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Sample records for accurate dna copy

  1. Comparison of four digital PCR platforms for accurate quantification of DNA copy number of a certified plasmid DNA reference material

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lianhua; Meng, Ying; Sui, Zhiwei; Wang, Jing; Wu, Liqing; Fu, Boqiang

    2015-01-01

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a unique approach to measurement of the absolute copy number of target DNA without using external standards. However, the comparability of different dPCR platforms with respect to measurement of DNA copy number must be addressed before dPCR can be classified fundamentally as an absolute quantification technique. The comparability of four dPCR platforms with respect to accuracy and measurement uncertainty was investigated by using a certified plasmid reference material. Plasmid conformation was found to have a significant effect on droplet-based dPCR (QX100 and RainDrop) not shared with chip-based QuantStudio 12k or BioMark. The relative uncertainty of partition volume was determined to be 0.7%, 0.8%, 2.3% and 2.9% for BioMark, QX100, QuantStudio 12k and RainDrop, respectively. The measurements of the certified pNIM-001 plasmid made using the four dPCR platforms were corrected for partition volume and closely consistent with the certified value within the expended uncertainty. This demonstrated that the four dPCR platforms are of comparable effectiveness in quantifying DNA copy number. These findings provide an independent assessment of this method of determining DNA copy number when using different dPCR platforms and underline important factors that should be taken into consideration in the design of dPCR experiments. PMID:26302947

  2. Comparison of four digital PCR platforms for accurate quantification of DNA copy number of a certified plasmid DNA reference material.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lianhua; Meng, Ying; Sui, Zhiwei; Wang, Jing; Wu, Liqing; Fu, Boqiang

    2015-01-01

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a unique approach to measurement of the absolute copy number of target DNA without using external standards. However, the comparability of different dPCR platforms with respect to measurement of DNA copy number must be addressed before dPCR can be classified fundamentally as an absolute quantification technique. The comparability of four dPCR platforms with respect to accuracy and measurement uncertainty was investigated by using a certified plasmid reference material. Plasmid conformation was found to have a significant effect on droplet-based dPCR (QX100 and RainDrop) not shared with chip-based QuantStudio 12k or BioMark. The relative uncertainty of partition volume was determined to be 0.7%, 0.8%, 2.3% and 2.9% for BioMark, QX100, QuantStudio 12k and RainDrop, respectively. The measurements of the certified pNIM-001 plasmid made using the four dPCR platforms were corrected for partition volume and closely consistent with the certified value within the expended uncertainty. This demonstrated that the four dPCR platforms are of comparable effectiveness in quantifying DNA copy number. These findings provide an independent assessment of this method of determining DNA copy number when using different dPCR platforms and underline important factors that should be taken into consideration in the design of dPCR experiments.

  3. Methods for applying accurate digital PCR analysis on low copy DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Whale, Alexandra S; Cowen, Simon; Foy, Carole A; Huggett, Jim F

    2013-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is a highly accurate molecular approach, capable of precise measurements, offering a number of unique opportunities. However, in its current format dPCR can be limited by the amount of sample that can be analysed and consequently additional considerations such as performing multiplex reactions or pre-amplification can be considered. This study investigated the impact of duplexing and pre-amplification on dPCR analysis by using three different assays targeting a model template (a portion of the Arabidopsis thaliana alcohol dehydrogenase gene). We also investigated the impact of different template types (linearised plasmid clone and more complex genomic DNA) on measurement precision using dPCR. We were able to demonstrate that duplex dPCR can provide a more precise measurement than uniplex dPCR, while applying pre-amplification or varying template type can significantly decrease the precision of dPCR. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the pre-amplification step can introduce measurement bias that is not consistent between experiments for a sample or assay and so could not be compensated for during the analysis of this data set. We also describe a model for estimating the prevalence of molecular dropout and identify this as a source of dPCR imprecision. Our data have demonstrated that the precision afforded by dPCR at low sample concentration can exceed that of the same template post pre-amplification thereby negating the need for this additional step. Our findings also highlight the technical differences between different templates types containing the same sequence that must be considered if plasmid DNA is to be used to assess or control for more complex templates like genomic DNA.

  4. Copy-choice illegitimate DNA recombination revisited.

    PubMed Central

    d'Alençon, E; Petranovic, M; Michel, B; Noirot, P; Aucouturier, A; Uzest, M; Ehrlich, S D

    1994-01-01

    Nearly precise excision of a transposon related to Tn10 from an Escherichia coli plasmid was used as a model to study illegitimate DNA recombination between short direct repeats. The excision was stimulated 100-1000 times by induction of plasmid single-stranded DNA synthesis and did not involve transfer of DNA from the parental to the progeny molecule. We conclude that it occurred by copy-choice DNA recombination, and propose that other events of recombination between short direct repeats might be a result of the same process. Images PMID:8013470

  5. Getting DNA copy numbers without control samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The selection of the reference to scale the data in a copy number analysis has paramount importance to achieve accurate estimates. Usually this reference is generated using control samples included in the study. However, these control samples are not always available and in these cases, an artificial reference must be created. A proper generation of this signal is crucial in terms of both noise and bias. We propose NSA (Normality Search Algorithm), a scaling method that works with and without control samples. It is based on the assumption that genomic regions enriched in SNPs with identical copy numbers in both alleles are likely to be normal. These normal regions are predicted for each sample individually and used to calculate the final reference signal. NSA can be applied to any CN data regardless the microarray technology and preprocessing method. It also finds an optimal weighting of the samples minimizing possible batch effects. Results Five human datasets (a subset of HapMap samples, Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), Ovarian, Prostate and Lung Cancer experiments) have been analyzed. It is shown that using only tumoral samples, NSA is able to remove the bias in the copy number estimation, to reduce the noise and therefore, to increase the ability to detect copy number aberrations (CNAs). These improvements allow NSA to also detect recurrent aberrations more accurately than other state of the art methods. Conclusions NSA provides a robust and accurate reference for scaling probe signals data to CN values without the need of control samples. It minimizes the problems of bias, noise and batch effects in the estimation of CNs. Therefore, NSA scaling approach helps to better detect recurrent CNAs than current methods. The automatic selection of references makes it useful to perform bulk analysis of many GEO or ArrayExpress experiments without the need of developing a parser to find the normal samples or possible batches within the data. The method is

  6. Fast and accurate nonenzymatic copying of an RNA-like synthetic genetic polymer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenglong; Blain, J Craig; Zielinska, Daria; Gryaznov, Sergei M; Szostak, Jack W

    2013-10-29

    Recent advances suggest that it may be possible to construct simple artificial cells from two subsystems: a self-replicating cell membrane and a self-replicating genetic polymer. Although multiple pathways for the growth and division of model protocell membranes have been characterized, no self-replicating genetic material is yet available. Nonenzymatic template-directed synthesis of RNA with activated ribonucleotide monomers has led to the copying of short RNA templates; however, these reactions are generally slow (taking days to weeks) and highly error prone. N3'-P5'-linked phosphoramidate DNA (3'-NP-DNA) is similar to RNA in its overall duplex structure, and is attractive as an alternative to RNA because the high reactivity of its corresponding monomers allows rapid and efficient copying of all four nucleobases on homopolymeric RNA and DNA templates. Here we show that both homopolymeric and mixed-sequence 3'-NP-DNA templates can be copied into complementary 3'-NP-DNA sequences. G:T and A:C wobble pairing leads to a high error rate, but the modified nucleoside 2-thiothymidine suppresses wobble pairing. We show that the 2-thiothymidine modification increases both polymerization rate and fidelity in the copying of a 3'-NP-DNA template into a complementary strand of 3'-NP-DNA. Our results suggest that 3'-NP-DNA has the potential to serve as the genetic material of artificial biological systems. PMID:24101473

  7. Accuracy of DNA polymerase-alpha in copying natural DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, F; Krauss, G; Knill-Jones, J W; Fersht, A R

    1983-01-01

    The fidelity of DNA polymerase-alpha from calf thymus (9S enzyme) in copying bacteriophage phi174am16 DNA in vitro has been determined from the frequency of production of different revertants. In the self-priming reaction we were able to measure the frequencies of base pairing mismatches during the course of replication on biasing the ratios of deoxynucleoside triphosphates. The frequency of dGTP:T, dGTP:G and dATP:G mismatches were 7.6 x 10(-5), 4.4 x 10(-5) and 2.8 x 10(-5), respectively, at equal concentrations of the deoxynucleoside triphosphates. dCTP:A, dGTP:A, dCTP:T and dTTP:T mismatches were below the limit of detection (<5 x 10(-6)). A synthetic dodecamer primer with a 3' end covering the first two bases of the amber codon was used to determine the misinsertion frequency of the first nucleotide incorporated. This gave a misinsertion frequency of 1.5 x 10(-4) for the dGTP:T mismatch, which is slightly higher than that observed from the pool bias studies. Further, it showed no sensitivity to biasing the nucleotide pool, suggesting a different mechanism for the incorporation of the first nucleotide. These data do not support 'energy-relay'-like models for achieving high accuracy in eukaryotes. The observed misinsertion frequencies were corrected for mismatch repair of the heteroduplexes during the transfection experiments by parallel experiments using a mismatched primer. This was synthesized to have the same G:T mismatch as produced in the preceding experiment. PMID:11892804

  8. Accurate determination of plasmid copy number of flow-sorted cells using droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Michael; Vorpahl, Carsten; Türkowsky, Dominique; Lindmeyer, Martin; Bühler, Bruno; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Susann

    2014-06-17

    Many biotechnological processes rely on the expression of a plasmid-based target gene. A constant and sufficient number of plasmids per cell is desired for efficient protein production. To date, only a few methods for the determination of plasmid copy number (PCN) are available, and most of them average the PCN of total populations disregarding heterogeneous distributions. Here, we utilize the highly precise quantification of DNA molecules by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) and combine it with cell sorting using flow cytometry. A duplex PCR assay was set up requiring only 1000 sorted cells for precise determination of PCN. The robustness of this method was proven by thorough optimization of cell sorting, cell disruption, and PCR conditions. When non plasmid-harboring cells of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 were spiked with different dilutions of the expression plasmid pA-EGFP_B, a PCN from 1 to 64 could be accurately detected. As a proof of principle, induced cultures of P. putida KT2440 producing an EGFP-fused model protein by means of the plasmid pA-EGFP_B were investigated by flow cytometry and showed two distinct subpopulations, fluorescent and nonfluorescent cells. These two subpopulations were sorted for PCN determination with ddPCR. A remarkably diverging plasmid distribution was found within the population, with nonfluorescent cells showing a much lower PCN (≤1) than fluorescent cells (PCN of up to 5) under standard conditions.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA copy number variation across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Miller, Martin L; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Riaz, Nadeem; Sarungbam, Judy; Tickoo, Satish K; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Lee, William; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Hakimi, A Ari; Sander, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Mutations, deletions, and changes in copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are observed throughout cancers. Here, we survey mtDNA copy number variation across 22 tumor types profiled by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observe a tendency for some cancers, especially of the bladder, breast, and kidney, to be depleted of mtDNA, relative to matched normal tissue. Analysis of genetic context reveals an association between incidence of several somatic alterations, including IDH1 mutations in gliomas, and mtDNA content. In some but not all cancer types, mtDNA content is correlated with the expression of respiratory genes, and anti-correlated to the expression of immune response and cell-cycle genes. In tandem with immunohistochemical evidence, we find that some tumors may compensate for mtDNA depletion to sustain levels of respiratory proteins. Our results highlight the extent of mtDNA copy number variation in tumors and point to related therapeutic opportunities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10769.001 PMID:26901439

  10. Reconstructing DNA copy number by joint segmentation of multiple sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variations in DNA copy number carry information on the modalities of genome evolution and mis-regulation of DNA replication in cancer cells. Their study can help localize tumor suppressor genes, distinguish different populations of cancerous cells, and identify genomic variations responsible for disease phenotypes. A number of different high throughput technologies can be used to identify copy number variable sites, and the literature documents multiple effective algorithms. We focus here on the specific problem of detecting regions where variation in copy number is relatively common in the sample at hand. This problem encompasses the cases of copy number polymorphisms, related samples, technical replicates, and cancerous sub-populations from the same individual. Results We present a segmentation method named generalized fused lasso (GFL) to reconstruct copy number variant regions. GFL is based on penalized estimation and is capable of processing multiple signals jointly. Our approach is computationally very attractive and leads to sensitivity and specificity levels comparable to those of state-of-the-art specialized methodologies. We illustrate its applicability with simulated and real data sets. Conclusions The flexibility of our framework makes it applicable to data obtained with a wide range of technology. Its versatility and speed make GFL particularly useful in the initial screening stages of large data sets. PMID:22897923

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Spermatozoa of Fertile Stallions.

    PubMed

    Orsztynowicz, M; Pawlak, P; Podstawski, Z; Nizanski, W; Partyka, A; Gotowiecka, M; Kosiniak-Kamysz, K; Lechniak, D

    2016-06-01

    Predicting male fertility on non-invasive sperm traits is of big importance to human and animal reproduction strategies. Combining the wide range of parameters monitored by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) with some molecular traits (e.g. mtDNA content) may help to identify markers of the male fertility. The aim of this study was to characterize variation in the mtDNA copy number in equine sperm and to investigate whether mtDNA content is correlated with quality traits of stallion spermatozoa and the age of the male. Ejaculates collected from 53 fertile stallions were divided into four age groups (3-5, 6-10, 11-14 and >15 years) and were subjected to a complex investigation including conventional analysis, CASA, flow cytometry and mtDNA content (real-time PCR). The mean (±SD) number of mtDNA copies equalled 14 ± 9 and varied from 3 to 64. Considering the great number of sperm parameters monitored in this study, only few of them were correlated with the mtDNA content: ejaculate volume (a positive correlation), the amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH; a negative correlation) and the high mitochondrial activity index (a negative correlation). The stallion age was not correlated with the mtDNA copy number. This study provides the first set of data on mtDNA content in equine sperm and confirms phenomena previously described for humans and dog on associations between sperm mtDNA content and selected motility parameters monitored by the CASA. Basing our study on spermatozoa from fertile stallions could however limit the extent of detected associations. PMID:27037507

  12. Flexible and accurate detection of genomic copy-number changes from aCGH.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Oscar M; Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón

    2007-06-01

    Genomic DNA copy-number alterations (CNAs) are associated with complex diseases, including cancer: CNAs are indeed related to tumoral grade, metastasis, and patient survival. CNAs discovered from array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data have been instrumental in identifying disease-related genes and potential therapeutic targets. To be immediately useful in both clinical and basic research scenarios, aCGH data analysis requires accurate methods that do not impose unrealistic biological assumptions and that provide direct answers to the key question, "What is the probability that this gene/region has CNAs?" Current approaches fail, however, to meet these requirements. Here, we introduce reversible jump aCGH (RJaCGH), a new method for identifying CNAs from aCGH; we use a nonhomogeneous hidden Markov model fitted via reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo; and we incorporate model uncertainty through Bayesian model averaging. RJaCGH provides an estimate of the probability that a gene/region has CNAs while incorporating interprobe distance and the capability to analyze data on a chromosome or genome-wide basis. RJaCGH outperforms alternative methods, and the performance difference is even larger with noisy data and highly variable interprobe distance, both commonly found features in aCGH data. Furthermore, our probabilistic method allows us to identify minimal common regions of CNAs among samples and can be extended to incorporate expression data. In summary, we provide a rigorous statistical framework for locating genes and chromosomal regions with CNAs with potential applications to cancer and other complex human diseases.

  13. Rates of single-copy DNA evolution in herons.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, F H

    1987-01-01

    DNA-DNA hybridization was used to discover the extent of single-copy DNA similarity among 13 species of herons and one ibis. Genetic distances among taxa were summarized as Tm values in a folded matrix. From this matrix, trees with the same branching pattern were constructed by least squares under one of two assumptions: (1) that sister branches are equal in length and (2) that sister branches are not necessarily equal in length. The residual sums of squares of these trees were compared by F-test to see whether the branches of the tree built under assumption (2) fit the matrix data significantly better than those of the tree built under assumption (1). By this method the existence of different rates of DNA evolution in different heron lineages was established. Bittern single-copy DNA has evolved at a rate approximately 25% faster, and boat-billed heron (Cochearius) and rufescent tiger heron (Tigrisoma lineatum) DNA has evolved approximately 19% slower, than that of day and night herons. It appears that the differences in rates of DNA evolution may increase proportionally with genealogical distance.

  14. Chloroplast DNA Copy Number Changes during Plant Development in Organelle DNA Polymerase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Morley, Stewart A.; Nielsen, Brent L.

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast genome copy number is very high in leaf tissue, with upwards of 10,000 or more copies of the chloroplast DNA (ctDNA) per leaf cell. This is often promoted as a major advantage for engineering the plastid genome, as it provides high gene copy number and thus is expected to result in high expression of foreign proteins from integrated genes. However, it is also known that ctDNA copy number and ctDNA integrity decrease as cells age. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) allows measurement of organelle DNA levels relative to a nuclear gene target. We have used this approach to determine changes in copy number of ctDNA relative to the nuclear genome at different ages of Arabidopsis plant growth and in organellar DNA polymerase mutants. The mutant plant lines have T-DNA insertions in genes encoding the two organelle localized DNA polymerases (PolIA and PolIB). Each of these mutant lines exhibits some delay in plant growth and development as compared to wild-type plants, with the PolIB plants having a more pronounced delay. Both mutant lines develop to maturity and produce viable seeds. Mutants for both proteins were observed to have a reduction in ctDNA and mtDNA copy number relative to wild type plants at all time points as measured by qPCR. Both DNA polymerase mutants had a fairly similar decrease in ctDNA copy number, while the PolIB mutant had a greater effect of reduction in mtDNA levels. However, despite similar decreases in genome copy number, RT-PCR analysis of PolIA mutants show that PolIB expression remains unchanged, suggesting that PolIA may not be essential to plant survival. Furthermore, genotypic analysis of plants from heterozygous parents display a strong pressure to maintain two functioning copies of PolIB. These results indicate that the two DNA polymerases are both important in ctDNA replication, and they are not fully redundant to each other, suggesting each has a specific function in plant organelles. PMID:26870072

  15. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  16. Accurate restoration of DNA sequences. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, G.A.

    1994-05-01

    The primary of this project are the development of (1) a general stochastic model for DNA sequencing errors (2) algorithms to restore the original DNA sequence and (3) statistical methods to assess the accuracy of this restoration. A secondary objective is to develop new algorithms for fragment assembly. Initially a stochastic model that assumes errors are independent and uniformly distributed will be developed. Generalizations of the basic model will be developed to account for (1) decay of accuracy along fragments, (2) variable error rates among fragments, (3) sequence dependent errors (e.g. homopolymeric, runs), and (4) strand--specific systematic errors (e.g. compressions). The emphasis of this project will be the development of a theoretical basis for determining sequence accuracy. However, new algorithms are proposed and these will be implemented as software (in the C programming language). This software will be tested using real and simulated data. It will be modular in design and will be made available for distribution to the scientific community.

  17. PCR Based Determination of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, JP; Ryde, IT; Sanders, LH; Howlett, EH; Colton, MD; Germ, KE; Mayer, GD; Greenamyre, JT; Meyer, JN

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is a critical component of overall mitochondrial health. In this chapter we describe methods for isolation of both mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nucDNA), and measurement of their respective copy numbers using quantitative PCR. Methods differ depending on the species and cell type of the starting material, and availability of specific PCR reagents. PMID:25308485

  18. Increased leukocyte mitochondrial DNA copy number is associated with oral premalignant lesions: an epidemiology study

    PubMed Central

    He, Yonggang; Gong, Yilei; Gu, Jian; Lee, J.Jack; Lippman, Scott M.; Wu, Xifeng

    2014-01-01

    Although changes in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) have been linked to increased susceptibility to several cancers, the relationship between the mtDNA copy number in PBLs and the risk of cancer precursors has not been investigated. In this study, we measured the relative mtDNA copy number in PBLs of 143 patients with histologically confirmed oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) and of 357 healthy controls that were frequency-matched to patients according to age, sex and race. OPL patients had a significantly higher mtDNA copy number than the controls (1.36±0.74 versus 1.11±0.32; P < 0.001). In analyses stratified by sex, race, alcohol consumption and smoking status, the mtDNA copy number was higher in the OPL patients than in the controls in all the strata. Using the median mtDNA copy number in the control group as a cutoff, we found that individuals with a high mtDNA copy number had significantly higher risk of having OPLs than individuals with a low mtDNA copy number (adjusted odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.23–3.05, P = 0.004). Analysis of the joint effect of alcohol consumption and smoking revealed even greater risk for OPLs. Our results suggest that high mtDNA copy number in PBLs is significantly associated with having OPLs. To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiologic study to show that the mtDNA copy number may indicate the risk of cancer precursors. PMID:24743515

  19. Reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number is a biomarker of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Angela; Anugrha, Haidyan; Kurzawa-Akanbi, Marzena; Yarnall, Alison; Burn, David; Hudson, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Like any organ, the brain is susceptible to the march of time and a reduction in mitochondrial biogenesis is a hallmark of the aging process. In the largest investigation of mitochondrial copy number in Parkinson's disease (PD) to date and by using multiple tissues, we demonstrate that reduced Parkinson DNA (mitochondrial DNA mtDNA) copy number is a biomarker for the etiology of PD. We used established methods of mtDNA quantification to assess the copy number of mtDNA in n = 363 peripheral blood samples, n = 151 substantia nigra pars compacta tissue samples and n = 120 frontal cortex tissue samples from community-based PD cases fulfilling UK-PD Society brain bank criteria for the diagnosis of PD. Accepting technical limitations, our data show that PD patients suffer a significant reduction in mtDNA copy number in both peripheral blood and the vulnerable substantia nigra pars compacta when compared to matched controls. Our study indicates that reduced mtDNA copy number is restricted to the affected brain tissue, but is also reflected in the peripheral blood, suggesting that mtDNA copy number may be a viable diagnostic predictor of PD. PMID:26639155

  20. Reduced mtDNA copy number increases the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Mei, H; Sun, S; Bai, Y; Chen, Y; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-04-02

    Many cancer drugs are toxic to cells by activating apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that mitochondria have key roles in apoptosis in mammalian cells, but the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number variation in the pathogenesis of tumor cell apoptosis remains largely unknown. We used the HEp-2, HNE2, and A549 tumor cell lines to explore the relationship between mtDNA copy number variation and cell apoptosis. We first induced apoptosis in three tumor cell lines and one normal adult human skin fibroblast cell line (HSF) with cisplatin (DDP) or doxorubicin (DOX) treatment and found that the mtDNA copy number significantly increased in apoptotic tumor cells, but not in HSF cells. We then downregulated the mtDNA copy number by transfection with shRNA-TFAM plasmids or treatment with ethidium bromide and found that the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDP or DOX was significantly increased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly in tumor cells with lower mtDNA copy numbers, and this might be related to a low level of antioxidant gene expression. Finally, we rescued the increase of ROS in tumor cells with lipoic acid or N-acetyl-L-cysteine and found that the apoptosis rate decreased. Our studies suggest that the increase of mtDNA copy number is a self-protective mechanism of tumor cells to prevent apoptosis and that reduced mtDNA copy number increases ROS levels in tumor cells, increases the tumor cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and increases the rate of apoptosis. This research provides evidence that mtDNA copy number variation might be a promising new therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of tumors.

  1. Reduced mtDNA copy number increases the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mei, H; Sun, S; Bai, Y; Chen, Y; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer drugs are toxic to cells by activating apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that mitochondria have key roles in apoptosis in mammalian cells, but the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number variation in the pathogenesis of tumor cell apoptosis remains largely unknown. We used the HEp-2, HNE2, and A549 tumor cell lines to explore the relationship between mtDNA copy number variation and cell apoptosis. We first induced apoptosis in three tumor cell lines and one normal adult human skin fibroblast cell line (HSF) with cisplatin (DDP) or doxorubicin (DOX) treatment and found that the mtDNA copy number significantly increased in apoptotic tumor cells, but not in HSF cells. We then downregulated the mtDNA copy number by transfection with shRNA-TFAM plasmids or treatment with ethidium bromide and found that the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDP or DOX was significantly increased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly in tumor cells with lower mtDNA copy numbers, and this might be related to a low level of antioxidant gene expression. Finally, we rescued the increase of ROS in tumor cells with lipoic acid or N-acetyl-L-cysteine and found that the apoptosis rate decreased. Our studies suggest that the increase of mtDNA copy number is a self-protective mechanism of tumor cells to prevent apoptosis and that reduced mtDNA copy number increases ROS levels in tumor cells, increases the tumor cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and increases the rate of apoptosis. This research provides evidence that mtDNA copy number variation might be a promising new therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of tumors. PMID:25837486

  2. BASIC: A Simple and Accurate Modular DNA Assembly Method.

    PubMed

    Storch, Marko; Casini, Arturo; Mackrow, Ben; Ellis, Tom; Baldwin, Geoff S

    2017-01-01

    Biopart Assembly Standard for Idempotent Cloning (BASIC) is a simple, accurate, and robust DNA assembly method. The method is based on linker-mediated DNA assembly and provides highly accurate DNA assembly with 99 % correct assemblies for four parts and 90 % correct assemblies for seven parts [1]. The BASIC standard defines a single entry vector for all parts flanked by the same prefix and suffix sequences and its idempotent nature means that the assembled construct is returned in the same format. Once a part has been adapted into the BASIC format it can be placed at any position within a BASIC assembly without the need for reformatting. This allows laboratories to grow comprehensive and universal part libraries and to share them efficiently. The modularity within the BASIC framework is further extended by the possibility of encoding ribosomal binding sites (RBS) and peptide linker sequences directly on the linkers used for assembly. This makes BASIC a highly versatile library construction method for combinatorial part assembly including the construction of promoter, RBS, gene variant, and protein-tag libraries. In comparison with other DNA assembly standards and methods, BASIC offers a simple robust protocol; it relies on a single entry vector, provides for easy hierarchical assembly, and is highly accurate for up to seven parts per assembly round [2]. PMID:27671933

  3. BASIC: A Simple and Accurate Modular DNA Assembly Method.

    PubMed

    Storch, Marko; Casini, Arturo; Mackrow, Ben; Ellis, Tom; Baldwin, Geoff S

    2017-01-01

    Biopart Assembly Standard for Idempotent Cloning (BASIC) is a simple, accurate, and robust DNA assembly method. The method is based on linker-mediated DNA assembly and provides highly accurate DNA assembly with 99 % correct assemblies for four parts and 90 % correct assemblies for seven parts [1]. The BASIC standard defines a single entry vector for all parts flanked by the same prefix and suffix sequences and its idempotent nature means that the assembled construct is returned in the same format. Once a part has been adapted into the BASIC format it can be placed at any position within a BASIC assembly without the need for reformatting. This allows laboratories to grow comprehensive and universal part libraries and to share them efficiently. The modularity within the BASIC framework is further extended by the possibility of encoding ribosomal binding sites (RBS) and peptide linker sequences directly on the linkers used for assembly. This makes BASIC a highly versatile library construction method for combinatorial part assembly including the construction of promoter, RBS, gene variant, and protein-tag libraries. In comparison with other DNA assembly standards and methods, BASIC offers a simple robust protocol; it relies on a single entry vector, provides for easy hierarchical assembly, and is highly accurate for up to seven parts per assembly round [2].

  4. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion. PMID:27031233

  5. Quantitative changes in mitochondrial DNA copy number in various tissues of pigs during growth.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y M; Jin, L; Chen, X J; He, M N; Wang, Y; Liu, R; Li, M Z; Li, X W

    2015-03-06

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content is dependent on the energy requirements of tissues. To date, no comprehensive study has been conducted to examine mtDNA copy number variations in pigs. In the current study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the mtDNA copy number in 15 pig tissue types at 5 growth stages from embryo to adult. Observable differences in mtDNA content were detected in the tissues, including a 6-fold greater mtDNA content in the heart compared with the lung of 180-day-old samples. mtDNA content in the heart, longissimus dorsi muscle, psoas major muscle, kidney, brain, ovary, and subcutaneous adipose increased with growth. Expression of the replicative mitochondrial helicase (TWINKLE), which regulates mtDNA turnover, was significantly associated with changes in mtDNA copy numbers across tissues during growth (r = 0.33, P = 0.01). We demonstrated that the expression levels of mitochondrial genes were positively correlated with mtDNA copy number.

  6. Quantitative changes in mitochondrial DNA copy number in various tissues of pigs during growth.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y M; Jin, L; Chen, X J; He, M N; Wang, Y; Liu, R; Li, M Z; Li, X W

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content is dependent on the energy requirements of tissues. To date, no comprehensive study has been conducted to examine mtDNA copy number variations in pigs. In the current study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the mtDNA copy number in 15 pig tissue types at 5 growth stages from embryo to adult. Observable differences in mtDNA content were detected in the tissues, including a 6-fold greater mtDNA content in the heart compared with the lung of 180-day-old samples. mtDNA content in the heart, longissimus dorsi muscle, psoas major muscle, kidney, brain, ovary, and subcutaneous adipose increased with growth. Expression of the replicative mitochondrial helicase (TWINKLE), which regulates mtDNA turnover, was significantly associated with changes in mtDNA copy numbers across tissues during growth (r = 0.33, P = 0.01). We demonstrated that the expression levels of mitochondrial genes were positively correlated with mtDNA copy number. PMID:25867308

  7. Changes in DNA damage, molecular integrity, and copy number for plastid DNA and mitochondrial DNA during maize development

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rachana A.; Oldenburg, Delene J.; Bendich, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    The amount and structural integrity of organellar DNAs change during plant development, although the mechanisms of change are poorly understood. Using PCR-based methods, we quantified DNA damage, molecular integrity, and genome copy number for plastid and mitochondrial DNAs of maize seedlings. A DNA repair assay was also used to assess DNA impediments. During development, DNA damage increased and molecules with impediments that prevented amplification by Taq DNA polymerase increased, with light causing the greatest change. DNA copy number values depended on the assay method, with standard real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) values exceeding those determined by long-PCR by 100- to 1000-fold. As the organelles develop, their DNAs may be damaged in oxidative environments created by photo-oxidative reactions and photosynthetic/respiratory electron transfer. Some molecules may be repaired, while molecules with unrepaired damage may be degraded to non-functional fragments measured by standard qPCR but not by long-PCR. PMID:25261192

  8. Simple, Sensitive and Accurate Multiplex Detection of Clinically Important Melanoma DNA Mutations in Circulating Tumour DNA with SERS Nanotags

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Eugene J.H.; Wang, Yuling; Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and accurate identification of specific DNA mutations can influence clinical decisions. However accurate diagnosis from limiting samples such as circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is challenging. Current approaches based on fluorescence such as quantitative PCR (qPCR) and more recently, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) have limitations in multiplex detection, sensitivity and the need for expensive specialized equipment. Herein we describe an assay capitalizing on the multiplexing and sensitivity benefits of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with the simplicity of standard PCR to address the limitations of current approaches. This proof-of-concept method could reproducibly detect as few as 0.1% (10 copies, CV < 9%) of target sequences thus demonstrating the high sensitivity of the method. The method was then applied to specifically detect three important melanoma mutations in multiplex. Finally, the PCR/SERS assay was used to genotype cell lines and ctDNA from serum samples where results subsequently validated with ddPCR. With ddPCR-like sensitivity and accuracy yet at the convenience of standard PCR, we believe this multiplex PCR/SERS method could find wide applications in both diagnostics and research. PMID:27446486

  9. Low Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number is Associated With Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Chang-Yun; Park, Jung Tak; Kee, Youn Kyung; Han, Seung Gyu; Han, In Mee; Kwon, Young Eun; Park, Kyoung Sook; Lee, Mi Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial dysfunction may play an important role in abnormal glucose metabolism and systemic inflammation. We aimed to investigate the relationship between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and clinical outcomes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We recruited 120 prevalent PD patients and determined mtDNA copy number by PCR. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality, whereas secondary outcomes included cardiovascular events, technical PD failure, and incident malignancy. Cox proportional hazards analysis determined the independent association of mtDNA copy number with outcomes. The mean patient age was 52.3 years; 42.5% were men. The mean log mtDNA copy number was 3.30 ± 0.50. During a follow-up period of 35.4 ± 19.3 months, all-cause mortality and secondary outcomes were observed in 20.0% and 59.2% of patients, respectively. Secondary outcomes were significantly lower in the highest mtDNA copy number group than in the lower groups. In multiple Cox analysis, the mtDNA copy number was not associated with all-cause mortality (lower two vs highest tertile: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.208, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.477–3.061). However, the highest tertile group was significantly associated with lower incidences of secondary outcomes (lower two vs highest tertile: HR [95% CI] = 0.494 [0.277–0.882]) after adjusting for confounding factors. The decreased mtDNA copy number was significantly associated with adverse clinical outcomes in PD patients. PMID:26886611

  10. Accurate episomal HIV 2-LTR circles quantification using optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the detection of episomal HIV 2-LTR circles is a potential marker for ongoing viral replication. Quantification of 2-LTR circles is based on quantitative PCR or more recently on digital PCR assessment, but is hampered due to its low abundance. Sample pre-PCR processing is a critical step for 2-LTR circles quantification, which has not yet been sufficiently evaluated in patient derived samples. Materials and Methods We compared two sample processing procedures to more accurately quantify 2-LTR circles using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Episomal HIV 2-LTR circles were either isolated by genomic DNA isolation or by a modified plasmid DNA isolation, to separate the small episomal circular DNA from chromosomal DNA. This was performed in a dilution series of HIV-infected cells and HIV-1 infected patient derived samples (n=59). Samples for the plasmid DNA isolation method were spiked with an internal control plasmid. Results Genomic DNA isolation enables robust 2-LTR circles quantification. However, in the lower ranges of detection, PCR inhibition caused by high genomic DNA load substantially limits the amount of sample input and this impacts sensitivity and accuracy. Moreover, total genomic DNA isolation resulted in a lower recovery of 2-LTR templates per isolate, further reducing its sensitivity. The modified plasmid DNA isolation with a spiked reference for normalization was more accurate in these low ranges compared to genomic DNA isolation. A linear correlation of both methods was observed in the dilution series (R2=0.974) and in the patient derived samples with 2-LTR numbers above 10 copies per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), (R2=0.671). Furthermore, Bland–Altman analysis revealed an average agreement between the methods within the 27 samples in which 2-LTR circles were detectable with both methods (bias: 0.3875±1.2657 log10). Conclusions 2-LTR circles

  11. Ribosomal DNA and Stellate gene copy number variation on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1989-01-01

    Multigene families on the Y chromosome face an unusual array of evolutionary forces. Both ribosomal DNA and Stellate, the two families examined here, have multiple copies of similar sequences on the X and Y chromosomes. Although the rate of sequence divergence on the Y chromosome depends on rates of mutation, gene conversion and exchange with the X chromosome, as well as purifying selection, the regulation of gene copy number may also depend on other pleiotropic functions, such as maintenance of chromosome pairing. Gene copy numbers were estimated for a series of 34 Y chromosome replacement lines using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster. Scans of autoradiographs of the same blots probed with the cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene, a single copy gene, served as internal standards. Copy numbers span a 6-fold range for ribosomal DNA and a 3-fold range for Stellate DNA. Despite this magnitude of variation, there was no association between copy number and segregation variation of the sex chromosomes. Images PMID:2494656

  12. rDNA Copy Number Variants Are Frequent Passenger Mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Deletion Collections and de Novo Transformants

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Elizabeth X.; Wang, Xiaobin S.; Amemiya, Haley M.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Raghuraman, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus is known to exhibit greater instability relative to the rest of the genome. However, wild-type cells preferentially maintain a stable number of rDNA copies, suggesting underlying genetic control of the size of this locus. We performed a screen of a subset of the Yeast Knock-Out (YKO) single gene deletion collection to identify genetic regulators of this locus and to determine if rDNA copy number correlates with yeast replicative lifespan. While we found no correlation between replicative lifespan and rDNA size, we identified 64 candidate strains with significant rDNA copy number differences. However, in the process of validating candidate rDNA variants, we observed that independent isolates of our de novo gene deletion strains had unsolicited but significant changes in rDNA copy number. Moreover, we were not able to recapitulate rDNA phenotypes from the YKO yeast deletion collection. Instead, we found that the standard lithium acetate transformation protocol is a significant source of rDNA copy number variation, with lithium acetate exposure being the treatment causing variable rDNA copy number events after transformation. As the effects of variable rDNA copy number are being increasingly reported, our finding that rDNA is affected by lithium acetate exposure suggested that rDNA copy number variants may be influential passenger mutations in standard strain construction in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27449518

  13. The potential role for use of mitochondrial DNA copy number as predictive biomarker in presbycusis

    PubMed Central

    Falah, Masoumeh; Houshmand, Massoud; Najafi, Mohammad; Balali, Maryam; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Asghari, Alimohamad; Emamdjomeh, Hessamaldin; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is the most common communication disorder and neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Its prevalence is expected to increase, due to the trend of growth of the elderly population. The current diagnostic test for detection of presbycusis is implemented after there has been a change in hearing sensitivity. Identification of a pre-diagnostic biomarker would raise the possibility of preserving hearing sensitivity before damage occurs. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including the production of reactive oxygen species and induction of expression of apoptotic genes, participates in the progression of presbycusis. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation has a critical role in presbycusis. However, the nature of the relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number, an important biomarker in many other diseases, and presbycusis is undetermined. Methods Fifty-four subjects with presbycusis and 29 healthy controls were selected after ear, nose, throat examination and pure-tone audiometry. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. The copy number of mitochondrial DNA relative to the nuclear genome was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Subjects with presbycusis had a lower median mitochondrial DNA copy number than healthy subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.007). Mitochondrial DNA copy number was also significantly associated with degree of hearing impairment (P=0.025) and audiogram configuration (P=0.022). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that lower mitochondrial DNA copy number is responsible for presbycusis through alteration of mitochondrial function. Moreover, the significant association of mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood samples with the degree of hearing impairment and audiogram configuration has potential for use as a standard test for presbycusis, providing the possibility of the development of an easy

  14. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Peripheral Blood Cells and Risk of Developing Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lemnrau, Alina; Brook, Mark N; Fletcher, Olivia; Coulson, Penny; Tomczyk, Katarzyna; Jones, Michael; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-07-15

    Increased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood cells (PBC) has been associated with the risk of developing several tumor types. Here we evaluate sources of variation of this biomarker and its association with breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort study. mtDNA copy number was measured using quantitative real-time PCR on PBC DNA samples from participants in the UK-based Breakthrough Generations Study. Temporal and assay variation was evaluated in a serial study of 91 women, with two blood samples collected approximately 6-years apart. Then, associations with breast cancer risk factors and risk were evaluated in 1,108 cases and 1,099 controls using a nested case-control design. In the serial study, mtDNA copy number showed low assay variation but large temporal variation [assay intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), 79.3%-87.9%; temporal ICC, 38.3%). Higher mtDNA copy number was significantly associated with younger age at blood collection, being premenopausal, having an older age at menopause, and never taking HRT, both in cases and controls. Based on measurements in a single blood sample taken on average 6 years before diagnosis, higher mtDNA copy number was associated with increased breast cancer risk [OR (95% CI) for highest versus lowest quartile, 1.37 (1.02-1.83); P trend = 0.007]. In conclusion, mtDNA copy number is associated with breast cancer risk and represents a promising biomarker for risk assessment. The relatively large temporal variation should be taken into account in future analyses.

  15. DNA barcode data accurately assign higher spider taxa

    PubMed Central

    Coddington, Jonathan A.; Agnarsson, Ingi; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Čandek, Klemen; Driskell, Amy; Frick, Holger; Gregorič, Matjaž; Kostanjšek, Rok; Kropf, Christian; Kweskin, Matthew; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Pipan, Miha; Vidergar, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The use of unique DNA sequences as a method for taxonomic identification is no longer fundamentally controversial, even though debate continues on the best markers, methods, and technology to use. Although both existing databanks such as GenBank and BOLD, as well as reference taxonomies, are imperfect, in best case scenarios “barcodes” (whether single or multiple, organelle or nuclear, loci) clearly are an increasingly fast and inexpensive method of identification, especially as compared to manual identification of unknowns by increasingly rare expert taxonomists. Because most species on Earth are undescribed, a complete reference database at the species level is impractical in the near term. The question therefore arises whether unidentified species can, using DNA barcodes, be accurately assigned to more inclusive groups such as genera and families—taxonomic ranks of putatively monophyletic groups for which the global inventory is more complete and stable. We used a carefully chosen test library of CO1 sequences from 49 families, 313 genera, and 816 species of spiders to assess the accuracy of genus and family-level assignment. We used BLAST queries of each sequence against the entire library and got the top ten hits. The percent sequence identity was reported from these hits (PIdent, range 75–100%). Accurate assignment of higher taxa (PIdent above which errors totaled less than 5%) occurred for genera at PIdent values >95 and families at PIdent values ≥ 91, suggesting these as heuristic thresholds for accurate generic and familial identifications in spiders. Accuracy of identification increases with numbers of species/genus and genera/family in the library; above five genera per family and fifteen species per genus all higher taxon assignments were correct. We propose that using percent sequence identity between conventional barcode sequences may be a feasible and reasonably accurate method to identify animals to family/genus. However, the quality of

  16. DNA barcode data accurately assign higher spider taxa.

    PubMed

    Coddington, Jonathan A; Agnarsson, Ingi; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Čandek, Klemen; Driskell, Amy; Frick, Holger; Gregorič, Matjaž; Kostanjšek, Rok; Kropf, Christian; Kweskin, Matthew; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Pipan, Miha; Vidergar, Nina; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    The use of unique DNA sequences as a method for taxonomic identification is no longer fundamentally controversial, even though debate continues on the best markers, methods, and technology to use. Although both existing databanks such as GenBank and BOLD, as well as reference taxonomies, are imperfect, in best case scenarios "barcodes" (whether single or multiple, organelle or nuclear, loci) clearly are an increasingly fast and inexpensive method of identification, especially as compared to manual identification of unknowns by increasingly rare expert taxonomists. Because most species on Earth are undescribed, a complete reference database at the species level is impractical in the near term. The question therefore arises whether unidentified species can, using DNA barcodes, be accurately assigned to more inclusive groups such as genera and families-taxonomic ranks of putatively monophyletic groups for which the global inventory is more complete and stable. We used a carefully chosen test library of CO1 sequences from 49 families, 313 genera, and 816 species of spiders to assess the accuracy of genus and family-level assignment. We used BLAST queries of each sequence against the entire library and got the top ten hits. The percent sequence identity was reported from these hits (PIdent, range 75-100%). Accurate assignment of higher taxa (PIdent above which errors totaled less than 5%) occurred for genera at PIdent values >95 and families at PIdent values ≥ 91, suggesting these as heuristic thresholds for accurate generic and familial identifications in spiders. Accuracy of identification increases with numbers of species/genus and genera/family in the library; above five genera per family and fifteen species per genus all higher taxon assignments were correct. We propose that using percent sequence identity between conventional barcode sequences may be a feasible and reasonably accurate method to identify animals to family/genus. However, the quality of the

  17. Mitochondrial DNA copy number is regulated by DNA methylation and demethylation of POLGA in stem and cancer cells and their differentiated progeny.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Johnson, J; Gough, D J; Donoghue, J; Cagnone, G L M; Vaghjiani, V; Brown, K A; Johns, T G; St John, J C

    2015-02-26

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is strictly regulated during differentiation so that cells with a high requirement for ATP generated through oxidative phosphorylation have high mtDNA copy number, whereas those with a low requirement have few copies. Using immunoprecipitation of DNA methylation on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which distinguish between de novo DNA methylation and demethylation, respectively, we set out to determine whether DNA methylation at exon 2 of the human mtDNA-specific polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma A (POLGA)) regulates cell-specific mtDNA copy number in highly proliferative and terminally differentiated cells. Highly proliferative cancer and pluripotent and multipotent cells possessed low mtDNA copy number and were highly methylated at exon 2 of POLGA in contrast to post-mitotic cells. Unlike neural stem cells, cancer cells were unable to differentiate and remained extensively DNA methylated at exon 2 of POLGA. However, mtDNA depletion of cancer cells reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA as they replenished mtDNA to form tumours in mice. Glioblastoma cells treated with the DNA demethylation agent 5-azacytidine over 28 days of astrocyte-induced differentiation demethylated exon 2 of POLGA leading to increased mtDNA copy number and expression of the astrocyte endpoint marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, the demethylation agent vitamin C (VitC) was unable to sustain increased mtDNA copy number and differentiation, as was the case when VitC was withdrawn after short-term treatment. These data demonstrate that DNA demethylation of POLGA is an essential regulator of mtDNA copy number and cellular fate and that cancer cells are only able to modulate DNA methylation of POLGA and mtDNA copy number in the presence of a DNA demethylation agent that inhibits de novo methyltransferase 1 activity.

  18. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  19. Mitochondrial transcription factor A regulates mitochondrial transcription initiation, DNA packaging, and genome copy number.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Christopher T; Kolesar, Jill E; Kaufman, Brett A

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA, mtTF1, TFAM) is an essential protein that binds mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with and without sequence specificity to regulate both mitochondrial transcription initiation and mtDNA copy number. The abundance of mtDNA generally reflects TFAM protein levels; however, the precise mechanism(s) by which this occurs remains a matter of debate. Data suggest that the usage of mitochondrial promoters is regulated by TFAM dosage, allowing TFAM to affect both gene expression and RNA priming for first strand mtDNA replication. Additionally, TFAM has a non-specific DNA binding activity that is both cooperative and high affinity. TFAM can compact plasmid DNA in vitro, suggesting a structural role for the non-specific DNA binding activity in genome packaging. This review summarizes TFAM-mtDNA interactions and describes an emerging view of TFAM as a multipurpose coordinator of mtDNA transactions, with direct consequences for the maintenance of gene expression and genome copy number. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Gene Expression. PMID:22465614

  20. Sequential Model Selection based Segmentation to Detect DNA Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianhua; Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Huixia Judy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Array-based CGH experiments are designed to detect genomic aberrations or regions of DNA copy-number variation that are associated with an outcome, typically a state of disease. Most of the existing statistical methods target on detecting DNA copy number variations in a single sample or array. We focus on the detection of group effect variation, through simultaneous study of multiple samples from multiple groups. Rather than using direct segmentation or smoothing techniques, as commonly seen in existing detection methods, we develop a sequential model selection procedure that is guided by a modified Bayesian information criterion. This approach improves detection accuracy by accumulatively utilizing information across contiguous clones, and has computational advantage over the existing popular detection methods. Our empirical investigation suggests that the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the existing detection methods, in particular, in detecting small segments or separating neighboring segments with differential degrees of copy-number variation. PMID:26954760

  1. Quantification of Fewer than Ten Copies of a DNA Biomarker without Amplification or Labeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonhee; Kim, Youngkyu; Lee, Donggyu; Roy, Dhruvajyoti; Park, Joon Won

    2016-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a highly sensitive diagnosis technique for detection of nucleic acids and for monitoring residual disease; however, PCR can be unreliable for samples containing very few target molecules. Here, we describe a quantification method, using force-distance (FD) curve based atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect a target DNA bound to small (1.4-1.9 μm diameter) probe DNA spots, allowing mapping of entire spots to nanometer resolution. Using a synthetic BCR-ABL fusion gene sequence target, we examined samples containing between one and 10 target copies. A high degree of correlation (r(2) = 0.994) between numbers of target copies and detected probe clusters was observed, and the approach could detect the BCR-ABL biomarker when only a single copy was present, although multiple screens were required. Our results clearly demonstrate that FD curve-based imaging is suitable for quantitative analysis of fewer than 10 copies of DNA biomarkers without amplification, modification, or labeling. PMID:27175474

  2. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.

  3. Directed gene copy number amplification in Pichia pastoris by vector integration into the ribosomal DNA locus.

    PubMed

    Marx, Hans; Mecklenbräuker, Astrid; Gasser, Brigitte; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2009-12-01

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used host organism for heterologous protein production. One of the basic steps for strain improvement is to ensure a sufficient level of transcription of the heterologous gene, based on promoter strength and gene copy number. To date, high-copy-number integrants of P. pastoris are achievable only by screening of random events or by cloning of gene concatemers. Methods for rapid and reliable multicopy integration of the expression cassette are therefore desirable. Here we present such a method based on vector integration into the rDNA locus and post-transformational vector amplification by repeated selection on increased antibiotic concentrations. Data are presented for two exemplary products: human serum albumin, which is secreted into the supernatant, and human superoxide dismutase, which is accumulated in the cytoplasm of the cells. The striking picture evolving is that intracellular protein production is tightly correlated with gene copy number, while use of the secretory pathway introduces a high clonal variability and the correlation with gene copy number is valid only for low gene copy numbers. PMID:19799640

  4. Constitutive mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood of melanoma families with and without CDKN2A mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Paula L.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Rotunno, Melissa; Hofmann, Jonathan N.; Liu, Chin-San; Cheng, Wen-Ling; Yuenger, Jeff; Lan, Qing; Tucker, Margaret A.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Yang, Xiaohong R.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been associated with the risk of a number of human cancers; however, the relationship between constitutive mtDNA copy number in blood and the risk of familial cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has not been reported. We measured mtDNA copy number using quantitative PCR in blood-derived DNA from 136 CMM cases and 302 controls in 53 melanoma-prone families (23 segregating CDKN2A germline mutations). MtDNA copy number did not vary by age, sex, pigmentation characteristics, or CMM status. However, germline CDKN2A mutation carriers had significantly higher mean mtDNA copy number compared to non-carriers, particularly among CMM cases (geometric mean mtDNA copy number of 144 and 111 for carrier versus non-carrier, respectively; P= 0.02). When adjusting for age, sex, and familial correlation, having increasing mtDNA copy number was significantly associated with CDKN2A mutation status among CMM cases (OR=1.47, Ptrend=0.024). In particular, individuals with specific CDKN2A mutations with the potential to inactivate or reduce the level of the p16-INK4 reactive oxygen species (ROS) protective function had significantly increased mtDNA copy number levels (P=0.035). Future research in prospective studies is required to validate these findings and to further investigate mtDNA copy number in both blood and melanoma tissues in relation to CMM risk and CDKN2A mutation status. PMID:25685612

  5. A novel satellite DNA sequence in the Peromyscus genome (PMSat): Evolution via copy number fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Louzada, Sandra; Vieira-da-Silva, Ana; Mendes-da-Silva, Ana; Kubickova, Svatava; Rubes, Jiri; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Satellite DNAs (satDNA) are tandemly arrayed repeated sequences largely present in eukaryotic genomes, which play important roles in genome evolution and function, and therefore, their analysis is vital. Here, we describe the isolation of a novel satellite DNA family (PMSat) from the rodent Peromyscus eremicus (Cricetidae, Rodentia), which is located in pericentromeric regions and exhibits a typical satellite DNA genome organization. Orthologous PMSat sequences were isolated and characterized from three species belonging to Cricetidae: Cricetus cricetus, Phodopus sungorus and Microtus arvalis. In these species, PMSat is highly conserved, with the absence of fixed species-specific mutations. Strikingly, different numbers of copies of this sequence were found among the species, suggesting evolution by copy number fluctuation. Repeat units of PMSat were also found in the Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii BioProject, but our results suggest that these repeat units are from genome regions outside the pericentromere. The remarkably high evolutionary sequence conservation along with the preservation of a few numbers of copies of this sequence in the analyzed genomes may suggest functional significance but a different sequence nature/organization. Our data highlight that repeats are difficult to analyze due to the limited tools available to dissect genomes and the fact that assemblies do not cover regions of constitutive heterochromatin.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Risk of Oral Cancer: A Report from Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Rosy; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Choudhury, Javed Hussain; Seram, Anil; Sinha, Kavita; Hussain, Marine; Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Rabha, Bijuli; Dey, Pradip; Ganguli, Sabitri; NathChoudhury, Monisha; Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman; Chaudhuri, Biswadeep; Dhar, Bishal

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common cancer globally. Tobacco consumption and HPV infection, both are the major risk factor for the development of oral cancer and causes mitochondrial dysfunction. Genetic polymorphisms in xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes modify the effect of environmental exposures, thereby playing a significant role in gene–environment interactions and hence contributing to the individual susceptibility to cancer. Here, we have investigated the association of tobacco - betel quid chewing, HPV infection, GSTM1-GSTT1 null genotypes, and tumour stages with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content variation in oral cancer patients. Methodology/Principal Findings The study comprised of 124 cases of OSCC and 140 control subjects to PCR based detection was done for high-risk HPV using a consensus primer and multiplex PCR was done for detection of GSTM1-GSTT1 polymorphism. A comparative ΔCt method was used for determination of mtDNA content. The risk of OSCC increased with the ceased mtDNA copy number (Ptrend = 0.003). The association between mtDNA copy number and OSCC risk was evident among tobacco – betel quid chewers rather than tobacco – betel quid non chewers; the interaction between mtDNA copy number and tobacco – betel quid was significant (P = 0.0005). Significant difference was observed between GSTM1 - GSTT1 null genotypes (P = 0.04, P = 0.001 respectively) and HPV infection (P<0.001) with mtDNA content variation in cases and controls. Positive correlation was found with decrease in mtDNA content with the increase in tumour stages (P<0.001). We are reporting for the first time the association of HPV infection and GSTM1-GSTT1 null genotypes with mtDNA content in OSCC. Conclusion Our results indicate that the mtDNA content in tumour tissues changes with tumour stage and tobacco-betel quid chewing habits while low levels of mtDNA content suggests invasive thereby serving as a biomarker in detection

  7. Concerted copy number variation balances ribosomal DNA dosage in human and mouse genomes.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, John G; Branco, Alan T; Godinho, Susana A; Yu, Shoukai; Lemos, Bernardo

    2015-02-24

    Tandemly repeated ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are among the most evolutionary dynamic loci of eukaryotic genomes. The loci code for essential cellular components, yet exhibit extensive copy number (CN) variation within and between species. CN might be partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance between the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays. The arrays are nonhomologous, physically unlinked in mammals, and encode functionally interdependent RNA components of the ribosome. Here we show that the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays exhibit concerted CN variation (cCNV). Despite 5S and 45S rDNA elements residing on different chromosomes and lacking sequence similarity, cCNV between these loci is strong, evolutionarily conserved in humans and mice, and manifested across individual genotypes in natural populations and pedigrees. Finally, we observe that bisphenol A induces rapid and parallel modulation of 5S and 45S rDNA CN. Our observations reveal a novel mode of genome variation, indicate that natural selection contributed to the evolution and conservation of cCNV, and support the hypothesis that 5S CN is partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance with the 45S rDNA array. We suggest that human disease variation might be traced to disrupted rDNA dosage balance in the genome.

  8. Accurate measurement of the relative abundance of different DNA species in complex DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-06-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription.

  9. Accurate Measurement of the Relative Abundance of Different DNA Species in Complex DNA Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription. PMID:22334570

  10. A High-Resolution Map of Segmental DNA Copy Number Variation in the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Graubert, Timothy A; Selzer, Rebecca R; Richmond, Todd A; Eis, Peggy S; Shannon, William D; Li, Xia; McLeod, Howard L; Cheverud, James M; Ley, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Submicroscopic (less than 2 Mb) segmental DNA copy number changes are a recently recognized source of genetic variability between individuals. The biological consequences of copy number variants (CNVs) are largely undefined. In some cases, CNVs that cause gene dosage effects have been implicated in phenotypic variation. CNVs have been detected in diverse species, including mice and humans. Published studies in mice have been limited by resolution and strain selection. We chose to study 21 well-characterized inbred mouse strains that are the focus of an international effort to measure, catalog, and disseminate phenotype data. We performed comparative genomic hybridization using long oligomer arrays to characterize CNVs in these strains. This technique increased the resolution of CNV detection by more than an order of magnitude over previous methodologies. The CNVs range in size from 21 to 2,002 kb. Clustering strains by CNV profile recapitulates aspects of the known ancestry of these strains. Most of the CNVs (77.5%) contain annotated genes, and many (47.5%) colocalize with previously mapped segmental duplications in the mouse genome. We demonstrate that this technique can identify copy number differences associated with known polymorphic traits. The phenotype of previously uncharacterized strains can be predicted based on their copy number at these loci. Annotation of CNVs in the mouse genome combined with sequence-based analysis provides an important resource that will help define the genetic basis of complex traits. PMID:17206864

  11. Genomic DNA Copy Number Aberrations, Histological Diagnosis, Oral Subsite and Aneuploidy in OPMDs/OSCCs

    PubMed Central

    Monticone, Massimiliano; Malacarne, Davide; Cirmena, Gabriella; Brown, David; Aiello, Cinzia; Maffei, Massimo; Marino, Roberto; Giaretti, Walter; Pentenero, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) characterized by the presence of dysplasia and DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), may reflect chromosomal instability (CIN) and predispose to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Early detection of OPMDs with such characteristics may play a crucial role in OSCC prevention. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between CNAs, histological diagnosis, oral subsite and aneuploidy in OPMDs/OSCCs. Samples from OPMDs and OSCCs were processed by high-resolution DNA flow cytometry (hr DNA-FCM) to determine the relative nuclear DNA content. Additionally, CNAs were obtained for a subset of these samples by genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) using DNA extracted from either diploid or aneuploid nuclei suspension sorted by FCM. Our study shows that: i) aneuploidy, global genomic imbalance (measured as the total number of CNAs) and specific focal CNAs occur early in the development of oral cancer and become more frequent at later stages; ii) OPMDs limited to tongue (TNG) mucosa display a higher frequency of aneuploidy compared to OPMDs confined to buccal mucosa (BM) as measured by DNA-FCM; iii) TNG OPMDs/OSCCs show peculiar features of CIN compared to BM OPMDs/OSCCs given the preferential association with total broad and specific focal CNA gains. Follow-up studies are warranted to establish whether the presence of DNA aneuploidy and specific focal or broad CNAs may predict cancer development in non-dysplastic OPMDs. PMID:26540282

  12. Role of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Alteration in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Sung; Lee, Hui-Ting; Lee, Ming-Huei; Pan, Siao-Cian; Ke, Chen-Yeh; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number alteration in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The mtDNA copy numbers of paired cancer and non-cancer parts from five resected RCC kidneys after radical nephrectomy were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). An RCC cell line, 786-O, was infected by lentiviral particles to knock down mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM). Null target (NT) and TFAM-knockdown (TFAM-KD) represented the control and knockdown 786-O clones, respectively. Protein or mRNA expression levels of TFAM; mtDNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), ND6 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (COX-2); nuclear DNA (nDNA)-encoded succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA); v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 gene (AKT)-encoded AKT and v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog gene (c-MYC)-encoded MYC; glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase II (HK-II), glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and lactate dehydrogenase subunit A (LDHA); and hypoxia-inducible factors the HIF-1α and HIF-2α, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component α subunit (PDHA1) were analyzed by Western blot or Q-PCR. Bioenergetic parameters of cellular metabolism, basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (mOCRB) and basal extracellular acidification rate (ECARB), were measured by a Seahorse XFe-24 analyzer. Cell invasiveness was evaluated by a trans-well migration assay and vimentin expression. Doxorubicin was used as a chemotherapeutic agent. The results showed a decrease of mtDNA copy numbers in resected RCC tissues (p = 0.043). The TFAM-KD clone expressed lower mtDNA copy number (p = 0.034), lower mRNA levels of TFAM (p = 0.008), ND1 (p = 0.007), and ND6 (p = 0.017), and lower protein levels of TFAM and COX-2 than did the NT clone. By contrast, the protein levels of HIF-2α, HK-II, PFK, LDHA, AKT, MYC and vimentin; trans-well migration activity (p = 0

  13. Role of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Alteration in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Sung; Lee, Hui-Ting; Lee, Ming-Huei; Pan, Siao-Cian; Ke, Chen-Yeh; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number alteration in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The mtDNA copy numbers of paired cancer and non-cancer parts from five resected RCC kidneys after radical nephrectomy were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). An RCC cell line, 786-O, was infected by lentiviral particles to knock down mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM). Null target (NT) and TFAM-knockdown (TFAM-KD) represented the control and knockdown 786-O clones, respectively. Protein or mRNA expression levels of TFAM; mtDNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), ND6 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (COX-2); nuclear DNA (nDNA)-encoded succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA); v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 gene (AKT)-encoded AKT and v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog gene (c-MYC)-encoded MYC; glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase II (HK-II), glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and lactate dehydrogenase subunit A (LDHA); and hypoxia-inducible factors the HIF-1α and HIF-2α, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component α subunit (PDHA1) were analyzed by Western blot or Q-PCR. Bioenergetic parameters of cellular metabolism, basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (mOCRB) and basal extracellular acidification rate (ECARB), were measured by a Seahorse XF(e)-24 analyzer. Cell invasiveness was evaluated by a trans-well migration assay and vimentin expression. Doxorubicin was used as a chemotherapeutic agent. The results showed a decrease of mtDNA copy numbers in resected RCC tissues (p = 0.043). The TFAM-KD clone expressed lower mtDNA copy number (p = 0.034), lower mRNA levels of TFAM (p = 0.008), ND1 (p = 0.007), and ND6 (p = 0.017), and lower protein levels of TFAM and COX-2 than did the NT clone. By contrast, the protein levels of HIF-2α, HK-II, PFK, LDHA, AKT, MYC and vimentin; trans-well migration activity (p = 0

  14. Cell Cycle- and Ribonucleotide Reductase-Driven Changes in mtDNA Copy Number Influence mtDNA Inheritance Without Compromising Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Maria A.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2008-01-01

    Most eukaryotes maintain multiple copies of mtDNA, ranging from 20–50 in yeast to as many as 10,000 in mammalian cells. The mitochondrial genome encodes essential subunits of the respiratory chain, but the number of mtDNA molecules is apparently in excess of that needed to sustain adequate respiration, as evidenced by the “threshold effect” in mitochondrial diseases. Thus, other selective pressures apparently have contributed to the universal maintenance of multiple mtDNA molecules/cell. Here we analyzed the interplay between the two pathways proposed to regulate mtDNA copy number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the requirement of normal mtDNA copy number for mitochondrial gene expression, respiration, and inheritance. We provide the first direct evidence that upregulation of mtDNA can be achieved by increasing ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) activity via derepression of nuclear RNR gene transcription or elimination of allosteric-feedback regulation. Analysis of rad53 mutant strains also revealed upregulation of mtDNA copy number independent of that resulting from elevated RNR activity. We present evidence that a prolonged cell cycle allows accumulation of mtDNA in these strains. Analysis of multiple strains with increased or decreased mtDNA revealed that mechanisms are in place to prevent significant changes in mitochondrial gene expression and respiration in the face of ∼two-fold alterations in mtDNA copy number. However, depletion of mtDNA in abf2 null strains leads to defective mtDNA inheritance that is partially rescued by replenishing mtDNA via overexpression of RNR1. These results indicate that one role for multiple mtDNA copies is to ensure optimal inheritance of mtDNA during cell division. PMID:17721079

  15. Increased mitochondrial DNA deletions and copy number in transfusion-dependent thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Calloway, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron overload is the primary cause of morbidity in transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Increase in iron causes mitochondrial dysfunction under experimental conditions, but the occurrence and significance of mitochondrial damage is not understood in patients with thalassemia. METHODS. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to nuclear DNA copy number (Mt/N) and frequency of the common 4977-bp mitochondrial deletion (ΔmtDNA4977) were quantified using a quantitative PCR assay on whole blood samples from 38 subjects with thalassemia who were receiving regular transfusions. RESULTS. Compared with healthy controls, Mt/N and ΔmtDNA4977 frequency were elevated in thalassemia (P = 0.038 and P < 0.001, respectively). ΔmtDNA4977 was increased in the presence of either liver iron concentration > 15 mg/g dry-weight or splenectomy, with the highest levels observed in subjects who had both risk factors (P = 0.003). Myocardial iron (MRI T2* < 20 ms) was present in 0%, 22%, and 46% of subjects with ΔmtDNA4977 frequency < 20, 20–40, and > 40/1 × 107 mtDNA, respectively (P = 0.025). Subjects with Mt/N values below the group median had significantly lower Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (5.76 ± 0.53) compared with the high Mt/N group (9.11 ± 0.95, P = 0.008). CONCLUSION. Individuals with transfusion-dependent thalassemia demonstrate age-related increase in mtDNA damage in leukocytes. These changes are markedly amplified by splenectomy and are associated with extrahepatic iron deposition. Elevated mtDNA damage in blood cells may predict the risk of iron-associated organ damage in thalassemia. FUNDING. This project was supported by Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland Institutional Research Award and by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH, through UCSF-CTSI grant UL1 TR000004. PMID:27583305

  16. Increased mitochondrial DNA deletions and copy number in transfusion-dependent thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Ashutosh; Gomez, Esteban; Calloway, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Iron overload is the primary cause of morbidity in transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Increase in iron causes mitochondrial dysfunction under experimental conditions, but the occurrence and significance of mitochondrial damage is not understood in patients with thalassemia. METHODS Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to nuclear DNA copy number (Mt/N) and frequency of the common 4977-bp mitochondrial deletion (ΔmtDNA4977) were quantified using a quantitative PCR assay on whole blood samples from 38 subjects with thalassemia who were receiving regular transfusions. RESULTS Compared with healthy controls, Mt/N and ΔmtDNA4977 frequency were elevated in thalassemia (P = 0.038 and P < 0.001, respectively). ΔmtDNA4977 was increased in the presence of either liver iron concentration > 15 mg/g dry-weight or splenectomy, with the highest levels observed in subjects who had both risk factors (P = 0.003). Myocardial iron (MRI T2* < 20 ms) was present in 0%, 22%, and 46% of subjects with ΔmtDNA4977 frequency < 20, 20–40, and > 40/1 × 107 mtDNA, respectively (P = 0.025). Subjects with Mt/N values below the group median had significantly lower Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (5.76 ± 0.53) compared with the high Mt/N group (9.11 ± 0.95, P = 0.008). CONCLUSION Individuals with transfusion-dependent thalassemia demonstrate age-related increase in mtDNA damage in leukocytes. These changes are markedly amplified by splenectomy and are associated with extrahepatic iron deposition. Elevated mtDNA damage in blood cells may predict the risk of iron-associated organ damage in thalassemia. PMID:27583305

  17. DNA copy number changes in Schistosoma-associated and non-Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    El-Rifai, W; Kamel, D; Larramendy, M L; Shoman, S; Gad, Y; Baithun, S; El-Awady, M; Eissa, S; Khaled, H; Soloneski, S; Sheaff, M; Knuutila, S

    2000-03-01

    DNA copy number changes were investigated in 69 samples of schistosoma-associated (SA) and non-schistosoma-associated (NSA) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). DNA copy number changes were detected in 47 tumors. SA tumors had more changes than NSA tumors (mean, 7 vs. 4), whereas the number of changes in SCC and TCC tumors was similar. SA tumors displayed more gains than losses (1.7:1), whereas NSA tumors showed an equal number of gains and losses. Changes that were observed at similar frequencies in SCC and TCC, irrespective of the schistosomal status, included gains and high-level amplifications at 1q, 8q, and 20q and losses in 9p and 13q. These changes may be involved in a common pathway for bladder tumor development and progression independent of schistosomal status or histological subtype. Losses in 3p and gains at 5p were seen only in SCC (P < 0.01) and losses in 5q were more frequent in SA-SCC than in other tumors (P < 0.05). However, changes that were more frequent in TCC than those in SCC included gains at 17q (P < 0.01) and losses in 4q (P < 0.05) and 6q (P < 0.01). Gains and high-level amplifications at 5p were seen only in SA-SCC (P < 0. 01), whereas gains and high-level amplifications with minimal common overlapping regions at 11q13 were more frequently seen both in SA-SCC and SA-TCC tumors (P < 0.01). In addition to the above mentioned alterations, several other changes were also seen at lower frequencies. The variations in the DNA copy number changes observed in TCC, SCC, SA, and NSA bladder carcinomas suggest that these tumors have different genetic pathways. PMID:10702404

  18. Accurate, noninvasive detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA from stool samples: potential usefulness for monitoring treatment.

    PubMed

    Shuber, Anthony P; Ascaño, Jennifer J; Boynton, Kevin A; Mitchell, Anastasia; Frierson, Henry F; El-Rifai, Wa'el; Powell, Steven M

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA assay demonstrating sensitive and accurate detection of Helicobacter pylori from stool samples is reported. Moreover, in three individuals tested for therapeutic response, the assay showed the disappearance of H. pylori DNA during treatment. Thus, this noninvasive molecular biology-based assay has the potential to be a powerful diagnostic tool given its ability to specifically identify H. pylori DNA.

  19. Association of telomere length and mitochondrial DNA copy number in a community sample of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Tyrka, Audrey R; Carpenter, Linda L; Kao, Hung-Teh; Porton, Barbara; Philip, Noah S; Ridout, Samuel J; Ridout, Kathryn K; Price, Lawrence H

    2015-06-01

    Cellular aging plays a role in longevity and senescence, and has been implicated in medical and psychiatric conditions, including heart disease, cancer, major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Telomere shortening and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be central to the cellular aging process. The present study examined the association between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and telomere length in a sample of medically healthy adults. Participants (total n=392) were divided into 4 groups based on the presence or absence of early life adversity and lifetime psychopathology: No Adversity/No Disorder, n=136; Adversity/No Disorder, n=91; No Adversity/Disorder, n=46; Adversity/Disorder, n=119. Telomere length and mtDNA copy number were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. There was a positive correlation between mtDNA and telomere length in the entire sample (r=0.120, p<0.001) and in each of the four groups of participants (No Adversity/No Disorder, r=0.291, p=0.001; Adversity/No Disorder r=0.279, p=0.007; No Adversity/Disorder r=0.449, p=0.002; Adversity/Disorder, r=0.558, p<0.001). These correlations remained significant when controlling for age, smoking, and body mass index and establish an association between mtDNA and telomere length in a large group of women and men both with and without early adversity and psychopathology, suggesting co-regulation of telomeres and mitochondrial function. The mechanisms underlying this association may be important in the pathophysiology of age-related medical conditions, such as heart disease and cancer, as well as for stress-associated psychiatric disorders.

  20. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  1. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  2. Whole genome DNA copy number changes identified by high density oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Changes in DNA copy number are one of the hallmarks of the genetic instability common to most human cancers. Previous micro-array-based methods have been used to identify chromosomal gains and losses; however, they are unable to genotype alleles at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here we describe a novel algorithm that uses a recently developed high-density oligonucleotide array-based SNP genotyping method, whole genome sampling analysis (WGSA), to identify genome-wide chromosomal gains and losses at high resolution. WGSA simultaneously genotypes over 10,000 SNPs by allele-specific hybridisation to perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes synthesised on a single array. The copy number algorithm jointly uses PM intensity and discrimination ratios between paired PM and MM intensity values to identify and estimate genetic copy number changes. Values from an experimental sample are compared with SNP-specific distributions derived from a reference set containing over 100 normal individuals to gain statistical power. Genomic regions with statistically significant copy number changes can be identified using both single point analysis and contiguous point analysis of SNP intensities. We identified multiple regions of amplification and deletion using a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. We verified these results using an independent method based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that our approach is both sensitive and specific and can tolerate samples which contain a mixture of both tumour and normal DNA. In addition, by using known allele frequencies from the reference set, statistically significant genomic intervals can be identified containing contiguous stretches of homozygous markers, potentially allowing the detection of regions undergoing loss of heterozygosity (LOH) without the need for a matched normal control sample. The coupling of LOH analysis, via SNP genotyping, with copy number estimations using a single array

  3. Mechanism for accurate, protein-assisted DNA annealing by Deinococcus radiodurans DdrB.

    PubMed

    Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N; Weiss, Yoni M; Junop, Murray S

    2016-04-19

    Accurate pairing of DNA strands is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). How cells achieve accurate annealing when large regions of single-strand DNA are unpaired has remained unclear despite many efforts focused on understanding proteins, which mediate this process. Here we report the crystal structure of a single-strand annealing protein [DdrB (DNA damage response B)] in complex with a partially annealed DNA intermediate to 2.2 Å. This structure and supporting biochemical data reveal a mechanism for accurate annealing involving DdrB-mediated proofreading of strand complementarity. DdrB promotes high-fidelity annealing by constraining specific bases from unauthorized association and only releases annealed duplex when bound strands are fully complementary. To our knowledge, this mechanism provides the first understanding for how cells achieve accurate, protein-assisted strand annealing under biological conditions that would otherwise favor misannealing.

  4. Accurate phylogenetic classification of DNA fragments based onsequence composition

    SciTech Connect

    McHardy, Alice C.; Garcia Martin, Hector; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Hugenholtz, Philip; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2006-05-01

    Metagenome studies have retrieved vast amounts of sequenceout of a variety of environments, leading to novel discoveries and greatinsights into the uncultured microbial world. Except for very simplecommunities, diversity makes sequence assembly and analysis a verychallenging problem. To understand the structure a 5 nd function ofmicrobial communities, a taxonomic characterization of the obtainedsequence fragments is highly desirable, yet currently limited mostly tothose sequences that contain phylogenetic marker genes. We show that forclades at the rank of domain down to genus, sequence composition allowsthe very accurate phylogenetic 10 characterization of genomic sequence.We developed a composition-based classifier, PhyloPythia, for de novophylogenetic sequence characterization and have trained it on adata setof 340 genomes. By extensive evaluation experiments we show that themethodis accurate across all taxonomic ranks considered, even forsequences that originate fromnovel organisms and are as short as 1kb.Application to two metagenome datasets 15 obtained from samples ofphosphorus-removing sludge showed that the method allows the accurateclassification at genus level of most sequence fragments from thedominant populations, while at the same time correctly characterizingeven larger parts of the samples at higher taxonomic levels.

  5. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii’s physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene.

  6. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii’s physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene. PMID:27672381

  7. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens.

    PubMed

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii's physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene.

  8. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens.

    PubMed

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii's physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene. PMID:27672381

  9. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization for the detection of DNA sequence copy number changes in Barrett's adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Bettina; Hausmann, Michael; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Stein, Hubert; Siewert, Jörg Rüdiger; Hopt, Ulrich; Langer, Rupert; Höfler, Heinz; Werner, Martin; Walch, Axel

    2004-07-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) allows the identification of DNA sequence copy number changes at high resolution by co-hybridizing differentially labelled test and control DNAs to a micro-array of genomic clones. The present study has analysed a series of 23 formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples of Barrett's adenocarcinoma (BCA, n = 18) and non-neoplastic squamous oesophageal (n = 2) and gastric cardia mucosa (n = 3) by aCGH. The micro-arrays used contained 287 genomic targets covering oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA sequences localized within chromosomal regions previously reported to be altered in BCA. DNA sequence copy number changes for a panel of approximately 50 genes were identified, most of which have not been previously described in BCA. DNA sequence copy number gains (mean 41 +/- 25/BCA) were more frequent than DNA sequence copy number losses (mean 20 +/- 15/BCA). The highest frequencies for DNA sequence copy number gains were detected for SNRPN (61%); GNLY (44%); NME1 (44%); DDX15, ABCB1 (MDR), ATM, LAMA3, MYBL2, ZNF217, and TNFRSF6B (39% each); and MSH2, TERC, SERPINE1, AFM137XA11, IGF1R, and PTPN1 (33% each). DNA sequence copy number losses were identified for PDGFB (44%); D17S125 (39%); AKT3 (28%); and RASSFI, FHIT, CDKN2A (p16), and SAS (CDK4) (28% each). In all non-neoplastic tissue samples of squamous oesophageal and gastric cardia mucosa, the measured mean ratios were 1.00 (squamous oesophageal mucosa) or 1.01 (gastric mucosa), indicating that no DNA sequence copy number chances were present. For validation, the DNA sequence copy number changes of selected clones (SNRPN, CMYC, HER2, ZNF217) detected by aCGH were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These data show the sensitivity of aCGH for the identification of DNA sequence copy number changes at high resolution in BCA. The newly identified genes may include so far unknown biomarkers in BCA and are therefore a starting point for

  10. Accurate multiplex gene synthesis from programmable DNA microchips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jingdong; Gong, Hui; Sheng, Nijing; Zhou, Xiaochuan; Gulari, Erdogan; Gao, Xiaolian; Church, George

    2004-12-01

    Testing the many hypotheses from genomics and systems biology experiments demands accurate and cost-effective gene and genome synthesis. Here we describe a microchip-based technology for multiplex gene synthesis. Pools of thousands of `construction' oligonucleotides and tagged complementary `selection' oligonucleotides are synthesized on photo-programmable microfluidic chips, released, amplified and selected by hybridization to reduce synthesis errors ninefold. A one-step polymerase assembly multiplexing reaction assembles these into multiple genes. This technology enabled us to synthesize all 21 genes that encode the proteins of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit, and to optimize their translation efficiency in vitro through alteration of codon bias. This is a significant step towards the synthesis of ribosomes in vitro and should have utility for synthetic biology in general.

  11. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes.

  12. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  13. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  14. Age-Related and Heteroplasmy-Related Variation in Human mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkun; Madea, Burkhard; Stoneking, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome is present in many copies in human cells, and intra-individual variation in mtDNA sequences is known as heteroplasmy. Recent studies found that heteroplasmies are highly tissue-specific, site-specific, and allele-specific, however the functional implications have not been explored. This study investigates variation in mtDNA copy numbers (mtCN) in 12 different tissues obtained at autopsy from 152 individuals (ranging in age from 3 days to 96 years). Three different methods to estimate mtCN were compared: shotgun sequencing (in 4 tissues), capture-enriched sequencing (in 12 tissues) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR, in 2 tissues). The highest precision in mtCN estimation was achieved using shotgun sequencing data. However, capture-enrichment data provide reliable estimates of relative (albeit not absolute) mtCNs. Comparisons of mtCN from different tissues of the same individual revealed that mtCNs in different tissues are, with few exceptions, uncorrelated. Hence, each tissue of an individual seems to regulate mtCN in a tissue-related rather than an individual-dependent manner. Skeletal muscle (SM) samples showed an age-related decrease in mtCN that was especially pronounced in males, while there was an age-related increase in mtCN for liver (LIV) samples. MtCN in SM samples was significantly negatively correlated with both the total number of heteroplasmic sites and with minor allele frequency (MAF) at two heteroplasmic sites, 408 and 16327. Heteroplasmies at both sites are highly specific for SM, accumulate with aging and are part of functional elements that regulate mtDNA replication. These data support the hypothesis that selection acting on these heteroplasmic sites is reducing mtCN in SM of older individuals. PMID:26978189

  15. Overexpression of TFAM or Twinkle Increases mtDNA Copy Number and Facilitates Cardioprotection Associated with Limited Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Masataka; Ide, Tomomi; Fujino, Takeo; Arai, Shinobu; Saku, Keita; Kakino, Takamori; Tyynismaa, Henna; Yamasaki, Toshihide; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Kang, Dongchon; Suomalainen, Anu; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number decreases in animal and human heart failure (HF), yet its role in cardiomyocytes remains to be elucidated. Thus, we investigated the cardioprotective function of increased mtDNA copy number resulting from the overexpression of human transcription factor A of mitochondria (TFAM) or Twinkle helicase in volume overload (VO)-induced HF. Methods and Results Two strains of transgenic (TG) mice, one overexpressing TFAM and the other overexpressing Twinkle helicase, exhibit an approximately 2-fold equivalent increase in mtDNA copy number in heart. These TG mice display similar attenuations in eccentric hypertrophy and improved cardiac function compared to wild-type (WT) mice without any deterioration of mitochondrial enzymatic activities in response to VO, which was accompanied by a reduction in matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and reactive oxygen species after 8 weeks of VO. Moreover, acute VO-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 upregulation was also suppressed at 24 h in both TG mice. In isolated rat cardiomyocytes, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mitoROS) upregulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed mitoROS and their upregulation. Additionally, mitoROS were equally suppressed in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts that overexpress hTFAM or rat Twinkle, both of which exhibit increased mtDNA copy number. Furthermore, mitoROS and mitochondrial protein oxidation from both TG mice were suppressed compared to WT mice. Conclusions The overexpression of TFAM or Twinkle results in increased mtDNA copy number and facilitates cardioprotection associated with limited mitochondrial oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that increasing mtDNA copy number could be a useful therapeutic strategy to target mitoROS in HF. PMID:25822152

  16. An evaluation of new and established methods to determine T-DNA copy number and homozygosity in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, Katarzyna; Kromdijk, Johannes; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Niyogi, Krishna K; Clemente, Tom E; Long, Stephen P

    2016-04-01

    Stable transformation of plants is a powerful tool for hypothesis testing. A rapid and reliable evaluation method of the transgenic allele for copy number and homozygosity is vital in analysing these transformations. Here the suitability of Southern blot analysis, thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL-)PCR, quantitative (q)PCR and digital droplet (dd)PCR to estimate T-DNA copy number, locus complexity and homozygosity were compared in transgenic tobacco. Southern blot analysis and ddPCR on three generations of transgenic offspring with contrasting zygosity and copy number were entirely consistent, whereas TAIL-PCR often underestimated copy number. qPCR deviated considerably from the Southern blot results and had lower precision and higher variability than ddPCR. Comparison of segregation analyses and ddPCR of T1 progeny from 26 T0 plants showed that at least 19% of the lines carried multiple T-DNA insertions per locus, which can lead to unstable transgene expression. Segregation analyses failed to detect these multiple copies, presumably because of their close linkage. This shows the importance of routine T-DNA copy number estimation. Based on our results, ddPCR is the most suitable method, because it is as reliable as Southern blot analysis yet much faster. A protocol for this application of ddPCR to large plant genomes is provided.

  17. An evaluation of new and established methods to determine T-DNA copy number and homozygosity in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, Katarzyna; Kromdijk, Johannes; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Niyogi, Krishna K; Clemente, Tom E; Long, Stephen P

    2016-04-01

    Stable transformation of plants is a powerful tool for hypothesis testing. A rapid and reliable evaluation method of the transgenic allele for copy number and homozygosity is vital in analysing these transformations. Here the suitability of Southern blot analysis, thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL-)PCR, quantitative (q)PCR and digital droplet (dd)PCR to estimate T-DNA copy number, locus complexity and homozygosity were compared in transgenic tobacco. Southern blot analysis and ddPCR on three generations of transgenic offspring with contrasting zygosity and copy number were entirely consistent, whereas TAIL-PCR often underestimated copy number. qPCR deviated considerably from the Southern blot results and had lower precision and higher variability than ddPCR. Comparison of segregation analyses and ddPCR of T1 progeny from 26 T0 plants showed that at least 19% of the lines carried multiple T-DNA insertions per locus, which can lead to unstable transgene expression. Segregation analyses failed to detect these multiple copies, presumably because of their close linkage. This shows the importance of routine T-DNA copy number estimation. Based on our results, ddPCR is the most suitable method, because it is as reliable as Southern blot analysis yet much faster. A protocol for this application of ddPCR to large plant genomes is provided. PMID:26670088

  18. Variation in copy number of the 28S rDNA of Aspergillus fumigatus measured by droplet digital PCR and analog quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Benabou, Marion; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) after DNA digestion yielded a 28S rDNA copy number of 61 to 86 copies/genome when testing 10 unrelated Aspergillus fumigatus isolates, higher than with quantitative PCR. Unfortunately, ddPCR after DNA digestion did not improve the sensitivity of our PCR assay when testing serum patients with invasive aspergillosis. PMID:27316653

  19. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Weitemier, Kevin; Straub, Shannon C K; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual's consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%). Most nrDNA positions (91%) were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the "noncoding" ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming). PMID:25653903

  20. Jagged1 DNA Copy Number Variation Is Associated with Poor Outcome in Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Honda, Masao; Yamashita, Taro; Okada, Hikari; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Nishikawa, Masashi; Nio, Kouki; Arai, Kuniaki; Sakai, Yoshio; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Notch signaling abnormalities are reported to be involved in the acceleration of malignancy in solid tumors and stem cell formation or regeneration in various organs. We analyzed specific genes for DNA copy number variations in liver cancer cells and investigated whether these factors relate to clinical outcome. Chromosome 20p, which includes the ligand for Notch pathways, Jagged1, was found to be amplified in several types of hepatoma cells, and its mRNA was up-regulated according to α-fetoprotein gene expression levels. Notch inhibition using Jagged1 shRNA and γ-secretase inhibitors produced significant suppression of cell growth in α-fetoprotein-producing cells with suppression of downstream genes. Using in vivo hepatoma models, the administration of γ-secretase inhibitors resulted in reduced tumor sizes and effective Notch inhibition with widespread apoptosis and necrosis of viable tumor cells. The γ-secretase inhibitors suppressed cell growth of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule-positive fraction in hepatoma cells, indicating that Notch inhibitors could suppress the stem cell features of liver cancer cells. Even in clinical liver cancer samples, the expression of α-fetoprotein and Jagged1 showed significant correlation, and amplification of the copy number of Jagged1 was associated with Jagged1 mRNA expression and poor survival after liver cancer surgical resection. In conclusion, amplification of Jagged1 contributed to mRNA expression that activates the Jagged1-Notch signaling pathway in liver cancer and led to poor outcome.

  1. Is mitochondrial DNA copy number associated with clinical characteristics and prognosis in gastric cancer?

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunsu; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Dong-Choon; Hwang, IlSeon; Kang, Yu-Na; Gwon, Gi-Jeong; Choi, In-Jang; Kim, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been studied in various cancers. However, the clinical value of mtDNA copy number (mtCN) alterations in gastric cancer (GC) is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether alterations in mtCNs might be associated with clinicopathological parameters in GC cases. mtCN was measured in 109 patients with GC by quantitative real-time PCR. Then, correlations with clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. mtCN was elevated in 64.2% of GC tissues compared with paired, adjacent, non-cancerous tissue. However, the observed alterations in mtCN were not associated with any clinicopathological characteristics, including age, gender, TN stage, Lauren classification, lymph node metastasis, and depth of invasion. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that mtCN was not significantly associated with the survival of GC patients. In this study, we demonstrated that mtCN was not a significant marker for predicting clinical characteristics or prognosis in GC. PMID:25640396

  2. Mitochondrial DNA copy number - but not a mitochondrial tandem CC to TT transition - is increased in sun-exposed skin.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Daniel; Mahler, Bettina; Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Bergemann, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are causatively associated with photo-ageing and are used as biomarkers of UV exposure. The most prominent mitochondrial mutation is the common deletion (CD), which is induced in many tissues by oxidative stress. More photo-specific mutations might be CC to TT tandem transitions which arise from UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. As nucleotide excision repair is absent in mitochondria, this DNA damage can presumably not be repaired resulting in high mitochondrial mutation levels. Here, we analysed levels of the CD, a mitochondrial and a chromosomal tandem transition in epidermis and dermis from exposed and less UV-exposed skin. We also analysed mtDNA copy number, for which changes as a result of oxidative stress have been described in different experimental settings. Whereas mitochondrial tandem transition levels were surprisingly low with no discernible correlation with UV exposure, mtDNA copy number and CD were significantly increased in UV-exposed samples.

  3. [Collection of low copy number repeats for use as probes in human DNA Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    To isolate novel families of repeated human sequences our basic plan is to (i) construct repeated sequence libraries, (ii) discard known repeats by hybridization and (iii) sort through the remaining clones to eliminate single copy sequences as well as known repeats that slipped through the first screening. During the previous grant period, we completed the library construction and initial screening. Six size selected sublibraries of renatured human DNA were constructed, e.g. sublibrary II contains 250 nt to 380 nt inserts. The released inserts were hybridized to Alu, L1, THE 1, [alpha] satellite and satellite M (which crosshybridizes to satellites I and H) hybridization probes. We have adopted two strategies to sort through these candidate clones.

  4. DNA copy number changes in carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma of the salivary gland: a comparative genomic hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Morio, Takashi; Morimitsu, Yosuke; Hisaoka, Masanori; Makishima, Kazumi; Hashimoto, Hiroshi

    2002-08-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign tumor of the salivary glands and is rarely associated with concurrent epithelial malignancy, which is designated as carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (CPA). Genetic abnormalities potentially related to the development of CPA have not been fully investigated. We analyzed DNA copy number changes in each of the adenomatous and carcinomatous components of seven CPA by comparative genomic hybridization using DNA extracted from microdissected tissues of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples. Carcinomatous components of CPA showed multiple DNA copy number changes at 1-18 different genomic sites (mean 13 sites). Adenomatous components displayed less frequent DNA copy number changes (0-13 sites; mean, 5). In both components, the majority of the changes were gains. The most common recurrent gains in carcinomatous components were seen at 6q (four cases in each), whereas gains at 13q1-2 and 15q1 were most frequently detected in adenomatous components (three cases in each). In five CPA, the same chromosomal regions were involved in the DNA copy number changes detected in both components. Our data suggest that an accumulated or increased number of chromosomal changes including 6q abnormalities may be associated with the development of carcinomatous components in a subset of CPA.

  5. Prognostic impact of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA copy number at diagnosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yi; Gale, Robert Peter; Chen, Rui-Ze; Yang, Yu-Qiong; Wang, Li; Qu, Xiao-Yan; Qiu, Hai-Rong; Cao, Lei; Hong, Min; Wang, Rong; Wang, Yan; Fan, Lei; Chen, Yao-Yu; Hu, Zhi-Bin; Li, Jian-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA is detected in the blood of some persons with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at diagnosis. Whether this is important in the development or progression of CLL is controversial. We interrogated associations between blood EBV-DNA copy number and biological and clinical variables in 243 new-diagnosed consecutive subjects with CLL. Quantification of EBV-DNA copies was done by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR). All subjects had serological evidence of prior EBV-infection. However, only 24 subjects (10%) had a EBV-DNA-positive test at diagnosis. EBV-DNA-positive subjects at diagnosis had lower hemoglobin concentrations and platelet levels, higher thymidine kinase-1 and serum ferritin levels, un-mutated IGHV genes and a greater risk of Richter transformation compared with EBV-DNA-negative subjects. Percent CD20-, CD148- and ZAP70-positive cells and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of each cluster designation were also increased in EBV-DNA-positive subjects at diagnosis. EBV-DNA test positivity was associated with a briefer time-to-treatment interval (HR 1.85; [95% confidence interval, 1.13, 3.03]; P=0.014) and worse survival (HR 2.77; [1.18, 6.49]; P=0.019). Reduction in EBV copies was significantly associated with therapy-response. A positive blood EBV-DNA test at diagnosis and sequential testing of EBV copies during therapy were significantly associated with biological and clinical variables, time-to-treatment, therapy-response and survival. If validated these data may be added to CLL prognostic scoring systems. PMID:26539641

  6. Elevation of Pollen Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number by WHIRLY2: Altered Respiration and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiang; Guo, Liang; Shen, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-09-01

    In plants, the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be much lower than the number of mitochondria. The biological significance and regulatory mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, using the pollen vegetative cell, we examined the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mtDNA-binding protein WHIRLY2 (AtWHY2). AtWHY2 decreases during pollen development, in parallel with the rapid degradation of mtDNA; to examine the importance of this decrease, we used the pollen vegetative cell-specific promoter Lat52 to express AtWHY2. The transgenic plants (LWHY2) had very high mtDNA levels in pollen, more than 10 times more than in the wild type (ecotype Columbia-0). LWHY2 plants were fertile, morphologically normal, and set seeds; however, reciprocal crosses with heterozygous plants showed reduced transmission of LWHY2-1 through the male and slower growth of LWHY2-1 pollen tubes. We found that LWHY2-1 pollen had significantly more reactive oxygen species and less ATP compared with the wild type, indicating an effect on mitochondrial respiration. These findings reveal that AtWHY2 affects mtDNA copy number in pollen and suggest that low mtDNA copy numbers might be the normal means by which plant cells maintain mitochondrial genetic information.

  7. Elevation of Pollen Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number by WHIRLY2: Altered Respiration and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Guo, Liang; Shen, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be much lower than the number of mitochondria. The biological significance and regulatory mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, using the pollen vegetative cell, we examined the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mtDNA-binding protein WHIRLY2 (AtWHY2). AtWHY2 decreases during pollen development, in parallel with the rapid degradation of mtDNA; to examine the importance of this decrease, we used the pollen vegetative cell-specific promoter Lat52 to express AtWHY2. The transgenic plants (LWHY2) had very high mtDNA levels in pollen, more than 10 times more than in the wild type (ecotype Columbia-0). LWHY2 plants were fertile, morphologically normal, and set seeds; however, reciprocal crosses with heterozygous plants showed reduced transmission of LWHY2-1 through the male and slower growth of LWHY2-1 pollen tubes. We found that LWHY2-1 pollen had significantly more reactive oxygen species and less ATP compared with the wild type, indicating an effect on mitochondrial respiration. These findings reveal that AtWHY2 affects mtDNA copy number in pollen and suggest that low mtDNA copy numbers might be the normal means by which plant cells maintain mitochondrial genetic information. PMID:26195569

  8. Elevation of Pollen Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number by WHIRLY2: Altered Respiration and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiang; Guo, Liang; Shen, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-09-01

    In plants, the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be much lower than the number of mitochondria. The biological significance and regulatory mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, using the pollen vegetative cell, we examined the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mtDNA-binding protein WHIRLY2 (AtWHY2). AtWHY2 decreases during pollen development, in parallel with the rapid degradation of mtDNA; to examine the importance of this decrease, we used the pollen vegetative cell-specific promoter Lat52 to express AtWHY2. The transgenic plants (LWHY2) had very high mtDNA levels in pollen, more than 10 times more than in the wild type (ecotype Columbia-0). LWHY2 plants were fertile, morphologically normal, and set seeds; however, reciprocal crosses with heterozygous plants showed reduced transmission of LWHY2-1 through the male and slower growth of LWHY2-1 pollen tubes. We found that LWHY2-1 pollen had significantly more reactive oxygen species and less ATP compared with the wild type, indicating an effect on mitochondrial respiration. These findings reveal that AtWHY2 affects mtDNA copy number in pollen and suggest that low mtDNA copy numbers might be the normal means by which plant cells maintain mitochondrial genetic information. PMID:26195569

  9. Development and validation of InnoQuant™, a sensitive human DNA quantitation and degradation assessment method for forensic samples using high copy number mobile elements Alu and SVA.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Gina M; Montgomery, Anne H; Thompson, Robyn; Indest, Brooke; Carroll, Marion; Sinha, Sudhir K

    2014-11-01

    There is a constant need in forensic casework laboratories for an improved way to increase the first-pass success rate of forensic samples. The recent advances in mini STR analysis, SNP, and Alu marker systems have now made it possible to analyze highly compromised samples, yet few tools are available that can simultaneously provide an assessment of quantity, inhibition, and degradation in a sample prior to genotyping. Currently there are several different approaches used for fluorescence-based quantification assays which provide a measure of quantity and inhibition. However, a system which can also assess the extent of degradation in a forensic sample will be a useful tool for DNA analysts. Possessing this information prior to genotyping will allow an analyst to more informatively make downstream decisions for the successful typing of a forensic sample without unnecessarily consuming DNA extract. Real-time PCR provides a reliable method for determining the amount and quality of amplifiable DNA in a biological sample. Alu are Short Interspersed Elements (SINE), approximately 300bp insertions which are distributed throughout the human genome in large copy number. The use of an internal primer to amplify a segment of an Alu element allows for human specificity as well as high sensitivity when compared to a single copy target. The advantage of an Alu system is the presence of a large number (>1000) of fixed insertions in every human genome, which minimizes the individual specific variation possible when using a multi-copy target quantification system. This study utilizes two independent retrotransposon genomic targets to obtain quantification of an 80bp "short" DNA fragment and a 207bp "long" DNA fragment in a degraded DNA sample in the multiplex system InnoQuant™. The ratio of the two quantitation values provides a "Degradation Index", or a qualitative measure of a sample's extent of degradation. The Degradation Index was found to be predictive of the observed loss

  10. Jagged1 DNA Copy Number Variation Is Associated with Poor Outcome in Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Honda, Masao; Yamashita, Taro; Okada, Hikari; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Nishikawa, Masashi; Nio, Kouki; Arai, Kuniaki; Sakai, Yoshio; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Notch signaling abnormalities are reported to be involved in the acceleration of malignancy in solid tumors and stem cell formation or regeneration in various organs. We analyzed specific genes for DNA copy number variations in liver cancer cells and investigated whether these factors relate to clinical outcome. Chromosome 20p, which includes the ligand for Notch pathways, Jagged1, was found to be amplified in several types of hepatoma cells, and its mRNA was up-regulated according to α-fetoprotein gene expression levels. Notch inhibition using Jagged1 shRNA and γ-secretase inhibitors produced significant suppression of cell growth in α-fetoprotein-producing cells with suppression of downstream genes. Using in vivo hepatoma models, the administration of γ-secretase inhibitors resulted in reduced tumor sizes and effective Notch inhibition with widespread apoptosis and necrosis of viable tumor cells. The γ-secretase inhibitors suppressed cell growth of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule-positive fraction in hepatoma cells, indicating that Notch inhibitors could suppress the stem cell features of liver cancer cells. Even in clinical liver cancer samples, the expression of α-fetoprotein and Jagged1 showed significant correlation, and amplification of the copy number of Jagged1 was associated with Jagged1 mRNA expression and poor survival after liver cancer surgical resection. In conclusion, amplification of Jagged1 contributed to mRNA expression that activates the Jagged1-Notch signaling pathway in liver cancer and led to poor outcome. PMID:27315779

  11. Rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms contaminating cosmetic products based on DNA sequence homology.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Shibayama, H; Suzuki, Y; Karita, S; Takamatsu, S

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop rapid and accurate procedures to identify microorganisms contaminating cosmetic products, based on the identity of the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal RNA coding DNA (rDNA). Five types of microorganisms were isolated from the inner portion of lotion bottle caps, skin care lotions, and cleansing gels. The rDNA ITS region of microorganisms was amplified through the use of colony-direct PCR or ordinal PCR using DNA extracts as templates. The nucleotide sequences of the amplified DNA were determined and subjected to homology search of a publicly available DNA database. Thereby, we obtained DNA sequences possessing high similarity with the query sequences from the databases of all the five organisms analyzed. The traditional identification procedure requires expert skills, and a time period of approximately 1 month to identify the microorganisms. On the contrary, 3-7 days were sufficient to complete all the procedures employed in the current method, including isolation and cultivation of organisms, DNA sequencing, and the database homology search. Moreover, it was possible to develop the skills necessary to perform the molecular techniques required for the identification procedures within 1 week. Consequently, the current method is useful for rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms, contaminating cosmetics.

  12. Extremely high copy numbers and polymorphisms of the rDNA operon estimated from single cell analysis of oligotrich and peritrich ciliates.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Dong, Jun; Liu, Xihan; Massana, Ramon

    2013-05-01

    The copy number and sequence variation of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) operon are of functional significance in evolution and ecology of organisms. However, the relationship between copy number and sequence variation of rDNA in protists has been rarely studied. Here we quantified rDNA copy numbers of oligotrich and peritrich ciliate species using single-cell quantitative PCR. We also examined the rDNA sequence variation by using single-cell PCR, cloning, and sequencing of multiple clones. We found that the rDNA copy numbers per cell were extremely high and different among even congeners, with the highest record of about 310,000. There was substantial intraindividual haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity for the rDNA markers, with sequence differences primarily characterized by single nucleotide polymorphisms. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity was positively correlated to the rDNA copy number. Our findings provide evidence that: (1) ciliates generally have much higher rDNA copy numbers than other protists and fungi, which could lead to overestimation of the relative abundance of ciliates in environmental samples when rDNA sequence-based methodologies are used; and that (2) the rDNA might not always evolve in a strictly concerted manner in ciliates, which may raise problems in rDNA-based inference of species richness and phylogeny.

  13. Random DNA fragmentation allows detection of single-copy, single-exon alterations of copy number by oligonucleotide array CGH in clinical FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Hostetter, Galen; Kim, Su Young; Savage, Stephanie; Gooden, Gerald C; Barrett, Michael; Zhang, Jian; Alla, Lalitamba; Watanabe, April; Einspahr, Janine; Prasad, Anil; Nickoloff, Brian J; Carpten, John; Trent, Jeffrey; Alberts, David; Bittner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Genomic technologies, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), increasingly offer definitive gene dosage profiles in clinical samples. Historically, copy number profiling was limited to large fresh-frozen tumors where intact DNA could be readily extracted. Genomic analyses of pre-neoplastic tumors and diagnostic biopsies are often limited to DNA processed by formalin-fixation and paraffin-embedding (FFPE). We present specialized protocols for DNA extraction and processing from FFPE tissues utilizing DNase processing to generate randomly fragmented DNA. The protocols are applied to FFPE clinical samples of varied tumor types, from multiple institutions and of varied block age. Direct comparative analyses with regression coefficient were calculated on split-sample (portion fresh/portion FFPE) of colorectal tumor samples. We show equal detection of a homozygous loss of SMAD4 at the exon-level in the SW480 cell line and gene-specific alterations in the split tumor samples. aCGH application to a set of archival FFPE samples of skin squamous cell carcinomas detected a novel hemizygous deletion in INPP5A on 10q26.3. Finally we present data on derivative of log ratio, a particular sensitive detector of measurement variance, for 216 sequential hybridizations to assess protocol reliability over a wide range of FFPE samples.

  14. FACETS: allele-specific copy number and clonal heterogeneity analysis tool for high-throughput DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ronglai; Seshan, Venkatraman E

    2016-09-19

    Allele-specific copy number analysis (ASCN) from next generation sequencing (NGS) data can greatly extend the utility of NGS beyond the identification of mutations to precisely annotate the genome for the detection of homozygous/heterozygous deletions, copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH), allele-specific gains/amplifications. In addition, as targeted gene panels are increasingly used in clinical sequencing studies for the detection of 'actionable' mutations and copy number alterations to guide treatment decisions, accurate, tumor purity-, ploidy- and clonal heterogeneity-adjusted integer copy number calls are greatly needed to more reliably interpret NGS-based cancer gene copy number data in the context of clinical sequencing. We developed FACETS, an ASCN tool and open-source software with a broad application to whole genome, whole-exome, as well as targeted panel sequencing platforms. It is a fully integrated stand-alone pipeline that includes sequencing BAM file post-processing, joint segmentation of total- and allele-specific read counts, and integer copy number calls corrected for tumor purity, ploidy and clonal heterogeneity, with comprehensive output and integrated visualization. We demonstrate the application of FACETS using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) whole-exome sequencing of lung adenocarcinoma samples. We also demonstrate its application to a clinical sequencing platform based on a targeted gene panel.

  15. FACETS: allele-specific copy number and clonal heterogeneity analysis tool for high-throughput DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ronglai; Seshan, Venkatraman E.

    2016-01-01

    Allele-specific copy number analysis (ASCN) from next generation sequencing (NGS) data can greatly extend the utility of NGS beyond the identification of mutations to precisely annotate the genome for the detection of homozygous/heterozygous deletions, copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH), allele-specific gains/amplifications. In addition, as targeted gene panels are increasingly used in clinical sequencing studies for the detection of ‘actionable’ mutations and copy number alterations to guide treatment decisions, accurate, tumor purity-, ploidy- and clonal heterogeneity-adjusted integer copy number calls are greatly needed to more reliably interpret NGS-based cancer gene copy number data in the context of clinical sequencing. We developed FACETS, an ASCN tool and open-source software with a broad application to whole genome, whole-exome, as well as targeted panel sequencing platforms. It is a fully integrated stand-alone pipeline that includes sequencing BAM file post-processing, joint segmentation of total- and allele-specific read counts, and integer copy number calls corrected for tumor purity, ploidy and clonal heterogeneity, with comprehensive output and integrated visualization. We demonstrate the application of FACETS using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) whole-exome sequencing of lung adenocarcinoma samples. We also demonstrate its application to a clinical sequencing platform based on a targeted gene panel. PMID:27270079

  16. FACETS: allele-specific copy number and clonal heterogeneity analysis tool for high-throughput DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ronglai; Seshan, Venkatraman E

    2016-09-19

    Allele-specific copy number analysis (ASCN) from next generation sequencing (NGS) data can greatly extend the utility of NGS beyond the identification of mutations to precisely annotate the genome for the detection of homozygous/heterozygous deletions, copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH), allele-specific gains/amplifications. In addition, as targeted gene panels are increasingly used in clinical sequencing studies for the detection of 'actionable' mutations and copy number alterations to guide treatment decisions, accurate, tumor purity-, ploidy- and clonal heterogeneity-adjusted integer copy number calls are greatly needed to more reliably interpret NGS-based cancer gene copy number data in the context of clinical sequencing. We developed FACETS, an ASCN tool and open-source software with a broad application to whole genome, whole-exome, as well as targeted panel sequencing platforms. It is a fully integrated stand-alone pipeline that includes sequencing BAM file post-processing, joint segmentation of total- and allele-specific read counts, and integer copy number calls corrected for tumor purity, ploidy and clonal heterogeneity, with comprehensive output and integrated visualization. We demonstrate the application of FACETS using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) whole-exome sequencing of lung adenocarcinoma samples. We also demonstrate its application to a clinical sequencing platform based on a targeted gene panel. PMID:27270079

  17. Simultaneous A8344G heteroplasmy and mitochondrial DNA copy number quantification in myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome by a multiplex molecular beacon based real-time fluorescence PCR.

    PubMed

    Szuhai, K; Ouweland, J; Dirks, R; Lemaître, M; Truffert, J; Janssen, G; Tanke, H; Holme, E; Maassen, J; Raap, A

    2001-02-01

    The association of a particular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation with different clinical phenotypes is a well-known feature of mitochondrial diseases. A simple genotype-phenotype correlation has not been found between mutation load and disease expression. Tissue and intercellular mosaicism as well as mtDNA copy number are thought to be responsible for the different clinical phenotypes. As disease expression of mitochondrial tRNA mutations is mostly in postmitotic tissues, studies to elucidate disease mechanisms need to be performed on patient material. Heteroplasmy quantitation and copy number estimation using small patient biopsy samples has not been reported before, mainly due to technical restrictions. In order to resolve this problem, we have developed a robust assay that utilizes Molecular Beacons to accurately quantify heteroplasmy levels and determine mtDNA copy number in small samples carrying the A8344G tRNA(Lys) mutation. It provides the methodological basis to investigate the role of heteroplasmy and mtDNA copy number in determining the clinical phenotypes.

  18. Fluorescence imaging of single-copy DNA sequences within the human genome using PNA-directed padlock probe assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yaroslavsky, Anastasia I.; Smolina, Irina V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a novel approach for fluorescent in situ detection of short, single-copy sequences within genomic DNA in human cells. The single copy sensitivity and single base specificity of our method is achieved due to the combination of three components. First, a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe locally opens a chosen target site, which allows a padlock DNA probe to access the site and become ligated. Second, rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates thousands of single-stranded copies of the target sequence. Finally, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to visualize the amplified DNA. We validate this new technique by successfully detecting six unique target sites on human mitochondrial and autosomal DNA. We also demonstrate the high specificity of this method by detecting X- and Y- specific sequences on human sex chromosomes and by simultaneously detecting three unique target sites. Finally, we discriminate two target sites that differ by two nucleotides. The PNA-RCA-FISH approach is a unique in situ hybridization method capable of multi-target visualization within human chromosomes and nuclei that does not require DNA denaturation and is extremely sequence specific. PMID:23521801

  19. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Shannon C.K.; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual’s consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%). Most nrDNA positions (91%) were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the “noncoding” ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming). PMID:25653903

  20. Mitochondrial Lon protease regulates mitochondrial DNA copy number and transcription by selective degradation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM).

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Yuichi; Goto, Yu-ichi; Kaguni, Laurie S

    2010-10-26

    Lon is the major protease in the mitochondrial matrix in eukaryotes, and is well conserved among species. Although a role for Lon in mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed, the mechanistic basis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate a role for Lon in mtDNA metabolism. An RNA interference (RNAi) construct was designed that reduces Lon to less than 10% of its normal level in Drosophila Schneider cells. RNAi knockdown of Lon results in increased abundance of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA copy number. In a corollary manner, overexpression of Lon reduces TFAM levels and mtDNA copy number. Notably, induction of mtDNA depletion in Lon knockdown cells does not result in degradation of TFAM, thereby causing a dramatic increase in the TFAMmtDNA ratio. The increased TFAMmtDNA ratio in turn causes inhibition of mitochondrial transcription. We conclude that Lon regulates mitochondrial transcription by stabilizing the mitochondrial TFAMmtDNA ratio via selective degradation of TFAM.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA copy number and hnRNP A2/B1 protein: biomarkers for direct exposure of benzene.

    PubMed

    Eom, Ha-Young; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Hwan-Young; Han, Dong-Kyun; Baek, Hee-Jo; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Moon, Jai Dong; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Kook, Hoon; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2011-12-01

    The present study was performed to identify biomarkers for exposure of benzene in blood cells and hematopoietic tissues. Peripheral mononuclear cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and leukemia cell lines were cultured in RPMI 1640 media with the addition of 0, 1, and 10 mM of benzene. Hydrogen peroxide was measured using an enzyme immunoassay. Mitochondrial mass, membrane potential, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number were measured using MitoTracker Green/Red probes, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) technology were performed to identify protein markers. The mitochondrial contents and membrane potentials were dramatically increased after three weeks of direct benzene exposure. The hydrogen peroxide level increased significantly after two weeks of treatment with benzene (4.4 ± 1.9 µM/mg protein) compared to the non-benzene treatment group (1.2 ± 1.0; p = 0.001). The mtDNA copy number gradually increased after exposure to benzene. Numerous protein markers showed significant aberrant expression after exposure to benzene. Among them, the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2/B1 was markedly decreased after exposure to benzene. Thus, increased mitochondrial mass, mtDNA copy number, and the hnRNP A2/B1 protein were biomarkers for benzene-related toxicity and hematotoxicity.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA as a non-invasive biomarker: accurate quantification using real time quantitative PCR without co-amplification of pseudogenes and dilution bias.

    PubMed

    Malik, Afshan N; Shahni, Rojeen; Rodriguez-de-Ledesma, Ana; Laftah, Abas; Cunningham, Phil

    2011-08-19

    Circulating mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) is a potential non-invasive biomarker of cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, the latter known to be central to a wide range of human diseases. Changes in MtDNA are usually determined by quantification of MtDNA relative to nuclear DNA (Mt/N) using real time quantitative PCR. We propose that the methodology for measuring Mt/N needs to be improved and we have identified that current methods have at least one of the following three problems: (1) As much of the mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the nuclear genome, many commonly used MtDNA primers co-amplify homologous pseudogenes found in the nuclear genome; (2) use of regions from genes such as β-actin and 18S rRNA which are repetitive and/or highly variable for qPCR of the nuclear genome leads to errors; and (3) the size difference of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes cause a "dilution bias" when template DNA is diluted. We describe a PCR-based method using unique regions in the human mitochondrial genome not duplicated in the nuclear genome; unique single copy region in the nuclear genome and template treatment to remove dilution bias, to accurately quantify MtDNA from human samples.

  3. Integrated DNA Copy Number and Gene Expression Regulatory Network Analysis of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iranmanesh, Seyed M; Guo, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Integrative analysis of multi-level molecular profiles can distinguish interactions that cannot be revealed based on one kind of data in the analysis of cancer susceptibility and metastasis. DNA copy number variations (CNVs) are common in cancer cells, and their role in cell behaviors and relationship to gene expression (GE) is poorly understood. An integrative analysis of CNV and genome-wide mRNA expression can discover copy number alterations and their possible regulatory effects on GE. This study presents a novel framework to identify important genes and construct potential regulatory networks based on these genes. Using this approach, DNA copy number aberrations and their effects on GE in lung cancer progression were revealed. Specifically, this approach contains the following steps: (1) select a pool of candidate driver genes, which have significant CNV in lung cancer patient tumors or have a significant association with the clinical outcome at the transcriptional level; (2) rank important driver genes in lung cancer patients with good prognosis and poor prognosis, respectively, and use top-ranked driver genes to construct regulatory networks with the COpy Number and EXpression In Cancer (CONEXIC) method; (3) identify experimentally confirmed molecular interactions in the constructed regulatory networks using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA); and (4) visualize the refined regulatory networks with the software package Genatomy. The constructed CNV/mRNA regulatory networks provide important insights into potential CNV-regulated transcriptional mechanisms in lung cancer metastasis. PMID:25392690

  4. Mitochondrial DNA as a non-invasive biomarker: Accurate quantification using real time quantitative PCR without co-amplification of pseudogenes and dilution bias

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, Afshan N.; Shahni, Rojeen; Rodriguez-de-Ledesma, Ana; Laftah, Abas; Cunningham, Phil

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial dysfunction is central to many diseases of oxidative stress. {yields} 95% of the mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the nuclear genome. {yields} Dilution of untreated genomic DNA leads to dilution bias. {yields} Unique primers and template pretreatment are needed to accurately measure mitochondrial DNA content. -- Abstract: Circulating mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) is a potential non-invasive biomarker of cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, the latter known to be central to a wide range of human diseases. Changes in MtDNA are usually determined by quantification of MtDNA relative to nuclear DNA (Mt/N) using real time quantitative PCR. We propose that the methodology for measuring Mt/N needs to be improved and we have identified that current methods have at least one of the following three problems: (1) As much of the mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the nuclear genome, many commonly used MtDNA primers co-amplify homologous pseudogenes found in the nuclear genome; (2) use of regions from genes such as {beta}-actin and 18S rRNA which are repetitive and/or highly variable for qPCR of the nuclear genome leads to errors; and (3) the size difference of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes cause a 'dilution bias' when template DNA is diluted. We describe a PCR-based method using unique regions in the human mitochondrial genome not duplicated in the nuclear genome; unique single copy region in the nuclear genome and template treatment to remove dilution bias, to accurately quantify MtDNA from human samples.

  5. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of rRNA genes requires a copy number correction to accurately reflect the effects of management practices on soil nematode community structure.

    PubMed

    Darby, B J; Todd, T C; Herman, M A

    2013-11-01

    Nematodes are abundant consumers in grassland soils, but more sensitive and specific methods of enumeration are needed to improve our understanding of how different nematode species affect, and are affected by, ecosystem processes. High-throughput amplicon sequencing is used to enumerate microbial and invertebrate communities at a high level of taxonomic resolution, but the method requires validation against traditional specimen-based morphological identifications. To investigate the consistency between these approaches, we enumerated nematodes from a 25-year field experiment using both morphological and molecular identification techniques in order to determine the long-term effects of annual burning and nitrogen enrichment on soil nematode communities. Family-level frequencies based on amplicon sequencing were not initially consistent with specimen-based counts, but correction for differences in rRNA gene copy number using a genetic algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. Multivariate analysis of corrected sequence-based abundances of nematode families was consistent with, but not identical to, analysis of specimen-based counts. In both cases, herbivores, fungivores and predator/omnivores generally were more abundant in burned than nonburned plots, while bacterivores generally were more abundant in nonburned or nitrogen-enriched plots. Discriminate analysis of sequence-based abundances identified putative indicator species representing each trophic group. We conclude that high-throughput amplicon sequencing can be a valuable method for characterizing nematode communities at high taxonomic resolution as long as rRNA gene copy number variation is accounted for and accurate sequence databases are available. PMID:24103081

  6. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of rRNA genes requires a copy number correction to accurately reflect the effects of management practices on soil nematode community structure.

    PubMed

    Darby, B J; Todd, T C; Herman, M A

    2013-11-01

    Nematodes are abundant consumers in grassland soils, but more sensitive and specific methods of enumeration are needed to improve our understanding of how different nematode species affect, and are affected by, ecosystem processes. High-throughput amplicon sequencing is used to enumerate microbial and invertebrate communities at a high level of taxonomic resolution, but the method requires validation against traditional specimen-based morphological identifications. To investigate the consistency between these approaches, we enumerated nematodes from a 25-year field experiment using both morphological and molecular identification techniques in order to determine the long-term effects of annual burning and nitrogen enrichment on soil nematode communities. Family-level frequencies based on amplicon sequencing were not initially consistent with specimen-based counts, but correction for differences in rRNA gene copy number using a genetic algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. Multivariate analysis of corrected sequence-based abundances of nematode families was consistent with, but not identical to, analysis of specimen-based counts. In both cases, herbivores, fungivores and predator/omnivores generally were more abundant in burned than nonburned plots, while bacterivores generally were more abundant in nonburned or nitrogen-enriched plots. Discriminate analysis of sequence-based abundances identified putative indicator species representing each trophic group. We conclude that high-throughput amplicon sequencing can be a valuable method for characterizing nematode communities at high taxonomic resolution as long as rRNA gene copy number variation is accounted for and accurate sequence databases are available.

  7. Segmentation of genomic and transcriptomic microarrays data reveals major correlation between DNA copy number aberrations and gene-loci expression.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Estevez, M; De Las Rivas, J; Fontanillo, C; Rubio, A

    2011-02-01

    DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) are genetic alterations common in cancer cells. Their transcriptional consequences are still poorly understood. Based on the fact that DNA copy number (CN) is highly correlated with the genomic position, we have applied a segmentation algorithm to gene expression (GE) to explore its relation with CN. We have found a strong correlation between segmented CN (sCN) and segmented GE (sGE), corroborating that CNAs have clear effects on genome-wide expression. We have found out that most of the recurrent regions of sGE are common to those obtained from sCN analysis. Results for two cancer datasets confirm the known targets of aberrations and provide new candidates to study. The suggested methodology allows to find recurrent aberrations specific to sGE, revealing loci where the expression of the genes is independent from their CNs. R code and additional files are available as supplementary material. PMID:21044881

  8. Ultra-deep Illumina sequencing accurately identifies MHC class IIb alleles and provides evidence for copy number variation in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Lighten, Jackie; van Oosterhout, Cock; Paterson, Ian G; McMullan, Mark; Bentzen, Paul

    2014-07-01

    We address the bioinformatic issue of accurately separating amplified genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) from artefacts generated during high-throughput sequencing workflows. We fit observed ultra-deep sequencing depths (hundreds to thousands of sequences per amplicon) of allelic variants to expectations from genetic models of copy number variation (CNV). We provide a simple, accurate and repeatable method for genotyping multigene families, evaluating our method via analyses of 209 b of MHC class IIb exon 2 in guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Genotype repeatability for resequenced individuals (N = 49) was high (100%) within the same sequencing run. However, repeatability dropped to 83.7% between independent runs, either because of lower mean amplicon sequencing depth in the initial run or random PCR effects. This highlights the importance of fully independent replicates. Significant improvements in genotyping accuracy were made by greatly reducing type I genotyping error (i.e. accepting an artefact as a true allele), which may occur when using low-depth allele validation thresholds used by previous methods. Only a small amount (4.9%) of type II error (i.e. rejecting a genuine allele as an artefact) was detected through fully independent sequencing runs. We observed 1-6 alleles per individual, and evidence of sharing of alleles across loci. Variation in the total number of MHC class II loci among individuals, both among and within populations was also observed, and some genotypes appeared to be partially hemizygous; total allelic dosage added up to an odd number of allelic copies. Collectively, observations provide evidence of MHC CNV and its complex basis in natural populations.

  9. RUBIC identifies driver genes by detecting recurrent DNA copy number breaks

    PubMed Central

    van Dyk, Ewald; Hoogstraat, Marlous; ten Hoeve, Jelle; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The frequent recurrence of copy number aberrations across tumour samples is a reliable hallmark of certain cancer driver genes. However, state-of-the-art algorithms for detecting recurrent aberrations fail to detect several known drivers. In this study, we propose RUBIC, an approach that detects recurrent copy number breaks, rather than recurrently amplified or deleted regions. This change of perspective allows for a simplified approach as recursive peak splitting procedures and repeated re-estimation of the background model are avoided. Furthermore, we control the false discovery rate on the level of called regions, rather than at the probe level, as in competing algorithms. We benchmark RUBIC against GISTIC2 (a state-of-the-art approach) and RAIG (a recently proposed approach) on simulated copy number data and on three SNP6 and NGS copy number data sets from TCGA. We show that RUBIC calls more focal recurrent regions and identifies a much larger fraction of known cancer genes. PMID:27396759

  10. CNVkit: Genome-Wide Copy Number Detection and Visualization from Targeted DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shain, A. Hunter; Botton, Thomas; Bastian, Boris C.

    2016-01-01

    Germline copy number variants (CNVs) and somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are of significant importance in syndromic conditions and cancer. Massively parallel sequencing is increasingly used to infer copy number information from variations in the read depth in sequencing data. However, this approach has limitations in the case of targeted re-sequencing, which leaves gaps in coverage between the regions chosen for enrichment and introduces biases related to the efficiency of target capture and library preparation. We present a method for copy number detection, implemented in the software package CNVkit, that uses both the targeted reads and the nonspecifically captured off-target reads to infer copy number evenly across the genome. This combination achieves both exon-level resolution in targeted regions and sufficient resolution in the larger intronic and intergenic regions to identify copy number changes. In particular, we successfully inferred copy number at equivalent to 100-kilobase resolution genome-wide from a platform targeting as few as 293 genes. After normalizing read counts to a pooled reference, we evaluated and corrected for three sources of bias that explain most of the extraneous variability in the sequencing read depth: GC content, target footprint size and spacing, and repetitive sequences. We compared the performance of CNVkit to copy number changes identified by array comparative genomic hybridization. We packaged the components of CNVkit so that it is straightforward to use and provides visualizations, detailed reporting of significant features, and export options for integration into existing analysis pipelines. CNVkit is freely available from https://github.com/etal/cnvkit. PMID:27100738

  11. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep' proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep', in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replica...

  12. TALE nickase mediates high efficient targeted transgene integration at the human multi-copy ribosomal DNA locus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Gao, Tieli; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Youjin; Hu, Xuyun; Hu, Zhiqing; Pang, Jialun; Li, Zhuo; Xue, Jinfeng; Feng, Mai; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2014-03-28

    Although targeted gene addition could be stimulated strikingly by a DNA double strand break (DSB) created by either zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) or TALE nucleases (TALENs), the DSBs are really mutagenic and toxic to human cells. As a compromised solution, DNA single-strand break (SSB) or nick has been reported to mediate high efficient gene addition but with marked reduction of random mutagenesis. We previously demonstrated effective targeted gene addition at the human multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus, a genomic safe harbor for the transgene with therapeutic potential. To improve the transgene integration efficiency by using TALENs while lowering the cytotoxicity of DSBs, we created both TALENs and TALE nickases (TALENickases) targeting this multicopy locus. A targeting vector which could integrate a GFP cassette at the rDNA locus was constructed and co-transfected with TALENs or TALENickases. Although the fraction of GFP positive cells using TALENs was greater than that using TALENickases during the first few days after transfection, it reduced to a level less than that using TALENickases after continuous culture. Our findings showed that the TALENickases were more effective than their TALEN counterparts at the multi-copy rDNA locus, though earlier studies using ZFNs and ZFNickases targeting the single-copy loci showed the reverse. Besides, TALENickases mediated the targeted integration of a 5.4 kb fragment at a frequency of up to 0.62% in HT1080 cells after drug selection, suggesting their potential application in targeted gene modification not being limited at the rDNA locus.

  13. Gene copy number variations in the leukocyte genome of hepatocellular carcinoma patients with integrated hepatitis B virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guixia; Cheng, Kai; Cao, Guangwen; Wu, Mengchao; Cheng, Shuqun; Liu, Shanrong

    2016-01-01

    Integration of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA into the human liver cell genome is believed to promote HBV-related carcinogenesis. This study aimed to quantify the integration of HBV DNA into the leukocyte genome in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients in order to identify potential biomarkers for HBV-related diseases. Whole-genome comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) chip array analyses were performed to screen gene copy number variations (CNV) in the leukocyte genome, and the results were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The commonly detected regions included chromosome arms 19p, 5q, 1q and 15p, where 200 copy number gain events and 270 copy number loss events were noted. In particular, gains were observed in 5q35.3 (OR4F3) and 19p13.3 (OR4F17) in 90% of the samples. Successful homologous recombination of OR4F3 and the HBV P gene was demonstrated, and the amplification at 5q35.3 is potentially associated with the integration of HBV P gene into natural killer cells isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that the combination of OR4F3 and OR4F17 a novel potential biomarker of HBV-related diseases. PMID:26769853

  14. A novel set of single-copy nuclear DNA markers for the genetic study of Salicaceae.

    PubMed

    Du, S H; Wang, Z S; Zhang, J G

    2014-07-04

    Species of Populus are widely distributed worldwide, playing a significant role in both ecology and economy. However, the lack of single-copy nuclear markers limits knowledge about the phylogeny and population genetics of this genus. In the present study, primer pairs of 15 single-copy nuclear markers were developed through bioinformatic methods based on complete genomic sequences of Populus trichocarpa and Salix arbutifolia. Twenty individuals of Populus davidiana Dode and Salix matsudana Koidz were used to evaluate the basic application of these markers with respect to marker length and diversity indices, respectively. The utility of single-copy nuclear markers is anticipated to facilitate further studies about the phylogeny, population genetics, and phylogeography of this genus, in addition to providing information about the evolutionary dynamics of Salicaceae.

  15. Individual and combined effects of DNA methylation and copy number alterations on miRNA expression in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The global effect of copy number and epigenetic alterations on miRNA expression in cancer is poorly understood. In the present study, we integrate genome-wide DNA methylation, copy number and miRNA expression and identify genetic mechanisms underlying miRNA dysregulation in breast cancer. Results We identify 70 miRNAs whose expression was associated with alterations in copy number or methylation, or both. Among these, five miRNA families are represented. Interestingly, the members of these families are encoded on different chromosomes and are complementarily altered by gain or hypomethylation across the patients. In an independent breast cancer cohort of 123 patients, 41 of the 70 miRNAs were confirmed with respect to aberration pattern and association to expression. In vitro functional experiments were performed in breast cancer cell lines with miRNA mimics to evaluate the phenotype of the replicated miRNAs. let-7e-3p, which in tumors is found associated with hypermethylation, is shown to induce apoptosis and reduce cell viability, and low let-7e-3p expression is associated with poorer prognosis. The overexpression of three other miRNAs associated with copy number gain, miR-21-3p, miR-148b-3p and miR-151a-5p, increases proliferation of breast cancer cell lines. In addition, miR-151a-5p enhances the levels of phosphorylated AKT protein. Conclusions Our data provide novel evidence of the mechanisms behind miRNA dysregulation in breast cancer. The study contributes to the understanding of how methylation and copy number alterations influence miRNA expression, emphasizing miRNA functionality through redundant encoding, and suggests novel miRNAs important in breast cancer. PMID:24257477

  16. Altered mitochondrial DNA copy number contributes to human cancer risk: evidence from an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liwen; Yao, Xinyue; Shen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates that the quantitative changes in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number could affect the genetic susceptibility of malignancies in a tumor-specific manner, but the results are still elusive. To provide a more precise estimation on the association between mtDNA copy number and risk of diverse malignancies, a meta-analysis was conducted by calculating the pooled odds ratios (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A total of 36 case-control studies involving 11,847 cases and 15,438 controls were finally included in the meta-analysis. Overall analysis of all studies suggested no significant association between mtDNA content and cancer risk (OR = 1.044, 95% CI = 0.866–1.260, P = 0.651). Subgroup analyses by cancer types showed an obvious positive association between mtDNA content and lymphoma and breast cancer (OR = 1.645, 95% CI = 1.117–2.421, P = 0.012; OR = 1.721, 95% CI = 1.130–2.622, P = 0.011, respectively), and a negative association for hepatic carcinoma. Stratified analyses by other confounding factors also found increased cancer risk in people with drinking addiction. Further analysis using studies of quartiles found that populations with the highest mtDNA content may be under more obvious risk of melanoma and that Western populations were more susceptible than Asians. PMID:27775013

  17. Effect of Maternal Age on the Ratio of Cleavage and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Early Developmental Stage Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    TAKEO, Shun; GOTO, Hiroya; KUWAYAMA, Takehito; MONJI, Yasunori; IWATA, Hisataka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Age-associated deterioration in both the quality and quantity of mitochondria occurs in older women. The main aim of this study was to examine the effect of age on mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA number) in early developmental stage bovine embryos as well as the dynamics of mtDNA number during early embryo development. Real-time PCR was used to determine mtDNA number. In vitro-produced embryos 48 h after insemination derived from Japanese black cows, ranging in age from 25 to 209 months were categorized based on their cleavage status. There was an overall negative relationship between the age of the cow and cleavage status, to the extent that the ratio of embryos cleaved over the 4-cell stage was greater in younger cows. The mtDNA number did not differ among the cleaved status of embryos. In the next experiment, oocytes collected from each donor cow were divided into 2 groups containing 10 oocytes each, in order to compare the mtDNA number of mature oocytes and early developmental stage embryos within individuals. Upon comparing the mtDNA number between oocytes at the M2 stage and early developmental stage 48 h post insemination, mtDNA number was found to decrease in most cows, but was found to increase in some cows. In conclusion, age affects the cleaving ability of oocytes, and very old cows (> 180 months) tend to have lower mtDNA numbers in their oocytes. The change in mtDNA number during early development varied among individual cows, although overall, it showed a tendency to decrease. PMID:23269452

  18. Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test Using ddPCR (SMART-ddPCR): An Accurate Method for Assessment of Preferential Allelic Imbalance in Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    de Smith, Adam J.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Hansen, Helen M.; Endicott, Alyson A.; Wiencke, John K.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which heritable genetic variants can affect tumor development has yet to be fully elucidated. Tumor selection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk alleles, a phenomenon called preferential allelic imbalance (PAI), has been demonstrated in some cancer types. We developed a novel application of digital PCR termed Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test using Droplet Digital PCR (SMART-ddPCR) for accurate assessment of tumor PAI, and have applied this method to test the hypothesis that heritable SNPs associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may demonstrate tumor PAI. These SNPs are located at CDKN2A (rs3731217) and IKZF1 (rs4132601), genes frequently lost in ALL, and at CEBPE (rs2239633), ARID5B (rs7089424), PIP4K2A (rs10764338), and GATA3 (rs3824662), genes located on chromosomes gained in high-hyperdiploid ALL. We established thresholds of AI using constitutional DNA from SNP heterozygotes, and subsequently measured allelic copy number in tumor DNA from 19–142 heterozygote samples per SNP locus. We did not find significant tumor PAI at these loci, though CDKN2A and IKZF1 SNPs showed a trend towards preferential selection of the risk allele (p = 0.17 and p = 0.23, respectively). Using a genomic copy number control ddPCR assay, we investigated somatic copy number alterations (SCNA) underlying AI at CDKN2A and IKZF1, revealing a complex range of alterations including homozygous and hemizygous deletions and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, with varying degrees of clonality. Copy number estimates from ddPCR showed high agreement with those from multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays. We demonstrate that SMART-ddPCR is a highly accurate method for investigation of tumor PAI and for assessment of the somatic alterations underlying AI. Furthermore, analysis of publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas identified 16 recurrent SCNA loci that contain heritable cancer risk SNPs associated with a

  19. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5-8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be...

  20. SNP-microarrays can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex forensic DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, Lev; Ayers, Sheri B; LeFebvre, Aaron K; Darvasi, Ariel

    2015-05-01

    Common forensic and mass disaster scenarios present DNA evidence that comprises a mixture of several contributors. Identifying the presence of an individual in such mixtures has proven difficult. In the current study, we evaluate the practical usefulness of currently available "off-the-shelf" SNP microarrays for such purposes. We found that a set of 3000 SNPs specifically selected for this purpose can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex DNA mixtures of various compositions. For example, individuals contributing as little as 5% to a complex DNA mixture can be robustly identified even if the starting DNA amount was as little as 5.0ng and had undergone whole-genome amplification (WGA) prior to SNP analysis. The work presented in this study represents proof-of-principle that our previously proposed approach, can work with real "forensic-type" samples. Furthermore, in the absence of a low-density focused forensic SNP microarray, the use of standard, currently available high-density SNP microarrays can be similarly used and even increase statistical power due to the larger amount of available information.

  1. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that

  2. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways.

    PubMed

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-12-17

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that

  3. Discovery of common Asian copy number variants using integrated high-resolution array CGH and massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Park, Hansoo; Kim, Jong-Il; Ju, Young Seok; Gokcumen, Omer; Mills, Ryan E; Kim, Sheehyun; Lee, Seungbok; Suh, Dongwhan; Hong, Dongwan; Kang, Hyunseok Peter; Yoo, Yun Joo; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Yavartanoo, Maryam; Chang, Young Wha; Ha, Jung-Sook; Chong, Wilson; Hwang, Ga-Ram; Darvishi, Katayoon; Kim, Hyeran; Yang, Song Ju; Yang, Kap-Seok; Kim, Hyungtae; Hurles, Matthew E; Scherer, Stephen W; Carter, Nigel P; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Lee, Charles; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2010-05-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) account for the majority of human genomic diversity in terms of base coverage. Here, we have developed and applied a new method to combine high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data with whole-genome DNA sequencing data to obtain a comprehensive catalog of common CNVs in Asian individuals. The genomes of 30 individuals from three Asian populations (Korean, Chinese and Japanese) were interrogated with an ultra-high-resolution array CGH platform containing 24 million probes. Whole-genome sequencing data from a reference genome (NA10851, with 28.3x coverage) and two Asian genomes (AK1, with 27.8x coverage and AK2, with 32.0x coverage) were used to transform the relative copy number information obtained from array CGH experiments into absolute copy number values. We discovered 5,177 CNVs, of which 3,547 were putative Asian-specific CNVs. These common CNVs in Asian populations will be a useful resource for subsequent genetic studies in these populations, and the new method of calling absolute CNVs will be essential for applying CNV data to personalized medicine.

  4. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and multiple copies of DNA sequences homologous with probes for P-fimbriae and hemolysin genes among uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hull, S I; Bieler, S; Hull, R A

    1988-03-01

    Hemolysin and P-fimbriae are two virulence traits frequently found together in uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Previous studies have discovered evidence both for linkage between the genes for these traits and for their duplication in the chromosomes of a limited number of strains. To test whether these observations are characteristic of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, the method of DNA hybridization to DNA restriction fragments separated by electrophoresis and transferred to nylon was used to determine copy number of genes for P-fimbriae (pap) among 51 E. coli strains isolated from symptomatic urinary tract infections. Twenty percent of the strains had more than one copy of pap homologous sequences. Fifteen strains, each representing a unique clone, were examined for the presence of sequences homologous with cloned hemolysin genes (hly). Samples of DNA from 14 of the 15 strains hybridized with hly probes. In eight strains the number of copies of pap equalled the number of copies of hly, including one strain with two apparent copies of each. Five strains appeared to have one more copy of pap than of hly, and one strain had an extra copy of hly.

  5. A scale-space method for detecting recurrent DNA copy number changes with analytical false discovery rate control.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Ewald; Reinders, Marcel J T; Wessels, Lodewyk F A

    2013-05-01

    Tumor formation is partially driven by DNA copy number changes, which are typically measured using array comparative genomic hybridization, SNP arrays and DNA sequencing platforms. Many techniques are available for detecting recurring aberrations across multiple tumor samples, including CMAR, STAC, GISTIC and KC-SMART. GISTIC is widely used and detects both broad and focal (potentially overlapping) recurring events. However, GISTIC performs false discovery rate control on probes instead of events. Here we propose Analytical Multi-scale Identification of Recurrent Events, a multi-scale Gaussian smoothing approach, for the detection of both broad and focal (potentially overlapping) recurring copy number alterations. Importantly, false discovery rate control is performed analytically (no need for permutations) on events rather than probes. The method does not require segmentation or calling on the input dataset and therefore reduces the potential loss of information due to discretization. An important characteristic of the approach is that the error rate is controlled across all scales and that the algorithm outputs a single profile of significant events selected from the appropriate scales. We perform extensive simulations and showcase its utility on a glioblastoma SNP array dataset. Importantly, ADMIRE detects focal events that are missed by GISTIC, including two events involving known glioma tumor-suppressor genes: CDKN2C and NF1.

  6. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  7. Detection of Clonal and Subclonal Copy-Number Variants in Cell-Free DNA from Patients with Breast Cancer Using a Massively Multiplexed PCR Methodology.

    PubMed

    Kirkizlar, Eser; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Constantin, Tudor; Swenerton, Ryan; Hoang, Bin; Wayham, Nicholas; Babiarz, Joshua E; Demko, Zachary; Pelham, Robert J; Kareht, Stephanie; Simon, Alexander L; Jinnett, Kristine N; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Hill, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate proof-of-concept for the use of massively multiplexed PCR and next-generation sequencing (mmPCR-NGS) to identify both clonal and subclonal copy-number variants (CNVs) in circulating tumor DNA. This is the first report of a targeted methodology for detection of CNVs in plasma. Using an in vitro model of cell-free DNA, we show that mmPCR-NGS can accurately detect CNVs with average allelic imbalances as low as 0.5%, an improvement over previously reported whole-genome sequencing approaches. Our method revealed differences in the spectrum of CNVs detected in tumor tissue subsections and matching plasma samples from 11 patients with stage II breast cancer. Moreover, we showed that liquid biopsies are able to detect subclonal mutations that may be missed in tumor tissue biopsies. We anticipate that this mmPCR-NGS methodology will have broad applicability for the characterization, diagnosis, and therapeutic monitoring of CNV-enriched cancers, such as breast, ovarian, and lung cancer. PMID:26500031

  8. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A.; Borba, Juliane C.; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Landers, James P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer ‘trigger’ DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use. PMID:26068926

  9. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Borba, Juliane C; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M; Feldman, Sanford H; Landers, James P

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer 'trigger' DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use. PMID:26068926

  10. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Borba, Juliane C; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M; Feldman, Sanford H; Landers, James P

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer 'trigger' DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use.

  11. Detection of the free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri by using conventional and real-time PCR based on a single copy DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The amoeba-flagellate Naegleria fowleri is a causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). This thermophilic species occurs worldwide and tends to proliferate in warm aquatic environment. The PAM cases remain rare but this infection is mostly fatal. Here, we describe a single copy region which has been cloned and sequenced, and was used for both conventional and real-time PCR. Targeting a single-copy DNA sequence allows to directly quantify the N. fowleri cells. The real-time PCR results give a detection limit of 1 copy per reaction with high reproducibility without the need of a Taqman probe. This procedure is of interest as compared to other procedures which are mostly based on the detection of multi-copy DNA associated with a Taqman probe. PMID:26688582

  12. Detection of the free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri by using conventional and real-time PCR based on a single copy DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The amoeba-flagellate Naegleria fowleri is a causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). This thermophilic species occurs worldwide and tends to proliferate in warm aquatic environment. The PAM cases remain rare but this infection is mostly fatal. Here, we describe a single copy region which has been cloned and sequenced, and was used for both conventional and real-time PCR. Targeting a single-copy DNA sequence allows to directly quantify the N. fowleri cells. The real-time PCR results give a detection limit of 1 copy per reaction with high reproducibility without the need of a Taqman probe. This procedure is of interest as compared to other procedures which are mostly based on the detection of multi-copy DNA associated with a Taqman probe.

  13. Tumor size-related DNA copy number changes occur in solitary fibrous tumors but not in hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, M M; el-Rifai, W; Sarlomo-Rikala, M; Andersson, L C; Knuutila, S

    1997-12-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) presenting in the pleura and other soft tissue sites and hemangiopericytoma (HPC) presenting at various soft tissue sites are mesenchymal tumors that share many histologic and immunohistochemical features. This raises the questions of whether these tumors are related and whether they belong within the spectrum of a single biologic entity. The behavior of both SFTs and HPCs is difficult to predict histologically. The genetic background of both SFTs and HPCs is poorly known, but it could be helpful in the evaluation of malignancy and could give clues to their possible relationship. In this study, we analyzed 15 SFTs and 11 HPCs by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), a powerful molecular cytogenetic tool that can be applied to DNA extracted from formaldehyde-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. All of these tumors were immunohistochemically similar and showed reactivity for CD34-antigen but not for keratins, desmin, or muscle actins. Only 1 SFT smaller than 10 cm showed DNA copy number changes (a single loss in chromosome 13), but 7 of 8 SFTs larger than 10 cm (including all 4 tumors with more than 4 mitoses per 10 high power fields) showed changes, mostly chromosomal gains in 5q 7, 8, 12, and 18. Four cases showed losses, two of them in chromosome 13 and two others in 20q. These findings suggest that CGH might be useful in the evaluation of malignant transformation in SFT. The most common change, gain of the entire chromosome 8, seen in two cases as the only change, suggests trisomy 8 and parallels a similar finding previously described in other fibrous tumors, such as subsets of desmoid fibromatosis and infantile fibrosarcoma. In contrast, HPCs, including large and mitotically active tumors, showed no DNA copy number changes on CGH. This suggests that HPC is genetically different from SFT.

  14. The role of mitochondrial DNA copy number, variants, and haplotypes in farm animal developmental outcome.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tesha; St John, Justin C

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of cellular energy is generated through the process of oxidative phosphorylation, which takes place in the electron transport chain in the mitochondria. The electron transport chain is encoded by 2 genomes, the chromosomal and the mitochondrial genomes. Mitochondrial DNA is associated with a number of traits, which include tolerance to heat, growth and physical performance, meat and milk quality, and fertility. Mitochondrial genomes can be clustered into groups known as mtDNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are a potential genetic source for manipulating phenotypes in farm animals. The use of assisted reproductive technologies, such as nuclear transfer, allows favorable chromosomal genetic traits to be mixed and matched with sought after mtDNA haplotype traits. As a result super breeds can be generated. PMID:27345311

  15. Decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number in the hippocampus and peripheral blood during opiate addiction is mediated by autophagy and can be salvaged by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yue-Mei; Jia, Yun-Fang; Su, Ling-Yan; Wang, Dong; Lv, Li; Xu, Lin; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2013-09-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disease that is a serious social problem and causes enormous financial burden. Because mitochondrial abnormalities have been associated with opiate addiction, we examined the effect of morphine on mtDNA levels in rat and mouse models of addiction and in cultured cells. We found that mtDNA copy number was significantly reduced in the hippocampus and peripheral blood of morphine-addicted rats and mice compared with control animals. Concordantly, decreased mtDNA copy number and elevated mtDNA damage were observed in the peripheral blood from opiate-addicted patients, indicating detrimental effects of drug abuse and stress. In cultured rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and mouse neurons, morphine treatment caused many mitochondrial defects, including a reduction in mtDNA copy number that was mediated by autophagy. Knockdown of the Atg7 gene was able to counteract the loss of mtDNA copy number induced by morphine. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant melatonin restored mtDNA content and neuronal outgrowth and prevented the increase in autophagy upon morphine treatment. In mice, coadministration of melatonin with morphine ameliorated morphine-induced behavioral sensitization, analgesic tolerance and mtDNA content reduction. During drug withdrawal in opiate-addicted patients and improvement of protracted abstinence syndrome, we observed an increase of serum melatonin level. Taken together, our study indicates that opioid addiction is associated with mtDNA copy number reduction and neurostructural remodeling. These effects appear to be mediated by autophagy and can be salvaged by melatonin.

  16. TagGD: fast and accurate software for DNA Tag generation and demultiplexing.

    PubMed

    Costea, Paul Igor; Lundeberg, Joakim; Akan, Pelin

    2013-01-01

    Multiplexing is of vital importance for utilizing the full potential of next generation sequencing technologies. We here report TagGD (DNA-based Tag Generator and Demultiplexor), a fully-customisable, fast and accurate software package that can generate thousands of barcodes satisfying user-defined constraints and can guarantee full demultiplexing accuracy. The barcodes are designed to minimise their interference with the experiment. Insertion, deletion and substitution events are considered when designing and demultiplexing barcodes. 20,000 barcodes of length 18 were designed in 5 minutes and 2 million barcoded Illumina HiSeq-like reads generated with an error rate of 2% were demultiplexed with full accuracy in 5 minutes. We believe that our software meets a central demand in the current high-throughput biology and can be utilised in any field with ample sample abundance. The software is available on GitHub (https://github.com/pelinakan/UBD.git).

  17. The effect of leaving groups on binding and reactivity in enzyme-free copying of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Kervio, Eric; Sosson, Marilyne; Richert, Clemens

    2016-07-01

    The template-directed incorporation of nucleotides at the terminus of a growing primer is the basis of the transmission of genetic information. Nature uses polymerases-catalyzed reactions, but enzyme-free versions exist that employ nucleotides with organic leaving groups. The leaving group affects yields, but it was not clear whether inefficient extensions are due to poor binding, low reactivity toward the primer, or rapid hydrolysis. We have measured the binding of a total of 15 different activated nucleotides to DNA or RNA sequences. Further, we determined rate constants for the chemical step of primer extension involving methylimidazolides or oxyazabenzotriazolides of deoxynucleotides or ribonucleotides. Binding constants range from 10 to >500 mM and rate constants from 0.1 to 370 M(-1) h(-1) For aminoterminal primers, a fast covalent step and slow hydrolysis are the main factors leading to high yields. For monomers with weakly pairing bases, the leaving group can improve binding significantly. A detailed mechanistic picture emerges that explains why some enzyme-free primer extensions occur in high yield, while others remain recalcitrant to copying without enzymatic catalysis. A combination of tight binding and rapid extension, coupled with slow hydrolysis induces efficient enzyme-free copying. PMID:27235418

  18. The effect of leaving groups on binding and reactivity in enzyme-free copying of DNA and RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kervio, Eric; Sosson, Marilyne; Richert, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    The template-directed incorporation of nucleotides at the terminus of a growing primer is the basis of the transmission of genetic information. Nature uses polymerases-catalyzed reactions, but enzyme-free versions exist that employ nucleotides with organic leaving groups. The leaving group affects yields, but it was not clear whether inefficient extensions are due to poor binding, low reactivity toward the primer, or rapid hydrolysis. We have measured the binding of a total of 15 different activated nucleotides to DNA or RNA sequences. Further, we determined rate constants for the chemical step of primer extension involving methylimidazolides or oxyazabenzotriazolides of deoxynucleotides or ribonucleotides. Binding constants range from 10 to >500 mM and rate constants from 0.1 to 370 M−1 h−1. For aminoterminal primers, a fast covalent step and slow hydrolysis are the main factors leading to high yields. For monomers with weakly pairing bases, the leaving group can improve binding significantly. A detailed mechanistic picture emerges that explains why some enzyme-free primer extensions occur in high yield, while others remain recalcitrant to copying without enzymatic catalysis. A combination of tight binding and rapid extension, coupled with slow hydrolysis induces efficient enzyme-free copying. PMID:27235418

  19. cDNA sequence and mapping of the mouse Copb gene encoding the beta subunit of the COPI coatomer complex.

    PubMed

    LI, W; Elliott, R W; Novak, E K; Swank, R T

    1999-05-01

    COPI-coated vesicles are involved in retrograde-directed selective transport of proteins from the Golgi complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as mediate anterograde transport of cargo proteins within the Golgi or in endosomal trafficking. The COPI protein complex contains an ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF1) and seven coatamer subunits (alpha, beta, beta', gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta-COP). The localization and function of human beta subunit of coatamer (COPB) suggests it is likely a candidate gene of ruby-eye-2 (ru2), which is a mouse model of human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome characterized by the dysfunction of several subcellular organelles. In this study, we determined the entire coding sequence of mouse (Copb) cDNA by combining an overlapping mouse EST contig with EST walking. beta-COP was found highly conserved in mouse, rat, and human, and it is ubiquitously expressed in mouse. The Copb gene was mapped to mouse Chr 7 at a position of 53.3 cM by radiation hybrid mapping. Our RH mapping data, sequencing of RT-PCR products, and Western blotting exclude the Copb gene as a candidate for ru2.

  20. Rapid Elimination of Low-Copy DNA Sequences in Polyploid Wheat: A Possible Mechanism for Differentiation of Homoeologous Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, M.; Liu, B.; Segal, G.; Abbo, S.; Levy, A. A.; Vega, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    To study genome evolution in allopolyploid plants, we analyzed polyploid wheats and their diploid progenitors for the occurrence of 16 low-copy chromosome- or genome-specific sequences isolated from hexaploid wheat. Based on their occurrence in the diploid species, we classified the sequences into two groups: group I, found in only one of the three diploid progenitors of hexaploid wheat, and group II, found in all three diploid progenitors. The absence of group II sequences from one genome of tetraploid wheat and from two genomes of hexaploid wheat indicates their specific elimination from these genomes at the polyploid level. Analysis of a newly synthesized amphiploid, having a genomic constitution analogous to that of hexaploid wheat, revealed a pattern of sequence elimination similar to the one found in hexaploid wheat. Apparently, speciation through allopolyploidy is accompanied by a rapid, nonrandom elimination of specific, low-copy, probably noncoding DNA sequences at the early stages of allopolyploidization, resulting in further divergence of homoeologous chromosomes (partially homologous chromosomes of different genomes carrying the same order of gene loci). We suggest that such genomic changes may provide the physical basis for the diploid-like meiotic behavior of polyploid wheat. PMID:9383078

  1. Genome-Wide DNA Copy Number Analysis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Identifies New Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Forero-Castro, Maribel; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Abáigar, María; África Martín, Ana; Arefi, Maryam; Fuster, José Luis; de las Heras, Natalia; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Quintero, Jonathan; Riesco, Susana; Hermosín, Lourdes; de la Fuente, Ignacio; Recio, Isabel; Ribera, Jordi; Labrador, Jorge; Alonso, José M.; Olivier, Carmen; Sierra, Magdalena; Megido, Marta; Corchete-Sánchez, Luis A.; Ciudad Pizarro, Juana; García, Juan Luis; Ribera, José M.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying additional genetic alterations associated with poor prognosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is still a challenge. Aims: To characterize the presence of additional DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) in children and adults with ALL by whole-genome oligonucleotide array (aCGH) analysis, and to identify their associations with clinical features and outcome. Array-CGH was carried out in 265 newly diagnosed ALLs (142 children and 123 adults). The NimbleGen CGH 12x135K array (Roche) was used to analyze genetic gains and losses. CNAs were analyzed with GISTIC and aCGHweb software. Clinical and biological variables were analyzed. Three of the patients showed chromothripsis (cth6, cth14q and cth15q). CNAs were associated with age, phenotype, genetic subtype and overall survival (OS). In the whole cohort of children, the losses on 14q32.33 (p = 0.019) and 15q13.2 (p = 0.04) were related to shorter OS. In the group of children without good- or poor-risk cytogenetics, the gain on 1p36.11 was a prognostic marker independently associated with shorter OS. In adults, the gains on 19q13.2 (p = 0.001) and Xp21.1 (p = 0.029), and the loss of 17p (p = 0.014) were independent markers of poor prognosis with respect to OS. In summary, CNAs are frequent in ALL and are associated with clinical parameters and survival. Genome-wide DNA copy number analysis allows the identification of genetic markers that predict clinical outcome, suggesting that detection of these genetic lesions will be useful in the management of patients newly diagnosed with ALL. PMID:26872047

  2. Laser Capture Microdissection of Cervical Human Papillomavirus Infections: Copy Number of the Virus in Cancerous and Normal Tissue and Heterogeneous DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Mina; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Morales-Vazquez, Claudia Dalia; Zuna, Rosemary; Montiel, Delia Perez; Calleja-Macias, Itzel E.; Johansson, Bo; Andersson, Sonia; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Research on the pathogenicity of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) during cervical carcinogenesis often relies on the study of homogenized tissue or cultured cells. This approach does not detect molecular heterogeneities within the infected tissue. It is desirable to understand molecular properties in specific histological contexts. We asked whether Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) of archival cervical tumors in combination with real-time polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing permits (i) sensitive DNA diagnosis of small clusters of formalin fixed cells, (ii) quantification of HPV DNA in neoplastic and normal cells, and (iii) analysis of HPV DNA methylation, a marker of tumor progression. We analyzed 26 tumors containing HPV-16 or 18. We prepared DNA from LCM dissected thin sections of 100 to 2000 cells, and analyzed aliquots corresponding to between nine and 70 cells. We detected nine to 630 HPV-16 genome copies and one to 111 HPV-18 genome copies per tumor cell, respectively. In 17 of the 26 samples, HPV DNA existed in histologically normal cells distant from the margins of the tumors, but at much lower concentrations than in the tumor, suggesting that HPVs can infect at low levels without pathogenic changes. Methylation of HPV DNA, a biomarker of integration of the virus into cellular DNA, could be measured only in few samples due to limited sensitivity, and indicated heterogeneous methylation patterns in small clusters of cancerous and normal cells. LCM is powerful to study molecular parameters of cervical HPV infections like copy number, latency and epigenetics. PMID:19497607

  3. Functional DNA quantification guides accurate next-generation sequencing mutation detection in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsy is a challenging sample for molecular assays such as targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS). We compared three methods for FFPE DNA quantification, including a novel PCR assay (‘QFI-PCR’) that measures the absolute copy number of amplifiable DNA, across 165 residual clinical specimens. The results reveal the limitations of commonly used approaches, and demonstrate the value of an integrated workflow using QFI-PCR to improve the accuracy of NGS mutation detection and guide changes in input that can rescue low quality FFPE DNA. These findings address a growing need for improved quality measures in NGS-based patient testing. PMID:24001039

  4. Mitochondrial DNA copy number is maintained during spermatogenesis and in the development of male larvae to sustain the doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA system in the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Sano, Natsumi; Obata, Mayu; Ooie, Yosiyasu; Komaru, Akira

    2011-08-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial (mt) DNA has been reported in the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In DUI, males inherit both paternal (M type) and maternal (F type) mtDNA. Here we investigated changes in M type mtDNA copy numbers and mitochondrial mass in testicular cells by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. The ratios of M type mtDNA copy numbers to nuclear DNA content were not different between haploid (1n), diploid (2n) and tetraploid (4n) spermatogenic cells. The mitochondrial mass decreased gradually during spermatogenesis. These results suggest that mtDNA and mitochondrial mass are maintained during spermatogenesis. We then traced M type mtDNA in larvae after fertilization. M type mtDNA was maintained up to 24 h after fertilization in the male-biased crosses, but decreased significantly in female-biased crosses (predicted by Mito Tracker staining pattern). These results are strikingly different from those reported for mammals and fish, where it is well known that the mitochondria and mtDNA are reduced during spermatogenesis and that sperm mitochondria and mtDNA are eliminated soon after fertilization. Thus, the M type mtDNA copy number is maintained during spermatogenesis and in the development of male larvae to sustain the DUI system in the blue mussel.

  5. Analysis of X chromosome genomic DNA sequence copy number variation associated with premature ovarian failure (POF)

    PubMed Central

    Quilter, C.R.; Karcanias, A.C.; Bagga, M.R.; Duncan, S.; Murray, A.; Conway, G.S.; Sargent, C.A.; Affara, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a heterogeneous disease defined as amenorrhoea for >6 months before age 40, with an FSH serum level >40 mIU/ml (menopausal levels). While there is a strong genetic association with POF, familial studies have also indicated that idiopathic POF may also be genetically linked. Conventional cytogenetic analyses have identified regions of the X chromosome that are strongly associated with ovarian function, as well as several POF candidate genes. Cryptic chromosome abnormalities that have been missed might be detected by array comparative genomic hybridization. METHODS In this study, samples from 42 idiopathic POF patients were subjected to a complete end-to-end X/Y chromosome tiling path array to achieve a detailed copy number variation (CNV) analysis of X chromosome involvement in POF. The arrays also contained a 1 Mb autosomal tiling path as a reference control. Quantitative PCR for selected genes contained within the CNVs was used to confirm the majority of the changes detected. The expression pattern of some of these genes in human tissue RNA was examined by reverse transcription (RT)–PCR. RESULTS A number of CNVs were identified on both Xp and Xq, with several being shared among the POF cases. Some CNVs fall within known polymorphic CNV regions, and others span previously identified POF candidate regions and genes. CONCLUSIONS The new data reported in this study reveal further discrete X chromosome intervals not previously associated with the disease and therefore implicate new clusters of candidate genes. Further studies will be required to elucidate their involvement in POF. PMID:20570974

  6. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R; Shaw, Chad; Wang, Xueqing; Patel, Ankita; Patterson, Lance W; Kolodziejska, Katarzyna; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Ou, Zhishuo; Tian, Qi; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Jinnah, Amina; Ali, Sophia; Malik, Aamir; Hixson, Patricia; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Dawson, Brian; Beaudet, Arthur L; Boricha, Fatima M; Whittaker, Runako; Li, Chumei; Ware, Stephanie M; Cheung, Sau Wai; Penny, Daniel J; Jefferies, John Lynn; Belmont, John W

    2013-01-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5–8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be detected in patients with CVMs plus extracardiac anomalies (ECAs). Through a genome-wide survey of 203 subjects with CVMs and ECAs, we identified 55 CNVs >50 kb in length that were not present in children without known cardiovascular defects (n=872). Sixteen unique CNVs overlapping these variants were found in an independent CVM plus ECA cohort (n=511), which were not observed in 2011 controls. The study identified 12/16 (75%) novel loci including non-recurrent de novo 16q24.3 loss (4/714) and de novo 2q31.3q32.1 loss encompassing PPP1R1C and PDE1A (2/714). The study also narrowed critical intervals in three well-recognized genomic disorders of CVM, such as the cat-eye syndrome region on 22q11.1, 8p23.1 loss encompassing GATA4 and SOX7 and 17p13.3-p13.2 loss. An analysis of protein-interaction databases shows that the rare inherited and de novo CNVs detected in the combined cohort are enriched for genes encoding proteins that are direct or indirect partners of proteins known to be required for normal cardiac development. Our findings implicate rare variants such as 16q24.3 loss and 2q31.3-q32.1 loss, and delineate regions within previously reported structural variants known to cause CVMs. PMID:22929023

  7. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Seema R; Shaw, Chad; Wang, Xueqing; Patel, Ankita; Patterson, Lance W; Kolodziejska, Katarzyna; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Ou, Zhishuo; Tian, Qi; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Jinnah, Amina; Ali, Sophia; Malik, Aamir; Hixson, Patricia; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Dawson, Brian; Beaudet, Arthur L; Boricha, Fatima M; Whittaker, Runako; Li, Chumei; Ware, Stephanie M; Cheung, Sau Wai; Penny, Daniel J; Jefferies, John Lynn; Belmont, John W

    2013-02-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5-8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be detected in patients with CVMs plus extracardiac anomalies (ECAs). Through a genome-wide survey of 203 subjects with CVMs and ECAs, we identified 55 CNVs >50 kb in length that were not present in children without known cardiovascular defects (n=872). Sixteen unique CNVs overlapping these variants were found in an independent CVM plus ECA cohort (n=511), which were not observed in 2011 controls. The study identified 12/16 (75%) novel loci including non-recurrent de novo 16q24.3 loss (4/714) and de novo 2q31.3q32.1 loss encompassing PPP1R1C and PDE1A (2/714). The study also narrowed critical intervals in three well-recognized genomic disorders of CVM, such as the cat-eye syndrome region on 22q11.1, 8p23.1 loss encompassing GATA4 and SOX7 and 17p13.3-p13.2 loss. An analysis of protein-interaction databases shows that the rare inherited and de novo CNVs detected in the combined cohort are enriched for genes encoding proteins that are direct or indirect partners of proteins known to be required for normal cardiac development. Our findings implicate rare variants such as 16q24.3 loss and 2q31.3-q32.1 loss, and delineate regions within previously reported structural variants known to cause CVMs.

  8. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep׳ proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Andrew K

    2015-07-01

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep׳, in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replication) and generates the single-stranded circular (ssc) genome from the displaced DNA strand. In the process, a minus-genome primer (MGP) necessary for complementary-strand synthesis, from ssc to ccc, is synthesized. Rep׳ cleaves the growing nascent-strand to regenerate the parent ccc molecule. In the process, a Rep׳-DNA hybrid containing the right palindromic sequence (at the origin of DNA replication) is generated. Analysis of the virus particle showed that it is composed of four components: ssc, MGP, capsid protein and a novel Rep-related protein (designated Protein-3).

  9. Functions of the high mobility group protein, Abf2p, in mitochondrial DNA segregation, recombination and copy number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Zelenaya-Troitskaya, O; Newman, S M; Okamoto, K; Perlman, P S; Butow, R A

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have established that the mitochondrial high mobility group (HMG) protein, Abf2p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae influences the stability of wild-type (rho+) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and plays an important role in mtDNA organization. Here we report new functions for Abf2p in mtDNA transactions. We find that in homozygous deltaabf2 crosses, the pattern of sorting of mtDNA and mitochondrial matrix protein is altered, and mtDNA recombination is suppressed relative to homozygous ABF2 crosses. Although Abf2p is known to be required for the maintenance of mtDNA in rho+ cells growing on rich dextrose medium, we find that it is not required for the maintenance of mtDNA in p cells grown on the same medium. The content of both rho+ and rho- mtDNAs is increased in cells by 50-150% by moderate (two- to threefold) increases in the ABF2 copy number, suggesting that Abf2p plays a role in mtDNA copy control. Overproduction of Abf2p by > or = 10-fold from an ABF2 gene placed under control of the GAL1 promoter, however, leads to a rapid loss of rho+ mtDNA and a quantitative conversion of rho+ cells to petites within two to four generations after a shift of the culture from glucose to galactose medium. Overexpression of Abf2p in rho- cells also leads to a loss of mtDNA, but at a slower rate than was observed for rho+ cells. The mtDNA instability phenotype is related to the DNA-binding properties of Abf2p because a mutant Abf2p that contains mutations in residues of both HMG box domains known to affect DNA binding in vitro, and that binds poorly to mtDNA in vivo, complements deltaabf2 cells only weakly and greatly lessens the effect of overproduction on mtDNA instability. In vivo binding was assessed by colocalization to mtDNA of fusions between mutant or wild-type Abf2p and green fluorescent protein.These findings are discussed in the context of a model relating mtDNA copy number control and stability to mtDNA recombination. PMID:9581629

  10. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  11. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for accurate quantification of global DNA methylation in human sperms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Suo, Yongshan; Yin, Ruichuan; Shen, Heqing; Wang, Hailin

    2011-06-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation in human sperms has been proposed to be a possible mechanism associated with male infertility. We developed an ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of global DNA methylation level in human sperms. Multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used in MS/MS detection for accurate quantification of DNA methylation. The intra-day and inter-day precision values of this method were within 1.50-5.70%. By using 2-deoxyguanosine as an internal standard, UPLC-MS/MS method was applied for the detection of global DNA methylation levels in three cultured cell lines. DNA methyltransferases inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine can significantly reduce global DNA methylation levels in treated cell lines, showing the reliability of our method. We further examined global DNA methylation levels in human sperms, and found that global methylation values varied from 3.79% to 4.65%. The average global DNA methylation level of sperm samples washed only by PBS (4.03%) was relatively lower than that of sperm samples in which abnormal and dead sperm cells were removed by density gradient centrifugation (4.25%), indicating the possible aberrant DNA methylation level in abnormal sperm cells. Clinical application of UPLC-MS/MS method in global DNA methylation detection of human sperms will be useful in human sperm quality evaluation and the study of epigenetic mechanisms responsible for male infertility.

  12. DNA sequence heterogeneity in the three copies of the long 16S-23S rDNA spacer of Enterococcus faecalis isolates.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, V; Rao, Y; Pearson, S R; Bates, S M; Mayall, B C

    1999-07-01

    The possibility of intragenic heterogeneity between copies of the long intergenic (16S-23S rDNA) spacer region (LISR) was investigated by specific amplification of this region from 21 Enterococcus faecalis isolates. Three copies of the LISR (rrnA, B and C) were demonstrated by hybridization of the LISR to genomic DNA cleaved with I-Ceul and SmaI. When the LISR amplicon was digested with Tsp509I, two known nucleotide substitutions were detected, one 4 nt upstream from the 5' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (allele rrnB has the Tsp509I site and rrnA and C do not) and the other 22 nt downstream from the 3' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (rrnC has the Tsp509I site). Sequence differences at these sites were detected at the allelic level (alleles rrnA, B and C) and different combinations of these alleles were designated Tsp Types. Using densitometry to analyse bands from electrophoresis gels, the intra-isolate ratios of the separate alleles (rrnA:rrnB:rrnC) were determined in each Tsp Type: I (0:3:0), II (1:2:0), III (2:0:1), IV (3:0:0), V (2:1:0) and VI (1:1:1). Sequence variation between the three copies of the LISR was confirmed by the detection of at least five other intra-isolate nucleotide substitutions using heteroduplex analysis by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) that were not detected by Tsp509I cleavage. Perpendicular denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was capable of resolving homoduplexes; six to seven out of a possible nine curves were obtained in some isolates. In the isolate where seven curves were obtained one or more further nucleotide substitutions, not detected by Tsp509I cleavage or CSGE, were detected. On the basis of LISR sequence heterogeneity, isolates were categorized into homogeneous (only one allele sequence present) and heterogeneous (two or three allele sequences present). The transition between homogeneous and heterogeneous LISRs may be useful in studying evolutionary mechanisms between E. faecalis isolates.

  13. Methods for accurate quantification of LTR-retrotransposon copy number using short-read sequence data: a case study in Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Dhanushya; Hawkins, Jennifer S

    2016-10-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes and their mobility impacts genome structure and function in myriad ways. Because of their abundance, activity, and repetitive nature, the characterization and analysis of TEs remain challenging, particularly from short-read sequencing projects. To overcome this difficulty, we have developed a method that estimates TE copy number from short-read sequences. To test the accuracy of our method, we first performed an in silico analysis of the reference Sorghum bicolor genome, using both reference-based and de novo approaches. The resulting TE copy number estimates were strikingly similar to the annotated numbers. We then tested our method on real short-read data by estimating TE copy numbers in several accessions of S. bicolor and its close relative S. propinquum. Both methods effectively identify and rank similar TE families from highest to lowest abundance. We found that de novo characterization was effective at capturing qualitative variation, but underestimated the abundance of some TE families, specifically families of more ancient origin. Also, interspecific reference-based mapping of S. propinquum reads to the S. bicolor database failed to fully describe TE content in S. propinquum, indicative of recent TE activity leading to changes in the respective repetitive landscapes over very short evolutionary timescales. We conclude that reference-based analyses are best suited for within-species comparisons, while de novo approaches are more reliable for evolutionarily distant comparisons. PMID:27295958

  14. Preferential access to genetic information from endogenous hominin ancient DNA and accurate quantitative SNP-typing via SPEX

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Paul; Sanchez, Juan J.; Cooper, Alan; Endicott, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of targeted genetic loci from ancient, forensic and clinical samples is usually built upon polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated sequence data. However, many studies have shown that PCR amplification from poor-quality DNA templates can create sequence artefacts at significant levels. With hominin (human and other hominid) samples, the pervasive presence of highly PCR-amplifiable human DNA contaminants in the vast majority of samples can lead to the creation of recombinant hybrids and other non-authentic artefacts. The resulting PCR-generated sequences can then be difficult, if not impossible, to authenticate. In contrast, single primer extension (SPEX)-based approaches can genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms from ancient fragments of DNA as accurately as modern DNA. A single SPEX-type assay can amplify just one of the duplex DNA strands at target loci and generate a multi-fold depth-of-coverage, with non-authentic recombinant hybrids reduced to undetectable levels. Crucially, SPEX-type approaches can preferentially access genetic information from damaged and degraded endogenous ancient DNA templates over modern human DNA contaminants. The development of SPEX-type assays offers the potential for highly accurate, quantitative genotyping from ancient hominin samples. PMID:19864251

  15. Quantification of plasmid DNA copies in the nucleus after lipoplex and polyplex transfection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Richard N; van der Aa, Marieke A E M; Macaraeg, Nichole; Lee, Ai Ping; Szoka, Francis C

    2009-04-17

    Nuclear uptake of plasmid DNA is one of the many cellular barriers that limit the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery systems. We have determined the number of plasmids that reach the nucleus of a transfected cell using an internally standardized quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. We isolated nuclei using two different protocols: a density gradient technique and a detergent-based method. The density gradient procedure yielded nuclei with substantially less adhering plasmids on the outside of the nuclei. Using the density gradient protocol we determined that cells transfected with Lipofectamine lipoplexes or polyethylenimine polyplexes contained between 75 and 50,000 plasmids/nucleus, depending on the applied plasmid dose. Any increase above 3000 plasmids/nucleus resulted in only marginal increases in transgene expression. Furthermore, lipoplex-delivered plasmids were more efficiently expressed, on the basis of protein expression per plasmid number in the nucleus, than polyplex-delivered plasmids. This indicates that polymer may remain bound to some plasmids in the nucleus. Lastly, by sorting transfected cells into high- and low-expressing sub-populations, we observe that a sub-population of cells contain 3x greater plasmids/nucleus but express nearly 100x more transgene than other cells within a single transfection reaction. Taken together these results suggest the importance of considering the processes downstream from nuclear entry for strategies to improve the efficiency of gene transfer reagents.

  16. Postoperative hepatitis B virus reactivation in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma patients with hepatitis B virus DNA levels <500 copies/mL

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Fu, De-Liang; Zhong, Jian-Hong; Yang, Xia-Wei; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma have the risk of postoperative hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation (PHR). Antiviral therapy was given to patients with detectable HBV DNA levels but not to patients with undetectable HBV DNA levels. Methods In this retrospective study, 258 patients were enrolled (HBV DNA levels <500 copies/mL group, n=159, and HBV DNA levels >500 copies/mL group, n=99). Results A total of 50 patients (19.4%) had PHR. The following significant factors related to PHR were found: without antiviral therapy (hazard ratio [HR] =0.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.031–0.911), hepatitis B e antigen positivity (HR =5.20, 95% CI 1.931–14.007), hepatitis B core antigen S1 positivity (HR =2.54, 95% CI 1.116–5.762), preoperative HBV DNA levels ≥500 copies/mL (HR =1.28, 95% CI 1.085–2.884), hepatic inflow occlusion (HR =3.60, 95% CI 1.402–9.277), moderate liver cirrhosis or more (HR =2.26, 95% CI 1.001–5.121), and blood transfusion (HR =2.89, 95% CI 0.836–10.041). Recurrence-free survival time was significantly shorter in patients with PHR (23.06±2.46 months) than in patients without PHR (29.30±1.27 months). Conclusion Antiviral therapy could efficiently decrease the incidence of PHR. Patients with HBV DNA levels <500 copies/mL still have the risk of PHR. PHR remained as a prognostic risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and recurrence-free survival. PMID:27524913

  17. Characterization of the DNA Copy-Number Genome in the Blood of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, William M.; Lewis, Julia M.; Filler, Renata B.; Modi, Badri G.; Carlson, Kacie R.; Reddy, Swapna; Thornberg, Adam; Saksena, Gordon; Umlauf, Sheila; Oberholzer, Patrick A.; Karpova, Maria; Getz, Gad; Mane, Shrikant; Garraway, Levi A.; Dummer, Reinhard; Berger, Carole L.; Edelson, Richard L.; Girardi, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a heterogeneous non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that may variably involve the skin, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood. Malignant burden ranges from cutaneous patches and plaques with little evidence of blood involvement to erythroderma often in association with frank leukemia, as in Sézary syndrome. Toward a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this CD4+ T-cell malignancy, we conducted a high-resolution genomic analysis combining DNA (23 samples) and mRNA (12 samples) data of peripheral blood isolates from CTCL patients across a spectrum of stages. Strikingly, even patients with limited involvement, e.g., normal CD4 counts, contained significant copy-number alterations. Defining genomic characteristics of CTCL blood involvement included gains on 8q and 17q, and deletions on 17p and chromosome 10. A consensus analysis of 108 leukemic CTCL samples demonstrated global similarities among patients with varied blood involvement, narrowing 38 of 62 loci. Toward an annotated framework for in vitro testing, we also characterized genomic alterations in five CTCL cell lines (HH, HUT78, PNO, SeAx, and Sez4), revealing intact core features of leukemic CTCL. Together, these studies produce the most comprehensive view of the leukemic CTCL genome to date, with implications for pathogenesis, molecular classification, and potential future therapeutic developments. PMID:21881587

  18. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:27299603

  19. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement.

  20. Enhanced detection of DNA sequences using end-point PCR amplification and online gel electrophoresis (GE)-ICP-MS: determination of gene copy number variations.

    PubMed

    González, T Iglesias; Espina, M; Sierra, L M; Bettmer, J; Blanco-González, E; Montes-Bayón, M; Sanz-Medel, A

    2014-11-18

    The design and evaluation of analytical methods that permit quantitative analysis of specific DNA sequences is exponentially increasing. For this purpose, highly sensitive methodologies usually based on labeling protocols with fluorescent dyes or nanoparticles are often explored. Here, the possibility of label-free signal amplification using end-point polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are exploited using on-column agarose gel electrophoresis as separation and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the detection of phosphorus in amplified DNA sequences. The calibration of the separation system with a DNA ladder permits direct estimation of the size of the amplified gene fragment after PCR. With this knowledge, and considering the compound-independent quantification capabilities exhibited by ICP-MS for phosphorus (it is only dependent on the number of P atoms per molecule), the correlation of the P-peak area of the amplified gene fragment, with respect to the gene copy numbers (in the starting DNA), is then established. Such a relationship would permit the determination of copy number variations (CNVs) in genomic DNA using ICP-MS measurements. The method detection limit, in terms of the required amount of starting DNA, is ∼6 ng (or 1000 cells if 100% extraction efficiency is expected). The suitability of the proposed label-free amplification strategy is applied to CNVs monitoring in cells exposed to a chemical agent capable of deletion induction, such as cisplatin. PMID:25312744

  1. The DNA Copy Number of Human Endogenous Retrovirus-W (MSRV-Type) Is Increased in Multiple Sclerosis Patients and Is Influenced by Gender and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Montojo, Marta; Dominguez-Mozo, María; Arias-Leal, Ana; Garcia-Martinez, Ángel; De las Heras, Virginia; Casanova, Ignacio; Faucard, Raphaël; Gehin, Nadège; Madeira, Alexandra; Arroyo, Rafael; Curtin, François; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Perron, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis is an autoimmune disease more prevalent in women than in men. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Retrovirus element (MSRV) is a member of type-W endogenous retrovirus family (HERV-W), known to be associated to MS. Most HERVs are unable to replicate but MSRV expression associated with reverse-transcriptase activity in MS would explain reported DNA copy number increase in MS patients. A potential link between HERV-W copies on chromosome X and gender differential prevalence has been suggested. The present study addresses MSRV-type DNA load in relation with the gender differences and clinical status in MS and healthy controls. Results 178 MS patients (62.9% women) and 124 controls (56.5% women) were included. MSRV env load (copies/pg of DNA) was analyzed by real time qPCR with specific primers and probe for its env gene, in DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). MSRV load was more elevated in MS patients than in controls (p = 4.15e-7). MS women presented higher MSRV load than control women (p = 0.009) and MS men also had higher load than control men (p = 2.77e-6). Besides, women had higher levels than men, both among patients (p = 0.007) and controls (p = 1.24e-6). Concordantly, EDSS and MSSS scores were higher among female patients with an elevated MSRV load (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions MSRV increases its copy number in PBMC of MS patients and particularly in women with high clinical scores. This may explain causes underlying the higher prevalence of MS in women. The association with the clinical severity calls for further investigations on MSRV load in PBMCs as a biomarker for MS. PMID:23308264

  2. Nonempirically Tuned Range-Separated DFT Accurately Predicts Both Fundamental and Excitation Gaps in DNA and RNA Nucleobases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Using a nonempirically tuned range-separated DFT approach, we study both the quasiparticle properties (HOMO–LUMO fundamental gaps) and excitation energies of DNA and RNA nucleobases (adenine, thymine, cytosine, guanine, and uracil). Our calculations demonstrate that a physically motivated, first-principles tuned DFT approach accurately reproduces results from both experimental benchmarks and more computationally intensive techniques such as many-body GW theory. Furthermore, in the same set of nucleobases, we show that the nonempirical range-separated procedure also leads to significantly improved results for excitation energies compared to conventional DFT methods. The present results emphasize the importance of a nonempirically tuned range-separation approach for accurately predicting both fundamental and excitation gaps in DNA and RNA nucleobases. PMID:22904693

  3. Accurate identification of Candida parapsilosis (sensu lato) by use of mitochondrial DNA and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Carolina R; Ferreira, Renata C; Gonçalves, Sarah S; Quindós, Guillermo; Eraso, Elena; Bizerra, Fernando C; Briones, Marcelo R S; Colombo, Arnaldo L

    2012-07-01

    Candida parapsilosis is the Candida species isolated the second most frequently from blood cultures in South America and some European countries, such as Spain. Since 2005, this species has been considered a complex of 3 closely related species: C. parapsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, and Candida orthopsilosis. Here, we describe a real-time TaqMan-MGB PCR assay, using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as the target, which readily distinguishes these 3 species. We first used comparative genomics to locate syntenic regions between these 3 mitochondrial genomes and then selected NADH5 as the target for the real-time PCR assay. Probes were designed to include a combination of different single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are able to differentiate each species within the C. parapsilosis complex. This new methodology was first tested using mtDNA and then genomic DNA from 4 reference and 5 clinical strains. For assay validation, a total of 96 clinical isolates and 4 American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) isolates previously identified by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing were tested. Real-time PCR using genomic DNA was able to differentiate the 3 species with 100% accuracy. No amplification was observed when DNA from other species was used as the template. We observed 100% congruence with ITS rDNA sequencing identification, including for 30 strains used in blind testing. This novel method allows a quick and accurate intracomplex identification of C. parapsilosis and saves time compared with sequencing, which so far has been considered the "gold standard" for Candida yeast identification. In addition, this assay provides a useful tool for epidemiological and clinical studies of these emergent species.

  4. Accurate measurement of circulating mitochondrial DNA content from human blood samples using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Ajaz, Saima; Czajka, Anna; Malik, Afshan

    2015-01-01

    We describe a protocol to accurately measure the amount of human mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) in peripheral blood samples which can be modified to quantify MtDNA from other body fluids, human cells, and tissues. This protocol is based on the use of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) to quantify the amount of MtDNA relative to nuclear DNA (designated the Mt/N ratio). In the last decade, there have been increasing numbers of studies describing altered MtDNA or Mt/N in circulation in common nongenetic diseases where mitochondrial dysfunction may play a role (for review see Malik and Czajka, Mitochondrion 13:481-492, 2013). These studies are distinct from those looking at genetic mitochondrial disease and are attempting to identify acquired changes in circulating MtDNA content as an indicator of mitochondrial function. However, the methodology being used is not always specific and reproducible. As more than 95 % of the human mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the human nuclear genome, it is important to avoid co-amplification of nuclear pseudogenes. Furthermore, template preparation protocols can also affect the results because of the size and structural differences between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Here we describe how to (1) prepare DNA from blood samples; (2) pretreat the DNA to prevent dilution bias; (3) prepare dilution standards for absolute quantification using the unique primers human mitochondrial genome forward primer (hMitoF3) and human mitochondrial genome reverse primer(hMitoR3) for the mitochondrial genome, and human nuclear genome forward primer (hB2MF1) and human nuclear genome reverse primer (hB2MR1) primers for the human nuclear genome; (4) carry out qPCR for either relative or absolute quantification from test samples; (5) analyze qPCR data; and (6) calculate the sample size to adequately power studies. The protocol presented here is suitable for high-throughput use.

  5. Using next-generation sequencing for high resolution multiplex analysis of copy number variation from nanogram quantities of DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens.

    PubMed

    Wood, Henry M; Belvedere, Ornella; Conway, Caroline; Daly, Catherine; Chalkley, Rebecca; Bickerdike, Melissa; McKinley, Claire; Egan, Phil; Ross, Lisa; Hayward, Bruce; Morgan, Joanne; Davidson, Leslie; MacLennan, Ken; Ong, Thian K; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Cook, Ian; Adams, David J; Taylor, Graham R; Rabbitts, Pamela

    2010-08-01

    The use of next-generation sequencing technologies to produce genomic copy number data has recently been described. Most approaches, however, reply on optimal starting DNA, and are therefore unsuitable for the analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, which largely precludes the analysis of many tumour series. We have sought to challenge the limits of this technique with regards to quality and quantity of starting material and the depth of sequencing required. We confirm that the technique can be used to interrogate DNA from cell lines, fresh frozen material and FFPE samples to assess copy number variation. We show that as little as 5 ng of DNA is needed to generate a copy number karyogram, and follow this up with data from a series of FFPE biopsies and surgical samples. We have used various levels of sample multiplexing to demonstrate the adjustable resolution of the methodology, depending on the number of samples and available resources. We also demonstrate reproducibility by use of replicate samples and comparison with microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and digital PCR. This technique can be valuable in both the analysis of routine diagnostic samples and in examining large repositories of fixed archival material.

  6. Performance of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIP) in Allele CopyNumber Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuker; Moorhead, Martin; Karlin-Neumann, George; Wang,Nicolas J.; Ireland, James; Lin, Steven; Chen, Chunnuan; Heiser, LauraM.; Chin, Koei; Esserman, Laura; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Faham,Malek

    2007-05-14

    We have developed a new protocol for using MolecularInversion Probes (MIP) to accurately and specifically measure allele copynumber (ACN). The new protocol provides for significant improvementsincluding the reduction of input DNA (from 2?g) by more than 25 fold (to75ng total genomic DNA), higher overall precision resulting in one orderof magnitude lower false positive rate, and greater dynamic range withaccurate absolute copy number up to 60 copies.

  7. Accurate characterization of carcinogenic DNA adducts using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Charles A.; Chiu, Norman H. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical carcinogens and their in vivo activated metabolites react readily with genomic DNA, and form covalently bound carcinogen-DNA adducts. Clinically, carcinogen-DNA adducts have been linked to various cancer diseases. Among the current methods for DNA adduct analysis, mass spectroscopic method allows the direct measurement of unlabeled DNA adducts. The goal of this study is to explore the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) to determine the identity of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Two of the known carcinogenic DNA adducts, namely N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP) and N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP), were selected as our models. In MALDI-TOF MS measurements, the small matrix ion and its cluster ions did not interfere with the measurements of both selected dG adducts. To achieve a higher accuracy for the characterization of selected dG adducts, 1 keV collision energy in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS was used to measure the adducts. In comparison to other MS/MS techniques with lower collision energies, more extensive precursor ion dissociations were observed. The detection of the corresponding fragment ions allowed the identities of guanine, PhIP or ABP, and the position of adduction to be confirmed. Some of the fragment ions of dG-C8-PhIP have not been reported by other MS/MS techniques.

  8. Collaborative design for automated DNA storage that allows for rapid, accurate, large-scale studies.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Scott; Ardlie, Kristin G; Krenitsky, Kevin F; Walsh, Gary; Clough, Graham

    2004-12-01

    Genomics Collaborative, Inc., a division of Sera Care Life Sciences, Inc. (Cambridge, MA), is among the first commercial entities in the world to enable genetic research on an industrial scale via its Large Scale Global Repository, a biobank of human specimens collected for research purposes. With the demand for large-scale DNA studies increasing, decisions about the strategic direction of sample storage and collection must be made to create a sound plan to support continued demands for drug discovery. Reported here is the approach used by Genomics Collaborative to automate its DNA processing, storage, and retrieval.

  9. Array CGH identifies distinct DNA copy number profiles of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in chromosomal- and microsatellite-unstable sporadic colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lassmann, Silke; Weis, Roland; Makowiec, Frank; Roth, Jasmine; Danciu, Mihai; Hopt, Ulrich; Werner, Martin

    2007-03-01

    DNA copy number changes represent molecular fingerprints of solid tumors and are as such relevant for better understanding of tumor development and progression. In this study, we applied genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify gene-specific DNA copy number changes in chromosomal (CIN)- and microsatellite (MIN)-unstable sporadic colorectal cancers (sCRC). Genomic DNA was extracted from microdissected, matching normal colorectal epithelium and invasive tumor cells of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues of 22 cases with colorectal cancer (CIN = 11, MIN = 11). DNA copy number changes were determined by aCGH for 287 target sequences in tumor cell DNAs, using pooled normal DNAs as reference. aCGH data of tumor cell DNAs was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for three genes on serial tissues as those used for aCGH. aCGH revealed DNA copy number changes previously described by metaphase CGH (gains 7, 8q, 13q, and 20q; losses 8p, 15q, 18q, and 17p). However, chromosomal regions 20q, 13q, 7, and 17p were preferentially altered in CIN-type tumors and included DNA amplifications of eight genes on chromosome 20q (TOP1, AIB1, MYBL2, CAS, PTPN1, STK15, ZNF217, and CYP24), two genes on chromosome 13q (BRCA2 and D13S25), and three genes on chromosome 7 (IL6, CYLN2, and MET) as well as DNA deletions of two genes on chromosome 17p (HIC1 and LLGL1). Finally, additional CIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were identified for EXT1 (8q24.11) and MYC (8q24.12) as well as DNA deletions for MAP2K5 (15q23) and LAMA3 (18q11.2). In contrast, distinct MIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were detected for E2F5 (8p22-q21.3), GARP (11q13.5-q14), ATM (11q22.3), KAL (Xp22.3), and XIST (Xq13.2) as well as DNA deletions for RAF1 (3p25), DCC (18q21.3), and KEN (21q tel). aCGH revealed distinct DNA copy number changes of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in CIN- and MIN-type sporadic colorectal carcinomas. The identified candidate

  10. Using minimum DNA marker loci for accurate population classification in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using few DNA markers to classify genetic background of a germplasm pool will help breeders make a quick decision while saving time and resources. WHICHLOCI is a computer program that selects the best combination of loci for population assignment through empiric analysis of molecular marker data. Th...

  11. Plant DNA Barcodes Can Accurately Estimate Species Richness in Poorly Known Floras

    PubMed Central

    Costion, Craig; Ford, Andrew; Cross, Hugh; Crayn, Darren; Harrington, Mark; Lowe, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Background Widespread uptake of DNA barcoding technology for vascular plants has been slow due to the relatively poor resolution of species discrimination (∼70%) and low sequencing and amplification success of one of the two official barcoding loci, matK. Studies to date have mostly focused on finding a solution to these intrinsic limitations of the markers, rather than posing questions that can maximize the utility of DNA barcodes for plants with the current technology. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we test the ability of plant DNA barcodes using the two official barcoding loci, rbcLa and matK, plus an alternative barcoding locus, trnH-psbA, to estimate the species diversity of trees in a tropical rainforest plot. Species discrimination accuracy was similar to findings from previous studies but species richness estimation accuracy proved higher, up to 89%. All combinations which included the trnH-psbA locus performed better at both species discrimination and richness estimation than matK, which showed little enhanced species discriminatory power when concatenated with rbcLa. The utility of the trnH-psbA locus is limited however, by the occurrence of intraspecific variation observed in some angiosperm families to occur as an inversion that obscures the monophyly of species. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate for the first time, using a case study, the potential of plant DNA barcodes for the rapid estimation of species richness in taxonomically poorly known areas or cryptic populations revealing a powerful new tool for rapid biodiversity assessment. The combination of the rbcLa and trnH-psbA loci performed better for this purpose than any two-locus combination that included matK. We show that although DNA barcodes fail to discriminate all species of plants, new perspectives and methods on biodiversity value and quantification may overshadow some of these shortcomings by applying barcode data in new ways. PMID:22096501

  12. Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic Is Associated with Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Longer Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ameer, Syeda S.; Xu, YiYi; Engström, Karin; Li, Huiqi; Tallving, Pia; Nermell, Barbro; Boemo, Analia; Parada, Luis A.; Peñaloza, Lidia G.; Concha, Gabriela; Harari, Florencia; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water causes cancer. Alterations in mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) and telomere length in blood have been associated with cancer risk. We elucidated if arsenic exposure alters mtDNAcn and telomere length in individuals with different arsenic metabolizing capacity. Methods: We studied two groups in the Salta province, Argentina, one in the Puna area of the Andes (N = 264, 89% females) and one in Chaco (N = 169, 75% females). We assessed arsenic exposure as the sum of arsenic metabolites [iAs, methylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)] in urine (U-As) using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Efficiency of arsenic metabolism was expressed as percentage of urinary metabolites. MtDNAcn and telomere length were determined in blood by real-time PCR. Results: Median U-As was 196 (5–95 percentile: 21–537) μg/L in Andes and 80 (5–95 percentile: 15–1637) μg/L in Chaco. The latter study group had less-efficient metabolism, with higher %iAs and %MMA in urine compared with the Andean group. U-As was significantly associated with increased mtDNAcn (log2 transformed to improve linearity) in Chaco (β = 0.027 per 100 μg/L, p = 0.0085; adjusted for age and sex), but not in Andes (β = 0.025, p = 0.24). U-As was also associated with longer telomere length in Chaco (β = 0.016, p = 0.0066) and Andes (β = 0.0075, p = 0.029). In both populations, individuals with above median %iAs showed significantly higher mtDNAcn and telomere length compared with individuals with below median %iAs. Conclusions: Arsenic was associated with increased mtDNAcn and telomere length, particularly in individuals with less-efficient arsenic metabolism, a group who may have increased risk for arsenic-related cancer.

  13. Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic Is Associated with Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Longer Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ameer, Syeda S.; Xu, YiYi; Engström, Karin; Li, Huiqi; Tallving, Pia; Nermell, Barbro; Boemo, Analia; Parada, Luis A.; Peñaloza, Lidia G.; Concha, Gabriela; Harari, Florencia; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water causes cancer. Alterations in mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) and telomere length in blood have been associated with cancer risk. We elucidated if arsenic exposure alters mtDNAcn and telomere length in individuals with different arsenic metabolizing capacity. Methods: We studied two groups in the Salta province, Argentina, one in the Puna area of the Andes (N = 264, 89% females) and one in Chaco (N = 169, 75% females). We assessed arsenic exposure as the sum of arsenic metabolites [iAs, methylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)] in urine (U-As) using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Efficiency of arsenic metabolism was expressed as percentage of urinary metabolites. MtDNAcn and telomere length were determined in blood by real-time PCR. Results: Median U-As was 196 (5–95 percentile: 21–537) μg/L in Andes and 80 (5–95 percentile: 15–1637) μg/L in Chaco. The latter study group had less-efficient metabolism, with higher %iAs and %MMA in urine compared with the Andean group. U-As was significantly associated with increased mtDNAcn (log2 transformed to improve linearity) in Chaco (β = 0.027 per 100 μg/L, p = 0.0085; adjusted for age and sex), but not in Andes (β = 0.025, p = 0.24). U-As was also associated with longer telomere length in Chaco (β = 0.016, p = 0.0066) and Andes (β = 0.0075, p = 0.029). In both populations, individuals with above median %iAs showed significantly higher mtDNAcn and telomere length compared with individuals with below median %iAs. Conclusions: Arsenic was associated with increased mtDNAcn and telomere length, particularly in individuals with less-efficient arsenic metabolism, a group who may have increased risk for arsenic-related cancer. PMID:27597942

  14. L-DNA molecular beacon: a safe, stable, and accurate intracellular nano-thermometer for temperature sensing in living cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Guoliang; Wang, Chunming; Ge, Yun; Zheng, Nanfeng; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-11-21

    Noninvasive and accurate measurement of intracellular temperature is of great significance in biology and medicine. This paper describes a safe, stable, and accurate intracellular nano-thermometer based on an L-DNA molecular beacon (L-MB), a dual-labeled hairpin oligonucleotide built from the optical isomer of naturally occurring d-DNA. Relying on the temperature-responsive hairpin structure and the FRET signaling mechanism of MBs, the fluorescence of L-MBs is quenched below the melting temperature and enhanced with increasing temperature. Because of the excellent reversibility and tunable response range, L-MBs are very suitable for temperature sensing. More importantly, the non-natural L-DNA backbone prevents the L-MBs from binding to cellular nucleic acids and proteins as well as from being digested by nucleases inside the cells, thus ensuring excellent stability and accuracy of the nano-thermometer in a complex cellular environment. The L-MB nano-thermometer was used for the photothermal study of Pd nanosheets in living cells, establishing the nano-thermometer as a useful tool for intracellular temperature measurement.

  15. Accurate and Phenol Free DNA Sexing of Day 30 Porcine Embryos by PCR.

    PubMed

    Blanes, Milena S; Tsoi, Stephen C M; Dyck, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Research into prenatal programming in the pig has shown that the sex of the developing embryo or fetus can influence the developmental outcome. Therefore, the ability to determine an embryo's sex is necessary in many experiments particularly regarding early development. The present protocol demonstrates an inexpensive, rapid and non-toxic preparation of pig genomic DNA for use with PCR. Day 30 embryos must be humanely collected according to the guidelines established by Institutional Animal Policy and Welfare Committees for the present protocol. The preparation of the whole embryo for this PCR based sexing technique simply involves grinding the frozen embryo to a fine powder using a pre-chilled mortar and pestle. PCR-quality DNA is released from a small amount of embryo powder by applying a hot incubation in an alkaline lysis reagent. Next, the DNA solution is mixed with neutralization buffer and used directly for PCR. Two primer pairs are generated to detect specific sex determining region of the Y- chromosome (SRY) and ZFX region of the X- chromosome with high accuracy and specificity. The same protocol can be applied to other elongated embryos (Day 10 to Day 14) earlier than Day 30. Also, this protocol can be carried with 96-welled plates when screening a large number of embryos, making it feasible for automation and high-throughput sex typing. PMID:26966900

  16. DNA copy number analysis of fresh and formalin-fixed specimens by shallow whole-genome sequencing with identification and exclusion of problematic regions in the genome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Scheinin, Ilari; Sie, Daoud; Bengtsson, Henrik; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Olshen, Adam B.; van Thuijl, Hinke F.; van Essen, Hendrik F.; Eijk, Paul P.; Rustenburg, François; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Wesseling, Pieter; Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna G.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of DNA copy number aberrations by shallow whole-genome sequencing (WGS) faces many challenges, including lack of completion and errors in the human reference genome, repetitive sequences, polymorphisms, variable sample quality, and biases in the sequencing procedures. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival material, the analysis of which is important for studies of cancer, presents particular analytical difficulties due to degradation of the DNA and frequent lack of matched reference samples. We present a robust, cost-effective WGS method for DNA copy number analysis that addresses these challenges more successfully than currently available procedures. In practice, very useful profiles can be obtained with ∼0.1× genome coverage. We improve on previous methods by first implementing a combined correction for sequence mappability and GC content, and second, by applying this procedure to sequence data from the 1000 Genomes Project in order to develop a blacklist of problematic genome regions. A small subset of these blacklisted regions was previously identified by ENCODE, but the vast majority are novel unappreciated problematic regions. Our procedures are implemented in a pipeline called QDNAseq. We have analyzed over 1000 samples, most of which were obtained from the fixed tissue archives of more than 25 institutions. We demonstrate that for most samples our sequencing and analysis procedures yield genome profiles with noise levels near the statistical limit imposed by read counting. The described procedures also provide better correction of artifacts introduced by low DNA quality than prior approaches and better copy number data than high-resolution microarrays at a substantially lower cost. PMID:25236618

  17. DNA copy number analysis of fresh and formalin-fixed specimens by shallow whole-genome sequencing with identification and exclusion of problematic regions in the genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Scheinin, Ilari; Sie, Daoud; Bengtsson, Henrik; van de Wiel, Mark A; Olshen, Adam B; van Thuijl, Hinke F; van Essen, Hendrik F; Eijk, Paul P; Rustenburg, François; Meijer, Gerrit A; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Wesseling, Pieter; Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna G; Ylstra, Bauke

    2014-12-01

    Detection of DNA copy number aberrations by shallow whole-genome sequencing (WGS) faces many challenges, including lack of completion and errors in the human reference genome, repetitive sequences, polymorphisms, variable sample quality, and biases in the sequencing procedures. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival material, the analysis of which is important for studies of cancer, presents particular analytical difficulties due to degradation of the DNA and frequent lack of matched reference samples. We present a robust, cost-effective WGS method for DNA copy number analysis that addresses these challenges more successfully than currently available procedures. In practice, very useful profiles can be obtained with ∼0.1× genome coverage. We improve on previous methods by first implementing a combined correction for sequence mappability and GC content, and second, by applying this procedure to sequence data from the 1000 Genomes Project in order to develop a blacklist of problematic genome regions. A small subset of these blacklisted regions was previously identified by ENCODE, but the vast majority are novel unappreciated problematic regions. Our procedures are implemented in a pipeline called QDNAseq. We have analyzed over 1000 samples, most of which were obtained from the fixed tissue archives of more than 25 institutions. We demonstrate that for most samples our sequencing and analysis procedures yield genome profiles with noise levels near the statistical limit imposed by read counting. The described procedures also provide better correction of artifacts introduced by low DNA quality than prior approaches and better copy number data than high-resolution microarrays at a substantially lower cost.

  18. Localization of single-copy T-DNA insertion in transgenic shallots (Allium cepa) by using ultra-sensitive FISH with tyramide signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Khrustaleva, L I; Kik, C

    2001-03-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for mapping plant chromosomes of single-copy DNA sequences is limited. We have adapted for plant cytogenetics a new signal-amplification method termed tyramide-FISH (Tyr-FISH). Until present this technique has only been applied to human chromosomes. The method is based on enzymatic deposition of fluorochrome-conjugated tyramide. With Tyr-FISH it was possible to detect target T-DNA sequences on plant metaphase chromosomes as small as 710 bp without using a cooled CCD camera. Short detection time and high sensitivity, in combination with a low background, make the Tyr-FISH method very suitable for routine application in plant cytogenetic research. With Tyr-FISH we analysed the position of T-DNA inserts in transgenic shallots. We found that the inserts were preferentially located in the distal region of metaphase chromosomes. Sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization with a 375 bp satellite sequence suggested that a specific T-DNA insert was located within the satellite sequence hybridization region on a metaphase chromosome. Analysis of less-condensed prophase and interphase chromosomes revealed that the T-DNA was integrated outside the satellite DNA-hybridization region in a more proximal euchromatin region.

  19. Genome wide DNA copy number analysis in cholangiocarcinoma using high resolution molecular inversion probe single nucleotide polymorphism assay.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Alexander; Bahra, Marcus; Lenze, Dido; Bradtmöller, Maren; Guse, Katrin; Gehlhaar, Claire; Bläker, Hendrik; Heppner, Frank L; Koch, Arend

    2015-10-01

    In order to study molecular similarities and differences of intrahepatic (IH-CCA) and extrahepatic (EH-CCA) cholangiocarcinoma, 24 FFPE tumor samples (13 IH-CCA, 11 EH-CCA) were analyzed for whole genome copy number variations (CNVs) using a new high-density Molecular Inversion Probe Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (MIP SNP) assay. Common in both tumor subtypes the most frequent losses were detected on chromosome 1p, 3p, 6q and 9 while gains were mostly seen in 1q, 8q as well as complete chromosome 17 and 20. Applying the statistical GISTIC (Genomic Identification of Significant Targets in Cancer) tool we identified potential novel candidate tumor suppressor- (DBC1, FHIT, PPP2R2A) and oncogenes (LYN, FGF19, GRB7, PTPN1) within these regions of chromosomal instability. Next to common aberrations in IH-CCA and EH-CCA, we additionally found significant differences in copy number variations on chromosome 3 and 14. Moreover, due to the fact that mutations in the Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH-1 and IDH-2) genes are more frequent in our IH-CCA than in our EH-CCA samples, we suggest that the tumor subtypes have a different molecular profile. In conclusion, new possible target genes within regions of high significant copy number aberrations were detected using a high-density Molecular Inversion Probe Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (MIP SNP) assay, which opens a future perspective of fast routine copy number and marker gene identification for gene targeted therapy.

  20. TP53 copy number expansion is associated with the evolution of increased body size and an enhanced DNA damage response in elephants

    PubMed Central

    Sulak, Michael; Fong, Lindsey; Mika, Katelyn; Chigurupati, Sravanthi; Yon, Lisa; Mongan, Nigel P; Emes, Richard D; Lynch, Vincent J

    2016-01-01

    A major constraint on the evolution of large body sizes in animals is an increased risk of developing cancer. There is no correlation, however, between body size and cancer risk. This lack of correlation is often referred to as 'Peto's Paradox'. Here, we show that the elephant genome encodes 20 copies of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 and that the increase in TP53 copy number occurred coincident with the evolution of large body sizes, the evolution of extreme sensitivity to genotoxic stress, and a hyperactive TP53 signaling pathway in the elephant (Proboscidean) lineage. Furthermore, we show that several of the TP53 retrogenes (TP53RTGs) are transcribed and likely translated. While TP53RTGs do not appear to directly function as transcription factors, they do contribute to the enhanced sensitivity of elephant cells to DNA damage and the induction of apoptosis by regulating activity of the TP53 signaling pathway. These results suggest that an increase in the copy number of TP53 may have played a direct role in the evolution of very large body sizes and the resolution of Peto's paradox in Proboscideans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11994.001 PMID:27642012

  1. Four DNA methylation biomarkers in biliary brush samples accurately identify the presence of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Kim; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Vedeld, Hege Marie; Honne, Hilde; Jebsen, Peter; Hektoen, Merete; Wadsworth, Christopher A.; Clausen, Ole Petter; Lundin, Knut E.A.; Paulsen, Vemund; Foss, Aksel; Mathisen, Øystein; Aabakken, Lars; Schrumpf, Erik; Lothe, Ragnhild A.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of the highly aggressive malignancy cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) remains a challenge but has the potential to render the tumor curable by surgical removal. This study evaluates a biomarker panel for the diagnosis of CCA by DNA methylation analyses of biliary brush samples. The methylation status of 13 candidate genes (CDO1, CNRIP1, DCLK1, FBN1, INA, MAL, SEPT9, SFRP1, SNCA, SPG20, TMEFF2, VIM, and ZSCAN18) was investigated in 93 tissue samples (39 CCAs and 54 nonmalignant controls) using quantitative methylation‐specific polymerase chain reaction. The 13 genes were further analyzed in a test series of biliary brush samples (15 CCAs and 20 nonmalignant primary sclerosing cholangitis controls), and the methylation status of the four best performing markers was validated (34 CCAs and 34 primary sclerosing cholangitis controls). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to evaluate the performance of individual biomarkers and the combination of biomarkers. The 13 candidate genes displayed a methylation frequency of 26%‐82% in tissue samples. The four best‐performing genes (CDO1, CNRIP1, SEPT9, and VIM) displayed individual methylation frequencies of 45%‐77% in biliary brushes from CCA patients. Across the test and validation biliary brush series, this four‐gene biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 98%, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.944. Conclusion: We report a straightforward biomarker assay with high sensitivity and specificity for CCA, outperforming standard brush cytology, and suggest that the biomarker panel, potentially in combination with cytological evaluation, may improve CCA detection, particularly among primary sclerosing cholangitis patients. (Hepatology 2015;61:1651–1659) PMID:25644509

  2. Stable high-copy-number integration of Aspergillus oryzae alpha-AMYLASE cDNA in an industrial baker's yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Nieto, A; Prieto, J A; Sanz, P

    1999-01-01

    The Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase cDNA was placed under the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin promoter (pACT1) and introduced into the ribosomal DNA locus of an industrial baker's yeast strain. To obtain a strain eligible for commercial use, we constructed an integrative cassette lacking bacterial DNA sequences but containing the alpha-amylase cDNA and ribosomal DNA sequences to target the integration to this locus. High-copy-number integrants were obtained including a defective TRP1d promoter in the integrative cassette. We selected one transformant, Rib-AMY (CECT10872), in which the multi-integrated sequences were stable even after 200 generations of growth in nonselective medium. This transformant also expressed and secreted high levels of alpha-amylase. Bread made with this strain had a higher volume, lower density, and softer crumbs than bread made with a control strain. The Rib-AMY transformant also was useful in retarding bread firming. This new strain fulfills all the requirements for commercial utilization and should reduce or eliminate the requirement for addition of exogenous alpha-amylase to the flour, reducing allergenic work-related symptoms due to this enzyme.

  3. Single mammalian cells compensate for differences in cellular volume and DNA copy number through independent global transcriptional mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Padovan-Merhar, Olivia; Nair, Gautham P.; Biaesch, Andrew; Mayer, Andreas; Scarfone, Steven; Foley, Shawn W.; Wu, Angela R.; Churchman, L. Stirling; Singh, Abhyudai; Raj, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Individual mammalian cells exhibit large variability in cellular volume even with the same absolute DNA content and so must compensate for differences in DNA concentration in order to maintain constant concentration of gene expression products. Using single molecule counting and computational image analysis, we show that transcript abundance correlates with cellular volume at the single cell level due to increased global transcription in larger cells. Cell fusion experiments establish that increased cellular content itself can directly increase transcription. Quantitative analysis shows that this mechanism measures the ratio of cellular volume to DNA content, mostly likely through sequestration of a transcriptional factor to DNA. Analysis of transcriptional bursts reveals a separate mechanism for gene dosage compensation after DNA replication that enables proper transcriptional output during early and late S-phase. Our results provide a framework for quantitatively understanding the relationships between DNA content, cell size and gene expression variability in single cells. PMID:25866248

  4. Reticulate evolution in diploid and tetraploid species of Polystachya (Orchidaceae) as shown by plastid DNA sequences and low-copy nuclear genes

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Anton; Samuel, Rosabelle; Klejna, Verena; Barfuss, Michael H. J.; Rupp, Barbara; Chase, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Here evidence for reticulation in the pantropical orchid genus Polystachya is presented, using gene trees from five nuclear and plastid DNA data sets, first among only diploid samples (homoploid hybridization) and then with the inclusion of cloned tetraploid sequences (allopolyploids). Two groups of tetraploids are compared with respect to their origins and phylogenetic relationships. Methods Sequences from plastid regions, three low-copy nuclear genes and ITS nuclear ribosomal DNA were analysed for 56 diploid and 17 tetraploid accessions using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Reticulation was inferred from incongruence between gene trees using supernetwork and consensus network analyses and from cloning and sequencing duplicated loci in tetraploids. Key Results Diploid trees from individual loci showed considerable incongruity but little reticulation signal when support from more than one gene tree was required to infer reticulation. This was coupled with generally low support in the individual gene trees. Sequencing the duplicated gene copies in tetraploids showed clearer evidence of hybrid evolution, including multiple origins of one group of tetraploids included in the study. Conclusions A combination of cloning duplicate gene copies in allotetraploids and consensus network comparison of gene trees allowed a phylogenetic framework for reticulation in Polystachya to be built. There was little evidence for homoploid hybridization, but our knowledge of the origins and relationships of three groups of allotetraploids are greatly improved by this study. One group showed evidence of multiple long-distance dispersals to achieve a pantropical distribution; another showed no evidence of multiple origins or long-distance dispersal but had greater morphological variation, consistent with hybridization between more distantly related parents. PMID:20525745

  5. Accurate quantification of episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat circles by use of optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2015-02-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation.

  6. Genome wide copy number analysis of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Rodgers, Linda; Cox, Hilary; Riggs, Mike; Stepansky, Asya; Troge, Jennifer; Ravi, Kandasamy; Esposito, Diane; Lakshmi, B.; Wigler, Michael; Navin, Nicholas; Hicks, James

    2016-01-01

    Summary Copy number variation (CNV) is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to phenotypic variation in health and disease. Most methods for determining CNV rely on admixtures of cells, where information regarding genetic heterogeneity is lost. Here, we present a protocol that allows for the genome wide copy number analysis of single nuclei isolated from mixed populations of cells. Single nucleus sequencing (SNS), combines flow sorting of single nuclei based on DNA content, whole genome amplification (WGA), followed by next generation sequencing to quantize genomic intervals in a genome wide manner. Multiplexing of single cells is discussed. Additionally, we outline informatic approaches that correct for biases inherent in the WGA procedure and allow for accurate determination of copy number profiles. All together, the protocol takes ~3 days from flow cytometry to sequence-ready DNA libraries. PMID:22555242

  7. Evaluation of Faecalibacterium 16S rDNA genetic markers for accurate identification of swine faecal waste by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chuanren; Cui, Yamin; Zhao, Yi; Zhai, Jun; Zhang, Baoyun; Zhang, Kun; Sun, Da; Chen, Hang

    2016-10-01

    A genetic marker within the 16S rRNA gene of Faecalibacterium was identified for use in a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to detect swine faecal contamination in water. A total of 146,038 bacterial sequences were obtained using 454 pyrosequencing. By comparative bioinformatics analysis of Faecalibacterium sequences with those of numerous swine and other animal species, swine-specific Faecalibacterium 16S rRNA gene sequences were identified and Polymerase Chain Okabe (PCR) primer sets designed and tested against faecal DNA samples from swine and non-swine sources. Two PCR primer sets, PFB-1 and PFB-2, showed the highest specificity to swine faecal waste and had no cross-reaction with other animal samples. PFB-1 and PFB-2 amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences from 50 samples of swine with positive ratios of 86 and 90%, respectively. We compared swine-specific Faecalibacterium qPCR assays for the purpose of quantifying the newly identified markers. The quantification limits (LOQs) of PFB-1 and PFB-2 markers in environmental water were 6.5 and 2.9 copies per 100 ml, respectively. Of the swine-associated assays tested, PFB-2 was more sensitive in detecting the swine faecal waste and quantifying the microbial load. Furthermore, the microbial abundance and diversity of the microbiomes of swine and other animal faeces were estimated using operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The species specificity was demonstrated for the microbial populations present in various animal faeces. PMID:27353369

  8. Increased copy-number and not DNA hypomethylation causes overexpression of the candidate proto-oncogene CYP24A1 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Höbaus, Julia; Hummel, Doris M; Thiem, Ursula; Fetahu, Irfete S; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Müllauer, Leonhard; Heller, Gerwin; Egger, Gerda; Mesteri, Ildiko; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Kallay, Enikö

    2013-09-15

    In colorectal cancer (CRC) the vitamin D catabolizing enzyme 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) is overexpressed with a potentially significant, positive impact on the catabolism of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3 ). However, the underlying mechanism of CYP24A1 overexpression is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated possible causes including hypomethylation of the CYP24A1 promoter, amplification of the CYP24A1 gene locus (20q13.2), and altered expression of CYP24A1-specific transcription factors. We quantified CYP24A1 gene copy-number, performed bisulfite sequencing of the CYP24A1 promoter to assess DNA methylation, and measured mRNA expression of CYP24A1, 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), vitamin D receptor (VDR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR). We found that 77 (60%) out of 127 colorectal tumors showed increased CYP24A1 gene copy-number and that more than 6 copies of CYP24A1 correlated positively with CYP24A1 mRNA expression suggestive of a causal relationship. No differences in CYP24A1 promoter methylation were found between tumor tissue and adjacent mucosa from the same patient or between tissues with high or low mRNA expression, thus excluding DNA hypomethylation as a possible cause of CYP24A1 overexpression in CRC. Furthermore, mRNA expression of several factors involved in replication licensing positively correlated with CYP24A1 mRNA expression, raising the possibility that CYP24A1 overexpression might favor increased proliferation in tumors by suppressing local 1,25-D3 levels. We conclude that high copy-number gain is a key determinant of CYP24A1 overexpression in CRC. Other postulated causes of CYP24A1 overexpression including promoter hypomethylation and enhanced VDR and/or RXR expression do not appear to be involved.

  9. Subspecies of DNA polymerase alpha from calf thymus with different fidelity in copying synthetic template-primers.

    PubMed Central

    Brosius, S; Grosse, F; Krauss, G

    1983-01-01

    Three different subspecies of DNA polymerase alpha from calf thymus sedimenting at 9 S, 7 S and 5.7 S have been investigated with respect to their accuracy of in vitro DNA synthesis on poly (dA) (dT)16 and poly d(AT) as template-primers. Our results indicate that the structure of DNA polymerase alpha has a strong influence on the accuracy of DNA synthesis. The 9 S enzyme shows a misincorporation frequency of about 1:100 000. An error rate of 1:15 000 is measured for the 7 S species. The 5.7 S enzyme for which an error rate of 1:3 000 is determined, has to be considered as error prone. Lowering the rate of DNA synthesis leads to a decrease in fidelity. The single stranded DNA binding protein from E.coli increases the accuracy of the 5.7 S and the 7 S enzyme by a factor of two. Mn2+ decreases the fidelity of all three subspecies in a concentration dependent manner. PMID:6866763

  10. Validation of a digital PCR method for quantification of DNA copy number concentrations by using a certified reference material.

    PubMed

    Deprez, Liesbet; Corbisier, Philippe; Kortekaas, Anne-Marie; Mazoua, Stéphane; Beaz Hidalgo, Roxana; Trapmann, Stefanie; Emons, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Digital PCR has become the emerging technique for the sequence-specific detection and quantification of nucleic acids for various applications. During the past years, numerous reports on the development of new digital PCR methods have been published. Maturation of these developments into reliable analytical methods suitable for diagnostic or other routine testing purposes requires their validation for the intended use. Here, the results of an in-house validation of a droplet digital PCR method are presented. This method is intended for the quantification of the absolute copy number concentration of a purified linearized plasmid in solution with a nucleic acid background. It has been investigated which factors within the measurement process have a significant effect on the measurement results, and the contribution to the overall measurement uncertainty has been estimated. A comprehensive overview is provided on all the aspects that should be investigated when performing an in-house method validation of a digital PCR method. PMID:27617230

  11. Performance Evaluation of NIPT in Detection of Chromosomal Copy Number Variants Using Low-Coverage Whole-Genome Sequencing of Plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Linhua; Yin, Xuyang; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dayang; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Hui; Ren, Jinghui; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the performance of noninvasively prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal copy number variants (CNVs) in clinical samples, using a whole-genome sequencing method. Method A total of 919 archived maternal plasma samples with karyotyping/microarray results, including 33 CNVs samples and 886 normal samples from September 1, 2011 to May 31, 2013, were enrolled in this study. The samples were randomly rearranged and blindly sequenced by low-coverage (about 7M reads) whole-genome sequencing of plasma DNA. Fetal CNVs were detected by Fetal Copy-number Analysis through Maternal Plasma Sequencing (FCAPS) to compare to the karyotyping/microarray results. Sensitivity, specificity and were evaluated. Results 33 samples with deletions/duplications ranging from 1 to 129 Mb were detected with the consistent CNV size and location to karyotyping/microarray results in the study. Ten false positive results and two false negative results were obtained. The sensitivity and specificity of detection deletions/duplications were 84.21% and 98.42%, respectively. Conclusion Whole-genome sequencing-based NIPT has high performance in detecting genome-wide CNVs, in particular >10Mb CNVs using the current FCAPS algorithm. It is possible to implement the current method in NIPT to prenatally screening for fetal CNVs. PMID:27415003

  12. A multi-locus analysis of phylogenetic relationships within grass subfamily Pooideae (Poaceae) inferred from sequences of nuclear single copy gene regions compared with plastid DNA.

    PubMed

    Hochbach, Anne; Schneider, Julia; Röser, Martin

    2015-06-01

    To investigate phylogenetic relationships within the grass subfamily Pooideae we studied about 50 taxa covering all recognized tribes, using one plastid DNA (cpDNA) marker (matK gene-3'trnK exon) and for the first time four nuclear single copy gene loci. DNA sequence information from two parts of the nuclear genes topoisomerase 6 (Topo6) spanning the exons 8-13 and 17-19, the exons 9-13 encoding plastid acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (Acc1) and the partial exon 1 of phytochrome B (PhyB) were generated. Individual and nuclear combined data were evaluated using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. All of the phylogenetic results show Brachyelytrum and the tribe Nardeae as earliest diverging lineages within the subfamily. The 'core' Pooideae (Hordeeae and the Aveneae/Poeae tribe complex) are also strongly supported, as well as the monophyly of the tribes Brachypodieae, Meliceae and Stipeae (except PhyB). The beak grass tribe Diarrheneae and the tribe Duthieeae are not monophyletic in some of the analyses. However, the combined nuclear DNA (nDNA) tree yields the highest resolution and the best delimitation of the tribes, and provides the following evolutionary hypothesis for the tribes: Brachyelytrum, Nardeae, Duthieeae, Meliceae, Stipeae, Diarrheneae, Brachypodieae and the 'core' Pooideae. Within the individual datasets, the phylogenetic trees obtained from Topo6 exon 8-13 shows the most interesting results. The divergent positions of some clone sequences of Ampelodesmos mauritanicus and Trikeraia pappiformis, for instance, may indicate a hybrid origin of these stipoid taxa.

  13. B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans are present in all body parts analyzed and show extensive variation for rDNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; López-León, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans are considered to be mitotically stable, because all meiotic (primary spermatocytes and oocytes) or mitotic (embryos, ovarioles, and gastric caecum) cells analyzed within the same individual show the same B chromosome number. Nothing is known, however, about body parts with somatic tissues with no mitotic activity in adult individuals, constituting the immense majority of their body. Therefore, we investigated whether B chromosomes are present in 8 non-mitotically active somatic body parts from both sexes in addition to ovarioles and testes by PCR analysis of 2 B-specific molecular markers. We also elucidated the number of B chromosomes that an individual carried through quantifying the B-located rDNA copy number by qPCR. Our results indicated the amplification of both B-specific markers in all analyzed body parts. However, we found high variation between males for the estimated number of rDNA units in the B chromosomes. These results demonstrate the presence of B chromosomes in all body parts from the same individual and suggest a high variation in the rDNA content of the B chromosomes carried by different individuals from the same population, presumably due to unequal crossovers during meiosis.

  14. Combined analysis of gene expression, DNA copy number, and mutation profiling data to display biological process anomalies in individual breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weiwei; Balazs, Balint; Györffy, Balazs; Jiang, Tingting; Symmans, W Fraser; Hatzis, Christos; Pusztai, Lajos

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this analysis was to develop a computational tool that integrates the totality of gene expression, DNA copy number, and sequence abnormalities in individual cancers in the framework of biological processes. We used the hierarchical structure of the gene ontology (GO) database to create a reference network and projected mRNA expression, DNA copy number and mutation anomalies detected in single samples into this space. We applied our method to 59 breast cancers where all three types of molecular data were available. Each cancer had a large number of disturbed biological processes. Locomotion, multicellular organismal process, and signal transduction pathways were the most commonly affected GO terms, but the individual molecular events were different from case-to-case. Estrogen receptor-positive and -negative cancers had different repertoire of anomalies. We tested the functional impact of 27 mRNAs that had overexpression in cancer with variable frequency (<2-42 %) using an siRNA screen. Each of these genes inhibited cell growth in at least some of 18 breast cancer cell lines. We developed a free, on-line software tool ( http://netgoplot.org ) to display the complex genomic abnormalities in individual cancers in the biological framework of the GO biological processes. Each cancer harbored a variable number of pathway anomalies and the individual molecular events that caused an anomaly varied from case-to-case. Our in vitro experiments indicate that rare case-specific molecular abnormalities can play a functional role and driver events may vary from case-to-case depending on the constellation of other molecular anomalies.

  15. A DNA target-enrichment approach to detect mutations, copy number changes and immunoglobulin translocations in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bolli, N; Li, Y; Sathiaseelan, V; Raine, K; Jones, D; Ganly, P; Cocito, F; Bignell, G; Chapman, M A; Sperling, A S; Anderson, K C; Avet-Loiseau, H; Minvielle, S; Campbell, P J; Munshi, N C

    2016-01-01

    Genomic lesions are not investigated during routine diagnostic workup for multiple myeloma (MM). Cytogenetic studies are performed to assess prognosis but with limited impact on therapeutic decisions. Recently, several recurrently mutated genes have been described, but their clinical value remains to be defined. Therefore, clinical-grade strategies to investigate the genomic landscape of myeloma samples are needed to integrate new and old prognostic markers. We developed a target-enrichment strategy followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) to streamline simultaneous analysis of gene mutations, copy number changes and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) translocations in MM in a high-throughput manner, and validated it in a panel of cell lines. We identified 548 likely oncogenic mutations in 182 genes. By integrating published data sets of NGS in MM, we retrieved a list of genes with significant relevance to myeloma and found that the mutational spectrum of primary samples and MM cell lines is partially overlapping. Gains and losses of chromosomes, chromosomal segments and gene loci were identified with accuracy comparable to conventional arrays, allowing identification of lesions with known prognostic significance. Furthermore, we identified IGH translocations with high positive and negative predictive value. Our approach could allow the identification of novel biomarkers with clinical relevance in myeloma. PMID:27588520

  16. A DNA target-enrichment approach to detect mutations, copy number changes and immunoglobulin translocations in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bolli, N; Li, Y; Sathiaseelan, V; Raine, K; Jones, D; Ganly, P; Cocito, F; Bignell, G; Chapman, M A; Sperling, A S; Anderson, K C; Avet-Loiseau, H; Minvielle, S; Campbell, P J; Munshi, N C

    2016-01-01

    Genomic lesions are not investigated during routine diagnostic workup for multiple myeloma (MM). Cytogenetic studies are performed to assess prognosis but with limited impact on therapeutic decisions. Recently, several recurrently mutated genes have been described, but their clinical value remains to be defined. Therefore, clinical-grade strategies to investigate the genomic landscape of myeloma samples are needed to integrate new and old prognostic markers. We developed a target-enrichment strategy followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) to streamline simultaneous analysis of gene mutations, copy number changes and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) translocations in MM in a high-throughput manner, and validated it in a panel of cell lines. We identified 548 likely oncogenic mutations in 182 genes. By integrating published data sets of NGS in MM, we retrieved a list of genes with significant relevance to myeloma and found that the mutational spectrum of primary samples and MM cell lines is partially overlapping. Gains and losses of chromosomes, chromosomal segments and gene loci were identified with accuracy comparable to conventional arrays, allowing identification of lesions with known prognostic significance. Furthermore, we identified IGH translocations with high positive and negative predictive value. Our approach could allow the identification of novel biomarkers with clinical relevance in myeloma. PMID:27588520

  17. Identification of Multiple DNA Copy Number Alterations Including Frequent 8p11.22 Amplification in Conjunctival Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asnaghi, Laura; Alkatan, Hind; Mahale, Alka; Othman, Maha; Alwadani, Saeed; Al-Hussain, Hailah; Jastaneiah, Sabah; Yu, Wayne; Maktabi, Azza; Edward, Deepak P.; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Little is known about the molecular alterations that drive formation and growth of conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). We therefore sought to identify genetic changes that could be used as diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets. Methods. The DNA extracted from 10 snap-frozen cSCC tumor specimens and 2 in situ carcinomas was analyzed using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), and further examined with NanoString and quantitative PCR. Results. The number of regions of DNA loss ranged from 1 to 23 per tumor, whereas gains and amplifications ranged from 1 to 15 per tumor. Most large regions of chromosomal gain and loss were confirmed by NanoString karyotype analysis. The commonest alteration was amplification of 8p11.22 in 9 tumors (75%), and quantitative PCR analysis revealed 100-fold or greater overexpression of ADAM3A mRNA from 8p11.22 locus. In addition, recurring losses were observed at 14q13.2 and 22q11.23, both lost in 5 (42%) of the 12 tumors, and at 12p13.31, lost in 4 (33%) of the 12 samples. Of the eight loci associated with the DNA damage repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, three showed loss of at least one allele in our aCGH analysis, including XPA (9q22.33, one tumor), XPE/DDB2 (11p11.2, one tumor) and XPG/ERCC5 (13q33.1, three tumors). Conclusions. Conjunctival SCC contains a range of chromosomal alterations potentially important in tumor formation and growth. Amplification of 8p11.22 and overexpression of ADAM3A suggests a potential role for this protease. Our findings also suggest that defects in DNA repair loci are important in sporadic cSCC. PMID:25491297

  18. High-resolution copy number profiling by array CGH using DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    van Essen, Hendrik F; Ylstra, Bauke

    2012-01-01

    We describe protocols to acquire high-quality DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for the use in array comparative genome hybridization (CGH). Formalin fixation combined with paraffin embedding is routine procedure for solid malignancies in the diagnostic practice of the pathologist. As a consequence, large archives of FFPE tissues are available in pathology institutes across the globe. This archival material is for many research questions an invaluable resource, with long-term clinical follow-up and survival data available. FFPE is, thus, highly attractive for large genomics studies, including experiments requiring samples for test/learning and validation. Most larger array CGH studies have, therefore, made use of FFPE material and show that CNAs have tumor- and tissue-specific traits (Chin et al. Cancer Cell 10: 529-541, 2006; Fridlyand et al. BMC Cancer 6: 96, 2006; Weiss et al. Oncogene 22: 1872-1879, 2003; Jong et al. Oncogene 26: 1499-1506, 2007). The protocols described are tailored to array CGH of FFPE solid malignancies: from sectioning FFPE blocks to specific cynosures for pathological revisions of sections, DNA isolation, quality testing, and amplification. The protocols are technical in character and elaborate up to the labeling of isolated DNA while further processes and interpretation and data analysis are beyond the scope.

  19. Accurate Quantification of Episomal HIV-1 Two-Long Terminal Repeat Circles by Use of Optimized DNA Isolation and Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation. PMID:25502524

  20. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M; Upton, Melissa P; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R; Doody, David R; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC.

  1. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M; Upton, Melissa P; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R; Doody, David R; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC. PMID:26247464

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation, Copy Number Variation, and Gene Expression in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Selmi, Carlo; Cavaciocchi, Francesca; Lleo, Ana; Cheroni, Cristina; De Francesco, Raffaele; Lombardi, Simone A.; De Santis, Maria; Meda, Francesca; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella; Crotti, Chiara; Folci, Marco; Zammataro, Luca; Mayo, Marlyn J.; Bach, Nancy; Shimoda, Shinji; Gordon, Stuart C.; Miozzo, Monica; Invernizzi, Pietro; Podda, Mauro; Scavelli, Rossana; Martin, Michelle R.; Seldin, Michael F.; LaSalle, Janine M.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an uncommon autoimmune disease with a homogeneous clinical phenotype that reflects incomplete disease concordance in monozygotic (MZ) twins. We have taken advantage of a unique collection consisting of genomic DNA and mRNA from peripheral blood cells of female MZ twins (n = 3 sets) and sisters of similar age (n = 8 pairs) discordant for disease. We performed a genome-wide study to investigate differences in (i) DNA methylation (using a custom tiled four-plex array containing tiled 50-mers 19,084 randomly chosen methylation sites), (ii) copy number variation (CNV) (with a chip including markers derived from the 1000 Genomes Project, all three HapMap phases, and recently published studies), and/or (iii) gene expression (by whole-genome expression arrays). Based on the results obtained from these three approaches we utilized quantitative PCR to compare the expression of candidate genes. Importantly, our data support consistent differences in discordant twins and siblings for the (i) methylation profiles of 60 gene regions, (ii) CNV of 10 genes, and (iii) the expression of 2 interferon-dependent genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that 17 of these genes are differentially expressed in discordant sibling pairs. In conclusion, we report that MZ twins and sisters discordant for PBC manifest particular epigenetic differences and highlight the value of the epigenetic study of twins. PMID:24734033

  3. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M.; Upton, Melissa P.; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R.; Doody, David R.; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC. PMID:26247464

  4. Characterization of a family B DNA polymerase from Thermococcus barophilus Ch5 and its application for long and accurate PCR.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyung-Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Sokolova, Tatyana G; Cho, Sung Suk; Kim, Yun Jae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Kwon, Suk-Tae

    2016-05-01

    The family B DNA polymerase gene from the euryarchaeon Thermococcus barophilus Ch5 (Tba5) contains an open reading frame of 6198 base pairs that encodes 2065 amino acid residues. The gene is split by three inteins that must be spliced out to form the mature DNA polymerase. A Tba5 DNA polymerase gene without inteins (genetically intein-spliced) was expressed under the control of the pET-28b(+)T7lac promoter in E. coli Rosetta 2(DE3)pLysS cells. The molecular mass of the purified Tba5 DNA polymerase was about 90kDa consistent with the 90,470Da molecular mass calculated based on the 776 amino acid sequence. The optimal pH for Tba5 DNA polymerase activity was 7.5 and the optimal temperature was 70-75°C. The enzyme possessed 3'→5' exonuclease activity and was activated by magnesium ions. PCR amplification using Tba5 DNA polymerase enables high-yield for 1- to 6-kb target DNA products, while 8- to 10-kb target DNA products were amplified at low or inefficient levels. To simultaneously improve product yield and amplification fidelity, Tba5 plus DNA polymerase mixtures were constituted with various amounts of Tba5 DNA polymerase mixed with Taq DNA polymerase. The Tba5 plus DNA polymerase mixtures robustly amplified up to 25-kb λ DNA fragments. In addition, the PCR error rate of Tba5 plus3 and Tba5 plus4 mixtures were much lower than those of wild-type Tba5 DNA polymerase, Pfu DNA polymerase, Taq DNA polymerase, and Pfu plus DNA polymerase. PMID:26992800

  5. High-throughput assessment of transgene copy number in sugarcane using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Casu, Rosanne E; Selivanova, Alexandra; Perroux, Jai M

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and timely detection of transgene copy number in sugarcane is currently hampered by the requirement to use Southern blotting, needing relatively large amounts of genomic DNA and, therefore, the continued growth and maintenance of bulky plants in containment glasshouses. In addition, the sugarcane genome is both polyploid and aneuploid, complicating the identification of appropriate genes for use as references in the development of a high-throughput method. Using bioinformatic techniques followed by in vitro testing, two genes that appear to occur once per base genome of sugarcane were identified. Using these genes as reference genes, a high-throughput assay employing RT-qPCR was developed and tested using a group of sugarcane plants that contained unknown numbers of copies of the nptII gene encoding kanamycin resistance. Using this assay, transgene copy numbers from 3 to more than 50 were identified. In comparison, Southern blotting accurately identified the number of transgene copies for one line and by inference for another, but was not able to provide an accurate estimation for transgenic lines containing numerous copies of the nptII gene. Using the reference genes identified in this study, a high-throughput assay for the determination of transgene copy number was developed and tested for sugarcane. This method requires much less input DNA, can be performed much earlier in the production of transgenic sugarcane plants and allows much more efficient assessment of numerous potentially transgenic lines than Southern blotting.

  6. Haplotype Detection from Next-Generation Sequencing in High-Ploidy-Level Species: 45S rDNA Gene Copies in the Hexaploid Spartina maritima

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Julien; Aliaga, Benoît; Lima, Oscar; Ferreira de Carvalho, Julie; Ainouche, Abdelkader; Macas, Jiri; Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Coriton, Olivier; Ainouche, Malika; Salmon, Armel

    2015-01-01

    Gene and whole-genome duplications are widespread in plant nuclear genomes, resulting in sequence heterogeneity. Identification of duplicated genes may be particularly challenging in highly redundant genomes, especially when there are no diploid parents as a reference. Here, we developed a pipeline to detect the different copies in the ribosomal RNA gene family in the hexaploid grass Spartina maritima from next-generation sequencing (Roche-454) reads. The heterogeneity of the different domains of the highly repeated 45S unit was explored by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and assembling reads based on shared polymorphisms. SNPs were validated using comparisons with Illumina sequence data sets and by cloning and Sanger (re)sequencing. Using this approach, 29 validated polymorphisms and 11 validated haplotypes were reported (out of 34 and 20, respectively, that were initially predicted by our program). The rDNA domains of S. maritima have similar lengths as those found in other Poaceae, apart from the 5′-ETS, which is approximately two-times longer in S. maritima. Sequence homogeneity was encountered in coding regions and both internal transcribed spacers (ITS), whereas high intragenomic variability was detected in the intergenic spacer (IGS) and the external transcribed spacer (ETS). Molecular cytogenetic analysis by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed the presence of one pair of 45S rDNA signals on the chromosomes of S. maritima instead of three expected pairs for a hexaploid genome, indicating loss of duplicated homeologous loci through the diploidization process. The procedure developed here may be used at any ploidy level and using different sequencing technologies. PMID:26530424

  7. Concurrent DNA Copy-Number Alterations and Mutations in Genes Related to Maintenance of Genome Stability in Uninvolved Mammary Glandular Tissue from Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Ronowicz, Anna; Janaszak-Jasiecka, Anna; Skokowski, Jarosław; Madanecki, Piotr; Bartoszewski, Rafal; Bałut, Magdalena; Seroczyńska, Barbara; Kochan, Kinga; Bogdan, Adam; Butkus, Małgorzata; Pęksa, Rafał; Ratajska, Magdalena; Kuźniacka, Alina; Wasąg, Bartosz; Gucwa, Magdalena; Krzyżanowski, Maciej; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Forsberg, Lars; Ochocka, J Renata; Limon, Janusz; Crowley, Michael R; Buckley, Patrick G; Messiaen, Ludwine; Dumanski, Jan P; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz

    2015-11-01

    Somatic mosaicism for DNA copy-number alterations (SMC-CNAs) is defined as gain or loss of chromosomal segments in somatic cells within a single organism. As cells harboring SMC-CNAs can undergo clonal expansion, it has been proposed that SMC-CNAs may contribute to the predisposition of these cells to genetic disease including cancer. Herein, the gross genomic alterations (>500 kbp) were characterized in uninvolved mammary glandular tissue from 59 breast cancer patients and matched samples of primary tumors and lymph node metastases. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization showed 10% (6/59) of patients harbored one to 359 large SMC-CNAs (mean: 1,328 kbp; median: 961 kbp) in a substantial portion of glandular tissue cells, distal from the primary tumor site. SMC-CNAs were partially recurrent in tumors, albeit with considerable contribution of stochastic SMC-CNAs indicating genomic destabilization. Targeted resequencing of 301 known predisposition and somatic driver loci revealed mutations and rare variants in genes related to maintenance of genomic integrity: BRCA1 (p.Gln1756Profs*74, p.Arg504Cys), BRCA2 (p.Asn3124Ile), NCOR1 (p.Pro1570Glnfs*45), PALB2 (p.Ser500Pro), and TP53 (p.Arg306*). Co-occurrence of gross SMC-CNAs along with point mutations or rare variants in genes responsible for safeguarding genomic integrity highlights the temporal and spatial neoplastic potential of uninvolved glandular tissue in breast cancer patients. PMID:26219265

  8. Sensitive and accurate identification of protein–DNA binding events in ChIP-chip assays using higher order derivative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Christian L.; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Immuno-precipitation of protein–DNA complexes followed by microarray hybridization is a powerful and cost-effective technology for discovering protein–DNA binding events at the genome scale. It is still an unresolved challenge to comprehensively, accurately and sensitively extract binding event information from the produced data. We have developed a novel strategy composed of an information-preserving signal-smoothing procedure, higher order derivative analysis and application of the principle of maximum entropy to address this challenge. Importantly, our method does not require any input parameters to be specified by the user. Using genome-scale binding data of two Escherichia coli global transcription regulators for which a relatively large number of experimentally supported sites are known, we show that ∼90% of known sites were resolved to within four probes, or ∼88 bp. Over half of the sites were resolved to within two probes, or ∼38 bp. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our strategy delivers significant quantitative and qualitative performance gains over available methods. Such accurate and sensitive binding site resolution has important consequences for accurately reconstructing transcriptional regulatory networks, for motif discovery, for furthering our understanding of local and non-local factors in protein–DNA interactions and for extending the usefulness horizon of the ChIP-chip platform. PMID:21051353

  9. Improved Methods of Carnivore Faecal Sample Preservation, DNA Extraction and Quantification for Accurate Genotyping of Wild Tigers

    PubMed Central

    Harika, Katakam; Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasively collected samples allow a variety of genetic studies on endangered and elusive species. However due to low amplification success and high genotyping error rates fewer samples can be identified up to the individual level. Number of PCRs needed to obtain reliable genotypes also noticeably increase. Methods We developed a quantitative PCR assay to measure and grade amplifiable nuclear DNA in feline faecal extracts. We determined DNA degradation in experimentally aged faecal samples and tested a suite of pre-PCR protocols to considerably improve DNA retrieval. Results Average DNA concentrations of Grade I, II and III extracts were 982pg/µl, 9.5pg/µl and 0.4pg/µl respectively. Nearly 10% of extracts had no amplifiable DNA. Microsatellite PCR success and allelic dropout rates were 92% and 1.5% in Grade I, 79% and 5% in Grade II, and 54% and 16% in Grade III respectively. Our results on experimentally aged faecal samples showed that ageing has a significant effect on quantity and quality of amplifiable DNA (p<0.001). Maximum DNA degradation occurs within 3 days of exposure to direct sunlight. DNA concentrations of Day 1 samples stored by ethanol and silica methods for a month varied significantly from fresh Day 1 extracts (p<0.1 and p<0.001). This difference was not significant when samples were preserved by two-step method (p>0.05). DNA concentrations of fresh tiger and leopard faecal extracts without addition of carrier RNA were 816.5pg/µl (±115.5) and 690.1pg/µl (±207.1), while concentrations with addition of carrier RNA were 49414.5pg/µl (±9370.6) and 20982.7pg/µl (±6835.8) respectively. Conclusions Our results indicate that carnivore faecal samples should be collected as freshly as possible, are better preserved by two-step method and should be extracted with addition of carrier RNA. We recommend quantification of template DNA as this facilitates several downstream protocols. PMID:23071624

  10. SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers in cell lines derived from patients with spinal muscular atrophy as measured by array digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Stabley, Deborah L; Harris, Ashlee W; Holbrook, Jennifer; Chubbs, Nicholas J; Lozo, Kevin W; Crawford, Thomas O; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Funanage, Vicky L; Wang, Wenlan; Mackenzie, William; Scavina, Mena; Sol-Church, Katia; Butchbach, Matthew E R

    2015-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an early-onset motor neuron disease characterized by loss of α-motor neurons and associated muscle atrophy. SMA is caused by deletion or other disabling mutation of survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1). In the human genome, a large duplication of the SMN-containing region gives rise to a second copy of this gene (SMN2) that is distinguishable by a single nucleotide change in exon 7. Within the SMA population, there is substantial variation in SMN2 copy number; in general, those individuals with SMA who have a high SMN2 copy number have a milder disease. Because SMN2 functions as a disease modifier, its accurate copy number determination may have clinical relevance. In this study, we describe the development of an assay to assess SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers in DNA samples using an array-based digital PCR (dPCR) system. This dPCR assay can accurately and reliably measure the number of SMN1 and SMN2 copies in DNA samples. In a cohort of SMA patient-derived cell lines, the assay confirmed a strong inverse correlation between SMN2 copy number and disease severity. Array dPCR is a practical technique to determine, accurately and reliably, SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers from SMA samples. PMID:26247043

  11. Developmental Exposure to Second-Hand Smoke Increases Adult Atherogenesis and Alters Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Deletions in apoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fetterman, Jessica L.; Pompilius, Melissa; Westbrook, David G.; Uyeminami, Dale; Brown, Jamelle; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Ballinger, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. While many studies have focused upon the effects of adult second-hand smoke exposure on cardiovascular disease development, disease development occurs over decades and is likely influenced by childhood exposure. The impacts of in utero versus neonatal second-hand smoke exposure on adult atherosclerotic disease development are not known. The objective of the current study was to determine the effects of in utero versus neonatal exposure to a low dose (1 mg/m3 total suspended particulate) of second-hand smoke on adult atherosclerotic lesion development using the apolipoprotein E null mouse model. Consequently, apolipoprotein E null mice were exposed to either filtered air or second-hand smoke: (i) in utero from gestation days 1–19, or (ii) from birth until 3 weeks of age (neonatal). Subsequently, all animals were exposed to filtered air and sacrificed at 12–14 weeks of age. Oil red-O staining of whole aortas, measures of mitochondrial damage, and oxidative stress were performed. Results show that both in utero and neonatal second-hand smoke exposure significantly increased adult atherogenesis in mice compared to filtered air controls. These changes were associated with changes in aconitase and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase activities consistent with increased oxidative stress in the aorta, changes in mitochondrial DNA copy number and deletion levels. These studies show that in utero or neonatal exposure to second-hand smoke significantly influences adult atherosclerotic lesion development and results in significant alterations to the mitochondrion and its genome that may contribute to atherogenesis. PMID:23825571

  12. DNA extraction techniques compared for accurate detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products.

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Kazan, Hande; Karacanli, Burçin; Lucas, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, DNA extraction methods have been evaluated to detect the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products commercialised in Turkey. All the extraction methods tested performed well for the majority of maize foods and feed products analysed. However, the highest DNA content was achieved by the Wizard, Genespin or the CTAB method, all of which produced optimal DNA yield and purity for different maize food and feed products. The samples were then screened for the presence of GM elements, along with certified reference materials. Of the food and feed samples, 8 % tested positive for the presence of one GM element (NOS terminator), of which half (4 % of the total) also contained a second element (the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter). The results obtained herein clearly demonstrate the presence of GM maize in the Turkish market, and that the Foodproof GMO Screening Kit provides reliable screening of maize food and feed products. PMID:26243938

  13. DNA extraction techniques compared for accurate detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products.

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Kazan, Hande; Karacanli, Burçin; Lucas, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, DNA extraction methods have been evaluated to detect the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products commercialised in Turkey. All the extraction methods tested performed well for the majority of maize foods and feed products analysed. However, the highest DNA content was achieved by the Wizard, Genespin or the CTAB method, all of which produced optimal DNA yield and purity for different maize food and feed products. The samples were then screened for the presence of GM elements, along with certified reference materials. Of the food and feed samples, 8 % tested positive for the presence of one GM element (NOS terminator), of which half (4 % of the total) also contained a second element (the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter). The results obtained herein clearly demonstrate the presence of GM maize in the Turkish market, and that the Foodproof GMO Screening Kit provides reliable screening of maize food and feed products.

  14. Highly Informative Single-Copy Nuclear Microsatellite DNA Markers Developed Using an AFLP-SSR Approach in Black Spruce (Picea mariana) and Red Spruce (P. rubens)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yong-Zhong; Forneris, Natascha; Rajora, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are highly informative molecular markers for various biological studies in plants. In spruce (Picea) and other conifers, the development of single-copy polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers is quite difficult, owing primarily to the large genome size and predominance of repetitive DNA sequences throughout the genome. We have developed highly informative single-locus genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce (Picea mariana) and red spruce (Picea rubens) using a simple but efficient method based on a combination of AFLP and microsatellite technologies. Principal Findings A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from genomic AFLP DNA fragments of black spruce. Sequencing of the 108 putative SSR-containing clones provided 94 unique sequences with microsatellites. Twenty-two of the designed 34 primer pairs yielded scorable amplicons, with single-locus patterns. Fourteen of these microsatellite markers were characterized in 30 black spruce and 30 red spruce individuals drawn from many populations. The number of alleles at a polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 18, with a mean of 9.3 in black spruce, and from 3 to 15, with a mean of 6.2 alleles in red spruce. The polymorphic information content or expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.340 to 0.909 (mean = 0.67) in black spruce and from 0.161 to 0.851 (mean = 0.62) in red spruce. Ten SSR markers showing inter-parental polymorphism inherited in a single-locus Mendelian mode, with two cases of distorted segregation. Primer pairs for almost all polymorphic SSR loci resolved microsatellites of comparable size in Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, P. sitchensis, and P. abies. Significance The AFLP-based microsatellite-enriched library appears to be a rapid, cost-effective approach for isolating and developing single-locus informative genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce. The markers developed should be useful in black spruce, red spruce

  15. MBRidge: an accurate and cost-effective method for profiling DNA methylome at single-base resolution

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wanshi; Mao, Fengbiao; Teng, Huajing; Cai, Tao; Zhao, Fangqing; Wu, Jinyu; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Organisms and cells, in response to environmental influences or during development, undergo considerable changes in DNA methylation on a genome-wide scale, which are linked to a variety of biological processes. Using MethylC-seq to decipher DNA methylome at single-base resolution is prohibitively costly. In this study, we develop a novel approach, named MBRidge, to detect the methylation levels of repertoire CpGs, by innovatively introducing C-hydroxylmethylated adapters and bisulfate treatment into the MeDIP-seq protocol and employing ridge regression in data analysis. A systematic evaluation of DNA methylome in a human ovarian cell line T29 showed that MBRidge achieved high correlation (R > 0.90) with much less cost (∼10%) in comparison with MethylC-seq. We further applied MBRidge to profiling DNA methylome in T29H, an oncogenic counterpart of T29's. By comparing methylomes of T29H and T29, we identified 131790 differential methylation regions (DMRs), which are mainly enriched in carcinogenesis-related pathways. These are substantially different from 7567 DMRs that were obtained by RRBS and related with cell development or differentiation. The integrated analysis of DMRs in the promoter and expression of DMR-corresponding genes revealed that DNA methylation enforced reverse regulation of gene expression, depending on the distance from the proximal DMR to transcription starting sites in both mRNA and lncRNA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MBRidge is an efficient and cost-effective method that can be widely applied to profiling DNA methylomes. PMID:26078362

  16. Accurate and easy-to-use assessment of contiguous DNA methylation sites based on proportion competitive quantitative-PCR and lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cheng, Nan; Huang, Kunlun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Chenguang; Xu, Yuancong; Zhu, Longjiao; Du, Dan; Luo, Yunbo

    2016-06-15

    Many types of diagnostic technologies have been reported for DNA methylation, but they require a standard curve for quantification or only show moderate accuracy. Moreover, most technologies have difficulty providing information on the level of methylation at specific contiguous multi-sites, not to mention easy-to-use detection to eliminate labor-intensive procedures. We have addressed these limitations and report here a cascade strategy that combines proportion competitive quantitative PCR (PCQ-PCR) and lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor (LFNAB), resulting in accurate and easy-to-use assessment. The P16 gene with specific multi-methylated sites, a well-studied tumor suppressor gene, was used as the target DNA sequence model. First, PCQ-PCR provided amplification products with an accurate proportion of multi-methylated sites following the principle of proportionality, and double-labeled duplex DNA was synthesized. Then, a LFNAB strategy was further employed for amplified signal detection via immune affinity recognition, and the exact level of site-specific methylation could be determined by the relative intensity of the test line and internal reference line. This combination resulted in all recoveries being greater than 94%, which are pretty satisfactory recoveries in DNA methylation assessment. Moreover, the developed cascades show significantly high usability as a simple, sensitive, and low-cost tool. Therefore, as a universal platform for sensing systems for the detection of contiguous multi-sites of DNA methylation without external standards and expensive instrumentation, this PCQ-PCR-LFNAB cascade method shows great promise for the point-of-care diagnosis of cancer risk and therapeutics.

  17. Stochastic and reversible assembly of a multiprotein DNA repair complex ensures accurate target site recognition and efficient repair

    PubMed Central

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; Gourdin, Audrey M.; Politi, Antonio Z.; Moné, Martijn J.; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Goedhart, Joachim; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-01-01

    To understand how multiprotein complexes assemble and function on chromatin, we combined quantitative analysis of the mammalian nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) machinery in living cells with computational modeling. We found that individual NER components exchange within tens of seconds between the bound state in repair complexes and the diffusive state in the nucleoplasm, whereas their net accumulation at repair sites evolves over several hours. Based on these in vivo data, we developed a predictive kinetic model for the assembly and function of repair complexes. DNA repair is orchestrated by the interplay of reversible protein-binding events and progressive enzymatic modifications of the chromatin substrate. We demonstrate that faithful recognition of DNA lesions is time consuming, whereas subsequently, repair complexes form rapidly through random and reversible assembly of NER proteins. Our kinetic analysis of the NER system reveals a fundamental conflict between specificity and efficiency of chromatin-associated protein machineries and shows how a trade off is negotiated through reversibility of protein binding. PMID:20439997

  18. Stochastic and reversible assembly of a multiprotein DNA repair complex ensures accurate target site recognition and efficient repair.

    PubMed

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; Gourdin, Audrey M; Politi, Antonio Z; Moné, Martijn J; Warmerdam, Daniël O; Goedhart, Joachim; Vermeulen, Wim; van Driel, Roel; Höfer, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    To understand how multiprotein complexes assemble and function on chromatin, we combined quantitative analysis of the mammalian nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) machinery in living cells with computational modeling. We found that individual NER components exchange within tens of seconds between the bound state in repair complexes and the diffusive state in the nucleoplasm, whereas their net accumulation at repair sites evolves over several hours. Based on these in vivo data, we developed a predictive kinetic model for the assembly and function of repair complexes. DNA repair is orchestrated by the interplay of reversible protein-binding events and progressive enzymatic modifications of the chromatin substrate. We demonstrate that faithful recognition of DNA lesions is time consuming, whereas subsequently, repair complexes form rapidly through random and reversible assembly of NER proteins. Our kinetic analysis of the NER system reveals a fundamental conflict between specificity and efficiency of chromatin-associated protein machineries and shows how a trade off is negotiated through reversibility of protein binding. PMID:20439997

  19. Characterization of three active transposable elements recently inserted in three independent DFR-A alleles and one high-copy DNA transposon isolated from the Pink allele of the ANS gene in onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunggil; Park, Jee Young; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Intact retrotransposon and DNA transposons inserted in a single gene were characterized in onions (Allium cepa) and their transcription and copy numbers were estimated in this study. While analyzing diverse onion germplasm, large insertions in the DFR-A gene encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) involved in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were found in two accessions. A 5,070-bp long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon inserted in the active DFR-A (R4) allele was identified from one of the large insertions and designated AcCOPIA1. An intact ORF encoded typical domains of copia-like LTR retrotransposons. However, AcCOPIA1 contained atypical 'TG' and 'TA' dinucleotides at the ends of the LTRs. A 4,615-bp DNA transposon was identified in the other large insertion. This DNA transposon, designated AcCACTA1, contained an ORF coding for a transposase showing homology with the CACTA superfamily transposable elements (TEs). Another 5,073-bp DNA transposon was identified from the DFR-A (TRN) allele. This DNA transposon, designated AchAT1, belonged to the hAT superfamily with short 4-bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). Finally, a 6,258-bp non-autonomous DNA transposon, designated AcPINK, was identified in the ANS-p allele encoding anthocyanidin synthase, the next downstream enzyme to DFR in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. AcPINK also possessed very short 3-bp TIRs. Active transcription of AcCOPIA1, AcCACTA1, and AchAT1 was observed through RNA-Seq analysis and RT-PCR. The copy numbers of AcPINK estimated by mapping the genomic DNA reads produced by NextSeq 500 were predominantly high compared with the other TEs. A series of evidence indicated that these TEs might have transposed in these onion genes very recently, providing a stepping stone for elucidation of enormously large-sized onion genome structure.

  20. Characterization of three active transposable elements recently inserted in three independent DFR-A alleles and one high-copy DNA transposon isolated from the Pink allele of the ANS gene in onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunggil; Park, Jee Young; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Intact retrotransposon and DNA transposons inserted in a single gene were characterized in onions (Allium cepa) and their transcription and copy numbers were estimated in this study. While analyzing diverse onion germplasm, large insertions in the DFR-A gene encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) involved in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were found in two accessions. A 5,070-bp long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon inserted in the active DFR-A (R4) allele was identified from one of the large insertions and designated AcCOPIA1. An intact ORF encoded typical domains of copia-like LTR retrotransposons. However, AcCOPIA1 contained atypical 'TG' and 'TA' dinucleotides at the ends of the LTRs. A 4,615-bp DNA transposon was identified in the other large insertion. This DNA transposon, designated AcCACTA1, contained an ORF coding for a transposase showing homology with the CACTA superfamily transposable elements (TEs). Another 5,073-bp DNA transposon was identified from the DFR-A (TRN) allele. This DNA transposon, designated AchAT1, belonged to the hAT superfamily with short 4-bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). Finally, a 6,258-bp non-autonomous DNA transposon, designated AcPINK, was identified in the ANS-p allele encoding anthocyanidin synthase, the next downstream enzyme to DFR in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. AcPINK also possessed very short 3-bp TIRs. Active transcription of AcCOPIA1, AcCACTA1, and AchAT1 was observed through RNA-Seq analysis and RT-PCR. The copy numbers of AcPINK estimated by mapping the genomic DNA reads produced by NextSeq 500 were predominantly high compared with the other TEs. A series of evidence indicated that these TEs might have transposed in these onion genes very recently, providing a stepping stone for elucidation of enormously large-sized onion genome structure. PMID:25515665

  1. IrisPlex: a sensitive DNA tool for accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour in the absence of ancestry information.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Ballantyne, Kaye N; van Oven, Mannis; Lao, Oscar; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-06-01

    A new era of 'DNA intelligence' is arriving in forensic biology, due to the impending ability to predict externally visible characteristics (EVCs) from biological material such as those found at crime scenes. EVC prediction from forensic samples, or from body parts, is expected to help concentrate police investigations towards finding unknown individuals, at times when conventional DNA profiling fails to provide informative leads. Here we present a robust and sensitive tool, termed IrisPlex, for the accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour from DNA in future forensic applications. We used the six currently most eye colour-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that previously revealed prevalence-adjusted prediction accuracies of over 90% for blue and brown eye colour in 6168 Dutch Europeans. The single multiplex assay, based on SNaPshot chemistry and capillary electrophoresis, both widely used in forensic laboratories, displays high levels of genotyping sensitivity with complete profiles generated from as little as 31pg of DNA, approximately six human diploid cell equivalents. We also present a prediction model to correctly classify an individual's eye colour, via probability estimation solely based on DNA data, and illustrate the accuracy of the developed prediction test on 40 individuals from various geographic origins. Moreover, we obtained insights into the worldwide allele distribution of these six SNPs using the HGDP-CEPH samples of 51 populations. Eye colour prediction analyses from HGDP-CEPH samples provide evidence that the test and model presented here perform reliably without prior ancestry information, although future worldwide genotype and phenotype data shall confirm this notion. As our IrisPlex eye colour prediction test is capable of immediate implementation in forensic casework, it represents one of the first steps forward in the creation of a fully individualised EVC prediction system for future use in forensic DNA intelligence.

  2. Accurate detection of male subclinical genital tract infection via cervical culture and DNA hybridization assay of the female partner.

    PubMed

    Trum, J W; Pannekoek, Y; Spanjaard, L; Bleker, O P; Van Der Veen, F

    2000-02-01

    The accuracy of the PACE2 DNA hybridization assay of the cervix and cervical culture in female partners for the diagnosis of male subclinical genital tract infection were assessed in a male infertility population. A total of 184 men were screened for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis. Seventy-one men were identified with a positive test for one or more of the above mentioned micro-organisms. The overall prevalence of bacterial infection was 39%. Female partners of all men were tested with the PACE2 DNA hybridization assay to detect a C. trachomatis infection. Sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 100%. In 67 female partners (94%) of men who tested positive for U. urealyticum and/or M. hominis, a cervical swab culture was performed. The sensitivity of the cervical swab culture was 100%. In view of the high prevalence of U. urealyticum and M. hominis in the male genital tract and the role these sexually transmitted pathogens may play in infertility, one might question whether all couples should be screened for the presence of these pathogens. Transurethral swab culture after digital prostatic massage is disincentive to men. The cervical culture in their female partner, performed as part of the routine fertility work-up, is a suitable alternative to detect the presence of these micro-organisms in the male genital tract.

  3. Copy number variation and mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  4. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Accurately Detects Malaria DNA from Filter Paper Blood Samples of Low Density Parasitaemias

    PubMed Central

    González, Iveth J.; Polley, Spencer D.; Bell, David; Shakely, Delér; Msellem, Mwinyi I.; Björkman, Anders; Mårtensson, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) provides an opportunity for improved, field-friendly detection of malaria infections in endemic areas. However data on the diagnostic accuracy of LAMP for active case detection, particularly low-density parasitaemias, are lacking. We therefore evaluated the performance of a new LAMP kit compared with PCR using DNA from filter paper blood spots. Methods and Findings Samples from 865 fever patients and 465 asymptomatic individuals collected in Zanzibar were analysed for Pan (all species) and Pf (P. falciparum) DNA with the Loopamp MALARIA Pan/Pf kit. Samples were amplified at 65°C for 40 minutes in a real-time turbidimeter and results were compared with nested PCR. Samples with discordant results between LAMP and nested PCR were analysed with real-time PCR. The real-time PCR corrected nested PCR result was defined as gold standard. Among the 117 (13.5%) PCR detected P. falciparum infections from fever patients (mean parasite density 7491/µL, range 6–782,400) 115, 115 and 111 were positive by Pan-LAMP, Pf-LAMP and nested PCR, respectively. The sensitivities were 98.3% (95%CI 94–99.8) for both Pan and Pf-LAMP. Among the 54 (11.6%) PCR positive samples from asymptomatic individuals (mean parasite density 10/µL, range 0–4972) Pf-LAMP had a sensitivity of 92.7% (95%CI 80.1–98.5) for detection of the 41 P. falciparum infections. Pan-LAMP had sensitivities of 97% (95%CI 84.2–99.9) and 76.9% (95%CI 46.2–95) for detection of P. falciparum and P. malariae, respectively. The specificities for both Pan and Pf-LAMP were 100% (95%CI 99.1–100) in both study groups. Conclusion Both components of the Loopamp MALARIA Pan/Pf detection kit revealed high diagnostic accuracy for parasite detection among fever patients and importantly also among asymptomatic individuals of low parasite densities from minute blood volumes preserved on filter paper. These data support LAMPs potential role for improved detection of low

  5. Accurate variant detection across non-amplified and whole genome amplified DNA using targeted next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many hypothesis-driven genetic studies require the ability to comprehensively and efficiently target specific regions of the genome to detect sequence variations. Often, sample availability is limited requiring the use of whole genome amplification (WGA). We evaluated a high-throughput microdroplet-based PCR approach in combination with next generation sequencing (NGS) to target 384 discrete exons from 373 genes involved in cancer. In our evaluation, we compared the performance of six non-amplified gDNA samples from two HapMap family trios. Three of these samples were also preamplified by WGA and evaluated. We tested sample pooling or multiplexing strategies at different stages of the tested targeted NGS (T-NGS) workflow. Results The results demonstrated comparable sequence performance between non-amplified and preamplified samples and between different indexing strategies [sequence specificity of 66.0% ± 3.4%, uniformity (coverage at 0.2× of the mean) of 85.6% ± 0.6%]. The average genotype concordance maintained across all the samples was 99.5% ± 0.4%, regardless of sample type or pooling strategy. We did not detect any errors in the Mendelian patterns of inheritance of genotypes between the parents and offspring within each trio. We also demonstrated the ability to detect minor allele frequencies within the pooled samples that conform to predicted models. Conclusion Our described PCR-based sample multiplex approach and the ability to use WGA material for NGS may enable researchers to perform deep resequencing studies and explore variants at very low frequencies and cost. PMID:22994565

  6. Selection of suitable endogenous reference genes for relative copy number detection in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bantong; Guo, Jinlong; Que, Youxiong; Fu, Zhiwei; Wu, Luguang; Xu, Liping

    2014-05-19

    Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM) crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential "single copy" genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3--high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1--medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2--low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane.

  7. Phytochip: development of a DNA-microarray for rapid and accurate identification of Pseudo-nitzschia spp and other harmful algal species.

    PubMed

    Noyer, Charlotte; Abot, Anne; Trouilh, Lidwine; Leberre, Véronique Anton; Dreanno, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Detection of harmful algal blooms has become a challenging concern because of the direct impacts on public health and economy. The identification of toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms in monitoring programs requires an extensive taxonomic expertise and is time consuming. Advances in molecular biology have allowed the development of new approaches, more rapid, accurate and cost-effective for detecting these microorganisms. In this context, we developed a new DNA microarray (called, Phytochip) for the simultaneous detection of multiple HAB species with a particular emphasis on Pseudo-nitzschia species. Oligonucleotide probes were designed along the rRNA operon. After DNA extraction, the target rDNA genes were amplified and labeled using an asymmetric PCR; then, the amplicons were hybridized to the oligonucleotide probes present on the chips. The total assay from seawater sampling to data acquisition can be performed within a working day. Specificity and sensitivity were assessed by using monoclonal cultures, mixtures of species and field samples spiked with a known amount of cultured cells. The Phytochip with its 81 validated oligonucleotide probes was able to detect 12 species of Pseudo-nitzschia and 11 species of dinoflagellates among which were 3 species of Karenia and 3 species of Alexandrium. The Phytochip was applied to environmental samples already characterized by light microscopy and cloned into DNA libraries. The hybridizations on the Phytochip were in good agreement with the sequences retrieved from the clone libraries and the microscopic observations. The Phytochip enables a reliable multiplex detection of phytoplankton and can assist a water quality monitoring program as well as more general ecological research. PMID:25765159

  8. Phytochip: development of a DNA-microarray for rapid and accurate identification of Pseudo-nitzschia spp and other harmful algal species.

    PubMed

    Noyer, Charlotte; Abot, Anne; Trouilh, Lidwine; Leberre, Véronique Anton; Dreanno, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Detection of harmful algal blooms has become a challenging concern because of the direct impacts on public health and economy. The identification of toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms in monitoring programs requires an extensive taxonomic expertise and is time consuming. Advances in molecular biology have allowed the development of new approaches, more rapid, accurate and cost-effective for detecting these microorganisms. In this context, we developed a new DNA microarray (called, Phytochip) for the simultaneous detection of multiple HAB species with a particular emphasis on Pseudo-nitzschia species. Oligonucleotide probes were designed along the rRNA operon. After DNA extraction, the target rDNA genes were amplified and labeled using an asymmetric PCR; then, the amplicons were hybridized to the oligonucleotide probes present on the chips. The total assay from seawater sampling to data acquisition can be performed within a working day. Specificity and sensitivity were assessed by using monoclonal cultures, mixtures of species and field samples spiked with a known amount of cultured cells. The Phytochip with its 81 validated oligonucleotide probes was able to detect 12 species of Pseudo-nitzschia and 11 species of dinoflagellates among which were 3 species of Karenia and 3 species of Alexandrium. The Phytochip was applied to environmental samples already characterized by light microscopy and cloned into DNA libraries. The hybridizations on the Phytochip were in good agreement with the sequences retrieved from the clone libraries and the microscopic observations. The Phytochip enables a reliable multiplex detection of phytoplankton and can assist a water quality monitoring program as well as more general ecological research.

  9. Variants of mouse DNA polymerase κ reveal a mechanism of efficient and accurate translesion synthesis past a benzo[a]pyrene dG adduct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Yeran; Tang, Tie-Shan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhifeng; Friedberg, Errol; Yang, Wei; Guo, Caixia

    2014-02-01

    DNA polymerase κ (Polκ) is the only known Y-family DNA polymerase that bypasses the 10S (+)-trans-anti-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)-N(2)-deoxyguanine adducts efficiently and accurately. The unique features of Polκ, a large structure gap between the catalytic core and little finger domain and a 90-residue addition at the N terminus known as the N-clasp, may give rise to its special translesion capability. We designed and constructed two mouse Polκ variants, which have reduced gap size on both sides [Polκ Gap Mutant (PGM) 1] or one side flanking the template base (PGM2). These Polκ variants are nearly as efficient as WT in normal DNA synthesis, albeit with reduced accuracy. However, PGM1 is strongly blocked by the 10S (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N(2)-dG lesion. Steady-state kinetic measurements reveal a significant reduction in efficiency of dCTP incorporation opposite the lesion by PGM1 and a moderate reduction by PGM2. Consistently, Polκ-deficient cells stably complemented with PGM1 GFP-Polκ remained hypersensitive to BPDE treatment, and complementation with WT or PGM2 GFP-Polκ restored BPDE resistance. Furthermore, deletion of the first 51 residues of the N-clasp in mouse Polκ (mPolκ(52-516)) leads to reduced polymerization activity, and the mutant PGM2(52-516) but not PGM1(52-516) can partially compensate the N-terminal deletion and restore the catalytic activity on normal DNA. However, neither WT nor PGM2 mPolκ(52-516) retains BPDE bypass activity. We conclude that the structural gap physically accommodates the bulky aromatic adduct and the N-clasp is essential for the structural integrity and flexibility of Polκ during translesion synthesis. PMID:24449898

  10. Isolation and characterization of a set of disease resistance-gene analogs (RGAs) from wild rice, Zizania latifolia Griseb. I. Introgression, copy number lability, sequence change, and DNA methylation alteration in several rice-Zizania introgression lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Long, Likun; Lin, Xiuyun; Guo, Wanli; Liu, Bao

    2006-02-01

    Eight resistance-gene analogs (RGAs) were isolated from wild rice, Zizania latifolia Griseb., by degenerate primers designed according to conserved motifs at or around the nucleotide-binding site (NBS) of known NBS-containing plant resistance genes. The 8 RGAs were classified into 6 distinct groups based on their deduced amino acid sequence similarity of 60% or greater. Gel-blot hybridization of each of the RGAs to 4 rice - Z. latifolia intro gression lines indicated an array of changes at either introgressed Zizania RGAs or, more likely, their rice homologs. The changes included dramatic increase in copy number, modification at the primary DNA sequence, and alteration in DNA methylation patterns. PMID:16498465

  11. Selection of Suitable Endogenous Reference Genes for Relative Copy Number Detection in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bantong; Guo, Jinlong; Que, Youxiong; Fu, Zhiwei; Wu, Luguang; Xu, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM) crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential “single copy” genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3—high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1—medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2—low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane. PMID:24857916

  12. 37 CFR 1.13 - Copies and certified copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copies and certified copies... Patent and Trademark Office § 1.13 Copies and certified copies. (a) Non-certified copies of patents, and... States Patent and Trademark Office to any person, and copies of other records or papers will be...

  13. 37 CFR 2.201 - Copies and certified copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copies and certified copies... Trademark Office § 2.201 Copies and certified copies. (a) Non-certified copies of trademark registrations... appropriate fee required by § 2.6. (b) Certified copies of trademark registrations and of any...

  14. A Continental-Wide Perspective: The Genepool of Nuclear Encoded Ribosomal DNA and Single-Copy Gene Sequences in North American Boechera (Brassicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Christiane; Koch, Marcus A.

    2012-01-01

    74 of the currently accepted 111 taxa of the North American genus Boechera (Brassicaceae) were subject to pyhlogenetic reconstruction and network analysis. The dataset comprised 911 accessions for which ITS sequences were analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses yielded largely unresolved trees. Together with the network analysis confirming this result this can be interpreted as an indication for multiple, independent, and rapid diversification events. Network analyses were superimposed with datasets describing i) geographical distribution, ii) taxonomy, iii) reproductive mode, and iv) distribution history based on phylogeographic evidence. Our results provide first direct evidence for enormous reticulate evolution in the entire genus and give further insights into the evolutionary history of this complex genus on a continental scale. In addition two novel single-copy gene markers, orthologues of the Arabidopsis thaliana genes At2g25920 and At3g18900, were analyzed for subsets of taxa and confirmed the findings obtained through the ITS data. PMID:22606266

  15. Comparison of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in identical sequences in primary human fibroblast and immortal hamster-human hybrid cells harboring a single copy of human chromosome 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouladi, B.; Waldren, C. A.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We have optimized a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay that measures induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in specific regions of the genome (Lobrich et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 12050-12054, 1995). The increased sensitivity resulting from these improvements makes it possible to analyze the size distribution of broken DNA molecules immediately after the introduction of DSBs and after repair incubation. This analysis shows that the distribution of broken DNA pieces after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is consistent with the distribution expected from randomly induced DSBs. It is apparent from the distribution of rejoined DNA pieces after repair incubation that DNA ends continue to rejoin between 3 and 24 h postirradiation and that some of these rejoining events are in fact misrejoining events, since novel restriction fragments both larger and smaller than the original fragment are generated after repair. This improved assay was also used to study the kinetics of DSB rejoining and the extent of misrejoining in identical DNA sequences in human GM38 cells and human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells containing a single human chromosome 11. Despite the numerous differences between these cells, which include species and tissue of origin, levels of TP53, expression of telomerase, and the presence or absence of a homologous chromosome for the restriction fragments examined, the kinetics of rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs and the extent of misrejoining were similar in the two cell lines when studied in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, DSBs were removed from the single-copy human chromosome in the hamster A(L) cells with similar kinetics and misrejoining frequency as at a locus on this hybrid's CHO chromosomes.

  16. Specific in situ hepatitis B viral double mutation (HBVDM) detection in urine with 60 copies ml(-1) analytical sensitivity in a background of 250-fold wild type without DNA isolation and amplification.

    PubMed

    Kirimli, Ceyhun E; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y

    2015-03-01

    We have examined in situ detection of hepatitis B virus 1762T/1764A double mutation (HBVDM) in urine using a (Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3)(0.65)(PbTiO3)(0.35) (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensor (PEPS) coated with a 16-nucleotide (nt) probe DNA (pDNA) complementary to the HBVDM. The in situ mutation (MT) detection was carried out in a flow with the PEPS vertically situated at the center of the flow in a background of wild type (WT). For validation, this detection was followed by detection in the mixture of MT fluorescent reporter microspheres (FRMs) (MT FRMs) and WT FRMs that emitted different fluorescence colours and were designed to specifically bind to MT and WT, respectively. At 30 °C and 4 ml min(-1), a PEPS was shown to specifically detect HBVDM in situ with 60 copies ml(-1) analytical sensitivity in a background of clinically-relevant 250-fold more WT in 30 min without DNA isolation, amplification, or labelling as validated by the visualization of the captured MT FRMs and WT FRMs following FRM detection where the captured MT FRMs outnumbered the WT FRMs by a factor of 5 to 1. PMID:25599103

  17. Copy-left and Copy-right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderPlas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Any discussion of open licensing almost invariably devolves into a debate between copy-left licenses and permissive licenses, both sides defending their views with a nearly religious fervor. Copy-left licenses, typified by the GPL family of licenses, require all derived products to maintain the open, GPL license. Permissive licenses, typified by the BSD family of licenses, do not impose such requirements. I'll briefly explore the common arguments put forth in favor of either approach, and discuss some concrete examples of where these approaches have helped or hindered the software packages that used them.

  18. Differences in Aggressive Behavior and DNA Copy Number Variants Between BALB/cJ and BALB/cByJ Substrains

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Lady; Sokoloff, Greta; Miczek, Klaus A.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2013-01-01

    Some BALB/c substrains exhibit different levels of aggression. We compared aggression levels between male BALB/cJ and BALB/cByJ substrains using the resident intruder paradigm. These substrains were also assessed in other tests of emotionality and information processing including the open field, forced swim, fear conditioning, and prepulse inhibition tests. We also evaluated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported between these BALB/c substrains. Finally, we compared BALB/cJ and BALB/cByJ mice for genomic deletions or duplications, collectively termed copy number variants (CNVs), to identify candidate genes that might underlie the observed behavioral differences. BALB/cJ mice showed substantially higher aggression levels than BALB/cByJ mice; however, only minor differences in other behaviors were observed. None of the previously reported SNPs were verified. Eleven CNV regions were identified between the two BALB/c substrains. Our findings identify a robust difference in aggressive behavior between BALB/cJ and BALB/cByJ substrains, which could be the result of the identified CNVs. PMID:20033273

  19. Evaluating quantitative methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Shay; Paulsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The life of plasmids is a constant battle against fluctuations: failing to correct copy number fluctuations can increase the plasmid loss rate by many orders of magnitude, as can a failure to more evenly divide the copies between daughters at cell division. Plasmids are therefore long-standing model systems for stochastic processes in cells, much thanks to the efforts of Kurt Nordström to whose memory this issue is dedicated. Here we analyze a range of experimental methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells, focusing on challenges, trade-offs and necessary experimental controls. In particular we analyze published and unpublished strategies to infer copy numbers from expression of plasmid-encoded reporters, direct labeling of plasmids with fluorescent probes or DNA binding proteins fused to fluorescent reporters, PCR based methods applied to single cell lysates, and plasmid-specific replication arrest. We conclude that no method currently exists to measure plasmid copy numbers in single cells, and that most methods instead inadvertently measure various types of experimental noise. We also discuss how accurate methods can be developed. PMID:22305922

  20. 7 CFR 97.179 - Copies and certified copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies and certified copies. 97.179 Section 97.179... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION Fees and Charges § 97.179 Copies and certified copies. (a) Upon request, copies of applications, certificates, or of any records, books, papers, drawings, or photographs in...

  1. Kinetic versus Energetic Discrimination in Biological Copying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-05-01

    We study stochastic copying schemes in which discrimination between a right and a wrong match is achieved via different kinetic barriers or different binding energies of the two matches. We demonstrate that, in single-step reactions, the two discrimination mechanisms are strictly alternative and cannot be mixed to further reduce the error fraction. Close to the lowest error limit, kinetic discrimination results in a diverging copying velocity and dissipation per copied bit. On the other hand, energetic discrimination reaches its lowest error limit in an adiabatic regime where dissipation and velocity vanish. By analyzing experimentally measured kinetic rates of two DNA polymerases, T7 and Polγ, we argue that one of them operates in the kinetic and the other in the energetic regime. Finally, we show how the two mechanisms can be combined in copying schemes implementing error correction through a proofreading pathway.

  2. Tensor GSVD of Patient- and Platform-Matched Tumor and Normal DNA Copy-Number Profiles Uncovers Chromosome Arm-Wide Patterns of Tumor-Exclusive Platform-Consistent Alterations Encoding for Cell Transformation and Predicting Ovarian Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Preethi; Schomay, Theodore E.; Aiello, Katherine A.; Alter, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD), which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs). We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient’s prognosis, is independent of the tumor’s stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell’s immortality, and a patient’s shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival. In Xq

  3. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy versus concurrent chemoradiotherapy alone in stage III-IVb nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with Epstein-Barr virus DNA ≥4000 copies/ml: a matched study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Li-Ting; Guo, Ling; Mo, Hao-Yuan; Luo, Dong-Hua; Huang, Pei-Yu; Xiang, Yan-Qun; Sun, Rui; Chen, Ming-Yuan; Wang, Lin; Lv, Xing; Zhao, Chong; Guo, Xiang; Cao, Ka-Jia; Qian, Chao-Nan; Zeng, Mu-Shen; Bei, Jin-Xin; Hong, Ming-Huang; Shao, Jian-Yong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun; Mai, Hai-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of induction chemotherapy (IC) followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in high-risk (stage III-IVb with EBV DNA≥4000 copies/ml) nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients are unclear. Methods A total of 325 high-risk NPC patients treated with IC+CCRT or CCRT alone who were treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) between March 2007 and March 2013 were included. For each patient in the IC+CCRT group, a matched pair in the CCRT group was matching for: gender, age, T stage, N stage, clinical stage and WHO (World Health Organization) type. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS), and the secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS). Results There were no significant differences in OS, PFS, DMFS, and LRFS between the IC+CCRT (148 patients) and CCRT (177 patients) groups. After matching, 103 paired patients were analyzed, and there were no differences between the IC+CCRT and CCRT groups regarding clinical outcomes. Based on the subgroup analysis of 156 very-high-risk patients (stage N2-3 with EBV DNA ≥4000 copies/ml), the 5-year OS of the IC+CCRT and CCRT groups was 84.3% and 67.5% (P =0.033), respectively. Based on our multivariate analysis, the treatment group was significantly associated with OS (P=0.034; HR0.451, 95%CI 0.216-0.941). Conclusions IC+CCRT did not improve the clinical outcomes of high-risk NPC patients compared to CCRT alone. However, in very-high-risk patients, IC+CCRT treatment led to increased OS compared to patients received CCRT treatment alone. PMID:27105538

  4. Quadruplex MAPH: improvement of throughput in high-resolution copy number screening

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Jess; Majerus, Tamsin MO; Walker, Susan; Armour, John AL

    2009-01-01

    Background Copy number variation (CNV) in the human genome is recognised as a widespread and important source of human genetic variation. Now the challenge is to screen for these CNVs at high resolution in a reliable, accurate and cost-effective way. Results Multiplex Amplifiable Probe Hybridisation (MAPH) is a sensitive, high-resolution technology appropriate for screening for CNVs in a defined region, for a targeted population. We have developed MAPH to a highly multiplexed format ("QuadMAPH") that allows the user a four-fold increase in the number of loci tested simultaneously. We have used this method to analyse a genomic region of 210 kb, including the MSH2 gene and 120 kb of flanking DNA. We show that the QuadMAPH probes report copy number with equivalent accuracy to simplex MAPH, reliably demonstrating diploid copy number in control samples and accurately detecting deletions in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) samples. Conclusion QuadMAPH is an accurate, high-resolution method that allows targeted screening of large numbers of subjects without the expense of genome-wide approaches. Whilst we have applied this technique to a region of the human genome, it is equally applicable to the genomes of other organisms. PMID:19785739

  5. DNA Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Explains a method to enable students to understand DNA and protein synthesis using model-building and role-playing. Acquaints students with the triplet code and transcription. Includes copies of the charts used in this technique. (DDR)

  6. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  7. Using copy milling technology in restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E A

    1997-03-01

    A technique for the fabrication of copy milled ceramic restorations has been presented. Both direct and indirect fabrication techniques of inlays, onlays, veneers, and crowns are possible. A copy milling machine can mill accurately fitting restorations with a marginal gap of 50 microns. The machine uses premanufactured porcelain blanks, which have improved physical properties over conventional porcelains used in standard techniques. Recently, the ability to mill In-Ceram crowns from presintered alumina blocks and Spinell crowns from alumina/magnesia blocks has been added to the system. The copings are veneered with aluminous porcelain as in the conventional In-Ceram technique.

  8. Lake sediment multi-taxon DNA from North Greenland records early post-glacial appearance of vascular plants and accurately tracks environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, L. S.; Gussarova, G.; Boessenkool, S.; Olsen, J.; Haile, J.; Schrøder-Nielsen, A.; Ludikova, A.; Hassel, K.; Stenøien, H. K.; Funder, S.; Willerslev, E.; Kjær, K.; Brochmann, C.

    2015-06-01

    High Arctic environments are particularly sensitive to climate changes, but retrieval of paleoecological data is challenging due to low productivity and biomass. At the same time, Arctic soils and sediments have proven exceptional for long-term DNA preservation due to their constantly low temperatures. Lake sediments contain DNA paleorecords of the surrounding ecosystems and can be used to retrieve a variety of organismal groups from a single sample. In this study, we analyzed vascular plant, bryophyte, algal (in particular diatom) and copepod DNA retrieved from a sediment core spanning the Holocene, taken from Bliss Lake on the northernmost coast of Greenland. A previous multi-proxy study including microscopic diatom analyses showed that this lake experienced changes between marine and lacustrine conditions. We inferred the same environmental changes from algal DNA preserved in the sediment core. Our DNA record was stratigraphically coherent, with no indication of leaching between layers, and our cross-taxon comparisons were in accordance with previously inferred local ecosystem changes. Authentic ancient plant DNA was retrieved from nearly all layers, both from the marine and the limnic phases, and distinct temporal changes in plant presence were recovered. The plant DNA was mostly in agreement with expected vegetation history, but very early occurrences of vascular plants, including the woody Empetrum nigrum, document terrestrial vegetation very shortly after glacial retreat. Our study shows that multi-taxon metabarcoding of sedimentary ancient DNA from lake cores is a valuable tool both for terrestrial and aquatic paleoecology, even in low-productivity ecosystems such as the High Arctic.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles-cooperated fluorescence sensor for sensitive and accurate detection of DNA methyltransferase activity coupled with exonuclease III-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Zhang, Youna; Xu, Shuling; Li, Haibo; Wang, Lei; Li, Rui; Zhang, Yuanfu; Yue, Qiaoli; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Huaisheng

    2015-11-21

    A fluorescence magnetic biosensor for the DNA methyltransferase activity was developed based on the cooperative amplification by combining the magnetic nanoparticles synergistic exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted circular exponential amplification and a supramolecular structure ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex. First, a duplex DNA probe, which was constructed by the hybridization of a quadruplex-forming oligomer with a molecular beacon, was assembled on the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a reporter. A hairpin probe (HP)-containing sequence of GATC was used as the methylation substrate of DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM). Once HP was methylated by DAM, it could be recognized and cleaved by Dpn I, which allows the release of a single-stranded DNA. The DNA (tDNA1) then hybridizes to the MNP probe, which then triggers the exonuclease III-mediated target exponential recycling reaction. Simultaneously, numerous quadruplex forming oligomers are liberated and folded into the G-quadruplex-ZnPPIX complexes with the help of zinc(ii)-protoporphyrin IX(ZnPPIX) on the MNP surface to give a remarkable fluorescence response. In the developed sensor, a small amount of target DAM can be converted to a large number of stable DNA triggers, leading to remarkable amplification of the target. Moreover, using MNPs as a vector of the sensor may reduce the interference from the real samples, which increases the anti-interference of the sensing system. Based on this unique amplification strategy, a very low detection limit down to 2.0 × 10(-4) U mL(-1) was obtained. Furthermore, the sensor could be used to evaluate the DAM activity in different growth stages of E. coli cells and screen Dam MTase inhibitors. Therefore, the strategy proposed here provides a promising platform for monitoring the activity and inhibition of DNA MTases and has great potential to be applied further in early clinical diagnostics and medical research.

  10. Influence of storage time on DNA of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for accurate detection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Rong, C Z; Zhao, J Y; Lao, X J; Xie, L; Li, S; Qin, X

    2016-01-01

    The shipment and storage conditions of clinical samples pose a major challenge to the detection accuracy of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) when using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of storage time at 4°C on the DNA of these pathogens and its effect on their detection by qRT-PCR. CT, NG, and UU positive genital swabs from 70 patients were collected, and DNA of all samples were extracted and divided into eight aliquots. One aliquot was immediately analyzed with qRT-PCR to assess the initial pathogen load, whereas the remaining samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. No significant differences in CT, NG, and UU DNA loads were observed between baseline (day 0) and the subsequent time points (days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28) in any of the 70 samples. Although a slight increase in DNA levels was observed at day 28 compared to day 0, paired sample t-test results revealed no significant differences between the mean DNA levels at different time points following storage at 4°C (all P>0.05). Overall, the CT, UU, and NG DNA loads from all genital swab samples were stable at 4°C over a 28-day period. PMID:27580005

  11. Influence of storage time on DNA of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for accurate detection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Rong, C Z; Zhao, J Y; Lao, X J; Xie, L; Li, S; Qin, X

    2016-08-25

    The shipment and storage conditions of clinical samples pose a major challenge to the detection accuracy of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) when using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of storage time at 4°C on the DNA of these pathogens and its effect on their detection by qRT-PCR. CT, NG, and UU positive genital swabs from 70 patients were collected, and DNA of all samples were extracted and divided into eight aliquots. One aliquot was immediately analyzed with qRT-PCR to assess the initial pathogen load, whereas the remaining samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. No significant differences in CT, NG, and UU DNA loads were observed between baseline (day 0) and the subsequent time points (days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28) in any of the 70 samples. Although a slight increase in DNA levels was observed at day 28 compared to day 0, paired sample t-test results revealed no significant differences between the mean DNA levels at different time points following storage at 4°C (all P>0.05). Overall, the CT, UU, and NG DNA loads from all genital swab samples were stable at 4°C over a 28-day period.

  12. Influence of storage time on DNA of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for accurate detection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y.; Rong, C.Z.; Zhao, J.Y.; Lao, X.J.; Xie, L.; Li, S.; Qin, X.

    2016-01-01

    The shipment and storage conditions of clinical samples pose a major challenge to the detection accuracy of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) when using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of storage time at 4°C on the DNA of these pathogens and its effect on their detection by qRT-PCR. CT, NG, and UU positive genital swabs from 70 patients were collected, and DNA of all samples were extracted and divided into eight aliquots. One aliquot was immediately analyzed with qRT-PCR to assess the initial pathogen load, whereas the remaining samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. No significant differences in CT, NG, and UU DNA loads were observed between baseline (day 0) and the subsequent time points (days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28) in any of the 70 samples. Although a slight increase in DNA levels was observed at day 28 compared to day 0, paired sample t-test results revealed no significant differences between the mean DNA levels at different time points following storage at 4°C (all P>0.05). Overall, the CT, UU, and NG DNA loads from all genital swab samples were stable at 4°C over a 28-day period. PMID:27580005

  13. Mitochondrial copy number and risk of breast cancer: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Platek, Mary; Mahasneh, Amjad; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the copy number of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) per cell reflects gene–environment interactions between unknown hereditary factors and exposures affecting levels of oxidative stress. However, whether copy number of mtDNA could be a risk predictor of oxidative stress-related human cancers, such as breast cancer, remains to be determined. To explore the role of mtDNA copy number in breast cancer etiology, we analyzed mtDNA copy number in whole blood from 103 patients with breast cancer and 103 matched control subjects and examined in relation to endogenous antioxidants. Case patients with breast cancer had a statistically significantly higher mtDNA copy number than control subjects (median: 1.29 vs. 0.80, P < 0.01). High mtDNA copy number (above the median in controls) was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of breast cancer, compared with low copy number (Odds ratio (OR) = 4.67, 95% CI: 2.45–8.92), with a statistically significant dose–response relationship in trend analysis (P < 0.01). Moreover, mtDNA copy number was significantly inversely associated with several important endogenous oxidants and antioxidants in blood in either the cases (total glutathione, CuZn-SOD activity and myeloperoxidase (MPO)) or the controls (catalase (CAT) activity). These results suggest the mtDNA copy number could be associated with risk of breast cancer, perhaps through an oxidative stress mechanism. PMID:19788937

  14. A highly accurate heuristic algorithm for the haplotype assembly problem

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common form of genetic variation in human DNA. The sequence of SNPs in each of the two copies of a given chromosome in a diploid organism is referred to as a haplotype. Haplotype information has many applications such as gene disease diagnoses, drug design, etc. The haplotype assembly problem is defined as follows: Given a set of fragments sequenced from the two copies of a chromosome of a single individual, and their locations in the chromosome, which can be pre-determined by aligning the fragments to a reference DNA sequence, the goal here is to reconstruct two haplotypes (h1, h2) from the input fragments. Existing algorithms do not work well when the error rate of fragments is high. Here we design an algorithm that can give accurate solutions, even if the error rate of fragments is high. Results We first give a dynamic programming algorithm that can give exact solutions to the haplotype assembly problem. The time complexity of the algorithm is O(n × 2t × t), where n is the number of SNPs, and t is the maximum coverage of a SNP site. The algorithm is slow when t is large. To solve the problem when t is large, we further propose a heuristic algorithm on the basis of the dynamic programming algorithm. Experiments show that our heuristic algorithm can give very accurate solutions. Conclusions We have tested our algorithm on a set of benchmark datasets. Experiments show that our algorithm can give very accurate solutions. It outperforms most of the existing programs when the error rate of the input fragments is high. PMID:23445458

  15. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    Lanman, Richard B; Mortimer, Stefanie A; Zill, Oliver A; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A; Divers, Stephen G; Hoon, Dave S B; Kopetz, E Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G; Baca, Arthur M; Kermani, Bahram G; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital Sequencing™ is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient's cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing.

  16. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Oliver A.; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A.; Divers, Stephen G.; Hoon, Dave S. B.; Kopetz, E. Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G.; Baca, Arthur M.; Kermani, Bahram G.; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital SequencingTM is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient’s cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing. PMID:26474073

  17. Conditionally Amplifiable BACs: Switching From Single-Copy to High-Copy Vectors and Genomic Clones

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Jadwiga; Hradecna, Zdenka; Szybalski, Waclaw

    2002-01-01

    The widely used, very-low-copy BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) vectors are the mainstay of present genomic research. The principal advantage of BACs is the high stability of inserted clones, but an important disadvantage is the low yield of DNA, both for vectors alone and when carrying genomic inserts. We describe here a novel class of single-copy/high-copy (SC/HC) pBAC/oriV vectors that retain all the advantages of low-copy BAC vectors, but are endowed with a conditional and tightly controlled oriV/TrfA amplification system that allows: (1) a yield of ∼100 copies of the vector per host cell when conditionally induced with l-arabinose, and (2) analogous DNA amplification (only upon induction and with copy number depending on the insert size) of pBAC/oriV clones carrying >100-kb inserts. Amplifiable clones and libraries facilitate high-throughput DNA sequencing and other applications requiring HC plasmid DNA. To turn on DNA amplification, which is driven by the oriV origin of replication, we used copy-up mutations in the gene trfA whose expression was very tightly controlled by the araC–ParaBAD promoter/regulator system. This system is inducible by l-arabinose, and could be further regulated by glucose and fucose. Amplification of DNA upon induction with l-arabinose and its modulation by glucose are robust and reliable. Furthermore, we discovered that addition of 0.2% d-glucose to the growth medium helped toward the objective of obtaining a real SC state for all BAC systems, thus enhancing the stability of their maintenance, which became equivalent to cloning into the host chromosome. [The following individuals kindly provided reagents, samples or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: F.R. Blattner D. Helinski, S. Valla, F. Schomburg, C. Small, R. Bogden, C. Gaskins, M.P. Mayer, D.C. Schwartz, and O. Azzam.] PMID:12213781

  18. Copying Machine Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Manufacturer of the Model 2210 copying machine was looking for a plastic valve bushing material that could be produced by a low-cost injection molding process to replace the unsuitable valve bushing they were using. NERAC conducted a computer search of the NASA database and was able to supply Nashua Corporation with several technical reports in their area of interest. Information aided the company's development of a urethane valve bushing which solved the problem and created a dramatic reduction in unit cost.

  19. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  20. Eclipse period of R1 plasmids during downshift from elevated copy number: Nonrandom selection of copies for replication.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan A; Berg, Otto; Nordström, Kurt; Dasgupta, Santanu

    2012-03-01

    The classical Meselson-Stahl density-shift method was used to study replication of pOU71, a runaway-replication derivative of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli. The miniplasmid maintained the normal low copy number of R1 during steady growth at 30°C, but as growth temperatures were raised above 34°C, the copy number of the plasmid increased to higher levels, and at 42°C, it replicated without control in a runaway replication mode with lethal consequences for the host. The eclipse periods (minimum time between successive replication of the same DNA) of the plasmid shortened with rising copy numbers at increasing growth temperatures (Olsson et al., 2003). In this work, eclipse periods were measured during downshifts in copy number of pOU71 after it had replicated at 39 and 42°C, resulting in 7- and 50-fold higher than normal plasmid copy number per cell, respectively. Eclipse periods for plasmid replication, measured during copy number downshift, suggested that plasmid R1, normally selected randomly for replication, showed a bias such that a newly replicated DNA had a higher probability of replication compared to the bulk of the R1 population. However, even the unexpected nonrandom replication followed the copy number kinetics such that every generation, the plasmids underwent the normal inherited number of replication, n, independent of the actual number of plasmid copies in a newborn cell.

  1. The Solid Gold Copy Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riblet, Carl, Jr.

    This book discusses the role of the newspaper copy editor on a daily newspaper and contains lessons instructing editors on how to prepare copy for print. The book is specifically designed to polish the skills of the already experienced newspaper copy editor, although a beginner will find the lessons useful and instructive. Contained in the lessons…

  2. CalMaTe: a method and software to improve allele-specific copy number of SNP arrays for downstream segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Aramburu, Ander; Bengtsson, Henrik; Neuvial, Pierre; Rubio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Summary: CalMaTe calibrates preprocessed allele-specific copy number estimates (ASCNs) from DNA microarrays by controlling for single-nucleotide polymorphism-specific allelic crosstalk. The resulting ASCNs are on average more accurate, which increases the power of segmentation methods for detecting changes between copy number states in tumor studies including copy neutral loss of heterozygosity. CalMaTe applies to any ASCNs regardless of preprocessing method and microarray technology, e.g. Affymetrix and Illumina. Availability: The method is available on CRAN (http://cran.r-project.org/) in the open-source R package calmate, which also includes an add-on to the Aroma Project framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/). Contact: arubio@ceit.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22576175

  3. Structure and dynamics of near-threshold leptons driven by dipolar interactions: an accurate computational study for the DNA purinic bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carelli, Fabio; Gianturco, Francesco Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of low-energy scattering electrons/positrons with molecular targets characterized by a "supercritical" permanent dipole moment (≳2.0 D) presents special physical characteristics that affect their spatial distributions, around the nuclear network of the molecular partners, both above and below the energy thresholds. Such special states are described as either dipole scattering states (DSS) above thresholds or as dipole bound states (DBS) below thresholds. The details of their respective behaviour will be presented and discussed in this work in the case of the purinic DNA bases of adenine and guanine. The behavior of the additional electron, in particular, will be discussed in detail by providing new computational results that will be related to the findings from recent experiments on the same DNA bases, confirming the transient electron's behaviour surmised by them. This work is affectionately dedicated to Michael Allan on the occasion of his official retirement. We wish to this dear friend and outstanding scientist many years to come in the happy pursuit of his many scientific interests.Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  4. DNA studies are necessary for accurate patient diagnosis in compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) with deletional or nondeletional α-thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Kho, Siew Leng; Ngim, Chin Fang; Chua, Kek Heng; Goh, Ai Sim; Yeoh, Seoh Leng; George, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) interacts with deletional and nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations to produce HbH disorders with varying clinical manifestations from asymptomatic to severe anaemia with significant hepatosplenomegaly. Hb Adana carriers are generally asymptomatic and haemoglobin subtyping is unable to detect this highly unstable α-haemoglobin variant. This study identified 13 patients with compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana with either the 3.7 kb gene deletion (-α(3.7)), Hb Constant Spring (HbCS) (HBA2:c.427T>C) or Hb Paksé (HBA2:429A>T). Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System was used for the detection of five deletional and six nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations. Duplex-PCR was used to confirm Hb Paksé and HbCS. Results showed 84.6% of the Hb Adana patients were Malays. Using DNA studies, compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana and HbCS (α(codon 59)α/α(CS)α) was confirmed in 11 patients. A novel point in this investigation was that DNA studies confirmed Hb Paksé for the first time in a Malaysian patient (α(codon 59)α/α(Paksé)α) after nine years of being misdiagnosis with Hb Adana and HbCS (α(codon 59)α/α(CS)α). Thus, the reliance on haematology studies and Hb subtyping to detect Hb variants is inadequate in countries where thalassaemia is prevalent and caused by a wide spectrum of mutations. PMID:27271331

  5. DNA studies are necessary for accurate patient diagnosis in compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) with deletional or nondeletional α-thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Kho, Siew Leng; Ngim, Chin Fang; Chua, Kek Heng; Goh, Ai Sim; Yeoh, Seoh Leng; George, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) interacts with deletional and nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations to produce HbH disorders with varying clinical manifestations from asymptomatic to severe anaemia with significant hepatosplenomegaly. Hb Adana carriers are generally asymptomatic and haemoglobin subtyping is unable to detect this highly unstable α-haemoglobin variant. This study identified 13 patients with compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana with either the 3.7 kb gene deletion (-α3.7), Hb Constant Spring (HbCS) (HBA2:c.427T>C) or Hb Paksé (HBA2:429A>T). Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System was used for the detection of five deletional and six nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations. Duplex-PCR was used to confirm Hb Paksé and HbCS. Results showed 84.6% of the Hb Adana patients were Malays. Using DNA studies, compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana and HbCS (αcodon 59α/αCSα) was confirmed in 11 patients. A novel point in this investigation was that DNA studies confirmed Hb Paksé for the first time in a Malaysian patient (αcodon 59α/αPakséα) after nine years of being misdiagnosis with Hb Adana and HbCS (αcodon 59α/αCSα). Thus, the reliance on haematology studies and Hb subtyping to detect Hb variants is inadequate in countries where thalassaemia is prevalent and caused by a wide spectrum of mutations. PMID:27271331

  6. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  7. Polymerase chain reaction amplifying mycobacterial DNA from aspirates obtained by endoscopic ultrasound allows accurate diagnosis of mycobacterial disease in HIV-positive patients with abdominal lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Nieuwoudt, Martin; Lameris, Roeland; Corcoran, Craig; Rossouw, Theresa M; Slavik, Tomas; Du Plessis, Johannie; Omoshoro-Jones, Jones A O; Stivaktas, Paraskevi; Potgieter, Fritz; Van der Merwe, Schalk W

    2014-09-01

    Abdominal lymphadenopathy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a diagnostic challenge. We performed a prospective cohort study by recruiting 31 symptomatic HIV + patients with abdominal lymphadenopathy and assessing the diagnostic yield of endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). Mean age was 38 years; 52% were female; and mean CD4 count and viral load were 124 cells/μL and 4 log, respectively. EUS confirmed additional mediastinal nodes in 26%. The porta hepatis was the most common abdominal site. Aspirates obtained by EUS-FNA were subjected to cytology, culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Mycobacterial infections were confirmed in 67.7%, and 31% had reactive lymphadenopathy. Cytology and culture had low sensitivity, whereas PCR identified 90% of mycobacterial infections. By combining the appearance of aspirates obtained by EUS-FNA and cytologic specimens, we developed a diagnostic algorithm to indicate when analysis with PCR would be useful. PCR performed on material obtained by EUS-FNA was highly accurate in confirming mycobacterial disease and determining genotypic drug resistance.

  8. 12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-50, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF DISCHARGE BASIN. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  9. 11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-1950, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF UPSTREAM WING WALLS. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  10. High-Throughput Amplicon-Based Copy Number Detection of 11 Genes in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Ovarian Tumour Samples by MLPA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Kondrashova, Olga; Love, Clare J; Lunke, Sebastian; Hsu, Arthur L; Waring, Paul M; Taylor, Graham R

    2015-01-01

    Whilst next generation sequencing can report point mutations in fixed tissue tumour samples reliably, the accurate determination of copy number is more challenging. The conventional Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is an effective tool for measurement of gene dosage, but is restricted to around 50 targets due to size resolution of the MLPA probes. By switching from a size-resolved format, to a sequence-resolved format we developed a scalable, high-throughput, quantitative assay. MLPA-seq is capable of detecting deletions, duplications, and amplifications in as little as 5ng of genomic DNA, including from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour samples. We show that this method can detect BRCA1, BRCA2, ERBB2 and CCNE1 copy number changes in DNA extracted from snap-frozen and FFPE tumour tissue, with 100% sensitivity and >99.5% specificity.

  11. High-Throughput Amplicon-Based Copy Number Detection of 11 Genes in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Ovarian Tumour Samples by MLPA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Kondrashova, Olga; Love, Clare J; Lunke, Sebastian; Hsu, Arthur L; Waring, Paul M; Taylor, Graham R

    2015-01-01

    Whilst next generation sequencing can report point mutations in fixed tissue tumour samples reliably, the accurate determination of copy number is more challenging. The conventional Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is an effective tool for measurement of gene dosage, but is restricted to around 50 targets due to size resolution of the MLPA probes. By switching from a size-resolved format, to a sequence-resolved format we developed a scalable, high-throughput, quantitative assay. MLPA-seq is capable of detecting deletions, duplications, and amplifications in as little as 5ng of genomic DNA, including from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour samples. We show that this method can detect BRCA1, BRCA2, ERBB2 and CCNE1 copy number changes in DNA extracted from snap-frozen and FFPE tumour tissue, with 100% sensitivity and >99.5% specificity. PMID:26569395

  12. High-Throughput Amplicon-Based Copy Number Detection of 11 Genes in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Ovarian Tumour Samples by MLPA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashova, Olga; Love, Clare J.; Lunke, Sebastian; Hsu, Arthur L.; Waring, Paul M.; Taylor, Graham R.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst next generation sequencing can report point mutations in fixed tissue tumour samples reliably, the accurate determination of copy number is more challenging. The conventional Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is an effective tool for measurement of gene dosage, but is restricted to around 50 targets due to size resolution of the MLPA probes. By switching from a size-resolved format, to a sequence-resolved format we developed a scalable, high-throughput, quantitative assay. MLPA-seq is capable of detecting deletions, duplications, and amplifications in as little as 5ng of genomic DNA, including from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour samples. We show that this method can detect BRCA1, BRCA2, ERBB2 and CCNE1 copy number changes in DNA extracted from snap-frozen and FFPE tumour tissue, with 100% sensitivity and >99.5% specificity. PMID:26569395

  13. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  14. Principles and Concepts of DNA Replication in Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Michael; Langston, Lance; Stillman, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The accurate copying of genetic information in the double helix of DNA is essential for inheritance of traits that define the phenotype of cells and the organism. The core machineries that copy DNA are conserved in all three domains of life: bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. This article outlines the general nature of the DNA replication machinery, but also points out important and key differences. The most complex organisms, eukaryotes, have to coordinate the initiation of DNA replication from many origins in each genome and impose regulation that maintains genomic integrity, not only for the sake of each cell, but for the organism as a whole. In addition, DNA replication in eukaryotes needs to be coordinated with inheritance of chromatin, developmental patterning of tissues, and cell division to ensure that the genome replicates once per cell division cycle. PMID:23818497

  15. Principles and concepts of DNA replication in bacteria, archaea, and eukarya.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Michael; Langston, Lance; Stillman, Bruce

    2013-07-01

    The accurate copying of genetic information in the double helix of DNA is essential for inheritance of traits that define the phenotype of cells and the organism. The core machineries that copy DNA are conserved in all three domains of life: bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. This article outlines the general nature of the DNA replication machinery, but also points out important and key differences. The most complex organisms, eukaryotes, have to coordinate the initiation of DNA replication from many origins in each genome and impose regulation that maintains genomic integrity, not only for the sake of each cell, but for the organism as a whole. In addition, DNA replication in eukaryotes needs to be coordinated with inheritance of chromatin, developmental patterning of tissues, and cell division to ensure that the genome replicates once per cell division cycle. PMID:23818497

  16. Digital Genotyping of Macrosatellites and Multicopy Genes Reveals Novel Biological Functions Associated with Copy Number Variation of Large Tandem Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Quilez, Javier; Hasson, Dan; Borel, Christelle; Warburton, Peter; Sharp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5–10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality ‘finished’ human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed “repeat induced gene silencing”, which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their role in

  17. 10. Photographic copy of copy of original construction drawing, dated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photographic copy of copy of original construction drawing, dated 1899?. Original in possession of Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Company, Ordway, Colorado. PLAN OF DAM AND HEAD GATES FOR THE TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  18. Counting copy number and calories.

    PubMed

    White, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) at several genomic loci has been associated with different human traits and diseases, but in many cases the findings could not be replicated. A new study provides insights into the degree of variation present at the amylase locus and calls into question a previous association between amylase copy number and body mass index. PMID:26220133

  19. Microarray analysis of copy number variation in single cells.

    PubMed

    Konings, Peter; Vanneste, Evelyne; Jackmaert, Sigrun; Ampe, Michèle; Verbeke, Geert; Moreau, Yves; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Voet, Thierry

    2012-02-01

    We present a protocol for reliably detecting DNA copy number aberrations in a single human cell. Multiple displacement-amplified DNAs of a cell are hybridized to a 3,000-bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array and to an Affymetrix 250,000 (250K)-SNP array. Subsequent copy number calling is based on the integration of BAC probe-specific copy number probabilities that are estimated by comparing probe intensities with a single-cell whole-genome amplification (WGA) reference model for diploid chromosomes, as well as SNP copy number and loss-of-heterozygosity states estimated by hidden Markov models (HMM). All methods for detecting DNA copy number aberrations in single human cells have difficulty in confidently discriminating WGA artifacts from true genetic variants. Furthermore, some methods lack thorough validation for segmental DNA imbalance detection. Our protocol minimizes false-positive variant calling and enables uniparental isodisomy detection in single cells. Additionally, it provides quality assessment, allowing the exclusion of uninterpretable single-cell WGA samples. The protocol takes 5-7 d. PMID:22262009

  20. Global variation in copy number in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Redon, Richard; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Fitch, Karen R.; Feuk, Lars; Perry, George H.; Andrews, T. Daniel; Fiegler, Heike; Shapero, Michael H.; Carson, Andrew R.; Chen, Wenwei; Cho, Eun Kyung; Dallaire, Stephanie; Freeman, Jennifer L.; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Gratacos, Monica; Huang, Jing; Kalaitzopoulos, Dimitrios; Komura, Daisuke; MacDonald, Jeffrey R.; Marshall, Christian R.; Mei, Rui; Montgomery, Lyndal; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Okamura, Kohji; Shen, Fan; Somerville, Martin J.; Tchinda, Joelle; Valsesia, Armand; Woodwark, Cara; Yang, Fengtang; Zhang, Junjun; Zerjal, Tatiana; Zhang, Jane; Armengol, Lluis; Conrad, Donald F.; Estivill, Xavier; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Carter, Nigel P.; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Lee, Charles; Jones, Keith W.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2009-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) of DNA sequences is functionally significant but has yet to be fully ascertained. We have constructed a first-generation CNV map of the human genome through the study of 270 individuals from four populations with ancestry in Europe, Africa or Asia (the HapMap collection). DNA from these individuals was screened for CNV using two complementary technologies: single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays, and clone-based comparative genomic hybridization. 1,447 copy number variable regions covering 360 megabases (12% of the genome) were identified in these populations; these CNV regions contained hundreds of genes, disease loci, functional elements and segmental duplications. Strikingly, these CNVs encompassed more nucleotide content per genome than SNPs, underscoring the importance of CNV in genetic diversity and evolution. The data obtained delineate linkage disequilibrium patterns for many CNVs, and reveal dramatic variation in copy number among populations. We also demonstrate the utility of this resource for genetic disease studies. PMID:17122850

  1. 36 CFR 1290.6 - Originals and copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Records Collection; (6) In the case of machine-readable information, a true and accurate copy of the original (duplicating all information contained in the original and in a format that permits retrieval of the information), may be placed in the JFK Assassination Records Collection; and (7) In the case...

  2. Comparative analysis of a translocated copy of the trnK intron in carnivorous family Nepenthaceae.

    PubMed

    Meimberg, Harald; Thalhammer, Stefan; Brachmann, Andreas; Heubl, Günther

    2006-05-01

    During phylogenetic analysis of the Nepenthaceae cpDNA trnK intron, it became apparent that a second non-functional copy of the locus was present in most of the investigated taxa. The translocation event was older than the radiation of all recent Nepenthaceae, and the translocated pseudogenized copy was conserved in nearly all members of the plant family. Using single chloroplast PCR and inverse PCR, we could exclude a plastom location for the second copy. Although translocation into the nucleus is possible, mitochondrial localization seems more likely based on these data. In total, the translocated sequence contained at least 3525 base pairs (bp) that were homologous to the Spinacia oleracea chloroplast genome. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of the non-functional copy revealed a high amount of homoplasies compared to topologies from the cpDNA trnK intron phylogenetic reconstruction. Therefore, this copy proved to be insufficient for phylogenetic reconstruction of the family. Since two different paralogs of the non-functional copy were found in one species, it is feasible that different paralogs were conserved in different groups and that paralogous sequences were included in the data matrix. These data demonstrate that phylogenetic analyses of pseudogenized copies of phylogenetically relevant loci should be performed with great caution. In addition, pseudogenized copies can exist in nearly every member of a plant family, and can be PCR-amplified at levels comparable to the specific copy. In this case, the inclusion of such copies can easily remain unnoticed, thus leading to faulty hypotheses.

  3. How Y-Family DNA polymerase IV is more accurate than Dpo4 at dCTP insertion opposite an N2-dG adduct of benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Sholder, Gabriel; Creech, Amanda; Loechler, Edward L

    2015-11-01

    To bypass DNA damage, cells have Y-Family DNA polymerases (DNAPs). One Y-Family-class includes DNAP κ and DNAP IV, which accurately insert dCTP opposite N(2)-dG adducts, including from the carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BP). Another class includes DNAP η and DNAP V, which insert accurately opposite UV-damage, but inaccurately opposite BP-N(2)-dG. To investigate structural differences between Y-Family-classes, regions are swapped between DNAP IV (a κ/IV-class-member) and Dpo4 (a η/V-class-member); the kinetic consequences are evaluated via primer-extension studies with a BP-N(2)-dG-containing template. Four key structural elements are revealed. (1) Y-Family DNAPs have discreet non-covalent contacts between their little finger-domain (LF-Domain) and their catalytic core-domain (CC-Domain), which we call "non-covalent bridges" (NCBs). Arg37 and Arg38 in DNAP IV's CC-Domain near the active site form a non-covalent bridge (AS-NCB) by interacting with Glu251 and Asp252, respectively, in DNAP IV's LF-Domain. Without these interactions dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions increase. DNAP IV's AS-NCB suppresses misinsertions better than Dpo4's equivalent AS-NCB. (2) DNAP IV also suppresses dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions via a second non-covalent bridge, which is ∼8Å from the active site (Distal-NCB). Dpo4 has no Distal-NCB, rendering it inferior at dATP/dGTP/dTTP suppression. (3) dCTP insertion is facilitated by the larger minor groove opening near the active site in DNAP IV versus Dpo4, which is sensible given that Watson/Crick-like [dCTP:BP-N(2)-dG] pairing requires the BP-moiety to be in the minor groove. (4) Compared to Dpo4, DNAP IV has a smaller major groove opening, which suppresses dGTP misinsertion, implying BP-N(2)-dG bulk in the major groove during Hoogsteen syn-adduct-dG:dGTP pairing. In summary, DNAP IV has a large minor groove opening to enhance dCTP insertion, a plugged major groove opening to suppress dGTP misinsertion, and two non-covalent bridges (near and distal

  4. Plasmid Copy Number Determination by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Anindyajati; Artarini, A Anita; Riani, Catur; Retnoningrum, Debbie S

    2016-01-01

    that both primer pairs were acceptable and were predicted to have good performance. Those predictions were in agreement with the in vitro test that gave a single band in the PCR product's electropherogram and a single peak in DNA amplicon's melting curve with a Tm value of 79.01 ± 0.11°C for the tdk primer and 81.53 ± 0.29°C for the ori primer. The efficiency of each primer was 1.95 and 1.97, respectively. The calculation result of pCAD's copy number was 13.1 ± 0.3 copies/cell, showing that pCAD's low copy number has been determined and confirmed. Meanwhile, it was 576.3 ± 91.9 copies/cell for pJExpress414-sod, in accordance with the hypothesis that pUC ori regulates the high copy number plasmid. In conclusion, the designed primers and qPCR conditions used in this study can be used to determine plasmid copy number for plasmids with pBR322 and pUC ori. The method should be tested further on plasmids harboring other type of ori. PMID:27110501

  5. The role of mutation in genetic copy number variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. K.; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean number of genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  6. Chromosome Conformation Capture Carbon Copy (5C) in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Belton, Jon-Matthew; Dekker, Job

    2015-06-01

    Chromosome conformation capture carbon copy (5C) is a high-throughput method for detecting ligation products of interest in a chromosome conformation capture (3C) library. 5C uses ligation-mediated amplification (LMA) to generate carbon copies of 3C ligation product junctions using single-stranded oligonucleotide probes. This procedure produces a 5C library of short DNA molecules which represent the interactions between the corresponding restriction fragments. The 5C library can be amplified using universal primers containing the Illumina paired-end adaptor sequences for subsequent high-throughput sequencing.

  7. Thermostable and site-specific DNA binding of the gene product ORF56 from the Sulfolobus islandicus plasmid pRN1, a putative archael plasmid copy control protein

    PubMed Central

    Lipps, Georg; Stegert, Mario; Krauss, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    There is still a lack of information on the specific characteristics of DNA-binding proteins from hyperthermophiles. Here we report on the product of the gene orf56 from plasmid pRN1 of the acidophilic and thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. orf56 has not been characterised yet but low sequence similarily to several eubacterial plasmid-encoded genes suggests that this 6.5 kDa protein is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. The DNA-binding properties of ORF56, expressed in Escherichia coli, have been investigated by EMSA experiments and by fluorescence anisotropy measurements. Recombinant ORF56 binds to double-stranded DNA, specifically to an inverted repeat located within the promoter of orf56. Binding to this site could down-regulate transcription of the orf56 gene and also of the overlapping orf904 gene, encoding the putative initiator protein of plasmid replication. By gel filtration and chemical crosslinking we have shown that ORF56 is a dimeric protein. Stoichiometric fluorescence anisotropy titrations further indicate that ORF56 binds as a tetramer to the inverted repeat of its target binding site. CD spectroscopy points to a significant increase in ordered secondary structure of ORF56 upon binding DNA. ORF56 binds without apparent cooperativity to its target DNA with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range. Quantitative analysis of binding isotherms performed at various salt concentrations and at different temperatures indicates that approximately seven ions are released upon complex formation and that complex formation is accompanied by a change in heat capacity of –6.2 kJ/mol. Furthermore, recombinant ORF56 proved to be highly thermostable and is able to bind DNA up to 85°C. PMID:11160922

  8. Zero-Copy Objects System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Zero-Copy Objects System software enables application data to be encapsulated in layers of communication protocol without being copied. Indirect referencing enables application source data, either in memory or in a file, to be encapsulated in place within an unlimited number of protocol headers and/or trailers. Zero-copy objects (ZCOs) are abstract data access representations designed to minimize I/O (input/output) in the encapsulation of application source data within one or more layers of communication protocol structure. They are constructed within the heap space of a Simple Data Recorder (SDR) data store to which all participating layers of the stack must have access. Each ZCO contains general information enabling access to the core source data object (an item of application data), together with (a) a linked list of zero or more specific extents that reference portions of this source data object, and (b) linked lists of protocol header and trailer capsules. The concatenation of the headers (in ascending stack sequence), the source data object extents, and the trailers (in descending stack sequence) constitute the transmitted data object constructed from the ZCO. This scheme enables a source data object to be encapsulated in a succession of protocol layers without ever having to be copied from a buffer at one layer of the protocol stack to an encapsulating buffer at a lower layer of the stack. For large source data objects, the savings in copy time and reduction in memory consumption may be considerable.

  9. Retrotransposon mdg3 of Drosophila: General structure and functional domains of the full-length copy

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisov, S.N.; Ilyin, Yu.V.

    1995-09-01

    A full-length copy of the transposable element mdg3 from the plasmid clone Dm38 of Drosophila melanogaster was obtained by screening the DNA library of the cell culture 67J25D. Previous work demonstrated that only full-length copies of mdg3 (5.5 kb) are amplified in this culture, whereas the number of deleted copies probably has not changed since the cell line was established. We sequenced the full-length copy of mdg3 from cDm38 by the method described by Sanger. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. 1 CFR 18.5 - Certified copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certified copies. 18.5 Section 18.5 General... DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.5 Certified copies. The certified copies or duplicate originals of each document must be submitted with the original. Each copy or...

  11. SMASH, a fragmentation and sequencing method for genomic copy number analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zihua; Andrews, Peter; Kendall, Jude; Ma, Beicong; Hakker, Inessa; Rodgers, Linda; Ronemus, Michael; Wigler, Michael; Levy, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) underlie a significant amount of genetic diversity and disease. CNVs can be detected by a number of means, including chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS), but these approaches suffer from either limited resolution (CMA) or are highly expensive for routine screening (both CMA and WGS). As an alternative, we have developed a next-generation sequencing-based method for CNV analysis termed SMASH, for short multiply aggregated sequence homologies. SMASH utilizes random fragmentation of input genomic DNA to create chimeric sequence reads, from which multiple mappable tags can be parsed using maximal almost-unique matches (MAMs). The SMASH tags are then binned and segmented, generating a profile of genomic copy number at the desired resolution. Because fewer reads are necessary relative to WGS to give accurate CNV data, SMASH libraries can be highly multiplexed, allowing large numbers of individuals to be analyzed at low cost. Increased genomic resolution can be achieved by sequencing to higher depth. PMID:27197213

  12. Chromatic adaptation in hard copy/soft copy comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, Mark D.

    1993-06-01

    The human visual system has evolved with a sophisticated set of mechanisms to produce stable perceptions of object colors across changes in illumination. This phenomenon is typically referred to as chromatic adaptation or color constancy. When viewing scenes or hard-copy reproductions, it is generally assumed that one adapts almost completely to the color and luminance of the prevailing light source. This is likely not the case when soft-copy image displays are viewed. Differences in the degree of chromatic adaptation to hard-copy and soft- copy displays point to two types of chromatic-adaptation mechanisms: sensory and cognitive. Sensory mechanisms are those that act automatically in response to the stimulus, such as retinal gain control. Cognitive mechanisms are those that rely on observers' knowledge of scene content. A series of experiments that measured the spatial, temporal, and chromatic properties of chromatic-adaptation mechanisms are reviewed and a mathematical model for predicting these chromatic adaptation effects is briefly described along with some practical recommendations, based on psychophysical experiments, on how to approach these problems in typical cross-media color reproduction situations.

  13. Upregulation of TFAM and mitochondria copy number in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Sanjiban; D'Souza, Reena Reshma; Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada; Gopinath, Puthiya M; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are central to several physiological and pathological conditions in humans. In the present study, we performed copy number analysis of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and its representative lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). We have observed hyper diploid copies of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) gene in the LCLs along with increased mtDNA copy number, mitochondrial mass, intracellular ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting elevated mitochondrial biogenesis in LCLs. Gene expression analysis confirmed TFAM over-expression in LCLs when compared to PBMC. Based on our observation, we suggest that increased copy number of TFAM gene upregulates its expression, increases mtDNA copy numbers and protects it from oxidative stress induced damage in the transformed LCLs.

  14. FSHD: copy number variations on the theme of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cabianca, Daphne Selvaggia

    2010-01-01

    In humans, copy number variations (CNVs) are a common source of phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an important genetic disease caused by CNVs. It is an autosomal-dominant myopathy caused by a reduction in the copy number of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat located at chromosome 4q35. Interestingly, the reduction of D4Z4 copy number is not sufficient by itself to cause FSHD. A number of epigenetic events appear to affect the severity of the disease, its rate of progression, and the distribution of muscle weakness. Indeed, recent findings suggest that virtually all levels of epigenetic regulation, from DNA methylation to higher order chromosomal architecture, are altered at the disease locus, causing the de-regulation of 4q35 gene expression and ultimately FSHD. PMID:21149563

  15. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, Andre

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  16. A Robust Protocol for Using Multiplexed Droplet Digital PCR to Quantify Somatic Copy Number Alterations in Clinical Tissue Specimens.

    PubMed

    Hughesman, Curtis B; Lu, X J David; Liu, Kelly Y P; Zhu, Yuqi; Poh, Catherine F; Haynes, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The ability of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) to accurately determine the concentrations of amplifiable targets makes it a promising platform for measuring copy number alterations (CNAs) in genomic biomarkers. However, its application to clinical samples, particularly formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, will require strategies to reliably determine CNAs in DNA of limited quantity and quality. When applied to cancerous tissue, those methods must also account for global genetic instability and the associated probability that the abundance(s) of one or more chosen reference loci do not represent the average ploidy of cells comprising the specimen. Here we present an experimental design strategy and associated data analysis tool that enables accurate determination of CNAs in a panel of biomarkers using multiplexed ddPCR. The method includes strategies to optimize primer and probes design to cleanly segregate droplets in the data output from reaction wells amplifying multiple independent templates, and to correct for bias from artifacts such as DNA fragmentation. We demonstrate how a panel of reference loci can be used to determine a stable CNA-neutral benchmark. These innovations, when taken together, provide a comprehensive strategy that can be used to reliably detect biomarker CNAs in DNA extracted from either frozen or FFPE tissue biopsies.

  17. A Robust Protocol for Using Multiplexed Droplet Digital PCR to Quantify Somatic Copy Number Alterations in Clinical Tissue Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Hughesman, Curtis B.; Lu, X. J. David; Liu, Kelly Y. P.; Zhu, Yuqi; Poh, Catherine F.; Haynes, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The ability of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) to accurately determine the concentrations of amplifiable targets makes it a promising platform for measuring copy number alterations (CNAs) in genomic biomarkers. However, its application to clinical samples, particularly formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, will require strategies to reliably determine CNAs in DNA of limited quantity and quality. When applied to cancerous tissue, those methods must also account for global genetic instability and the associated probability that the abundance(s) of one or more chosen reference loci do not represent the average ploidy of cells comprising the specimen. Here we present an experimental design strategy and associated data analysis tool that enables accurate determination of CNAs in a panel of biomarkers using multiplexed ddPCR. The method includes strategies to optimize primer and probes design to cleanly segregate droplets in the data output from reaction wells amplifying multiple independent templates, and to correct for bias from artifacts such as DNA fragmentation. We demonstrate how a panel of reference loci can be used to determine a stable CNA-neutral benchmark. These innovations, when taken together, provide a comprehensive strategy that can be used to reliably detect biomarker CNAs in DNA extracted from either frozen or FFPE tissue biopsies. PMID:27537682

  18. A Robust Protocol for Using Multiplexed Droplet Digital PCR to Quantify Somatic Copy Number Alterations in Clinical Tissue Specimens.

    PubMed

    Hughesman, Curtis B; Lu, X J David; Liu, Kelly Y P; Zhu, Yuqi; Poh, Catherine F; Haynes, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The ability of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) to accurately determine the concentrations of amplifiable targets makes it a promising platform for measuring copy number alterations (CNAs) in genomic biomarkers. However, its application to clinical samples, particularly formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, will require strategies to reliably determine CNAs in DNA of limited quantity and quality. When applied to cancerous tissue, those methods must also account for global genetic instability and the associated probability that the abundance(s) of one or more chosen reference loci do not represent the average ploidy of cells comprising the specimen. Here we present an experimental design strategy and associated data analysis tool that enables accurate determination of CNAs in a panel of biomarkers using multiplexed ddPCR. The method includes strategies to optimize primer and probes design to cleanly segregate droplets in the data output from reaction wells amplifying multiple independent templates, and to correct for bias from artifacts such as DNA fragmentation. We demonstrate how a panel of reference loci can be used to determine a stable CNA-neutral benchmark. These innovations, when taken together, provide a comprehensive strategy that can be used to reliably detect biomarker CNAs in DNA extracted from either frozen or FFPE tissue biopsies. PMID:27537682

  19. Detection of the Remaining Files Copied from Removable Storage Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, Chikako; Andoh, Yuu; Nishida, Makoto

    This paper proposes a method for detecting remaining files copied from removable storage medium. The proposed method logs events that the database of a file system, “Folder”, is changed. The remaining file can be detected by tracing the sequence of logs using path/file-name matching. Our experimental result suggests that the proposed method can accurately detect remaining files left on the computer.

  20. Copy number variation and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    St Clair, David

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 12 months, a series of major articles have reported associations with schizophrenia of copy number variants at 1q21, 15q11.2, 15q13.3, 16p11.2, 22q12, and Neurexin 1 loci. These are rare high-penetrant mutations that increase risk not only of schizophrenia but also of a range of other psychiatric disorders including autism and mental retardation. In some cases, the same phenotype can occur irrespective of whether the copy number variant causes a deletion or duplication. Some of these mutations occur at very high rates in human populations, but because of reduced fecundity associated with major psychiatric disorders the overall frequency in the population remains low. These new findings raise fundamental clinical and scientific questions concerning classification of major neuropsychiatric disorders, modes of inheritance, diagnostics, and genetic counseling. Although the loci identified so far account for only a small proportion of cases, many more are likely to be discovered over the next few years. A major focus of research will be to identify the key, the genetic and environmental determinants of schizophrenia risk in carriers of these copy number variants, and to discover whether their rates of mutation are unstable or fixed. PMID:18990708

  1. 48 CFR 1501.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1501.105-3 Copies. Copies of the EPAAR in Federal Register and CFR form may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office (GPO), Washington,...

  2. 48 CFR 1501.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1501.105-3 Copies. Copies of the EPAAR in Federal Register and CFR form may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office (GPO), Washington,...

  3. Data analysis considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. In this article, we describe the steps needed to obtain reliable copy number predictions from degraded and contaminated FFPE samples.

  4. Bayesian Hierarchical Mixture Modelling to Assign Copy Number from a targeted CNV array

    PubMed Central

    Cardin, Niall; Holmes, Chris; Donnelly, Peter; Marchini, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Accurate assignment of copy number at known copy number variant (CNV) loci is important for both increasing understanding of the structural evolution of genomes as well as for carrying out association studies of copy number with disease. As with calling SNP genotypes, the task can be framed as a clustering problem but for a number of reasons assigning copy number is much more challenging. CNV-assays have lower signal to noise ratios than SNP assays, often display heavy tailed and asymmetric intensity distributions, contain outlying observations and may exhibit systematic technical differences among different cohorts. In addition, the number of copy-number classes at a CNV in the population may be unknown a priori. Due to these complications automatic and robust assignment of copy number from array data remains a challenging problem. We have developed a copy number assignment algorithm, CNVCALL, for a targeted CNV array, such as that used by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium’s recent CNV association study. We use a Bayesian hierarchical mixture model that robustly identifies both the number of different copy number classes at a specific locus as well as relative copy number for each individual in the sample. This approach is fully automated which is a critical requirement when analysing large numbers of CNVs. We illustrate the methods performance using real data from the WTCCC’s CNV association study and using simulated data. PMID:21769931

  5. 48 CFR 1501.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Copies. 1501.105-3 Section 1501.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL GENERAL Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1501.105-3 Copies. Copies of the EPAAR in Federal Register and CFR form...

  6. 48 CFR 1401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 1401.105-3 Section 1401.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1401.105-3 Copies. Copies of...

  7. 14 CFR 1206.207 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Copies. 1206.207 Section 1206.207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Records Available § 1206.207 Copies. The furnishing of a single copy of the...

  8. 14 CFR 1206.207 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies. 1206.207 Section 1206.207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Records Available § 1206.207 Copies. The furnishing of a single copy of the...

  9. Patterns, Correlates, and Reduction of Homework Copying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazzo, David J.; Lee, Young-Jin; Warnakulasooriya, Rasil; Pritchard, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Submissions to an online homework tutor were analyzed to determine whether they were copied. The fraction of copied submissions increased rapidly over the semester, as each weekly deadline approached and for problems later in each assignment. The majority of students, who copied less than 10% of their problems, worked steadily over the three days…

  10. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false File copies. 703.20 Section... Is Not a Party § 703.20 File copies. The Office of the General Counsel will maintain the official file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  11. 14 CFR § 1206.207 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Copies. § 1206.207 Section § 1206.207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Records Available § 1206.207 Copies. The furnishing of a single copy of the...

  12. 14 CFR 1206.207 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Copies. 1206.207 Section 1206.207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Records Available § 1206.207 Copies. The furnishing of a single copy of the...

  13. 14 CFR 1206.207 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Copies. 1206.207 Section 1206.207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Records Available § 1206.207 Copies. The furnishing of a single copy of the...

  14. 49 CFR 7.8 - Copies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies 7.8 Section 7.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Information Required To Be Made Public by DOT § 7.8 Copies Copies of any material covered by this subpart that is not published...

  15. 48 CFR 1.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1.105-3 Copies. Copies of the FAR in Federal Register, loose-leaf, CD-ROM and CFR form may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 1.105-3 Section...

  16. 48 CFR 3401.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.104-3 Copies. Copies of the EDAR in the Federal Register and Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) form may be purchased from the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 3401.104-3...

  17. 48 CFR 1001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TREASURY ACQUISITION REGULATORY (DTAR) SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1001.105-3 Copies. Copies of the DTAR in Federal Register or CFR form may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 1001.105-3...

  18. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies of the NRCAR in Federal Register and CFR form may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Copies. 2001.104-3...

  19. 48 CFR 901.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 901.104-3 Section 901.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 901.104-3 Copies. Copies of the DEAR published in the...

  20. 44 CFR 6.81 - Additional copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional copies. 6.81... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Fees § 6.81 Additional copies. A reasonable number of additional copies shall be provided for the applicable fee to a requestor who...

  1. 22 CFR 92.76 - Copying documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copying documents. 92.76 Section 92.76 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES NOTARIAL AND RELATED SERVICES Copying, Recording, Translating and Procuring Documents § 92.76 Copying documents. (a) Consular authority. The consular officer...

  2. 22 CFR 92.76 - Copying documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copying documents. 92.76 Section 92.76 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES NOTARIAL AND RELATED SERVICES Copying, Recording, Translating and Procuring Documents § 92.76 Copying documents. (a) Consular authority. The consular officer...

  3. 22 CFR 92.76 - Copying documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copying documents. 92.76 Section 92.76 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES NOTARIAL AND RELATED SERVICES Copying, Recording, Translating and Procuring Documents § 92.76 Copying documents. (a) Consular authority. The consular officer...

  4. 22 CFR 92.76 - Copying documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copying documents. 92.76 Section 92.76 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES NOTARIAL AND RELATED SERVICES Copying, Recording, Translating and Procuring Documents § 92.76 Copying documents. (a) Consular authority. The consular officer...

  5. 22 CFR 92.76 - Copying documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copying documents. 92.76 Section 92.76 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES NOTARIAL AND RELATED SERVICES Copying, Recording, Translating and Procuring Documents § 92.76 Copying documents. (a) Consular authority. The consular officer...

  6. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... H of 49 CFR part 7. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents...

  7. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... H of 49 CFR part 7. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents...

  8. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... H of 49 CFR part 7. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents...

  9. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... H of 49 CFR part 7. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents...

  10. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... H of 49 CFR part 7. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents...

  11. A method to accurately quantitate intensities of (32)P-DNA bands when multiple bands appear in a single lane of a gel is used to study dNTP insertion opposite a benzo[a]pyrene-dG adduct by Sulfolobus DNA polymerases Dpo4 and Dbh.

    PubMed

    Sholder, Gabriel; Loechler, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    Quantitating relative (32)P-band intensity in gels is desired, e.g., to study primer-extension kinetics of DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Following imaging, multiple (32)P-bands are often present in lanes. Though individual bands appear by eye to be simple and well-resolved, scanning reveals they are actually skewed-Gaussian in shape and neighboring bands are overlapping, which complicates quantitation, because slower migrating bands often have considerable contributions from the trailing edges of faster migrating bands. A method is described to accurately quantitate adjacent (32)P-bands, which relies on having a standard: a simple skewed-Gaussian curve from an analogous pure, single-component band (e.g., primer alone). This single-component scan/curve is superimposed on its corresponding band in an experimentally determined scan/curve containing multiple bands (e.g., generated in a primer-extension reaction); intensity exceeding the single-component scan/curve is attributed to other components (e.g., insertion products). Relative areas/intensities are determined via pixel analysis, from which relative molarity of components is computed. Common software is used. Commonly used alternative methods (e.g., drawing boxes around bands) are shown to be less accurate. Our method was used to study kinetics of dNTP primer-extension opposite a benzo[a]pyrene-N(2)-dG-adduct with four DNAPs, including Sulfolobus solfataricus Dpo4 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Dbh. Vmax/Km is similar for correct dCTP insertion with Dpo4 and Dbh. Compared to Dpo4, Dbh misinsertion is slower for dATP (∼20-fold), dGTP (∼110-fold) and dTTP (∼6-fold), due to decreases in Vmax. These findings provide support that Dbh is in the same Y-Family DNAP class as eukaryotic DNAP κ and bacterial DNAP IV, which accurately bypass N(2)-dG adducts, as well as establish the scan-method described herein as an accurate method to quantitate relative intensity of overlapping bands in a single lane, whether generated

  12. A method to accurately quantitate intensities of (32)P-DNA bands when multiple bands appear in a single lane of a gel is used to study dNTP insertion opposite a benzo[a]pyrene-dG adduct by Sulfolobus DNA polymerases Dpo4 and Dbh.

    PubMed

    Sholder, Gabriel; Loechler, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    Quantitating relative (32)P-band intensity in gels is desired, e.g., to study primer-extension kinetics of DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Following imaging, multiple (32)P-bands are often present in lanes. Though individual bands appear by eye to be simple and well-resolved, scanning reveals they are actually skewed-Gaussian in shape and neighboring bands are overlapping, which complicates quantitation, because slower migrating bands often have considerable contributions from the trailing edges of faster migrating bands. A method is described to accurately quantitate adjacent (32)P-bands, which relies on having a standard: a simple skewed-Gaussian curve from an analogous pure, single-component band (e.g., primer alone). This single-component scan/curve is superimposed on its corresponding band in an experimentally determined scan/curve containing multiple bands (e.g., generated in a primer-extension reaction); intensity exceeding the single-component scan/curve is attributed to other components (e.g., insertion products). Relative areas/intensities are determined via pixel analysis, from which relative molarity of components is computed. Common software is used. Commonly used alternative methods (e.g., drawing boxes around bands) are shown to be less accurate. Our method was used to study kinetics of dNTP primer-extension opposite a benzo[a]pyrene-N(2)-dG-adduct with four DNAPs, including Sulfolobus solfataricus Dpo4 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Dbh. Vmax/Km is similar for correct dCTP insertion with Dpo4 and Dbh. Compared to Dpo4, Dbh misinsertion is slower for dATP (∼20-fold), dGTP (∼110-fold) and dTTP (∼6-fold), due to decreases in Vmax. These findings provide support that Dbh is in the same Y-Family DNAP class as eukaryotic DNAP κ and bacterial DNAP IV, which accurately bypass N(2)-dG adducts, as well as establish the scan-method described herein as an accurate method to quantitate relative intensity of overlapping bands in a single lane, whether generated

  13. Copying and Evolution of Neuronal Topology

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Chrisantha; Karishma, K. K.; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2008-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for copying of neuronal networks that is of considerable interest for neuroscience for it suggests a neuronal basis for causal inference, function copying, and natural selection within the human brain. To date, no model of neuronal topology copying exists. We present three increasingly sophisticated mechanisms to demonstrate how topographic map formation coupled with Spike-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) can copy neuronal topology motifs. Fidelity is improved by error correction and activity-reverberation limitation. The high-fidelity topology-copying operator is used to evolve neuronal topologies. Possible roles for neuronal natural selection are discussed. PMID:19020662

  14. [Dual copy-supplement collimator].

    PubMed

    Wang, Z K; Lian, X; Wang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Dual Copy-Supplement Collimator consists of two lead conic sections centered on one common radioactive source and having a lot of small square holes on them. When scanning electron beams strike X-Ray target and create some X-Ray fields while passing through the primary section, they penetrate the secondary section and generate even smaller field units(FU). Using these FUs would compose various treatment fields with different energy (dosage). It is able not only to replace many existing collimators such as MLC, but also to make the conformal radiotherapy easier.

  15. Direct and precise length measurement of single, stretched DNA fragments by dynamic molecular combing and STED nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namdoo; Kim, Hyung Jun; Kim, Younggyu; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Seong Keun

    2016-09-01

    A combination of DNA stretching method and super-resolution nanoscopy allows an accurate and precise measurement of the length of DNA fragments ranging widely in size from 117 to 23,130 bp. BstEII- and HindIII-treated λDNA fragments were stained with an intercalating dye and then linearly stretched on a coverslip by dynamic molecular combing. The image of individual DNA fragments was obtained by stimulated emission depletion nanoscopy. For DNA fragments longer than ∼1000 bp, the measured lengths of DNA fragments were consistently within ∼0.5 to 1.0 % of the reference values, raising the possibility of this method in a wide range of applications including facile detection for copy number variations and trinucleotide repeat disorder. PMID:27457103

  16. Automatic estimation and compensation of geometric distortions in video copies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, B.; Massoudi, A.; Lefèbvre, F.

    2007-01-01

    The proliferation of pirate copies of feature films on peer-to-peer networks arouses a great interest to countermeasures such as the insertion of (invisible) forensic marks in projected movies, to deter their illegal capture. The registration of pirate copies with the original content is however a prerequisite to the recovery of such embedded messages, as severe geometric distortions often occur in illegally camcorded contents. After a brief state-of-the-art in image registration, the paper details an algorithm for video registration, focusing on the compensation of geometric distortions. Control points are automatically extracted in original and copy pictures, followed by pre- and post-matching filtering steps to discard not relevant control points and erroneous matched pairs of control points respectively. This enables the accurate numerical estimation of an 8-parameter homographic distortion model, used to register the copy frames with the original reference grid. Such an image registration algorithm is inserted into a general video registration scheme. Results are presented on both natural and synthetic test material.

  17. Droplet digital PCR-aided screening and characterization of Pichia pastoris multiple gene copy strains.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Elena; Albiol, Joan; Ferrer, Pau

    2016-07-01

    Pichia (syn. Komagataella) pastoris is a widely used yeast platform for heterologous protein production. Expression cassettes are usually stably integrated into the genome of this host via homologous recombination. Although increasing gene dosage is a powerful strategy to improve recombinant protein production, an excess in the number of gene copies often leads to decreased product yields and increased metabolic burden, particularly for secreted proteins. We have constructed a series of strains harboring different copy numbers of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase gene (ROL), aiming to find the optimum gene dosage for secreted Rol production. In order to accurately determine ROL gene dosage, we implemented a novel protocol based on droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and cross validated it with conventional real-time PCR. Gene copy number determination based on ddPCR allowed for an accurate ranking of transformants according to their ROL gene dosage. Results indicated that ddPCR was particularly superior at lower gene dosages (one to five copies) over quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). This facilitated the determination of the optimal ROL gene dosage as low as two copies. The ranking of ROL gene dosage versus Rol yield was consistent at both small scale and bioreactor chemostat cultures, thereby easing clone characterization in terms of gene dosage dependent physiological effects, which could be discriminated even among strains differing by only one ROL copy. A selected two-copy strain showed twofold increase in Rol specific production in a chemostat culture over the single copy strain. Conversely, strains harboring more than two copies of the ROL gene showed decreased product and biomass yields, as well as altered substrate consumption specific rates, compared to the reference (one-copy) strain. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1542-1551. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26704939

  18. Comparative analysis of a translocated copy of the trnK intron in carnivorous family Nepenthaceae.

    PubMed

    Meimberg, Harald; Thalhammer, Stefan; Brachmann, Andreas; Heubl, Günther

    2006-05-01

    During phylogenetic analysis of the Nepenthaceae cpDNA trnK intron, it became apparent that a second non-functional copy of the locus was present in most of the investigated taxa. The translocation event was older than the radiation of all recent Nepenthaceae, and the translocated pseudogenized copy was conserved in nearly all members of the plant family. Using single chloroplast PCR and inverse PCR, we could exclude a plastom location for the second copy. Although translocation into the nucleus is possible, mitochondrial localization seems more likely based on these data. In total, the translocated sequence contained at least 3525 base pairs (bp) that were homologous to the Spinacia oleracea chloroplast genome. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of the non-functional copy revealed a high amount of homoplasies compared to topologies from the cpDNA trnK intron phylogenetic reconstruction. Therefore, this copy proved to be insufficient for phylogenetic reconstruction of the family. Since two different paralogs of the non-functional copy were found in one species, it is feasible that different paralogs were conserved in different groups and that paralogous sequences were included in the data matrix. These data demonstrate that phylogenetic analyses of pseudogenized copies of phylogenetically relevant loci should be performed with great caution. In addition, pseudogenized copies can exist in nearly every member of a plant family, and can be PCR-amplified at levels comparable to the specific copy. In this case, the inclusion of such copies can easily remain unnoticed, thus leading to faulty hypotheses. PMID:16414286

  19. Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yusi; Li, Chunmei; Lu, Sijia; Zhou, Wenxiong; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X. Sunney; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome amplification (WGA) for next-generation sequencing has seen wide applications in biology and medicine when characterization of the genome of a single cell is required. High uniformity and fidelity of WGA is needed to accurately determine genomic variations, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and single-nucleotide variations (SNVs). Prevailing WGA methods have been limited by fluctuation of the amplification yield along the genome, as well as false-positive and -negative errors for SNV identification. Here, we report emulsion WGA (eWGA) to overcome these problems. We divide single-cell genomic DNA into a large number (105) of picoliter aqueous droplets in oil. Containing only a few DNA fragments, each droplet is led to reach saturation of DNA amplification before demulsification such that the differences in amplification gain among the fragments are minimized. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle of eWGA with multiple displacement amplification (MDA), a popular WGA method. This easy-to-operate approach enables simultaneous detection of CNVs and SNVs in an individual human cell, exhibiting significantly improved amplification evenness and accuracy. PMID:26340991

  20. Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yusi; Li, Chunmei; Lu, Sijia; Zhou, Wenxiong; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X Sunney; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-09-22

    Whole-genome amplification (WGA) for next-generation sequencing has seen wide applications in biology and medicine when characterization of the genome of a single cell is required. High uniformity and fidelity of WGA is needed to accurately determine genomic variations, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and single-nucleotide variations (SNVs). Prevailing WGA methods have been limited by fluctuation of the amplification yield along the genome, as well as false-positive and -negative errors for SNV identification. Here, we report emulsion WGA (eWGA) to overcome these problems. We divide single-cell genomic DNA into a large number (10(5)) of picoliter aqueous droplets in oil. Containing only a few DNA fragments, each droplet is led to reach saturation of DNA amplification before demulsification such that the differences in amplification gain among the fragments are minimized. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle of eWGA with multiple displacement amplification (MDA), a popular WGA method. This easy-to-operate approach enables simultaneous detection of CNVs and SNVs in an individual human cell, exhibiting significantly improved amplification evenness and accuracy.

  1. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  2. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  3. Real-time PCR assay using molecular beacon for quantitation of hepatitis B virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Sum, Simon Siu-Man; Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Yuen, Man-Fung; Yuan, He-Jun; Yu, Jian; Lai, Ching-Lung; Ho, David; Zhang, Linqi

    2004-08-01

    Levels of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the blood serve as an important marker in monitoring the disease progression and treatment efficacy of chronic HBV infection. Several commercial assays are available for accurate measurement of HBV genomic DNA, but many of them are hampered by relatively low sensitivity and limited dynamic range. The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and accurate assay for measuring HBV genomic DNA using real-time PCR with a molecular beacon (HBV beacon assay). The performance of this assay was validated by testing serial dilutions of the two EUROHEP HBV DNA standards (ad and ay subtypes) of known concentrations. The assay showed low intra-assay (<7%) and interassay (<5%) variations for both subtypes. Its dynamic range was found to be 10(1) to 10(7) copies per reaction (1.0 x 10(2) to 1.0 x 10(9) copies ml(-1)). The assay was further evaluated clinically using serum samples from 175 individuals with chronic hepatitis B. The HBV DNA level measured by this assay showed good correlation with that measured by the commercially available COBAS AMPLICOR HBV Monitor test (r = 0.901; P < 0.001). The higher sensitivity and broader dynamic range of this assay compared to the existing commercial assays will provide an ideal tool for monitoring disease progression and treatment efficacy in HBV-infected patients, in particular for those with low levels of HBV viremia.

  4. Evidence for the kinetic partitioning of polymerase activity on G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Sarah; Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K.; Henninger, Erin E.; Pursell, Zachary F.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the action of the human DNA polymerase epsilon (hpol ε) and eta (hpol η) catalytic cores on G-quadruplex (G4) DNA substrates derived from the promoter of the c-MYC proto-oncogene. The translesion enzyme hpol η exhibits a 6.2-fold preference for binding to G4 DNA relative to non-G4 DNA, while hpol ε binds both G4 and non-G4 substrates with near equal affinity. Kinetic analysis of single-nucleotide insertion by hpol η reveals that it is able to maintain greater than 25% activity on G4 substrates compared to non-G4 DNA substrates, even when the primer template junction is positioned directly adjacent to G22 (the first tetrad-associated guanine in the c-MYC G4 motif). Surprisingly, hpol η fidelity increases ~15-fold when copying G22. By way of comparison, hpol ε retains ~4% activity and has a 33-fold decrease in fidelity when copying G22. The fidelity of hpol η is ~100-fold more accurate than hpol ε when comparing the mis-insertion frequencies of the two enzymes opposite a tetrad-associated guanine. The kinetic differences observed for the B- and Y-family pols on G4 DNA support a model where a simple kinetic switch between replicative and TLS pols could help govern fork progress during G4 DNA replication. PMID:25903680

  5. Copy Number Studies in Noisy Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ginsbach, Philip; Chen, Bowang; Jiang, Yanxiang; Engelter, Stefan T.; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar

    2013-01-01

    System noise was analyzed in 77 Affymetrix 6.0 samples from a previous clinical study of copy number variation (CNV). Twenty-three samples were classified as eligible for CNV detection, 29 samples as ineligible and 25 were classified as being of intermediate quality. New software (“noise-free-cnv”) was developed to visualize the data and reduce system noise. Fresh DNA preparations were more likely to yield eligible samples (p < 0.001). Eligible samples had higher rates of successfully genotyped SNPs (p < 0.001) and lower variance of signal intensities (p < 0.001), yielded fewer CNV findings after Birdview analysis (p < 0.001), and showed a tendency to yield fewer PennCNV calls (p = 0.053). The noise-free-cnv software visualized trend patterns of noise in the signal intensities across the ordered SNPs, including a wave pattern of noise, being co-linear with the banding pattern of metaphase chromosomes, as well as system deviations of individual probe sets (per-SNP noise). Wave noise and per-SNP noise occurred independently and could be separately removed from the samples. We recommend a two-step procedure of CNV validation, including noise reduction and visual inspection of all CNV calls, prior to molecular validation of a selected number of putative CNVs.

  6. Two computational primitives for algorithmic self-assembly: copying and counting.

    PubMed

    Barish, Robert D; Rothemund, Paul W K; Winfree, Erik

    2005-12-01

    Copying and counting are useful primitive operations for computation and construction. We have made DNA crystals that copy and crystals that count as they grow. For counting, 16 oligonucleotides assemble into four DNA Wang tiles that subsequently crystallize on a polymeric nucleating scaffold strand, arranging themselves in a binary counting pattern that could serve as a template for a molecular electronic demultiplexing circuit. Although the yield of counting crystals is low, and per-tile error rates in such crystals is roughly 10%, this work demonstrates the potential of algorithmic self-assembly to create complex nanoscale patterns of technological interest. A subset of the tiles for counting form information-bearing DNA tubes that copy bit strings from layer to layer along their length.

  7. PCR amplification of a multi-copy mitochondrial gene (cox3) improves detection of Cytauxzoon felis infection as compared to a ribosomal gene (18S).

    PubMed

    Schreeg, Megan E; Marr, Henry S; Griffith, Emily H; Tarigo, Jaime L; Bird, David M; Reichard, Mason V; Cohn, Leah A; Levy, Michael G; Birkenheuer, Adam J

    2016-07-30

    Cytauxzoon felis is a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite that infects felids. Clinical disease caused by acute C. felis infection rapidly progresses in domestic cats, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Accurately diagnosing cytauxzoonosis as soon as possible during acute infection would allow for earlier initiation of antiprotozoal therapy which could lead to higher survival rates. Molecular detection of parasite rRNA genes (18S) by PCR has previously been shown to be a sensitive method of diagnosing C. felis infections. Based on evidence from related apicomplexan species, we hypothesized that C. felis mitochondrial genes would exist at higher copy numbers than 18S and would be a more sensitive diagnostic target. In this study we have designed a PCR assay targeting the C. felis mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). Herein we demonstrate that (1) the cox3 PCR can detect as low as 1 copy of DNA target and can detect C. felis in samples with known mitochondrial sequence heterogeneity, (2) cox3 copy number is increased relative to 18S in blood and tissue samples from acutely infected cats, and (3) the cox3 PCR is more sensitive than 18S PCR for detection of C. felis during early infections.

  8. Quantification of human mitochondrial DNA using synthesized DNA standards.

    PubMed

    Kavlick, Mark F; Lawrence, Helen S; Merritt, R Travis; Fisher, Constance; Isenberg, Alice; Robertson, James M; Budowle, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Successful mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) forensic analysis depends on sufficient quantity and quality of mtDNA. A real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed to assess such characteristics in a DNA sample, which utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. The assay's 105-base pair target sequence facilitates amplification of degraded DNA and is minimally homologous to nonhuman mtDNA. The primers and probe hybridize to a region that has relatively few sequence polymorphisms. The assay can also identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification. The results show that the assay provides information down to 10 copies and provides a dynamic range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Additional experiments demonstrated that as few as 300 mtDNA copies resulted in successful hypervariable region amplification, information that permits sample conservation and optimized downstream PCR testing. The assay described is rapid, reliable, and robust.

  9. Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface

    2006-02-23

    The purpose of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy (ARMCI) library is to provide a general- purpose, efficient, and Widely portable remote memory access (RMA) operations (one-sided communication) optimized for Contiguous and noncontiguous (strided, scatter/gather, I/O vector) data transfers. In addition, ARMCI includes a set of atomic and mutual exclusion operations. The development ARMCI is driven by the need to support the global-addres space communication model in context of distributed regular or irregular distributed data structures,more » communication libraries, and compilers. ARMCI is a standalone system that could be used to support user-level libraries and applications that use MPI or PVM.« less

  10. Mapping DNA quantity into electrophoretic mobility through quantum dot nanotethers for high-resolution genetic and epigenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Kelvin J; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2012-01-24

    Newly discovered nanoparticle properties have driven the development of novel applications and uses. We report a new observation where the electrophoretic mobility of a quantum dot/DNA nanoassembly can be precisely modulated by the degree of surface DNA conjugation. By using streptavidin-coated quantum dots (QDs) as nanotethers to gather biotin-labeled DNA into electrophoretic nanoassemblies, the QD surface charge is modulated and transformed into electrophoretic mobility shifts using standard agarose gel electrophoresis. Typical fluorescent assays quantify based on relative intensity. However, this phenomenon uses a novel approach that accurately maps DNA quantity into shifts in relative band position. This property was applied in a QD-enabled nanoassay called quantum dot electrophoretic mobility shift assay (QEMSA) that enables accurate quantification of DNA targets down to 1.1-fold (9%) changes in quantity, beyond what is achievable in qPCR. In addition to these experimental findings, an analytical model is presented to explain this behavior. Finally, QEMSA was applied to both genetic and epigenetic analysis of cancer. First, it was used to analyze copy number variation (CNV) of the RSF1/HBXAP gene, where conventional approaches for CNV analysis based on comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), microarrays, and qPCR are unable to reliably differentiate less than 2-fold changes in copy number. Then, QEMSA was used for DNA methylation analysis of the p16/CDK2A tumor suppressor gene, where its ability to detect subtle changes in methylation was shown to be superior to that of qPCR.

  11. Transcript copy number of genes for DNA repair and translesion synthesis in yeast: contribution of transcription rate and mRNA stability to the steady-state level of each mRNA along with growth in glucose-fermentative medium.

    PubMed

    Michán, Carmen; Monje-Casas, Fernando; Pueyo, Carmen

    2005-04-01

    We quantitated the copy number of mRNAs (NTG1, NTG2, OGG1, APN1, APN2, MSH2, MSH6, REV3, RAD30) encoding different DNA repair enzymes and translesion-synthesis polymerases in yeast. Quantitations reported examine how the steady-state number of each transcript is modulated in association with the growth in glucose-fermentative medium, and evaluate the respective contribution of the rate of mRNA degradation and transcription initiation to the specific mRNA level profile of each gene. Each transcript displayed a unique growth-related profile, therefore altering the relative abundance of mRNAs coding for proteins with similar functions, as cells proceed from exponential to stationary phase. Nonetheless, as general trend, they exhibited maximal levels when cells proliferate rapidly and minimal values when cells cease proliferation. We found that previous calculations on the stability of the investigated mRNAs might be biased, in particular regarding those that respond to heat shock stress. Overall, the mRNAs experienced drastic increments in their stabilities in response to gradual depletion of essential nutrients in the culture. However, differences among the mRNA stability profiles suggest a dynamic modulation rather than a passive process. As general rule, the investigated genes were much more frequently transcribed during the fermentative growth than later during the diauxic arrest and the stationary phase, this finding conciliating low steady-state levels with increased mRNA stabilities. Interestingly, while the rate at which each gene is transcribed appeared as the only determinant of the number of mRNA copies at the exponential growth, later, when cell growth is arrested, the rate of mRNA degradation becomes also a key factor for gene expression. In short, our results raise the question of how important the respective contribution of transcription and mRNA stability mechanisms is for the steady-state profile of a given transcript, and how this contribution may

  12. Estimating Copy Number and Allelic Variation at the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Locus Using Short Reads.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shishi; Yu, Jane A; Song, Yun S

    2016-09-01

    The study of genomic regions that contain gene copies and structural variation is a major challenge in modern genomics. Unlike variation involving single nucleotide changes, data on the variation of copy number is difficult to collect and few tools exist for analyzing the variation between individuals. The immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV) locus, which plays an integral role in the adaptive immune response, is an example of a complex genomic region that varies in gene copy number. Lack of standard methods to genotype this region prevents it from being included in association studies and is holding back the growing field of antibody repertoire analysis. Here we develop a method that takes short reads from high-throughput sequencing and outputs a genetic profile of the IGHV locus with the read coverage depth and a putative nucleotide sequence for each operationally defined gene cluster. Our operationally defined gene clusters aim to address a major challenge in studying the IGHV locus: the high sequence similarity between gene segments in different genomic locations. Tests on simulated data demonstrate that our approach can accurately determine the presence or absence of a gene cluster from reads as short as 70 bp. More detailed resolution on the copy number of gene clusters can be obtained from read coverage depth using longer reads (e.g., ≥ 100 bp). Detail at the nucleotide resolution of single copy genes (genes present in one copy per haplotype) can be determined with 250 bp reads. For IGHV genes with more than one copy, accurate nucleotide-resolution reconstruction is currently beyond the means of our approach. When applied to a family of European ancestry, our pipeline outputs genotypes that are consistent with the family pedigree, confirms existing multigene variants and suggests new copy number variants. This study paves the way for analyzing population-level patterns of variation in IGHV gene clusters in larger diverse datasets and for quantitatively

  13. Estimating Copy Number and Allelic Variation at the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Locus Using Short Reads

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shishi; Song, Yun S.

    2016-01-01

    The study of genomic regions that contain gene copies and structural variation is a major challenge in modern genomics. Unlike variation involving single nucleotide changes, data on the variation of copy number is difficult to collect and few tools exist for analyzing the variation between individuals. The immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV) locus, which plays an integral role in the adaptive immune response, is an example of a complex genomic region that varies in gene copy number. Lack of standard methods to genotype this region prevents it from being included in association studies and is holding back the growing field of antibody repertoire analysis. Here we develop a method that takes short reads from high-throughput sequencing and outputs a genetic profile of the IGHV locus with the read coverage depth and a putative nucleotide sequence for each operationally defined gene cluster. Our operationally defined gene clusters aim to address a major challenge in studying the IGHV locus: the high sequence similarity between gene segments in different genomic locations. Tests on simulated data demonstrate that our approach can accurately determine the presence or absence of a gene cluster from reads as short as 70 bp. More detailed resolution on the copy number of gene clusters can be obtained from read coverage depth using longer reads (e.g., ≥ 100 bp). Detail at the nucleotide resolution of single copy genes (genes present in one copy per haplotype) can be determined with 250 bp reads. For IGHV genes with more than one copy, accurate nucleotide-resolution reconstruction is currently beyond the means of our approach. When applied to a family of European ancestry, our pipeline outputs genotypes that are consistent with the family pedigree, confirms existing multigene variants and suggests new copy number variants. This study paves the way for analyzing population-level patterns of variation in IGHV gene clusters in larger diverse datasets and for quantitatively

  14. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions.

  15. Accuracy estimation of foamy virus genome copying

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Kathleen; Wiktorowicz, Tatiana; Park, Jeonghae; Mergia, Ayalew; Rethwilm, Axel; Scheller, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    additional TS event per replication cycle. We also show that a given FV particle is able to cross-transfer a heterologous FV genome, although at reduced efficiency than the homologous vector. Conclusion Our results indicate that the copying of the FV genome is more accurate than previously thought. On the other hand recombination among FV genomes appears to be a frequent event. PMID:19348676

  16. New estimation method for highly sensitive quantitation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA and its application.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hiromi; Wada, Kaoru; Morishita, Takayuki; Utsumi, Makoto; Nishiyama, Yukihiro; Kaneda, Tsuguhiro

    2005-03-01

    A new estimation method for quantitation of HIV-1 DNA was established by introducing a pre-quantitation polymerase chain reaction (PCR) before conventional real-time PCR. Two alternative methods for estimating the copy number can be used: the first method utilizes the rate of beta2-microglobulin (beta2M) gene amplification during the pre-quantitation PCR, and the second utilizes a calibration curve of the crossing point of real-time PCR versus the standard HIV-1-plasmid concentration. These methods could be used to reproducibly and accurately detect a provirus density down to five copies/10(6) cells (for methods 1 and 2, inter-assay CV=17 and 16% and accuracy=81 and 92%, respectively). The levels of HIV-1 DNA could be measurable using as little as 100 microl of whole blood or buffy coat cells. Using a combination of a conventional and highly sensitive methods, we found that the amount of HIV-1 DNA ranged from 2 to 5960 copies/10(6) cells (median of 830 copies/10(6) cells) in CD4-positive T lymphocytes isolated from 30 patients responding well to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Thus, the highly sensitive method developed in this study allows estimation of the HIV-1 reservoirs in peripheral CD4-positive T lymphocytes of patients responding well to HAART. PMID:15664064

  17. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  18. 48 CFR 401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the AGAR published in CFR form may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Requests should reference Chapter 4 of Title 48 CFR....

  19. 48 CFR 401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the AGAR published in CFR form may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Requests should reference Chapter 4 of Title 48 CFR....

  20. Copy-Editing: The Cambridge Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Judith

    This handbook is designed as a reference manual for copy editors who prepare typescript for printing. It deals with the following topics: the copy editor's function; the work to be done at each stage in the production process; some difficult points of spelling, capitalization, and other features collectively known as "house style"; the parts of a…

  1. 14 CFR 249.4 - Photographic copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photographic copies. 249.4 Section 249.4 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS PRESERVATION OF AIR CARRIER RECORDS General Instructions § 249.4 Photographic copies. (a)...

  2. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13 Copies required. (a) Subject to paragraph (c) of this section, two duplicate originals and fifty...

  3. 48 CFR 601.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 601.105-3 Section 601.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 601.105-3 Copies. The DOSAR is available...

  4. 48 CFR 201.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 201.105-3 Section 201.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 201.105-3 Copies....

  5. 48 CFR 3001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 3001.105-3 Section 3001.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND SECURITY....105-3 Copies. The HSAR is available in the Federal Register and electronically at...

  6. 48 CFR 501.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES ADMINISTRATION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 501.105-3 Copies. The GSAR in CFR form may be purchased from: Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 501.105-3...

  7. IDLN-MSP: Idiolocal normalization of real-time methylation-specific PCR for genetic imbalanced DNA specimens.

    PubMed

    Santourlidis, Simeon; Ghanjati, Foued; Beermann, Agnes; Hermanns, Thomas; Poyet, Cédric

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive, accurate, and reliable measurements of tumor cell-specific DNA methylation changes are of fundamental importance in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring. Real-time methylation-specific PCR (MSP) using intercalating dyes is an established method of choice for this purpose. Here we present a simple but crucial adaptation of this widely applied method that overcomes a major obstacle: genetic abnormalities in the DNA samples, such as aneuploidy or copy number variations, that could result in inaccurate results due to improper normalization if the copy numbers of the target and reference sequences are not the same. In our idiolocal normalization (IDLN) method, the locus for the normalizing, methylation-independent reference amplification is chosen close to the locus of the methylation-dependent target amplification. This ensures that the copy numbers of both the target and reference sequences will be identical in most cases if they are close enough to each other, resulting in accurate normalization and reliable comparative measurements of DNA methylation in clinical samples when using real-time MSP.

  8. Structure and mechanism of COPI vesicle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Lauren P

    2014-08-01

    Distinct trafficking pathways within the secretory and endocytic systems ensure prompt and precise delivery of specific cargo molecules to different cellular compartments via small vesicular (50-150nm) and tubular carriers. The COPI vesicular coat is required for retrograde trafficking from the cis-Golgi back to the ER and within the Golgi stack. Recent structural data have been obtained from X-ray crystallographic studies on COPI coat components alone and on COPI subunits in complex with either cargo motifs or Arf1, and from reconstructions of COPI coated vesicles by electron tomography. These studies provide important molecular information and indicate key differences in COPI coat assembly as compared with clathrin-based and COPII-based coats. PMID:24840894

  9. Inferring Haplotypes of Copy Number Variations From High-Throughput Data With Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Yoon, Seungtai; Hosono, Naoya; Leotta, Anthony; Sebat, Jonathan; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate information on haplotypes and diplotypes (haplotype pairs) is required for population-genetic analyses; however, microarrays do not provide data on a haplotype or diplotype at a copy number variation (CNV) locus; they only provide data on the total number of copies over a diplotype or an unphased sequence genotype (e.g., AAB, unlike AB of single nucleotide polymorphism). Moreover, such copy numbers or genotypes are often incorrectly determined when microarray signal intensities derived from different copy numbers or genotypes are not clearly separated due to noise. Here we report an algorithm to infer CNV haplotypes and individuals’ diplotypes at multiple loci from noisy microarray data, utilizing the probability that a signal intensity may be derived from different underlying copy numbers or genotypes. Performing simulation studies based on known diplotypes and an error model obtained from real microarray data, we demonstrate that this probabilistic approach succeeds in accurate inference (error rate: 1–2%) from noisy data, whereas previous deterministic approaches failed (error rate: 12–18%). Applying this algorithm to real microarray data, we estimated haplotype frequencies and diplotypes in 1486 CNV regions for 100 individuals. Our algorithm will facilitate accurate population-genetic analyses and powerful disease association studies of CNVs. PMID:22384316

  10. Large scale variation in DNA copy number in chicken breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Detecting genetic variation is a critical step in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic diversity. Until recently, such detection has mostly focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) because of the ease in screening complete genomes. Another type of variant, c...

  11. 16Stimator: statistical estimation of ribosomal gene copy numbers from draft genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Perisin, Matthew; Vetter, Madlen; Gilbert, Jack A; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-04-01

    The 16S rRNA gene (16S) is an accepted marker of bacterial taxonomic diversity, even though differences in copy number obscure the relationship between amplicon and organismal abundances. Ancestral state reconstruction methods can predict 16S copy numbers through comparisons with closely related reference genomes; however, the database of closed genomes is limited. Here, we extend the reference database of 16S copy numbers to de novo assembled draft genomes by developing 16Stimator, a method to estimate 16S copy numbers when these repetitive regions collapse during assembly. Using a read depth approach, we estimate 16S copy numbers for 12 endophytic isolates from Arabidopsis thaliana and confirm estimates by qPCR. We further apply this approach to draft genomes deposited in NCBI and demonstrate accurate copy number estimation regardless of sequencing platform, with an overall median deviation of 14%. The expanded database of isolates with 16S copy number estimates increases the power of phylogenetic correction methods for determining organismal abundances from 16S amplicon surveys. PMID:26359911

  12. Differential gene expression and epiregulation of alpha zein gene copies in maize haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Miclaus, Mihai; Xu, Jian-Hong; Messing, Joachim

    2011-06-01

    Multigenic traits are very common in plants and cause diversity. Nutritional quality is such a trait, and one of its factors is the composition and relative expression of storage protein genes. In maize, they represent a medium-size gene family distributed over several chromosomes and unlinked locations. Two inbreds, B73 and BSSS53, both from the Iowa Stiff Stock Synthetic collection, have been selected to analyze allelic and non-allelic variability in these regions that span between 80-500 kb of chromosomal DNA. Genes were copied to unlinked sites before and after allotetraploidization of maize, but before transposition enlarged intergenic regions in a haplotype-specific manner. Once genes are copied, expression of donor genes is reduced relative to new copies. Epigenetic regulation seems to contribute to silencing older copies, because some of them can be reactivated when endosperm is maintained as cultured cells, indicating that copy number variation might contribute to a reserve of gene copies. Bisulfite sequencing of the promoter region also shows different methylation patterns among gene clusters as well as differences between tissues, suggesting a possible position effect on regulatory mechanisms as a result of inserting copies at unlinked locations. The observations offer a potential paradigm for how different gene families evolve and the impact this has on their expression and regulation of their members. PMID:21731501

  13. Differential Gene Expression and Epiregulation of Alpha Zein Gene Copies in Maize Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miclaus, Mihai; Xu, Jian-Hong; Messing, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Multigenic traits are very common in plants and cause diversity. Nutritional quality is such a trait, and one of its factors is the composition and relative expression of storage protein genes. In maize, they represent a medium-size gene family distributed over several chromosomes and unlinked locations. Two inbreds, B73 and BSSS53, both from the Iowa Stiff Stock Synthetic collection, have been selected to analyze allelic and non-allelic variability in these regions that span between 80–500 kb of chromosomal DNA. Genes were copied to unlinked sites before and after allotetraploidization of maize, but before transposition enlarged intergenic regions in a haplotype-specific manner. Once genes are copied, expression of donor genes is reduced relative to new copies. Epigenetic regulation seems to contribute to silencing older copies, because some of them can be reactivated when endosperm is maintained as cultured cells, indicating that copy number variation might contribute to a reserve of gene copies. Bisulfite sequencing of the promoter region also shows different methylation patterns among gene clusters as well as differences between tissues, suggesting a possible position effect on regulatory mechanisms as a result of inserting copies at unlinked locations. The observations offer a potential paradigm for how different gene families evolve and the impact this has on their expression and regulation of their members. PMID:21731501

  14. A method for calling copy number polymorphism using haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ho Jang, Gun; Christie, Jason D.; Feng, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) are both widespread characteristic of the human genome, but are often called separately on common genotyping platforms. To capture integrated SNP and CNV information, methods have been developed for calling allelic specific copy numbers or so called copy number polymorphism (CNP), using limited inter-marker correlation. In this paper, we proposed a haplotype-based maximum likelihood method to call CNP, which takes advantage of the valuable multi-locus linkage disequilibrium (LD) information in the population. We also developed a computationally efficient algorithm to estimate haplotype frequencies and optimize individual CNP calls iteratively, even at presence of missing data. Through simulations, we demonstrated our model is more sensitive and accurate in detecting various CNV regions, compared with commonly-used CNV calling methods including PennCNV, another hidden Markov model (HMM) using CNP, a scan statistic, segCNV, and cnvHap. Our method often performs better in the regions with higher LD, in longer CNV regions, and in common CNV than the opposite. We implemented our method on the genotypes of 90 HapMap CEU samples and 23 patients with acute lung injury (ALI). For each ALI patient the genotyping was performed twice. The CNPs from our method show good consistency and accuracy comparable to others. PMID:24069028

  15. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  16. Copy Number Variation in Chickens: A Review and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofei; Byers, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    DNA sequence variations include nucleotide substitution, deletion, insertion, translocation and inversion. Deletion or insertion of a large DNA segment in the genome, referred to as copy number variation (CNV), has caught the attention of many researchers recently. It is believed that CNVs contribute significantly to genome variability, and thus contribute to phenotypic variability. In chickens, genome-wide surveys with array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH), SNP chip detection or whole genome sequencing have revealed a large number of CNVs. A large portion of chicken CNVs involves protein coding or regulatory sequences. A few CNVs have been demonstrated to be the determinant factors for single gene traits, such as late-feathering, pea-comb and dermal hyperpigmentation. The phenotypic effects of the majority of chicken CNVs are to be delineated.

  17. 25 CFR 571.13 - Copies of audit reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... submit to the Commission two paper copies or one electronic copy of the financial statements and audits... Commission two paper copies or one electronic copy of the financial statements, reports, and audits required... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copies of audit reports. 571.13 Section 571.13...

  18. Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA in Induced Pluripotent and Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, William; Kelly, Richard D W; Yeung, Ka Yu; Cagnone, Gael; McKenzie, Matthew; St John, Justin C

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome has a major role to play in establishing and maintaining pluripotency. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy is strictly regulated during differentiation. Undifferentiated, pluripotent cells possess fewer than 300 copies of mtDNA, which establishes the mtDNA set point and promotes cell proliferation and, as a result, these cells rely on glycolysis with some support from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for the generation of ATP. The mtDNA set point provides the starting point from which cells increase their mtDNA copy number as they differentiate into mature functional cells. Dependent on cell types, mtDNA copy number ranges from ~10 copies in sperm to several thousand in cardiomyocytes. Consequently, differentiating cell types can acquire the appropriate numbers of mtDNA copy to meet their specific requirements for ATP generated through OXPHOS. However, as reprogrammed somatic cells do not always achieve this, it is essential to analyze them for their OXPHOS potential and ability to regulate mtDNA copy number. Here, we describe how to assess mtDNA copy number in pluripotent and differentiating cells using real-time PCR protocols; assess expression of the mtDNA specific replication factors through real-time RT-PCR; identify mtDNA variants in embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells; determine DNA methylation patterns of the mtDNA-specific replication factors; and assess mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity. PMID:26621601

  19. The Impact of Meaning and Dimensionality on the Accuracy of Children's Copying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Elizabeth; Ropar, Danielle; Mitchell, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Studies of intellectual realism have shown that children aged 7 to 9 copy a line drawing of a cube less accurately than a non-object pattern composed of the same lines (Phillips, Hobbs, & Pratt, 1978). However, it remains unclear whether performance is worse on the cube because it is a three-dimensional representation, or because it is a…

  20. Concurrent Whole-Genome Haplotyping and Copy-Number Profiling of Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Mateiu, Ligia; Melotte, Cindy; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Das, Rakhi; Theunis, Koen; Cheng, Jiqiu; Legius, Eric; Moreau, Yves; Debrock, Sophie; D’Hooghe, Thomas; Verdyck, Pieter; De Rycke, Martine; Sermon, Karen; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Voet, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Methods for haplotyping and DNA copy-number typing of single cells are paramount for studying genomic heterogeneity and enabling genetic diagnosis. Before analyzing the DNA of a single cell by microarray or next-generation sequencing, a whole-genome amplification (WGA) process is required, but it substantially distorts the frequency and composition of the cell’s alleles. As a consequence, haplotyping methods suffer from error-prone discrete SNP genotypes (AA, AB, BB) and DNA copy-number profiling remains difficult because true DNA copy-number aberrations have to be discriminated from WGA artifacts. Here, we developed a single-cell genome analysis method that reconstructs genome-wide haplotype architectures as well as the copy-number and segregational origin of those haplotypes by employing phased parental genotypes and deciphering WGA-distorted SNP B-allele fractions via a process we coin haplarithmisis. We demonstrate that the method can be applied as a generic method for preimplantation genetic diagnosis on single cells biopsied from human embryos, enabling diagnosis of disease alleles genome wide as well as numerical and structural chromosomal anomalies. Moreover, meiotic segregation errors can be distinguished from mitotic ones. PMID:25983246

  1. Correction of the lack of commutability between plasmid DNA and genomic DNA for quantification of genetically modified organisms using pBSTopas as a model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Yuhua; Wu, Gang; Cao, Yinglong; Lu, Changming

    2014-10-01

    Plasmid calibrators are increasingly applied for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). To evaluate the commutability between plasmid DNA (pDNA) and genomic DNA (gDNA) as calibrators, a plasmid molecule, pBSTopas, was constructed, harboring a Topas 19/2 event-specific sequence and a partial sequence of the rapeseed reference gene CruA. Assays of the pDNA showed similar limits of detection (five copies for Topas 19/2 and CruA) and quantification (40 copies for Topas 19/2 and 20 for CruA) as those for the gDNA. Comparisons of plasmid and genomic standard curves indicated that the slopes, intercepts, and PCR efficiency for pBSTopas were significantly different from CRM Topas 19/2 gDNA for quantitative analysis of GMOs. Three correction methods were used to calibrate the quantitative analysis of control samples using pDNA as calibrators: model a, or coefficient value a (Cva); model b, or coefficient value b (Cvb); and the novel model c or coefficient formula (Cf). Cva and Cvb gave similar estimated values for the control samples, and the quantitative bias of the low concentration sample exceeded the acceptable range within ±25% in two of the four repeats. Using Cfs to normalize the Ct values of test samples, the estimated values were very close to the reference values (bias -13.27 to 13.05%). In the validation of control samples, model c was more appropriate than Cva or Cvb. The application of Cf allowed pBSTopas to substitute for Topas 19/2 gDNA as a calibrator to accurately quantify the GMO. PMID:25182967

  2. Correction of the lack of commutability between plasmid DNA and genomic DNA for quantification of genetically modified organisms using pBSTopas as a model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Yuhua; Wu, Gang; Cao, Yinglong; Lu, Changming

    2014-10-01

    Plasmid calibrators are increasingly applied for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). To evaluate the commutability between plasmid DNA (pDNA) and genomic DNA (gDNA) as calibrators, a plasmid molecule, pBSTopas, was constructed, harboring a Topas 19/2 event-specific sequence and a partial sequence of the rapeseed reference gene CruA. Assays of the pDNA showed similar limits of detection (five copies for Topas 19/2 and CruA) and quantification (40 copies for Topas 19/2 and 20 for CruA) as those for the gDNA. Comparisons of plasmid and genomic standard curves indicated that the slopes, intercepts, and PCR efficiency for pBSTopas were significantly different from CRM Topas 19/2 gDNA for quantitative analysis of GMOs. Three correction methods were used to calibrate the quantitative analysis of control samples using pDNA as calibrators: model a, or coefficient value a (Cva); model b, or coefficient value b (Cvb); and the novel model c or coefficient formula (Cf). Cva and Cvb gave similar estimated values for the control samples, and the quantitative bias of the low concentration sample exceeded the acceptable range within ±25% in two of the four repeats. Using Cfs to normalize the Ct values of test samples, the estimated values were very close to the reference values (bias -13.27 to 13.05%). In the validation of control samples, model c was more appropriate than Cva or Cvb. The application of Cf allowed pBSTopas to substitute for Topas 19/2 gDNA as a calibrator to accurately quantify the GMO.

  3. TEGS-CN: A Statistical Method for Pathway Analysis of Genome-wide Copy Number Profile.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Hsu, Thomas; Christiani, David C

    2014-01-01

    The effects of copy number alterations make up a significant part of the tumor genome profile, but pathway analyses of these alterations are still not well established. We proposed a novel method to analyze multiple copy numbers of genes within a pathway, termed Test for the Effect of a Gene Set with Copy Number data (TEGS-CN). TEGS-CN was adapted from TEGS, a method that we previously developed for gene expression data using a variance component score test. With additional development, we extend the method to analyze DNA copy number data, accounting for different sizes and thus various numbers of copy number probes in genes. The test statistic follows a mixture of X (2) distributions that can be obtained using permutation with scaled X (2) approximation. We conducted simulation studies to evaluate the size and the power of TEGS-CN and to compare its performance with TEGS. We analyzed a genome-wide copy number data from 264 patients of non-small-cell lung cancer. With the Molecular Signatures Database (MSigDB) pathway database, the genome-wide copy number data can be classified into 1814 biological pathways or gene sets. We investigated associations of the copy number profile of the 1814 gene sets with pack-years of cigarette smoking. Our analysis revealed five pathways with significant P values after Bonferroni adjustment (<2.8 × 10(-5)), including the PTEN pathway (7.8 × 10(-7)), the gene set up-regulated under heat shock (3.6 × 10(-6)), the gene sets involved in the immune profile for rejection of kidney transplantation (9.2 × 10(-6)) and for transcriptional control of leukocytes (2.2 × 10(-5)), and the ganglioside biosynthesis pathway (2.7 × 10(-5)). In conclusion, we present a new method for pathway analyses of copy number data, and causal mechanisms of the five pathways require further study.

  4. Low AMY1 Gene Copy Number Is Associated with Increased Body Mass Index in Prepubertal Boys

    PubMed Central

    Verginelli, Fabio; De Lellis, Laura; Capelli, Cristian; Verzilli, Delfina; Chiarelli, Francesco; Mohn, Angelika; Cama, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 60 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with Body Mass Index (BMI). Additional genetic variants, such as copy number variations (CNV), have also been investigated in relation to BMI. Recently, the highly polymorphic CNV in the salivary amylase (AMY1) gene, encoding an enzyme implicated in the first step of starch digestion, has been associated with obesity in adults and children. We assessed the potential association between AMY1 copy number and a wide range of BMI in a population of Italian school-children. Methods 744 children (354 boys, 390 girls, mean age (±SD): 8.4±1.4years) underwent anthropometric assessments (height, weight) and collection of saliva samples for DNA extraction. AMY1 copies were evaluated by quantitative PCR. Results A significant increase of BMI z-score by decreasing AMY1 copy number was observed in boys (β: -0.117, p = 0.033), but not in girls. Similarly, waist circumference (β: -0.155, p = 0.003, adjusted for age) was negatively influenced by AMY1 copy number in boys. Boys with 8 or more AMY1 copy numbers presented a significant lower BMI z-score (p = 0.04) and waist circumference (p = 0.01) when compared to boys with less than 8 copy numbers. Conclusions In this pediatric-only, population-based study, a lower AMY1 copy number emerged to be associated with increased BMI in boys. These data confirm previous findings from adult studies and support a potential role of a higher copy number of the salivary AMY1 gene in protecting from excess weight gain. PMID:27149670

  5. NASA printing, duplicating, and copying management handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook provides information and procedures for the implementation of NASA policy and applicable laws and regulations relating to printing, duplicating, and copying. The topics addressed include a description of relevant laws and regulations, authorizations required, and responsible entities for NASA printing, duplicating, and copying. The policy of NASA is to ensure understanding and application of authority and responsibility on printing matters. Where necessary, the handbook clarifies the intent of basic laws and regulations applicable to NASA.

  6. Amplified protein detection and identification through DNA-conjugated M13 bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hun; Domaille, Dylan W; Cha, Jennifer N

    2012-06-26

    Sensitive protein detection and accurate identification continues to be in great demand for disease screening in clinical and laboratory settings. For these diagnostics to be of clinical value, it is necessary to develop sensors that have high sensitivity but favorable cost-to-benefit ratios. However, many of these sensing platforms are thermally unstable or require significant materials synthesis, engineering, or fabrication. Recently, we demonstrated that naturally occurring M13 bacteriophage can serve as biological scaffolds for engineering protein diagnostics. These viruses have five copies of the pIII protein, which can bind specifically to target antigens, and thousands of pVIII coat proteins, which can be genetically or chemically modified to react with signal-producing materials, such as plasmon-shifting gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). In this report, we show that DNA-conjugated M13 bacteriophage can act as inexpensive protein sensors that can rapidly induce a color change in the presence of a target protein yet also offer the ability to identify the detected antigen in a separate step. Many copies of a specific DNA oligonucleotide were appended to each virus to create phage-DNA conjugates that can hybridize with DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In the case of a colorimetric positive result, the identity of the antigen can also be easily determined by using a DNA microarray. This saves precious resources by establishing a rapid, quantitative method to first screen for the presence of antigen followed by a highly specific typing assay if necessary.

  7. COPI Is Required for Enterovirus 71 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Wu, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a member of the Picornaviridae family, is found in Asian countries where it causes a wide range of human diseases. No effective therapy is available for the treatment of these infections. Picornaviruses undergo RNA replication in association with membranes of infected cells. COPI and COPII have been shown to be involved in the formation of picornavirus-induced vesicles. Replication of several picornaviruses, including poliovirus and Echovirus 11 (EV11), is dependent on COPI or COPII. Here, we report that COPI, but not COPII, is required for EV71 replication. Replication of EV71 was inhibited by brefeldin A and golgicide A, inhibitors of COPI activity. Furthermore, we found EV71 2C protein interacted with COPI subunits by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay, indicating that COPI coatomer might be directed to the viral replication complex through viral 2C protein. Additionally, because the pathway is conserved among different species of enteroviruses, it may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies. PMID:22662263

  8. Integrated genotype calling and association analysis of SNPs, common copy number polymorphisms and rare CNVs

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Joshua M; Kuruvilla, Finny G; McCarroll, Steven A; Wysoker, Alec; Nemesh, James; Cawley, Simon; Hubbell, Earl; Veitch, Jim; Collins, Patrick J; Darvishi, Katayoon; Lee, Charles; Nizzari, Marcia M; Gabriel, Stacey B; Purcell, Shaun; Daly, Mark J; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    Accurate and complete measurement of single nucleotide (SNP) and copy number (CNV) variants, both common and rare, will be required to understand the role of genetic variation in disease. We present Birdsuite, a four-stage analytical framework instantiated in software for deriving integrated and mutually consistent copy number and SNP genotypes. The method sequentially assigns copy number across regions of common copy number polymorphisms (CNPs), calls genotypes of SNPs, identifies rare CNVs via a hidden Markov model (HMM), and generates an integrated sequence and copy number genotype at every locus (for example, including genotypes such as A-null, AAB and BBB in addition to AA, AB and BB calls). Such genotypes more accurately depict the underlying sequence of each individual, reducing the rate of apparent mendelian inconsistencies. The Birdsuite software is applied here to data from the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Additionally, we describe a method, implemented in PLINK, to utilize these combined SNP and CNV genotypes for association testing with a phenotype. PMID:18776909

  9. Strategies to improve low copy transgenic events in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of maize.

    PubMed

    Sivamani, Elumalai; Li, Xianggan; Nalapalli, Samson; Barron, Yoshimi; Prairie, Anna; Bradley, David; Doyle, Michele; Que, Qiudeng

    2015-12-01

    Transgenic plants containing low copy transgene insertion free of vector backbone are highly desired for many biotechnological applications. We have investigated two different strategies for increasing the percentage of low copy events in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation experiments in maize. One of the strategies is to use a binary vector with two separate T-DNAs, one T-DNA containing an intact E.coli manA gene encoding phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) as selectable marker gene cassette and another T-DNA containing an RNAi cassette of PMI sequences. By using this strategy, low copy transgenic events containing the transgenes were increased from 43 to 60 % in maize. An alternate strategy is using selectable marker gene cassettes containing regulatory or coding sequences derived from essential plant genes such as 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) or MADS box transcription factor. In this paper we demonstrate that higher percentage of low copy transgenic events can be obtained in Agrobacterium-mediated maize transformation experiments using both strategies. We propose that the above two strategies can be used independently or in combination to increase transgenic events that contain low copy transgene insertion in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation experiments.

  10. Haplotype Phasing and Inheritance of Copy Number Variants in Nuclear Families

    PubMed Central

    Palta, Priit; Kaplinski, Lauris; Nagirnaja, Liina; Veidenberg, Andres; Möls, Märt; Nelis, Mari; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Laan, Maris; Remm, Maido

    2015-01-01

    DNA copy number variants (CNVs) that alter the copy number of a particular DNA segment in the genome play an important role in human phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility. A number of CNVs overlapping with genes have been shown to confer risk to a variety of human diseases thus highlighting the relevance of addressing the variability of CNVs at a higher resolution. So far, it has not been possible to deterministically infer the allelic composition of different haplotypes present within the CNV regions. We have developed a novel computational method, called PiCNV, which enables to resolve the haplotype sequence composition within CNV regions in nuclear families based on SNP genotyping microarray data. The algorithm allows to i) phase normal and CNV-carrying haplotypes in the copy number variable regions, ii) resolve the allelic copies of rearranged DNA sequence within the haplotypes and iii) infer the heritability of identified haplotypes in trios or larger nuclear families. To our knowledge this is the first program available that can deterministically phase null, mono-, di-, tri- and tetraploid genotypes in CNV loci. We applied our method to study the composition and inheritance of haplotypes in CNV regions of 30 HapMap Yoruban trios and 34 Estonian families. For 93.6% of the CNV loci, PiCNV enabled to unambiguously phase normal and CNV-carrying haplotypes and follow their transmission in the corresponding families. Furthermore, allelic composition analysis identified the co-occurrence of alternative allelic copies within 66.7% of haplotypes carrying copy number gains. We also observed less frequent transmission of CNV-carrying haplotypes from parents to children compared to normal haplotypes and identified an emergence of several de novo deletions and duplications in the offspring. PMID:25853576

  11. Properties of R1162, a broad-host-range, high-copy-number plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R; Hinds, M; Brasch, M

    1982-01-01

    Regions of plasmid DNA encoding characteristic properties of the IncQ (P-4) group plasmid R1162 were identified by mutagenesis and in vitro cloning. Coding sequences sufficient for expression of incompatibility and efficient conjugal mobilization by plasmid R751 were found to be linked to the origin of DNA replication. In contrast, there was a region remote from the origin, and active in trans, that was required for plasmid maintenance. A derivative that was temperature sensitive for stability was isolated. The defect mapped at or near the region required for plasmid maintenance and resulted in far fewer copies of supercoiled plasmid DNA per cell under permissive conditions. A second region required for stability was also identified from the behavior of a deletion derivative of R1162, which did not, however, show an altered number of supercoiled plasmid DNA copies. Finally, a plasmid DNA mutation resulting in a substantially higher copy number was isolated. Plasmid reconstruction experiments suggested that the mutation was linked to the replicative origin. Images PMID:6279561

  12. Data analysis considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. In this article, we describe the steps needed to obtain reliable copy number predictions from degraded and contaminated FFPE samples. PMID:23118356

  13. Host genetic variants and gene expression patterns associated with Epstein-Barr virus copy number in lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J; Petrova, Velislava; Liu, Jimmy Z; Frampton, Dan; Anderson, Carl A; Gall, Astrid; Kellam, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) are commonly used in molecular genetics, supplying DNA for the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Projects, used to test chemotherapeutic agents, and informing the basis of a number of population genetics studies of gene expression. The process of transforming human B cells into LCLs requires the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a double-stranded DNA virus which through B-cell immortalisation maintains an episomal virus genome in every cell of an LCL at variable copy numbers. Previous studies have reported that EBV alters host-gene expression and EBV copy number may be under host genetic control. We performed a genome-wide association study of EBV genome copy number in LCLs and found the phenotype to be highly heritable, although no individual SNPs achieved a significant association with EBV copy number. The expression of two host genes (CXCL16 and AGL) was positively correlated and expression of ADARB2 was negatively correlated with EBV copy number in a genotype-independent manner. This study shows an association between EBV copy number and the gene expression profile of LCLs, and suggests that EBV copy number should be considered as a covariate in future studies of host gene expression in LCLs.

  14. Sample processing considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. Because of these issues, FFPE DNA is not suitable for all molecular assays designed for high-quality DNA samples. Strategies recommended for processing FFPE DNA samples through WGSA and to the Mapping arrays are described here. PMID:23118355

  15. Sample processing considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. Because of these issues, FFPE DNA is not suitable for all molecular assays designed for high-quality DNA samples. Strategies recommended for processing FFPE DNA samples through WGSA and to the Mapping arrays are described here.

  16. Creating Single-Copy Genetic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Wook; Gyorgy, Andras; Cameron, D Ewen; Pyenson, Nora; Choi, Kyeong Rok; Way, Jeffrey C; Silver, Pamela A; Del Vecchio, Domitilla; Collins, James J

    2016-07-21

    Synthetic biology is increasingly used to develop sophisticated living devices for basic and applied research. Many of these genetic devices are engineered using multi-copy plasmids, but as the field progresses from proof-of-principle demonstrations to practical applications, it is important to develop single-copy synthetic modules that minimize consumption of cellular resources and can be stably maintained as genomic integrants. Here we use empirical design, mathematical modeling, and iterative construction and testing to build single-copy, bistable toggle switches with improved performance and reduced metabolic load that can be stably integrated into the host genome. Deterministic and stochastic models led us to focus on basal transcription to optimize circuit performance and helped to explain the resulting circuit robustness across a large range of component expression levels. The design parameters developed here provide important guidance for future efforts to convert functional multi-copy gene circuits into optimized single-copy circuits for practical, real-world use. PMID:27425413

  17. HIV DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses are distinguished from other viruses by two characteristic steps in the viral replication cycle. The first is reverse transcription, which results in the production of a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome, and the second is integration, which results in covalent attachment of the DNA copy to host cell DNA. The initial catalytic steps of the integration reaction are performed by the virus-encoded integrase (IN) protein. The chemistry of the IN-mediated DNA breaking and joining steps is well worked out, and structures of IN-DNA complexes have now clarified how the overall complex assembles. Methods developed during these studies were adapted for identification of IN inhibitors, which received FDA approval for use in patients in 2007. At the chromosomal level, HIV integration is strongly favored in active transcription units, which may promote efficient viral gene expression after integration. HIV IN binds to the cellular factor LEDGF/p75, which promotes efficient infection and tethers IN to favored target sites. The HIV integration machinery must also interact with many additional host factors during infection, including nuclear trafficking and pore proteins during nuclear entry, histones during initial target capture, and DNA repair proteins during completion of the DNA joining steps. Models for some of the molecular mechanisms involved have been proposed, but important details remain to be clarified. PMID:22762018

  18. 15. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original drawing located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). 1980 BLDG 10, BLDG 42 FLOOR PLAN, NASA MARCH 15 1980. - NASA Industrial Plant, Maintenance Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 14. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original photograph by original photographer located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH 1935-1936 CONSOLIDATED VULTEE AIRCRAFT CORPORATION FROM WEST TO EAST - NASA Industrial Plant, Maintenance Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 22. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of a print. (Original print located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). 1954 USAF PLANT 16 AERIAL BUILDING 41 NORTH TO SOUTH. - NASA Industrial Plant, Missile Research Laboratory, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 9. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative. (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative. (Original drawing located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). 1976 BLDGS.25, 41 SITE PLAN. - NASA Industrial Plant, Storage Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 23. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of a drawing (Original drawing located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, Calfornia). JANUARY 1960 USAF PLANT 16 MASTER PLOT AND GRID PLAN. - NASA Industrial Plant, Missile Research Laboratory, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 43 CFR 4.437 - Copies of transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of transcript. 4.437 Section 4.437... Fact § 4.437 Copies of transcript. Each party shall pay for any copies of the transcript obtained by him. Unless a summary of the evidence is stipulated to, the Government will file the original copy...

  4. 22 CFR 1471.4 - Copies and service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Copies and service. 1471.4 Section 1471.4... SERVICE IMPASSE DISPUTES PANEL PROCEDURES OF THE PANEL § 1471.4 Copies and service. Any party submitting a... file an original and one copy with the Panel, shall serve a copy promptly on the other party to...

  5. 22 CFR 1423.6 - Filing and service of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Filing and service of copies. 1423.6 Section... LABOR PRACTICE PROCEEDINGS § 1423.6 Filing and service of copies. (a) An original and four (4) copies of the charge together with one copy for each additional charged party named shall be filed with...

  6. 7 CFR 46.42 - Copies of records; how obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies of records; how obtained. 46.42 Section 46.42... REGULATIONS (OTHER THAN RULES OF PRACTICE) UNDER THE PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES ACT, 1930 Copies of Records § 46.42 Copies of records; how obtained. Copies of records pertaining to licensees under the...

  7. 49 CFR 1310.6 - Furnishing copies of tariff publications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Furnishing copies of tariff publications. 1310.6... REQUIREMENTS FOR HOUSEHOLD GOODS CARRIERS § 1310.6 Furnishing copies of tariff publications. (a) Copies of... copies of tariff publications to interested persons. If a charge is made, the charge must be...

  8. 40 CFR 121.11 - Copies of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copies of documents. 121.11 Section....11 Copies of documents. (a) Upon receipt from an applicant of an application for a license or permit... copy of the application to the appropriate certifying agency and two copies to the...

  9. 33 CFR 401.94 - Keeping copies of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Keeping copies of regulations..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations General § 401.94 Keeping copies of regulations. (a) A copy of these Regulations (subpart A of part 401), a copy of the vessel's valid...

  10. 22 CFR 1429.25 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Number of copies. 1429.25 Section 1429.25... AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.25 Number of copies. Unless otherwise provided by... therewith, shall be submitted in an original and four (4) copies. A clean copy capable of being used as...

  11. DNA Adductomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the 32P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC–MSn), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC–MSn instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology. PMID:24437709

  12. Plasmid copy number noise in monoclonal populations of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong Ng, Jérôme; Chatenay, Didier; Robert, Jérôme; Poirier, Michael Guy

    2010-01-01

    Plasmids are extra chromosomal DNA that can confer to their hosts’ supplementary characteristics such as antibiotic resistance. Plasmids code for their copy number through their own replication frequency. Even though the biochemical networks underlying the plasmid copy number (PCN) regulation processes have been studied and modeled, no measurement of the heterogeneity in PCN within a whole population has been done. We have developed a fluorescent-based measurement system, which enables determination of the mean and noise in PCN within a monoclonal population of bacteria. Two different fluorescent protein reporters were inserted: one on the chromosome and the other on the plasmid. The fluorescence of these bacteria was measured with a microfluidic flow cytometry device. We show that our measurements are consistent with known plasmid characteristics. We find that the partitioning system lowers the PCN mean and standard deviation. Finally, bacterial populations were allowed to grow without selective pressure. In this case, we were able to determine the plasmid loss rate and growth inhibition effect.

  13. The Effects of Answer Copying on the Ability Level Estimates of Cheater Examinees in Answer Copying Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zopluoglu, Cengiz; Davenport, Ernest C., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of answer copying on the ability level estimates of cheater examinees in answer copying pairs. The study generated answer copying pairs for each of 1440 conditions, source ability (12) x cheater ability (12) x amount of copying (10). The average difference between the ability level estimates…

  14. A copy number variation map of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Zarrei, Mehdi; MacDonald, Jeffrey R; Merico, Daniele; Scherer, Stephen W

    2015-03-01

    A major contribution to the genome variability among individuals comes from deletions and duplications - collectively termed copy number variations (CNVs) - which alter the diploid status of DNA. These alterations may have no phenotypic effect, account for adaptive traits or can underlie disease. We have compiled published high-quality data on healthy individuals of various ethnicities to construct an updated CNV map of the human genome. Depending on the level of stringency of the map, we estimated that 4.8-9.5% of the genome contributes to CNV and found approximately 100 genes that can be completely deleted without producing apparent phenotypic consequences. This map will aid the interpretation of new CNV findings for both clinical and research applications.

  15. [Copy number variation: markers and predictors for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Valverde, Alan Gilberto; Antúnez-Ortiz, Diana Lizzete; Méndez-Beleche, Alberto; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Ascencio-Montiel, Iván Jesús; Cruz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease characterized by a deficiency in production or action of insulin. It is the result mainly of the interaction of the environment, lifestyle, as well as genetic factors. It is considered as one of the major health issues in the world because it affects severely the psychological well-being and overall life quality. Recently it has been shown that DNA copy number variations (CNVs) are associated with several diseases, including obesity and T2D. The CNVs are present from 9 to 18 % of the genome and can modify the expression levels of mRNA and proteins encoded by genes located near their localization. Less is known about their contribution to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, which is necessary to characterize so that these variations can be potentially used as biomarkers of genetic risk CNVs of T2D.

  16. Emerging critical roles of Fe-S clusters in DNA replication and repair

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Jill O.; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Ishida, Justin P.; Tainer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-S clusters are partners in the origin of life that predate cells, acetyl-CoA metabolism, DNA, and the RNA world. The double helix solved the mystery of DNA replication by base pairing for accurate copying. Yet, for genome stability necessary to life, the double helix has equally important implications for damage repair. Here we examine striking advances that uncover Fe-S cluster roles both in copying the genetic sequence by DNA polymerases and in crucial repair processes for genome maintenance, as mutational defects cause cancer and degenerative disease. Moreover, we examine an exciting, controversial role for Fe-S clusters in a third element required for life – the long-range coordination and regulation of replication and repair events. By their ability to delocalize electrons over both Fe and S centers, Fe-S clusters have unbeatable features for protein conformational control and charge transfer via double-stranded DNA that may fundamentally transform our understanding of life, replication, and repair. PMID:25655665

  17. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  18. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  19. Copyright & Home Copying. Technology Challenges the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    Home recording technologies allow today's consumer to make near-perfect copies of recorded music, television shows, movies, and other copyrighted works for private use at home. With the advance of digital recording equipment, consumers will be able to reproduce these copyrighted works with even greater accuracy. This is an issue of great concern…

  20. Teaching Ad Copy--I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welty, Ward; Vanden Bergh, Bruce G.

    1981-01-01

    Ward Welty notes that the standard advertising course could be improved by including a unit of study in rhetoric, especially Aristotelian rhetoric. Bruce Vanden Bergh reports on research on the differences in creating advertising copy for radio versus the visual media of magazines, newspapers, and television. (RL)

  1. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 703.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DISCLOSURE OR PRODUCTION OF RECORDS OR INFORMATION Testimony by Employees and Production of Documents in Certain Legal Proceedings Where the Library... file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  2. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 703.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DISCLOSURE OR PRODUCTION OF RECORDS OR INFORMATION Testimony by Employees and Production of Documents in Certain Legal Proceedings Where the Library... file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  3. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 703.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DISCLOSURE OR PRODUCTION OF RECORDS OR INFORMATION Testimony by Employees and Production of Documents in Certain Legal Proceedings Where the Library... file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  4. Do Scribes Learn? Copying and Information Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Joy H.; Streitenberger, Denise C.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses two field studies that observed the behavior of 11th-grade students as they used reference sources to write research papers. Topics include plagiarism, citing sources correctly, paraphrasing, and the intervention role of the teacher of information skills and composition. Examples of copying are appended. (Author/LRW)

  5. Copy to contiguous example using C descriptor

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Craig E

    2011-01-18

    In N1838-2 there is an example of how to use the CFI-cdesc-t type in a C implementation of a BIND (C) interface. This paper provides another example of using the CFI-cdesc-t type in C. This new example provides code to copy an array (possibly noncontiguous) into a contiguous buffer.

  6. The 2-micron plasmid as a nonselectable, stable, high copy number yeast vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. L.; Bruschi, C. V.

    1991-01-01

    The endogenous 2-microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the construction of yeast cloning and expression plasmids because it is a native yeast plasmid that is able to be maintained stably in cells at high copy number. Almost invariably, these plasmid constructs, containing some or all 2-microns sequences, exhibit copy number levels lower than 2-microns and are maintained stably only under selective conditions. We were interested in determining if there was a means by which 2-microns could be utilized for vector construction, without forfeiting either copy number or nonselective stability. We identified sites in the 2-microns plasmid that could be used for the insertion of genetic sequences without disrupting 2-microns coding elements and then assessed subsequent plasmid constructs for stability and copy number in vivo. We demonstrate the utility of a previously described 2-microns recombination chimera, pBH-2L, for the manipulation and transformation of 2-microns as a pure yeast plasmid vector. We show that the HpaI site near the STB element in the 2-microns plasmid can be utilized to clone yeast DNA of at least 3.9 kb with no loss of plasmid stability. Additionally, the copy number of these constructs is as high as levels reported for the endogenous 2-microns.

  7. Single-copy nuclear genes resolve the phylogeny of the holometabolous insects

    PubMed Central

    Wiegmann, Brian M; Trautwein, Michelle D; Kim, Jung-Wook; Cassel, Brian K; Bertone, Matthew A; Winterton, Shaun L; Yeates, David K

    2009-01-01

    Background Evolutionary relationships among the 11 extant orders of insects that undergo complete metamorphosis, called Holometabola, remain either unresolved or contentious, but are extremely important as a context for accurate comparative biology of insect model organisms. The most phylogenetically enigmatic holometabolan insects are Strepsiptera or twisted wing parasites, whose evolutionary relationship to any other insect order is unconfirmed. They have been controversially proposed as the closest relatives of the flies, based on rDNA, and a possible homeotic transformation in the common ancestor of both groups that would make the reduced forewings of Strepsiptera homologous to the reduced hindwings of Diptera. Here we present evidence from nucleotide sequences of six single-copy nuclear protein coding genes used to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships and estimate evolutionary divergence times for all holometabolan orders. Results Our results strongly support Hymenoptera as the earliest branching holometabolan lineage, the monophyly of the extant orders, including the fleas, and traditionally recognized groupings of Neuropteroidea and Mecopterida. Most significantly, we find strong support for a close relationship between Coleoptera (beetles) and Strepsiptera, a previously proposed, but analytically controversial relationship. Exploratory analyses reveal that this relationship cannot be explained by long-branch attraction or other systematic biases. Bayesian divergence times analysis, with reference to specific fossil constraints, places the origin of Holometabola in the Carboniferous (355 Ma), a date significantly older than previous paleontological and morphological phylogenetic reconstructions. The origin and diversification of most extant insect orders began in the Triassic, but flourished in the Jurassic, with multiple adaptive radiations producing the astounding diversity of insect species for which these groups are so well known. Conclusion These

  8. COPI selectively drives maturation of the early Golgi

    DOE PAGES

    Papanikou, Effrosyni; Day, Kasey J.; Austin, Jotham; Glick, Benjamin S.

    2015-12-28

    COPI coated vesicles carry material between Golgi compartments, but the role of COPI in the secretory pathway has been ambiguous. Previous studies of thermosensitive yeast COPI mutants yielded the surprising conclusion that COPI was dispensable both for the secretion of certain proteins and for Golgi cisternal maturation. To revisit these issues, we optimized the anchor-away method, which allows peripheral membrane proteins such as COPI to be sequestered rapidly by adding rapamycin. Video fluorescence microscopy revealed that COPI inactivation causes an early Golgi protein to remain in place while late Golgi proteins undergo cycles of arrival and departure. These dynamics generatemore » partially functional hybrid Golgi structures that contain both early and late Golgi proteins, explaining how secretion can persist when COPI has been inactivated. Our findings suggest that cisternal maturation involves a COPI-dependent pathway that recycles early Golgi proteins, followed by multiple COPI-independent pathways that recycle late Golgi proteins.« less

  9. DNA-DNA hybridization evidence of the rapid rate of muroid rodent DNA evolution.

    PubMed

    Catzeflis, F M; Sheldon, F H; Ahlquist, J E; Sibley, C G

    1987-05-01

    Single-copy nuclear DNAs (scnDNAs) of eight species of arvicoline and six species of murine rodents were compared using DNA-DNA hybridization. The branching pattern derived from the DNA comparisons is congruent with the fossil evidence and supported by comparative biochemical, chromosomal, and morphological studies. The recently improved fossil record for these lineages provides seven approximate divergence dates, which were used to calibrate the DNA-hybridization data. The average rate of scnDNA divergence was estimated as 2.5%/Myr. This is approximately 10 times the rate in the hominoid primates. These results agree with previous reports of accelerated DNA evolution in muroid rodents and extend the DNA-DNA hybridization data set of Brownell.

  10. Multiple independent transpositions of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, M D; Fleischer, R C

    1996-12-24

    Transpositions of mtDNA sequences to the nuclear genome have been documented in a wide variety of individual taxa, but little is known about their taxonomic frequency or patterns of variation. We provide evidence of nuclear sequences homologous to the mtDNA control region in seven species of diving ducks (tribe Aythyini). Phylogenetic analysis places each nuclear sequence as a close relative of the mtDNA haplotypes of the specie(s) in which it occurs, indicating that they derive from six independent transposition events, all occurring within the last approximately 1.5 million years. Relative-rate tests and comparison of intraspecific variation in nuclear and mtDNA sequences confirm the expectation of a greatly reduced rate of evolution in the nuclear copies. By representing mtDNA haplotypes from ancestral populations, nuclear insertions may be valuable in some phylogenetic analyses, but they also confound the accurate determination of mtDNA sequences. In particular, our data suggest that the presumably nonfunctional but more slowly evolving nuclear sequences often will not be identifiable by changes incompatible with function and may be preferentially amplified by PCR primers based on mtDNA sequences from related taxa. PMID:8986794

  11. Stable transformation of a mosquito cell line results in extraordinarily high copy numbers of the plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, T J; Muhlmann-Diaz, M C; Kovach, M J; Carlson, J O; Bedford, J S; Beaty, B J

    1992-01-01

    Stable incorporation of high copy numbers (greater than 10,000 per cell) of a plasmid vector containing a gene conferring resistance to the antibiotic hygromycin was achieved in a cell line derived from the Aedes albopictus mosquito. Plasmid sequences were readily observed by ethidium bromide staining of cellular DNA after restriction endonuclease digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis. The plasmid was demonstrated by in situ hybridization to be present in large arrays integrated in metaphase chromosomes and in minute and double-minute replicating elements. In one subclone, approximately 60,000 copies of the plasmid were organized in a large array that resembles a chromosome, morphologically and in the segregation of its chromatids during anaphase. The original as well as modified versions of the plasmid were rescued by transformation of Escherichia coli using total cellular DNA. Southern blot analyses of recovered plasmids indicate the presence of mosquito-derived sequences. Images PMID:1631052

  12. Can DNA barcoding accurately discriminate megadiverse Neotropical freshwater fish fauna?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The megadiverse Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna is the richest in the world with approximately 6,000 recognized species. Interestingly, they are distributed among only 17 orders, and almost 80% of them belong to only three orders: Characiformes, Siluriformes and Perciformes. Moreover, evidence based on molecular data has shown that most of the diversification of the Neotropical ichthyofauna occurred recently. These characteristics make the taxonomy and identification of this fauna a great challenge, even when using molecular approaches. In this context, the present study aimed to test the effectiveness of the barcoding methodology (COI gene) to identify the mega diverse freshwater fish fauna from the Neotropical region. For this purpose, 254 species of fishes were analyzed from the Upper Parana River basin, an area representative of the larger Neotropical region. Results Of the 254 species analyzed, 252 were correctly identified by their barcode sequences (99.2%). The main K2P intra- and inter-specific genetic divergence values (0.3% and 6.8%, respectively) were relatively low compared with similar values reported in the literature, reflecting the higher number of closely related species belonging to a few higher taxa and their recent radiation. Moreover, for 84 pairs of species that showed low levels of genetic divergence (<2%), application of a complementary character-based nucleotide diagnostic approach proved useful in discriminating them. Additionally, 14 species displayed high intra-specific genetic divergence (>2%), pointing to at least 23 strong candidates for new species. Conclusions Our study is the first to examine a large number of freshwater fish species from the Neotropical area, including a large number of closely related species. The results confirmed the efficacy of the barcoding methodology to identify a recently radiated, megadiverse fauna, discriminating 99.2% of the analyzed species. The power of the barcode sequences to identify species, even with low interspecific divergence, gives us an idea of the distribution of inter-specific genetic divergence in these megadiverse fauna. The results also revealed hidden genetic divergences suggestive of reproductive isolation and putative cryptic speciation in some species (23 candidates for new species). Finally, our study constituted an important contribution to the international Barcoding of Life (iBOL.org) project, providing barcode sequences for use in identification of these species by experts and non-experts, and allowing them to be available for use in other applications. PMID:23497346

  13. Replicating Damaged DNA in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail. PMID:24296172

  14. Replicating damaged DNA in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail.

  15. Organellar genome copy number variation and integrity during moderate maturation of roots and leaves of maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Li, Xiu-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Little information is available about organellar genome copy numbers and integrity in plant roots, although it was reported recently that the plastid and mitochondrial genomes were damaged under light, resulting in non-functional fragments in green seedling leaves in a maize line. In the present study, we investigated organellar genome copy numbers and integrity, after assessing the cellular ploidy, in seedling leaves and roots of two elite maize (Zea mays) cultivars using both long-fragment polymerase chain reaction (long-PCR) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, a type of short-PCR). Since maize leaf and root cells are mainly diploid according to chromosome number counting and the literature, the DNA amount ratio between the organellar genomes and the nuclear genome could be used to estimate average organellar genome copy numbers per cell. In the present study, both long-PCR and qPCR analyses found that green leaves had dramatically more plastid DNA and less mitochondrial DNA than roots had in both cultivars. The similarity in results from long-PCR and qPCR suggests that green leaves and roots during moderate maturation have largely intact plastid and mitochondrial genomes. The high resolution of qPCR led to the detection of an increase in copies in the plastid genome and a decrease in copies in the analyzed mitochondrial sub-genomes during the moderate maturation of seedling leaves and roots. These results suggest that green seedling leaves and roots of these two maize cultivars during moderate maturation had essentially intact organellar genomes, an increased copy number of the plastid genome, and decreased copy numbers of certain mitochondrial sub-genomes.

  16. Developmental control of gene copy number by repression of replication initiation and fork progression.

    PubMed

    Sher, Noa; Bell, George W; Li, Sharon; Nordman, Jared; Eng, Thomas; Eaton, Matthew L; Macalpine, David M; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Precise DNA replication is crucial for genome maintenance, yet this process has been inherently difficult to study on a genome-wide level in untransformed differentiated metazoan cells. To determine how metazoan DNA replication can be repressed, we examined regions selectively under-replicated in Drosophila polytene salivary glands, and found they are transcriptionally silent and enriched for the repressive H3K27me3 mark. In the first genome-wide analysis of binding of the origin recognition complex (ORC) in a differentiated metazoan tissue, we find that ORC binding is dramatically reduced within these large domains, suggesting reduced initiation as one mechanism leading to under-replication. Inhibition of replication fork progression by the chromatin protein SUUR is an additional repression mechanism to reduce copy number. Although repressive histone marks are removed when SUUR is mutated and copy number restored, neither transcription nor ORC binding is reinstated. Tethering of the SUUR protein to a specific site is insufficient to block replication, however. These results establish that developmental control of DNA replication, at both the initiation and elongation stages, is a mechanism to change gene copy number during differentiation.

  17. Library preparation for highly accurate population sequencing of RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Ashley; Andino, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Circular resequencing (CirSeq) is a novel technique for efficient and highly accurate next-generation sequencing (NGS) of RNA virus populations. The foundation of this approach is the circularization of fragmented viral RNAs, which are then redundantly encoded into tandem repeats by ‘rolling-circle’ reverse transcription. When sequenced, the redundant copies within each read are aligned to derive a consensus sequence of their initial RNA template. This process yields sequencing data with error rates far below the variant frequencies observed for RNA viruses, facilitating ultra-rare variant detection and accurate measurement of low-frequency variants. Although library preparation takes ~5 d, the high-quality data generated by CirSeq simplifies downstream data analysis, making this approach substantially more tractable for experimentalists. PMID:24967624

  18. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji-Young

    2006-01-01

    was probed with fluorescently-labeled probe molecules and imaged. When only the probes were stained and hybridized in a vial, it had 6 orders of magnitude dynamic range with a detection limit of ~0.7 copy/cell. A second dye was added to lower the false positive levels. Although there was a sacrifice of two orders of magnitude in detection limit, the number of false positives was reduced to zero. HPV-16 DNA was also hybridized and detected on surface-tethered probes. When the entire human genomic DNA and HPV was labeled and hybridized, the detection limit was similar to that of one-color assay detected in capillary. However, non-specific adsorption was high, and the dynamic range was narrow because of saturation of the surface and electrostatic repulsion between hybridized targets on the surface. The second probe was introduced to lower non-specific adsorption, and the strategy succeeded in 4 orders of magnitude linear dynamic range in a log-log plot, along with 2.4 copies/cell detection limit. DNA extracts of cell lines that contained a known copy number of HPV-16 DNA were tested with the four strategies described above. The calculated numbers from observed molecule counts matched the known values. Results from the Pap test sample with added HPV DNA were similar to those of purified DNA, suggesting our method is compatible with the conventional Pap test sample collection method. Further optimization will be needed before this single molecule level detection and identification can actually be used in a real clinical lab, but it has good potential and applicability. Improvement such as automated imaging and scanning, more accurate data processing software as well as sensitive camera, should help increase the efficiency and throughput.

  19. Retroviral DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  20. Digital authentication with copy-detection patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Justin

    2004-06-01

    Technologies for making high-quality copies of documents are getting more available, cheaper, and more efficient. As a result, the counterfeiting business engenders huge losses, ranging to 5% to 8% of worldwide sales of brand products, and endangers the reputation and value of the brands themselves. Moreover, the growth of the Internet drives the business of counterfeited documents (fake IDs, university diplomas, checks, and so on), which can be bought easily and anonymously from hundreds of companies on the Web. The incredible progress of digital imaging equipment has put in question the very possibility of verifying the authenticity of documents: how can we discern genuine documents from seemingly "perfect" copies? This paper proposes a solution based on creating digital images with specific properties, called a Copy-detection patterns (CDP), that is printed on arbitrary documents, packages, etc. CDPs make an optimal use of an "information loss principle": every time an imae is printed or scanned, some information is lost about the original digital image. That principle applies even for the highest quality scanning, digital imaging, printing or photocopying equipment today, and will likely remain true for tomorrow. By measuring the amount of information contained in a scanned CDP, the CDP detector can take a decision on the authenticity of the document.

  1. Copy number and loss of heterozygosity detected by SNP array of formalin-fixed tissues using whole-genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Angela; Drozdov, Ignat; Guerra, Eliete; Ouzounis, Christos A; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Gleeson, Michael J; McGurk, Mark; Tavassoli, Mahvash; Odell, Edward W

    2011-01-01

    The requirement for large amounts of good quality DNA for whole-genome applications prohibits their use for small, laser capture micro-dissected (LCM), and/or rare clinical samples, which are also often formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE). Whole-genome amplification of DNA from these samples could, potentially, overcome these limitations. However, little is known about the artefacts introduced by amplification of FFPE-derived DNA with regard to genotyping, and subsequent copy number and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analyses. Using a ligation adaptor amplification method, we present data from a total of 22 Affymetrix SNP 6.0 experiments, using matched paired amplified and non-amplified DNA from 10 LCM FFPE normal and dysplastic oral epithelial tissues, and an internal method control. An average of 76.5% of SNPs were called in both matched amplified and non-amplified DNA samples, and concordance was a promising 82.4%. Paired analysis for copy number, LOH, and both combined, showed that copy number changes were reduced in amplified DNA, but were 99.5% concordant when detected, amplifications were the changes most likely to be 'missed', only 30% of non-amplified LOH changes were identified in amplified pairs, and when copy number and LOH are combined ∼50% of gene changes detected in the unamplified DNA were also detected in the amplified DNA and within these changes, 86.5% were concordant for both copy number and LOH status. However, there are also changes introduced as ∼20% of changes in the amplified DNA are not detected in the non-amplified DNA. An integrative network biology approach revealed that changes in amplified DNA of dysplastic oral epithelium localize to topologically critical regions of the human protein-protein interaction network, suggesting their functional implication in the pathobiology of this disease. Taken together, our results support the use of amplification of FFPE-derived DNA, provided sufficient samples are used to increase power

  2. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  3. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  4. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  5. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  6. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  7. A Simulation Model for Purchasing Duplicate Copies in a Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arms, W. Y.; Walter, T. P.

    1974-01-01

    A method of estimating the number of duplicate copies of books needed based on a computer simulation which takes into account number of copies available, number of loans, total underlying demand, satisfaction level, percentage time on shelf. (LS)

  8. 13. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF HISTORIC POSTCARD, THE HOSE FIGHT, HOMECOMING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF HISTORIC POSTCARD, THE HOSE FIGHT, HOMECOMING, 1911 (Original copy in possession of Mrs. Elizabeth C. Arnesi) - Bridge Street Bridge, Spanning Grand River at Bridge Street, Portland, Ionia County, MI

  9. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  10. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  11. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  12. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  13. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  14. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  15. To copy or not to copy: A compile-time technique for assessing when data copying should be used to eliminate cache conflicts

    SciTech Connect

    Temam, O.; Granston, E.D.; Jalby, W.

    1993-12-31

    In recent years, loop tiling has become an increasingly popular technique for increasing cache effectiveness. This is accomplished by transforming a loop nest so that the temporal and spatial locality can be better exploited for a given cache size. However, this optimization only targets the reduction of capacity misses. As recently demonstrated by several groups of researchers, conflict misses can still preclude effective cache utilization. Moreover, the severity of cache conflicts can vary greatly with slight variations in problem size and starting addresses, making performance difficult to even predict, let alone optimize. To reduce conflict misses, data copying has been proposed. With this technique, data layout in cache is adjusted by copying array tiles into temporary arrays that exhibit better cache behavior. Although copying has been proposed as the panacea to the problem of cache conflicts, this solution experiences a cost proportional to the amount of data being copied. To date, there has been no discussion regarding either this tradeoff or the problem of determining what and when to copy. In this paper, the authors present a compile-time technique for making this determination, and present a selective copying strategy based on this methodology. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that, because of the sensitivity of cache conflicts to small changes in problem size and base addresses, selective copying can lead to better overall performance than either no copying, complete copying, or copying based on manually applied heuristics.

  16. 42 CFR 456.612 - Copies of reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of reports. 456.612 Section 456.612 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.612 Copies of reports. The agency must send a copy of each...

  17. 27 CFR 18.64 - Photographic copies of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Photographic copies of records. 18.64 Section 18.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Reports § 18.64 Photographic copies of records. Proprietors may record, copy, or reproduce...

  18. 27 CFR 31.192 - Photographic copies of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Photographic copies of records. 31.192 Section 31.192 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Records and Files § 31.192 Photographic copies of records. (a) General. Dealers may record, copy,...

  19. 27 CFR 22.165 - Photographic copies of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Photographic copies of records. 22.165 Section 22.165 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Transactions § 22.165 Photographic copies of records. (a) General. Permittees may record, copy, or...

  20. 49 CFR 390.31 - Copies of records or documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... retention period. (b) To be acceptable in lieu of original records, photographic copies of records must meet the following minimum requirements: (1) Photographic copies shall be no less readily accessible than... facilities shall be available to locate, identify, read, and reproduce such photographic copies. (2)...

  1. 27 CFR 19.725 - Photographic copies of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Photographic copies of records. 19.725 Section 19.725 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Photographic copies of records. (a) Application. Proprietors who desire to record, copy or reproduce...

  2. 27 CFR 20.268 - Photographic copies of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Photographic copies of records. 20.268 Section 20.268 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Reports § 20.268 Photographic copies of records. (a) General. Permittees may record, copy, or...

  3. Syllables as Functional Units in a Copying Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Sonia; Valdois, Sylviane

    2006-01-01

    This research used a copying task to study spelling acquisition from a perception and action perspective. First to fifth graders copied words and pseudo-words on a digitiser. Simultaneously, a camera registered the children's gaze lifts. First and second graders copied the first syllable and then produced a gaze lift to obtain information on the…

  4. Readability as a Factor in Magazine Ad Copy Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesson, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the relationship between advertising copy readability and advertising effectiveness. Finds that recall is improved when the copy style is either fairly easy or fairly hard to read. Suggests the value of considering copy readability as a potential contributor, though a minor one, to the success of magazine advertising. (RS)

  5. 1 CFR 18.1 - Original and copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Original and copies required. 18.1 Section 18.1... PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.1 Original and copies... two duplicate originals or certified copies. 1 However, if the document is printed or processed...

  6. 1 CFR 18.1 - Original and copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Original and copies required. 18.1 Section 18.1... PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.1 Original and copies... two duplicate originals or certified copies. 1 However, if the document is printed or processed...

  7. 1 CFR 18.1 - Original and copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Original and copies required. 18.1 Section 18.1... PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.1 Original and copies... two duplicate originals or certified copies. 1 However, if the document is printed or processed...

  8. 75 FR 4031 - Streamlining Hard-Copy Postage Statement Processing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... 111 Streamlining Hard-Copy Postage Statement Processing AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Proposed... Postal Service, Domestic Mail Manual (DMM ), to reflect changes in the processing of hard-copy postage... complete the ``USPS Use Only'' section of, or round date, hard-copy postage statements...

  9. 47 CFR 3.25 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Number of copies. 3.25 Section 3.25 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL AUTHORIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF ACCOUNTING... copies. One original and one copy of FCC Form 44, “Application For Certification As An...

  10. 7 CFR 1200.12 - Copies of the transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies of the transcript. 1200.12 Section 1200.12... Governing Proceedings To Formulate and Amend an Order § 1200.12 Copies of the transcript. (a) During the period in which the proceeding has an active status in the Department, a copy of the transcript...

  11. 26 CFR 601.525 - Certification of copies of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certification of copies of documents. 601.525... Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Activities § 601.525 Certification of copies of documents. The provisions of paragraph (e) of § 601.504 with respect to certification of copies are applicable to a power...

  12. 46 CFR 67.539 - Copies of instruments and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Fees § 67.539 Copies of instruments and documents. The fee charged for furnishing a copy of any instrument or document is calculated in the same manner as described in 49 CFR 7.95. ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of instruments and documents. 67.539 Section...

  13. 40 CFR 374.5 - Copy of complaint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copy of complaint. 374.5 Section 374.5... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS PRIOR NOTICE OF CITIZEN SUITS § 374.5 Copy of complaint. At the time of filing an action under this Act, the plaintiff must provide a copy of the complaint to the...

  14. 47 CFR 78.67 - Copies of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of rules. 78.67 Section 78.67... SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 78.67 Copies of rules. The licensee of a CARS station shall have a current copy of this part 78, and, in cases where aeronautical obstruction marking of antennas...

  15. 7 CFR 46.8 - Copies of licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies of licenses. 46.8 Section 46.8 Agriculture... THAN RULES OF PRACTICE) UNDER THE PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES ACT, 1930 Licenses § 46.8 Copies of licenses. Copies of licenses may be issued upon request and upon the payment of a fee of...

  16. 18 CFR 385.1904 - Copies of transcripts (Rule 1904).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copies of transcripts... § 385.1904 Copies of transcripts (Rule 1904). The Commission will cause to be made a stenographic record of public hearings and such copies of the transcript thereof as it requires for its own...

  17. 12 CFR 269b.730 - Number of copies; form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Number of copies; form. 269b.730 Section 269b... SYSTEM CHARGES OF UNFAIR LABOR PRACTICES General Rules § 269b.730 Number of copies; form. Except as... copies in addition to the original. All matters filed shall be printed, typed, or otherwise...

  18. 7 CFR 900.11 - Copies of the transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies of the transcript. 900.11 Section 900.11....11 Copies of the transcript. (a) During the period in which the proceeding has an active status in the Department, a copy of the transcript and exhibits shall be kept on file in the office of...

  19. 45 CFR 1309.40 - Copies of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of documents. 1309.40 Section 1309.40 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES... § 1309.40 Copies of documents. Certified copies of the deed, lease, loan instrument, mortgage, and...

  20. 44 CFR 5.85 - Authentication and attestation of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... attestation of copies. 5.85 Section 5.85 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT... Authentication and attestation of copies. The Administrator, Deputy Administrators, Regional Administrators... name of the Administrator to authenticate and attest for copies or reproductions of...

  1. 5 CFR 2423.6 - Filing and service of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing and service of copies. 2423.6..., Investigating, Resolving, and Acting on Charges § 2423.6 Filing and service of copies. (a) Where to file. A... Charging Party is not required to file an original copy of the charge with the Region. A Charging...

  2. 40 CFR 264.53 - Copies of contingency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copies of contingency plan. 264.53 Section 264.53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Contingency Plan and Emergency Procedures § 264.53 Copies of contingency plan. A copy of the contingency...

  3. 37 CFR 360.5 - Copies of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copies of claims. 360.5... § 360.5 Copies of claims. A claimant shall, for each claim submitted to the Copyright Royalty Board by hand delivery or by mail, file an original and one copy of the claim to cable royalty fees....

  4. 45 CFR 2106.4 - Requests for copies of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests for copies of records. 2106.4 Section... FOR COMPLIANCE WITH 5 U.S.C. 552a, THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 2106.4 Requests for copies of records. Rules governing requests for copies of records are the same as those for the granting of access to...

  5. 40 CFR 51.281 - Copies of rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copies of rules and regulations. 51.281... Requirements § 51.281 Copies of rules and regulations. Emission limitations and other measures necessary for... requirements of subpart L must be adopted as rules and regulations enforceable by the State agency. Copies...

  6. 34 CFR 5.52 - Copies of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copies of records. 5.52 Section 5.52 Education Office.... L. 90-23 (Eff. until 7-14-10) Procedures for Requesting Access to Records § 5.52 Copies of records. Copies of available records shall be produced as promptly as possible upon receipt of the fee...

  7. 33 CFR 88.05 - Copy of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copy of rules. 88.05 Section 88... RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.05 Copy of rules. The operator of each self-propelled vessel 12 meters or more in length shall carry on board and maintain for ready reference a copy of the...

  8. 19 CFR 210.55 - Content of service copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Content of service copies. 210.55 Section 210.55... TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Temporary Relief § 210.55 Content of service copies. (a) Any purported confidential business information that is deleted from the nonconfidential service copies of...

  9. 27 CFR 478.95 - Certified copy of license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certified copy of license... Conduct of Business § 478.95 Certified copy of license. The license furnished to each person licensed... the licensee desires an additional copy of the license for certification (instead of making...

  10. 47 CFR 95.673 - Copy of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copy of rules. 95.673 Section 95.673... SERVICES Technical Regulations Additional Certification Requirements for Cb Transmitters § 95.673 Copy of rules. A copy of part 95, subpart D, of the FCC Rules, current at the time of packing of the...

  11. 40 CFR 35.935-10 - Copies of contract documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copies of contract documents. 35.935-10... Copies of contract documents. In addition to the notification of project changes under § 30.900 of this chapter, a grantee must promptly submit to the Regional Administrator a copy of any prime contract...

  12. 49 CFR 1312.13 - Furnishing copies of tariff publications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... with 49 CFR 1312.13 has been made. (d) Charges. (1) If any charge is made, the charge for copies of... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Furnishing copies of tariff publications. 1312.13... CARRIER IN NONCONTIGUOUS DOMESTIC TRADE § 1312.13 Furnishing copies of tariff publications....

  13. 47 CFR 1.356 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of exhibits. 1.356 Section 1.356....356 Copies of exhibits. No document or exhibit, or part thereof, shall be received as, or admitted in... offered in evidence, copies shall be furnished to other counsel unless the presiding officer...

  14. 37 CFR 360.14 - Copies of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copies of claims. 360.14... Claims § 360.14 Copies of claims. A claimant shall, for each claim submitted to the Copyright Royalty Board by hand delivery or by mail, file an original and one copy of the claim to satellite...

  15. 29 CFR 1905.7 - Form of documents; subscription; copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Form of documents; subscription; copies. 1905.7 Section...; subscription; copies. (a) No particular form is prescribed for applications and other papers which may be filed.... An original and six copies of any application or other papers shall be filed. The original shall...

  16. 46 CFR 502.168 - Copies of data or evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of data or evidence. 502.168 Section 502.168... Hearings; Presiding Officers; Evidence § 502.168 Copies of data or evidence. Every person compelled to submit data or evidence shall be entitled to retain or, on payment of proper costs, procure a copy...

  17. 33 CFR 72.01-40 - Single copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Single copies. 72.01-40 Section 72.01-40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION MARINE INFORMATION Notices to Mariners § 72.01-40 Single copies. Single copies of the “Notice...

  18. 49 CFR 1001.2 - Certified copies of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certified copies of records. 1001.2 Section 1001.2... OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS INSPECTION OF RECORDS § 1001.2 Certified copies of records. Copies of and extracts from public records will be certified by the Records Officer....

  19. 30 CFR 47.72 - Cost for copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost for copies. 47.72 Section 47.72 Mineral... COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Making HazCom Information Available § 47.72 Cost for copies. (a) The operator must provide the first copy and each revision of the HazCom material without cost. (b) Fees for a...

  20. 47 CFR 78.67 - Copies of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies of rules. 78.67 Section 78.67 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 78.67 Copies of rules. The licensee of a CARS station shall have a current copy of this part 78, and,...