjusted up to 5 kN, and the temperatures are sensed by thermocouples placed directly on the TEG's surfaces. A computer program controls all the instruments in order to minimize errors and to aid accurate measurement and test repeatability. The test rig can measure four TEGs simultaneously, each one individually controlled and heated by a maximum electrical power of 2 kW. This allows testing of the effects of series and parallel connection of TEGs under mismatched conditions, e.g., dimensions, clamping force, temperature, etc. The test rig can be employed both as a performance evaluator and as a quality control unit, due to the ability to provide nonparametric testing of four TEGs concurrently. It can also be used to rapidly characterize devices of different dimensions at the same time.

  13. Effect of Culture-Independent Diagnostic Tests on Future Emerging Infections Program Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Langley, Gayle; Besser, John; Iwamoto, Martha; Lessa, Fernanda C; Cronquist, Alicia; Skoff, Tami H; Chaves, Sandra; Boxrud, Dave; Pinner, Robert W; Harrison, Lee H

    2015-09-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program (EIP) network conducts population-based surveillance for pathogens of public health importance. Central to obtaining estimates of disease burden and tracking microbiological characteristics of these infections is accurate laboratory detection of pathogens. The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs) in clinical settings presents both opportunities and challenges to EIP surveillance. Because CIDTs offer better sensitivity than culture and are relatively easy to perform, their use could potentially improve estimates of disease burden. However, changes in clinical testing practices, use of tests with different sensitivities and specificities, and changes to case definitions make it challenging to monitor trends. Isolates are still needed for performing strain typing, antimicrobial resistance testing, and identifying other molecular characteristics of organisms. In this article, we outline current and future EIP activities to address issues associated with adoption of CIDTs, which may apply to other public health surveillance. PMID:26291736

  14. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic).

    PubMed

    Claustres, Mireille; Kožich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J; Barton, David E

    2014-02-01

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report should therefore provide a clear, concise, accurate, fully interpretative and authoritative answer to the clinical question. The need for harmonizing reporting practice of genetic tests has been recognised by the External Quality Assessment (EQA), providers and laboratories. The ESHG Genetic Services Quality Committee has produced reporting guidelines for the genetic disciplines (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic). These guidelines give assistance on report content, including the interpretation of results. Selected examples of genetic test reports for all three disciplines are provided in an annexe.

  15. Reporting standards for studies of diagnostic test accuracy in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Noel-Storr, Anna H.; McCleery, Jenny M.; Richard, Edo; Ritchie, Craig W.; Flicker, Leon; Cullum, Sarah J.; Davis, Daniel; Quinn, Terence J.; Hyde, Chris; Rutjes, Anne W.S.; Smailagic, Nadja; Marcus, Sue; Black, Sandra; Blennow, Kaj; Brayne, Carol; Fiorivanti, Mario; Johnson, Julene K.; Köpke, Sascha; Schneider, Lon S.; Simmons, Andrew; Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Bossuyt, Patrick M.M.; Wilcock, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To provide guidance on standards for reporting studies of diagnostic test accuracy for dementia disorders. Methods: An international consensus process on reporting standards in dementia and cognitive impairment (STARDdem) was established, focusing on studies presenting data from which sensitivity and specificity were reported or could be derived. A working group led the initiative through 4 rounds of consensus work, using a modified Delphi process and culminating in a face-to-face consensus meeting in October 2012. The aim of this process was to agree on how best to supplement the generic standards of the STARD statement to enhance their utility and encourage their use in dementia research. Results: More than 200 comments were received during the wider consultation rounds. The areas at most risk of inadequate reporting were identified and a set of dementia-specific recommendations to supplement the STARD guidance were developed, including better reporting of patient selection, the reference standard used, avoidance of circularity, and reporting of test-retest reliability. Conclusion: STARDdem is an implementation of the STARD statement in which the original checklist is elaborated and supplemented with guidance pertinent to studies of cognitive disorders. Its adoption is expected to increase transparency, enable more effective evaluation of diagnostic tests in Alzheimer disease and dementia, contribute to greater adherence to methodologic standards, and advance the development of Alzheimer biomarkers. PMID:24944261

  16. Ethical issues in the diagnostic genetic testing process.

    PubMed

    Nyrhinen, Tarja; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Hietala, Marja

    2004-04-01

    The diagnostic genetic testing process has certain unique ethical features and deserves special consideration. The purpose of this study was to determine through empirical research, using focussed interview, what ethical issues are involved in the diagnostic genetic testing process. This article describes views and perceptions of adult patients, parents of child patients and various personnel groups (n=30). The ethical issues were analysed classified into three main categories: a) personnel characteristics, including personality, professional skills, morals and values; b) realization of ethical principles in the examination process, with subcategories of knowledge, autonomy, data protection and equity; and c) consequences of genetic testing, including patients' control over their own lives, manifestation of heterogeneity and outlook on the world. Problematic ethical issues in all three main categories were described in a more many-sided way by parents and personnel than by adult patients. In the future, attention should be paid to the content areas highlighted by the study, in both clinical practice and further studies.

  17. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis drug susceptibility and molecular diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S; Shafiq, Majid; Lee, James C; Ray, Susan M; Wang, Yun F; Metchock, Beverly; Anderson, Albert M; Nguyen, Minh Ly T

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB), defined by resistance to the 2 most effective first-line drugs, isoniazid and rifampin, is on the rise globally and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the increasing availability of novel rapid diagnostic tools for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) drug susceptibility testing, the clinical applicability of these methods is unsettled. In this study, the mechanisms of action and resistance of Mtb to isoniazid and rifampin, and the utility, advantages and limitations of the available Mtb drug susceptibility testing tools are reviewed, with particular emphasis on molecular methods with rapid turnaround including line probe assays, molecular beacon-based real-time polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. The authors conclude that neither rapid molecular drug testing nor phenotypic methods are perfect in predicting Mtb drug susceptibility and therefore must be interpreted within the clinical context of each patient.

  18. Epidemiology and diagnostic testing for hemochromatosis and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Adams, P C

    2015-05-01

    Hemochromatosis is the most common genetic disease in northern European populations. Body iron stores progressively increase in most patients, which can lead to cirrhosis of the liver, hepatocellular carcinoma, heart failure, arthritis, and pigmentation. Simple blood tests such as the serum ferritin and transferrin saturation are useful to suggest the diagnosis which can be confirmed in most cases with a simple genetic test for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. However, these blood tests are often misinterpreted and there are rare patients with iron overload without HFE mutations. A diagnostic approach is presented based on a large referral practice and a population-based study (HEIRS) which screened for iron overload in 101,168 participants.

  19. ECG in stress testing: child of a lesser diagnostic god?

    PubMed

    Longo, S; Del Negro, B; Picano, E

    1997-01-01

    When new technologies are added to the previously existing ones, the latter can be prematurely discarded and judged obsolete not only on the basis of rational scientific facts, but also on irrational trends. Old techniques, like electrocardiography, suffer from diagnostic ambiguities that can be solved by combination with a cardiac imaging technique, like stress echocardiography. ECG monitoring during all forms of stress testing can still offer surprising dividends for a better understanding of the complex physiology of coronary artery disease, a better clinical characterization of patients with microvascular angina, and may serve as an important adjunct marker to cardiac imaging techniques. PMID:9350596

  20. Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Dengue Virus Infection in Febrile Cambodian Children: Diagnostic Accuracy and Incorporation into Diagnostic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michael J.; Emary, Kate R.; Moore, Catherine E.; Parry, Christopher M.; Sona, Soeng; Putchhat, Hor; Reaksmey, Sin; Chanpheaktra, Ngoun; Stoesser, Nicole; Dobson, Andrew D. M.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Kumar, Varun; Blacksell, Stuart D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue virus (DENV) infection is prevalent across tropical regions and may cause severe disease. Early diagnosis may improve supportive care. We prospectively assessed the Standard Diagnostics (Korea) BIOLINE Dengue Duo DENV rapid diagnostic test (RDT) to NS1 antigen and anti-DENV IgM (NS1 and IgM) in children in Cambodia, with the aim of improving the diagnosis of DENV infection. Methodology and principal findings We enrolled children admitted to hospital with non-localised febrile illnesses during the 5-month DENV transmission season. Clinical and laboratory variables, and DENV RDT results were recorded at admission. Children had blood culture and serological and molecular tests for common local pathogens, including reference laboratory DENV NS1 antigen and IgM assays. 337 children were admitted with non-localised febrile illness over 5 months. 71 (21%) had DENV infection (reference assay positive). Sensitivity was 58%, and specificity 85% for RDT NS1 and IgM combined. Conditional inference framework analysis showed the additional value of platelet and white cell counts for diagnosis of DENV infection. Variables associated with diagnosis of DENV infection were not associated with critical care admission (70 children, 21%) or mortality (19 children, 6%). Known causes of mortality were melioidosis (4), other sepsis (5), and malignancy (1). 22 (27%) children with a positive DENV RDT had a treatable other infection. Conclusions The DENV RDT had low sensitivity for the diagnosis of DENV infection. The high co-prevalence of infections in our cohort indicates the need for a broad microbiological assessment of non-localised febrile illness in these children. PMID:25710684

  1. Using Combined Diagnostic Test Results to Hindcast Trends of Infection from Cross-Sectional Data

    PubMed Central

    Rydevik, Gustaf; Innocent, Giles T.; Marion, Glenn; White, Piran C. L.; Billinis, Charalambos; Barrow, Paul; Mertens, Peter P. C.; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hutchings, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious disease surveillance is key to limiting the consequences from infectious pathogens and maintaining animal and public health. Following the detection of a disease outbreak, a response in proportion to the severity of the outbreak is required. It is thus critical to obtain accurate information concerning the origin of the outbreak and its forward trajectory. However, there is often a lack of situational awareness that may lead to over- or under-reaction. There is a widening range of tests available for detecting pathogens, with typically different temporal characteristics, e.g. in terms of when peak test response occurs relative to time of exposure. We have developed a statistical framework that combines response level data from multiple diagnostic tests and is able to ‘hindcast’ (infer the historical trend of) an infectious disease epidemic. Assuming diagnostic test data from a cross-sectional sample of individuals infected with a pathogen during an outbreak, we use a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to estimate time of exposure, and the overall epidemic trend in the population prior to the time of sampling. We evaluate the performance of this statistical framework on simulated data from epidemic trend curves and show that we can recover the parameter values of those trends. We also apply the framework to epidemic trend curves taken from two historical outbreaks: a bluetongue outbreak in cattle, and a whooping cough outbreak in humans. Together, these results show that hindcasting can estimate the time since infection for individuals and provide accurate estimates of epidemic trends, and can be used to distinguish whether an outbreak is increasing or past its peak. We conclude that if temporal characteristics of diagnostics are known, it is possible to recover epidemic trends of both human and animal pathogens from cross-sectional data collected at a single point in time. PMID:27384712

  2. Using Combined Diagnostic Test Results to Hindcast Trends of Infection from Cross-Sectional Data.

    PubMed

    Rydevik, Gustaf; Innocent, Giles T; Marion, Glenn; Davidson, Ross S; White, Piran C L; Billinis, Charalambos; Barrow, Paul; Mertens, Peter P C; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hutchings, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Infectious disease surveillance is key to limiting the consequences from infectious pathogens and maintaining animal and public health. Following the detection of a disease outbreak, a response in proportion to the severity of the outbreak is required. It is thus critical to obtain accurate information concerning the origin of the outbreak and its forward trajectory. However, there is often a lack of situational awareness that may lead to over- or under-reaction. There is a widening range of tests available for detecting pathogens, with typically different temporal characteristics, e.g. in terms of when peak test response occurs relative to time of exposure. We have developed a statistical framework that combines response level data from multiple diagnostic tests and is able to 'hindcast' (infer the historical trend of) an infectious disease epidemic. Assuming diagnostic test data from a cross-sectional sample of individuals infected with a pathogen during an outbreak, we use a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to estimate time of exposure, and the overall epidemic trend in the population prior to the time of sampling. We evaluate the performance of this statistical framework on simulated data from epidemic trend curves and show that we can recover the parameter values of those trends. We also apply the framework to epidemic trend curves taken from two historical outbreaks: a bluetongue outbreak in cattle, and a whooping cough outbreak in humans. Together, these results show that hindcasting can estimate the time since infection for individuals and provide accurate estimates of epidemic trends, and can be used to distinguish whether an outbreak is increasing or past its peak. We conclude that if temporal characteristics of diagnostics are known, it is possible to recover epidemic trends of both human and animal pathogens from cross-sectional data collected at a single point in time. PMID:27384712

  3. Multifrequency excitation method for rapid and accurate dynamic test of micromachined gyroscope chips.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Xing, Chao; Zhang, Rong

    2014-10-17

    A novel multifrequency excitation (MFE) method is proposed to realize rapid and accurate dynamic testing of micromachined gyroscope chips. Compared with the traditional sweep-frequency excitation (SFE) method, the computational time for testing one chip under four modes at a 1-Hz frequency resolution and 600-Hz bandwidth was dramatically reduced from 10 min to 6 s. A multifrequency signal with an equal amplitude and initial linear-phase-difference distribution was generated to ensure test repeatability and accuracy. The current test system based on LabVIEW using the SFE method was modified to use the MFE method without any hardware changes. The experimental results verified that the MFE method can be an ideal solution for large-scale dynamic testing of gyroscope chips and gyroscopes.

  4. Multifrequency Excitation Method for Rapid and Accurate Dynamic Test of Micromachined Gyroscope Chips

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Xing, Chao; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    A novel multifrequency excitation (MFE) method is proposed to realize rapid and accurate dynamic testing of micromachined gyroscope chips. Compared with the traditional sweep-frequency excitation (SFE) method, the computational time for testing one chip under four modes at a 1-Hz frequency resolution and 600-Hz bandwidth was dramatically reduced from 10 min to 6 s. A multifrequency signal with an equal amplitude and initial linear-phase-difference distribution was generated to ensure test repeatability and accuracy. The current test system based on LabVIEW using the SFE method was modified to use the MFE method without any hardware changes. The experimental results verified that the MFE method can be an ideal solution for large-scale dynamic testing of gyroscope chips and gyroscopes. PMID:25330052

  5. Using Three-Tier Diagnostic Test to Assess Students' Misconceptions of States of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirbulut, Zubeyde Demet; Geban, Omer

    2014-01-01

    This study involves the development of a three-tier diagnostic test to measure high school students' understanding of states of matter concepts. The States of Matter Diagnostic Test (SMDT) is a 19-item three-tier diagnostic test consisting of three-tier items for assessing students' understanding of states of matter concepts. The SMDT…

  6. Noninvasive prenatal screening or advanced diagnostic testing: caveat emptor.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark I; Wapner, Ronald J; Berkowitz, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    The past few years have seen extraordinary advances in prenatal genetic practice led by 2 major technological advances; next-generation sequencing of cell-free DNA in the maternal plasma to noninvasively identify fetal chromosome abnormalities, and microarray analysis of chorionic villus sampling and amniotic fluid samples, resulting in increased cytogenetic resolution. Noninvasive prenatal screening of cell-free DNA has demonstrated sensitivity and specificity for trisomy 21 superior to all previous screening approaches with slightly lower performance for other common aneuploidies. These tests have rapidly captured an increasing market share, with substantial reductions in the number of chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis performed suggesting that physicians and patients regard such screening approaches as an equivalent replacement for diagnostic testing. Simultaneously, many clinical programs have noted significant decreases in patient counseling. In 2012 the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded a blinded comparison of karyotype with the emerging technology of array comparative genomic hybridization showing that in patients with a normal karyotype, 2.5% had a clinically relevant microdeletion or duplication identified. In pregnancies with an ultrasound-detected structural anomaly, 6% had an incremental finding, and of those with a normal scan, 1.6% had a copy number variant. For patients of any age with a normal ultrasound and karyotype, the chance of a pathogenic copy number variant is greater than 1%, similar to the age-related risk of aneuploidy in the fetus of a 38 year old. This risk is 4-fold higher than the risk of trisomy 21 in a woman younger than 30 years and 5- to 10-fold higher than the present accepted risk of a diagnostic procedure. Based on this, we contend that every patient, regardless of her age, be educated about these risks and offered the opportunity to have a diagnostic procedure with

  7. Is the Posner Reaction Time Test More Accurate Than Clinical Tests in Detecting Left Neglect in Acute and Chronic Stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Rengachary, Jennifer; d'Avossa, Giovanni; Sapir, Ayelet; Shulman, Gordon L.; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of common clinical tests for left neglect with that of a computerized reaction time Posner test in a stroke population. Design Neglect measures were collected longitudinally in stroke patients at the acute (≈2wk) and chronic (≈9mo) stage. Identical measures were collected in a healthy control group. Setting Inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation. Participants Acute stroke patients (n=59) with left neglect, 30 of whom were tested longitudinally; healthy age-matched controls (n=30). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures A receiver operating characteristic analysis, ranking the measures' sensitivity and specificity using a single summary statistic. Results Most clinical tests were adequately accurate at the acute stage, but many were near chance at the chronic stage. The Posner test was the most sensitive test at both stages, the most sensitive variable being the reaction time difference for detecting targets appearing on the left compared to the right side. Conclusions Computerized reaction time tests can be used to screen for subtle but potentially clinically relevant left neglect, which may not be detectable by conventional clinical tests, especially at the chronic stage. Such tests may be useful to assess the severity of the patients' deficits and provide more accurate measures of the degree of recovery in clinical trials than established clinical measures. PMID:19969172

  8. Diagnostic Tests for Entering and Departing Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, Chris; Kotlicki, A.

    2006-12-01

    A diagnostic test administered at the start of a class should test basic concepts which are recognized as course prerequisites. The questions should not be over-packaged: e.g. students should be required to create models, rather than this being done for them each time. Students should be allowed great latitude in their answers, so we can discover what they are thinking. When administered at the end of a class the goals should be similar: testing concepts taught in the class itself and the retention of necessary concepts from previous classes. Great care has to be taken to avoid teaching to the test. In assessing an entire program, for example an undergraduate majors degree in physics, then one looks for very general skills and knowledge not specific to any one course. The purpose of an undergraduate degree in physics (or indeed any science) is to equip the students with a set of problem-solving skills and basic knowledge which can be applied in a large variety of workplace settings and to allow that student to contribute to civic society as a science-literate person. The creator of any diagnostic test should always have these big goals in mind. We have developed a set of questions which we think fulfill these criteria, yet are not specific to any particular level of science education. They have been administered to students in secondary schools across Canada, incoming first-year science students and final-year physics students at the University of British Columbia. The results will be presented.

  9. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

  10. Diagnostic testing of the emergency department patient with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Shamsa, F H

    1998-07-01

    In evaluating patients with nondiagnostic initial clinical or electrocardiogram (ECG) findings for acute cardiac ischemia, continuous 12-lead ECG monitoring increases the detection of diagnostic ECG findings, including ST-segment elevation, in patients awaiting hospital admission. Rest scanning with technitium-99m sestamibi is able to risk stratify low-moderate risk patients into lower and higher risk groups for cardiac events. Caveats include the reduced sensitivity of scanning of patients who are pain free and the need for follow-up exercise scans for patients free of perfusion defects at rest. Cardiac markers, particularly the troponins, show great promise for the detection of a larger part of the spectrum of acute coronary syndromes in the emergency department, including patients with minimal myocardial damage and higher risk for short-term death and nonfatal acute myocardial infarction. Accelerated diagnostic protocols using serial testing with cardiac markers, ECGs and then provocative testing over a 14-hour period, are feasible, safe, and cost-effective. PMID:10091020

  11. Reactor protection system with automatic self-testing and diagnostic

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, Donald C.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor protection system having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Automatic detection and discrimination against failed sensors allows the reactor protection system to automatically enter a known state when sensor failures occur. Cross communication of sensor readings allows comparison of four theoretically "identical" values. This permits identification of sensor errors such as drift or malfunction. A diagnostic request for service is issued for errant sensor data. Automated self test and diagnostic monitoring, sensor input through output relay logic, virtually eliminate the need for manual surveillance testing. This provides an ability for each division to cross-check all divisions and to sense failures of the hardware logic.

  12. Reactor protection system with automatic self-testing and diagnostic

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, D.C.

    1996-12-17

    A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Automatic detection and discrimination against failed sensors allows the reactor protection system to automatically enter a known state when sensor failures occur. Cross communication of sensor readings allows comparison of four theoretically ``identical`` values. This permits identification of sensor errors such as drift or malfunction. A diagnostic request for service is issued for errant sensor data. Automated self test and diagnostic monitoring, sensor input through output relay logic, virtually eliminate the need for manual surveillance testing. This provides an ability for each division to cross-check all divisions and to sense failures of the hardware logic. 16 figs.

  13. New Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Neisseria meningitidis Serogroups A, W135, C, and Y

    PubMed Central

    Chanteau, Suzanne; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Mahamane, Ali Elhadj; Djibo, Saacou; Boisier, Pascal; Nato, Farida

    2006-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis (meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis) are a major public health concern in the African “meningitis belt,” which includes 21 countries from Senegal to Ethiopia. Of the several species that can cause meningitis, N. meningitidis is the most important cause of epidemics in this region. In choosing the appropriate vaccine, accurate N. meningitidis serogroup determination is key. To this end, we developed and evaluated two duplex rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for detecting N. meningitidis polysaccharide (PS) antigens of several important serogroups. Methods and Findings Mouse monoclonal IgG antibodies against N. meningitidis PS A, W135/Y, Y, and C were used to develop two immunochromatography duplex RDTs, RDT1 (to detect serogroups A and W135/Y) and RDT2 (to detect serogroups C and Y). Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy criteria were used to determine diagnostic accuracy of RDTs on reference strains and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples using culture and PCR, respectively, as reference tests. The cutoffs were 105 cfu/ml for reference strains and 1 ng/ml for PS. Sensitivities and specificities were 100% for reference strains, and 93.8%–100% for CSF serogroups A, W135, and Y in CSF. For CSF serogroup A, the positive and negative likelihood ratios (± 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were 31.867 (16.1–63.1) and 0.065 (0.04–0.104), respectively, and the diagnostic odds ratio (± 95% CI) was 492.9 (207.2–1,172.5). For CSF serogroups W135 and Y, the positive likelihood ratio was 159.6 (51.7–493.3) Both RDTs were equally reliable at 25 °C and 45 °C. Conclusions These RDTs are important new bedside diagnostic tools for surveillance of meningococcus serogroups A and W135, the two serogroups that are responsible for major epidemics in Africa. PMID:16953658

  14. The bone diagnostic instrument III: testing mouse femora.

    PubMed

    Randall, Connor; Mathews, Phillip; Yurtsev, Eugene; Sahar, Nadder; Kohn, David; Hansma, Paul

    2009-06-01

    Here we describe modifications that allow the bone diagnostic instrument (BDI) [P. Hansma et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 064303 (2008); Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 075105 (2006)], developed to test human bone, to test the femora of mice. These modifications include reducing the effective weight of the instrument on the bone, designing and fabricating new probe assemblies to minimize damage to the small bone, developing new testing protocols that involve smaller testing forces, and fabricating a jig for securing the smaller bones for testing. With these modifications, the BDI was used to test the hypothesis that short-term running has greater benefit on the mechanical properties of the femur for young growing mice compared to older, skeletally mature mice. We measured elastic modulus, hardness, and indentation distance increase (IDI), which had previously been shown to be the best discriminators in model systems known to exhibit differences in mechanical properties at the whole bone level. In the young exercised murine femora, the IDI was significantly lower than in young control femora. Since IDI has a relation to postyield properties, these results suggest that exercise during bone development increases post yield mechanical competence. We were also able to measure effects of aging on bone properties with the BDI. There was a significant increase in the IDI, and a significant decrease in the elastic modulus and hardness between the young and old groups. Thus, with the modifications described here, the BDI can take measurements on mouse bones and obtain statistically significant results.

  15. Test of a new tip material for Langmuir probe diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, M. Y.; Shukrullah, S.; Ghaffar, A.; Rehman, N. U.; Khan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the work is to test a nickel-chrome alloy as a probe tip material for characterization of discharge plasmas. In order to meet the objective, a symmetric triple Langmuir probe diagnostic system and an associated driving circuit are designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma generated by a 13.56-MHz radio frequency source coupled with an automated impedance match network. This probe is used to measure the electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current as functions of the input power of the radio frequency source and the filling gas pressure. An increasing trend is noticed in the electron temperature and electron number density with an increase in the input power, whilst a decreasing trend is evident in these parameters with an increase in the nitrogen gas pressure. The overall inaccuracies in electron temperature and electron number density measurements are 5-12% and 3-13%, respectively.

  16. Digital test signal generation: An accurate SNR calibration approach for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, B. O.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of generating analog test signals with accurate signal to noise ratios (SNRs) is described. High accuracy will be obtained by simultaneous generation of digital noise and signal spectra at a given baseband or bandpass limited bandwidth. The digital synthesis will provide a test signal embedded in noise with the statistical properties of a stationary random process. Accuracy will only be dependent on test integration time with a limit imposed by the system quantization noise (expected to be 0.02 dB). Setability will be approximately 0.1 dB. The first digital SNR generator to provide baseband test signals is being built and will be available in early 1991.

  17. Hierarchical diagnostic classification models: a family of models for estimating and testing attribute hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Templin, Jonathan; Bradshaw, Laine

    2014-04-01

    Although latent attributes that follow a hierarchical structure are anticipated in many areas of educational and psychological assessment, current psychometric models are limited in their capacity to objectively evaluate the presence of such attribute hierarchies. This paper introduces the Hierarchical Diagnostic Classification Model (HDCM), which adapts the Log-linear Cognitive Diagnosis Model to cases where attribute hierarchies are present. The utility of the HDCM is demonstrated through simulation and by an empirical example. Simulation study results show the HDCM is efficiently estimated and can accurately test for the presence of an attribute hierarchy statistically, a feature not possible when using more commonly used DCMs. Empirically, the HDCM is used to test for the presence of a suspected attribute hierarchy in a test of English grammar, confirming the data is more adequately represented by hierarchical attribute structure when compared to a crossed, or nonhierarchical structure.

  18. Culture-independent diagnostic testing: have we opened Pandora's box for good?

    PubMed

    Janda, J Michael; Abbott, Sharon A

    2014-11-01

    The ability to accurately and quickly identify microbial agents associated with infectious diseases has been a longstanding and continuous goal of diagnostic microbiology laboratories. Over the course of several decades, technology and testing methodologies in this field have gradually evolved from traditional- or classic-based culture and identification approaches to antigen capture systems and more molecular-oriented applications. Recently, these molecular-based applications have signaled a new era in clinical diagnostic microbiology with the commercial introduction of culture-independent diagnostic testing (CIDT) systems. The first major commercial venture into the CIDT arena involves the detection of acute bacterial gastroenteritis. Several commercial products are now on the market globally with at least 4 Food and Drug Administration approved since January of 2013. These new systems offer the direct detection of a variety of enteropathogens quickly without the need for traditional culture. In Greek mythology, Pandora opened a "jar" or "box" out of curiosity thereby releasing all of humanity's evils most notably diseases and plagues according to Hesiod's Theogony. While not ill-intentioned the only thing left in the box was Hope.

  19. Culture-independent diagnostic testing: have we opened Pandora's box for good?

    PubMed

    Janda, J Michael; Abbott, Sharon A

    2014-11-01

    The ability to accurately and quickly identify microbial agents associated with infectious diseases has been a longstanding and continuous goal of diagnostic microbiology laboratories. Over the course of several decades, technology and testing methodologies in this field have gradually evolved from traditional- or classic-based culture and identification approaches to antigen capture systems and more molecular-oriented applications. Recently, these molecular-based applications have signaled a new era in clinical diagnostic microbiology with the commercial introduction of culture-independent diagnostic testing (CIDT) systems. The first major commercial venture into the CIDT arena involves the detection of acute bacterial gastroenteritis. Several commercial products are now on the market globally with at least 4 Food and Drug Administration approved since January of 2013. These new systems offer the direct detection of a variety of enteropathogens quickly without the need for traditional culture. In Greek mythology, Pandora opened a "jar" or "box" out of curiosity thereby releasing all of humanity's evils most notably diseases and plagues according to Hesiod's Theogony. While not ill-intentioned the only thing left in the box was Hope. PMID:25200256

  20. Diagnostic tests for the detection of human papillomavirus-associated cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Current diagnostic approaches for primary cervical cancer screening, work-up of equivocal or positive screening results or follow- up after treatment of precancerous lesions primarily rely on the morphologic interpretation of squamous epithelial cells (Pap cytology), in some setting accompanied by the detection of human papillomavirus DNA and have largely contributed to remarkable reduction of disease incidence in countries with implemented screening programs. However, these approaches are limited by a poor sensitivity and reproducibility of Pap cytology and low specificity for high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of HPV DNA detection assays. Early detection might be improved by complementing or even replacing these tests by markers which are more directly related to molecular events triggering HPV-induced carcinogenesis and thereby might deliver more accurate diagnostic performance. The delineation of molecular changes which occur during different stages of HPV infections and the identification of changes which induce neoplastic alterations allow for the detection of markers that specifically highlight the transforming stage of the infection where viral oncogenes are overexpressed and therefore allow for a more specific diagnosis of lesions that require treatment. The evaluation of such markers in clinical studies revealed that some indeed show an improved diagnostic performance compared to Pap cytology or HPV DNA tests only.

  1. Testing for cattle allergy: modified diagnostic cutoff levels improve sensitivity in symptomatic claw trimmers

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Natalja; Hallier, Ernst; Zuberbier, Torsten; Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of cattle-related sensitization is complicated by the variability and complexity of cattle allergen extracts. Objective To evaluate a modified diagnostic procedure leading to more accurate results especially in the early phase of sensitization. Methods We tested 27 claw trimmers with and 65 without cattle-related symptoms using two commercially available cattle allergen extracts. We also used a self-prepared cattle allergen mix designed to represent the full spectrum of cattle allergens from a typical agricultural workplace. Results More than 50% of symptomatic claw trimmers showed negative test results with commercial extracts and a sensitization cutoff point of 0.35 kU/l. In contrast, with the self-prepared cattle allergen mix, positive results were observed for almost all of them. Evaluating the results of the commercial test kits at different cutoff levels, we found an ideal cutoff point to improve the sensitivity at 0.2 kU/l. Conclusion Additional tests with self-made cattle hair extracts can help to bridge the diagnostic gap seen in patients showing cattle-related symptoms, but negative results in commercially available tests. For early-stage sensitization screening, we propose to lower the cutoff level indicating sensitization to 0.2 kU/l. PMID:20658147

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy of Tests for Polyuria in Lithium-Treated Patients.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, James Conor; NiChorcorain, Aoife; Cunningham, Sean; Freyne, Aideen; Cooney, Colm; Barry, Siobhan; Kelly, Brendan D

    2015-08-01

    In lithium-treated patients, polyuria increases the risk of dehydration and lithium toxicity. If detected early, it is reversible. Despite its prevalence and associated morbidity in clinical practice, it remains underrecognized and therefore undertreated. The 24-hour urine collection is limited by its convenience and practicality. This study explores the diagnostic accuracy of alternative tests such as questionnaires on subjective polyuria, polydipsia, nocturia (dichotomous and ordinal responses), early morning urine sample osmolality (EMUO), and fluid intake record (FIR). This is a cross-sectional study of 179 lithium-treated patients attending a general adult and an old age psychiatry service. Participants completed the tests after completing an accurate 24-hour urine collection. The diagnostic accuracy of the individual tests was explored using the appropriate statistical techniques. Seventy-nine participants completed all of the tests. Polydipsia severity, EMUO, and FIR significantly differentiated the participants with polyuria (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.646, 0.760, and 0.846, respectively). Of the tests investigated, the FIR made the largest significant change in the probability that a patient experiences polyuria (<2000 mL/24 hours; interval likelihood ratio, 0.18 and >3500 mL/24 hours; interval likelihood ratio, 14). Symptomatic questioning, EMUO, and an FIR could be used in clinical practice to inform the prescriber of the probability that a lithium-treated patient is experiencing polyuria.

  3. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Testing on the C-17 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. To demonstrate the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The SDA attachment conditions were varied from fully tight to loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first.

  4. Introducing malaria rapid diagnostic tests at registered drug shops in Uganda: limitations of diagnostic testing in the reality of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Clare I R; Hall-Clifford, Rachel; Asaph, Turinde; Pascal, Magnussen; Clarke, Siân; Mbonye, Anthony K

    2011-03-01

    In Uganda, around two thirds of medicines are procured from the private sector, mostly from drug shops. The introduction of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) at drug shops therefore has the potential to make a significant contribution to targeting antimalarial drugs to those with malaria parasites. We undertook formative research in a district in Uganda in preparation for a randomised trial of RDTs in drug shops. In May to July 2009, we interviewed 9 drug shop workers, 5 health workers and 4 district health officials and carried out 10 focus group discussions with a total of 75 community members to investigate the role of drug shops and the potential for implementation of RDTs at these health care outlets. Drug shops were seen to provide an important service to community members, the nature of which is determined by responsiveness to client demands. However, drug shops hold a liminal status: in the eyes of different actors, these outlets are at once a shop and clinic; legitimate and illegitimate; and trusted and distrusted. Malaria treatment was found to be synonymous with diagnosis. Diagnostic testing was deemed useful in theory, and community members were curious about the results, with the expectation that a test would decrease uncertainty and help secure an end to illness. However, whether testing would be sought as a routine step in treatment decisions in practice is uncertain, since the appeal of the tests waned in light of their costs and potential for results to conflict with presumed diagnosis. Interventions that increase awareness of multiple causes and management of malaria-like illness will be needed to support the new rationalisation for malaria treatment represented by parasitological diagnosis.

  5. [List of diagnostic tests and procedures in leg ulcer].

    PubMed

    Spoljar, Sanja

    2013-10-01

    Many factors contribute to the pathogenesis of leg ulcer. Most patients have venous leg ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency. Less often, patients have arterial leg ulcer resulting from peripheral arterial occlusive disease, the most common cause of which is arteriosclerosis. Leg ulcer may be of a mixed arteriovenous origin. In diabetic patients, distal symmetric neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are probably the most important etiologic factors in the development of diabetic leg ulcer. Other causes of chronic leg ulcers are hematologic diseases, autoimmune diseases, genetic defects, infectious diseases, primary skin diseases, cutaneous malignant diseases, use of some medications and therapeutic procedures, and numerous exogenous factors. Diagnosis of leg ulcer is based on medical history, inspection, palpation of skin temperature, palpation of arteries, fascia holes, presence and degree of edema, firm painful cords, and functional testing to assess peripheral occlusive arterial disease or identify superficial and deep venous reflux of the legs. Knowledge of differential diagnosis is essential for ensuring treatment success in patients with leg ulcer. There are many possible etiologic factors of leg ulcers and sometimes, clinical findings are similar. Additional testing should be performed, e.g., serologic testing such as blood count, C-reactive protein, HBA1c, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, differential blood count, total proteins, electrolytes, coagulation parameters, circulating immune complex, cryoglobulins, homocysteins, AT, PAI-1, APC resistance, proteins C and S, paraproteins, ANA, ENA, ANCA, dsDNA, antiphospholipid antibodies, urea, creatinine, blood lipids, vitamins and trace elements. Also, biopsy of the lesion for histopathology, direct immunofluorescence, bacteriology and mycology should be included. Other tests are Raynaud (cold stimulation) test and pathergy test. Device-based diagnostic testing should be performed for future

  6. ORNL/IAT ARMATURE DIAGNOSTICS DEMONSTRATION TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Cates, Michael R; Goedeke, Shawn; Crawford, M. T.; Ferraro, S. B.; Akerman, A.

    2005-03-01

    This test established feasibility for 'on the fly' temperature measurements of rail gun projectiles. In addition, an approach for projectile velocity measurement was also demonstrated. Insight was gained into other useful optical and fiberoptic diagnostic approaches. Instantaneous diagnostics could be critical for achieving further improvements in rail gun operation. They have the potential to enable design enhancements by providing information on the state of the armature and its relationship to the rail as it proceeds down the bore. To that end, the following was accomplished: (1) Optical fibers successfully delivered optical excitation and returned reflective and fluorescence signals as desired. (2) Luminescent coatings survived multiple firings--approximately 40 shots. (3) Optical triggering effectively synchronized an ultraviolet laser pulse to strike the moving armature. (4) Velocity measurements were successfully accomplished by either triggering on the armature front edge using two red diode lasers or by using a single laser and grooved marks a known distance apart on the armature surface. (5) Velocities ranged from 19 to 88 m/s. (6) Temperatures of 30 to 92 C were measured with a precision of about 2 C-: (a) This precision was achieved with a single laser shot and (b) Motion effect was observed but a methodology adequately corrected the result. The correction was only about 2 C. (7) Adequate signal-to-noise and measurement precision was achieved with a single laser shot.

  7. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional electromagnetic computer code, MAFIA. Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making it possible, for the first time, to design a complete TWT via computer simulation.

  8. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic computer code, MAFIA. Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making it possible, for the first time, to design a complete TWT via computer simulation.

  9. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic computer code, MAxwell's equations by the Finite Integration Algorithm (MAFIA). Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveLing-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making It possible, for the first time, to design complete TWT via computer simulation.

  10. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Tone Modal Structure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    2002-01-01

    This investigation is part of a test series that was extremely comprehensive and included aerodynamic and acoustic testing of a fan stage using two different fan rotors and three different stator designs. The test series is known as the Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) and was conducted by NASA Glenn as part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program. Tone mode measurements of one of the rotors with three different stators were made. The stator designs involve changes in vane count and sweep at constant solidity. The results of both inlet and exhaust tone mode measurements are presented in terms of mode power for both circumferential and radial mode orders. The results show benefits of vane sweep to be large, up to 13 dB in total tone power. At many conditions, the increase in power due to cutting on the rotor/stator interaction is more than offset by vane sweep. The rotor locked mode is shown as an important contributor to tone power when the blade tip speed is near and above Mach one. This is most evident in the inlet when the direct rotor field starts to cut on.

  11. A Novel Automatic Rapid Diagnostic Test Reader Platform.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Haydar; Kayhan, Osman Semih

    2016-01-01

    A novel automatic Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) reader platform is designed to analyze and diagnose target disease by using existing consumer cameras of a laptop-computer or a tablet. The RDT reader is useable with numerous lateral immunochromatographic assays and similar biomedical tests. The system has two different components, which are 3D-printed, low-cost, tiny, and compact stand and a decision program named RDT-AutoReader 2.0. The program takes the image of RDT, crops the region of interest (ROI), and extracts the features from the control end test lines to classify the results as invalid, positive, or negative. All related patient's personal information, image of ROI, and the e-report are digitally saved and transferred to the related clinician. Condition of the patient and the progress of the disease can be monitored by using the saved data. The reader platform has been tested by taking image from used cassette RDTs of rotavirus (RtV)/adenovirus (AdV) and lateral flow strip RDTs of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) before discarding them. The created RDT reader can also supply real-time statistics of various illnesses by using databases and Internet. This can help to inhibit propagation of contagious diseases and to increase readiness against epidemic diseases worldwide. PMID:27190549

  12. A Novel Automatic Rapid Diagnostic Test Reader Platform

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Haydar; Kayhan, Osman Semih

    2016-01-01

    A novel automatic Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) reader platform is designed to analyze and diagnose target disease by using existing consumer cameras of a laptop-computer or a tablet. The RDT reader is useable with numerous lateral immunochromatographic assays and similar biomedical tests. The system has two different components, which are 3D-printed, low-cost, tiny, and compact stand and a decision program named RDT-AutoReader 2.0. The program takes the image of RDT, crops the region of interest (ROI), and extracts the features from the control end test lines to classify the results as invalid, positive, or negative. All related patient's personal information, image of ROI, and the e-report are digitally saved and transferred to the related clinician. Condition of the patient and the progress of the disease can be monitored by using the saved data. The reader platform has been tested by taking image from used cassette RDTs of rotavirus (RtV)/adenovirus (AdV) and lateral flow strip RDTs of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) before discarding them. The created RDT reader can also supply real-time statistics of various illnesses by using databases and Internet. This can help to inhibit propagation of contagious diseases and to increase readiness against epidemic diseases worldwide. PMID:27190549

  13. A powerful test of independent assortment that determines genome-wide significance quickly and accurately

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, W C L; Hager, V R

    2016-01-01

    In the analysis of DNA sequences on related individuals, most methods strive to incorporate as much information as possible, with little or no attention paid to the issue of statistical significance. For example, a modern workstation can easily handle the computations needed to perform a large-scale genome-wide inheritance-by-descent (IBD) scan, but accurate assessment of the significance of that scan is often hindered by inaccurate approximations and computationally intensive simulation. To address these issues, we developed gLOD—a test of co-segregation that, for large samples, models chromosome-specific IBD statistics as a collection of stationary Gaussian processes. With this simple model, the parametric bootstrap yields an accurate and rapid assessment of significance—the genome-wide corrected P-value. Furthermore, we show that (i) under the null hypothesis, the limiting distribution of the gLOD is the standard Gumbel distribution; (ii) our parametric bootstrap simulator is approximately 40 000 times faster than gene-dropping methods, and it is more powerful than methods that approximate the adjusted P-value; and, (iii) the gLOD has the same statistical power as the widely used maximum Kong and Cox LOD. Thus, our approach gives researchers the ability to determine quickly and accurately the significance of most large-scale IBD scans, which may contain multiple traits, thousands of families and tens of thousands of DNA sequences. PMID:27245422

  14. A powerful test of independent assortment that determines genome-wide significance quickly and accurately.

    PubMed

    Stewart, W C L; Hager, V R

    2016-08-01

    In the analysis of DNA sequences on related individuals, most methods strive to incorporate as much information as possible, with little or no attention paid to the issue of statistical significance. For example, a modern workstation can easily handle the computations needed to perform a large-scale genome-wide inheritance-by-descent (IBD) scan, but accurate assessment of the significance of that scan is often hindered by inaccurate approximations and computationally intensive simulation. To address these issues, we developed gLOD-a test of co-segregation that, for large samples, models chromosome-specific IBD statistics as a collection of stationary Gaussian processes. With this simple model, the parametric bootstrap yields an accurate and rapid assessment of significance-the genome-wide corrected P-value. Furthermore, we show that (i) under the null hypothesis, the limiting distribution of the gLOD is the standard Gumbel distribution; (ii) our parametric bootstrap simulator is approximately 40 000 times faster than gene-dropping methods, and it is more powerful than methods that approximate the adjusted P-value; and, (iii) the gLOD has the same statistical power as the widely used maximum Kong and Cox LOD. Thus, our approach gives researchers the ability to determine quickly and accurately the significance of most large-scale IBD scans, which may contain multiple traits, thousands of families and tens of thousands of DNA sequences.

  15. Efficient Noninferiority Testing Procedures for Simultaneously Assessing Sensitivity and Specificity of Two Diagnostic Tests.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Amei, Amei; Young, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity are often used to assess the performance of a diagnostic test with binary outcomes. Wald-type test statistics have been proposed for testing sensitivity and specificity individually. In the presence of a gold standard, simultaneous comparison between two diagnostic tests for noninferiority of sensitivity and specificity based on an asymptotic approach has been studied by Chen et al. (2003). However, the asymptotic approach may suffer from unsatisfactory type I error control as observed from many studies, especially in small to medium sample settings. In this paper, we compare three unconditional approaches for simultaneously testing sensitivity and specificity. They are approaches based on estimation, maximization, and a combination of estimation and maximization. Although the estimation approach does not guarantee type I error, it has satisfactory performance with regard to type I error control. The other two unconditional approaches are exact. The approach based on estimation and maximization is generally more powerful than the approach based on maximization.

  16. Detection of lipoarabinomannan as a diagnostic test for tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sada, E; Aguilar, D; Torres, M; Herrera, T

    1992-01-01

    A coagglutination technique was established for the detection of lipoarabinomannan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human serum samples and evaluated for its utility in the diagnosis of tuberculosis at the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias in Mexico City. The test had a sensitivity of 88% in patients with sputum-smear-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis. The sensitivity in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis negative for acid-fast bacilli in sputum was 67%. Less favorable results were obtained for patients with AIDS and tuberculosis, with a sensitivity of 57%. The specificity in control patients with lung diseases different from tuberculosis and in healthy subjects was 100%. The positive predictive value was 100%, and the negative predictive value for patients with sputum-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis was 97%. The results of this study suggest that the detection of lipoarabinomannan is an accurate test for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:1401008

  17. Detection of lipoarabinomannan as a diagnostic test for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sada, E; Aguilar, D; Torres, M; Herrera, T

    1992-09-01

    A coagglutination technique was established for the detection of lipoarabinomannan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human serum samples and evaluated for its utility in the diagnosis of tuberculosis at the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias in Mexico City. The test had a sensitivity of 88% in patients with sputum-smear-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis. The sensitivity in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis negative for acid-fast bacilli in sputum was 67%. Less favorable results were obtained for patients with AIDS and tuberculosis, with a sensitivity of 57%. The specificity in control patients with lung diseases different from tuberculosis and in healthy subjects was 100%. The positive predictive value was 100%, and the negative predictive value for patients with sputum-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis was 97%. The results of this study suggest that the detection of lipoarabinomannan is an accurate test for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  18. Assessment of diagnostics and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Brachyspira species using a ring test.

    PubMed

    Råsbäck, T; Fellström, C; Bergsjø, B; Cizek, A; Collin, K; Gunnarsson, A; Jensen, S M; Mars, A; Thomson, J; Vyt, P; Pringle, M

    2005-08-30

    There is no ring test for quality assessment available in Europe for diagnostics and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the fastidious, anaerobic bacteria of the genus Brachyspira. Therefore, an international ring test for Brachyspira spp. was performed once a year during 2002-2004. Two sets of coded samples were prepared and distributed on each occasion. One set comprised six swabs dipped in pig faeces spiked with Brachyspira spp. intended for diagnostics. The other set comprised two pure strains intended only for susceptibility testing. All methods used were in-house methods. The species used were Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, Brachyspira pilosicoli, Brachyspira innocens, Brachyspira murdochii and Brachyspira intermedia. In most cases, the correct Brachyspira spp. were detected. However, the results showed that Brachyspira spp. could be difficult to identify, especially if two Brachyspira spp. were mixed or if the concentration of Brachyspira in faeces was low. Additionally, some laboratories reported Brachyspira growth in control samples that were not seeded with any spirochaetes. The lowest detection level was 10(2) bacteria/ml faeces for both B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli. The susceptibility tests performed showed that disc diffusion was not recommendable for Brachyspira spp. Extended antimicrobial dilution series gave most congruent results. The diversity of the results highlights the importance of ring tests for a high quality of diagnostics and antimicrobial susceptibility tests for Brachyspira spp. This is the first ring test described for Brachyspira spp.

  19. SSME HPOTP post-test diagnostic system enhancement project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickmore, Timothy W.

    1995-01-01

    An assessment of engine and component health is routinely made after each test or flight firing of a space shuttle main engine (SSME). Currently, this health assessment is done by teams of engineers who manually review sensor data, performance data, and engine and component operating histories. Based on review of information from these various sources, an evaluation is made as to the health of each component of the SSME and the preparedness of the engine for another test or flight. The objective of this project is to further develop a computer program which automates the analysis of test data from the SSME high-pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) in order to detect and diagnose anomalies. This program fits into a larger system, the SSME Post-Test Diagnostic System (PTDS), which will eventually be extended to assess the health and status of most SSME components on the basis of test data analysis. The HPOTP module is an expert system, which uses 'rules-of-thumb' obtained from interviews with experts from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to detect and diagnose anomalies. Analyses of the raw test data are first performed using pattern recognition techniques which result in features such as spikes, shifts, peaks, and drifts being detected and written to a database. The HPOTP module then looks for combination of these features which are indicative of known anomalies, using the rules gathered from the turbomachinery experts. Results of this analysis are then displayed via a graphical user interface which provides ranked lists of anomalies and observations by engine component, along with supporting data plots for each.

  20. Mutual Information Item Selection Method in Cognitive Diagnostic Computerized Adaptive Testing with Short Test Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive diagnostic computerized adaptive testing (CD-CAT) purports to combine the strengths of both CAT and cognitive diagnosis. Cognitive diagnosis models aim at classifying examinees into the correct mastery profile group so as to pinpoint the strengths and weakness of each examinee whereas CAT algorithms choose items to determine those…

  1. Molecular and biological diagnostic tests for monitoring benzimidazole resistance in human soil-transmitted helminths.

    PubMed

    Diawara, Aïssatou; Schwenkenbecher, Jan M; Kaplan, Ray M; Prichard, Roger K

    2013-06-01

    In endemic countries with soil-transmitted helminths mass drug administration with albendazole or mebendazole are being implemented as a control strategy. However, it is well known in veterinary helminths that the use of the same benzimidazole drugs can place selection on the β-tubulin gene, leading to resistance. Given the concern that resistance could arise in human soil-transmitted helminths, there is an urgent need to develop accurate diagnostic tools for monitoring resistance. In this study, we developed molecular assays to detect putative resistance genetic changes in Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworms, and we optimized an egg hatch assay for the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum and applied it to Necator americanus. Both assays were tested on field samples. The molecular assays demonstrated their reproducibility and capacity to detect the presence of worms carrying putative resistance-associated genetic changes. However, further investigations are needed to validate our molecular and biological tests on additional field isolates.

  2. Birth of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test: Prototest Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilik, M.

    2001-12-01

    In 1992, with funding by the National Science Foundation, a multidisciplinary research team at the University of New Mexico accreted to transform a "traditional Astro 101" course into a conceptually-oriented one. The team consisted of people from astronomy, cognitive psychology, and education. Our aim was to improve the learning environment in a large "lecture" course based on current cognitive models of adult learning. We demanded that our effort be research-based, but found little in the literature to assist us; for example, no field-tested assessment tools that would measure appropiate outcomes had been developed in higher education. From prior research at lower grades, we saw the need of a valid and reliable "misconceptions" test. We also desired to tap into higher level conceptual learning, and so developed concept map assessments to measure acquisition of the "Big Picture" in astronomy. These "misconceptions measures" were protoversions of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT) that gained in structure and usefulness over four semesters involving hundreds of students. I will outline our methodology to develop the ADT in a bootstrap way, its basis as a learning tool, and its correlation with other assessments (especially the concept maps) and achievement in the UNM "Astro 101" course. This work was supported in part by NSF DUE grants 9253983 and 9981155.

  3. What's in a Name? The Impact of Accurate Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Identification on Appropriate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria in the Staphylococcus intermedius group, including Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, often encode mecA-mediated methicillin resistance. Reliable detection of this phenotype for proper treatment and infection control decisions requires that these coagulase-positive staphylococci are accurately identified and specifically that they are not misidentified as S. aureus. As correct species level bacterial identification becomes more commonplace in clinical laboratories, one can expect to see changes in guidance for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and interpretation. The study by Wu et al. in this issue (M. T. Wu, C.-A. D. Burnham, L. F. Westblade, J. Dien Bard, S. D. Lawhon, M. A. Wallace, T. Stanley, E. Burd, J. Hindler, R. M. Humphries, J Clin Microbiol 54:535–542, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02864-15) highlights the impact of robust identification of S. intermedius group organisms on the selection of appropriate antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and interpretation. PMID:26763965

  4. What's in a Name? The Impact of Accurate Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Identification on Appropriate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Limbago, Brandi M

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria in the Staphylococcus intermedius group, including Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, often encode mecA-mediated methicillin resistance. Reliable detection of this phenotype for proper treatment and infection control decisions requires that these coagulase-positive staphylococci are accurately identified and specifically that they are not misidentified as S. aureus. As correct species level bacterial identification becomes more commonplace in clinical laboratories, one can expect to see changes in guidance for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and interpretation. The study by Wu et al. in this issue (M. T. Wu, C.-A. D. Burnham, L. F. Westblade, J. Dien Bard, S. D. Lawhon, M. A. Wallace, T. Stanley, E. Burd, J. Hindler, R. M. Humphries, J Clin Microbiol 54:535-542, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02864-15) highlights the impact of robust identification of S. intermedius group organisms on the selection of appropriate antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and interpretation.

  5. Long maximal incremental tests accurately assess aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men.

    PubMed

    Lanzi, Stefano; Codecasa, Franco; Cornacchia, Mauro; Maestrini, Sabrina; Capodaglio, Paolo; Brunani, Amelia; Fanari, Paolo; Salvadori, Alberto; Malatesta, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min) (STest) and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min) (LTest)] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2) without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2) completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1) and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO) reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] and peak heart rate (HRpeak) of each test. There were no significant differences in [Formula: see text] (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1) and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm) between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between [Formula: see text] (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001) and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001) during both tests. [Formula: see text] and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity.

  6. Selected diagnostic ophthalmic tests in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Takle, Ginger L; Suedmeyer, W Kirk; Hunkeler, Amy

    2010-06-01

    The following tests were performed on a total of 20 eyes: Schirmer tear test, intraocular pressure (IOP), assessment of conjunctival flora, and pupillary diameter with application of topical tropicamide in 10 healthy captive red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) under manual restraint. The mean Schirmer tear test value was 22.6 +/- 6.07 mm/min. The mean intraocular pressure was 17.45 +/- 7.23 mm Hg. Values did not differ between eyes or gender for either test, but significant differences were identified for IOP values according to age. The most common bacteria isolated from the conjunctival fornix were Staphylococcus epidermidis (54.5%) and Corynebacterium sp. (18.2%). The mean onset of mydriasis after instillation of 1% tropicamide ophthalmic solution was 16.7 +/- 3.34 min and the mean duration of effect was 17.6 +/- 8.26 hr. The data obtained in this investigation will aid veterinary ophthalmologists and zoo veterinarians to diagnose ocular diseases in the red kangaroo accurately.

  7. Produced water toxicity tests accurately measure the produced water toxicity in marine environments?

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, W.S.; Veil, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region VI has issued a general permit for offshore oil and gas discharges to the Gulf of Mexico that places numerical limits on whole effluent toxicity (WEI) for produced water. Recently proposed EPA general permits for other produced water discharges in Regions VI and X also include enforceable numerical limits on WET. Clearly, the industry will be conducting extensive produced water WET testing. Unfortunately, the WET test may not accurately measure the toxicity of the chemical constituents of produced water. Rather the mortality of test organisms may be attributable to (1) the high salinity of produced water, which causes salinity shock to the organisms, or (2) an ionic imbalance caused by excesses or deficiencies of one or more of seawater`s essential ions in the test chambers. Both of these effects are likely to be mitigated in actual offshore discharge settings, where the receiving water will be seawater and substantial dilution will be probable. Thus, the additional salinity of produced water will be rapidly assimilated, and the proper marine ionic balance will be quickly restored. Regulatory authorities should be aware of these factors when interpreting WET test results.

  8. Persistent digestive disorders in the tropics: causative infectious pathogens and reference diagnostic tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent digestive disorders account for considerable disease burden in the tropics. Despite advances in understanding acute gastrointestinal infections, important issues concerning epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and control of most persistent digestive symptomatologies remain to be elucidated. Helminths and intestinal protozoa are considered to play major roles, but the full extent of the aetiologic spectrum is still unclear. We provide an overview of pathogens causing digestive disorders in the tropics and evaluate available reference tests. Methods We searched the literature to identify pathogens that might give rise to persistent diarrhoea, chronic abdominal pain and/or blood in the stool. We reviewed existing laboratory diagnostic methods for each pathogen and stratified them by (i) microscopy; (ii) culture techniques; (iii) immunological tests; and (iv) molecular methods. Pathogen-specific reference tests providing highest diagnostic accuracy are described in greater detail. Results Over 30 pathogens may cause persistent digestive disorders. Bacteria, viruses and parasites are important aetiologic agents of acute and long-lasting symptomatologies. An integrated approach, consisting of stool culture, microscopy and/or specific immunological techniques for toxin, antigen and antibody detection, is required for accurate diagnosis of bacteria and parasites. Molecular techniques are essential for sensitive diagnosis of many viruses, bacteria and intestinal protozoa, and are increasingly utilised as adjuncts for helminth identification. Conclusions Diagnosis of the broad spectrum of intestinal pathogens is often cumbersome. There is a need for rapid diagnostic tests that are simple and affordable for resource-constrained settings, so that the management of patients suffering from persistent digestive disorders can be improved. PMID:23347408

  9. Diagnostic errors and abnormal diagnostic tests lost to follow-up: a source of needless waste and delay to treatment.

    PubMed

    Wahls, Terry

    2007-01-01

    Diagnostic errors are an important and often underappreciated source of medical error, needless delays to treatment, and needlessly wasted resources. Almost 65% of diagnostic errors have an important contribution of system errors, of which many are an abnormal test result that was lost to follow-up, that is, missed results. These system problems that contribute to missed results may represent low-hanging fruit for those who wish to reduce diagnostic errors in their institution. The rate of missed results and associated treatment delay are discussed. The system factors and human factors that contribute to these errors are discussed along with strategies that can be adopted to reduce these errors. PMID:17873665

  10. Evaluation of coproexamination as a diagnostic test for avian botulism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jensen, W.I.

    1981-01-01

    Fecal extracts and blood sera from 113 ducks showing clinical signs of botulism were examined for Clostridium botulinum type C toxin by means of the mouse toxicity test to evaluate coproexamination as a diagnostic procedure, as compared with demonstration of toxin in serum. When death of test mice unprotected with type specific antitoxin (while protected controls survived) was the criterion, 78.8% of the sera and 5.3% of the fecal extracts were positive. When characteristic signs of intoxication in the unprotected mice was included as evidence of toxin in the specimens, these percentages increased to 86.7 and 6.2, respectively. Fecal specimens were collected hourly for the first 6 h after peroral dosing of eight mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) with 1.0 LD50 of type C toxin and at 24, 48, and 72 h from birds surviving that long. From 2 to 4 toxin-positive specimens were passed by all eight ducks during the first 6 h, five specimens were positive at 24 h, and three were positive at 48 h. Only three specimens were collected at 72 h, all of which were negative. These findings suggest that attempts to detect toxin in the feces of wild ducks might have been more successful had the birds been captured earlier in the course of the disease.

  11. Toward a Diagnostic Test for Hidden Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Plack, Christopher J; Léger, Agnès; Prendergast, Garreth; Kluk, Karolina; Guest, Hannah; Munro, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear synaptopathy (or hidden hearing loss), due to noise exposure or aging, has been demonstrated in animal models using histological techniques. However, diagnosis of the condition in individual humans is problematic because of (a) test reliability and (b) lack of a gold standard validation measure. Wave I of the transient-evoked auditory brainstem response is a noninvasive electrophysiological measure of auditory nerve function and has been validated in the animal models. However, in humans, Wave I amplitude shows high variability both between and within individuals. The frequency-following response, a sustained evoked potential reflecting synchronous neural activity in the rostral brainstem, is potentially more robust than auditory brainstem response Wave I. However, the frequency-following response is a measure of central activity and may be dependent on individual differences in central processing. Psychophysical measures are also affected by intersubject variability in central processing. Differential measures may help to reduce intersubject variability due to unrelated factors. A measure can be compared, within an individual, between conditions that are affected differently by cochlear synaptopathy. Validation of the metrics is also an issue. Comparisons with animal models, computational modeling, auditory nerve imaging, and human temporal bone histology are all potential options for validation, but there are technical and practical hurdles and difficulties in interpretation. Despite the obstacles, a diagnostic test for hidden hearing loss is a worthwhile goal, with important implications for clinical practice and health surveillance. PMID:27604783

  12. Filtering Medline for a clinical discipline: diagnostic test assessment framework

    PubMed Central

    Iansavichus, Arthur V; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Kastner, Monika; Baier, Leslie A; Shariff, Salimah Z; Rehman, Faisal; Weir, Matthew; McKibbon, K Ann; Haynes, R Brian

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a Medline filter that allows clinicians to search for articles within a clinical discipline, rather than searching the entire Medline database. Design Diagnostic test assessment framework with development and validation phases. Setting Sample of 4657 articles published in 2006 from 40 journals. Reviews Each article was manually reviewed, and 19.8% contained information relevant to the discipline of nephrology. The performance of 1 155 087 unique renal filters was compared with the manual review. Main outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of each filter. Results The best renal filters combined two to 14 terms or phrases and included the terms “kidney” with multiple endings (that is, truncation), “renal replacement therapy”, “renal dialysis”, “kidney function tests”, “renal”, “nephr” truncated, “glomerul” truncated, and “proteinuria”. These filters achieved peak sensitivities of 97.8% and specificities of 98.5%. Performance of filters remained excellent in the validation phase. Conclusions Medline can be filtered for the discipline of nephrology in a reliable manner. Storing these high performance renal filters in PubMed could help clinicians with their everyday searching. Filters can also be developed for other clinical disciplines by using similar methods. PMID:19767336

  13. Toward a Diagnostic Test for Hidden Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Agnès; Prendergast, Garreth; Kluk, Karolina; Guest, Hannah; Munro, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear synaptopathy (or hidden hearing loss), due to noise exposure or aging, has been demonstrated in animal models using histological techniques. However, diagnosis of the condition in individual humans is problematic because of (a) test reliability and (b) lack of a gold standard validation measure. Wave I of the transient-evoked auditory brainstem response is a noninvasive electrophysiological measure of auditory nerve function and has been validated in the animal models. However, in humans, Wave I amplitude shows high variability both between and within individuals. The frequency-following response, a sustained evoked potential reflecting synchronous neural activity in the rostral brainstem, is potentially more robust than auditory brainstem response Wave I. However, the frequency-following response is a measure of central activity and may be dependent on individual differences in central processing. Psychophysical measures are also affected by intersubject variability in central processing. Differential measures may help to reduce intersubject variability due to unrelated factors. A measure can be compared, within an individual, between conditions that are affected differently by cochlear synaptopathy. Validation of the metrics is also an issue. Comparisons with animal models, computational modeling, auditory nerve imaging, and human temporal bone histology are all potential options for validation, but there are technical and practical hurdles and difficulties in interpretation. Despite the obstacles, a diagnostic test for hidden hearing loss is a worthwhile goal, with important implications for clinical practice and health surveillance. PMID:27604783

  14. Digital test signal generation: An accurate SNR calibration approach for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, Benito O.

    1993-01-01

    In support of the on-going automation of the Deep Space Network (DSN) a new method of generating analog test signals with accurate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is described. High accuracy is obtained by simultaneous generation of digital noise and signal spectra at the desired bandwidth (base-band or bandpass). The digital synthesis provides a test signal embedded in noise with the statistical properties of a stationary random process. Accuracy is dependent on test integration time and limited only by the system quantization noise (0.02 dB). The monitor and control as well as signal-processing programs reside in a personal computer (PC). Commands are transmitted to properly configure the specially designed high-speed digital hardware. The prototype can generate either two data channels modulated or not on a subcarrier, or one QPSK channel, or a residual carrier with one biphase data channel. The analog spectrum generated is on the DC to 10 MHz frequency range. These spectra may be up-converted to any desired frequency without loss on the characteristics of the SNR provided. Test results are presented.

  15. A new algorithm for generating highly accurate benchmark solutions to transport test problems

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1997-06-01

    We present a new algorithm for solving the neutron transport equation in its discrete-variable form. The new algorithm is based on computing the full matrix relating the scalar flux spatial moments in all cells to the fixed neutron source spatial moments, foregoing the need to compute the angular flux spatial moments, and thereby eliminating the need for sweeping the spatial mesh in each discrete-angular direction. The matrix equation is solved exactly in test cases, producing a solution vector that is free from iteration convergence error, and subject only to truncation and roundoff errors. Our algorithm is designed to provide method developers with a quick and simple solution scheme to test their new methods on difficult test problems without the need to develop sophisticated solution techniques, e.g. acceleration, before establishing the worthiness of their innovation. We demonstrate the utility of the new algorithm by applying it to the Arbitrarily High Order Transport Nodal (AHOT-N) method, and using it to solve two of Burre`s Suite of Test Problems (BSTP). Our results provide highly accurate benchmark solutions, that can be distributed electronically and used to verify the pointwise accuracy of other solution methods and algorithms.

  16. A Highly Accurate Inclusive Cancer Screening Test Using Caenorhabditis elegans Scent Detection

    PubMed Central

    Uozumi, Takayuki; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Mimori, Koshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Ueda, Naoko; Hamakawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and treatment are of vital importance to the successful eradication of various cancers, and development of economical and non-invasive novel cancer screening systems is critical. Previous reports using canine scent detection demonstrated the existence of cancer-specific odours. However, it is difficult to introduce canine scent recognition into clinical practice because of the need to maintain accuracy. In this study, we developed a Nematode Scent Detection Test (NSDT) using Caenorhabditis elegans to provide a novel highly accurate cancer detection system that is economical, painless, rapid and convenient. We demonstrated wild-type C. elegans displayed attractive chemotaxis towards human cancer cell secretions, cancer tissues and urine from cancer patients but avoided control urine; in parallel, the response of the olfactory neurons of C. elegans to the urine from cancer patients was significantly stronger than to control urine. In contrast, G protein α mutants and olfactory neurons-ablated animals were not attracted to cancer patient urine, suggesting that C. elegans senses odours in urine. We tested 242 samples to measure the performance of the NSDT, and found the sensitivity was 95.8%; this is markedly higher than that of other existing tumour markers. Furthermore, the specificity was 95.0%. Importantly, this test was able to diagnose various cancer types tested at the early stage (stage 0 or 1). To conclude, C. elegans scent-based analyses might provide a new strategy to detect and study disease-associated scents. PMID:25760772

  17. Approximate likelihood-ratio test for branches: A fast, accurate, and powerful alternative.

    PubMed

    Anisimova, Maria; Gascuel, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    We revisit statistical tests for branches of evolutionary trees reconstructed upon molecular data. A new, fast, approximate likelihood-ratio test (aLRT) for branches is presented here as a competitive alternative to nonparametric bootstrap and Bayesian estimation of branch support. The aLRT is based on the idea of the conventional LRT, with the null hypothesis corresponding to the assumption that the inferred branch has length 0. We show that the LRT statistic is asymptotically distributed as a maximum of three random variables drawn from the chi(0)2 + chi(1)2 distribution. The new aLRT of interior branch uses this distribution for significance testing, but the test statistic is approximated in a slightly conservative but practical way as 2(l1- l2), i.e., double the difference between the maximum log-likelihood values corresponding to the best tree and the second best topological arrangement around the branch of interest. Such a test is fast because the log-likelihood value l2 is computed by optimizing only over the branch of interest and the four adjacent branches, whereas other parameters are fixed at their optimal values corresponding to the best ML tree. The performance of the new test was studied on simulated 4-, 12-, and 100-taxon data sets with sequences of different lengths. The aLRT is shown to be accurate, powerful, and robust to certain violations of model assumptions. The aLRT is implemented within the algorithm used by the recent fast maximum likelihood tree estimation program PHYML (Guindon and Gascuel, 2003).

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Rapid Diagnostic Test Kit for Scrub Typhus with Improved Performance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of scrub typhus is challenging due to its more than twenty serotypes and the similar clinical symptoms with other acute febrile illnesses including leptospirosis, murine typhus and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Accuracy and rapidity of a diagnostic test to Orientia tsutsugamushi is an important step to diagnose this disease. To discriminate scrub typhus from other diseases, the improved ImmuneMed Scrub Typhus Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) was evaluated in Korea and Sri Lanka. The sensitivity at the base of each IgM and IgG indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) in Korean patients was 98.6% and 97.1%, and the specificity was 98.2% and 97.7% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for retrospective diagnosis at the base of IFA in Sri Lanka was 92.1% and 96.1%. ImmuneMed RDT was not reactive to any serum from seventeen diseases including hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (n = 48), leptospirosis (n = 23), and murine typhus (n = 48). ImmuneMed RDT shows superior sensitivity (98.6% and 97.1%) compared with SD Bioline RDT (84.4% at IgM and 83.3% at IgG) in Korea. The retrospective diagnosis of ImmuneMed RDT exhibits 94.0% identity with enzyme-linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using South India patient serum samples. These results suggest that this RDT can replace other diagnostic tests and is applicable for global diagnosis of scrub typhus. This rapid and accurate diagnosis will be beneficial for diagnosing and managing scrub typhus. PMID:27478327

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Rapid Diagnostic Test Kit for Scrub Typhus with Improved Performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Sungman; Premaratna, Ranjan; Selvaraj, Stephen; Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Sora; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Min Soo; Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Kyung-Chan; Kwon, Soon-Hwan; Seo, Wonjun; Lee, Nam Taek; Kim, Seung-Han; Kang, Heui Keun; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosis of scrub typhus is challenging due to its more than twenty serotypes and the similar clinical symptoms with other acute febrile illnesses including leptospirosis, murine typhus and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Accuracy and rapidity of a diagnostic test to Orientia tsutsugamushi is an important step to diagnose this disease. To discriminate scrub typhus from other diseases, the improved ImmuneMed Scrub Typhus Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) was evaluated in Korea and Sri Lanka. The sensitivity at the base of each IgM and IgG indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) in Korean patients was 98.6% and 97.1%, and the specificity was 98.2% and 97.7% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for retrospective diagnosis at the base of IFA in Sri Lanka was 92.1% and 96.1%. ImmuneMed RDT was not reactive to any serum from seventeen diseases including hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (n = 48), leptospirosis (n = 23), and murine typhus (n = 48). ImmuneMed RDT shows superior sensitivity (98.6% and 97.1%) compared with SD Bioline RDT (84.4% at IgM and 83.3% at IgG) in Korea. The retrospective diagnosis of ImmuneMed RDT exhibits 94.0% identity with enzyme-linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using South India patient serum samples. These results suggest that this RDT can replace other diagnostic tests and is applicable for global diagnosis of scrub typhus. This rapid and accurate diagnosis will be beneficial for diagnosing and managing scrub typhus. PMID:27478327

  20. Teaching Posttraining : Influencing Diagnostic Strategy with Instructions at Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga-Moruzi, Chan; Brooks, Lee R.; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    It is believed that medical diagnosis involves two complementary processes, analytic and similarity-based. There is considerable debate as to which of these processes defines diagnostic expertise and how best to teach clinical diagnosis and reduce diagnostic errors. The purpose of these studies is to document the use of these strategies in medical…

  1. Development of a diagnostic test based on multiple continuous biomarkers with an imperfect reference test.

    PubMed

    García Barrado, Leandro; Coart, Els; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-02-20

    Ignoring the fact that the reference test used to establish the discriminative properties of a combination of diagnostic biomarkers is imperfect can lead to a biased estimate of the diagnostic accuracy of the combination. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian latent-class mixture model to select a combination of biomarkers that maximizes the area under the ROC curve (AUC), while taking into account the imperfect nature of the reference test. In particular, a method for specification of the prior for the mixture component parameters is developed that allows controlling the amount of prior information provided for the AUC. The properties of the model are evaluated by using a simulation study and an application to real data from Alzheimer's disease research. In the simulation study, 100 data sets are simulated for sample sizes ranging from 100 to 600 observations, with a varying correlation between biomarkers. The inclusion of an informative as well as a flat prior for the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test is investigated. In the real-data application, the proposed model was compared with the generally used logistic-regression model that ignores the imperfectness of the reference test. Conditional on the selected sample size and prior distributions, the simulation study results indicate satisfactory performance of the model-based estimates. In particular, the obtained average estimates for all parameters are close to the true values. For the real-data application, AUC estimates for the proposed model are substantially higher than those from the 'traditional' logistic-regression model.

  2. The DEX/CRH test for major depression: a potentially useful diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Mohammadreza; Arfken, Cynthia; Boutros, Nash

    2013-07-30

    The dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing hormone (DEX/CRH) test has been proposed as a potential diagnostic test for major depressive disorder (MDD). A previously proposed four-step approach assesses the stage of development for a biological finding into a clinically useful diagnostic test. Using this approach, we evaluated the progress of the DEX/CRH test using meta-analysis as a part of step 1. A literature review identified 15 studies of the DEX/CRH test in patients with MDD and healthy controls. Meta-analysis estimated the effect size, heterogeneity, and confidence intervals using random effects models. Studies consistent with any step of the four-step approach were identified, and their characteristics were presented. Eleven studies reported significantly higher cortisol levels with the DEX/CRH test in patients with MDD, compared with the healthy controls (step 1). Eight eligible studies were included in meta-analysis, and had an effect size of 1.34 (95% confidence interval: 0.70-1.97). Most studies were step-1 studies (comparison of patients and healthy controls), and no step-4 studies (multicenter trials) were found. This review emphasizes that despite appearing as a promising test, the DEX/CRH has not been adequately studied for the required stages of development into a clinically useful laboratory test. Particularly, additional step-3 and step-4 studies are necessary.

  3. Pre-course Results from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, Beth; Slater, Timothy; Deming, Grace; Adams, Jeff; Adrian, Rebecca L.; Brick, Christine; Zeilik, Michael

    2000-08-01

    We present selected results from the January 1999 semester pre-course administration of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT), a research-based, multiple-choice instrument that assesses student knowledge and understanding about selected concepts in astronomy. The ADT is valid for undergraduate non-science majors taking an introductory astronomy course. This paper briefly summarises the development and validation processes, which included pre-course administration to 1557 students in 22 classes attending 17 various post-secondary institutions across the USA in the January 1999 semester. Two interesting results of the ADT's pre-course administration are (1) the average class score of the ADT is about the same (32%) regardless of type of post-secondary institution or class size and (2) there is a significant gender difference, with women scoring an average of 28% and men 38%, with the standard errors both less than 1%. The current version of the ADT (Version 2 dated 21 June 1999) and a comparative by-class database is available to astronomy instructors at the (USA) Association of Astronomy Educators' and the National Institute for Science Education's (NISE) WebPages.

  4. Rapid non-invasive tests for diagnostics of infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    A rapid test for an infectious disease that can be used at point-of-care at a physician's office, a pharmacy, or in the field is critical for the prompt and appropriate therapeutic intervention. Ultimately by treating infections early on will decrease transmission of the pathogen. In contrast to metabolic diseases or cancer where multiple biomarkers are required, infectious disease targets (e.g. antigen, antibody, nucleic acid) are simple and specific for the pathogen causing the disease. Our laboratory has focused on three major infectious disease; HIV, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. These diseases are pandemic in much of the world thus putting natives, tourists and military personnel at risk for becoming infected, and upon returning to the U.S., transmitting these diseases to their contacts. Our devices are designed to detect antigens, antibodies or nucleic acids in blood or saliva samples in less than 30 minutes. An overview describing the current status of each of the three diagnostic platforms is presented. These microfluidic point-of-care devices will be relatively inexpensive, disposable, and user friendly.

  5. Broadband Liner Optimization for the Source Diagnostic Test Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with the utilization of increased bypass ratio and advanced fan designs. Thus, while the attenuation of fan tones remains paramount, the ability to simultaneously reduce broadband fan noise levels has become more appealing. This paper describes a broadband acoustic liner optimization study for the scale model Source Diagnostic Test fan. Specifically, in-duct attenuation predictions with a statistical fan source model are used to obtain optimum impedance spectra over a number of flow conditions for three liner locations in the bypass duct. The predicted optimum impedance information is then used with acoustic liner modeling tools to design liners aimed at producing impedance spectra that most closely match the predicted optimum values. Design selection is based on an acceptance criterion that provides the ability to apply increased weighting to specific frequencies and/or operating conditions. Typical tonal liner designs targeting single frequencies at one operating condition are first produced to provide baseline performance information. These are followed by multiple broadband design approaches culminating in a broadband liner targeting the full range of frequencies and operating conditions. The broadband liner is found to satisfy the optimum impedance objectives much better than the tonal liner designs. In addition, the broadband liner is found to provide better attenuation than the tonal designs over the full range of frequencies and operating conditions considered. Thus, the current study successfully establishes a process for the initial design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  6. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Vane Unsteady Pressure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the nature of fan outlet guide vane pressure fluctuations and their link to rotor-stator interaction noise, time histories of vane fluctuating pressures were digitally acquired as part of the Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test. Vane unsteady pressures were measured at seven fan tip speeds for both a radial and a swept vane configuration. Using time-domain averaging and spectral analysis, the blade passing frequency (BPF) harmonic and broadband contents of the vane pressures were individually analyzed. Significant Sound Pressure Level (SPL) reductions were observed for the swept vane relative to the radial vane for the BPF harmonics of vane pressure, but vane broadband reductions due to sweep turned out to be much smaller especially on an average basis. Cross-correlation analysis was used to establish the level of spatial coherence of broadband pressures between different locations on the vane and integral length scales of pressure fluctuations were estimated from these correlations. Two main results of this work are: (1) the average broadband level on the vane (in dB) increases linearly with the fan tip speed for both the radial and swept vanes, and (2) the broadband pressure distribution on the vane is nearly homogeneous and its integral length scale is a monotonically decreasing function of fan tip speed.

  7. A Comparison Between Two Methods for Display of Programmed Diagnostic Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Peter

    Two methods for presentation of programed diagnostic tests were compared. One method used a five-screen, tape and slide format and the other used television in the form of videotape recording. The electronics course used for the study employed 10 diagnostic tests, five for each method. Evaluation was made on the basis of test scores and attitude…

  8. Assessing Diagnostic Tests I: You Can't Be Too Sensitive.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians and patients are always interested in less invasive, cheaper, and faster diagnostic tests. When introducing such a test, physicians must ensure that it is reliable in its diagnoses and does not commit errors. In this article, I discuss several ways that new tests are compared against gold standard diagnostics.

  9. Feasibility of an early Alzheimer's disease immunosignature diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Lucas; Stafford, Phillip; Johnston, Stephen Albert

    2013-01-15

    A practical diagnostic test is needed for early Alzheimer's disease (AD) detection. Immunosignaturing, a technology that employs antibody binding to a random-sequence peptide microarray, generates profiles that distinguish transgenic mice engineered with familial AD mutations (APPswe/PSEN1-dE9) from non-transgenic littermates. It can also detect an AD-like signature in humans. Here, we assess the changes in the immunosignature at different time points of the disease in mice and humans. We also evaluate the accuracy of the late-stage signature as a test to discriminate between young mice with familial AD mutations from non-transgenic littermates. Plasma samples from AD patients were assayed 3-12 months apart, while APPswe/PSEN1-dE9 and non-transgenic controls supplied plasma at monthly intervals until they reached 15 months of age. Microarrays with 10,000 random-sequence peptides were used to compare antibody binding patterns. These patterns gradually changed over the life-span of mice. Strong, characteristic signatures were observed in transgenic mice at early, mid and late stages, but these profiles had minimal overlap. The signature of young transgenic mice had an error rate of 18% at classifying plasma samples from late-stage transgenic mice. Conversely, the late-stage transgenic mice signature discriminated between young transgenic mice and littermates with an error rate of 21%. Less distinctive profiles were recognizable throughout the transgenic mice lifespan, being detectable as early as 2 months. The human signature had minimal change on short-term follow-up. Our results call for a reappraisal of the way incipient AD is studied, as biomarkers seen in late-stages of the disease may not be relevant in earlier stages.

  10. Sensitivities and specificities of diagnostic tests and infection prevalence of Schistosoma haematobium estimated from data on adults in villages northwest of Accra in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Koukounari, Artemis; Webster, Joanne P.; Donnelly, Christl A.; Bray, Bethany C.; Naples, Jean; Bosompem, Kwabena; Shiff, Clive

    2009-01-01

    Substantial uncertainties surround the sensitivities and specificities of diagnostic techniques for urinary schistosomiasis. We used Latent Class (LC) modeling to address this problem. In this study 220 adults in three villages northwest of Accra in Ghana were examined using five Schistosoma haematobium diagnostic measures: microscopic examination of urine for detection of S. haematobium eggs, dipsticks for detection of haematuria, tests for circulating antigens, serological antibody tests and ultrasound scans of the urinary system. Testing of the LC model indicated non-invariance of the performance of the diagnostic tests across different age groups while measurement invariance held for males and females and for the three villages. We therefore recommend the use of LC models for comparison between, and the identification of, the most accurate schistosomiasis diagnostic tests. Furthermore, microscopy and haematuria dipsticks were indicated through these models as the most appropriate techniques for detection of S. haematobium infection. PMID:19270295

  11. Diagnostic value of the lumbar extension-loading test in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The gait-loading test is a well known, important test with which to assess the involved spinal level in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The lumbar extension-loading test also functions as a diagnostic loading test in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis; however, its efficacy remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of the lumbar extension-loading test with that of the gait-loading test in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods A total of 116 consecutive patients (62 men and 54 women) diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis were included in this cross-sectional study of the lumbar extension-loading test. Subjective symptoms and objective neurological findings (motor, sensory, and reflex) were examined before and after the lumbar extension-loading and gait-loading tests. The efficacy of the lumbar extension-loading test for establishment of a correct diagnosis of the involved spinal level was assessed and compared with that of the gait-loading test. Results There were no significant differences between the lumbar extension-loading test and the gait-loading test in terms of subjective symptoms, objective neurological findings, or changes in the involved spinal level before and after each loading test. Conclusions The lumbar extension-loading test is useful for assessment of lumbar spinal stenosis pathology and is capable of accurately determining the involved spinal level. PMID:25080292

  12. Tzanck smear as an accurate and rapid diagnostic tool for cutaneous alternariosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Karataş Toğral, A; Güleç, A T

    2016-10-01

    Alternaria species are becoming increasingly important opportunistic pathogens in recipients of solid organ transplant, as it has been shown that dissemination with systemic involvement is not as rare as previously reported. Therefore, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary for appropriate patient management. We report a patient with renal transplant who developed recurrent cutaneous alternariosis. Tzanck smear successfully and very rapidly revealed hyphae and spores in both the primary and subsequent lesions. Furthermore, Tzanck smear provided guidance for histopathological examination of the second lesion, which failed to disclose the fungal elements until additional deeper serial sections were performed. The present case emphasizes that the Tzanck smear is a useful clinical tool leading to the immediate correct diagnosis even in deep fungal infections. PMID:27663148

  13. A new automatic blood pressure kit auscultates for accurate reading with a smartphone: A diagnostic accuracy study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongjun; Wang, Bingjian; Zhu, Xinpu; Chu, Guang; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-08-01

    The widely used oscillometric automated blood pressure (BP) monitor was continuously questioned on its accuracy. A novel BP kit named Accutension which adopted Korotkoff auscultation method was then devised. Accutension worked with a miniature microphone, a pressure sensor, and a smartphone. The BP values were automatically displayed on the smartphone screen through the installed App. Data recorded in the phone could be played back and reconfirmed after measurement. They could also be uploaded and saved to the iCloud. The accuracy and consistency of this novel electronic auscultatory sphygmomanometer was preliminarily verified here. Thirty-two subjects were included and 82 qualified readings were obtained. The mean differences ± SD for systolic and diastolic BP readings between Accutension and mercury sphygmomanometer were 0.87 ± 2.86 and -0.94 ± 2.93 mm Hg. Agreements between Accutension and mercury sphygmomanometer were highly significant for systolic (ICC = 0.993, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.989-0.995) and diastolic (ICC = 0.987, 95% CI: 0.979-0.991). In conclusion, Accutension worked accurately based on our pilot study data. The difference was acceptable. ICC and Bland-Altman plot charts showed good agreements with manual measurements. Systolic readings of Accutension were slightly higher than those of manual measurement, while diastolic readings were slightly lower. One possible reason was that Accutension captured the first and the last korotkoff sound more sensitively than human ear during manual measurement and avoided sound missing, so that it might be more accurate than traditional mercury sphygmomanometer. By documenting and analyzing of variant tendency of BP values, Accutension helps management of hypertension and therefore contributes to the mobile heath service. PMID:27512876

  14. Diagnostic Algorithm for Glycogenoses and Myoadenylate Deaminase Deficiency Based on Exercise Testing Parameters: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Fabrice; Uguen, Arnaud; Scotet, Virginie; Le Maréchal, Cédric; Rigal, Odile; Marcorelles, Pascale; Gobin, Eric; Carré, Jean-Luc; Zagnoli, Fabien; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Aim Our aim was to evaluate the accuracy of aerobic exercise testing to diagnose metabolic myopathies. Methods From December 2008 to September 2012, all the consecutive patients that underwent both metabolic exercise testing and a muscle biopsy were prospectively enrolled. Subjects performed an incremental and maximal exercise testing on a cycle ergometer. Lactate, pyruvate, and ammonia concentrations were determined from venous blood samples drawn at rest, during exercise (50% predicted maximal power, peak exercise), and recovery (2, 5, 10, and 15 min). Biopsies from vastus lateralis or deltoid muscles were analysed using standard techniques (reference test). Myoadenylate deaminase (MAD) activity was determined using p-nitro blue tetrazolium staining in muscle cryostat sections. Glycogen storage was assessed using periodic acid-Schiff staining. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma metabolite levels to identify absent and decreased MAD activity was assessed using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results The study involved 51 patients. Omitting patients with glycogenoses (n = 3), MAD staining was absent in 5, decreased in 6, and normal in 37 subjects. Lactate/pyruvate at the 10th minute of recovery provided the greatest area under the ROC curves (AUC, 0.893 ± 0.067) to differentiate Abnormal from Normal MAD activity. The lactate/rest ratio at the 10th minute of recovery from exercise displayed the best AUC (1.0) for discriminating between Decreased and Absent MAD activities. The resulting decision tree achieved a diagnostic accuracy of 86.3%. Conclusion The present algorithm provides a non-invasive test to accurately predict absent and decreased MAD activity, facilitating the selection of patients for muscle biopsy and target appropriate histochemical analysis. PMID:26207760

  15. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course.

  16. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course. PMID:27001769

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of BRAF Immunohistochemistry in Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-Analysis and Diagnostic Test Accuracy Review.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Jung-Soo; Sohn, Jin Hee; Kang, Guhyun

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the concordance between the BRAF (V600E) mutation test and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of BRAF IHC for colorectal cancer (CRC) through a systematic review, meta-analysis, and diagnostic test accuracy review. The current study included 1021 CRCs from eight eligible studies. The concordance rates were investigated between BRAF IHC and the mutation test. In addition, diagnostic test accuracy review was conducted and calculated using the value of area under curve (AUC) on the summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve. The positive rate of BRAF IHC was 30.5 % (range; 13.2-66.2 %), and the BRAF mutation was found in 30.2 % (range; 11.7-66.2 %). The overall concordance rate between BRAF IHC and the mutation test was 0.944 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.873-0.977). In the BRAF IHC-positive and -negative groups, the concordance rates between BRAF IHC and the mutation test were 0.895 (95 % CI 0.800-0.945) and 0.956 (95 % CI 0.878-0.985), respectively. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.94 (95 % CI 0.91-0.96) and 0.96 (95 % CI 0.95-0.98), respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio was 272.86 (95 % CI 46.11-1614.88), and the value of AUC on SROC curve was 0.9846. Taken together, our results suggest that BRAF IHC is strongly concordant with the BRAF mutation test and has high diagnostic accuracy in BRAF mutation analysis of CRCs. Further cumulative studies on detailed evaluation criteria are needed before application in daily practice.

  18. Diagnostic testing for Clostridium difficile in Italian microbiological laboratories.

    PubMed

    Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Morandi, Matteo; Moro, Maria Luisa; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2016-02-01

    A laboratory diagnosis survey of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was performed in Italy in 2012-2013. Questionnaires from 278 healthcare settings from 15 regions of Italy were collected and analysed. Eighty seven percent of the laboratories declared to routinely perform CDI diagnosis, 99% of them only after the clinician's request. Among the 216 laboratories providing information on the size of the hospitals in which they were located, 65 had more than 500 beds (large hospitals), while 151 had less than 500 beds (small hospitals). The average percentage of positive tests for C. difficile toxins was 12.2%. Almost half of the laboratories (42%) used immunoenzymatic assay (EIA) for Tox A/B as a stand-alone method, while only 34% used an algorithm for CDI as indicated by the European guidelines. A low percentage of laboratories performed molecular assays or C. difficile culture, 25% and 29%, respectively. Most laboratories (161/278) declared to type C. difficile strains, the majority in collaboration with a reference laboratory. Among the 103 C. difficile clinical isolates collected during the study, 31 different PCR-ribotypes were identified. PCR-ribotype 356/607 (27%) was predominant, followed by 018 (12%). These two PCR-ribotypes show 87.5% of similarity in ribotyping profile. PCR-ribotypes 027 and 078 represented 8% and 4% of the strains, respectively. Four PCR-ribotypes (027, 033, 078 and 126) were positive for the binary toxin CDT. In particular, PCR-ribotype 033 produces only CDT, and it has recently been associated with symptomatic cases. The majority of strains were multidrug resistant. In particular, all strains PCR-ribotypes 356/607 and 018 were resistant to moxifloxacin, rifampicin, erythromycin and clindamycin. The results obtained highlight the need to raise awareness to the microbiological diagnosis of CDI among clinicians and to implement and harmonize diagnostic methods for CDI in Italian laboratories in the perspective of a future national

  19. Tourniquet Test for Dengue Diagnosis: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Diagnostic Test Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Hamish; Thomas, Emma; Foster, Charlie; Darton, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is a ubiquitous arboviral infection in tropical and sub-tropical regions, whose incidence has increased over recent decades. In the absence of a rapid point of care test, the clinical diagnosis of dengue is complex. The World Health Organisation has outlined diagnostic criteria for making the diagnosis of dengue infection, which includes the use of the tourniquet test (TT). Purpose To assess the quality of the evidence supporting the use of the TT and perform a diagnostic accuracy meta-analysis comparing the TT to antibody response measured by ELISA. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted in the following databases to April, 2016: MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, BIOSIS, Web of Science, SCOPUS. Study Selection Studies comparing the diagnostic accuracy of the tourniquet test with ELISA for the diagnosis of dengue were included. Data Extraction Two independent authors extracted data using a standardized form. Data Synthesis A total of 16 studies with 28,739 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled sensitivity for dengue diagnosis by TT was 58% (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 43%-71%) and the specificity was 71% (95% CI, 60%-80%). In the subgroup analysis sensitivity for non-severe dengue diagnosis was 55% (95% CI, 52%-59%) and the specificity was 63% (95% CI, 60%-66%), whilst sensitivity for dengue hemorrhagic fever diagnosis was 62% (95% CI, 53%-71%) and the specificity was 60% (95% CI, 48%-70%). Receiver-operator characteristics demonstrated a test accuracy (AUC) of 0.70 (95% CI, 0.66–0.74). Conclusion The tourniquet test is widely used in resource poor settings despite currently available evidence demonstrating only a marginal benefit in making a diagnosis of dengue infection alone. Registration The protocol for this systematic review was registered at PROSPERO: CRD42015020323. PMID:27486661

  20. Diagnostic Testing Package DX v 2.0 Technical Specification. Methodology Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David

    This paper contains the technical specifications, schematic diagrams, and program printout for a computer software package for the development and administration of diagnostic tests. The second version of the Diagnostic Testing Package DX consists of a PASCAL-based set of modules located in two main programs: (1) EDITTEST creates, modifies, and…

  1. Development and clinical evaluation of a highly accurate dengue NS1 rapid test: from the preparation of a soluble NS1 antigen to the construction of an RDT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihoo; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2015-06-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) is important. There are numerous products on the market claiming to detect DENV NS1, but these are not always reliable. In this study, a highly sensitive and accurate rapid diagnostic test (RDT) was developed using anti-dengue NS1 monoclonal antibodies. A recombinant NS1 protein was produced with high antigenicity and purity. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against this purified NS1 antigen. The RDT was constructed using a capturing (4A6A10, Kd=7.512±0.419×10(-9)) and a conjugating antibody (3E12E6, Kd=7.032±0.322×10(-9)). The diagnostic performance was evaluated with NS1-positive clinical samples collected from various dengue endemic countries and compared to SD BioLine Dengue NS1 Ag kit. The constructed RDT exhibited higher sensitivity (92.9%) with more obvious diagnostic performance than the commercial kit (83.3%). The specificity of constructed RDT was 100%. The constructed RDT could offer a reliable point-of-care testing tool for the early detection of dengue infections in remote areas and contribute to the control of dengue-related diseases. PMID:25824725

  2. Development and clinical evaluation of a highly accurate dengue NS1 rapid test: from the preparation of a soluble NS1 antigen to the construction of an RDT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihoo; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2015-06-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) is important. There are numerous products on the market claiming to detect DENV NS1, but these are not always reliable. In this study, a highly sensitive and accurate rapid diagnostic test (RDT) was developed using anti-dengue NS1 monoclonal antibodies. A recombinant NS1 protein was produced with high antigenicity and purity. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against this purified NS1 antigen. The RDT was constructed using a capturing (4A6A10, Kd=7.512±0.419×10(-9)) and a conjugating antibody (3E12E6, Kd=7.032±0.322×10(-9)). The diagnostic performance was evaluated with NS1-positive clinical samples collected from various dengue endemic countries and compared to SD BioLine Dengue NS1 Ag kit. The constructed RDT exhibited higher sensitivity (92.9%) with more obvious diagnostic performance than the commercial kit (83.3%). The specificity of constructed RDT was 100%. The constructed RDT could offer a reliable point-of-care testing tool for the early detection of dengue infections in remote areas and contribute to the control of dengue-related diseases.

  3. Development of a diagnostic test based on multiple continuous biomarkers with an imperfect reference test.

    PubMed

    García Barrado, Leandro; Coart, Els; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-02-20

    Ignoring the fact that the reference test used to establish the discriminative properties of a combination of diagnostic biomarkers is imperfect can lead to a biased estimate of the diagnostic accuracy of the combination. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian latent-class mixture model to select a combination of biomarkers that maximizes the area under the ROC curve (AUC), while taking into account the imperfect nature of the reference test. In particular, a method for specification of the prior for the mixture component parameters is developed that allows controlling the amount of prior information provided for the AUC. The properties of the model are evaluated by using a simulation study and an application to real data from Alzheimer's disease research. In the simulation study, 100 data sets are simulated for sample sizes ranging from 100 to 600 observations, with a varying correlation between biomarkers. The inclusion of an informative as well as a flat prior for the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test is investigated. In the real-data application, the proposed model was compared with the generally used logistic-regression model that ignores the imperfectness of the reference test. Conditional on the selected sample size and prior distributions, the simulation study results indicate satisfactory performance of the model-based estimates. In particular, the obtained average estimates for all parameters are close to the true values. For the real-data application, AUC estimates for the proposed model are substantially higher than those from the 'traditional' logistic-regression model. PMID:26388206

  4. Test and Product Review: Pediatric Attention Disorders Diagnostic Screener

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Leesa V.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive evaluation of the Pediatric Attention Disorders Diagnostic Screener (PADDS). PADDS was developed as a computer-based assessment system to screen for attention and executive function disorders in children aged 6 through 12 years. The evaluation of the PADDS indicated that it can be a useful and efficient…

  5. Evaluating Diagnostic Point-of-Care Tests in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Drain, Paul K; Hyle, Emily P; Noubary, Farzad; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Wilson, Douglas; Bishai, William; Rodriguez, William; Bassett, Ingrid V

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic point-of-care (POC) testing is intended to minimize the time to obtain a test result, thereby allowing clinicians and patients to make an expeditious clinical decision. As POC tests expand into resource-limited settings (RLS), the benefits must outweigh the costs. To optimize POC testing in RLS, diagnostic POC tests need rigorous evaluations focused on relevant clinical outcomes and operational costs, which differ from evaluations of conventional diagnostic tests. Here, we reviewed published studies on POC testing in RLS, and found no clearly defined metric for the clinical utility of POC testing. Therefore, we propose a framework for evaluating POC tests, and suggest and define the term “test efficacy” to describe a diagnostic test’s capacity to support a clinical decision within its operational context. We also proposed revised criteria for an ideal diagnostic POC test in resource-limited settings. Through systematic evaluations, comparisons between centralized diagnostic testing and novel POC technologies can be more formalized, and health officials can better determine which POC technologies represent valuable additions to their clinical programs. PMID:24332389

  6. The modified card agglutination test: an accurate tool for detecting anaplasmosis in Columbian black-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Howarth, A; Hokama, Y; Amerault, T E

    1976-07-01

    Inoculation of susceptible calves confirmed that the modified card agglutination test accurately detected the anaplasmosis infection status of each of 35 Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus). Anaplasma marginale, and specific antibodies, were demonstrated only in calves which received blood from deer that were positive by the card test. The modified card agglutination testing of deer serum was performed in the manner recommended for testing cattle serum with bovine-origin antigen and bovine serum factor.

  7. Accuracy of three diagnostic tests for determining Mycobacterium bovis infection status in live-sampled wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Drewe, Julian A; Dean, Gillian S; Michel, Anita L; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Pearce, Gareth P

    2009-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection (bovine tuberculosis [bTB]) in live animals is notoriously problematic. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of 2 new serologic tests (multiantigen print immunoassay [MAPIA] and lateral flow immunoassay rapid test [RT]) in comparison with mycobacterial culture of tracheal washes for determining M. bovis infection status in a free-ranging population of wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta). During a longitudinal study lasting 2.5 years, 240 individually identifiable meerkats were each sampled up to 8 times under anesthesia every 3 months. Diagnostic accuracy was determined through Bayesian and maximum likelihood estimations of sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios for each diagnostic test when used independently and in parallel to classify the disease status of individual meerkats in the absence of a gold standard. Culture of tracheal washes was highly specific (0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77, 1.00) but of low sensitivity (0.36; 95% CI = 0.24, 0.50) for diagnosing M. bovis-infected individuals. The longitudinal nature of the study with repeated sampling of the same individual animals served simultaneously to improve chances of detecting infection and increase confidence in a negative result in individual animals repeatedly testing negative. Although MAPIA and RT were individually of limited diagnostic use, interpreting the results of these 2 tests in parallel produced estimates of sensitivity (0.83; 95% CI = 0.67, 0.93) and specificity (0.73; 95% CI = 0.62, 0.82) high enough to usefully inform decision making when determining exposure to bTB in wild meerkats and potentially other species in which bTB poses a diagnostic challenge.

  8. Accuracy of three diagnostic tests for determining Mycobacterium bovis infection status in live-sampled wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Drewe, Julian A; Dean, Gillian S; Michel, Anita L; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Pearce, Gareth P

    2009-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection (bovine tuberculosis [bTB]) in live animals is notoriously problematic. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of 2 new serologic tests (multiantigen print immunoassay [MAPIA] and lateral flow immunoassay rapid test [RT]) in comparison with mycobacterial culture of tracheal washes for determining M. bovis infection status in a free-ranging population of wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta). During a longitudinal study lasting 2.5 years, 240 individually identifiable meerkats were each sampled up to 8 times under anesthesia every 3 months. Diagnostic accuracy was determined through Bayesian and maximum likelihood estimations of sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios for each diagnostic test when used independently and in parallel to classify the disease status of individual meerkats in the absence of a gold standard. Culture of tracheal washes was highly specific (0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77, 1.00) but of low sensitivity (0.36; 95% CI = 0.24, 0.50) for diagnosing M. bovis-infected individuals. The longitudinal nature of the study with repeated sampling of the same individual animals served simultaneously to improve chances of detecting infection and increase confidence in a negative result in individual animals repeatedly testing negative. Although MAPIA and RT were individually of limited diagnostic use, interpreting the results of these 2 tests in parallel produced estimates of sensitivity (0.83; 95% CI = 0.67, 0.93) and specificity (0.73; 95% CI = 0.62, 0.82) high enough to usefully inform decision making when determining exposure to bTB in wild meerkats and potentially other species in which bTB poses a diagnostic challenge. PMID:19139498

  9. Accurate Relative Location Estimates for the North Korean Nuclear Tests Using Empirical Slowness Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Pabian, F.; Näsholm, S. P.; Kværna', T.; Mykkeltveit, S.

    2016-10-01

    Declared North Korean nuclear tests in 2006, 2009, 2013, and 2016 were observed seismically at regional and teleseismic distances. Waveform similarity allows the events to be located relatively with far greater accuracy than the absolute locations can be determined from seismic data alone. There is now significant redundancy in the data given the large number of regional and teleseismic stations that have recorded multiple events, and relative location estimates can be confirmed independently by performing calculations on many mutually exclusive sets of measurements. Using a 1-dimensional global velocity model, the distances between the events estimated using teleseismic P phases are found to be approximately 25% shorter than the distances between events estimated using regional Pn phases. The 2009, 2013, and 2016 events all take place within 1 km of each other and the discrepancy between the regional and teleseismic relative location estimates is no more than about 150 m. The discrepancy is much more significant when estimating the location of the more distant 2006 event relative to the later explosions with regional and teleseismic estimates varying by many hundreds of meters. The relative location of the 2006 event is challenging given the smaller number of observing stations, the lower signal-to-noise ratio, and significant waveform dissimilarity at some regional stations. The 2006 event is however highly significant in constraining the absolute locations in the terrain at the Punggye-ri test-site in relation to observed surface infrastructure. For each seismic arrival used to estimate the relative locations, we define a slowness scaling factor which multiplies the gradient of seismic traveltime versus distance, evaluated at the source, relative to the applied 1-d velocity model. A procedure for estimating correction terms which reduce the double-difference time residual vector norms is presented together with a discussion of the associated uncertainty. The

  10. Rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosing uncomplicated non-falciparum or Plasmodium vivax malaria in endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Katharine; Kirkham, Amanda J; Olliaro, Piero L; Deeks, Jonathan J; Donegan, Sarah; Garner, Paul; Takwoingi, Yemisi

    2014-01-01

    specificities are presented alongside 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Main results We included 47 studies enrolling 22,862 participants. Patient characteristics, sampling methods and reference standard methods were poorly reported in most studies. RDTs detecting 'non-falciparum' parasitaemia Eleven studies evaluated Type 2 tests compared with microscopy, 25 evaluated Type 3 tests, and 11 evaluated Type 4 tests. In meta-analyses, average sensitivities and specificities were 78% (95% CI 73% to 82%) and 99% (95% CI 97% to 99%) for Type 2 tests, 78% (95% CI 69% to 84%) and 99% (95% CI 98% to 99%) for Type 3 tests, and 89% (95% CI 79% to 95%) and 98% (95% CI 97% to 99%) for Type 4 tests, respectively. Type 4 tests were more sensitive than both Type 2 (P = 0.01) and Type 3 tests (P = 0.03). Five studies compared Type 3 tests with PCR; in meta-analysis, the average sensitivity and specificity were 81% (95% CI 72% to 88%) and 99% (95% CI 97% to 99%) respectively. RDTs detecting P.vivax parasitaemia Eight studies compared pLDH tests to microscopy; the average sensitivity and specificity were 95% (95% CI 86% to 99%) and 99% (95% CI 99% to 100%), respectively. Authors' conclusions RDTs designed to detect P. vivax specifically, whether alone or as part of a mixed infection, appear to be more accurate than older tests designed to distinguish P. falciparum malaria from non-falciparum malaria. Compared to microscopy, these tests fail to detect around 5% ofP. vivax cases. This Cochrane Review, in combination with other published information about in vitro test performance and stability in the field, can assist policy-makers to choose between the available RDTs. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Rapid tests for diagnosing malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax or other less common parasites This review summarises trials evaluating the accuracy of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for diagnosing malaria due to Plasmodium vivax or other non-falciparum species. After searching for relevant studies up to December

  11. Summary of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) diagnostics, including JET (Joint European Torus) and JT-60

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Young, K.M.; Johnson, L.C.

    1990-05-01

    The diagnostic instrumentation on TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and the specific properties of each diagnostic, i.e., number of channels, time resolution, wavelength range, etc., are summarized in tables, grouped according to the plasma parameter measured. For comparison, the equivalent diagnostic capabilities of JET (Joint European Torus) and the Japanese large tokamak, JT-60, as of late 1987 are also listed in the tables. Extensive references are given to publications on each instrument.

  12. LeRC rail accelerators - Test designs and diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, L. M.; Kerslake, W. R.; Sturman, J. C.; Wang, S. Y.; Terdan, F. F.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using rail accelerators for various in-space and to-space propulsion applications was investigated. A 1 meter, 24 sq mm bore accelerator was designed with the goal of demonstrating projectile velocities of 15 km/sec using a peak current of 200 kA. A second rail accelerator, 1 meter long with a 156.25 sq mm bore, was designed with clear polycarbonate sidewalls to permit visual observation of the plasma arc. A study of available diagnostic techniques and their application to the rail accelerator is presented. Specific topics of discussion include the use of interferometry and spectroscopy to examine the plasma armature as well as the use of optical sensors to measure rail displacement during acceleration. Standard diagnostics such as current and voltage measurements are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35053

  13. BRAF mutation testing with a rapid, fully integrated molecular diagnostics system.

    PubMed

    Janku, Filip; Claes, Bart; Huang, Helen J; Falchook, Gerald S; Devogelaere, Benoit; Kockx, Mark; Bempt, Isabelle Vanden; Reijans, Martin; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Piha-Paul, Sarina A; Hong, David S; Holley, Veronica R; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Stepanek, Vanda M; Patel, Sapna P; Kopetz, E Scott; Subbiah, Vivek; Wheler, Jennifer J; Zinner, Ralph G; Karp, Daniel D; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Sablon, Erwin; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Maertens, Geert; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-09-29

    Fast and accurate diagnostic systems are needed for further implementation of precision therapy of BRAF-mutant and other cancers. The novel IdyllaTMBRAF Mutation Test has high sensitivity and shorter turnaround times compared to other methods. We used Idylla to detect BRAF V600 mutations in archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples and compared these results with those obtained using the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 Mutation Test or MiSeq deep sequencing system and with those obtained by a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory employing polymerase chain reaction-based sequencing, mass spectrometric detection, or next-generation sequencing. In one set of 60 FFPE tumor samples (15 with BRAF mutations per Idylla), the Idylla and cobas results had an agreement of 97%. Idylla detected BRAF V600 mutations in two additional samples. The Idylla and MiSeq results had 100% concordance. In a separate set of 100 FFPE tumor samples (64 with BRAF mutation per Idylla), the Idylla and CLIA-certified laboratory results demonstrated an agreement of 96% even though the tests were not performed simultaneously and different FFPE blocks had to be used for 9 cases. The IdyllaTMBRAF Mutation Test produced results quickly (sample to results time was about 90 minutes with about 2 minutes of hands on time) and the closed nature of the cartridge eliminates the risk of PCR contamination. In conclusion, our observations demonstrate that the Idylla test is rapid and has high concordance with other routinely used but more complex BRAF mutation-detecting tests.

  14. BRAF mutation testing with a rapid, fully integrated molecular diagnostics system

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Helen J.; Falchook, Gerald S.; Devogelaere, Benoit; Kockx, Mark; Bempt, Isabelle Vanden; Reijans, Martin; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.; Hong, David S.; Holley, Veronica R.; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Stepanek, Vanda M.; Patel, Sapna P.; Kopetz, E. Scott; Subbiah, Vivek; Wheler, Jennifer J.; Zinner, Ralph G.; Karp, Daniel D.; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Sablon, Erwin; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Maertens, Geert; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Fast and accurate diagnostic systems are needed for further implementation of precision therapy of BRAF-mutant and other cancers. The novel IdyllaTM BRAF Mutation Test has high sensitivity and shorter turnaround times compared to other methods. We used Idylla to detect BRAF V600 mutations in archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples and compared these results with those obtained using the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 Mutation Test or MiSeq deep sequencing system and with those obtained by a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory employing polymerase chain reaction–based sequencing, mass spectrometric detection, or next-generation sequencing. In one set of 60 FFPE tumor samples (15 with BRAF mutations per Idylla), the Idylla and cobas results had an agreement of 97%. Idylla detected BRAF V600 mutations in two additional samples. The Idylla and MiSeq results had 100% concordance. In a separate set of 100 FFPE tumor samples (64 with BRAF mutation per Idylla), the Idylla and CLIA-certified laboratory results demonstrated an agreement of 96% even though the tests were not performed simultaneously and different FFPE blocks had to be used for 9 cases. The IdyllaTM BRAF Mutation Test produced results quickly (sample to results time was about 90 minutes with about 2 minutes of hands on time) and the closed nature of the cartridge eliminates the risk of PCR contamination. In conclusion, our observations demonstrate that the Idylla test is rapid and has high concordance with other routinely used but more complex BRAF mutation–detecting tests. PMID:26330075

  15. Evaluation of serological diagnostic tests for typhoid fever in Papua New Guinea using a composite reference standard.

    PubMed

    Siba, Valentine; Horwood, Paul F; Vanuga, Kilagi; Wapling, Johanna; Sehuko, Rebecca; Siba, Peter M; Greenhill, Andrew R

    2012-11-01

    Typhoid fever remains a major global health problem. A major impediment to improving outcomes is the lack of appropriate diagnostic tools, which have not significantly improved in low-income settings for 100 years. We evaluated two commercially available rapid diagnostic tests (Tubex and TyphiDot), a prototype (TyphiRapid TR-02), and the commonly used single-serum Widal test in a previously reported high-burden area of Papua New Guinea. Samples were collected from 530 outpatients with axillary temperatures of ≥37.5°C, and analysis was conducted on all malaria-negative samples (n = 500). A composite reference standard of blood culture and PCR was used, by which 47 participants (9.4%) were considered typhoid fever positive. The sensitivity and specificity of the Tubex (51.1% and 88.3%, respectively) and TyphiDot (70.0% and 80.1%, respectively) tests were not high enough to warrant their ongoing use in this setting; however, the sensitivity and specificity for the TR-02 prototype were promising (89.4% and 85.0%, respectively). An axillary temperature of ≥38.5°C correlated with typhoid fever (P = 0.014). With an appropriate diagnostic test, conducting typhoid fever diagnosis only on patients with high-grade fever could dramatically decrease the costs associated with diagnosis while having no detrimental impact on the ability to accurately diagnose the illness.

  16. Using Meta-Analysis to Inform the Design of Subsequent Studies of Diagnostic Test Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchliffe, Sally R.; Crowther, Michael J.; Phillips, Robert S.; Sutton, Alex J.

    2013-01-01

    An individual diagnostic accuracy study rarely provides enough information to make conclusive recommendations about the accuracy of a diagnostic test; particularly when the study is small. Meta-analysis methods provide a way of combining information from multiple studies, reducing uncertainty in the result and hopefully providing substantial…

  17. Results of metallographical diagnostic examination of Navy half-watt thermoelectric converters degraded by accelerated tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosell, F. E., Jr.; Rouklove, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    To verify the 15-year reliability of the Navy half-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG), bismuth-telluride thermoelectric converters were submitted to testing at high temperatures which accelerated the degradation and caused failure of the converters. Metallographic diagnostic examination of failed units verified failure mechanisms. Results of diagnostic examinations are presented.

  18. Chronic Vomiting in Cats: Etiology and Diagnostic Testing.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Shannon Ryan; Gisselman, Kelly; Cordner, Amy; Nicholson, Angela Gasser

    2016-01-01

    Chronic vomiting in cats is a common presenting problem seen in veterinary practice today. The initial step when presented with a vomiting patient is to differentiate between vomiting and regurgitation or dysphagia. There are numerous causes for chronic vomiting in cats, and therefore a detailed and comprehensive patient history and a systematic diagnostic approach are key steps in determining the cause for vomiting and the most appropriate treatment plan. Common causes for chronic vomiting in cats may include inflammatory bowel disease, food allergy, gastrointestinal motility disorders, neoplasia, and extra-gastrointestinal diseases, such as renal disease, hepatobiliary disease, and hyperthyroidism. PMID:27487349

  19. 77 FR 3748 - Request for Comments and Notice of Public Hearings on Genetic Diagnostic Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... in gathering information on the genetic diagnostic testing for purposes of preparing a report on the... testing. Public Hearings: The USPTO will hold two public hearings in support of the genetic testing study... ``Genetic Testing Study.'' Because written comments and testimony will be made available for...

  20. Fecal microbiome analysis as a diagnostic test for diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Daniels, L; Budding, A E; de Korte, N; Eck, A; Bogaards, J A; Stockmann, H B; Consten, E C; Savelkoul, P H; Boermeester, M A

    2014-11-01

    Disease-specific variations in intestinal microbiome composition have been found for a number of intestinal disorders, but little is known about diverticulitis. The purpose of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota of diverticulitis patients with control subjects from a general gastroenterological practice and to investigate the feasibility of predictive diagnostics based on complex microbiota data. Thirty-one patients with computed tomography (CT)-proven left-sided uncomplicated acute diverticulitis were included and compared with 25 control subjects evaluated for a range of gastrointestinal indications. A high-throughput polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based profiling technique (IS-pro) was performed on DNA isolates from baseline fecal samples. Differences in bacterial phylum abundance and diversity (Shannon index) of the resulting profiles were assessed by conventional statistics. Dissimilarity in microbiome composition was analyzed with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) based on cosine distance measures. To develop a prediction model for the diagnosis of diverticulitis, we used cross-validated partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratios and Proteobacteria load were comparable among patients and controls (p = 0.20). The Shannon index indicated a higher diversity in diverticulitis for Proteobacteria (p < 0.00002) and all phyla combined (p = 0.002). PCoA based on Proteobacteria profiles resulted in visually separate clusters of patients and controls. The diagnostic accuracy of the cross-validated PLS-DA regression model was 84 %. The most discriminative species derived largely from the family Enterobacteriaceae. Diverticulitis patients have a higher diversity of fecal microbiota than controls from a mixed population, with the phylum Proteobacteria defining the difference. The analysis of intestinal microbiota offers a novel way to diagnose diverticulitis.

  1. Borehole flowmeter logging for the accurate design and analysis of tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, Stefano; Crosta, Giovanni B; Frattini, Paolo; Villa, Alberto; Godio, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests often give ambiguous interpretations that may be due to the erroneous location of sampling points and/or the lack of flow rate measurements through the sampler. To obtain more reliable tracer test results, we propose a methodology that optimizes the design and analysis of tracer tests in a cross borehole mode by using vertical borehole flow rate measurements. Experiments using this approach, herein defined as the Bh-flow tracer test, have been performed by implementing three sequential steps: (1) single-hole flowmeter test, (2) cross-hole flowmeter test, and (3) tracer test. At the experimental site, core logging, pumping tests, and static water-level measurements were previously carried out to determine stratigraphy, fracture characteristics, and bulk hydraulic conductivity. Single-hole flowmeter testing makes it possible to detect the presence of vertical flows as well as inflow and outflow zones, whereas cross-hole flowmeter testing detects the presence of connections along sets of flow conduits or discontinuities intercepted by boreholes. Finally, the specific pathways and rates of groundwater flow through selected flowpaths are determined by tracer testing. We conclude that the combined use of single and cross-borehole flowmeter tests is fundamental to the formulation of the tracer test strategy and interpretation of the tracer test results. PMID:25417730

  2. Testing of optical diagnostics for ion-beam-driven WDM experiments at NDCX-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Leitner, M.; Weber, C.; Waldron, W.L.

    2008-06-01

    We report on the testing of optical diagnostics developed for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-1) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The diagnostics consist of a fast optical pyrometer, a streak camera spectrometer, and a VISAR.While the NDCX is in the last stage of commissioning for the target experiments, the diagnostics were tested elsewhere in an experiment where an intense laser pulse was used to generate the WDM state in metallic and carbon samples.

  3. [Usefulness of clinical data and rapid diagnostic tests to identify bacterial etiology in adult respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Toledano-Sierra, Pilar; Arriola-Hernández, Maite; Orueta-Sánchez, Ramón

    2015-01-19

    Respiratory tract infections are a common complaint and most of them, such as common cold and laryngitis, are viral in origin, so antibiotic use should be exceptional. However, there are other respiratory tract infections (sinusitis, pharyngitis, lower respiratory tract infections, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) where a bacterial etiology is responsible for a non-negligible percentage, and antibiotics are often empirically indicated. The aim of the study is to identify the strength of the data obtained from the symptoms, physical examination and rapid diagnostic methods in respiratory infections in which antibiotic use is frequently proposed in order to improve diagnosis and influence the decision to prescribe these drugs. The review concludes that history, physical examination and rapid tests are useful to guide the need for antibiotic treatment in diseases such as acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, exacerbation of lower respiratory tract infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, no isolated data is accurate enough by itself to confirm or rule out the need for antibiotics. Therefore, clinical prediction rules bring together history and physical examination, thereby improving the accuracy of the decision to indicate or not antibiotics.

  4. A Genetically Optimized Predictive System for Success in General Chemistry Using a Diagnostic Algebra Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Cameron I.; Pearson, Paul T.

    2012-02-01

    In higher education, many high-enrollment introductory courses have evolved into "gatekeeper" courses due to their high failure rates. These courses prevent many students from attaining their educational goals and often become graduation roadblocks. At the authors' home institution, general chemistry has become a gatekeeper course in which approximately 25% of students do not pass. This failure rate in chemistry is common, and often higher, at many other institutions of higher education, and mathematical deficiencies are perceived to be a large contributing factor. This paper details the development of a highly accurate predictive system that identifies students at the beginning of the semester who are "at-risk" for earning a grade of C- or below in chemistry. The predictive accuracy of this system is maximized by using a genetically optimized neural network to analyze the results of a diagnostic algebra test designed for a specific population. Once at-risk students have been identified, they can be helped to improve their chances of success using techniques such as concurrent support courses, online tutorials, "just-in-time" instructional aides, study skills, motivational interviewing, and/or peer mentoring.

  5. Diagnostic Testing for Hemorrhagic Fevers in Pakistan: 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zahra; Atkinson, Barry; Jamil, Bushra; Samreen, Azra; Altaf, Lamia; Hewson, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) and dengue virus (DENV) are endemic to Pakistan. Patients presenting with symptoms of fever, bleeding, and rash cannot be distinguished without appropriate testing. We report data on 354 samples tested for CCHFV at The Aga Khan University Hospital in Pakistan between 2007 and 2013. All samples were tested for the presence of CCHFV RNA. Some samples were also tested for DENV RNA, NS-1 antigen, and/or reactive immunoglobulin M antibodies. Of 354 clinical specimens screened for CCHFV, 52 specimens were positive, with 24 cases in 2013 alone. Most cases were from Sindh and Baluchistan, which border other CCHFV-endemic regions: Iran and Afghanistan. Among CCHFV-negative samples, 168 samples were tested for DENV, and 36% of these samples were found to be DENV-positive. Rapid differentiation of CCHFV and DENV can prevent nosocomial transmission and result in time and cost savings for patients and healthcare workers. PMID:25311694

  6. Auditory Automotive Mechanics Diagnostic Achievement Test. Center Technical Paper No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Richard Arthur

    The Auditory Automotive Mechanics Diagnostic Achievement Test assesses an automobile mechanic's ability to determine mechanical faults from auditory cues alone. The 44-item test and its instructions are recorded on magnetic tape; answer choices are presented on tape, and are also written in the printed test booklets. The norming and validity…

  7. Bayesian meta-analysis of diagnostic tests allowing for imperfect reference standards.

    PubMed

    Menten, J; Boelaert, M; Lesaffre, E

    2013-12-30

    There is an increasing interest in meta-analyses of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for infectious diseases. To avoid spectrum bias, these meta-analyses should focus on phase IV studies performed in the target population. For many infectious diseases, these target populations attend primary health care centers in resource-constrained settings where it is difficult to perform gold standard diagnostic tests. As a consequence, phase IV diagnostic studies often use imperfect reference standards, which may result in biased meta-analyses of the diagnostic accuracy of novel RDTs. We extend the standard bivariate model for the meta-analysis of diagnostic studies to correct for differing and imperfect reference standards in the primary studies and to accommodate data from studies that try to overcome the absence of a true gold standard through the use of latent class analysis. Using Bayesian methods, improved estimates of sensitivity and specificity are possible, especially when prior information is available on the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test. In this analysis, the deviance information criterion can be used to detect conflicts between the prior information and observed data. When applying the model to a dataset of the diagnostic accuracy of an RDT for visceral leishmaniasis, the standard meta-analytic methods appeared to underestimate the specificity of the RDT. PMID:24003003

  8. Bayesian meta-analysis of diagnostic tests allowing for imperfect reference standards.

    PubMed

    Menten, J; Boelaert, M; Lesaffre, E

    2013-12-30

    There is an increasing interest in meta-analyses of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for infectious diseases. To avoid spectrum bias, these meta-analyses should focus on phase IV studies performed in the target population. For many infectious diseases, these target populations attend primary health care centers in resource-constrained settings where it is difficult to perform gold standard diagnostic tests. As a consequence, phase IV diagnostic studies often use imperfect reference standards, which may result in biased meta-analyses of the diagnostic accuracy of novel RDTs. We extend the standard bivariate model for the meta-analysis of diagnostic studies to correct for differing and imperfect reference standards in the primary studies and to accommodate data from studies that try to overcome the absence of a true gold standard through the use of latent class analysis. Using Bayesian methods, improved estimates of sensitivity and specificity are possible, especially when prior information is available on the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test. In this analysis, the deviance information criterion can be used to detect conflicts between the prior information and observed data. When applying the model to a dataset of the diagnostic accuracy of an RDT for visceral leishmaniasis, the standard meta-analytic methods appeared to underestimate the specificity of the RDT.

  9. Diagnostic tests for influenza and other respiratory viruses: determining performance specifications based on clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Yoshihito; Patterson, Bruce K

    2010-06-01

    The lack of sensitivity of rapid immunoassays in detecting the novel 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection has led to recommendations on influenza diagnostic testing for clinicians treating patients as well as advising clinicians on testing decisions. Studies have also shown that rapid immunoassays for seasonal influenza virus show considerable variability in performance characteristics, based on age of patient, prevalence of disease, course of infection, and the quality of the kit used. While public health authorities are currently focused on influenza virus diagnostics, a lack of sensitivity of rapid immunoassays for other viral respiratory pathogens has been widely reported, such as the very limited value of rapid immunoassays for the detection of respiratory syncytial virus in adults. In light of the lack of sensitivity of diagnostic tests for suspected 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection, as well as their variable performance characteristics for seasonal influenza virus, a number of recommendations have been made by public health authorities advising clinicians on the need for clinical judgment as an important part of testing and treatment decisions as well as reliance on local epidemiologic and surveillance data. With the availability of new molecular methodologies that are user-friendly and allow the front-line physician as well as hospital infection control programs to significantly improve respiratory viral diagnostics, there is a need to carefully determine the most optimal diagnostic testing methodology based on the clinical setting. This review will describe the historical, current, and changing dynamics of respiratory virus infection diagnostics.

  10. Automated tests for diagnosing and monitoring cognitive impairment: a diagnostic accuracy review.

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Rabeea'h W; Bates, Vickie; Dundar, Yenal; Hounsome, Juliet; Richardson, Marty; Krishan, Ashma; Dickson, Rumona; Boland, Angela; Kotas, Eleanor; Fisher, Joanne; Sikdar, Sudip; Robinson, Louise

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cognitive impairment is a growing public health concern, and is one of the most distinctive characteristics of all dementias. The timely recognition of dementia syndromes can be beneficial, as some causes of dementia are treatable and are fully or partially reversible. Several automated cognitive assessment tools for assessing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early dementia are now available. Proponents of these tests cite as benefits the tests' repeatability and robustness and the saving of clinicians' time. However, the use of these tools to diagnose and/or monitor progressive cognitive impairment or response to treatment has not yet been evaluated. OBJECTIVES The aim of this review was to determine whether or not automated computerised tests could accurately identify patients with progressive cognitive impairment in MCI and dementia and, if so, to investigate their role in monitoring disease progression and/or response to treatment. DATA SOURCES Five electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, ISI Web of Science and PsycINFO), plus ProQuest, were searched from 2005 to August 2015. The bibliographies of retrieved citations were also examined. Trial and research registers were searched for ongoing studies and reviews. A second search was run to identify individual test costs and acquisition costs for the various tools identified in the review. REVIEW METHODS Two reviewers independently screened all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant studies for inclusion in the review. Full-text copies were assessed independently by two reviewers. Data were extracted and assessed for risk of bias by one reviewer and independently checked for accuracy by a second. The results of the data extraction and quality assessment for each study are presented in structured tables and as a narrative summary. RESULTS The electronic searching of databases, including ProQuest, resulted in 13,542 unique citations. The titles and abstracts of these

  11. Estimation of diagnostic test accuracy without full verification: a review of latent class methods

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John; Huynh, Minh

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a diagnostic test is best evaluated against a reference test that is without error. For many diseases, this is not possible, and an imperfect reference test must be used. However, diagnostic accuracy estimates may be biased if inaccurately verified status is used as the truth. Statistical models have been developed to handle this situation by treating disease as a latent variable. In this paper, we conduct a systematized review of statistical methods using latent class models for estimating test accuracy and disease prevalence in the absence of complete verification. PMID:24910172

  12. A Novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab Rapid Diagnostic Test Using a Differential Diagnostic Marker Identified by Network Biology.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Jin; Lee, Jihoo; Lee, Hyun Jae; Jo, Hyun-Young; Sinniah, Mangalam; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can detect anti-malaria antibodies in human blood. As they can detect parasite infection at the low parasite density, they are useful in endemic areas where light infection and/or re-infection of parasites are common. Thus, malaria antibody tests can be used for screening bloods in blood banks to prevent transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM), an emerging problem in malaria endemic areas. However, only a few malaria antibody tests are available in the microwell-based assay format and these are not suitable for field application. A novel malaria antibody (Ab)-based RDT using a differential diagnostic marker for falciparum and vivax malaria was developed as a suitable high-throughput assay that is sensitive and practical for blood screening. The marker, merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) was discovered by generation of a Plasmodium-specific network and the hierarchical organization of modularity in the network. Clinical evaluation revealed that the novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab RDT shows improved sensitivity (98%) and specificity (99.7%) compared with the performance of a commercial kit, SD BioLine Malaria P.f/P.v (95.1% sensitivity and 99.1% specificity). The novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab RDT has potential for use as a cost-effective blood-screening tool for malaria and in turn, reduces TTM risk in endemic areas. PMID:27313496

  13. A Novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab Rapid Diagnostic Test Using a Differential Diagnostic Marker Identified by Network Biology

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Jin; Lee, Jihoo; Lee, Hyun Jae; Jo, Hyun-Young; Sinniah, Mangalam; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can detect anti-malaria antibodies in human blood. As they can detect parasite infection at the low parasite density, they are useful in endemic areas where light infection and/or re-infection of parasites are common. Thus, malaria antibody tests can be used for screening bloods in blood banks to prevent transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM), an emerging problem in malaria endemic areas. However, only a few malaria antibody tests are available in the microwell-based assay format and these are not suitable for field application. A novel malaria antibody (Ab)-based RDT using a differential diagnostic marker for falciparum and vivax malaria was developed as a suitable high-throughput assay that is sensitive and practical for blood screening. The marker, merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) was discovered by generation of a Plasmodium-specific network and the hierarchical organization of modularity in the network. Clinical evaluation revealed that the novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab RDT shows improved sensitivity (98%) and specificity (99.7%) compared with the performance of a commercial kit, SD BioLine Malaria P.f/P.v (95.1% sensitivity and 99.1% specificity). The novel Malaria Pf/Pv Ab RDT has potential for use as a cost-effective blood-screening tool for malaria and in turn, reduces TTM risk in endemic areas. PMID:27313496

  14. A Procedure for Accurately Measuring the Shaker Overturning Moment During Random Vibration Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeri, Reza D.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: For large system level random vibration tests, there may be some concerns about the shaker's capability for the overturning moment. It is the test conductor's responsibility to predict and monitor the overturning moment during random vibration tests. If the predicted moment is close to the shaker's capability, test conductor must measure the instantaneous moment at low levels and extrapolate to higher levels. That data will be used to decide whether it is safe to proceed to the next test level. Challenge: Kistler analog formulation for computing the real-time moment is only applicable to very limited cases in which we have 3 or 4 load cells installed at shaker interface with hardware. Approach: To overcome that limitation, a simple procedure was developed for computing the overturning moment time histories using the measured time histories of the individual load cells.

  15. Toward an Objective Diagnostic Test for Bacterial Cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Bry, Lynn; Dwyer, Richard C.; Lipworth, Adam D.; Leung, Donald Y.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Filbin, Michael R.; Murphy, George F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies repeatedly showed that cultures of skin lesions diagnosed as "cellulitis" are usually negative. However, lack of a gold standard for diagnosis (against which culture might be judged) and failure to assess the human immune response are important limitations of prior work. In this pilot study, we aimed to develop a criterion standard for research on bacterial cellulitis, to evaluate the sensitivity of procalcitonin for bacterial cellulitis, and to use gene expression analysis to find other candidate diagnostic markers. Methods We classified lesions via biopsies, 16s rRNA gene detection, culture, and histopathology. We quantified procalcitonin expression in blood. We also used Nanostring technology to quantify transcription of immunomodulators that may distinguish cases from inflamed controls. Results Of 28 participants, 15 had a clinical diagnosis of cellulitis, six had a diagnosis of non-infectious dermatitis, and seven were normal volunteers. Of the “cellulitis” patients, three (20%) had pathogens isolated, and were designated confirmed cases. Procalcitonin was undetectable in all three. HLA-DQA1 was expressed 34-fold more in confirmed cases vs. controls (fold change of geometric mean). Heat maps depicting multiplex gene expression analysis revealed a distinct profile of gene expression in confirmed cases relative to comparators. Conclusions Most “cellulitis” patients had microbiologically-negative biopsies. Procalcitonin was undetectable, and HLA-DQA1 elevated, in confirmed bacterial cases. Multivariable transcriptomic profiling results supported our algorithm’s ability to identify patients with true bacterial cellulitis. A larger sample may allow discovery of an immunological signature capable of distinguishing bacterial cellulitis from its mimics in clinical practice. PMID:27656884

  16. Design predictions and diagnostic test methods for hydronic heating systems in ASHRAE standard 152P

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    A new method of test for residential thermal distribution efficiency is currently being developed under the auspices of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). The initial version of this test method is expected to have two main approaches, or ``pathways,`` designated Design and Diagnostic. The Design Pathway will use builder`s information to predict thermal distribution efficiency in new construction. The Diagnostic Pathway will use simple tests to evaluate thermal distribution efficiency in a completed house. Both forced-air and hydronic systems are included in the test method. This report describes an approach to predicting and measuring thermal distribution efficiency for residential hydronic heating systems for use in the Design and Diagnostic Pathways of the test method. As written, it is designed for single-loop systems with any type of passive radiation/convection (baseboard or radiators). Multiloop capability may be added later.

  17. Power calculation for comparing diagnostic accuracies in a multi-reader, multi-test design.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunhee; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Youdan; Zeng, Donglin

    2014-12-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis is widely used to evaluate the performance of diagnostic tests with continuous or ordinal responses. A popular study design for assessing the accuracy of diagnostic tests involves multiple readers interpreting multiple diagnostic test results, called the multi-reader, multi-test design. Although several different approaches to analyzing data from this design exist, few methods have discussed the sample size and power issues. In this article, we develop a power formula to compare the correlated areas under the ROC curves (AUC) in a multi-reader, multi-test design. We present a nonparametric approach to estimate and compare the correlated AUCs by extending DeLong et al.'s (1988, Biometrics 44, 837-845) approach. A power formula is derived based on the asymptotic distribution of the nonparametric AUCs. Simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed power formula and an example is provided to illustrate the proposed procedure.

  18. Comprehensive Carrier Screening and Molecular Diagnostic Testing for Recessive Childhood Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kingsmore, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Of 7,028 disorders with suspected Mendelian inheritance, 1,139 are recessive and have an established molecular basis. Although individually uncommon, Mendelian diseases collectively account for ~20% of infant mortality and ~18% of pediatric hospitalizations. Molecular diagnostic testing is currently available for only ~300 recessive disorders. Preconception screening, together with genetic counseling of carriers, has resulted in remarkable declines in the incidence of several severe recessive diseases including Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis. However, extension of preconception screening and molecular diagnostic testing to most recessive disease genes has hitherto been impractical. Recently, we reported a preconception carrier screen / molecular diagnostic test for 448 recessive childhood diseases. The current status of this test is reviewed here. Currently, this reports analytical validity of the comprehensive carrier test. As the clinical validity and clinical utility in the contexts described is ascertained, this article will be updated. PMID:22872815

  19. Comprehensive carrier screening and molecular diagnostic testing for recessive childhood diseases.

    PubMed

    Kingsmore, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Of 7,028 disorders with suspected Mendelian inheritance, 1,139 are recessive and have an established molecular basis. Although individually uncommon, Mendelian diseases collectively account for ~20% of infant mortality and ~18% of pediatric hospitalizations. Molecular diagnostic testing is currently available for only ~300 recessive disorders. Preconception screening, together with genetic counseling of carriers, has resulted in remarkable declines in the incidence of several severe recessive diseases including Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis. However, extension of preconception screening and molecular diagnostic testing to most recessive disease genes has hitherto been impractical. Recently, we reported a preconception carrier screen / molecular diagnostic test for 448 recessive childhood diseases. The current status of this test is reviewed here. Currently, this reports analytical validity of the comprehensive carrier test. As the clinical validity and clinical utility in the contexts described is ascertained, this article will be updated. PMID:22872815

  20. Improving Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    New test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the residential building retrofit market. Reducing the energy use of existing homes in the United States offers significant energy-saving opportunities, which can be identified through building simulation software tools that calculate optimal packages of efficiency measures. To improve the accuracy of energy analysis for residential buildings, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Buildings Research team developed the Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), a method for diagnosing and correcting errors in building energy audit software and calibration procedures. BESTEST-EX consists of building physics and utility bill calibration test cases, which software developers can use to compare their tools simulation findings to reference results generated with state-of-the-art simulation tools. Overall, the BESTEST-EX methodology: (1) Tests software predictions of retrofit energy savings in existing homes; (2) Ensures building physics calculations and utility bill calibration procedures perform to a minimum standard; and (3) Quantifies impacts of uncertainties in input audit data and occupant behavior. BESTEST-EX is helping software developers identify and correct bugs in their software, as well as develop and test utility bill calibration procedures.

  1. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Final progress report, March 1980--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU), under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-80ET-15601, Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities, developed diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, were refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics were developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems were interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support was provided for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort. DIAL personnel also cooperated with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. The initial contract, Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery, established a data base on heat transfer, slagging effects on heat transfer surfaces, metal durability, secondary combustor performance, secondary combustor design requirements, and other information pertinent to the design of HR/SR components at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF). To accomplish these objectives, a combustion test stand was constructed that simulated MHD environments, and mathematical models were developed and evaluated for the heat transfer in hot-wall test sections. Two transitions occurred during the span of this contract. In May 1983, the objectives and title of the contract changed from Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery to Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities. In July 1988, the research laboratory`s name changed from the MHD Energy Center to the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory.

  2. A general and accurate approach for computing the statistical power of the transmission disequilibrium test for complex disease genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, W M; Deng, H W

    2001-07-01

    Transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) is a nuclear family-based analysis that can test linkage in the presence of association. It has gained extensive attention in theoretical investigation and in practical application; in both cases, the accuracy and generality of the power computation of the TDT are crucial. Despite extensive investigations, previous approaches for computing the statistical power of the TDT are neither accurate nor general. In this paper, we develop a general and highly accurate approach to analytically compute the power of the TDT. We compare the results from our approach with those from several other recent papers, all against the results obtained from computer simulations. We show that the results computed from our approach are more accurate than or at least the same as those from other approaches. More importantly, our approach can handle various situations, which include (1) families that consist of one or more children and that have any configuration of affected and nonaffected sibs; (2) families ascertained through the affection status of parent(s); (3) any mixed sample with different types of families in (1) and (2); (4) the marker locus is not a disease susceptibility locus; and (5) existence of allelic heterogeneity. We implement this approach in a user-friendly computer program: TDT Power Calculator. Its applications are demonstrated. The approach and the program developed here should be significant for theoreticians to accurately investigate the statistical power of the TDT in various situations, and for empirical geneticists to plan efficient studies using the TDT.

  3. Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. 13C-urea breath test.

    PubMed

    Graham, D Y; Klein, P D

    2000-12-01

    The preferred schema for management of Helicobacter pylori infection is diagnosis, treatment, and confirmation of cure. The 13C-urea breath test is ideal for active H. pylori infection for those in whom endoscopy is not required (e.g., those in whom cancer is not suspected) because it offers the combination of simplicity, accuracy, reliability, and absence of exposure to radioactivity. New versions of the test also offer increasing simplicity and lower costs. PMID:11190073

  4. Rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosing uncomplicated non-falciparum or Plasmodium vivax malaria in endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Katharine; Kirkham, Amanda J; Olliaro, Piero L; Deeks, Jonathan J; Donegan, Sarah; Garner, Paul; Takwoingi, Yemisi

    2014-01-01

    specificities are presented alongside 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Main results We included 47 studies enrolling 22,862 participants. Patient characteristics, sampling methods and reference standard methods were poorly reported in most studies. RDTs detecting 'non-falciparum' parasitaemia Eleven studies evaluated Type 2 tests compared with microscopy, 25 evaluated Type 3 tests, and 11 evaluated Type 4 tests. In meta-analyses, average sensitivities and specificities were 78% (95% CI 73% to 82%) and 99% (95% CI 97% to 99%) for Type 2 tests, 78% (95% CI 69% to 84%) and 99% (95% CI 98% to 99%) for Type 3 tests, and 89% (95% CI 79% to 95%) and 98% (95% CI 97% to 99%) for Type 4 tests, respectively. Type 4 tests were more sensitive than both Type 2 (P = 0.01) and Type 3 tests (P = 0.03). Five studies compared Type 3 tests with PCR; in meta-analysis, the average sensitivity and specificity were 81% (95% CI 72% to 88%) and 99% (95% CI 97% to 99%) respectively. RDTs detecting P.vivax parasitaemia Eight studies compared pLDH tests to microscopy; the average sensitivity and specificity were 95% (95% CI 86% to 99%) and 99% (95% CI 99% to 100%), respectively. Authors' conclusions RDTs designed to detect P. vivax specifically, whether alone or as part of a mixed infection, appear to be more accurate than older tests designed to distinguish P. falciparum malaria from non-falciparum malaria. Compared to microscopy, these tests fail to detect around 5% ofP. vivax cases. This Cochrane Review, in combination with other published information about in vitro test performance and stability in the field, can assist policy-makers to choose between the available RDTs. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Rapid tests for diagnosing malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax or other less common parasites This review summarises trials evaluating the accuracy of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for diagnosing malaria due to Plasmodium vivax or other non-falciparum species. After searching for relevant studies up to December

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and GeneXpert: A Rapid and Accurate Diagnostic Tool for the Management of Tuberculosis of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Mahajan, Rajat; Chabra, Tarun; Batra, Sahil

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze various diagnostic tools, including GeneXpert, for the management of tuberculosis of the spine. Overview of Literature Traditional diagnostic methods of microscopy, histology, and culture have low sensitivity and specificity for the management of tuberculosis of the spine. Methods Of the 262 treated cases of spinal tuberculosis, data on 1 year follow-up was available for 217 cases. Of these, only 145 cases with a confirmed diagnosis were selected for retrospective analysis. Results In 145 of the 217 patients (66.80%), diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of a culture. Of the 145 patients with a confirmed diagnosis, 98 (66.20%) patients were diagnosed on the basis of clinical presentation, whereas 123 (84.8%) exhibited a typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) picture. In 99 surgically treated patients, the diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of an intraoperative tissue biopsy. Among the 46 patients treated conservatively, 35 underwent a transpedicular biopsy, 4 patients underwent computed tomography-guided biopsy, 6 patients were diagnosed on the basis of material obtained from a cold abscess, and 1 patient underwent an open biopsy. The sensitivity of the culture for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was 66.80% (145/217) in our patients. Among the cases in which GeneXpert was used, the sensitivity for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was 93.4% (43/46). Moreover, the sensitivity of GeneXpert to detect rifampicin resistance was 100% (7/7) in our study. Conclusions Majority of the patients with tuberculosis of the spine can be diagnosed on the basis of a typical radiological presentation via MRI. In our study, 84.8% cases exhibited typical MRI findings. For patients presenting with atypical MRI features, a rapid and accurate diagnosis is possible by combining GeneXpert with MRI. The combined use of MRI and GeneXpert is a rapid and highly sensitive tool to diagnose

  6. 42 CFR 414.506 - Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.506 Section 414.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR... FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.506 Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory...

  7. Diagnostic efficacy of in vitro methods vs. skin testing in patients with inhalant allergies

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, J.P.; Liudahl, J.J.; Young, S.A.; Rodman, S.M. )

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of two selected methods of in vitro allergy testing. Specifically, the PRIST/modified RAST I125 isotope systems and the Quantizyme/modified EAST alkaline phosphatase method were compared. The time, expense, convenience, and diagnostic efficacy of the two procedures are discussed. Special attention is given to the practicality of each method for the practicing physician.

  8. A field diagnostic test for the improvised explosive urea nitrate.

    PubMed

    Almog, Joseph; Klein, Asne; Tamiri, Tsippy; Shloosh, Yael; Abramovich-Bar, Sara

    2005-05-01

    A sensitive, specific and simple color test for the improvised explosive urea nitrate is described. It is based on the formation of a red pigment upon the reaction between urea nitrate and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (p-DMAC) under neutral conditions. Urea itself, which is the starting material for urea nitrate, does not react with p-DMAC under the same conditions. Other potential sources of false positive response e.g., common fertilizers, medications containing the urea moiety and various amines, do not produce the red pigment with p-DMAC. Exhibits collected from 10 terrorist cases have been tested with p-DMAC. The results were in full agreement with those obtained by instrumental techniques including GC/MS, XRD and IR.

  9. Blood lactate diagnostics in exercise testing and training.

    PubMed

    Beneke, Ralph; Leithäuser, Renate M; Ochentel, Oliver

    2011-03-01

    A link between lactate and muscular exercise was seen already more than 200 years ago. The blood lactate concentration (BLC) is sensitive to changes in exercise intensity and duration. Multiple BLC threshold concepts define different points on the BLC power curve during various tests with increasing power (INCP). The INCP test results are affected by the increase in power over time. The maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) is measured during a series of prolonged constant power (CP) tests. It detects the highest aerobic power without metabolic energy from continuing net lactate production, which is usually sustainable for 30 to 60 min. BLC threshold and MLSS power are highly correlated with the maximum aerobic power and athletic endurance performance. The idea that training at threshold intensity is particularly effective has no evidence. Three BLC-orientated intensity domains have been established: (1) training up to an intensity at which the BLC clearly exceeds resting BLC, light- and moderate-intensity training focusing on active regeneration or high-volume endurance training (Intensity < Threshold); (2) heavy endurance training at work rates up to MLSS intensity (Threshold ≤ Intensity ≤ MLSS); and (3) severe exercise intensity training between MLSS and maximum oxygen uptake intensity mostly organized as interval and tempo work (Intensity > MLSS). High-performance endurance athletes combining very high training volume with high aerobic power dedicate 70 to 90% of their training to intensity domain 1 (Intensity < Threshold) in order to keep glycogen homeostasis within sustainable limits. PMID:21487146

  10. Diagnostic Role of ECG Recording Simultaneously With EEG Testing.

    PubMed

    Kendirli, Mustafa Tansel; Aparci, Mustafa; Kendirli, Nurten; Tekeli, Hakan; Karaoglan, Mustafa; Senol, Mehmet Guney; Togrol, Erdem

    2015-07-01

    Arrhythmia is not uncommon in the etiology of syncope which mimics epilepsy. Data about the epilepsy induced vagal tonus abnormalities have being increasingly reported. So we aimed to evaluate what a neurologist may gain by a simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) recording in the patients who underwent EEG testing due to prediagnosis of epilepsy. We retrospectively evaluated and detected ECG abnormalities in 68 (18%) of 376 patients who underwent EEG testing. A minimum of 20 of minutes artifact-free recording were required for each patient. Standard 1-channel ECG was simultaneously recorded in conjunction with the EEG. In all, 28% of females and 14% of males had ECG abnormalities. Females (mean age 49 years, range 18-88 years) were older compared with the male group (mean age 28 years, range 16-83 years). Atrial fibrillation was more frequent in female group whereas bradycardia and respiratory sinus arrhythmia was higher in male group. One case had been detected a critical asystole indicating sick sinus syndrome in the female group and treated with a pacemaker implantation in the following period. Simultaneous ECG recording in conjunction with EEG testing is a clinical prerequisite to detect and to clarify the coexisting ECG and EEG abnormalities and their clinical relevance. Potentially rare lethal causes of syncope that mimic seizure or those that could cause resistance to antiepileptic therapy could effectively be distinguished by detecting ECG abnormalities coinciding with the signs and abnormalities during EEG recording.

  11. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience

    PubMed Central

    Žilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mölter-Väär, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009–2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1–3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5 Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists. PMID:24689080

  12. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience.

    PubMed

    Zilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mölter-Väär, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Ounap, Katrin

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009-2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1-3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5 Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists.

  13. Can script concordance testing be used in nursing education to accurately assess clinical reasoning skills?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Tyia; Comer, Linda; Kossick, Mark A; Neubrander, Judy

    2014-05-01

    The Script Concordance Test (SCT) has been used successfully in medical schools to assess clinical reasoning in medical students, but it has not been widely used in nursing education. The purpose of this study was to provide additional evidence of the validity and reliability of the SCT in evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students by replicating a previous study. The test was administered to 48 first-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing students. A scoring grid was developed using the aggregate scores method based on the modal responses of 13 panel members. The reliability of the scores was measured by Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and the scores of the students and the panel were compared using a t test. The difference between the panel's and the students' scores was statistically significant, and the reliability of the scores is high. The SCT provides a reliable, standardized, and easy-to-administer method of evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students.

  14. Molecular diagnostics: harmonization through reference materials, documentary standards and proficiency testing.

    PubMed

    Holden, Marcia J; Madej, Roberta M; Minor, Philip; Kalman, Lisa V

    2011-09-01

    There is a great need for harmonization in nucleic acid testing for infectious disease and clinical genetics. The proliferation of assay methods, the number of targets for molecular diagnostics and the absence of standard reference materials contribute to variability in test results among laboratories. This article provides a comprehensive overview of reference materials, related documentary standards and proficiency testing programs. The article explores the relationships among these resources and provides necessary information for people practicing in this area that is not taught in formal courses and frequently is obtained on an ad hoc basis. The aim of this article is to provide helpful tools for molecular diagnostic laboratories.

  15. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure.

  16. The use of experimental bending tests to more accurate numerical description of TBC damage process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, T.; Golewski, P.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been extensively used in aircraft engines to protect critical engine parts such as blades and combustion chambers, which are exposed to high temperatures and corrosive environment. The blades of turbine engines are additionally exposed to high mechanical loads. These loads are created by the high rotational speed of the rotor (30 000 rot/min), causing the tensile and bending stresses. Therefore, experimental testing of coated samples is necessary in order to determine strength properties of TBCs. Beam samples with dimensions 50×10×2 mm were used in those studies. The TBC system consisted of 150 μm thick bond coat (NiCoCrAlY) and 300 μm thick top coat (YSZ) made by APS (air plasma spray) process. Samples were tested by three-point bending test with various loads. After bending tests, the samples were subjected to microscopic observation to determine the quantity of cracks and their depth. The above mentioned results were used to build numerical model and calibrate material data in Abaqus program. Brittle cracking damage model was applied for the TBC layer, which allows to remove elements after reaching criterion. Surface based cohesive behavior was used to model the delamination which may occur at the boundary between bond coat and top coat.

  17. Paradoxical Effects of Testing: Retrieval Enhances Both Accurate Recall and Suggestibility in Eyewitnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Jason C. K.; Langley, Moses M.

    2011-01-01

    Although retrieval practice typically enhances memory retention, it can also impair subsequent eyewitness memory accuracy (Chan, Thomas, & Bulevich, 2009). Specifically, participants who had taken an initial test about a witnessed event were more likely than nontested participants to recall subsequently encountered misinformation--an effect we…

  18. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure. PMID:19950907

  19. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  20. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  1. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  2. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  3. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  4. Development and Validation of a Diagnostic Grammar Test for Japanese Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koizumi, Rie; Sakai, Hideki; Ido, Takahiro; Ota, Hiroshi; Hayama, Megumi; Sato, Masatoshi; Nemoto, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the development and validation of the English Diagnostic Test of Grammar (EDiT Grammar) for Japanese learners of English. From among the many aspects of grammar, this test focuses on the knowledge of basic English noun phrases (NPs), especially their internal structures, because previous research has indicated the…

  5. The Application of the Monte Carlo Approach to Cognitive Diagnostic Computerized Adaptive Testing With Content Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Xiuzhen; Xin, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The Monte Carlo approach which has previously been implemented in traditional computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is applied here to cognitive diagnostic CAT to test the ability of this approach to address multiple content constraints. The performance of the Monte Carlo approach is compared with the performance of the modified maximum global…

  6. North Carolina Minimum Skills Diagnostic Testing Program. Administrative Information, 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability Services/Research.

    Information is presented regarding the administration of the North Carolina Minimum Skills Diagnostic Testing Program. This testing program, mandated by the state's basic education program under the Secondary School Reform Act of 1984, checks the necessity for remediation by determining a student's mastery of specific objectives and diagnoses…

  7. Diagnostic Tests and Criterion-Referenced Assessments: Their Contribution to the Resolution of Pupil Learning Difficulties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Mary; Arnold, Brian

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that failure to learn is often the result of inappropriateness of level of instruction and deficiencies in instructional procedures and educational strategies, and differentiates between the functions of criterion referenced tests and diagnostic tests. Results are reported from two studies of the teaching of osmosis and photosynthesis.…

  8. Cognitive Diagnostic Models for Tests with Multiple-Choice and Constructed-Response Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Chen, Chun-Hua; Yang, Chih-Wei; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, teachers evaluate students' abilities via their total test scores. Recently, cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs) have begun to provide information about the presence or absence of students' skills or misconceptions. Nevertheless, CDMs are typically applied to tests with multiple-choice (MC) items, which provide less diagnostic…

  9. Constructing and Validating a Q-Matrix for Cognitive Diagnostic Analyses of a Reading Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hongli; Suen, Hoi K.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive diagnostic analyses have been advocated as methods that allow an assessment to function as a formative assessment to inform instruction. To use this approach, it is necessary to first identify the skills required for each item in the test, known as a Q-matrix. However, because the construct being tested and the underlying cognitive…

  10. Paths to Success, Volume III. Validating the California Chemistry Diagnostic Test for Local Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpp, Edward R.

    The California Chemistry Diagnostic Test (CCDT) was developed by chemistry faculties at the University of California, California State University, and California Community College systems to address dissatisfaction with existing chemistry assessment instruments. The instrument was tested at 25 campuses of the 3 systems, after which Glendale…

  11. 42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... test. 414.508 Section 414.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new...

  12. 42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... test. 414.508 Section 414.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new...

  13. 42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... test. 414.508 Section 414.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new...

  14. Development and Use of Diagnostic Tests to Evaluate Students' Misconceptions in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treagust, David F.

    1988-01-01

    Describes 10 steps for developing a diagnostic test of students' misconceptions and the use of two tests in chemistry (covalent bonding and structure) and in biology (photosynthesis and respiration in plants). Discusses the results and some implications for teaching science. (YP)

  15. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests. PMID:27574576

  16. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew; Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests. PMID:27574576

  17. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew; Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests.

  18. Diagnostic value of lasik test for detection of lumbar discopathy in patients attending emergency department with acute low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Aala, Alireza; Alizadeh Shahri, Saeid; Meshkini, Ali; Shams Vahdati, Samad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Low back pain is one of the most important health problems. Disk herniation is one of the common causes of low back pain. Accurate examination is the best and simplest diagnostic methods. Physical examination, Straight leg raise (SLR) and neurologic tests as well as other tests are usually used to locate the exact place of herniation. Paraclinical studies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be used because of the low diagnostic efficiency of physical examination. Methods: 100 patients attended the emergency unit because of back pain or radicular pain, were enrolled in the study. SLR, Reverse- SLR (R-SLR) and Crossed-SLR (C-SLR) tests were performed for all patients. Then, the patients were referred to the neurosurgery unit for treatment. Lumbar MRI was taken for all patients. Then, all patients were followed up and these data were collected. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of SLR test, C-SLR, and R-SLR tests was 77.52% and 36.36%, 29.21% and 90.9%, and 88.89% and 10.94%, respectively. There was no significant relationship between MRI and positive discopathy in the physical examination and SLR (P=0.11). Conclusions: SLR test has high sensitivity and low specificity. If the SLR test was accompanied by with physical examination the resulting sensitivity and specificity will increase. Findings of this study showed that SLR test has more sensitivity, while C-SLR has more specificity in low back pain diagnosis. Keywords: SLR test, Low Back Pain, Discopathy, Straight leg raise

  19. Accurate assessment of work done and power during a Wingate anaerobic test.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Kathryn L; Gordon, Rae S; Baker, Julien S; Davies, Bruce

    2007-04-01

    A Monark cycle ergometer is used in physiological studies to measure work done and power. In this paper, the accuracy of a Monark rope-braked cycle ergometer was examined for a Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT). The traditional method of determining brake torque fails to take into account rope-brake theory and, as the brake torque is used to determine the moment of inertia of the flywheel, a second error is introduced into the calculation to determine the work done or power. In this study, the rope tensions were measured to determine the actual brake torque. A deceleration test was carried out to determine the moment of inertia of the system. The work done by subjects of different masses was calculated for various accelerations and it was found that the traditional calculations overestimate work done and power by between 12% and 14.7%. PMID:17486163

  20. Susceptibility testing: accurate and reproducible minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and non-inhibitory concentration (NIC) values.

    PubMed

    Lambert, R J; Pearson, J

    2000-05-01

    Measuring the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of a substance by current methods is straightforward, whereas obtaining useful comparative information from the tests can be more difficult. A simple technique and a method of data analysis are reported which give the experimentalist more useful information from susceptibility testing. This method makes use of a 100-well microtitre plate and the analysis uses all the growth information, obtained by turbidometry, from each and every well of the microtitre plate. A modified Gompertz function is used to fit the data, from which a more exact value can be obtained for the MIC. The technique also showed that at certain concentrations of inhibitor, there was no effect on growth relative to a control well (zero inhibitor). Above a threshold value, which has been termed the non-inhibitory concentration or NIC, growth becomes limiting until it reaches the MIC, where no growth relative to the control is observed.

  1. Review of diagnostic plaque reduction neutralization tests for flavivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akihiko; Maeda, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Flavivirus infections (including Japanese encephalitis, West Nile encephalitis and dengue fever/severe dengue) present a worldwide public health problem. Recent climate change may affect the geographical distribution of the arthropod vectors for these viruses and so the risk of flavivirus epidemics may increase. Many methods have been developed for the serological diagnosis of flavivirus infections, such as haemagglutination inhibition assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunofluorescence in staining. However, the specificity of these assays varies. The plaque reduction neutralizing test (PRNT) using live viruses is currently the 'gold standard' for the differential serodiagnosis of flaviviruses. The specificity of results obtained with PRNT is better than that for other protocols and many laboratories apply the PRNT protocol to the differential serodiagnosis of flaviviruses. Here, recent refinements to the PRNT protocols with genetically modified recombinant viruses or reporter-harbouring virus-like particles are reviewed. Further, the problems associated with the differential serodiagnosis of flaviviruses using PRNT are discussed.

  2. Diagnostic performance characteristics of a rapid field test for anthrax in cattle.

    PubMed

    Muller, Janine; Gwozdz, Jacek; Hodgeman, Rachel; Ainsworth, Catherine; Kluver, Patrick; Czarnecki, Jill; Warner, Simone; Fegan, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Although diagnosis of anthrax can be made in the field with a peripheral blood smear, and in the laboratory with bacterial culture or molecular based tests, these tests require either considerable experience or specialised equipment. Here we report on the evaluation of the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of a simple and rapid in-field diagnostic test for anthrax, the anthrax immunochromatographic test (AICT). The AICT detects the protective antigen (PA) component of the anthrax toxin present within the blood of an animal that has died from anthrax. The test provides a result in 15min and offers the advantage of avoiding the necessity for on-site necropsy and subsequent occupational risks and environmental contamination. The specificity of the test was determined by testing samples taken from 622 animals, not infected with Bacillus anthracis. Diagnostic sensitivity was estimated on samples taken from 58 animals, naturally infected with B. anthracis collected over a 10-year period. All samples used to estimate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the AICT were also tested using the gold standard of bacterial culture. The diagnostic specificity of the test was estimated to be 100% (99.4-100%; 95% CI) and the diagnostic sensitivity was estimated to be 93.1% (83.3-98.1%; 95% CI) (Clopper-Pearson method). Four samples produced false negative AICT results. These were among 9 samples, all of which tested positive for B. anthracis by culture, where there was a time delay between collection and testing of >48h and/or the samples were collected from animals that were >48h post-mortem. A statistically significant difference (P<0.001; Fishers exact test) was found between the ability of the AICT to detect PA in samples from culture positive animals <48h post-mortem, 49 of 49, Se=100% (92.8-100%; 95% CI) compared with samples tested >48h post-mortem 5 of 9 Se=56% (21-86.3%; 95% CI) (Clopper-Pearson method). Based upon these results a post hoc cut-off for use of

  3. Diffusion of Molecular Diagnostic Lung Cancer Tests: A Survey of German Oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Julius Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at examining the diffusion of diagnostic lung cancer tests in Germany. It was motivated by the high potential of detecting and targeting oncogenic drivers. Recognizing that the diffusion of diagnostic tests is a conditio sine qua non for the success of personalized lung cancer therapies, this study analyzed the diffusion of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tests in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative research strategies were combined in a mixed-method design. A literature review and subsequent Key Opinion Leader interviews identified a set of qualitative factors driving the diffusion process, which were then translated into an online survey. The survey was conducted among a sample of 961 oncologists (11.34% response rate). The responses were analyzed in a multiple linear regression which identified six statistically significant factors driving the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests: reimbursement, attitude towards R&D, information self-assessment, perceived attitudes of colleagues, age and test-pathway strategies. Besides the important role of adequate reimbursement and relevant guidelines, the results of this study suggest that an increasing usage of test-pathway strategies, especially in an office-based setting, can increase the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests in the future. PMID:25562146

  4. Can simple tests performed in the primary care setting provide accurate and efficient diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia? Rationale and design of the Diagnosis Improvement in Primary Care Trial.

    PubMed

    Carballido, J; Fourcade, R; Pagliarulo, A; Cricelli, C; Brenes, F; Pedromingo-Marino, A; Castro, R

    2009-08-01

    Effective treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) improves lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and patient quality of life, and reduces the risk of complications arising from disease progression. However, treatment can only be initiated when men with BPH are identified by accurate diagnostic tests. Current evidence suggests that diagnostic procedures employed by primary care physicians vary widely across Europe. The expected increases in BPH prevalence accompanying the gradual aging of the population, coupled with greater use of medical therapy, mean that general practitioners (GPs) are likely to have an increasingly important role in managing the condition. The GP/primary care clinic is therefore an attractive target location for strategies designed to improve the accuracy of BPH diagnosis. The Diagnosis Improvement in Primary Care Trial (D-IMPACT) is a prospective, multicentre, epidemiological study that aims to identify the optimal subset of simple tests applied by GPs in the primary care setting to diagnose BPH in men who spontaneously report obstructive (voiding) and/or irritative (storage) LUTS. These tests comprise medical history, symptom assessment with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire, urinalysis, measurement of serum levels of prostate-specific antigen and subjective GP diagnosis after completing all tests including digital rectal examination. GP diagnoses and all other tests will be compared with gold-standard diagnoses provided by specialist urologists following completion of additional diagnostic tests. D-IMPACT will establish the diagnostic performance using a non-subjective and reproducible algorithm. An adjusted and multivariate analysis of the results of D-IMPACT will allow identification of the most efficient combination of tests that facilitate accurate BPH diagnosis in the primary care setting. In addition, D-IMPACT will estimate the prevalence of BPH in patients who present spontaneously to GPs with LUTS. PMID

  5. Optimal Sequential Diagnostic Strategy Generation Considering Test Placement Cost for Multimode Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shigang; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yongmin

    2015-10-08

    Sequential fault diagnosis is an approach that realizes fault isolation by executing the optimal test step by step. The strategy used, i.e., the sequential diagnostic strategy, has great influence on diagnostic accuracy and cost. Optimal sequential diagnostic strategy generation is an important step in the process of diagnosis system construction, which has been studied extensively in the literature. However, previous algorithms either are designed for single mode systems or do not consider test placement cost. They are not suitable to solve the sequential diagnostic strategy generation problem considering test placement cost for multimode systems. Therefore, this problem is studied in this paper. A formulation is presented. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which is realized by system transformation and the other is newly designed. Extensive simulations are carried out to test the effectiveness of the algorithms. A real-world system is also presented. All the results show that both of them have the ability to solve the diagnostic strategy generation problem, and they have different characteristics.

  6. Optimal Sequential Diagnostic Strategy Generation Considering Test Placement Cost for Multimode Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shigang; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yongmin

    2015-01-01

    Sequential fault diagnosis is an approach that realizes fault isolation by executing the optimal test step by step. The strategy used, i.e., the sequential diagnostic strategy, has great influence on diagnostic accuracy and cost. Optimal sequential diagnostic strategy generation is an important step in the process of diagnosis system construction, which has been studied extensively in the literature. However, previous algorithms either are designed for single mode systems or do not consider test placement cost. They are not suitable to solve the sequential diagnostic strategy generation problem considering test placement cost for multimode systems. Therefore, this problem is studied in this paper. A formulation is presented. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which is realized by system transformation and the other is newly designed. Extensive simulations are carried out to test the effectiveness of the algorithms. A real-world system is also presented. All the results show that both of them have the ability to solve the diagnostic strategy generation problem, and they have different characteristics. PMID:26457709

  7. Rotating Arc Jet Test Model: Time-Accurate Trajectory Heat Flux Replication in a Ground Test Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, Bernard; Grinstead, Jay; Dyakonov, Artem; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2011-01-01

    Though arc jet testing has been the proven method employed for development testing and certification of TPS and TPS instrumentation, the operational aspects of arc jets limit testing to selected, but constant, conditions. Flight, on the other hand, produces timevarying entry conditions in which the heat flux increases, peaks, and recedes as a vehicle descends through an atmosphere. As a result, we are unable to "test as we fly." Attempts to replicate the time-dependent aerothermal environment of atmospheric entry by varying the arc jet facility operating conditions during a test have proven to be difficult, expensive, and only partially successful. A promising alternative is to rotate the test model exposed to a constant-condition arc jet flow to yield a time-varying test condition at a point on a test article (Fig. 1). The model shape and rotation rate can be engineered so that the heat flux at a point on the model replicates the predicted profile for a particular point on a flight vehicle. This simple concept will enable, for example, calibration of the TPS sensors on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) aeroshell for anticipated flight environments.

  8. Convergent and diagnostic validity of STAVUX, a word and pseudoword spelling test for adults.

    PubMed

    Östberg, Per; Backlund, Charlotte; Lindström, Emma

    2016-10-01

    Few comprehensive spelling tests are available in Swedish, and none have been validated in adults with reading and writing disorders. The recently developed STAVUX test includes word and pseudoword spelling subtests with high internal consistency and adult norms stratified by education. This study evaluated the convergent and diagnostic validity of STAVUX in adults with dyslexia. Forty-six adults, 23 with dyslexia and 23 controls, took STAVUX together with a standard word-decoding test and a self-rated measure of spelling skills. STAVUX subtest scores showed moderate to strong correlations with word-decoding scores and predicted self-rated spelling skills. Word and pseudoword subtest scores both predicted dyslexia status. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed excellent diagnostic discriminability. Sensitivity was 91% and specificity 96%. In conclusion, the results of this study support the convergent and diagnostic validity of STAVUX.

  9. Mathematics diagnostic testing in engineering: an international comparison between Ireland and Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, M.; Fidalgo, C.; Bigotte de Almeida, M. E.; Branco, J. R.; Santos, V.; Murphy, E.; Fhloinn, E. Ní

    2015-09-01

    Concern has been expressed throughout Europe about the significant deficiencies in the basic mathematical skills of many engineering undergraduates. Mathematics diagnostic tests in the UK, Ireland and Portugal have shown these shortcomings, which provide a challenge to those striving to introduce more innovative educational practices into engineering education, such as projects or real-world problems. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland) and the Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra (Portugal), a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students. A comparison showed some potentially interesting differences between these students. In September 2013, a project was undertaken to compare mathematical competencies of incoming engineering students in both countries. A modified diagnostic test was devised and the results were then compared to ascertain if there are common areas of difficulty between students in Ireland and Portugal, or evidence of one group significantly outperforming the other in a particular area.

  10. Diagnostic development and support of MHD Test Facilities. Technical progress report, October 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

  11. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Technical progress report, January--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.S.; Cook, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL`S computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

  12. Accurate time delay technology in simulated test for high precision laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Xiao, Wenjian; Wang, Weiming; Xue, Mingxi

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous development of technology, the ranging accuracy of pulsed laser range finder (LRF) is higher and higher, so the maintenance demand of LRF is also rising. According to the dominant ideology of "time analog spatial distance" in simulated test for pulsed range finder, the key of distance simulation precision lies in the adjustable time delay. By analyzing and comparing the advantages and disadvantages of fiber and circuit delay, a method was proposed to improve the accuracy of the circuit delay without increasing the count frequency of the circuit. A high precision controllable delay circuit was designed by combining the internal delay circuit and external delay circuit which could compensate the delay error in real time. And then the circuit delay accuracy could be increased. The accuracy of the novel circuit delay methods proposed in this paper was actually measured by a high sampling rate oscilloscope actual measurement. The measurement result shows that the accuracy of the distance simulated by the circuit delay is increased from +/- 0.75m up to +/- 0.15m. The accuracy of the simulated distance is greatly improved in simulated test for high precision pulsed range finder.

  13. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP) as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Quach, D T; Sakoulas, G; Nizet, V; Pogliano, J; Pogliano, K

    2016-02-01

    Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP), which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant (MRSA) clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71) within 1-2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS) from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS) S. aureus strains (n = 20) within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice. PMID:26981574

  14. Lower-Limb Power cannot be Estimated Accurately from Vertical Jump Tests

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Jean-François; Basset, Fabien-A; Simoneau, Martin; Teasdale, Normand

    2013-01-01

    The countermovement jump test is often adopted to monitor lower-limb power of an individual. Despite several studies on the validity of this test, there is still a need to determine the minimal difference needed to be confident that a difference in power between two individuals is present or that a true change in the performance of an individual has occurred. In this study, power was measured from ground reaction forces and compared to that obtained from predictive equations for two groups of subjects (67 trained and 20 highly trained individuals). The height of each jump was determined with kinematic techniques. The main outcome is a large discrepancy between power calculated from ground reaction forces and that calculated from predictive equations. For the trained group, the R-square value between power and predicted power was 0.53 and the minimal difference to consider that two individuals were different was 821.7 W. For the highly trained individuals, a much larger R-square value was obtained (0.94). Despite this, the minimal difference to consider that two individuals were different was still large (689.3 W). The large minimal differences obtained raise serious concerns about using countermovement jumps for appraisal and monitoring of lower-limb power of an individual. PMID:24235979

  15. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP) as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Quach, D.T.; Sakoulas, G.; Nizet, V.; Pogliano, J.; Pogliano, K.

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP), which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant (MRSA) clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71) within 1–2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS) from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS) S. aureus strains (n = 20) within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice. PMID:26981574

  16. Field Evaluation of Diagnostic Accuracy of an Oral Fluid Rapid Test for HIV, Tested at Point-of-Service Sites in Rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Langhaug, Lisa F.; Mudzori, James; Burke, Eileen; Hayes, Richard; Cowan, Frances M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to validate the use of OraQuick® ADVANCE Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody test (OraSure Technologies Inc., Bethlehem, PA) on oral fluid for a population-based HIV prevalence survey of rural youth in southeast Zimbabwe. The evaluation was conducted in patients presenting for voluntary counseling and testing at rural clinics. Each participant provided an oral fluid sample tested using OraQuick® ADVANCE. In addition, dried blood specimens were collected and tested blind at the National Microbiology Reference Laboratory in Harare using two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA; Vironostika®, Biomérieux BV, Boxtel, The Netherlands and Ani Labsystems, Ltd., Vantaa, Finland) with confirmatory Western blot (MP Diagnostics [formerly Genelabs Diagnostics], Medical Technology Promedt Consulting GMBH, St. Ingbert, Germany) for samples with discrepant results. Diagnostic accuracy of the oral fluid assay was determined against the ELISA/Western blot algorithm as gold standard. Five hundred and ninety-one participants took part in the study between February and July 2006. Sensitivity of the test on oral fluid was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 97.9–100), and specificity was 100% (95% CI: 99.1–100). HIV prevalence based on the reference standard was 29.8% (95% CI: 26.1–33.5). This is one of the first validations of this rapid assay on oral fluid conducted in a general population to be reported in Africa. While there are some limitations with the assay (e.g., unlikely to detect those in early stages of HIV infection or with reduced viral load; altered accuracy in pregnancy) these limitations also apply to other rapid assays. The results showed the assay to be 100% accurate in determining HIV status, performed well in field settings, and can be considered suitable for use in epidemiologic surveys aiming to estimate HIV prevalence in general populations. PMID:19530953

  17. Field evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of an oral fluid rapid test for HIV, tested at point-of-service sites in rural Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Sophie J S; Langhaug, Lisa F; Mudzori, James; Burke, Eileen; Hayes, Richard; Cowan, Frances M

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the use of OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody test (OraSure Technologies Inc., Bethlehem, PA) on oral fluid for a population-based HIV prevalence survey of rural youth in southeast Zimbabwe. The evaluation was conducted in patients presenting for voluntary counseling and testing at rural clinics. Each participant provided an oral fluid sample tested using OraQuick ADVANCE. In addition, dried blood specimens were collected and tested blind at the National Microbiology Reference Laboratory in Harare using two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA; Vironostika, Biomérieux BV, Boxtel, The Netherlands and Ani Labsystems, Ltd., Vantaa, Finland) with confirmatory Western blot (MP Diagnostics [formerly Genelabs Diagnostics], Medical Technology Promedt Consulting GMBH, St. Ingbert, Germany) for samples with discrepant results. Diagnostic accuracy of the oral fluid assay was determined against the ELISA/Western blot algorithm as gold standard. Five hundred and ninety-one participants took part in the study between February and July 2006. Sensitivity of the test on oral fluid was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 97.9-100), and specificity was 100% (95% CI: 99.1-100). HIV prevalence based on the reference standard was 29.8% (95% CI: 26.1-33.5). This is one of the first validations of this rapid assay on oral fluid conducted in a general population to be reported in Africa. While there are some limitations with the assay (e.g., unlikely to detect those in early stages of HIV infection or with reduced viral load; altered accuracy in pregnancy) these limitations also apply to other rapid assays. The results showed the assay to be 100% accurate in determining HIV status, performed well in field settings, and can be considered suitable for use in epidemiologic surveys aiming to estimate HIV prevalence in general populations.

  18. Measurement of testicular volume in smaller testes: how accurate is the conventional orchidometer?

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chieh; Huang, William J S; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of different methods, including the Seager orchidometer (SO) and ultrasonography (US), for assessing testicular volume of smaller testes (testes volume less than 18 mL). Moreover, the equations used for the calculations--the Hansen formula (length [L] x width [W](2) x 0.52, equation A), the prolate ellipsoid formula (L x W x height [H] x 0.52, equation B), and the Lambert equation (L x W x H x 0.71, equation C)--were also examined and compared with the gold standard testicular volume obtained by water displacement (Archimedes principle). In this study, 30 testes from 15 men, mean age 75.3 (+/-8.3) years, were included. They all had advanced prostate cancer and were admitted for orchiectomy. Before the procedure, all the testes were assessed using SO and US. The dimensions were then input into each equation to obtain the volume estimates. The testicular volume by water displacement was 8.1 +/- 3.5 mL. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) of the 2 different methods (SO, US) to the gold standard were 0.70 and 0.85, respectively. The calculated testicular volumes were 9.2 +/- 3.9 mL (measured by SO, equation A), 11.9 +/- 5.2 mL (measured by SO, equation C), 7.3 +/- 4.2 mL (measured by US, equation A), 6.5 +/- 3.3 mL (measured by US, equation B) and 8.9 +/- 4.5 mL (measured by US, equation C). Only the mean size measured by US and volume calculated with the Hansen equation (equation A) and the mean size measured by US and volume calculated with the Lambert equation (equation C) showed no significant differences when compared with the volumes estimated by water displacement (mean difference 0.81 mL, P = .053, and 0.81 mL, P = .056, respectively). Based on our measurements, we categorized testicular volume by different cutoff values (7.0 mL, 7.5 mL, 8.0 mL, and 8.5 mL) to calculate a new constant for use in the Hansen equation. The new constant was 0.59. We then reexamined the equations using the new 0.59 constant, and found

  19. Veterinary practitioners’ selection of diagnostic tests for the primary evaluation of colic in the horse

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, L.; Trewin, I.; England, G. C. W.; Burford, J. H.; Freeman, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to survey veterinary practitioners’ selection of diagnostic tests for horses with clinical signs of abdominal pain. A questionnaire was distributed to veterinary surgeons involved in the primary evaluation of horses with abdominal pain, including the respondent's demographics, selection of diagnostic tests and factors affecting decision-making. Data analysis included descriptive analysis, categorisation of free text and simple univariable correlations to explore the relationships between independent variables and the relative self-estimated frequency that diagnostic tests were performed. A total of 228 responses were analysed. Participants worked in mixed practice (55.7 per cent), first opinion equine (22.8 per cent), first and second opinion equine (17.9 per cent) and referral practice (3.1 per cent). The majority (48.2 per cent, 105/218) were very confident managing a colic case (confidence level 4/5). The most frequently used diagnostic tests were ‘response to analgesia’ (87.2±24.0 per cent cases), rectal examination (75.9±21.2 per cent) and nasogastric intubation (43.8±27.6 per cent). Approach varied between practitioners, and for all diagnostic tests with frequency of use ranging from 0 to 100 per cent of cases. ‘Risk to personal safety’ was the most common reason for not using rectal examination. Practitioner's opinion of their confidence level in managing a colic case was associated with how frequently they used different diagnostic tests. There was marked variation in practitioners’ approaches, highlighting the need for further evidence to support decision-making. PMID:26457192

  20. Understanding laboratory testing in diagnostic uncertainty: a qualitative study in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    van der Weijden, Trudy; van Bokhoven, Marloes A; Dinant, Geert-Jan; van Hasselt, Cathelijne M; Grol, Richard P T M

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Better knowledge of the professional's motives for ordering laboratory tests in the case of diagnostic uncertainty may lead to interventions directed at reducing unnecessary testing. AIM: To gain insight into the general practitioner's (GP's) motives for ordering laboratory tests for patients presenting with unexplained complaints. DESIGN OF STUDY: Semi-structured interviews based on surgery observations. SETTING: Twenty-one general practices in rural and urban areas of The Netherlands. METHOD: Investigation of the GP's perception of determinants of test-ordering behaviour in the situation of diagnostic uncertainty. The interviews were structured by evaluating the consultations and test-ordering performance of that day. RESULTS: Dutch GPs vary considerably in their motives for ordering tests. Numerous motives emerged from the data. Some examples of important themes include: personal routines; tolerance of diagnostic uncertainty; time pressure; and tactical motives for test ordering. Complying with the perceived needs of the patient for reassurance through testing is seen as an easy, cost- and time-effective strategy. A clear hierarchy in the determinants was not found. CONCLUSION: The decision to request laboratory testing is the result of a complex interaction of considerations that are often conflicting. Designers of interventions meant to improve the ordering of tests should be aware of the numerous determinants, and take contextual variables into account. PMID:12528582

  1. Bayesian analysis of longitudinal Johne's disease diagnostic data without a gold standard test.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Turnbull, B W; Nielsen, S S; Gröhn, Y T

    2011-05-01

    A Bayesian methodology was developed based on a latent change-point model to evaluate the performance of milk ELISA and fecal culture tests for longitudinal Johne's disease diagnostic data. The situation of no perfect reference test was considered; that is, no "gold standard." A change-point process with a Weibull survival hazard function was used to model the progression of the hidden disease status. The model adjusted for the fixed effects of covariate variables and random effects of subject on the diagnostic testing procedure. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to compute the posterior estimates of the model parameters that provide the basis for inference concerning the accuracy of the diagnostic procedure. Based on the Bayesian approach, the posterior probability distribution of the change-point onset time can be obtained and used as a criterion for infection diagnosis. An application is presented to an analysis of ELISA and fecal culture test outcomes in the diagnostic testing of paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) for a Danish longitudinal study from January 2000 to March 2003. The posterior probability criterion based on the Bayesian model with 4 repeated observations has an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.984, and is superior to the raw ELISA (AUC=0.911) and fecal culture (sensitivity=0.358, specificity=0.980) tests for Johne's disease diagnosis. PMID:21524521

  2. Special Educator's Complete Guide to 109 Diagnostic Tests: How To Select & Interpret Tests, Use Results in IEPs, and Remediate Specific Difficulties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierangelo, Roger; Giuliani, George

    This manual is a guide to the special education diagnostic process and covers the various stages of evaluation, interpretation, diagnosis, prescription, and remediation. Test information includes: explanations of the most commonly used diagnostic tests, coverage of the areas measured by each test, interpretation of test patterns for commonly used…

  3. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R; Crone, Wendy C; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  4. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) caused by multiple myeloma: the diagnostic value of the Naprosyn test.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Bouyarden, Michael; Hamid, Naveed S

    2006-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains a difficult diagnostic problem. The causes of FUO have changed over the years. Neoplastic disorders have now displaced infectious diseases as the most common cause of FUOs. Most neoplasms are associated with no or low-grade temperatures, with some important exceptions. Hypernephromas and lymphomas are neoplasms typically associated with high spiking fevers or may present as FUOs. Hematologic malignancies, that is, the acute and chronic leukemias, myeloproliferative disorders, and multiple myeloma, do not usually present with acute fevers or as FUOs. We present an elderly male patient who presented with an FUO, whose history is significant for multiple myeloma in remission. Differential diagnostic possibilities in this patient included plasma cell leukemia, relapse of multiple myeloma, secondary/superimposed malignancy, or opportunistic infection. The main differential diagnosis for his FUO was between neoplastic and infectious disorders. As part of the diagnostic workup, a Naprosyn test (naproxen 375 mg [by mouth] every 12 hours for 3 days) was used to differentiate neoplastic from infectious causes of FUO in this patient. The Naprosyn test was positive, which indicated a neoplastic explanation for the patient's FUO and eliminated, along with the infectious disease workup, an infectious explanation for his FUO. The patient's FUO was finally determined to be the result of a relapse of multiple myeloma and not of a secondary malignancy or malignant transformation of myeloma into plasma cell leukemia. We conclude the Naprosyn test remains a valuable diagnostic test to use to narrow differential diagnostic possibilities in patients with FUOs when a malignancy is a diagnostic consideration. PMID:16963369

  5. Evaluation of three rapid diagnostic tests for the detection of human infections with Plasmodium knowlesi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasmodium knowlesi, a malaria parasite of Southeast Asian macaques, infects humans and can cause fatal malaria. It is difficult to diagnose by microscopy because of morphological similarity to Plasmodium malariae. Nested PCR assay is the most accurate method to distinguish P. knowlesi from other Plasmodium species but is not cost effective in resource-poor settings. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are recommended for settings where malaria is prevalent. In this study, the effectiveness of three RDTs in detecting P. knowlesi from fresh and frozen patient blood samples was evaluated. Methods Forty malaria patients (28 P. knowlesi, ten P. vivax and two P. falciparum) diagnosed by microscopy were recruited in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo during a 16-month period. Patient blood samples were used to determine parasitaemia by microscopy, confirm the Plasmodium species present by PCR and evaluate three RDTs: OptiMAL-IT, BinaxNOW® Malaria and Paramax-3. The RDTs were also evaluated using frozen blood samples from 41 knowlesi malaria patients. Results OptiMAL-IT was the most sensitive RDT, with a sensitivity of 71% (20/28; 95% CI = 54-88%) for fresh and 73% (30/41; 95% CI = 59-87%) for frozen knowlesi samples. However, it yielded predominantly falciparum-positive results due to cross-reactivity of the P. falciparum test reagent with P. knowlesi. BinaxNOW® Malaria correctly detected non-P. falciparum malaria in P. knowlesi samples but was the least sensitive, detecting only 29% (8/28; 95% CI = 12-46%) of fresh and 24% (10/41; 95% CI = 11-37%) of frozen samples. The Paramax-3 RDT tested positive for P. vivax with PCR-confirmed P. knowlesi samples with sensitivities of 40% (10/25; 95% CI = 21-59%) with fresh and 32% (13/41; 95% CI = 17-46%) with frozen samples. All RDTs correctly identified P. falciparum- and P. vivax-positive controls with parasitaemias above 2,000 parasites/μl blood. Conclusions The RDTs detected Plasmodium in P. knowlesi-infected blood samples with

  6. Development and preparation of lead-containing paint films and diagnostic test materials.

    PubMed

    Binstock, David; Gutknecht, William; Sorrell, Kristen; Haas, Curtis; Winstead, Wayne; McCombs, Michelle; Brown, Gordon; Salmons, Cynthia; Harper, Sharon L

    2012-05-01

    Lead in paint continues to be a threat to children's health in cities across the United States, which means there is an ongoing need for testing and analysis of paint. This ongoing analytical effort and especially development of new methods continue to drive the need for diagnostic testing materials that provide the analytical challenges of real-world paints. To this end, 31 different types of paint test materials were developed and prepared. Preparation of the materials included development of lead-containing paint films yielding an overall relative standard error for one individual test sample being less than 10%. The 31 diagnostic test materials prepared with these paint films included two lead pigments; lead concentrations from nominally 0 to 2.0 mg lead/cm(2) (0 to 5% lead by weight); overlayers of both "lead-free," oil-based and water-based paints; Al, Ba, and Mg as potential chemical interferents; red and black potential color interferents; and substrates of wood, metal, masonry, and plaster. These materials challenge each step in method development and evaluation, including paint sample collection and preparation, lead extraction, and measurement of solubilized lead. When the materials were used to test performance of a new lead-in-paint testing method based on extraction using a rotor/stator method and measurement using turbidimetry, the results agreed to within ±20% of the expected lead values for 30 out of 31 of the diagnostic test materials, thereby demonstrating their levels of quality and utility.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide detection based on reflection: from a poison test approach of ancient China to single-cell accurate localization.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hao; Ma, Zhuoran; Wang, Song; Gong, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2014-08-01

    With the inspiration of an ancient Chinese poison test approach, we report a rapid hydrogen sulfide detection strategy in specific areas of live cells using silver needles with good spatial resolution of 2 × 2 μm(2). Besides the accurate-localization ability, this reflection-based strategy also has attractive merits of convenience and robust response when free pretreatment and short detection time are concerned. The success of endogenous H2S level evaluation in cellular cytoplasm and nuclear of human A549 cells promises the application potential of our strategy in scientific research and medical diagnosis.

  8. Assessing the impact of next-generation rapid diagnostic tests on Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination strategies.

    PubMed

    Slater, Hannah C; Ross, Amanda; Ouédraogo, André Lin; White, Lisa J; Nguon, Chea; Walker, Patrick G T; Ngor, Pengby; Aguas, Ricardo; Silal, Sheetal P; Dondorp, Arjen M; La Barre, Paul; Burton, Robert; Sauerwein, Robert W; Drakeley, Chris; Smith, Thomas A; Bousema, Teun; Ghani, Azra C

    2015-12-01

    Mass-screen-and-treat and targeted mass-drug-administration strategies are being considered as a means to interrupt transmission of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the effectiveness of such strategies will depend on the extent to which current and future diagnostics are able to detect those individuals who are infectious to mosquitoes. We estimate the relationship between parasite density and onward infectivity using sensitive quantitative parasite diagnostics and mosquito feeding assays from Burkina Faso. We find that a diagnostic with a lower detection limit of 200 parasites per microlitre would detect 55% of the infectious reservoir (the combined infectivity to mosquitoes of the whole population weighted by how often each individual is bitten) whereas a test with a limit of 20 parasites per microlitre would detect 83% and 2 parasites per microlitre would detect 95% of the infectious reservoir. Using mathematical models, we show that increasing the diagnostic sensitivity from 200 parasites per microlitre (equivalent to microscopy or current rapid diagnostic tests) to 2 parasites per microlitre would increase the number of regions where transmission could be interrupted with a mass-screen-and-treat programme from an entomological inoculation rate below 1 to one of up to 4. The higher sensitivity diagnostic could reduce the number of treatment rounds required to interrupt transmission in areas of lower prevalence. We predict that mass-screen-and-treat with a highly sensitive diagnostic is less effective than mass drug administration owing to the prophylactic protection provided to uninfected individuals by the latter approach. In low-transmission settings such as those in Southeast Asia, we find that a diagnostic tool with a sensitivity of 20 parasites per microlitre may be sufficient for targeted mass drug administration because this diagnostic is predicted to identify a similar village population prevalence compared with that currently detected using

  9. 75 FR 15443 - Advancing the Development of Diagnostic Tests and Biomarkers for Tuberculosis; Public Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... for Tuberculosis; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... of Diagnostic Tests and Biomarkers for Tuberculosis (TB).'' The purpose of the workshop is to provide... Medicine, Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States, Committee on...

  10. A Mixed Model Approach to Meta-Analysis of Diagnostic Studies with Binary Test Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doebler, Philipp; Holling, Heinz; Bohning, Dankmar

    2012-01-01

    We propose 2 related models for the meta-analysis of diagnostic tests. Both models are based on the bivariate normal distribution for transformed sensitivities and false-positive rates. Instead of using the logit as a transformation for these proportions, we employ the "t"[subscript alpha] family of transformations that contains the log, logit,…

  11. Comparison of the Minnesota Percepto-Diagnostic Test and Bender-Gestalt: Relationship with Achievement Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Gerald B.; Wallbrown, Fred H.

    1983-01-01

    Compared the Bender Gestalt (BD) and Minnesota Percepto-Diagnostic Test (MPD) in predicting academic achievement for younger children (N=69). Results suggested that the MPD is more sensitive than the Bender in identifying visual-motor perception areas of achievement performance problems. (LLL)

  12. Restrictive Stochastic Item Selection Methods in Cognitive Diagnostic Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Huebner, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes two new item selection methods for cognitive diagnostic computerized adaptive testing: the restrictive progressive method and the restrictive threshold method. They are built upon the posterior weighted Kullback-Leibler (KL) information index but include additional stochastic components either in the item selection index or in…

  13. A Needs-Based Approach to the Development of a Diagnostic College English Speaking Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Zhongbao

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated the current situation of oral English teaching, learning, and assessment at the tertiary level in China through needs analysis and explored the implications for the development of a diagnostic speaking test. Through random sampling, the researcher administered both a student questionnaire and a teacher questionnaire to over…

  14. The Literacy Skills of Secondary Teaching Undergraduates: Results of Diagnostic Testing and a Discussion of Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of secondary school teachers to support general literacy and to teach discipline-specific literacy skills depends upon their personal literacy competence. Diagnostic testing of 203 secondary teaching undergraduates at one Australian university revealed deficiencies in personal literacy competence that could affect their future…

  15. 30 CFR 250.523 - When do I have to repeat casing diagnostic testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., immediately. (b) your well, previously on gas lift, has been shut-in or returned to flowing status without gas lift for more than 180 days, immediately on the production casing (A annulus). The production casing (A annulus) of wells on active gas lift are exempt from diagnostic testing. (c) your casing pressure...

  16. 30 CFR 250.522 - When do I have to repeat casing diagnostic testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... term has expired, immediately. (b) your well, previously on gas lift, has been shut-in or returned to flowing status without gas lift for more than 180 days, immediately on the production casing (A annulus). The production casing (A annulus) of wells on active gas lift are exempt from diagnostic testing....

  17. Mathematics Diagnostic Testing in Engineering: An International Comparison between Ireland and Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, M.; Fidalgo, C.; Bigotte de Almeida, M. E.; Branco, J. R.; Santos, V.; Murphy, E.; Ní Fhloinn, E.

    2015-01-01

    Concern has been expressed throughout Europe about the significant deficiencies in the basic mathematical skills of many engineering undergraduates. Mathematics diagnostic tests in the UK, Ireland and Portugal have shown these shortcomings, which provide a challenge to those striving to introduce more innovative educational practices into…

  18. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  19. Medicare Program; Medicare Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Payment System. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-23

    This final rule implements requirements of section 216 of the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (PAMA), which significantly revises the Medicare payment system for clinical diagnostic laboratory tests. This final rule also announces an implementation date of January 1, 2018 for the private payor rate-based fee schedule required by PAMA. PMID:27373013

  20. Diagnostic testing and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, J; Subbarao, G; Croffie, J

    2012-12-01

    The diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has evolved from reliance on history and fluoroscopy to continuous esophageal pH monitoring with catheter-based pH probes and wireless pH probes to continuous impedance/pH monitoring. This review describes the currently employed diagnostic tests and the actual management of GERD in children.

  1. 77 FR 71170 - Notice of Public Roundtable on Genetic Diagnostic Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Hearings on Genetic Diagnostic Testing, 77 FR 3748 (Jan. 25, 2012). The Office also provided the public... will be held on Thursday, January 10, 2013, beginning at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) and ending at 4:00 p.m. (EST) in Alexandria, Virginia. Those wishing to share commentary at the...

  2. Comparing Eighth-Grade Diagnostic Test Results for Korean, Czech, and American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Um, Eunkyoung; Dogan, Enis; Im, Seongah; Tatsuoka, Kimumi; Corter, James E.

    Diagnostic analyses were conducted on data from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study second population (TIMSS-R; 1999) from the United States, Korea, and the Czech Republic in terms of test item attributes (i.e., content, processing skills, and item format) and inferred students' knowledge. The Rule Space model (K. Tatsuoka, 1998)…

  3. The Changing Landscape of Molecular Diagnostic Testing: Implications for Academic Medical Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Heidi L.; Hynes, Elizabeth; Funke, Birgit H.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the field of molecular diagnostics has undergone tremendous transformation, catalyzed by the clinical implementation of next generation sequencing (NGS). As technical capabilities are enhanced and current limitations are addressed, NGS is increasingly capable of detecting most variant types and will therefore continue to consolidate and simplify diagnostic testing. It is likely that genome sequencing will eventually serve as a universal first line test for disorders with a suspected genetic origin. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs), which have been at the forefront of this paradigm shift are now presented with challenges to keep up with increasing technical, bioinformatic and interpretive complexity of NGS-based tests in a highly competitive market. Additional complexity may arise from altered regulatory oversight, also triggered by the unprecedented scope of NGS-based testing, which requires new approaches. However, these challenges are balanced by unique opportunities, particularly at the interface between clinical and research operations, where AMCs can capitalize on access to cutting edge research environments and establish collaborations to facilitate rapid diagnostic innovation. This article reviews present and future challenges and opportunities for AMC associated molecular diagnostic laboratories from the perspective of the Partners HealthCare Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM). PMID:26828522

  4. Web-Based Two-Tier Diagnostic Test and Remedial Learning Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ah-Fur; Chen, Deng-Jyi

    2010-01-01

    Offering a series of diagnosis and individual remedial learning activities for a general class by means of web and multimedia technology can overcome the dilemma of conventional diagnosis and remedial instruction. The study proposes a three-layer conceptual framework and adopts a two-tier diagnostic test theory to develop a web-based two-tier…

  5. The Effects of Diagnostic Testing and Remediation on Science Achievement and Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Joe C.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to provide students with differing types of learning needs instruction following diagnostic testing; also examined were the effects of the instruction on science achievement and retention. A total of 154 seventh-grade students from six classes completed a five-week block of instruction in earth science composed of…

  6. Medicare Program; Medicare Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Payment System. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-23

    This final rule implements requirements of section 216 of the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (PAMA), which significantly revises the Medicare payment system for clinical diagnostic laboratory tests. This final rule also announces an implementation date of January 1, 2018 for the private payor rate-based fee schedule required by PAMA.

  7. An Examination of the Diagnostic Claims of the Revised Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Robert J.; Ames, Wilbur S.

    1978-01-01

    To analyze differential diagnostic efficiency of the Revised Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (a measure designed to assess strengths and weaknesses of learning disabled children), the Kelley procedure for estimating the proportion of differences in excess of chance was applied to the standardization data. (SBH)

  8. Development and Preparation of Lead-Containing Paint Films and Diagnostic Test Materials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead in paint continues to be a threat to children’s health in cities across the United States, which means there is an ongoing need for testing and analysis of paint. This ongoing analytical effort and especially development of new methods continue to drive the need for diagnost...

  9. Diagnostic Classification Models and Multidimensional Adaptive Testing: A Commentary on Rupp and Templin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Andreas; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2009-01-01

    On a general level, the objective of diagnostic classifications models (DCMs) lies in a classification of individuals regarding multiple latent skills. In this article, the authors show that this objective can be achieved by multidimensional adaptive testing (MAT) as well. The authors discuss whether or not the restricted applicability of DCMs can…

  10. Effects of a Web-Based Decision Aid Regarding Diagnostic Self-Testing. A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ickenroth, Martine H. P.; Grispen, J. E. J.; de Vries, N. K.; Dinant, G. J.; Ronda, G.; van der Weijden, T.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are many diagnostic self-tests on body materials available to consumers. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an online decision aid on diagnostic self-testing for cholesterol and diabetes on knowledge among consumers with an intention to take these tests. A randomized controlled trial was designed. A total of 1259…

  11. Scratching Where They Itch: Evaluation of Feedback on a Diagnostic English Grammar Test for Taiwanese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Muchun; Sims, James; Cothran, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Feedback to the test taker is a defining characteristic of diagnostic language testing (Alderson, 2005). This article reports on a study that investigated how much and in what ways students at a Taiwan university perceived the feedback to be useful on an online multiple-choice diagnostic English grammar test, both in general and by students of…

  12. An International Comparison Using a Diagnostic Testing Model: Turkish Students' Profile of Mathematical Skills on TIMSS-R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Enis; Tatsuoka, Kikumi

    2008-01-01

    This study illustrates how a diagnostic testing model can be used to make detailed comparisons between student populations participating in international assessments. The performance of Turkish students on the TIMSS-R mathematics test was reanalyzed with a diagnostic testing model called the Rule Space Model. First, mathematical and cognitive…

  13. Methods and recommendations for evaluating and reporting a new diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Hess, A S; Shardell, M; Johnson, J K; Thom, K A; Strassle, P; Netzer, G; Harris, A D

    2012-09-01

    No standardized guidelines exist for the biostatistical methods appropriate for studies evaluating diagnostic tests. Publication recommendations such as the STARD statement provide guidance for the analysis of data, but biostatistical advice is minimal and application is inconsistent. This article aims to provide a self-contained, accessible resource on the biostatistical aspects of study design and reporting for investigators. For all dichotomous diagnostic tests, estimates of sensitivity and specificity should be reported with confidence intervals. Power calculations are strongly recommended to ensure that investigators achieve desired levels of precision. In the absence of a gold standard reference test, the composite reference standard method is recommended for improving estimates of the sensitivity and specificity of the test under evaluation.

  14. Methods and recommendations for evaluating and reporting a new diagnostic test

    PubMed Central

    Shardell, M.; Johnson, J. K.; Thom, K. A.; Strassle, P.; Netzer, G.; Harris, A. D.

    2013-01-01

    No standardized guidelines exist for the biostatistical methods appropriate for studies evaluating diagnostic tests. Publication recommendations such as the STARD statement provide guidance for the analysis of data, but biostatistical advice is minimal and application is inconsistent. This article aims to provide a self-contained, accessible resource on the biostatistical aspects of study design and reporting for investigators. For all dichotomous diagnostic tests, estimates of sensitivity and specificity should be reported with confidence intervals. Power calculations are strongly recommended to ensure that investigators achieve desired levels of precision. In the absence of a gold standard reference test, the composite reference standard method is recommended for improving estimates of the sensitivity and specificity of the test under evaluation. PMID:22476385

  15. Evaluating Operational Specifications of Point-of-Care Diagnostic Tests: A Standardized Scorecard

    PubMed Central

    Lehe, Jonathan D.; Sitoe, Nádia E.; Tobaiwa, Ocean; Loquiha, Osvaldo; Quevedo, Jorge I.; Peter, Trevor F.; Jani, Ilesh V.

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of HIV antiretroviral therapy into decentralized rural settings will increasingly require simple point-of-care (POC) diagnostic tests that can be used without laboratory infrastructure and technical skills. New POC test devices are becoming available but decisions around which technologies to deploy may be biased without systematic assessment of their suitability for decentralized healthcare settings. To address this, we developed a standardized, quantitative scorecard tool to objectively evaluate the operational characteristics of POC diagnostic devices. The tool scores devices on a scale of 1–5 across 30 weighted characteristics such as ease of use, quality control, electrical requirements, shelf life, portability, cost and service, and provides a cumulative score that ranks products against a set of ideal POC characteristics. The scorecard was tested on 19 devices for POC CD4 T-lymphocyte cell counting, clinical chemistry or hematology testing. Single and multi-parameter devices were assessed in each of test categories. The scores across all devices ranged from 2.78 to 4.40 out of 5. The tool effectively ranked devices within each category (p<0.01) except the CD4 and multi-parameter hematology products. The tool also enabled comparison of different characteristics between products. Agreement across the four scorers for each product was high (intra-class correlation >0.80; p<0.001). Use of this tool enables the systematic evaluation of diagnostic tests to facilitate product selection and investment in appropriate technology. It is particularly relevant for countries and testing programs considering the adoption of new POC diagnostic tests. PMID:23118871

  16. A weighted generalized score statistic for comparison of predictive values of diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Kosinski, Andrzej S

    2013-03-15

    Positive and negative predictive values are important measures of a medical diagnostic test performance. We consider testing equality of two positive or two negative predictive values within a paired design in which all patients receive two diagnostic tests. The existing statistical tests for testing equality of predictive values are either Wald tests based on the multinomial distribution or the empirical Wald and generalized score tests within the generalized estimating equations (GEE) framework. As presented in the literature, these test statistics have considerably complex formulas without clear intuitive insight. We propose their re-formulations that are mathematically equivalent but algebraically simple and intuitive. As is clearly seen with a new re-formulation we presented, the generalized score statistic does not always reduce to the commonly used score statistic in the independent samples case. To alleviate this, we introduce a weighted generalized score (WGS) test statistic that incorporates empirical covariance matrix with newly proposed weights. This statistic is simple to compute, always reduces to the score statistic in the independent samples situation, and preserves type I error better than the other statistics as demonstrated by simulations. Thus, we believe that the proposed WGS statistic is the preferred statistic for testing equality of two predictive values and for corresponding sample size computations. The new formulas of the Wald statistics may be useful for easy computation of confidence intervals for difference of predictive values. The introduced concepts have potential to lead to development of the WGS test statistic in a general GEE setting.

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of Obstructive Airway Adult Test for Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Vicini, Claudio; De Benedetto, Michele; Salamanca, Fabrizio; Sorrenti, Giovanni; Romandini, Mario; Bosi, Marcello; Saponaro, Gianmarco; Foresta, Enrico; Laforì, Andreina; Meccariello, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Alessandro; Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Campanini, Aldo; Montevecchi, Filippo; Rizzotto, Grazia; Cervelli, Daniele; Moro, Alessandro; Arigliani, Michele; Gobbi, Riccardo; Pelo, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. The gold standard for the diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is polysomnography, whose access is however reduced by costs and limited availability, so that additional diagnostic tests are needed. Objectives. To analyze the diagnostic accuracy of the Obstructive Airway Adult Test (OAAT) compared to polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA in adult patients. Methods. Ninety patients affected by OSA verified with polysomnography (AHI ≥ 5) and ten healthy patients, randomly selected, were included and all were interviewed by one blind examiner with OAAT questions. Measurements and Main Results. The Spearman rho, evaluated to measure the correlation between OAAT and polysomnography, was 0.72 (p < 0.01). The area under the ROC curve (95% CI) was the parameter to evaluate the accuracy of the OAAT: it was 0.91 (0.81–1.00) for the diagnosis of OSA (AHI ≥ 5), 0.90 (0.82–0.98) for moderate OSA (AHI ≥ 15), and 0.84 (0.76–0.92) for severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30). Conclusions. The OAAT has shown a high correlation with polysomnography and also a high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of OSA. It has also been shown to be able to discriminate among the different degrees of severity of OSA. Additional large studies aiming to validate this questionnaire as a screening or diagnostic test are needed. PMID:26636102

  18. The Status of Spectral EEG Abnormality as a Diagnostic Test for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Boutros, Nash N.; Arfken, Cynthia; Galderisi, Silvana; Warrick, Joshua; Pratt, Garrett; Iacono, William

    2008-01-01

    Objective A literature review was conducted to ascertain whether or not EEG spectral abnormalities are consistent enough to warrant additional effort towards developing them into a clinical diagnostic test for schizophrenia. Methods Fifty three papers met criteria for inclusion into the review and 15 were included in a meta-analysis of the degree of significance of EEG deviations as compared to healthy controls. Studies were classified based on a 4-step approach based on guidelines for evaluating the clinical usefulness of a diagnostic test. Results Our review and meta-analysis revealed that most of the abnormalities are replicated in the expected directions with the most consistent results related to the increased preponderance of slow rhythms in schizophrenia patients. This effect remained consistent in un-medicated patients. Only a small number of studies provided data on the sensitivity and specificity of the findings in differentiating among the psychiatric disorders that frequently appear on the same differential diagnostic list as schizophrenia (step 3 studies). No multicenter studies using standardized assessment criteria were found (step 4 studies). Conclusions Additional Step 3 and Step 4 studies are needed to draw conclusions on the usefulness of EEG spectral abnormalities as a diagnostic test for schizophrenia PMID:18160260

  19. Assessment of a multi-assay biological diagnostic test for mood disorders in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Hidenaga; Ishima, Tamaki; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Kudo, Noriko; Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Kenji; Takeda, Masatoshi; Hashimoto, Ryota

    2016-01-26

    The current diagnostic tests for mood disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD), have limitations. Inflammatory markers, growth factors, and oxidative stress markers are involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. A multi-assay biological diagnostic test combining these biomarkers might improve diagnostic efficiency. The plasma levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR2), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and myeloperoxidase were measured in 40 MDD patients, 40 BD patients and 40 controls in a Japanese population. We also investigated the plasma levels of these markers in 40 patients with schizophrenia to determine the utility of these markers in differential diagnosis. The plasma levels of sTNFR2 were significantly higher in BD and schizophrenia patients than in controls. The plasma levels of EGF and myeloperoxidase were significantly higher in patients with BD than in controls. The correct classification rate obtained from discriminant analysis with sTNFR2 and EGF between controls and mood disorders was 69.2%, with a sensitivity and specificity of 62.5% and 82.5%, respectively. The correct classification rate obtained from discriminant analysis with sTNFR2 and EGF between controls and BD was 85.0%, with a sensitivity and specificity of 77.6% and 92.5%, respectively. Our results suggest that sTNFR2 and EGF could be biological markers of BD. Further studies are needed to determine the utility of these markers in diagnostic tests for mood disorders. PMID:26687272

  20. The development of a post-test diagnostic system for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, June F.

    1991-01-01

    An effort was undertaken by NASA to develop an automated post-test, post-flight diagnostic system for rocket engines. The automated system is designed to be generic and to automate the rocket engine data review process. A modular, distributed architecture with a generic software core was chosen to meet the design requirements. The diagnostic system is initially being applied to the Space Shuttle Main Engine data review process. The system modules currently under development are the session/message manager, and portions of the applications section, the component analysis section, and the intelligent knowledge server. An overview is presented of a rocket engine data review process, the design requirements and guidelines, the architecture and modules, and the projected benefits of the automated diagnostic system.

  1. [Practical evaluation of rapid diagnostic tests for mycobacteriosis and virus infection].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hisako

    2002-01-01

    Because cultures of mycobacteria and viruses take a great number of days, the results are delayed in these clinical laboratory tests. For this reason, rapid diagnostic tests without these cultures are required. Among the laboratory tests of mycobacteria, acid-fast stain as a rapid diagnostic test is the first to give significant information to laboratory staffs and physicians. There are mainly two procedures, directly smearing clinical specimens and smearing concentrated specimens treated with NALC-NaOH on slide glass. The former is performed for specimens from emergency patients. When a patient is suspected of tuberculosis, a DNA-amplification test such as COBAS AMPLICOR TEST (PCR test) is performed for directly detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical specimens, regardless of whether the specimens show positive or negative by acid-fast stain. Sixty-one of 1,023 specimens tested in Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital in February 2000-May 2002 were found positive by both PCR and culture tests. Fourteen were found negative by PCR test and positive by culture test. Five were found positive by PCR test and negative by culture test. Alternatively, MTB-64 (Capilia TB) is a kit for rapidly identifying M. tuberculosis using colonies. The time necessary for completion of the test was approximately 15 minutes per sample. In our study, the identification test showed weak-positive for 2 strains of M. marinum (ATCC927 and one clinical isolate), compared with positive for 28 clinical isolates and strain H37Ra of M. tuberculosis. Recently, rapid diagnostic kits for detecting various pathogenic viruses have been developed. The kits for detecting influenza virus are in especially great demand with the spread of newly-developed antiviral agents. There was an epidemic of the type A virus in the winters 2001-2002. 101 (32%) of 316 clinical specimens tested in the hospital were found positive with InfluA. B-Quick [SEIKEN] (Denka) or Directigen Flu A (Becton Dickinson). These

  2. Test and analytical results of a new bolt configuration for a diagnostic/device canister connection

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, L.

    1981-09-01

    Underground nuclear explosive tests utilize a nuclear device canister suspended from a canister containing diagnostic equipment. A standard design for these canisters and their connection is being developed by the Nuclear Test Engineering Divisions, Test Systems Section of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Test and analysis of a new bolt configuration for a portion of this bolted canister connection have been carried out and results are presented and compared for channel loads of 100,000 and 200,000 lb. When results for this connection design are compared with an earlier one, significant reductions are found in bolt loads, end plate separations, and certain stresses and moments.

  3. Diagnostic Role of Captopril Challenge Test in Korean Subjects with High Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hee; Park, Kyeong Seon; Hong, A Ram; Shin, Chan Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of primary aldosteronism (PA) begins with aldosterone-to-renin ratio (ARR) measurement followed by confirmative tests. However, the ARR has high false positive rates which led to unnecessary confirmatory tests. Captopril challenge test (CCT) has been used as one of confirmatory tests, but the accuracy of it in the diagnosis of PA is still controversial. We aimed to examine the clinical efficacy of CCT as a post-screening test in PA. Methods In a prospective study, we enrolled subjects with suspected PA who had hypertension and ARR >20 (ng/dL)/(ng/mL/hr). Sixty-four patients who underwent both the saline infusion test and the CCT were included. Results The diagnostic performance of plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) post-CCT was greater than that of ARR post-CCT and ARR pre-CCT in PA (area under the curve=0.956, 0.797, and 0.748, respectively; P=0.001). A cut-off value of 13 ng/dL showed the highest diagnostic odds ratio considering PAC post-CCT at 60 and 90 minutes. A PAC post-CCT of 19 ng/dL had a specificity of 100%, which can be used as a cut-off value for the confirmative test. Determining the diagnostic performance of PAC post-CCT at 90 minutes was sufficient for PA diagnosis. Subjects with PAC post-CCT at 90 minutes <13 ng/dL are less likely to have PA, and those with PAC post-CCT at 90 minutes ≥13 but <19 ng/dL should undergo secondary confirmatory tests. Conclusion The CCT test may be a reliable post-screening test to avoid the hospitalization in the setting of falsely elevated ARR screening tests. PMID:27184013

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of a urine lipoarabinomannan test for tuberculosis in hospitalized patients in a high HIV prevalence setting

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Variava, Ebrahim; Holmes, Charles B; Coppin, Alison; Golub, Jonathan E.; McCallum, Jeremy; Wong, Michelle; Luke, Binu; Martin, Desmond J.; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.; Martinson, Neil A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Effective tuberculosis (TB) control in HIV-prevalent settings is hindered by absence of accurate, rapid TB diagnostic tests. We evaluated the accuracy of a urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) test for TB diagnosis in South Africa. Methods Hospitalized adults with signs and/or symptoms of active TB were enrolled. Sputum smear microscopy and mycobacterial culture, mycobacterial blood culture, and HIV testing were performed. A spot urine specimen was tested for LAM. Results 499 participants were enrolled; 422 (84.6%) were HIV-infected. In microbiologically-confirmed TB patients, the LAM test was positive in 114/193 (sensitivity 59%, [95% CI 52, 66]), including 112/167 (67% [59, 74]) who were HIV-infected. Among individuals classified as “not TB”, the LAM test was negative in 117/122 (specificity 96% [91, 99]), including 83/88 (94% [87, 98]) who were HIV-infected. In confirmed TB patients, the LAM test was more sensitive than sputum smear microscopy (42%, 82/193, p<0.001) and detected 56% (62/111) of those who were sputum smear-negative. HIV-infection (AOR 13.4), mycobacteremia (AOR 3.21), and positive sputum smear (AOR 2.42) were risk factors for a positive LAM test. Conclusions The urine LAM test detected a subset of HIV-infected patients with severe TB in whom sputum smear microscopy had suboptimal sensitivity. The combination of urine LAM testing and sputum smear microscopy is attractive for use in settings with high HIV burden. PMID:19692904

  5. Fibre Diffraction Analysis of Skin Offers a Very Early and Extremely Accurate Diagnostic Test for Prostate Cancer

    DOE PAGES

    James, Veronica J.; O’Malley Ford, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Double blind analysis of a batch of thirty skin tissue samples from potential prostate cancer sufferers correctly identified all “control” patients, patients with high and low grade prostate cancers, the presence of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), perineural invasions, and the one lymphatic invasion. Identification was by analysis of fibre diffraction patterns interpreted using a schema developed from observations in nine previous studies. The method, schema, and specific experiment results are reported in this paper, with some implications then drawn.

  6. Robust diagnostic genetic testing using solution capture enrichment and a novel variant-filtering interface.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Morgan, Joanne E; Harrison, Sally M; Diggle, Christine P; Adlard, Julian; Lindsay, Helen A; Camm, Nick; Charlton, Ruth; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bonthron, David T; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M

    2014-04-01

    Targeted hybridization enrichment prior to next-generation sequencing is a widespread method for characterizing sequence variation in a research setting, and is being adopted by diagnostic laboratories. However, the number of variants identified can overwhelm clinical laboratories with strict time constraints, the final interpretation of likely pathogenicity being a particular bottleneck. To address this, we have developed an approach in which, after automatic variant calling on a standard unix pipeline, subsequent variant filtering is performed interactively, using AgileExomeFilter and AgilePindelFilter (http://dna.leeds.ac.uk/agile), tools designed for clinical scientists with standard desktop computers. To demonstrate the method's diagnostic efficacy, we tested 128 patients using (1) a targeted capture of 36 cancer-predisposing genes or (2) whole-exome capture for diagnosis of the genetically heterogeneous disorder primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In the cancer cohort, complete concordance with previous diagnostic data was achieved across 793 variant genotypes. A high yield (42%) was also achieved for exome-based PCD diagnosis, underscoring the scalability of our method. Simple adjustments to the variant filtering parameters further allowed the identification of a homozygous truncating mutation in a presumptive new PCD gene, DNAH8. These tools should allow diagnostic laboratories to expand their testing portfolios flexibly, using a standard set of reagents and techniques.

  7. High Diagnostic Accuracy of Nitrite Test Paired with Urine Sediment can Reduce Unnecessary Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, Sven A.; E. Holm, Stig; Ferry, B. Magnus; Monsen, Tor J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections dominated by lower UTI in women (LUTIW). Symptoms only are insufficient for diagnosis and accordingly, near patient diagnostic tests confidently confirming significant bacteriuria are desirable. The nitrite test (NIT) has low sensitivity, while bacterial and leukocyte counts disjunctively paired in urine sediment microscopy (SED) have high sensitivity. Similar symptomatic cure rates are found post antibiotic vs. placebo therapy in patients with negative cultures. Consequently, prescription on symptoms only implies unnecessary antibiotic therapy. Aims: to evaluate the diagnostic outcomes of NIT, SED and NIT disjunctively paired with SED (NIT+SED) vs. urine culture, with special focus on bladder incubation time (BIT), and to assess if NIT+SED can reduce unnecessary antibiotic therapy. Methods: A diagnostic, primary care, multicentre study including 1070 women with symptoms suggestive of lower UTI. Results: Significant bacteriuria was found in 77%. The BIT highly influenced the diagnostic outcomes and the optimal duration was ≥4h with sensitivity of 66, 90 and 95% for NIT, SED and NIT+SED, respectively. SED performed only in NIT negative specimens could reduce unnecessary antibiotics by 10% vs. prescription on symptoms only. The number needed to test with SED to reduce one unnecessary antibiotic course was five patients at BIT ≥4h and six patients at ≤3h or overall. Conclusion: The BIT highly influences the diagnostic outcomes with the highest accuracy of NIT+SED. Diagnosis of LUTIW with NIT+SED can reduce unnecessary antibiotic therapy and subsequently decrease antimicrobial resistance. Trial registration: The Swedish Medical Product Agency 1995 03 01:151:01783/94. PMID:26668667

  8. An Overview of Models of Speaking Performance and Its Implications for the Development of Procedural Framework for Diagnostic Speaking Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Zhongbao

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at developing a procedural framework for the development and validation of diagnostic speaking tests. The researcher reviews the current available models of speaking performance, analyzes the distinctive features and then points out the implications for the development of a procedural framework for diagnostic speaking tests. On…

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of nitroglycerine as a 'test of treatment' for cardiac chest pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Grailey, Katherine; Glasziou, Paul P

    2012-03-01

    To determine the accuracy of using nitroglycerine as a 'test of treatment' in the diagnosis of cardiac chest pain we undertook a systematic review of studies of diagnostic accuracy. Databases searched included PubMed, Cochrane Database, Google Scholar, Science Citation Index, EMBASE and manual searching of bibliographies of known primary and review articles. Studies were included if sublingual nitroglycerine was the index test, its effect on the patient's pain score was recorded and the reference test was performed on at least 80% of patients. The data from the five papers were used to form 2×2 contingency tables. Five eligible studies were found, all in the acute setting (although one paper collected its data in the follow-up setting, all patients had acute presentations). The sensitivity ranged from 35% to 92% and the specificity from 12% to 63%. However, in all but one paper the Youden indices were close to zero suggesting that the response to nitroglycerine is not useful as a diagnostic test. The combined sensitivity was 0.52 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.56) and combined specificity was 0.49 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.52). The diagnostic OR from the combined studies was 1.2 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.5), which is not significantly different from 1. In the acute setting, nitroglycerine is not a reliable test of treatment for use in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. However, further studies are needed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of nitroglycerine for recurrent exertional chest pain.

  10. Practice Bulletin No. 162 Summary: Prenatal Diagnostic Testing for Genetic Disorders.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnostic testing is intended to determine, with as much certainty as possible, whether a specific genetic disorder or condition is present in the fetus. In contrast, prenatal genetic screening is designed to assess whether a patient is at increased risk of having a fetus affected by a genetic disorder. Originally, prenatal genetic testing focused primarily on Down syndrome (trisomy 21), but now it is able to detect a broad range of genetic disorders. Although it is necessary to perform amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) to definitively diagnose most genetic disorders, in some circumstances, fetal imaging with ultrasonography, echocardiography, or magnetic resonance imaging may be diagnostic of a particular structural fetal abnormality that is suggestive of an underlying genetic condition.The objective of prenatal genetic testing is to detect health problems that could affect the woman, fetus, or newborn and provide the patient and her obstetrician-gynecologist or other obstetric care provider with enough information to allow a fully informed decision about pregnancy management. Prenatal genetic testing cannot identify all abnormalities or problems in a fetus, and any testing should be focused on the individual patient's risks, reproductive goals, and preferences. It is important that patients understand the benefits and limitations of all prenatal screening and diagnostic testing, including the conditions for which tests are available and the conditions that will not be detected by testing. It also is important that patients realize that there is a broad range of clinical presentations, or phenotypes, for many genetic disorders and that results of genetic testing cannot predict all outcomes. Prenatal genetic testing has many benefits, including reassuring patients when results are normal, identifying disorders for which prenatal treatment may provide benefit, optimizing neonatal outcomes by ensuring the appropriate location for

  11. Diagnostic dose of synergized d-phenothrin for insecticide susceptibility testing by bottle bioassay.

    PubMed

    Petersen, John L; Floore, Thomas G; Brogdon, William G

    2004-06-01

    The diagnostic dose of d-phenothrin synergized 1:1 with piperonyl butoxide for testing insecticide susceptibility of mosquitoes by bottle bioassay is reported for 2 mosquito species, Culex quinquefasciatus and Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus. The diagnostic dose was defined as 2 times the 95% lethal concentration (LC95). LC50, LC90, and LC95 were estimated by probit analysis of dose response data. Procedures for diluting the commercial-grade off-the-shelf pesticide in acetone, treating the bottles, and calculating baseline data for insecticide-susceptible mosquito populations are described. The advantages and disadvantages of testing off-the-shelf commercial-grade pesticides that are maintained on premises by mosquito control programs, in contrast to using reagent-grade chemicals purchased from a chemical supply house, are also discussed. Data obtained by this method can be invaluable in making timely management decisions about the choice of pesticides in a control program.

  12. Data mining approach to the evaluation of diagnostic tests in Wilson disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plutecki, Michal M.; Dądalski, Maciej; Socha, Piotr; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to figure out a new, better than so-far-known, evaluation method of diagnostic tests in Wilson disease. In order to find the most interesting classification models various data mining techniques were applied to real, suffering from Wilson disease, set of patients. It occurred that a combination of two classification algorithms with its implementations in Weka environment may significantly increase classification ability.

  13. Impact of clinical awareness and diagnostic tests on the underdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, L; Reigadas, E; Marín, M; Martín, A; Catalán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    A multicenter study of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) performed during 2008 in Spain revealed that two of every three episodes went undiagnosed or were misdiagnosed owing to nonsensitive diagnostic tests or lack of clinical suspicion and request. Since then, efforts have been made to improve the diagnostic tests used by laboratories and to increase the awareness of this disease among both clinicians and microbiologists. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of these efforts by assessing the current magnitude of underdiagnosis of CDI in Spain using two point-prevalence studies performed on one day each in January and July of 2013. A total of 111 Spanish laboratories selected all unformed stool specimens received for microbiological diagnosis on these days, and toxigenic culture was performed at a central reference laboratory. Toxigenic isolates were characterized both pheno- and genotypically. The reference laboratory detected 103 episodes of CDI in patients aged 2 years or more. Half (50.5 %) of the episodes were not diagnosed in the participating laboratories, owing to insensitive diagnostic tests (15.5 %) or the lack of clinical suspicion and request (35.0 %). The main ribotypes were 014, 078/126, 001/072, and 106. Ribotype 027 caused 2.9 % of all cases. Despite all the interventions undertaken, CDI remains a highly neglected disease because of the lack of sensitive diagnostic tests in some institutions and, especially, the absence of clinical suspicion, mainly in patients with community-associated CDI. Toxigenic C. difficile should be routinely sought in unformed stools sent for microbiological diagnosis, regardless of their origin.

  14. Experimental comparison of three nondestructive testing diagnostics on pigments and ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardini-Guidoni, Anna; Vendittelli, M.; Flamini, Chiari; Fantoni, Roberta; Sciuti, S.; Mele, Aldo

    2000-02-01

    Three non destructive testing techniques x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence and fast luminescence imaging by an intensified charge coupled device have been applied to analyze a few most common painting materials, namely natural and synthetic pigments and resins. A comparison of the experimental results obtained shows the applicability of these three methods and to observe and study an entire oil painting by a mobile station for 'in situ' diagnostics for restoration and conservation.

  15. Sweat testing for cystic fibrosis. Diagnostic screening with a combination chloride ion-selective electrode.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, P T; Clark, G C; Moody, G J; Thomas, G; Thomas, J D

    1978-01-01

    Screening of sweat chloride in newborn infants with the Orion Skin Chloride Measuring System and incorporating some procedural innovations is described. The results indicate that while diagnostic screening for cystic fibrosis can be readily undertaken, the test with the chloride ion-selective electrode is best left at least to the second day of life or later because of insufficient sweating in very young babies. Measurements on 2 babies with cystic fibrosis are also discussed. PMID:686774

  16. Dual Processing Model for Medical Decision-Making: An Extension to Diagnostic Testing.

    PubMed

    Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Hozo, Iztok; Kumar, Ambuj; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Dual Processing Theories (DPT) assume that human cognition is governed by two distinct types of processes typically referred to as type 1 (intuitive) and type 2 (deliberative). Based on DPT we have derived a Dual Processing Model (DPM) to describe and explain therapeutic medical decision-making. The DPM model indicates that doctors decide to treat when treatment benefits outweigh its harms, which occurs when the probability of the disease is greater than the so called "threshold probability" at which treatment benefits are equal to treatment harms. Here we extend our work to include a wider class of decision problems that involve diagnostic testing. We illustrate applicability of the proposed model in a typical clinical scenario considering the management of a patient with prostate cancer. To that end, we calculate and compare two types of decision-thresholds: one that adheres to expected utility theory (EUT) and the second according to DPM. Our results showed that the decisions to administer a diagnostic test could be better explained using the DPM threshold. This is because such decisions depend on objective evidence of test/treatment benefits and harms as well as type 1 cognition of benefits and harms, which are not considered under EUT. Given that type 1 processes are unique to each decision-maker, this means that the DPM threshold will vary among different individuals. We also showed that when type 1 processes exclusively dominate decisions, ordering a diagnostic test does not affect a decision; the decision is based on the assessment of benefits and harms of treatment. These findings could explain variations in the treatment and diagnostic patterns documented in today's clinical practice.

  17. Dual Processing Model for Medical Decision-Making: An Extension to Diagnostic Testing.

    PubMed

    Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Hozo, Iztok; Kumar, Ambuj; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Dual Processing Theories (DPT) assume that human cognition is governed by two distinct types of processes typically referred to as type 1 (intuitive) and type 2 (deliberative). Based on DPT we have derived a Dual Processing Model (DPM) to describe and explain therapeutic medical decision-making. The DPM model indicates that doctors decide to treat when treatment benefits outweigh its harms, which occurs when the probability of the disease is greater than the so called "threshold probability" at which treatment benefits are equal to treatment harms. Here we extend our work to include a wider class of decision problems that involve diagnostic testing. We illustrate applicability of the proposed model in a typical clinical scenario considering the management of a patient with prostate cancer. To that end, we calculate and compare two types of decision-thresholds: one that adheres to expected utility theory (EUT) and the second according to DPM. Our results showed that the decisions to administer a diagnostic test could be better explained using the DPM threshold. This is because such decisions depend on objective evidence of test/treatment benefits and harms as well as type 1 cognition of benefits and harms, which are not considered under EUT. Given that type 1 processes are unique to each decision-maker, this means that the DPM threshold will vary among different individuals. We also showed that when type 1 processes exclusively dominate decisions, ordering a diagnostic test does not affect a decision; the decision is based on the assessment of benefits and harms of treatment. These findings could explain variations in the treatment and diagnostic patterns documented in today's clinical practice. PMID:26244571

  18. Impact of clinical awareness and diagnostic tests on the underdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, L; Reigadas, E; Marín, M; Martín, A; Catalán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    A multicenter study of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) performed during 2008 in Spain revealed that two of every three episodes went undiagnosed or were misdiagnosed owing to nonsensitive diagnostic tests or lack of clinical suspicion and request. Since then, efforts have been made to improve the diagnostic tests used by laboratories and to increase the awareness of this disease among both clinicians and microbiologists. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of these efforts by assessing the current magnitude of underdiagnosis of CDI in Spain using two point-prevalence studies performed on one day each in January and July of 2013. A total of 111 Spanish laboratories selected all unformed stool specimens received for microbiological diagnosis on these days, and toxigenic culture was performed at a central reference laboratory. Toxigenic isolates were characterized both pheno- and genotypically. The reference laboratory detected 103 episodes of CDI in patients aged 2 years or more. Half (50.5 %) of the episodes were not diagnosed in the participating laboratories, owing to insensitive diagnostic tests (15.5 %) or the lack of clinical suspicion and request (35.0 %). The main ribotypes were 014, 078/126, 001/072, and 106. Ribotype 027 caused 2.9 % of all cases. Despite all the interventions undertaken, CDI remains a highly neglected disease because of the lack of sensitive diagnostic tests in some institutions and, especially, the absence of clinical suspicion, mainly in patients with community-associated CDI. Toxigenic C. difficile should be routinely sought in unformed stools sent for microbiological diagnosis, regardless of their origin. PMID:25904126

  19. Bayesian evaluation of clinical diagnostic test characteristics of visual observations and remote monitoring to diagnose bovine respiratory disease in beef calves.

    PubMed

    White, Brad J; Goehl, Dan R; Amrine, David E; Booker, Calvin; Wildman, Brian; Perrett, Tye

    2016-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle is a critical facet of therapeutic programs through promotion of prompt treatment of diseased calves in concert with judicious use of antimicrobials. Despite the known inaccuracies, visual observation (VO) of clinical signs is the conventional diagnostic modality for BRD diagnosis. Objective methods of remotely monitoring cattle wellness could improve diagnostic accuracy; however, little information exists describing the accuracy of this method compared to traditional techniques. The objective of this research is to employ Bayesian methodology to elicit diagnostic characteristics of conventional VO compared to remote early disease identification (REDI) to diagnose BRD. Data from previous literature on the accuracy of VO were combined with trial data consisting of direct comparison between VO and REDI for BRD in two populations. No true gold standard diagnostic test exists for BRD; therefore, estimates of diagnostic characteristics of each test were generated using Bayesian latent class analysis. Results indicate a 90.0% probability that the sensitivity of REDI (median 81.3%; 95% probability interval [PI]: 55.5, 95.8) was higher than VO sensitivity (64.5%; PI: 57.9, 70.8). The specificity of REDI (median 92.9%; PI: 88.2, 96.9) was also higher compared to VO (median 69.1%; PI: 66.3, 71.8). The differences in sensitivity and specificity resulted in REDI exhibiting higher positive and negative predictive values in both high (41.3%) and low (2.6%) prevalence situations. This research illustrates the potential of remote cattle monitoring to augment conventional methods of BRD diagnosis resulting in more accurate identification of diseased cattle. PMID:26879058

  20. Planning for Plume Diagnostics for Ground Testing of J-2X Engines at the SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintCyr, William W.; Tejwani, Gopal D.; McVay, Gregory P.; Langford, Lester A.; SaintCyr, William W.

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is the premier test facility for liquid rocket engine development and certification for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Therefore, it is no surprise that the SSC will play the most prominent role in the engine development testing and certification for the J-2X engine. The Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne J-2X engine has been selected by the Constellation Program to power the Ares I Upper Stage Element and the Ares V Earth Departure Stage in NASA s strategy of risk mitigation for hardware development by building on the Apollo program and other lessons learned to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with first demonstration flight in 2010 and human test flights in 2012. Accordingly, J-2X engine design, development, test, and evaluation is to build upon heritage hardware and apply valuable experience gained from past development and testing efforts. In order to leverage SSC s successful and innovative expertise in the plume diagnostics for the space shuttle main engine (SSME) health monitoring,1-10 this paper will present a blueprint for plume diagnostics for various proposed ground testing activities for J-2X at SSC. Complete description of the SSC s test facilities, supporting infrastructure, and test facilities is available in Ref. 11. The A-1 Test Stand is currently being prepared for testing the J-2X engine at sea level conditions. The A-2 Test Stand is currently being used for testing the SSME and may also be used for testing the J-2X engine at sea level conditions in the future. Very recently, ground-breaking ceremony for the new A-3 rocket engine test stand took place at SSC on August 23, 2007. A-3 is the first large - scale test stand to be built at the SSC since the A and B stands were constructed in the 1960s. The A-3 Test Stand will be used for testing J-2X engines under vacuum conditions simulating high altitude operation at approximately 30,480 m (100,000 ft

  1. Personality Assessment in the Diagnostic Manuals: On Mindfulness, Multiple Methods, and Test Score Discontinuities.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Recent controversies have illuminated the strengths and limitations of different frameworks for conceptualizing personality pathology (e.g., trait perspectives, categorical models), and stimulated debate regarding how best to diagnose personality disorders (PDs) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.), and in other diagnostic systems (i.e., the International Classification of Diseases, the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual). In this article I argue that regardless of how PDs are conceptualized and which diagnostic system is employed, multimethod assessment must play a central role in PD diagnosis. By complementing self-reports with evidence from other domains (e.g., performance-based tests), a broader range of psychological processes are engaged in the patient, and the impact of self-perception and self-presentation biases can be better understood. By providing the assessor with evidence drawn from multiple modalities, some of which provide converging patterns and some of which yield divergent results, a multimethod assessment compels the assessor to engage this evidence more deeply. The mindful processing that ensues can help minimize the deleterious impact of naturally occurring information processing bias and distortion on the part of the clinician (e.g., heuristics, attribution errors), bringing greater clarity to the synthesis and integration of assessment data.

  2. Access and Quality of HIV-Related Point-of-Care Diagnostic Testing in Global Health Programs.

    PubMed

    Fonjungo, Peter N; Boeras, Debrah I; Zeh, Clement; Alexander, Heather; Parekh, Bharat S; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-02-01

    Access to point-of-care testing (POCT) improves patient care, especially in resource-limited settings where laboratory infrastructure is poor and the bulk of the population lives in rural settings. However, because of challenges in rolling out the technology and weak quality assurance measures, the promise of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related POCT in resource-limited settings has not been fully exploited to improve patient care and impact public health. Because of these challenges, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), in partnership with other organizations, recently launched the Diagnostics Access Initiative. Expanding HIV programs, including the "test and treat" strategies and the newly established UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets, will require increased access to reliable and accurate POCT results. In this review, we examine various components that could improve access and uptake of quality-assured POC tests to ensure coverage and public health impact. These components include evaluation, policy, regulation, and innovative approaches to strengthen the quality of POCT. PMID:26423384

  3. Impact of gene patents on diagnostic testing: a new patent landscaping method applied to spinocerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Berthels, Nele; Matthijs, Gert; Van Overwalle, Geertrui

    2011-01-01

    Recent reports in Europe and the United States raise concern about the potential negative impact of gene patents on the freedom to operate of diagnosticians and on the access of patients to genetic diagnostic services. Patents, historically seen as legal instruments to trigger innovation, could cause undesired side effects in the public health domain. Clear empirical evidence on the alleged hindering effect of gene patents is still scarce. We therefore developed a patent categorization method to determine which gene patents could indeed be problematic. The method is applied to patents relevant for genetic testing of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The SCA test is probably the most widely used DNA test in (adult) neurology, as well as one of the most challenging due to the heterogeneity of the disease. Typically tested as a gene panel covering the five common SCA subtypes, we show that the patenting of SCA genes and testing methods and the associated licensing conditions could have far-reaching consequences on legitimate access to this gene panel. Moreover, with genetic testing being increasingly standardized, simply ignoring patents is unlikely to hold out indefinitely. This paper aims to differentiate among so-called ‘gene patents' by lifting out the truly problematic ones. In doing so, awareness is raised among all stakeholders in the genetic diagnostics field who are not necessarily familiar with the ins and outs of patenting and licensing. PMID:21811306

  4. Accurate diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome based upon objective test methods for characteristic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Frank NM

    2015-01-01

    Although myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are considered to be synonymous, the definitional criteria for ME and CFS define two distinct, partially overlapping, clinical entities. ME, whether defined by the original criteria or by the recently proposed criteria, is not equivalent to CFS, let alone a severe variant of incapacitating chronic fatigue. Distinctive features of ME are: muscle weakness and easy muscle fatigability, cognitive impairment, circulatory deficits, a marked variability of the symptoms in presence and severity, but above all, post-exertional “malaise”: a (delayed) prolonged aggravation of symptoms after a minor exertion. In contrast, CFS is primarily defined by (unexplained) chronic fatigue, which should be accompanied by four out of a list of 8 symptoms, e.g., headaches. Due to the subjective nature of several symptoms of ME and CFS, researchers and clinicians have questioned the physiological origin of these symptoms and qualified ME and CFS as functional somatic syndromes. However, various characteristic symptoms, e.g., post-exertional “malaise” and muscle weakness, can be assessed objectively using well-accepted methods, e.g., cardiopulmonary exercise tests and cognitive tests. The objective measures acquired by these methods should be used to accurately diagnose patients, to evaluate the severity and impact of the illness objectively and to assess the positive and negative effects of proposed therapies impartially. PMID:26140274

  5. Diagnostic Accuracy of Molecular Amplification Tests for Human African Trypanosomiasis—Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Kimberly R.; Dyserinck, Heleen C.; Büscher, Philippe; Schallig, Henk D. H. F.; Leeflang, Mariska M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background A range of molecular amplification techniques have been developed for the diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT); however, careful evaluation of these tests must precede implementation to ensure their high clinical accuracy. Here, we investigated the diagnostic accuracy of molecular amplification tests for HAT, the quality of articles and reasons for variation in accuracy. Methodology Data from studies assessing diagnostic molecular amplification tests were extracted and pooled to calculate accuracy. Articles were included if they reported sensitivity and specificity or data whereby values could be calculated. Study quality was assessed using QUADAS and selected studies were analysed using the bivariate random effects model. Results 16 articles evaluating molecular amplification tests fulfilled the inclusion criteria: PCR (n = 12), NASBA (n = 2), LAMP (n = 1) and a study comparing PCR and NASBA (n = 1). Fourteen articles, including 19 different studies were included in the meta-analysis. Summary sensitivity for PCR on blood was 99.0% (95% CI 92.8 to 99.9) and the specificity was 97.7% (95% CI 93.0 to 99.3). Differences in study design and readout method did not significantly change estimates although use of satellite DNA as a target significantly lowers specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of PCR on CSF for staging varied from 87.6% to 100%, and 55.6% to 82.9% respectively. Conclusion Here, PCR seems to have sufficient accuracy to replace microscopy where facilities allow, although this conclusion is based on multiple reference standards and a patient population that was not always representative. Future studies should, therefore, include patients for which PCR may become the test of choice and consider well designed diagnostic accuracy studies to provide extra evidence on the value of PCR in practice. Another use of PCR for control of disease could be to screen samples collected from rural areas and test in reference

  6. Diagnostic Methods of Helicobacter pylori Infection for Epidemiological Studies: Critical Importance of Indirect Test Validation

    PubMed Central

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Among the methods developed to detect H. pylori infection, determining the gold standard remains debatable, especially for epidemiological studies. Due to the decreasing sensitivity of direct diagnostic tests (histopathology and/or immunohistochemistry [IHC], rapid urease test [RUT], and culture), several indirect tests, including antibody-based tests (serology and urine test), urea breath test (UBT), and stool antigen test (SAT) have been developed to diagnose H. pylori infection. Among the indirect tests, UBT and SAT became the best methods to determine active infection. While antibody-based tests, especially serology, are widely available and relatively sensitive, their specificity is low. Guidelines indicated that no single test can be considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and that one should consider the method's advantages and disadvantages. Based on four epidemiological studies, culture and RUT present a sensitivity of 74.2–90.8% and 83.3–86.9% and a specificity of 97.7–98.8% and 95.1–97.2%, respectively, when using IHC as a gold standard. The sensitivity of serology is quite high, but that of the urine test was lower compared with that of the other methods. Thus, indirect test validation is important although some commercial kits propose universal cut-off values. PMID:26904678

  7. Center for Disease Control Diagnostic Immunology Proficiency Testing Program results for 1978.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R N; Fulford, K M; Przybyszewski, V A; Pope, V

    1979-01-01

    Data from about 1,000 laboratories participating in the Diagnostic Immunology portion of the 1978 Center for Disease Control Proficiency Testing Program provided information dealing with laboratory performance and trends in testing protocols. Ninety specimens were distributed in scheduled quarterly and semiannual shipments, and five additional specimens were provided in a special survey. The specimens offered both qualitative and quantitative challenges for a wide variety of analytes which included syphilis serology, rheumatoid factor, bacterial agglutinins, hepatitis B surface antigen, immunoglobulins and other serum proteins, infectious mononucleosis, rubella, toxoplasma, antinuclear antibodies, and streptococcal exoenzymes. This paper summarizes the results of the 1978 program. PMID:230201

  8. Fool's Gold: Why Imperfect Reference Tests Are Undermining the Evaluation of Novel Diagnostics: A Reevaluation of 5 Diagnostic Tests for Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Turner, Elizabeth L.; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Smythe, Lee D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Cooper, Ben; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. We observed that some patients with clinical leptospirosis supported by positive results of rapid tests were negative for leptospirosis on the basis of our diagnostic gold standard, which involves isolation of Leptospira species from blood culture and/or a positive result of a microscopic agglutination test (MAT). We hypothesized that our reference standard was imperfect and used statistical modeling to investigate this hypothesis. Methods. Data for 1652 patients with suspected leptospirosis recruited during three observational studies and one randomized control trial that described the application of culture, MAT, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), lateral flow (LF) and/or PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene were reevaluated using Bayesian latent class models and random-effects meta-analysis. Results. The estimated sensitivities of culture alone, MAT alone, and culture plus MAT (for which the result was considered positive if one or both tests had a positive result) were 10.5% (95% credible interval [CrI], 2.7%–27.5%), 49.8% (95% CrI, 37.6%–60.8%), and 55.5% (95% CrI, 42.9%–67.7%), respectively. These low sensitivities were present across all 4 studies. The estimated specificity of MAT alone (and of culture plus MAT) was 98.8% (95% CrI, 92.8%–100.0%). The estimated sensitivities and specificities of PCR (52.7% [95% CrI, 45.2%–60.6%] and 97.2% [95% CrI, 92.0%–99.8%], respectively), lateral flow test (85.6% [95% CrI, 77.5%–93.2%] and 96.2% [95% CrI, 87.7%–99.8%], respectively), and immunofluorescence assay (45.5% [95% CrI, 33.3%–60.9%] and 96.8% [95% CrI, 92.8%–99.8%], respectively) were considerably different from estimates in which culture plus MAT was considered a perfect gold standard test. Conclusions. Our findings show that culture plus MAT is an imperfect gold standard against which to compare alterative tests for the diagnosis of leptospirosis. Rapid point-of-care tests for this infection would bring an important improvement

  9. Calibration and Test of the Tangential Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostic on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Breslau, J.; Wright, J.; Choe, W.; Cdx-U Group

    1996-11-01

    The novel CO2 laser based tangential imaging diagnostic has been completely calibrated and the system has been tested on CDX-U plasmas. It can be shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam. A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on sound waves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of ≈ 1 × 10^7 cm-3/√Hz has been determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U are described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are 2-3 orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cut-off wavenumber (from ≈ 1-8 cm-1) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation k-spectrum is measured and found to peak at ≈ 1-3 cm-1. Preliminary correlation with other fluctuation diagnostics, including observation of sawteeth in the plasma core, indicate that localization of imaging to the core of the CDX-U plasma is occurring.

  10. Addressing Barriers to the Development and Adoption of Rapid Diagnostic Tests in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric; Sikes, Hadley D.

    2015-01-01

    Immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have demonstrated significant potential for use as point-of-care diagnostic tests in resource-limited settings. Most notably, RDTs for malaria have reached an unparalleled level of technological maturity and market penetration, and are now considered an important complement to standard microscopic methods of malaria diagnosis. However, the technical development of RDTs for other infectious diseases, and their uptake within the global health community as a core diagnostic modality, has been hindered by a number of extant challenges. These range from technical and biological issues, such as the need for better affinity agents and biomarkers of disease, to social, infrastructural, regulatory and economic barriers, which have all served to slow their adoption and diminish their impact. In order for the immunochromatographic RDT format to be successfully adapted to other disease targets, to see widespread distribution, and to improve clinical outcomes for patients on a global scale, these challenges must be identified and addressed, and the global health community must be engaged in championing the broader use of RDTs. PMID:26594252

  11. A four-step approach for developing diagnostic tests in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Boutros, N N; Arfken, C L

    2007-04-01

    A four-step approach for developing diagnostic tests in psychiatry is proposed. Step 1, a biological variable is observed to be deviant from healthy controls in a particular patient population. The demonstration of test retest reliability of the finding using blinding procedures is an essential component of this early step. Step 2, is the demonstration of potential clinical usefulness of the specific finding. The two most important objectives at this step are demonstration of difference between the target patient population and appropriate control groups (these should be groups of patients with diagnoses that commonly appear on the differential diagnostic lists of the target disorder). Estimation of the effect size of the finding could be a reasonable guide to which findings should be considered good candidates for Step 3 studies. During Step 3 the performance characteristics of the test should be established. Specifically, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the biological marker should be examined. Step 4 defines the clinical application of the test and helps standardize the technique used in large and multicenter clinical trials. Multicenter trials should pave the road towards standardization of laboratory procedures used to conduct the test, as well as providing data regarding cost effectiveness and impact on both short-term and long-term clinical outcomes.

  12. Performance of commercially available serological diagnostic tests to detect Leishmania infantum infection on experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Ojeda, Ana; Todolí, Felicitat; Alberola, Jordi

    2013-01-31

    Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) is the etiological agent of a widespread serious zoonotic disease that affects both humans and dogs. Prevalence and incidence of the canine infection are important parameters to determine the risk and the ways to control this reemergent zoonosis. Unfortunately, there is not a gold standard test for Leishmania infection. Our aim was to assess the operative validity of commercial tests used to detect antibodies to Leishmania in serum samples from experimental infections. Three ELISA tests (LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test, INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA, and INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA VET), three immunochromatographic tests (INGEZIM(®) LEISHMACROM, SNAP(®) Leishmania, and WITNESS(®) Leishmania), and one IFAT were evaluated. LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA test achieved the highest sensitivity and accuracy (both 0.98). Specificity was 1 for all tests except for IFAT. All tests but IFAT obtained a positive predictive value of 1, while the maximum negative predictive value was achieved by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.93). The best positive likelihood ratio was obtained by INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA VET (30.26), while the best negative likelihood ratio was obtained by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.02). The highest diagnostic odds ratio was achieved by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (729.00). The largest area under the ROC curve was obtained by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.981). Quantitative ELISA based tests performmed better than qualitative tests ("Rapid Tests"), and the test best suited to detect Leishmania in infected dogs and to provide clinically useful information was LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test. This and other results point also to the need of revising the status of IFAT as a gold standard for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis.

  13. Are natural products and medical diagnostic tests still eligible for patents in the USA?

    PubMed

    Cockbain, Julian; Sterckx, Sigrid

    2012-09-01

    In 2010, the biotechnology and molecular diagnostics industries were shocked by the decision from a US District Court to the effect that isolated endogenous DNA and diagnostic tests based on newly discovered DNA sequences were not eligible for US patents. The case related to the BRCA1/2 genes for breast and ovarian cancer. On appeal, the decision was almost entirely overturned. However, in March 2012, the US Supreme Court vacated the appeal court decision and instructed the appeals court to rehear the case in the light of its very recent decision, which suggested that products of nature and their obvious uses should not be patentable. This commentary explores the points at issue. PMID:24236874

  14. Supervisory control and diagnostics system for the mirror fusion test facility: overview and status 1980

    SciTech Connect

    McGoldrick, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a complex facility requiring a highly-computerized Supervisory Control and Diagnostics System (SCDS) to monitor and provide control over ten subsystems; three of which require true process control. SCDS will provide physicists with a method of studying machine and plasma behavior by acquiring and processing up to four megabytes of plasma diagnostic information every five minutes. A high degree of availability and throughput is provided by a distributed computer system (nine 32-bit minicomputers on shared memory). Data, distributed across SCDS, is managed by a high-bandwidth Distributed Database Management System. The MFTF operators' control room consoles use color television monitors with touch sensitive screens; this is a totally new approach. The method of handling deviations to normal machine operation and how the operator should be notified and assisted in the resolution of problems has been studied and a system designed.

  15. Meta-analysis of diagnostic tests accounting for disease prevalence: a new model using trivariate copulas.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, A; Kuss, O

    2015-05-20

    In real life and somewhat contrary to biostatistical textbook knowledge, sensitivity and specificity (and not only predictive values) of diagnostic tests can vary with the underlying prevalence of disease. In meta-analysis of diagnostic studies, accounting for this fact naturally leads to a trivariate expansion of the traditional bivariate logistic regression model with random study effects. In this paper, a new model is proposed using trivariate copulas and beta-binomial marginal distributions for sensitivity, specificity, and prevalence as an expansion of the bivariate model. Two different copulas are used, the trivariate Gaussian copula and a trivariate vine copula based on the bivariate Plackett copula. This model has a closed-form likelihood, so standard software (e.g., SAS PROC NLMIXED) can be used. The results of a simulation study have shown that the copula models perform at least as good but frequently better than the standard model. The methods are illustrated by two examples.

  16. An Integrated Architecture for Aircraft Engine Performance Monitoring and Fault Diagnostics: Engine Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Aidan W.; Simon, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based architecture for performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostics designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique analyzes residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for fault detection and isolation purposes. Diagnostic results from the application of the approach to test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine are presented. The approach is found to avoid false alarms when presented nominal fault-free data. Additionally, the approach is found to successfully detect and isolate gas path seeded-faults under steady-state operating scenarios although some fault misclassifications are noted during engine transients. Recommendations for follow-on maturation and evaluation of the technique are also presented.

  17. An Integrated Architecture for Aircraft Engine Performance Monitoring and Fault Diagnostics: Engine Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Aidan W.; Simon, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based architecture for performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostics designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique analyzes residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for fault detection and isolation purposes. Diagnostic results from the application of the approach to test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine are presented. The approach is found to avoid false alarms when presented nominal fault-free data. Additionally, the approach is found to successfully detect and isolate gas path seeded-faults under steady-state operating scenarios although some fault misclassifications are noted during engine transients. Recommendations for follow-on maturation and evaluation of the technique are also presented.

  18. Diagnostic testing, pre- and post-test probabilities, and their use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Sérgio; Mendes, Susana; Vizinho, Ricardo; Carneiro, António Vaz

    2004-09-01

    In the process of establishing a diagnosis, the clinician calculates the disease probabilities, which keep changing as data is gathered from clinical history, physical examination and laboratory and imaging data. This paper sets out to explain, in a simple and practical way, how the characteristics of a test can be applied in order to determine post-test probability, that is, the probability of a specific disease being present. Before applying the test, we start with a pretest probability that corresponds to the prevalence of the disease. With each additional test this probability changes, until a threshold is reached that includes or excludes the clinical diagnosis. To calculate the post-test probabilities, the sensitivity and specificity of the test are used to calculate the positive and negative predictive values for a determined pretest probability, as well as likelihood ratios (through graphics or nomograms, approximations or equations). Among the test characteristics, the most useful for calculating post-test probabilities are likelihood ratios, which have several advantages over sensitivity and specificity.

  19. The importance of diagnostic test parameters in the interpretation of clinical test findings: The Prone Hip Extension Test as an example

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The use of diagnostic tests is a crucial aspect of clinical practice since they assist clinicians in establishing whether a patient has or does not have a particular condition. In order for any clinical test to be used most appropriately, it is essential that several parameters be established regarding the test and that these are made known to clinicians to inform their clinical decision making. These include the test’s sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios. This article reviews their importance as well as provides an illustrative example that highlights how knowledge of the parameters for a given test allows clinicians to better interpret their test findings in practice. PMID:21629460

  20. Does the Reporting Quality of Diagnostic Test Accuracy Studies, as Defined by STARD 2015, Affect Citation?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Chung, Mi Sun; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Ji Eun; Yoon, Hee Mang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate with which diagnostic test accuracy studies that are published in a general radiology journal adhere to the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (STARD) 2015, and to explore the relationship between adherence rate and citation rate while avoiding confounding by journal factors. Materials and Methods All eligible diagnostic test accuracy studies that were published in the Korean Journal of Radiology in 2011–2015 were identified. Five reviewers assessed each article for yes/no compliance with 27 of the 30 STARD 2015 checklist items (items 28, 29, and 30 were excluded). The total STARD score (number of fulfilled STARD items) was calculated. The score of the 15 STARD items that related directly to the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS)-2 was also calculated. The number of times each article was cited (as indicated by the Web of Science) after publication until March 2016 and the article exposure time (time in months between publication and March 2016) were extracted. Results Sixty-three articles were analyzed. The mean (range) total and QUADAS-2-related STARD scores were 20.0 (14.5–25) and 11.4 (7–15), respectively. The mean citation number was 4 (0–21). Citation number did not associate significantly with either STARD score after accounting for exposure time (total score: correlation coefficient = 0.154, p = 0.232; QUADAS-2-related score: correlation coefficient = 0.143, p = 0.266). Conclusion The degree of adherence to STARD 2015 was moderate for this journal, indicating that there is room for improvement. When adjusted for exposure time, the degree of adherence did not affect the citation rate. PMID:27587959

  1. Rapid antigen-based testing for respiratory syncytial virus: moving diagnostics from bench to bedside?

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Caitlin; Papenburg, Jesse

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of infantile bronchiolitis and pneumonia. It is ubiquitous, with most children acquiring their primary infection within the first year of life and with subsequent reinfection occurring in all age groups. Clinically, RSV is virtually indistinguishable from other viral respiratory infections. Traditionally, the microbiologic diagnosis of RSV has been based on moderate to complex techniques performed in a laboratory (cell culture, nucleic acid amplification and immunofluorescence assays); however, rapid antigen-detection tests offer potential advantages associated with point-of-care testing. This review seeks to familiarize the readers with RSV rapid antigen-detection tests, describe their performance characteristics and comment on their strengths and weaknesses. The authors will discuss the impact of rapid RSV testing on clinical practice, with a look to the future of what the field ultimately requires of a point-of-care diagnostic technique.

  2. The status of diagnostic testing following referral from universal newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Windmill, Sue; Windmill, Ian M

    2006-05-01

    The Joint Committee on Infant Hearing 2000 position statement includes guidelines for the development of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention programs. These guidelines provide specific recommendations for the audiologic test battery for infants who fail a newborn infant hearing screening. The recommended test battery includes electrophysiologic measures such as the ABR, frequency specific electrophysiologic tests, bone-conducted ABR, OAEs, tympanometry using high frequency probe stimuli, and acoustic reflexes. In the Commonwealth of Kentucky, 42 centers are listed as providing follow-up diagnostic testing services for infants failing the newborn hearing screening. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how many of these centers were abiding by the Joint Committee guidelines. Results show that only three of 42 centers listed are providing services that meet the guidelines. Less than 50% of infants identified with hearing loss are referred for genetic evaluations by the audiologist. Only 19 of the 42 sites listed provide amplification services for infants identified with hearing loss.

  3. Differential Item Functioning Assessment in Cognitive Diagnostic Modeling: Application of the Wald Test to Investigate DIF in the DINA Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Likun; de la Torre, Jimmy; Nandakumar, Ratna

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing examinees' responses using cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs) has the advantage of providing diagnostic information. To ensure the validity of the results from these models, differential item functioning (DIF) in CDMs needs to be investigated. In this article, the Wald test is proposed to examine DIF in the context of CDMs. This…

  4. A Multi-Expert Approach for Developing Testing and Diagnostic Systems Based on the Concept-Effect Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panjaburee, Patcharin; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Triampo, Wannapong; Shih, Bo-Ying

    2010-01-01

    With the popularization of computer and communication technologies, researchers have attempted to develop computer-assisted testing and diagnostic systems to help students improve their learning performance on the Internet. In developing a diagnostic system for detecting students' learning problems, it is difficult for individual teachers to…

  5. The Relationship between Students' Reading Performance on Diagnostic Assessments and the Third Grade Reading Achievement Test in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollinger, Jamie L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this correlational study was twofold: to examine the relationship of students' reading performance on six different diagnostic reading assessments and the third grade Ohio Reading Achievement Test; and to assist educators in choosing the diagnostic assessments that best identify students at risk of failing the third grade Ohio…

  6. 42 CFR 414.509 - Reconsideration of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.509 Section 414.509 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory...

  7. 42 CFR 414.506 - Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.506 Section 414.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory...

  8. Clinical Evaluation of the ZstatFlu-II Test: a Chemiluminescent Rapid Diagnostic Test for Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Marilyn S.; Abel, David M.; Ballam, Yolanda J.; Otto, Mary K.; Nickell, Angela F.; Pence, Lisa M.; Appleman, James R.; Shimasaki, Craig D.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2002-01-01

    Exploiting the high sensitivity of the chemiluminescence phenomenon, an accurate and sensitive point-of-care test, called the ZstatFlu-II test (ZymeTx, Inc., Oklahoma City, Okla.), was developed to detect influenza virus infections. The ZstatFlu-II test takes 20 min and requires approximately 2 min of “hands-on” time for operational steps. The ZstatFlu-II test does not distinguish between infections with influenza virus types A and B. ZstatFlu-II test results are printed on Polaroid High-Speed Detector Film, allowing test results to be archived. A prototype version of the ZstatFlu-II test was evaluated during the 2000-to-2001 flu season with 300 nasal aspirate specimens from children at a pediatric hospital. Compared to culture, the ZstatFlu-II test had 88% sensitivity and 92% specificity. The Directigen test had a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 93%. The sensitivity of the ZstatFlu-II test was significantly higher than that of the Directigen test (P < 0.0574). PMID:12089243

  9. Toward accurate molecular identification of species in complex environmental samples: testing the performance of sequence filtering and clustering methods

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jullien M; Brown, Emily A; Chain, Frédéric J J; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-01-01

    Metabarcoding has the potential to become a rapid, sensitive, and effective approach for identifying species in complex environmental samples. Accurate molecular identification of species depends on the ability to generate operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that correspond to biological species. Due to the sometimes enormous estimates of biodiversity using this method, there is a great need to test the efficacy of data analysis methods used to derive OTUs. Here, we evaluate the performance of various methods for clustering length variable 18S amplicons from complex samples into OTUs using a mock community and a natural community of zooplankton species. We compare analytic procedures consisting of a combination of (1) stringent and relaxed data filtering, (2) singleton sequences included and removed, (3) three commonly used clustering algorithms (mothur, UCLUST, and UPARSE), and (4) three methods of treating alignment gaps when calculating sequence divergence. Depending on the combination of methods used, the number of OTUs varied by nearly two orders of magnitude for the mock community (60–5068 OTUs) and three orders of magnitude for the natural community (22–22191 OTUs). The use of relaxed filtering and the inclusion of singletons greatly inflated OTU numbers without increasing the ability to recover species. Our results also suggest that the method used to treat gaps when calculating sequence divergence can have a great impact on the number of OTUs. Our findings are particularly relevant to studies that cover taxonomically diverse species and employ markers such as rRNA genes in which length variation is extensive. PMID:26078860

  10. Clinical Implications of Referral Bias in the Diagnostic Performance of Exercise Testing for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ladapo, Joseph A.; Blecker, Saul; Elashoff, Michael R.; Federspiel, Jerome J.; Vieira, Dorice L.; Sharma, Gaurav; Monane, Mark; Rosenberg, Steven; Phelps, Charles E.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Exercise testing with echocardiography or myocardial perfusion imaging is widely used to risk‐stratify patients with suspected coronary artery disease. However, reports of diagnostic performance rarely adjust for referral bias, and this practice may adversely influence patient care. Therefore, we evaluated the potential impact of referral bias on diagnostic effectiveness and clinical decision‐making. Methods and Results Searching PubMed and EMBASE (1990–2012), 2 investigators independently evaluated eligibility and abstracted data on study characteristics and referral patterns. Diagnostic performance reported in 4 previously published meta‐analyses of exercise echocardiography and myocardial perfusion imaging was adjusted using pooled referral rates and Bayesian methods. Twenty‐one studies reported referral patterns in 49 006 patients (mean age 60.7 years, 39.6% women, and 0.8% prior history of myocardial infarction). Catheterization referral rates after normal and abnormal exercise tests were 4.0% (95% CI, 2.9% to 5.0%) and 42.5% (36.2% to 48.9%), respectively, with odds ratio for referral after an abnormal test of 14.6 (10.7 to 19.9). After adjustment for referral, exercise echocardiography sensitivity fell from 84% (80% to 89%) to 34% (27% to 41%), and specificity rose from 77% (69% to 86%) to 99% (99% to 100%). Similarly, exercise myocardial perfusion imaging sensitivity fell from 85% (81% to 88%) to 38% (31% to 44%), and specificity rose from 69% (61% to 78%) to 99% (99% to 100%). Summary receiver operating curve analysis demonstrated only modest changes in overall discriminatory power but adjusting for referral increased positive‐predictive value and reduced negative‐predictive value. Conclusions Exercise echocardiography and myocardial perfusion imaging are considerably less sensitive and more specific for coronary artery disease after adjustment for referral. Given these findings, future work should assess the comparative ability of

  11. Diagnostic performance of serological tests for swine brucellosis in the presence of false positive serological reactions.

    PubMed

    Dieste-Pérez, L; Blasco, J M; de Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; Muñoz, P M

    2015-04-01

    Swine brucellosis caused by Brucella suis biovar 2 is an emerging disease in Europe. Currently used diagnostic tests for swine brucellosis detect antibodies to the O-polysaccharide (O-PS) of Brucella smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) but their specificity is compromised by false-positive serological reactions (FPSRs) when bacteria carrying cross-reacting O-PS infect pigs. FPSRs occur throughout Europe, and the only tool available for a specific B. suis diagnosis is the intradermal test with Brucella protein extracts free of O-PS or S-LPS. Using sera of 162 sows naturally infected by B. suis biovar 2, 406 brucellosis-free sows, and 218 pigs of brucellosis-free farms affected by FPSR, we assessed the diagnostic performance of an indirect ELISA with rough LPS (thus devoid of O-PS) and of gel immunodiffusion, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, latex agglutination and indirect ELISA with O-PS free proteins in comparison with several S-LPS tests (Rose Bengal, complement fixation, gel immunodiffusion and indirect ELISA). When adjusted to 100% specificity, the sensitivity of the rough LPS ELISA was very low (30%), and adoption of other cut-offs resulted in poor specificity/sensitivity ratios. Although their specificity was 100%, the sensitivity of protein tests (ELISA, latex agglutination, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and gel immunodiffusion) was only moderate (45, 58, 61 and 63%, respectively). Among S-LPS tests, gel immunodiffusion was the only test showing acceptable sensitivity/specificity (68 and 100%, respectively). Despite these shortcomings, and when the purpose is to screen out FPSR at herd level, gel immunodiffusion tests may offer a technically simple and practical alternative to intradermal testing.

  12. Update on diagnostic value of breath test in gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ahmed, Sibtain; Abid, Shahab

    2016-08-15

    In the field of gastroenterology, breath tests (BTs) are used intermittently as diagnostic tools that allow indirect, non-invasive and relatively less cumbersome evaluation of several disorders by simply quantifying the appearance in exhaled breath of a metabolite of a specific substrate administered. The aim of this review is to have an insight into the principles, methods of analysis and performance parameters of various hydrogen, methane and carbon BTs which are available for diagnosing gastrointestinal disorders such as Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and carbohydrate malabsorption. Evaluation of gastric emptying is routinely performed by scintigraphy which is however, difficult to perform and not suitable for children and pregnant women, this review has abridged the 13C-octanoic acid test in comparison to scintigraphy and has emphasized on its working protocol and challenges. A new development such as electronic nose test is also highlighted. Moreover we have also explored the limitations and constraints restraining the wide use of these BT. We conclude that breath testing has an enormous potential to be used as a diagnostic modality. In addition it offers distinct advantages over the traditional invasive methods commonly employed. PMID:27574563

  13. Update on diagnostic value of breath test in gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ahmed, Sibtain; Abid, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    In the field of gastroenterology, breath tests (BTs) are used intermittently as diagnostic tools that allow indirect, non-invasive and relatively less cumbersome evaluation of several disorders by simply quantifying the appearance in exhaled breath of a metabolite of a specific substrate administered. The aim of this review is to have an insight into the principles, methods of analysis and performance parameters of various hydrogen, methane and carbon BTs which are available for diagnosing gastrointestinal disorders such as Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and carbohydrate malabsorption. Evaluation of gastric emptying is routinely performed by scintigraphy which is however, difficult to perform and not suitable for children and pregnant women, this review has abridged the 13C-octanoic acid test in comparison to scintigraphy and has emphasized on its working protocol and challenges. A new development such as electronic nose test is also highlighted. Moreover we have also explored the limitations and constraints restraining the wide use of these BT. We conclude that breath testing has an enormous potential to be used as a diagnostic modality. In addition it offers distinct advantages over the traditional invasive methods commonly employed. PMID:27574563

  14. Exploring Ways to Provide Diagnostic Feedback with an ESL Placement Test: Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment of L2 Reading Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ah-Young

    2015-01-01

    Previous research in cognitive diagnostic assessment (CDA) of L2 reading ability has been frequently conducted using large-scale English proficiency exams (e.g., TOEFL, MELAB). Using CDA, it is possible to analyze individual learners' strengths and weaknesses in multiple attributes (i.e., knowledge, skill, strategy) measured at the item level.…

  15. Use of Rapid, Point-of-Care Assays by Private Practitioners in Chennai, India: Priorities for Tuberculosis Diagnostic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Ramya; Sukumar, Sumanya; Augustine, Sheela; Krishnan, Nalini; Pai, Madhukar; Dowdy, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Setting Private practitioners are frequently the first point of healthcare contact for patients with tuberculosis (TB) in India. As new molecular tests are developed for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis of TB, it is imperative to understand these individuals’ practices and preferences for POC testing. Objective To evaluate rapid testing practices and identify priorities for novel POC TB tests among private practitioners in Chennai. Design We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 228 practitioners practicing in the private sector from January 2014 to February 2015 who saw at least one TB patient in the previous year. Practitioners were randomly selected from both the general community and a list of practitioners who referred patients to a public-private mix program for TB treatment. We used standardized questionnaires to collect data on current practices related to point-of-care diagnosis and interest in hypothetical POC tests. We used multivariable Poisson regression with robust estimates of standard error to calculate measures of association. Results Among 228 private practitioners, about half (48%) utilized any rapid testing in their current practice, most commonly for glucose (43%), pregnancy (21%), and malaria (5%). Providers using POC tests were more likely to work in hospitals (56% vs. 43%, P = 0.05) and less likely to be chest specialists (21% vs. 54%, P<0.001). Only half (51%) of providers would use a hypothetical POC test for TB that was accurate, equipment-free, and took 20 minutes to complete. Chest specialists were half as likely to express interest in performing the hypothetical POC TB test in-house as other practitioners (aPR 0.5, 95%CI: 0.2–0.9). Key challenges to performing POC testing for TB in this study included time constraints, easy access to local private labs and lack of an attached lab facility. Conclusion As novel POC tests for TB are developed and scaled up, attention must be paid to integrating these diagnostics into healthcare

  16. Accurate Time-Dependent Traveling-Wave Tube Model Developed for Computational Bit-Error-Rate Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2001-01-01

    The phenomenal growth of the satellite communications industry has created a large demand for traveling-wave tubes (TWT's) operating with unprecedented specifications requiring the design and production of many novel devices in record time. To achieve this, the TWT industry heavily relies on computational modeling. However, the TWT industry's computational modeling capabilities need to be improved because there are often discrepancies between measured TWT data and that predicted by conventional two-dimensional helical TWT interaction codes. This limits the analysis and design of novel devices or TWT's with parameters differing from what is conventionally manufactured. In addition, the inaccuracy of current computational tools limits achievable TWT performance because optimized designs require highly accurate models. To address these concerns, a fully three-dimensional, time-dependent, helical TWT interaction model was developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAFIA (Solution of MAxwell's equations by the Finite-Integration-Algorithm). The model includes a short section of helical slow-wave circuit with excitation fed by radiofrequency input/output couplers, and an electron beam contained by periodic permanent magnet focusing. A cutaway view of several turns of the three-dimensional helical slow-wave circuit with input/output couplers is shown. This has been shown to be more accurate than conventionally used two-dimensional models. The growth of the communications industry has also imposed a demand for increased data rates for the transmission of large volumes of data. To achieve increased data rates, complex modulation and multiple access techniques are employed requiring minimum distortion of the signal as it is passed through the TWT. Thus, intersymbol interference (ISI) becomes a major consideration, as well as suspected causes such as reflections within the TWT. To experimentally investigate effects of the physical TWT on ISI would be

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for bovine respiratory disease: getting more from diagnostic results.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, Brian V; Turnidge, John

    2015-02-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is one of the most common diseases of cattle worldwide. Given the significant bacterial component of this disease, antimicrobial agents remain one of the mainstays of therapy. However, the potential welfare and economic impact resulting from the selection of inappropriate antimicrobial therapy for BRD poses significant risks to both animal and animal owner. To determine the 'best' antimicrobial agent for a specific case, the decision-making process needs to incorporate all available evidence, often including the results of bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. While antimicrobial susceptibility testing can be a valuable diagnostic tool, integrating the test results into the clinical decision making process can be a challenging experience. This review details the process by which interpretive criteria for susceptibility tests are developed. Principles for how to best integrate antimicrobial susceptibility testing, both at the individual animal test and aggregate test levels, into the clinical decision making process are discussed. Non-traditional testing methodologies and how they may improve susceptibility testing in the future are also reviewed.

  18. Effects of Concept Map Extraction and a Test-Based Diagnostic Environment on Learning Achievement and Learners' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Chang, Yi-Chun; Liew, Keng-Hou; Chu, Chih-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Computerised testing and diagnostics are critical challenges within an e-learning environment, where the learners can assess their learning performance through tests. However, a test result based on only a single score is insufficient information to provide a full picture of learning performance. In addition, because test results implicitly…

  19. Effect of Two-Tier Diagnostic Tests on Promoting Learners' Conceptual Understanding of Variables in Conducting Scientific Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çil, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Taking a test generally improves the retention of the material tested. This is a phenomenon commonly referred to as testing effect. The present research investigated whether two-tier diagnostic tests promoted student teachers' conceptual understanding of variables in conducting scientific experiments, which is a scientific process skill. In this…

  20. Personality Assessment in the Diagnostic Manuals: On Mindfulness, Multiple Methods, and Test Score Discontinuities

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent controversies have illuminated the strengths and limitations of different frameworks for conceptualizing personality pathology (e.g., trait perspectives, categorical models), and stimulated debate regarding how best to diagnose personality disorders (PDs) in DSM-5, and in other diagnostic systems (i.e., the International Classification of Diseases, the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual). In this article I argue that regardless of how PDs are conceptualized and which diagnostic system is employed, multi-method assessment must play a central role in PD diagnosis. By complementing self-reports with evidence from other domains (e.g., performance-based tests), a broader range of psychological processes are engaged in the patient, and the impact of self-perception and self-presentation biases may be better understood. By providing the assessor with evidence drawn from multiple modalities, some of which provide converging patterns and some of which yield divergent results, the assessor is compelled to engage this evidence more deeply. The mindful processing that ensues can help minimize the deleterious impact of naturally occurring information processing bias and distortion on the part of the clinician (e.g., heuristics, attribution errors), bringing greater clarity to the synthesis and integration of assessment data. PMID:25856565

  1. A new generation of companion diagnostics: cobas BRAF, KRAS and EGFR mutation detection tests.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Barbara; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Gonzalez, David

    2014-06-01

    The cobas(®) (Roche) portfolio of companion diagnostics in oncology currently has three assays CE-marked for in vitro diagnostics. Two of these (EGFR and BRAF) are also US FDA-approved. These assays detect clinically relevant mutations that are correlated with response (BRAF, EGFR) or lack of response (KRAS) to targeted therapies such as selective mutant BRAF inhibitors in malignant melanoma, tyrosine kinases inhibitor in non-small cell lung cancer and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer, respectively. All these assays are run on a single platform using DNA extracted from a single 5 µm section of a formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue block. The assays provide an 'end-to-end' solution from extraction of DNA to automated analysis and report on the cobas z 480. The cobas tests have shown robust and reproducible performance, with high sensitivity and specificity and low limit of detection, making them suitable as companion diagnostics for clinical use. PMID:24844134

  2. Application of diagnostic tests for mycoplasmal infections of desert and gopher tortoises with management recommendations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, D.R.; Schumacher, Isabella M.; Mclaughlin, Grace S.; Wendland, L.D.; Brown, Mary E.; Klein, P.A.; Jacobson, E.R.

    2002-01-01

    Mycoplasmosis is a transmissible upper respiratory tract disease that has affected plans for management and conservation of wild desert and gopher tortoises in the United States. Although impact of mycoplasmosis on populations of desert and gopher tortoises is unknown, increased prevalence of seropositive animals as well as field observations of clinically ill tortoises have occurred in association with declining populations. In order to help in the identification of potentially infected animals, three tests have been developed to diagnose mycoplasmal infections of tortoises: 1) direct mycoplasmal culture; 2) detection of mycolplasmal chromosomal DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); and 3) detection of anti-Mycoplasma antibodies in tortoise plasma by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Each test provides different, complementary information that collectively can be used to define tortoise mycoplasmal infection status. The types of samples required, the predictive value, interpretation, and cost vary among tests. These assays have been used for epidemiological surveys and in decision making for relocation, repatriation, or captive management of tortoises to minimize the risk of outbreaks of mycoplasmal respiratory disease and spread of the causative agent of this disease. Certain features of mycoplasmal infections of tortoises and other animals create a diagnostic dilemma. Multiple Mycoplasma species can cause respiratory disease with identical clinical presentations. Further, individual strains of a given species may vary with respect to their virulence potential, and some species may be commensals rather than pathogens. Current diagnostic tests may not differentiate among mycoplasmal species or strains or permit determination of pathogenicity of individual isolates. Thus, the information provided by testing is not a simple 'positive' vs. 'negative' issue. While these tests provide much needed information on the exposure of tortoise populations to

  3. Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy of Three Rapid Tests for the Serodiagnosis of Hepatic Cystic Echinococcosis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Covini, Ilaria; Mariconti, Mara; Narra, Roberta; Tinelli, Carmine; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Manzoni, Federica; Casulli, Adriano; Ito, Akira; Neumayr, Andreas; Brunetti, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis (CE) is based primarily on imaging, in particular with ultrasound for abdominal CE, complemented by serology when imaging results are unclear. In rural endemic areas, where expertise in ultrasound may be scant and conventional serology techniques are unavailable due to lack of laboratory equipment, Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs) are appealing. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of 3 commercial RDTs for the diagnosis of hepatic CE. Sera from 59 patients with single hepatic CE cysts in well-defined ultrasound stages (gold standard) and 25 patients with non-parasitic cysts were analyzed by RDTs VIRapid HYDATIDOSIS (Vircell, Spain), Echinococcus DIGFA (Unibiotest, China), ADAMU-CE (ICST, Japan), and by RIDASCREEN Echinococcus IgG ELISA (R-Biopharm, Germany). Sensitivity, specificity and ROC curves were compared with McNemar and t-test. For VIRapid and DIGFA, correlation between semiquantitative results and ELISA OD values were evaluated by Spearman’s coefficient. Reproducibility was assessed on 16 randomly selected sera with Cohen’s Kappa coefficient. Sensitivity and Specificity of VIRapid (74%, 96%) and ADAMU-CE (57%, 100%) did not differ from ELISA (69%, 96%) while DIGFA (72%, 72%) did (p = 0.045). ADAMU-CE was significantly less sensitive in the diagnosis of active cysts (p = 0.019) while DIGFA was significantly less specific (p = 0.014) compared to ELISA. All tests were poorly sensitive in diagnosing inactive cysts (33.3% ELISA and ADAMU-CE, 42.8% DIGFA, 47.6% VIRapid). The reproducibility of all RDTs was good-very good. Band intensity of VIRapid and DIGFA correlated with ELISA OD values (r = 0.76 and r = 0.79 respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions/Significance RDTs may be useful in resource-poor settings to complement ultrasound diagnosis of CE in uncertain cases. VIRapid test appears to perform best among the examined kits, but all tests are poorly sensitive in the presence of

  4. Is there a pathological alpha angle for hip impingement? A diagnostic test study.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Cristián; Barahona, Maximiliano; Diaz, Jorge; Brañes, Julian; Chaparro, Felipe; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2016-08-01

    The normal value of alpha angle is controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the alpha angle in asymptomatic volunteers versus patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and determine a diagnostic cut-off value for symptomatic cam impingement. This is a diagnostic test study. Cases were defined as those patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam or mixed type FAI. Controls were defined as asymptomatic volunteers, with no history of hip pain who had undergone a computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis for a non-joint or bone-related reason. In both groups, the alpha angle was measured in an oblique axial CT reconstruction of the femoral neck. A logistic regression model was first estimated and a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was then calculated. The diagnostic cut-off value selected was the one that maximizes sensitivity and specificity. Data were analysed from 38 consecutive cases of cam or mixed FAI and 101 controls. The average alpha angle was 67°(±12°) among cases and 48°°(±5°) among controls. An odds ratio of 1.28 [1.18-1.39] was obtained. A ROC curve of 0.96 [0.93-0.99] was calculated, and using an alpha angle of 57° as the diagnostic cut-off value, provided a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 95%. If a patient complains of hip pain and an alpha angle of 57° is found in CT, strongly suggest that cam impingement is causing the pain. PMID:27583162

  5. Is there a pathological alpha angle for hip impingement? A diagnostic test study.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Cristián; Barahona, Maximiliano; Diaz, Jorge; Brañes, Julian; Chaparro, Felipe; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2016-08-01

    The normal value of alpha angle is controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the alpha angle in asymptomatic volunteers versus patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and determine a diagnostic cut-off value for symptomatic cam impingement. This is a diagnostic test study. Cases were defined as those patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam or mixed type FAI. Controls were defined as asymptomatic volunteers, with no history of hip pain who had undergone a computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis for a non-joint or bone-related reason. In both groups, the alpha angle was measured in an oblique axial CT reconstruction of the femoral neck. A logistic regression model was first estimated and a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was then calculated. The diagnostic cut-off value selected was the one that maximizes sensitivity and specificity. Data were analysed from 38 consecutive cases of cam or mixed FAI and 101 controls. The average alpha angle was 67°(±12°) among cases and 48°°(±5°) among controls. An odds ratio of 1.28 [1.18-1.39] was obtained. A ROC curve of 0.96 [0.93-0.99] was calculated, and using an alpha angle of 57° as the diagnostic cut-off value, provided a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 95%. If a patient complains of hip pain and an alpha angle of 57° is found in CT, strongly suggest that cam impingement is causing the pain.

  6. Is there a pathological alpha angle for hip impingement? A diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Cristián; Barahona, Maximiliano; Diaz, Jorge; Brañes, Julian; Chaparro, Felipe; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The normal value of alpha angle is controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the alpha angle in asymptomatic volunteers versus patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and determine a diagnostic cut-off value for symptomatic cam impingement. This is a diagnostic test study. Cases were defined as those patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam or mixed type FAI. Controls were defined as asymptomatic volunteers, with no history of hip pain who had undergone a computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis for a non-joint or bone-related reason. In both groups, the alpha angle was measured in an oblique axial CT reconstruction of the femoral neck. A logistic regression model was first estimated and a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was then calculated. The diagnostic cut-off value selected was the one that maximizes sensitivity and specificity. Data were analysed from 38 consecutive cases of cam or mixed FAI and 101 controls. The average alpha angle was 67°(±12°) among cases and 48°°(±5°) among controls. An odds ratio of 1.28 [1.18–1.39] was obtained. A ROC curve of 0.96 [0.93–0.99] was calculated, and using an alpha angle of 57° as the diagnostic cut-off value, provided a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 95%. If a patient complains of hip pain and an alpha angle of 57° is found in CT, strongly suggest that cam impingement is causing the pain. PMID:27583162

  7. TESTING DIAGNOSTICS OF NUCLEAR ACTIVITY AND STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z > 1

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Yan, Renbin; Juneau, Stephanie; McLean, Ian S.; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Villar, Victor

    2013-01-20

    We present some of the first science data with the new Keck/MOSFIRE instrument to test the effectiveness of different AGN/SF diagnostics at z {approx} 1.5. MOSFIRE spectra were obtained in three H-band multi-slit masks in the GOODS-S field, resulting in 2 hr exposures of 36 emission-line galaxies. We compare X-ray data with the traditional emission-line ratio diagnostics and the alternative mass-excitation and color-excitation diagrams, combining new MOSFIRE infrared data with previous HST/WFC3 infrared spectra (from the 3D-HST survey) and multiwavelength photometry. We demonstrate that a high [O III]/H{beta} ratio is insufficient as an active galactic nucleus (AGN) indicator at z > 1. For the four X-ray-detected galaxies, the classic diagnostics ([O III]/H{beta} versus [N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) remain consistent with X-ray AGN/SF classification. The X-ray data also suggest that 'composite' galaxies (with intermediate AGN/SF classification) host bona fide AGNs. Nearly {approx}2/3 of the z {approx} 1.5 emission-line galaxies have nuclear activity detected by either X-rays or the classic diagnostics. Compared to the X-ray and line ratio classifications, the mass-excitation method remains effective at z > 1, but we show that the color-excitation method requires a new calibration to successfully identify AGNs at these redshifts.

  8. HER2 diagnostics in gastric cancer-guideline validation and development of standardized immunohistochemical testing.

    PubMed

    Rüschoff, Josef; Dietel, Manfred; Baretton, Gustavo; Arbogast, Susanne; Walch, Axel; Monges, Geneviéve; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Nagelmeier, Iris; Schlake, Werner; Höfler, H; Kreipe, H H

    2010-09-01

    Trastuzumab-based therapy has been shown to confer overall survival benefit in HER2-positive patients with advanced gastric cancer in a large multicentric trial (ToGA study). Subgroup analysis identified adenocarcinomas of the stomach and gastroesophageal (GE) junction with overexpression of HER2 according to immunohistochemistry (IHC) as potential responders. Due to recent approval of trastuzumab for HER2 positive metastatic gastric and GE-junction cancer in Europe (EMEA) HER2 diagnostics is now mandatory with IHC being the primary test followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in IHC2+ cases. However, in order to not miss patients potentially responding to targeted therapy determination of a HER2-positive status for gastric cancer required modification of scoring as had been proposed in a pre-ToGA study. To validate this new HER2 status testing procedure in terms of inter-laboratory and inter-observer consensus for IHC scoring a series of 547 gastric cancer tissue samples on a tissue microarray (TMA) was used. In the first step, 30 representative cores were used to identify specific IHC HER2 scoring issues among eight French and German laboratories, while in the second step the full set of 547 cores was used to determine IHC HER2 intensity and area score concordance between six German pathologists. Specific issues relating to discordance were identified and recommendations formulated which proved to be effective to reliably determine HER2 status in a prospective test series of 447 diagnostic gastric cancer specimens.

  9. [Diagnostic value of the procalcitonine test in purulent-septic complications of chest traumas].

    PubMed

    Vadachkoriia, V K; Gogishvili, Sh G; Shapatava, K K

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the value of the semi-quantitative procalcitonine test (PCT) in diagnosis of purulent-septic complications of chest traumas, efficacy of the therapy carried out, and outcome prognosis. For this, 71 patients with chest traumas were enrolled in the study. Concentrations of PCT were assessed in dynamics using an immunochromatographic, semi-quantitative quick test. Semi-quantitative quick PCT test is highly sensitive diagnostic marker that can be used for the assessment of a chest trauma, infectious-septic complication severity, and efficiency of the therapy indicated. Thus, it can be successfully used for monitoring trauma therapy. PCT sensitivity during first 12 hrs of infectious-septic complication development is 2-3-times higher than that of routine methods for laboratory diagnostics, and even more sensitive that IL-6 and CRT, when we are dealing with combined chest traumas. PCT concentration increase is 4-times more frequent in gram-positive bacterial processes than in gram-negative ones. This has to be taken into account, when appropriate antibacterial treatment is selected for restricted infectious-septic complications. PMID:17525495

  10. Fermilab PXIE Beam Diagnostics Development and Testing at the HINS Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.A.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Steimel, J.; Wendt, M.; Hanna, B.M.; Prost, L.R.; Scarpine, V.E.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Fermilab is planning the construction of a prototype front end of the Project X linac. The Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) is expected to accelerate 1 mA CW H- beam up to 30 MeV. Some of the major goals of the project are to test a CW RFQ and H- source, a broadband bunch-by-bunch beam chopper and a low-energy superconducting linac. The successful characterization and operation of such an accelerator place stringent requirements on beamline diagnostics. These crucial beam measurements include bunch currents, beam orbit, beam phase, bunch length, transverse profile and emittance and beam halo and tails, as well as the extinction performance of the broadband chopper. This paper presents PXIE beam measurement requirements and instrumentation development plans. Presented are plans to test key instruments at the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) beam facility. Since HINS is already an operational accelerator, utilizing HINS for instrumentation testing will allow for quicker development of the required PXIE diagnostics.

  11. ViDI: Virtual Diagnostics Interface. Volume 1; The Future of Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A. (Technical Monitor); Schwartz, Richard J.

    2004-01-01

    The quality of data acquired in a given test facility ultimately resides within the fidelity and implementation of the instrumentation systems. Over the last decade, the emergence of robust optical techniques has vastly expanded the envelope of measurement possibilities. At the same time the capabilities for data processing, data archiving and data visualization required to extract the highest level of knowledge from these global, on and off body measurement techniques have equally expanded. Yet today, while the instrumentation has matured to the production stage, an optimized solution for gaining knowledge from the gigabytes of data acquired per test (or even per test point) is lacking. A technological void has to be filled in order to possess a mechanism for near-real time knowledge extraction during wind tunnel experiments. Under these auspices, the Virtual Diagnostics Interface, or ViDI, was developed.

  12. Results of prototype particle-beam diagnostics tests for the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Votaw, A.; Wang, X.

    1993-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be a third-generation synchrotron radiation source (hard x-rays) based on 7-GeV positrons circulating in a 1,104-m circumference storage ring. In the past year a number of the diagnostic prototypes for the measurement of the charged-particle beam parameters throughout the subsystems of the facility (ranging from 450-MeV to 7-GeV positrons and with different pulse formats) have been built and tested. Results are summarized for the beam position monitor (BPM), current monitor (CM), loss monitor (LM), and imaging systems (ISYS). The test facilities ranged from the 40-MeV APS linac test stand to the existing storage rings at SSRL and NSLS.

  13. Disentangling screening and diagnostic Chlamydia test positivity among females testing at title x-funded and adolescent health clinics, san francisco 2009.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Sally C; Snell, Ameera; Liska, Sally; Rauch, Leah; Philip, Susan S; Bernstein, Kyle T

    2011-07-01

    By using a reason-for-test code, we compared positivity for female chlamydia and gonorrhea. At family planning clinics, there were no statistically significant differences in screening versus diagnostic positivity for either chlamydia or gonorrhea among women. However, at adolescent health clinics, diagnostic positivity was higher than screening positivity for chlamydia and gonorrhea.

  14. Gamma radiation grafted polymers for immobilization of Brucella antigen in diagnostic test studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docters, E. H.; Smolko, E. E.; Suarez, C. E.

    The radiation grafting process has a wide field of industrial applications, and in the recent years the immobilization of biocomponents in grafted polymeric materials obtained by means of ionizing radiations is a new and important contribution to biotechnology. In the present work, gamma preirradiation grafting method was employed to produce acrylics hydrogels onto polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS). Two monomers were used to graft the previously mentioned polymers: methacrylic acid (MAAc) and acrylamide (AAm), and several working conditions were considered as influencing the degree of grafting. All this grafted polymers were used to study the possibility of a subsequent immobilization of Brucella antigen (BAg) in diagnostic test studies (ELISA).

  15. Study on validity of a rapid diagnostic test kit versus light microscopy for malaria diagnosis in Ahmedabad city, India.

    PubMed

    Vyas, S; Puwar, B; Patel, V; Bhatt, G; Kulkarni, S; Fancy, M

    2014-04-01

    Light microscopy of blood smears for diagnosis of malaria in the field has several limitations, notably delays in diagnosis. This study in Ahmedabad in Gujarat State, India, evaluated the diagnostic performance of a rapid diagnostic test for malaria (SD Bioline Malaria Ag P.f/Pan) versus blood smear examination as the gold standard. All fever cases presenting at 13 urban health centres were subjected to rapid diagnostic testing and thick and thin blood smears. A total of 677 cases with fever were examined; 135 (20.0%) tested positive by rapid diagnostic test and 86 (12.7%) by blood smear. The sensitivity of the rapid diagnostic test for malaria was 98.8%, specificity was 91.5%, positive predictive value 63.0% and negative predictive value 99.8%. For detection of Plasmodium falciparum the sensitivity of rapid diagnostic test was 100% and specificity was 97.3%. The results show the acceptability of the rapid test as an alternative to light microscopy in the field setting.

  16. Cognitive Reserve in Alzheimer's Dementia: Diagnostic Accuracy of a Testing-the-Limits Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Küster, Olivia C; Kösel, Jonas; Spohn, Stephanie; Schurig, Niklas; Tumani, Hayrettin; von Arnim, Christine A F; Uttner, Ingo

    2016-03-29

    Individuals with higher cognitive reserve are more able to cope with pathological brain alterations, potentially due to the application of more efficient cognitive strategies. The extent to which an individual's cognitive performance can be increased by advantageous conditions differs substantially between patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and healthy older adults and can be assessed with the Testing-the-Limits (TtL) approach. Thus, TtL has been proposed as a tool for the early diagnosis of AD. Here, we report the diagnostic accuracy of a memory TtL paradigm to discriminate between AD patients and controls. The TtL paradigm was administered to 57 patients with clinically diagnosed AD and 94 controls. It consisted of a pre-test condition, representing baseline cognitive performance, the presentation of an encoding strategy, and two subsequent post-test conditions, representing learning potential. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were analyzed for each condition in order to receive optimal cutoff points along with their sensitivity and specificity and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the conditions. Differentiation between AD patients and controls, indicated by the area under the ROC curve, increased significantly for the TtL post-test and total error scores compared to the pre-test score. The combined error score in the two post-tests could differentiate between AD patients and controls with a sensitivity of 0.93 and a specificity of 0.80. The presented approach can be carried out in 25 minutes and thus constitutes a time- and cost-effective way to diagnose AD with high accuracy. PMID:27031485

  17. Comparative Yield of Different Diagnostic Tests for Tuberculosis among People Living with HIV in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Joseph S.; Modi, Surbhi; Musau, Susan; McCarthy, Kimberly; Alexander, Heather; Burmen, Barbara; Heilig, Charles M.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Cain, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosis followed by effective treatment of tuberculosis (TB) reduces transmission and saves lives in persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Sputum smear microscopy is widely used for diagnosis, despite limited sensitivity in PLHIV. Evidence is needed to determine the optimal diagnostic approach for these patients. Methods From May 2011 through June 2012, we recruited PLHIV from 15 HIV treatment centers in western Kenya. We collected up to three sputum specimens for Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) and fluorescence microscopy (FM), GeneXpert MTB/RIF (Xpert), and culture, regardless of symptoms. We calculated the incremental yield of each test, stratifying results by CD4 cell count and specimen type; data were analyzed to account for complex sampling. Results From 778 enrolled patients, we identified 88 (11.3%) laboratory-confirmed TB cases. Of the 74 cases who submitted 2 specimens for microscopy and Xpert testing, ZN microscopy identified 25 (33.6%); Xpert identified those plus an additional 18 (incremental yield = 24.4%). Xpert testing of spot specimens identified 48 (57.0%) of 84 cases; whereas Xpert testing of morning specimens identified 50 (66.0%) of 76 cases. Two Xpert tests detected 22/24 (92.0%) TB cases with CD4 counts <100 cells/μL and 30/45 (67.0%) of cases with CD4 counts ≥100 cells/μl. Conclusions In PLHIV, Xpert substantially increased diagnostic yield compared to smear microscopy and had the highest yield when used to test morning specimens and specimens from PLHIV with CD4 count <100 cells/μL. TB programs unable to replace smear microscopy with Xpert for all symptomatic PLHIV should consider targeted replacement and using morning specimens. PMID:27023213

  18. Diagnostic Value of Electrocardiogram in Predicting Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Testing

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Ali; Ebdali, Reyhaneh Takalloo; Sajjadi, Seyed Sajed; Golnezhad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is believed that an exaggerated blood pressure response (EBPR) to exercise stress test is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events. It is also assumed that QT dispersion (QT-d), which was originally proposed to measure the spatial dispersion of ventricular recovery times, may have a relationship to cardiovascular events. The objective of this study was to examine the difference of changes in QT-d, Maxi-QT, Mini-QT, and QT-c (corrected QT interval) of the electrocardiogram in two groups of patients with exaggerated blood pressure responses (EBPR group) and normal responses (control group) to exercise testing. Also, the diagnostic value of each of these criteria in the prediction of EBPR was studied. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from May 2015 to February 2016 on patients suspected of coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing exercise testing who had been referred to Ghaem and Imam Reza hospitals in Mashhad (Iran). All patients underwent a treadmill exercise test with the 12-lead ECG, which was optically scanned and digitized for analysis of QT-d, QT max, and QT min. Patients were divided into two groups of normal and EBPR to exercise testing. QT changes of ECG were compared between the two groups, and the diagnostic accuracy of QT variables for prediction of EBPR to exercise testing was studied. A multiple linear regression analysis (MLR), Pearson Chi-qquare, independent samples t-test, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used as statistical methods in IBM SPSS version 19. Results Sixty patients (55% male) with a mean age of 50.48 ± 10.89 years were studied in two groups of normal (n=30) and exaggerated blood pressure response (n=30) to exercise testing. Maximum QT and QT dispersion were statistically different in individuals’ exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise stress test (p < 0.05). The logistic regression analysis revealed that none of our parameters predicted the EBPR. The ROC

  19. Small-scale deflagration cylinder test with velocimetry wall-motion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E; Hill, Larry G; Pierce, Timothy H

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the likelihood and effects of outcomes resultant from thermal initiation of explosives remains a significant challenge. For certain explosive formulations, the general outcome can be broadly predicted given knowledge of certain conditions. However, there remain unexplained violent events, and increased statistical understanding of outcomes as a function of many variables, or 'violence categorization,' is needed. Additionally, the development of an equation of state equivalent for deflagration would be very useful in predicting possible detailed event consequences using traditional hydrodynamic detonation moders. For violence categorization, it is desirable that testing be efficient, such that it is possible to statistically define outcomes reliant on the processes of initiation of deflagration, steady state deflagration, and deflagration to detonation transitions. If the test simultaneously acquires information to inform models of violent deflagration events, overall predictive capabilities for event likelihood and consequence might improve remarkably. In this paper we describe an economical scaled deflagration cylinder test. The cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive formu1lation PBX 9501 was tested using different temperature profiles in a thick-walled copper cylindrical confiner. This test is a scaled version of a recently demonstrated deflagration cylinder test, and is similar to several other thermal explosion tests. The primary difference is the passive velocimetry diagnostic, which enables measurement of confinement vessel wall velocities at failure, regardless of the timing and location of ignition.

  20. Hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants - diagnostic algorithm and suggested patch test series for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D; Taylor, James S; Maibach, Howard I; Lidén, Carola; Bruze, Magnus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metals are challenging to evaluate and treat. Although they are uncommon, they do exist, and require appropriate and complete evaluation. This review summarizes the evidence regarding evaluation tools, especially patch and lymphocyte transformation tests, for hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metal devices. Patch test evaluation is the gold standard for metal hypersensitivity, although the results may be subjective. Regarding pre-implant testing, those patients with a reported history of metal dermatitis should be evaluated by patch testing. Those without a history of dermatitis should not be tested unless considerable concern exists. Regarding post-implant testing, a subset of patients with metal hypersensitivity may develop cutaneous or systemic reactions to implanted metals following implant. For symptomatic patients, a diagnostic algorithm to guide the selection of screening allergen series for patch testing is provided. At a minimum, an extended baseline screening series and metal screening is necessary. Static and dynamic orthopaedic implants, intravascular stent devices, implanted defibrillators and dental and gynaecological devices are considered. Basic management suggestions are provided. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive reference for use by those evaluating suspected cutaneous and systemic metal hypersensitivity reactions.

  1. Epidemiology of meningitis with a negative CSF Gram stain: under-utilization of available diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Nesher, L; Hadi, C M; Salazar, L; Wootton, S H; Garey, K W; Lasco, T; Luce, A M; Hasbun, R

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis with a negative cerebrospinal fluid Gram stain (CSF-GS) poses a diagnostic challenge as more than 50% of patients remain without an aetiology. The introduction of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and arboviral serologies have increased diagnostic capabilities, yet large scale epidemiological studies evaluating their use in clinical practice are lacking. We conducted a prospective observational study in New Orleans between November 1999 and September 2008 (early era) when PCR was not widely available, and in Houston between November 2008 and June 2013 (modern era), when PCR was commonly used. Patients presenting with meningitis and negative CSF-GS were followed for 4 weeks. All investigations, PCR used, and results were recorded as they became available. In 323 patients enrolled, PCR provided the highest diagnostic yield (24·2%) but was ordered for 128 (39·6%) patients; followed by serology for arboviruses (15%) that was ordered for 100 (31%) of all patients. The yield of blood cultures was (10·3%) and that of CSF cultures was 4%; the yield for all other tests was <10%. Overall, 65% of the patients remained without a diagnosis at 4 weeks: 72·1% in early era vs. 53·4% (P < 0·01) in modern era; this change was attributed to diagnosing more viral pathogens, 8·3% and 26·3% (P < 0·01), respectively. The introduction of PCR and arboviral serologies has improved the yield of diagnosing patients with meningitis and a negative CSF-GS, but both tests are being under-utilized.

  2. An italian multicenter study for application of a diagnostic algorithm in autoantibody testing.

    PubMed

    Bonaguri, Chiara; Melegari, Alessandra; Dall'Aglio, PierPaolo; Ballabio, Andrea; Terenziani, Paolo; Russo, Annalisa; Battistelli, Luisita; Aloe, Rosalia; Camisa, Roberta; Campaniello, Giovanna; Sartori, Elisabetta; Monica, Cesare

    2009-09-01

    The presence in the serum of specific autoantibodies, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA), and antiextractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA), is one of the diagnostic criteria for autoimmune rheumatic disease, and the requests for these tests in the last few years have grown remarkably. A guideline for reducing clinically inappropriate requests in autoantibody testing (ANA, anti-dsDNA, anti-ENA) has been applied in the Parma Hospital since 2007. The results for the period January-December 2007 were compared to those of the previous period January-December 2006, and a significant reduction in the number of anti-dsDNA (23.9%) and anti-ENA (20.7%) was found. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of a similar guideline in a wide area (Parma, Modena, Piacenza, Reggio-Emilia) with reference to the diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic disease. This project, supported by a regional grant for innovative research projects, was started in January 2008 and consists of three different steps: (1) a study group of clinicians and laboratory physicians to evaluate the diagnostic criteria, the analytical procedures, and the number of tests performed in different hospitals; (2) developing common guidelines for autoantibody testing that takes into account the different clinical needs with the aim of improving efficiency and clinical effectiveness of diagnosis and monitoring; and (3) assessing compliance with the guidelines in the different hospitals that are evaluating the second-level test (anti-dsDNA, anti-ENA) decrease. We think that the validation of guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic disease can represent a tool for improving patients' outcomes and economic efficiency.

  3. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Ground Testing on a C-17 Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  4. Self diagnostic accelerometer ground testing on a C-17 aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDA's flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  5. Development of three-tier heat, temperature and internal energy diagnostic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurcay, Deniz; Gulbas, Etna

    2015-05-01

    Background:Misconceptions are major obstacles to learning physics, and the concepts of heat and temperature are some of the common misconceptions that are encountered in daily life. Therefore, it is important to develop valid and reliable tools to determine students' misconceptions about basic thermodynamics concepts. Three-tier tests are effective assessment tools to determine misconceptions in physics. Although a limited number of three-tier tests about heat and temperature are discussed in the literature, no reports discuss three-tier tests that simultaneously consider heat, temperature and internal energy. Purpose:The aim of this study is to develop a valid and reliable three-tier test to determine students' misconceptions about heat, temperature and internal energy. Sample:The sample consists of 462 11th-grade Anatolian high school students. Of the participants, 46.8% were female and 53.2% were male. Design and methods:This research takes the form of a survey study. Initially, a multiple-choice test was developed. To each multiple-choice question was added one open-ended question asking the students to explain their answers. This test was then administered to 259 high school students and the data were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The students' answers for each open-ended question were analyzed and used to create the choices for the second-tier questions of the test. Depending on those results, a three-tier Heat, Temperature and Internal Energy Diagnostic Test (HTIEDT) was developed by adding a second-tier and certainty response index to each item. This three-tier test was administered to the sample of 462 high school students. Results:The Cronbach alpha reliability for the test was estimated for correct and misconception scores as .75 and .68, respectively. The results of the study suggested that HTIEDT could be used as a valid and reliable test in determining misconceptions about heat, temperature and internal energy concepts.

  6. Diagnostic test accuracy of glutamate dehydrogenase for Clostridium difficile: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Jun; Horita, Nobuyuki; Kato, Shingo; Fuyuki, Akiko; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Endo, Hiroki; Takashi, Nonaka; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-07-15

    We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic accuracy of detecting glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) based on the hierarchical model. Two investigators electrically searched four databases. Reference tests were stool cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) and stool toxigenic culture (TC). To assess the overall accuracy, we calculated the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) using a DerSimonian-Laird random-model and area the under hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristics (AUC) using Holling's proportional hazard models. The summary estimate of the sensitivity and the specificity were obtained using the bivariate model. According to 42 reports consisting of 3055 reference positive comparisons, and 26188 reference negative comparisons, the DOR was 115 (95%CI: 77-172, I(2) = 12.0%) and the AUC was 0.970 (95%CI: 0.958-0.982). The summary estimate of sensitivity and specificity were 0.911 (95%CI: 0.871-0.940) and 0.912 (95%CI: 0.892-0.928). The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 10.4 (95%CI 8.4-12.7) and 0.098 (95%CI 0.066-0.142), respectively. Detecting GDH for the diagnosis of CDI had both high sensitivity and specificity. Considering its low cost and prevalence, it is appropriate for a screening test for CDI.

  7. Diagnostic test accuracy of glutamate dehydrogenase for Clostridium difficile: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto, Jun; Horita, Nobuyuki; Kato, Shingo; Fuyuki, Akiko; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Endo, Hiroki; Takashi, Nonaka; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic accuracy of detecting glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) based on the hierarchical model. Two investigators electrically searched four databases. Reference tests were stool cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) and stool toxigenic culture (TC). To assess the overall accuracy, we calculated the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) using a DerSimonian-Laird random-model and area the under hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristics (AUC) using Holling’s proportional hazard models. The summary estimate of the sensitivity and the specificity were obtained using the bivariate model. According to 42 reports consisting of 3055 reference positive comparisons, and 26188 reference negative comparisons, the DOR was 115 (95%CI: 77–172, I2 = 12.0%) and the AUC was 0.970 (95%CI: 0.958–0.982). The summary estimate of sensitivity and specificity were 0.911 (95%CI: 0.871–0.940) and 0.912 (95%CI: 0.892–0.928). The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 10.4 (95%CI 8.4–12.7) and 0.098 (95%CI 0.066–0.142), respectively. Detecting GDH for the diagnosis of CDI had both high sensitivity and specificity. Considering its low cost and prevalence, it is appropriate for a screening test for CDI. PMID:27418431

  8. Calibration and test of the tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic on CDX-U (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Choe, W.; Kaita, R.

    1997-01-01

    The novel CO{sub 2} laser based tangential imaging diagnostic has been completely calibrated and the system has been tested on CDX-U plasmas. It has been shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam.1 A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on soundwaves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of {approx}1{times}10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3}/{radical}(Hz) has been determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U are described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are 2{endash}3 orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cutoff wave number (from {approx}1{endash}8 cm{sup {minus}1}) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation {ital k} spectrum is measured and found to peak at {approx}1{endash}3 cm{sup {minus}1}.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Calibration and test of the tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic on CDX-U (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Choe, W.; Kaita, R.

    1997-01-01

    The novel CO2 laser based tangential imaging diagnostic has been completely calibrated and the system has been tested on CDX-U plasmas. It has been shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam.1 A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on soundwaves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of ≈1×107 cm-3/√Hz has been determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U are described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are 2-3 orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cutoff wave number (from ≈1-8 cm-1) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation k spectrum is measured and found to peak at ≈1-3 cm-1.

  10. Calibration and test of the tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic on CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Choe, W.; Kaita, R.

    1997-02-01

    A novel CO{sub 2} laser-based tangential imaging diagnostic was completely calibrated and the system was tested on CDX-U plasmas. It was shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam [E. Lo, J. Wright, and R. Nazikian, Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 66}, 1180 (1995)]. A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on sound waves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of {approx}1{times}10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3}/{radical}(Hz) was determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U is described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are two to three orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cut-off wave number (from {approx}1 to 8 cm{sup {minus}1}) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation {ital k} spectrum is measured and found to peak at {approx}1{endash}3 cm{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Calibration and test of the tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, E.; Nazikian, R.; Stutman, D.; Choe, W.; Kaita, R.

    1997-02-01

    A novel CO2 laser-based tangential imaging diagnostic was completely calibrated and the system was tested on CDX-U plasmas. It was shown that localized, two-dimensional images of the plasma electron density fluctuations in the tokamak core can be obtained from a tangential imaging beam [E. Lo, J. Wright, and R. Nazikian, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 1180 (1995)]. A variation of the Zernike phase mirror is used. Test measurements made on sound waves verify that the system will image phase variations placed at the object plane. An absolute sensitivity of ≈1×107 cm-3/√Hz was determined. A series of plasma measurements made on CDX-U is described. Results show that the plasma fluctuations are two to three orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the diagnostic. It is also verified that a high-pass cut-off wave number (from ≈1 to 8 cm-1) for the fluctuations can be selected by translating the phase mirror. The density fluctuation k spectrum is measured and found to peak at ≈1-3 cm-1.

  12. Interleukin (IL)-1A and IL-6: Applications to the predictive diagnostic testing of radiation pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau . E-mail: yuhchyau_chen@urmc.rochester.edu; Hyrien, Ollivier; Williams, Jacqueline; Okunieff, Paul; Smudzin, Therese; Rubin, Philip

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To explore the application of interleukin (IL)-1{alpha} and IL-6 measurements in the predictive diagnostic testing for symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods and materials: In a prospective protocol investigating RP and cytokines, IL-1{alpha} and IL-6 values were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay from serial weekly blood samples of patients receiving chest radiation. We analyzed sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) over selected threshold values for both cytokines in the application to diagnostic testing. Results: The average coefficient of variation was 51% of the weekly mean IL-1{alpha} level and 39% of the weekly mean IL-6 value. Interleukin 1{alpha} and IL-6 became positively correlated with time. Specificity for both cytokines was better than sensitivity. IL-6 globally outperformed IL-1{alpha} in predicting RP, with higher PPV and NPV. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate the feasibility of applying IL-1{alpha} and IL-6 measurements of blood specimens to predict RP. Interleukin-6 measurements offer stronger positive predictive value than IL-1{alpha}. This application might be further explored in a larger sample of patients.

  13. Rapid diagnostic tests for non-malarial febrile illness in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Chappuis, F; Alirol, E; d'Acremont, V; Bottieau, E; Yansouni, C P

    2013-05-01

    The recent roll-out of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria has highlighted the decreasing proportion of malaria-attributable illness in endemic areas. Unfortunately, once malaria is excluded, there are few accessible diagnostic tools to guide the management of severe febrile illnesses in low resource settings. This review summarizes the current state of RDT development for several key infections, including dengue fever, enteric fever, leptospirosis, brucellosis, visceral leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis, and highlights many remaining gaps. Most RDTs for non-malarial tropical infections currently rely on the detection of host antibodies against a single infectious agent. The sensitivity and specificity of host-antibody detection tests are both inherently limited. Moreover, prolonged antibody responses to many infections preclude the use of most serological RDTs for monitoring response to treatment and/or for diagnosing relapse. Considering these limitations, there is a pressing need for sensitive pathogen-detection-based RDTs, as have been successfully developed for malaria and dengue. Ultimately, integration of RDTs into a validated syndromic approach to tropical fevers is urgently needed. Related research priorities are to define the evolving epidemiology of fever in the tropics, and to determine how combinations of RDTs could be best used to improve the management of severe and treatable infections requiring specific therapy.

  14. Monocyte Activation in Immunopathology: Cellular Test for Development of Diagnostics and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Several highly prevalent human diseases are associated with immunopathology. Alterations in the immune system are found in such life-threatening disorders as cancer and atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation followed by macrophage polarization is an important step in normal immune response to pathogens and other relevant stimuli. Depending on the nature of the activation signal, macrophages can acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes that are characterized by the expression of distinct patterns of secreted cytokines and surface antigens. This process is disturbed in immunopathologies resulting in abnormal monocyte activation and/or bias of macrophage polarization towards one or the other phenotype. Such alterations could be used as important diagnostic markers and also as possible targets for the development of immunomodulating therapy. Recently developed cellular tests are designed to analyze the phenotype and activity of living cells circulating in patient's bloodstream. Monocyte/macrophage activation test is a successful example of cellular test relevant for atherosclerosis and oncopathology. This test demonstrated changes in macrophage activation in subclinical atherosclerosis and breast cancer and could also be used for screening a panel of natural agents with immunomodulatory activity. Further development of cellular tests will allow broadening the scope of their clinical implication. Such tests may become useful tools for drug research and therapy optimization. PMID:26885534

  15. DVA as a Diagnostic Test for Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Appelbaum, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) stabilizes vision on earth-fixed targets by eliciting eyes movements in response to changes in head position. How well the eyes perform this task can be functionally measured by the dynamic visual acuity (DVA) test. We designed a passive, horizontal DVA test to specifically study the acuity and reaction time when looking in different target locations. Visual acuity was compared among 12 subjects using a standard Landolt C wall chart, a computerized static (no rotation) acuity test and dynamic acuity test while oscillating at 0.8 Hz (+/-60 deg/s). In addition, five trials with yaw oscillation randomly presented a visual target in one of nine different locations with the size and presentation duration of the visual target varying across trials. The results showed a significant difference between the static and dynamic threshold acuities as well as a significant difference between the visual targets presented in the horizontal plane versus those in the vertical plane when comparing accuracy of vision and reaction time of the response. Visual acuity increased proportional to the size of the visual target and increased between 150 and 300 msec duration. We conclude that dynamic visual acuity varies with target location, with acuity optimized for targets in the plane of rotation. This DVA test could be used as a functional diagnostic test for visual-vestibular and neuro-cognitive impairments by assessing both accuracy and reaction time to acquire visual targets.

  16. Diagnostic value of quantitative sensory testing (QST) in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borg, K; Lindblom, U

    1988-12-01

    The initial sensory symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are usually intermittent and the clinical neurological examination is often normal. The aim of the present study was to determine the rate of impairment of different somatosensory modalities in CTS by means of the following tests: vibrametry, tactile pulses, von Frey hairs, two-point discrimination (2-PD), graphesthesia and warm and cold perception thresholds. The material consisted of 33 hands with CTS from 22 patients. Each of the first 3 tests was abnormal with elevated thresholds in 17 CTS hands (52%), 2-PD was abnormal in 10 hands (30%), graphesthesia in 8 hands (24%), and warm and cold thresholds in only 5 hands (15%). There was an overlap so that at least one test was abnormal in 27 of the 33 CTS hands (82%). Thus, impairment of sensibility can be demonstrated in a majority of patients with CTS if more than one test is applied. Vibrametry and von Frey hairs are recommended instead of the commonly used 2-PD, since abnormality was more often revealed and since they are equally easy to apply. No individual test was sensitive enough to qualify as a diagnostic criterion when it was applied with the hand in resting position. A significant increase in both sensitivity and specificity can be expected for any test if it is combined with provocation, such as wrist flexion, as has been demonstrated for vibrametry.

  17. How diagnostic tests help to disentangle the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms in painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain, ie, pain arising directly from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory afferent pathway, manifests with various symptoms, the commonest being ongoing burning pain, electrical shock-like sensations, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Reliable insights into the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms come from diagnostic tests documenting and quantifying somatosensory afferent pathway damage in patients with painful neuropathies. Neurophysiological investigation and skin biopsy studies suggest that ongoing burning pain primarily reflects spontaneous activity in nociceptive-fiber pathways. Electrical shock-like sensations presumably arise from high-frequency ectopic bursts generated in demyelinated, nonnociceptive, Aβ fibers. Although the mechanisms underlying dynamic mechanical allodynia remain debatable, normally innocuous stimuli might cause pain by activating spared and sensitized nociceptive afferents. Extending the mechanistic approach to neuropathic pain symptoms might advance targeted therapy for the individual patient and improve testing for new drugs.

  18. Technical tips: the eyes and ears of artifacts in diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Linenbroker, Cara

    2013-03-01

    Recognizing and eliminating artifacts are a daily part of my job as a neurodiagnostic technologist. Distinguishing between EEG and artifact is essential since it can impact the patient's diagnosis and treatment. I recently experienced an interesting situation that I had never previously encountered. My patient had a cochlear implant. This small device presented a challenge, but gave me the opportunity to put my troubleshooting skills to the test, and use some quick thinking to remove the artifact it created from the recording. It turns out this small device not only affected the EEG recording, but also another diagnostic test. I decided to do some research on the cochlear implant to find out how this tiny instrument affected the EEG recording as well as my patient's life, by allowing my patient to hear the world around him. PMID:23682542

  19. The Diagnostic Accuracy of a New Test of Early Nonword Repetition for Differentiating Late Talking and Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Stephanie F.; Klee, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of a new Test of Early Nonword Repetition (TENR) for 2-year-old children. Method: 232 British-English-speaking children aged 27 ([plus or minus] 3) months were assessed on 3 standardized tests (receptive and expressive vocabulary and visual processing) and a novel nonword repetition (NWR) test. Parents…

  20. The Value of In Vitro Diagnostic Testing in Medical Practice: A Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Dieterle, Thomas; Giusti, Francesco; Messina, Carlo Guiseppe Mario; Toerien, Eduard; Moch, Holger; Schäfer, Hans Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Background In vitro diagnostic (IVD) investigations are indispensable for routine patient management. Appropriate testing allows early-stage interventions, reducing late-stage healthcare expenditure (HCE). Aim To investigate HCE on IVDs in two developed markets and to assess the perceived value of IVDs on clinical decision-making. Physician-perceived HCE on IVD was evaluated, as well as desired features of new diagnostic markers. Methods Past and current HCE on IVD was calculated for the US and Germany. A total of 79 US/German oncologists and cardiologists were interviewed to assess the number of cases where: physicians ask for IVDs; IVDs are used for initial diagnosis, treatment monitoring, or post-treatment; and decision-making is based on an IVD test result. A sample of 201 US and German oncologists and cardiologists was questioned regarding the proportion of HCE they believed to be attributable to IVD testing. After disclosing the actual IVD HCE, the physician’s perception of the appropriateness of the amount was captured. Finally, the association between physician-rated impact of IVD on decision-making and perceived contribution of IVD expenditure on overall HCE was assessed. Results IVD costs account for 2.3% and 1.4% of total HCE in the US and Germany. Most physicians (81%) believed that the actual HCE on IVDs was >5%; 19% rated the spending correctly (0–4%, p<0.001). When informed of the actual amount, 64% of physicians rated this as appropriate (p<0.0001); 66% of decision-making was based on IVD. Significantly, more physicians asked for either additional clinical or combined clinical/health economic data than for the product (test/platform) alone (p<0.0001). Conclusions Our results indicate a poor awareness of actual HCE on IVD, but a high attributable value of diagnostic procedures for patient management. New markers should deliver actionable and medically relevant information, to guide decision-making and foster improved patient outcomes. PMID

  1. Leukotriene D4 nasal provocation test: Rationale, methodology and diagnostic value

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, ZHENG; XIE, YANQING; GUAN, WEIJIE; GAO, YI; XIA, SHU; LIANG, JIANXIN; ZHENG, JINPING

    2016-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (LT) play a vital role in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis (AR), but few studies have investigated the nasal mucosal physiological response to LTs in AR patients. The aim of the present study was to establish the methodology and investigate the diagnostic value and safety of a leukotriene D4 (LTD4) nasal provocation test. LTD4 nasal provocation tests were performed in 26 AR patients and 16 normal control subjects. Nasal airway responsiveness was assessed by calculating the concentration of LTD4 required to cause a 60% increase in nasal airway resistance (PC60NAR-LTD4), which was measured using rhinomanometry and a composite symptom score. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was applied to evaluate the diagnostic value of LTD4 nasal provocation test, and adverse events were recorded. The study protocol was registered with the U.S. National Institutes of Health (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01963741). PC60NAR-LTD4 in AR was significantly lower compared with that of normal controls [8.36 (IQR, 10.00) vs. 17.00 (IQR, 0.00) µg/ml, P=0.005]. Composite symptom score was higher in AR as compared with normal controls (1.19±0.94 vs. 0.12±0.50, P<0.001). The symptom scores included sneezing (0.12±0.34 vs. 0.00±0.00, P=0.149), rhinorrhea (0.79±0.66 vs. 0.06±0.25, P<0.001) and chemosis or itching of the eyes (0.06±0.25 vs. 0.21±0.42, P=0.216). High diagnostic value was indicated by the ROC [AUC: 0.822, 95%CI (0.665, 0.961)]. No serious adverse events were observed. Thus, the present results indicate that AR patients exhibited nasal hyperactivity to LTD4, and the established procedure of LTD4 nasal provocation testing is effective and safe for use in the diagnosis of AR. PMID:27347089

  2. The use of rapid dengue diagnostic tests in a routine clinical setting in a dengue-endemic area of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Lyda; Uribe, Marcela; Ardila, Gloria Ines; Orejuela, Yaneth; Velasco, Margarita; Bonelo, Anilza; Parra, Beatriz

    2015-06-01

    There is insufficient evidence of the usefulness of dengue diagnostic tests under routine conditions. We sought to analyse how physicians are using dengue diagnostics to inform research and development. Subjects attending 14 health institutions in an endemic area of Colombia with either a clinical diagnosis of dengue or for whom a dengue test was ordered were included in the study. Patterns of test-use are described herein. Factors associated with the ordering of dengue diagnostic tests were identified using contingency tables, nonparametric tests and logistic regression. A total of 778 subjects were diagnosed with dengue by the treating physician, of whom 386 (49.5%) were tested for dengue. Another 491 dengue tests were ordered in subjects whose primary diagnosis was not dengue. Severe dengue classification [odds ratio (OR) 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.5], emergency consultation (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.4-2.5) and month of the year (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.7-5.5) were independently associated with ordering of dengue tests. Dengue tests were used both to rule in and rule out diagnosis. The latter use is not justified by the sensitivity of current rapid dengue diagnostic tests. Ordering of dengue tests appear to depend on a combination of factors, including physician and institutional preferences, as well as other patient and epidemiological factors.

  3. Thiopurine S-methyltransferase testing for averting drug toxicity: a meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Zur, RM; Roy, LM; Ito, S; Beyene, J; Carew, C; Ungar, WJ

    2016-01-01

    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) deficiency increases the risk of serious adverse events in persons receiving thiopurines. The objective was to synthesize reported sensitivity and specificity of TPMT phenotyping and genotyping using a latent class hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic meta-analysis. In 27 studies, pooled sensitivity and specificity of phenotyping for deficient individuals was 75.9% (95% credible interval (CrI), 58.3–87.0%) and 98.9% (96.3–100%), respectively. For genotype tests evaluating TPMT*2 and TPMT*3, sensitivity and specificity was 90.4% (79.1–99.4%) and 100.0% (99.9–100%), respectively. For individuals with deficient or intermediate activity, phenotype sensitivity and specificity was 91.3% (86.4–95.5%) and 92.6% (86.5–96.6%), respectively. For genotype tests evaluating TPMT*2 and TPMT*3, sensitivity and specificity was 88.9% (81.6–97.5%) and 99.2% (98.4–99.9%), respectively. Genotyping has higher sensitivity as long as TPMT*2 and TPMT*3 are tested. Both approaches display high specificity. Latent class meta-analysis is a useful method for synthesizing diagnostic test performance data for clinical practice guidelines. PMID:27217052

  4. Summary of Glaucoma Diagnostic Testing Accuracy: An Evidence-Based Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Saad; Khan, Zainab; Si, Francie; Mao, Alex; Pan, Irene; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Hutnik, Cindy; Moher, David; Tingey, David; Trope, Graham E.; Damji, Karim F.; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Goeree, Ron; Hodge, William

    2016-01-01

    Background New glaucoma diagnostic technologies are penetrating clinical care and are changing rapidly. Having a systematic review of these technologies will help clinicians and decision makers and help identify gaps that need to be addressed. This systematic review studied five glaucoma technologies compared to the gold standard of white on white perimetry for glaucoma detection. Methods OVID® interface: MEDLINE® (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations), EMBASE®, BIOSIS Previews®, CINAHL®, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library were searched. A gray literature search was also performed. A technical expert panel, information specialists, systematic review method experts and biostatisticians were used. A PRISMA flow diagram was created and a random effect meta-analysis was performed. Results A total of 2,474 articles were screened. The greatest accuracy was found with frequency doubling technology (FDT) (diagnostic odds ratio (DOR): 57.7) followed by blue on yellow perimetry (DOR: 46.7), optical coherence tomography (OCT) (DOR: 41.8), GDx (DOR: 32.4) and Heidelberg retina tomography (HRT) (DOR: 17.8). Of greatest concern is that tests for heterogeneity were all above 50%, indicating that cutoffs used in these newer technologies were all very varied and not uniform across studies. Conclusions Glaucoma content experts need to establish uniform cutoffs for these newer technologies, so that studies that compare these technologies can be interpreted more uniformly. Nevertheless, synthesized data at this time demonstrate that amongst the newest technologies, OCT has the highest glaucoma diagnostic accuracy followed by GDx and then HRT. PMID:27540437

  5. EM field and instrumentation diagnostics in support of the LFT&E HPM methodology testing

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R A; Nelson, S D

    1997-09-04

    The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, under the direction of the DoD LFT&E Office performed a series of HPM tests for the purpose of exercising the HPM methodology for LFT&E applications. An AH-1S Cobra helicopter was used as the canonical test bed. The Air Force Research Lab (formally Phillips Lab) provided the wide-band source and the Army Research Lab provided the narrow-band used in the tests. LLNL provided the EM diagnostics used at the site for both test series. Our mission was to measure the radiated field from the sources, measure the fields inside the helicopter and the coupling onto various signal lines inside the helicopter, and to monitor the various system signal levels for "bird health" purposes. These experiments were performed during June of 1997 and consisted of exposing the test bed to a series of narrow-band and wide-band pulses from HPM sources. This report covers the measured radiated fields, the fields inside the helicopter, and the coupled signal levels. The radiated fields were measured over a region which spans the physical body of the helicopter. The fields inside the helicopter and the coupled fields were measured using a series of probes inside the helicopter and connected to the outside measurement system using fiber-optic cables. The helicopter effects data are presented in the main China Lake report.

  6. EM field and instrumentation diagnostics in support of the LFT E HPM methodology testing

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. A.; Nelson, S. D.

    1997-09-04

    The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, under the direction of the DOD LFT E Office performed a series of HPM tests for the purpose of exercising the HPM methodology for LFT E applications. An AH-1S Cobra helicopter was used as the canonical test bed. The Air Force Research Lab (formally Phillips Lab) provided the wide-band source and the Army Research Lab provided the narrow-band used in the tests. LLNL provided the EM diagnostics used at the site for both test series. Our mission was to measure the radiated field from the sources, measure the fields inside the helicopter and the coupling onto various signal lines inside the helicopter, and to monitor the various system signal levels for bird health purposes. These experiments were performed during June of 1997 and consisted of exposing the test bed to a series of narrow-band and wide-band pulses from HPM sources. This report covers the measured radiated fields, the fields inside the helicopter, and the coupled signal levels. The radiated fields were measured over a region which spans the physical body of the helicopter. The fields inside the helicopter and the coupled fields were measured using a series of probes inside the helicopter and connected to the outside measurement system using fiber-optic cables. The helicopter effects data are presented in the main China Lake report.

  7. The use of rapid diagnostic tests for transfusion infectious screening in Africa: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Pruett, Cristina R; Vermeulen, Marion; Zacharias, Pete; Ingram, Charlotte; Tayou Tagny, Claude; Bloch, Evan M

    2015-01-01

    Infectious risk associated with blood transfusion remains a major public health challenge in Africa, where prevalence rates of the major transfusion-transmissible infections (ie, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus, and syphilis) are among the highest in the world. Resource-limited blood services often operate with minimal predonation screening safeguards, prompting exclusive reliance on laboratory testing to mitigate infectious risk. Transfusion screening with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has been adopted in areas that lack the capacity to support the routine use of more sophisticated technologies. However, uncertainty surrounding the performance of some RDTs in the field has spurred debate regarding their application to blood donation screening. Our review of the literature identified 17 studies that evaluated RDTs for the infectious screening of blood donors in Africa. The review highlights the variable performance of available RDTs and the importance of their use in a quality-assured manner. Deficiencies in performance observed with some RDTs underscore the need to validate test kits prior to use under field conditions with locally acquired samples. Suboptimal sensitivities of some available tests, specifically hepatitis B virus rapid assays, question their suitability in single-test algorithms, particularly in high-prevalence regions. Although RDTs have limitations, many of which can be addressed through improved training and quality systems, they are frequently the only viable option for infectious screening in resource-poor African countries. Therefore, additional studies and specific guidelines regarding the use of RDTs in the context of blood safety are needed.

  8. Diagnostic hematology of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Nicole I; Alleman, A Rick; Sayler, Katherine A

    2011-03-01

    The hematologic evaluation of reptiles is an indispensable diagnostic tool in exotic veterinary practice. The diversity of reptile species, their characteristic physiologic features, and effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors present unique challenges for accurate interpretation of the hemogram. Combining the clinical presentation with hematologic findings provides valuable information in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease and helps guide the clinician toward therapy and further diagnostic testing. This article outlines the normal and pathologic morphology of blood cells of reptile species. The specific comparative aspects of reptiles are emphasized, and structural and functional abnormalities in the reptilian hemogram are described.

  9. Malaria rapid diagnostic test evaluation at private retail pharmacies in Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Audu, Rauf; Anto, Berko Panyin; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Abruquah, Akua Afriyie; Buabeng, Kwame Ohene

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Malaria rapid diagnostic test (MRDT) provides a good alternative to malaria microscopy diagnosis, particularly in resource-constrained settings. This study therefore evaluated MRDT in private retail pharmacies (PRPs) as a critical step in community case malaria management. Methods: In a prospective, cross-over, validation survey at six PRPs in the Ashanti Region of Ghana, 1200 patients presenting with fever in the preceding 48 h were sampled. Fingerstick blood samples were collected for preparation of thick and thin blood films for malaria microscopy. Categorized patients (600 each) went through the processes of MRDT or presumptive diagnosis (PD) of malaria. The malaria disease prevalence of the study area was established. Selectivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV) along with false discovery rate (FDR), and negative predictive value (NPV) along with the false omission rate (FOR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of MRDT were then calculated. Findings: While 43.0% tested positive using the MRDT, 57.0% tested negative. However, 62.0% MRDT-negative patients in addition to all the MRDT positives were given artemether-lumefantrine. Of those diagnosed by PD, 98.2% were prescribed with an antimalarial (microscopy however confirmed only 70.3% as positive). Se and Sp of the MRDT were 90.68 ± 11.18% and 98.68 ± 1.19%, respectively. Malaria prevalence was estimated to be 43.3%. PPV was 98.0%, FDR was 2.0%, NPV was 98.0%, FOR was 2.0%, and DOR was 2366.43. Conclusion: Results highlighted good performance of MRDTs at PRPs which could inform decision toward its implementation. PMID:27512708

  10. A Global Comparative Evaluation of Commercial Immunochromatographic Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Jane; Hasker, Epco; Das, Pradeep; El Safi, Sayda; Goto, Hiro; Mondal, Dinesh; Mbuchi, Margaret; Mukhtar, Maowia; Rabello, Ana; Rijal, Suman; Sundar, Shyam; Wasunna, Monique; Adams, Emily; Menten, Joris; Peeling, Rosanna; Boelaert, Marleen

    2012-01-01

    Background. Poor access to diagnosis stymies control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Antibody-detecting rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can be performed in peripheral health settings. However, there are many brands available and published reports of variable accuracy. Methods. Commercial VL RDTs containing bound rK39 or rKE16 antigen were evaluated using archived human sera from confirmed VL cases (n = 750) and endemic non-VL controls (n = 754) in the Indian subcontinent (ISC), Brazil, and East Africa to assess sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence intervals. A subset of RDTs were also evaluated after 60 days’ heat incubation (37°C, 45°C). Interlot and interobserver variability was assessed. Results. All test brands performed well against ISC panels (sensitivity range, 92.8%–100%; specificity range, 96%–100%); however, sensitivity was lower against Brazil and East African panels (61.5%–91% and 36.8%–87.2%, respectively). Specificity was consistently > 95% in Brazil and ranged between 90.8% and 98% in East Africa. Performance of some products was adversely affected by high temperatures. Agreement between lots and readers was good to excellent (κ > 0.73–0.99). Conclusions. Diagnostic accuracy of VL RDTs varies between the major endemic regions. Many tests performed well and showed good heat stability in the ISC; however, reduced sensitivity against Brazilian and East African panels suggests that in these regions, used alone, several RDTs are inadequate for excluding a VL diagnosis. More research is needed to assess ease of use and to compare performance using whole blood instead of serum and in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:22942208

  11. Parallel Recovery in a Trilingual Speaker: The Use of the Bilingual Aphasia Test as a Diagnostic Complement to the Comprehensive Aphasia Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, David W.; Ruffle, Louise; Grogan, Alice; Ali, Nilufa; Ramsden, Sue; Schofield, Tom; Leff, Alex P.; Crinion, Jenny; Price, Cathy J.

    2011-01-01

    We illustrate the value of the Bilingual Aphasia Test in the diagnostic assessment of a trilingual speaker post-stroke living in England for whom English was a non-native language. The Comprehensive Aphasia Test is routinely used to assess patients in English, but only in combination with the Bilingual Aphasia Test is it possible and practical to…

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pili (MTP), a putative biomarker for a tuberculosis diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Natasha; Ramsugit, Saiyur; Pillay, Manormoney

    2014-05-01

    Novel biomarkers are urgently needed for point of care TB diagnostics. In this study, we investigated the potential of the pilin subunit protein encoded by the mtp gene as a diagnostic biomarker. BLAST analysis of the mtp gene on published genome databases, and amplicon sequencing were performed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC) strains and other organisms. The protein secondary structure of the amino acid sequences of non-tuberculous Mycobacteria that partially aligned with the mtp sequence was analysed with PredictProtein software. The mtp gene and corresponding amino acid sequence of MTBC were 100% homologous with H37Rv, in contrast to the partial alignment of the non-tuberculous Mycobacteria. The mtp gene was present in all 91 clinical isolates of MTBC. Except for 2 strains with point mutations, the sequence was 100% conserved among the clinical strains. The mtp gene could not be amplified in all non-tuberculous Mycobacteria and respiratory organisms. The predicted MTP protein structure of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium abscessus differed significantly from that of the M. tuberculosis, which was similar to Mycobacterium marinum. The absence of the mtp gene in non-tuberculous Mycobacteria and other respiratory bacteria suggests that its encoded product, the pilin subunit protein of M. tuberculosis may be a suitable marker for a point of care TB test.

  13. Diagnostic Metabolomic Blood Tests for Endoluminal Gastrointestinal Cancer--A Systematic Review and Assessment of Quality.

    PubMed

    Antonowicz, Stefan; Kumar, Sacheen; Wiggins, Tom; Markar, Sheraz R; Hanna, George B

    2016-01-01

    Advances in analytics have resulted in metabolomic blood tests being developed for the detection of cancer. This systematic review aims to assess the diagnostic accuracy of blood-based metabolomic biomarkers for endoluminal gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Using endoscopic diagnosis as a reference standard, methodologic and reporting quality was assessed using validated tools, in addition to pathway-based informatics to biologically contextualize discriminant features. Twenty-nine studies (15 colorectal, 9 esophageal, 3 gastric, and 2 mixed) with data from 10,835 participants were included. All reported significant differences in hematologic metabolites. In pooled analysis, 246 metabolites were found to be significantly different after multiplicity correction. Incremental metabolic flux with disease progression was frequently reported. Two promising candidates have been validated in independent populations (both colorectal biomarkers), and one has been approved for clinical use. Networks analysis suggested modulation of elements of up to half of Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network subdivisions, and that the poor clinical applicability of commonly modulated metabolites could be due to extensive molecular interconnectivity. Methodologic and reporting quality was assessed as moderate-to-poor. Serum metabolomics holds promise for GI cancer diagnostics; however, future efforts must adhere to consensus standardization initiatives, utilize high-resolution discovery analytics, and compare candidate biomarkers with peer nonendoscopic alternatives.

  14. Barriers to Obtaining Diagnostic Testing for Coronary Artery Disease Among Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann, Leslie R. M.; Ibrahim, Said

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to identify factors associated with appointment nonattendance for diagnostic testing of coronary artery disease among veterans. For patients with possible heart disease, appointment nonattendance may seriously compromise short- and long-term outcomes. Understanding factors associated with nonattendance may help improve care while reducing inefficiency in service delivery. Methods. We surveyed patients who attended (n = 240) or did not attend (n = 139) a scheduled cardiac appointment at a midwestern Veterans Administration medical center. Multivariable regression models were used to assess factors associated with nonattendance. Results. Younger age, lower income, unemployment, and longer wait times for appointments were predictive of nonattendance. Nonattenders reported fewer cardiac symptoms and were more likely to attribute their symptoms to something other than heart disease. Nonattendance was also associated with a coping style characterized by avoidance of aversive information. Logistical issues, fear of diagnostic procedures, disbelief that one had heart disease, and medical mistrust were some of the reasons given for missed appointments. Conclusions. Appointment nonattendance among veterans scheduled for cardiology evaluation was associated with several important cognitive factors. These factors should be considered when one is designing clinical systems to reduce patient nonattendance. PMID:18381987

  15. Improving the reliability of diagnostic tests in population-based agreement studies

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kerrie P.; Edwards, Don

    2016-01-01

    Many large-scale studies have recently been carried out to assess the reliability of diagnostic procedures, such as mammography for the detection of breast cancer. The large numbers of raters and subjects involved raise new challenges in how to measure agreement in these types of studies. An important motivator of these studies is the identification of factors that contribute to the often wide discrepancies observed between raters’ classifications, such as a rater’s experience, in order to improve the reliability of the diagnostic process of interest. Incorporating covariate information into the agreement model is a key component in addressing these questions. Few agreement models are currently available that jointly model larger numbers of raters and subjects and incorporate covariate information. In this paper, we extend a recently developed population-based model and measure of agreement for binary ratings to incorporate covariate information using the class of generalized linear mixed models with a probit link function. Important information on factors related to the subjects and raters can be included as fixed and/or random effects in the model. We demonstrate how agreement can be assessed between subgroups of the raters and/or subjects, for example, comparing agreement between experienced and less experienced raters. Simulation studies are carried out to test the performance of the proposed models and measures of agreement. Application to a large-scale breast cancer study is presented. PMID:20128018

  16. “A New Tool Improves Diagnostic Test Performance for Transmission EM Evaluation of Axonemal Dynein Arms”

    PubMed Central

    Funkhouser, W. Keith; Niethammer, Marc; Carson, Johnny L.; Burns, Kimberlie A.; Knowles, Michael R.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) by identification of dynein arm loss in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images can be confounded by high background noise due to random electron-dense material within the ciliary matrix, leading to diagnostic uncertainty even for experienced morphologists. We developed a novel image analysis tool to average the axonemal peripheral microtubular doublets, thereby increasing microtubular signal and reducing random background noise. In a randomized, double-blinded study that compared two experienced morphologists and three different diagnostic approaches, we found that use of this tool led to improvement in diagnostic TEM test performance. PMID:23957500

  17. Measuring the quality-of-life effects of diagnostic and screening tests.

    PubMed

    Swan, J Shannon; Miksad, Rebecca A

    2009-08-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is a central concept for understanding the outcomes of medical care. When used in cost-effectiveness analysis, HRQL is typically measured for conditions persisting over long time frames (years), and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) values are generated. Consequently, years are the basic unit of time for cost-effectiveness analysis results: dollars spent per QALY gained. However, shorter term components of health care may also affect HRQL, and there is increased interest in measuring and accounting for these events. In radiology, the short-term HRQL effects of screening and diagnostic testing may affect a test's cost-effectiveness, even though they may only last for days. The unique challenge in radiology HRQL assessment is to realistically tap into the testing and screening experience while remaining consistent with QALY theory. The authors review HRQL assessment and highlight methods developed to specifically address the short-term effects of radiologic screening and testing. PMID:19643385

  18. The diagnostic performance of classical molecular tests used for detecting human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Marina; Camargo, Milena; Soto-De Leon, Sara C; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Sanchez, Ricardo; Jaimes, Camilo; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2012-10-01

    Cervical samples were evaluated for human papillomavirus (HPV) presence using the hybrid capture-2 (HC2) assay and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with three different primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R). PCR results were compared to HC2 and results of all assays were compared to cytological and colposcopy findings. Post-test probability was assessed in individual assays and test combinations. HPV-DNA prevalence was 36.5% with HC2 and 55.2% with PCR. MY09/11 detected HPV-DNA in 38% of samples, GP5+/6+ in 19.1% and pU1M/2R in 16.4%. pU1M/2R and HC2 had the highest concordance (75.31%, k=0.39 in the whole population; 74.1%, k=0.5 in women with abnormal cytology). pU1M/2R had the best diagnostic performance, including optimal post-test probabilities and cervical abnormality detection (individually or in a panel of tests). Women positive for pU1M/2R may be at higher risk of disease progression; the assay performance when combined with a Pap smear in cervical cancer screening programs should be evaluated.

  19. Gaps in Guideline-Concordant Use of Diagnostic Tests Among Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Meghan R.; Varghese, Thomas K.; Backhus, Leah M.; Wood, Douglas E.; Mulligan, Michael S.; Cheng, Aaron M.; Flum, David R.; Farjah, Farhood

    2016-01-01

    Background Practice guidelines recommend routine use of pulmonary function tests (PFTs), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET) for the workup of resectable lung cancer patients. Little is known about the frequency of guideline concordance in routine practice. Methods A cohort study (2007 to 2013) of 15,951 lung cancer patients undergoing lobectomy or pneumonectomy was conducted with MarketScan, a claims database of individuals with employer-provided health insurance. Guideline concordance was defined by claims for PFT within 180 days of resection and for CT and PET within 90 days of resection. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate temporal trends, patient characteristics, and costs associated with guideline-concordant care. Results Overall, 61% of patients received guideline-concordant care, increasing from 57% in 2007 to 66% in 2013 (p < 0.001). Compared with patients who received guideline-discordant care, patients with guideline-concordant care more frequently underwent repeat testing (PFT: 21% versus 12%, p < 0.001; CT: 46% versus 22%, p < 0.001; PET: 2.3% versus 1.1%, p < 0.001). Health plan–adjusted mean total test-related costs were higher among guideline-concordant patients who underwent repeat testing than patients who did not ($4,304 versus $3,454, p < 0.001). Conclusions Forty percent of lung cancer patients treated with surgical procedures did not receive recommended noninvasive cancer staging and physiologic assessment before resection. Guideline concordance was associated with repeat testing, and repeat testing was associated with higher costs. These findings support the need for quality improvement interventions that can increase guideline concordance while curbing potential excess use of diagnostic tests. PMID:26507425

  20. Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: diagnostic and predictive value of clinical testing, lumbar drainage, and CSF dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Cynthia V; Dengl, Markus; Nestler, Ulf; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Eichner, Gerrit; Preuß, Matthias; Meixensberger, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of the study was to analyze the diagnostic and predictive values of clinical tests, CSF dynamics, and intracranial pulsatility tests, compared with external lumbar drainage (ELD), for shunt response in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). METHODS Sixty-eight consecutive patients with suspected iNPH were prospectively evaluated. Preoperative assessment included clinical tests, overnight intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, lumbar infusion test (LIFT), and ELD for 24-72 hours. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to identify predictive parameters concerning the outcome after shunt therapy. RESULTS Positive response to ELD correctly predicted improvement after CSF diversion in 87.9% of the patients. A Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) value below 21 was associated with nonresponse after shunt insertion (specificity 93%, sensitivity 67%). Resistance to outflow of CSF (ROut) > 12 mm Hg/ml/min was false negative in 21% of patients. Intracranial pulsatility parameters yielded different results in various parameters (correlation coefficient between pulse amplitude and ICP, slow wave amplitude, and mean ICP) but did not correlate to outcome. In multiple linear regression analysis, a calculation of presurgical MMSE versus the value after ELD, ROut, and ICP amplitude quotient during LIFT was significantly associated with outcome (p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Despite a multitude of invasive tests, presurgical clinical testing and response to ELD yielded the best prediction for improvement of symptoms following surgery. The complication rate of invasive testing was 5.4%. Multiple and simple linear regression analyses indicated that outcome can only be predicted by a combination of parameters, in accordance with a multifactorial pathogenesis of iNPH. PMID:26824377