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Sample records for accurate dna copy

  1. Methods for Applying Accurate Digital PCR Analysis on Low Copy DNA Samples

    PubMed Central

    Whale, Alexandra S.; Cowen, Simon; Foy, Carole A.; Huggett, Jim F.

    2013-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is a highly accurate molecular approach, capable of precise measurements, offering a number of unique opportunities. However, in its current format dPCR can be limited by the amount of sample that can be analysed and consequently additional considerations such as performing multiplex reactions or pre-amplification can be considered. This study investigated the impact of duplexing and pre-amplification on dPCR analysis by using three different assays targeting a model template (a portion of the Arabidopsis thaliana alcohol dehydrogenase gene). We also investigated the impact of different template types (linearised plasmid clone and more complex genomic DNA) on measurement precision using dPCR. We were able to demonstrate that duplex dPCR can provide a more precise measurement than uniplex dPCR, while applying pre-amplification or varying template type can significantly decrease the precision of dPCR. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the pre-amplification step can introduce measurement bias that is not consistent between experiments for a sample or assay and so could not be compensated for during the analysis of this data set. We also describe a model for estimating the prevalence of molecular dropout and identify this as a source of dPCR imprecision. Our data have demonstrated that the precision afforded by dPCR at low sample concentration can exceed that of the same template post pre-amplification thereby negating the need for this additional step. Our findings also highlight the technical differences between different templates types containing the same sequence that must be considered if plasmid DNA is to be used to assess or control for more complex templates like genomic DNA. PMID:23472156

  2. Single copy DNA homology in sea stars.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J; Nicholson, R; Stuerzl, M; Lui, A

    1982-01-01

    The sequence homology in the single copy DNA of sea stars has been measured. Labeled single copy DNA from Pisaster ochraceus was reannealed with excess genomic DNA from P. brevispinus, Evasterias troschelii, Pycnopodia helianthoides, Solaster stimpsoni, and Dermasterias imbricata. Reassociation reactions were performed under two criteria of salt and temperature. The extent of reassociation and thermal denaturation characteristics of hybrid single copy DNA molecules follow classical taxonomic lines. P. brevispinus DNA contains essentially all of the sequences present in P. ochraceus single copy tracer while Evasterias and Pycnopodia DNAs contain 52% and 46% of such sequences respectively. Reciprocal reassociation reactions with labeled Evasterias single copy DNA confirm the amount and fidelity of the sequence homology. There is a small definite reaction of uncertain homology between P. ochraceus single copy DNA and Solaster or Dermasterias DNA. Similarly Solaster DNA contains sequences homologous to approximately 18% of Dermasterias unique DNA. The thermal denaturation temperatures of heteroduplexes indicate that the genera Pisaster and Evasterias diverged shortly after the divergence of the subfamilies Pycnopodiinae and Asteriinae. The two Pisaster species diverged more recently, probably in the most recent quarter of the interval since the separation of the genera Pisaster and Evasterias.

  3. Systematic biases in DNA copy number originate from isolation procedures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to accurately detect DNA copy number variation in both a sensitive and quantitative manner is important in many research areas. However, genome-wide DNA copy number analyses are complicated by variations in detection signal. Results While GC content has been used to correct for this, here we show that coverage biases are tissue-specific and independent of the detection method as demonstrated by next-generation sequencing and array CGH. Moreover, we show that DNA isolation stringency affects the degree of equimolar coverage and that the observed biases coincide with chromatin characteristics like gene expression, genomic isochores, and replication timing. Conclusion These results indicate that chromatin organization is a main determinant for differential DNA retrieval. These findings are highly relevant for germline and somatic DNA copy number variation analyses. PMID:23618369

  4. Most Cancers Caused by Random DNA Copying Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164252.html Most Cancers Caused by Random DNA Copying Errors While habits, environment can be key ... factors, genes inherited from parents, or simply random DNA copying errors. From their calculations, the researchers now ...

  5. Accurate measurement of transgene copy number in crop plants using droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Collier, Ray; Dasgupta, Kasturi; Xing, Yan-Ping; Hernandez, Bryan Tarape; Shao, Min; Rohozinski, Dominica; Kovak, Emma; Lin, Jeanie; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza P; Stover, Ed; McCue, Kent F; Harmon, Frank G; Blechl, Ann; Thomson, James G; Thilmony, Roger

    2017-02-23

    Genetic transformation is a powerful means for the improvement of crop plants, but requires labor and resource intensive methods. An efficient method for identifying single copy transgene insertion events from a population of independent transgenic lines is desirable. Currently transgene copy number is estimated by either Southern blot hybridization analyses or quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments. Southern hybridization is a convincing and reliable method, but it also is expensive, time-consuming and often requires a large amount of genomic DNA and radioactively labeled probes. Alternatively, qPCR requires less DNA and is potentially simpler to perform, but its results can lack the accuracy and precision needed to confidently distinguish between one and two copy events in transgenic plants with large genomes. To address this need, we developed a droplet digital PCR (dPCR)-based method for transgene copy number measurement in an array of crops: rice, citrus, potato, maize, tomato, and wheat. The method utilizes specific primers to amplify target transgenes, and endogenous reference genes in a single duplexed reaction containing thousands of droplets. Endpoint amplicon production in the droplets is detected and quantified using sequence-specific fluorescently labeled probes. The results demonstrate that this approach can generate confident copy number measurements in independent transgenic lines in these crop species. This method and the compendium of probes and primers will be a useful resource for the plant research community, enabling the simple and accurate determination of transgene copy number in these six important crop species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Getting DNA copy numbers without control samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The selection of the reference to scale the data in a copy number analysis has paramount importance to achieve accurate estimates. Usually this reference is generated using control samples included in the study. However, these control samples are not always available and in these cases, an artificial reference must be created. A proper generation of this signal is crucial in terms of both noise and bias. We propose NSA (Normality Search Algorithm), a scaling method that works with and without control samples. It is based on the assumption that genomic regions enriched in SNPs with identical copy numbers in both alleles are likely to be normal. These normal regions are predicted for each sample individually and used to calculate the final reference signal. NSA can be applied to any CN data regardless the microarray technology and preprocessing method. It also finds an optimal weighting of the samples minimizing possible batch effects. Results Five human datasets (a subset of HapMap samples, Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), Ovarian, Prostate and Lung Cancer experiments) have been analyzed. It is shown that using only tumoral samples, NSA is able to remove the bias in the copy number estimation, to reduce the noise and therefore, to increase the ability to detect copy number aberrations (CNAs). These improvements allow NSA to also detect recurrent aberrations more accurately than other state of the art methods. Conclusions NSA provides a robust and accurate reference for scaling probe signals data to CN values without the need of control samples. It minimizes the problems of bias, noise and batch effects in the estimation of CNs. Therefore, NSA scaling approach helps to better detect recurrent CNAs than current methods. The automatic selection of references makes it useful to perform bulk analysis of many GEO or ArrayExpress experiments without the need of developing a parser to find the normal samples or possible batches within the data. The method is

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Is Associated with Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Wang, Renwei; Nelson, Heather; Barcelo, Helene; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood is associated with increased risk of several cancers. However, data from prospective studies on mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk are lacking. We evaluated the association between mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study of 183 breast cancer cases with pre-diagnostic blood samples and 529 individually matched controls among participants of the Singapore Chinese Health Study. The mtDNA copy number was measured using real time PCR. Conditional logistic regression analyses showed that there was an overall positive association between mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk (Ptrend = 0.01). The elevated risk for higher mtDNA copy numbers was primarily seen for women with <3 years between blood draw and cancer diagnosis; ORs (95% CIs) for 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th quintile of mtDNA copy number were 1.52 (0.61, 3.82), 2.52 (1.03, 6.12), 3.12 (1.31, 7.43), and 3.06 (1.25, 7.47), respectively, compared with the 1st quintile (Ptrend = 0.004). There was no association between mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk among women who donated a blood sample ≥3 years before breast cancer diagnosis (Ptrend = 0.41). This study supports a prospective association between increased mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk that is dependent on the time interval between blood collection and breast cancer diagnosis. Future studies are warranted to confirm these findings and to elucidate the biological role of mtDNA copy number in breast cancer risk. PMID:23776581

  8. Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood and melanoma risk.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Lee, Jeffrey E; Fang, Shenying; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood has been suggested as risk modifier in various types of cancer. However, its influence on melanoma risk is unclear. We evaluated the association between mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood and melanoma risk in 500 melanoma cases and 500 healthy controls from an ongoing melanoma study. The mtDNA copy number was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Overall, mean mtDNA copy number was significantly higher in cases than in controls (1.15 vs 0.99, P<0.001). Increased mtDNA copy number was associated with a 1.45-fold increased risk of melanoma (95% confidence interval: 1.12-1.97). Significant joint effects between mtDNA copy number and variables related to pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure were observed. This study supports an association between increased mtDNA copy number and melanoma risk that is independent on the known melanoma risk factors (pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure).

  9. Number matters: control of mammalian mitochondrial DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Clay Montier, Laura L; Deng, Janice J; Bai, Yidong

    2009-03-01

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for proper cellular functioning. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and the resulting mitochondrial malfunction have been implicated in cancer, neurodegeneration, diabetes, aging, and many other human diseases. Although it is known that the dynamics of the mammalian mitochondrial genome are not linked with that of the nuclear genome, very little is known about the mechanism of mtDNA propagation. Nevertheless, our understanding of the mode of mtDNA replication has advanced in recent years, though not without some controversies. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA copy number control in mammalian cells, while focusing on both mtDNA replication and turnover. Although mtDNA copy number is seemingly in excess, we reason that mtDNA copy number control is an important aspect of mitochondrial genetics and biogenesis and is essential for normal cellular function.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Sleep Duration Discordant Monozygotic Twins

    PubMed Central

    Wrede, Joanna E.; Mengel-From, Jonas; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Bamshad, Michael; Noonan, Carolyn; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is an important component of mitochondrial function and varies with age, disease, and environmental factors. We aimed to determine whether mtDNA copy number varies with habitual differences in sleep duration within pairs of monozygotic twins. Setting: Academic clinical research center. Participants: 15 sleep duration discordant monozygotic twin pairs (30 twins, 80% female; mean age 42.1 years [SD 15.0]). Design: Sleep duration was phenotyped with wrist actigraphy. Each twin pair included a “normal” (7–9 h/24) and “short” (< 7 h/24) sleeping twin. Fasting peripheral blood leukocyte DNA was assessed for mtDNA copy number via the n-fold difference between qPCR measured mtDNA and nuclear DNA creating an mtDNA measure without absolute units. We used generalized estimating equation linear regression models accounting for the correlated data structure to assess within-pair effects of sleep duration on mtDNA copy number. Measurements and Results: Mean within-pair sleep duration difference per 24 hours was 94.3 minutes (SD 62.6 min). We found reduced sleep duration (β = 0.06; 95% CI 0.004, 0.12; P < 0.05) and sleep efficiency (β = 0.51; 95% CI 0.06, 0.95; P < 0.05) were significantly associated with reduced mtDNA copy number within twin pairs. Thus every 1-minute decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep duration was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.06. Likewise, a 1% decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep efficiency was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.51. Conclusions: Reduced sleep duration and sleep efficiency were associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number in sleep duration discordant monozygotic twins offering a potential mechanism whereby short sleep impairs health and longevity through mitochondrial stress. Citation: Wrede JE, Mengel-From J, Buchwald D, Vitiello MV, Bamshad M, Noonan C, Christiansen L, Christensen K, Watson NF. Mitochondrial DNA copy number

  11. RECONSTRUCTING DNA COPY NUMBER BY PENALIZED ESTIMATION AND IMPUTATION.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Lange, Kenneth; Ophoff, Roel; Sabatti, Chiara

    2010-12-01

    Recent advances in genomics have underscored the surprising ubiquity of DNA copy number variation (CNV). Fortunately, modern genotyping platforms also detect CNVs with fairly high reliability. Hidden Markov models and algorithms have played a dominant role in the interpretation of CNV data. Here we explore CNV reconstruction via estimation with a fused-lasso penalty as suggested by Tibshirani and Wang [Biostatistics 9 (2008) 18-29]. We mount a fresh attack on this difficult optimization problem by the following: (a) changing the penalty terms slightly by substituting a smooth approximation to the absolute value function, (b) designing and implementing a new MM (majorization-minimization) algorithm, and (c) applying a fast version of Newton's method to jointly update all model parameters. Together these changes enable us to minimize the fused-lasso criterion in a highly effective way.We also reframe the reconstruction problem in terms of imputation via discrete optimization. This approach is easier and more accurate than parameter estimation because it relies on the fact that only a handful of possible copy number states exist at each SNP. The dynamic programming framework has the added bonus of exploiting information that the current fused-lasso approach ignores. The accuracy of our imputations is comparable to that of hidden Markov models at a substantially lower computational cost.

  12. Accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA by digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lianhua; Yoo, Hee-Bong; Wang, Jing; Park, Sang-Ryoul

    2016-04-11

    Digital PCR (dPCR) as an enumeration-based quantification method is capable of quantifying the DNA copy number without the help of standards. However, it can generate false results when the PCR conditions are not optimized. A recent international comparison (CCQM P154) showed that most laboratories significantly underestimated the concentration of supercoiled plasmid DNA by dPCR. Mostly, supercoiled DNAs are linearized before dPCR to avoid such underestimations. The present study was conducted to overcome this problem. In the bilateral comparison, the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM) optimized and applied dPCR for supercoiled DNA determination, whereas Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) prepared the unknown samples and quantified them by flow cytometry. In this study, several factors like selection of the PCR master mix, the fluorescent label, and the position of the primers were evaluated for quantifying supercoiled DNA by dPCR. This work confirmed that a 16S PCR master mix avoided poor amplification of the supercoiled DNA, whereas HEX labels on dPCR probe resulted in robust amplification curves. Optimizing the dPCR assay based on these two observations resulted in accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA without preanalytical linearization. This result was validated in close agreement (101~113%) with the result from flow cytometry.

  13. Accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA by digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lianhua; Yoo, Hee-Bong; Wang, Jing; Park, Sang-Ryoul

    2016-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) as an enumeration-based quantification method is capable of quantifying the DNA copy number without the help of standards. However, it can generate false results when the PCR conditions are not optimized. A recent international comparison (CCQM P154) showed that most laboratories significantly underestimated the concentration of supercoiled plasmid DNA by dPCR. Mostly, supercoiled DNAs are linearized before dPCR to avoid such underestimations. The present study was conducted to overcome this problem. In the bilateral comparison, the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM) optimized and applied dPCR for supercoiled DNA determination, whereas Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) prepared the unknown samples and quantified them by flow cytometry. In this study, several factors like selection of the PCR master mix, the fluorescent label, and the position of the primers were evaluated for quantifying supercoiled DNA by dPCR. This work confirmed that a 16S PCR master mix avoided poor amplification of the supercoiled DNA, whereas HEX labels on dPCR probe resulted in robust amplification curves. Optimizing the dPCR assay based on these two observations resulted in accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA without preanalytical linearization. This result was validated in close agreement (101~113%) with the result from flow cytometry. PMID:27063649

  14. Mitochondrial DNA copy number variation across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Miller, Martin L; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Riaz, Nadeem; Sarungbam, Judy; Tickoo, Satish K; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Lee, William; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Hakimi, A Ari; Sander, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Mutations, deletions, and changes in copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are observed throughout cancers. Here, we survey mtDNA copy number variation across 22 tumor types profiled by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observe a tendency for some cancers, especially of the bladder, breast, and kidney, to be depleted of mtDNA, relative to matched normal tissue. Analysis of genetic context reveals an association between incidence of several somatic alterations, including IDH1 mutations in gliomas, and mtDNA content. In some but not all cancer types, mtDNA content is correlated with the expression of respiratory genes, and anti-correlated to the expression of immune response and cell-cycle genes. In tandem with immunohistochemical evidence, we find that some tumors may compensate for mtDNA depletion to sustain levels of respiratory proteins. Our results highlight the extent of mtDNA copy number variation in tumors and point to related therapeutic opportunities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10769.001 PMID:26901439

  15. Reconstructing DNA copy number by joint segmentation of multiple sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variations in DNA copy number carry information on the modalities of genome evolution and mis-regulation of DNA replication in cancer cells. Their study can help localize tumor suppressor genes, distinguish different populations of cancerous cells, and identify genomic variations responsible for disease phenotypes. A number of different high throughput technologies can be used to identify copy number variable sites, and the literature documents multiple effective algorithms. We focus here on the specific problem of detecting regions where variation in copy number is relatively common in the sample at hand. This problem encompasses the cases of copy number polymorphisms, related samples, technical replicates, and cancerous sub-populations from the same individual. Results We present a segmentation method named generalized fused lasso (GFL) to reconstruct copy number variant regions. GFL is based on penalized estimation and is capable of processing multiple signals jointly. Our approach is computationally very attractive and leads to sensitivity and specificity levels comparable to those of state-of-the-art specialized methodologies. We illustrate its applicability with simulated and real data sets. Conclusions The flexibility of our framework makes it applicable to data obtained with a wide range of technology. Its versatility and speed make GFL particularly useful in the initial screening stages of large data sets. PMID:22897923

  16. DNA Copy Number Control Through Inhibition of Replication Fork Progression

    PubMed Central

    Nordman, Jared T.; Kozhevnikova, Elena N.; Verrijzer, C. Peter; Pindyurin, Alexey V.; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N.; Shloma, Victor V.; Zhimulev, Igor F.; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Proper control of DNA replication is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material and to prevent chromosomal aberrations that can drive cancer progression and developmental disorders. DNA replication is regulated primarily at the level of initiation and is under strict cell cycle regulation. Importantly, DNA replication is highly influenced by developmental cues. In Drosophila, specific regions of the genome are repressed for DNA replication during differentiation by the SNF2 domain-containing protein SUUR through an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that SUUR is recruited to active replication forks and mediates repression of DNA replication by directly inhibiting replication fork progression instead of functioning as a replication fork barrier. Mass-spec identification of SUUR associated proteins identified the replicative helicase member CDC45 as a SUUR-associated protein, supporting a role for SUUR directly at replication forks. Our results reveal that control of eukaryotic DNA copy number can occur through inhibition of replication fork progression. PMID:25437540

  17. Rates of single-copy DNA evolution in herons.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, F H

    1987-01-01

    DNA-DNA hybridization was used to discover the extent of single-copy DNA similarity among 13 species of herons and one ibis. Genetic distances among taxa were summarized as Tm values in a folded matrix. From this matrix, trees with the same branching pattern were constructed by least squares under one of two assumptions: (1) that sister branches are equal in length and (2) that sister branches are not necessarily equal in length. The residual sums of squares of these trees were compared by F-test to see whether the branches of the tree built under assumption (2) fit the matrix data significantly better than those of the tree built under assumption (1). By this method the existence of different rates of DNA evolution in different heron lineages was established. Bittern single-copy DNA has evolved at a rate approximately 25% faster, and boat-billed heron (Cochearius) and rufescent tiger heron (Tigrisoma lineatum) DNA has evolved approximately 19% slower, than that of day and night herons. It appears that the differences in rates of DNA evolution may increase proportionally with genealogical distance.

  18. Chloroplast DNA Copy Number Changes during Plant Development in Organelle DNA Polymerase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Morley, Stewart A.; Nielsen, Brent L.

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast genome copy number is very high in leaf tissue, with upwards of 10,000 or more copies of the chloroplast DNA (ctDNA) per leaf cell. This is often promoted as a major advantage for engineering the plastid genome, as it provides high gene copy number and thus is expected to result in high expression of foreign proteins from integrated genes. However, it is also known that ctDNA copy number and ctDNA integrity decrease as cells age. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) allows measurement of organelle DNA levels relative to a nuclear gene target. We have used this approach to determine changes in copy number of ctDNA relative to the nuclear genome at different ages of Arabidopsis plant growth and in organellar DNA polymerase mutants. The mutant plant lines have T-DNA insertions in genes encoding the two organelle localized DNA polymerases (PolIA and PolIB). Each of these mutant lines exhibits some delay in plant growth and development as compared to wild-type plants, with the PolIB plants having a more pronounced delay. Both mutant lines develop to maturity and produce viable seeds. Mutants for both proteins were observed to have a reduction in ctDNA and mtDNA copy number relative to wild type plants at all time points as measured by qPCR. Both DNA polymerase mutants had a fairly similar decrease in ctDNA copy number, while the PolIB mutant had a greater effect of reduction in mtDNA levels. However, despite similar decreases in genome copy number, RT-PCR analysis of PolIA mutants show that PolIB expression remains unchanged, suggesting that PolIA may not be essential to plant survival. Furthermore, genotypic analysis of plants from heterozygous parents display a strong pressure to maintain two functioning copies of PolIB. These results indicate that the two DNA polymerases are both important in ctDNA replication, and they are not fully redundant to each other, suggesting each has a specific function in plant organelles. PMID:26870072

  19. Molecular Poltergeists: Mitochondrial DNA Copies (numts) in Sequenced Nuclear Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Zeller, Raymond M.; Martin, William

    2010-01-01

    The natural transfer of DNA from mitochondria to the nucleus generates nuclear copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) and is an ongoing evolutionary process, as genome sequences attest. In humans, five different numts cause genetic disease and a dozen human loci are polymorphic for the presence of numts, underscoring the rapid rate at which mitochondrial sequences reach the nucleus over evolutionary time. In the laboratory and in nature, numts enter the nuclear DNA via non-homolgous end joining (NHEJ) at double-strand breaks (DSBs). The frequency of numt insertions among 85 sequenced eukaryotic genomes reveal that numt content is strongly correlated with genome size, suggesting that the numt insertion rate might be limited by DSB frequency. Polymorphic numts in humans link maternally inherited mitochondrial genotypes to nuclear DNA haplotypes during the past, offering new opportunities to associate nuclear markers with mitochondrial markers back in time. PMID:20168995

  20. Mathematical Analysis of Copy Number Variation in a DNA Sample Using Digital PCR on a Nanofluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Dube, Simant; Qin, Jian; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    Copy Number Variations (CNVs) of regions of the human genome have been associated with multiple diseases. We present an algorithm which is mathematically sound and computationally efficient to accurately analyze CNV in a DNA sample utilizing a nanofluidic device, known as the digital array. This numerical algorithm is utilized to compute copy number variation and the associated statistical confidence interval and is based on results from probability theory and statistics. We also provide formulas which can be used as close approximations. PMID:18682853

  1. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  2. Reconstructing labroid evolution with single-copy nuclear DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Streelman, J T; Karl, S A

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen per cent of all living fishes are united in a single suborder (Labroidei) and display a dazzling array of behavioural and ecological traits. The labroids are considered monophyletic and members share a pharyngeal jaw apparatus (PJA) modified for crushing and processing prey. Outside of the explicitly functional PJA, there is no corroborative evidence for a monophyletic Labroidei. Here, we report the first molecular phylogenetic analysis of the suborder. Contrary to morphology-based phylogenies, our single-copy nuclear DNA data do not support labroid families as a natural group. Our data indicate that pharyngognathy has evolved independently among labroid families and that characters of the PJA are not reliable markers of perciform evolution. This work 'crushes' conventional views of fish phylogeny and should engender novel concepts of piscine life history evolution. PMID:9263469

  3. Increased leukocyte mitochondrial DNA copy number is associated with oral premalignant lesions: an epidemiology study.

    PubMed

    He, Yonggang; Gong, Yilei; Gu, Jian; Lee, J Jack; Lippman, Scott M; Wu, Xifeng

    2014-08-01

    Although changes in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) have been linked to increased susceptibility to several cancers, the relationship between the mtDNA copy number in PBLs and the risk of cancer precursors has not been investigated. In this study, we measured the relative mtDNA copy number in PBLs of 143 patients with histologically confirmed oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) and of 357 healthy controls that were frequency-matched to patients according to age, sex and race. OPL patients had a significantly higher mtDNA copy number than the controls (1.36 ± 0.74 versus 1.11 ± 0.32; P < 0.001). In analyses stratified by sex, race, alcohol consumption and smoking status, the mtDNA copy number was higher in the OPL patients than in the controls in all the strata. Using the median mtDNA copy number in the control group as a cutoff, we found that individuals with a high mtDNA copy number had significantly higher risk of having OPLs than individuals with a low mtDNA copy number (adjusted odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-3.05, P = 0.004). Analysis of the joint effect of alcohol consumption and smoking revealed even greater risk for OPLs. Our results suggest that high mtDNA copy number in PBLs is significantly associated with having OPLs. To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiologic study to show that the mtDNA copy number may indicate the risk of cancer precursors.

  4. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion.

  5. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion. PMID:27031233

  6. Association between Leukocyte Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Regular Exercise in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu Kyung; Kim, Da Eun; Cho, Soo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that habitual exercise can improve skeletal mitochondrial function; however, to date, the association between exercise and mitochondrial function in peripheral leukocytes has not been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between regular exercise and mitochondrial function by measuring leukocyte mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in postmenopausal women. Methods This cross-sectional study included 144 relatively healthy, non-diabetic, non-smoking, postmenopausal women. Clinical parameters, including anthropometric measurements and cardio-metabolic parameters, were assessed. Regular exercise was defined as at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous-intensity activity, over a duration of at least 6 months. Leukocyte mtDNA copy numbers were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction assays, and these were normalized to the β-globin copy number to give the relative mtDNA copy number. Results The mtDNA copy number of peripheral leukocytes was significantly greater in the exercise group (1.33±0.02) than in the no exercise group (1.05±0.02, P<0.01). Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that regular exercise was independently associated with mtDNA copy number (β=0.25, P<0.01) after adjusting for the variables age, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance value, and levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and homocysteine. Conclusion Regular exercise is associated with greater leukocyte mtDNA copy number in postmenopausal women. PMID:27900071

  7. Integration of DNA Copy Number Alterations and Transcriptional Expression Analysis in Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coral, Ho; Yuen, Siu Tsan; Chu, Kent Man; Law, Simon; Zhang, Lianhai; Ji, Jiafu; Leung, Suet Yi; Chen, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Genomic instability with frequent DNA copy number alterations is one of the key hallmarks of carcinogenesis. The chromosomal regions with frequent DNA copy number gain and loss in human gastric cancer are still poorly defined. It remains unknown how the DNA copy number variations contributes to the changes of gene expression profiles, especially on the global level. Principal Findings We analyzed DNA copy number alterations in 64 human gastric cancer samples and 8 gastric cancer cell lines using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Statistical analysis was applied to correlate previously published gene expression data obtained from cDNA microarrays with corresponding DNA copy number variation data to identify candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We found that gastric cancer samples showed recurrent DNA copy number variations, including gains at 5p, 8q, 20p, 20q, and losses at 4q, 9p, 18q, 21q. The most frequent regions of amplification were 20q12 (7/72), 20q12–20q13.1 (12/72), 20q13.1–20q13.2 (11/72) and 20q13.2–20q13.3 (6/72). The most frequent deleted region was 9p21 (8/72). Correlating gene expression array data with aCGH identified 321 candidate oncogenes, which were overexpressed and showed frequent DNA copy number gains; and 12 candidate tumor suppressor genes which were down-regulated and showed frequent DNA copy number losses in human gastric cancers. Three networks of significantly expressed genes in gastric cancer samples were identified by ingenuity pathway analysis. Conclusions This study provides insight into DNA copy number variations and their contribution to altered gene expression profiles during human gastric cancer development. It provides novel candidate driver oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes for human gastric cancer, useful pathway maps for the future understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this malignancy, and the construction of new therapeutic

  8. Ribosomal DNA and Stellate gene copy number variation on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1989-03-01

    Multigene families on the Y chromosome face an unusual array of evolutionary forces. Both ribosomal DNA and Stellate, the two families examined here, have multiple copies of similar sequences on the X and Y chromosomes. Although the rate of sequence divergence on the Y chromosome depends on rates of mutation, gene conversion and exchange with the X chromosome, as well as purifying selection, the regulation of gene copy number may also depend on other pleiotropic functions, such as maintenance of chromosome pairing. Gene copy numbers were estimated for a series of 34 Y chromosome replacement lines using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster. Scans of autoradiographs of the same blots probed with the cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene, a single copy gene, served as internal standards. Copy numbers span a 6-fold range for ribosomal DNA and a 3-fold range for Stellate DNA. Despite this magnitude of variation, there was no association between copy number and segregation variation of the sex chromosomes.

  9. The potential role for use of mitochondrial DNA copy number as predictive biomarker in presbycusis

    PubMed Central

    Falah, Masoumeh; Houshmand, Massoud; Najafi, Mohammad; Balali, Maryam; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Asghari, Alimohamad; Emamdjomeh, Hessamaldin; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is the most common communication disorder and neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Its prevalence is expected to increase, due to the trend of growth of the elderly population. The current diagnostic test for detection of presbycusis is implemented after there has been a change in hearing sensitivity. Identification of a pre-diagnostic biomarker would raise the possibility of preserving hearing sensitivity before damage occurs. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including the production of reactive oxygen species and induction of expression of apoptotic genes, participates in the progression of presbycusis. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation has a critical role in presbycusis. However, the nature of the relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number, an important biomarker in many other diseases, and presbycusis is undetermined. Methods Fifty-four subjects with presbycusis and 29 healthy controls were selected after ear, nose, throat examination and pure-tone audiometry. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. The copy number of mitochondrial DNA relative to the nuclear genome was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Subjects with presbycusis had a lower median mitochondrial DNA copy number than healthy subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.007). Mitochondrial DNA copy number was also significantly associated with degree of hearing impairment (P=0.025) and audiogram configuration (P=0.022). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that lower mitochondrial DNA copy number is responsible for presbycusis through alteration of mitochondrial function. Moreover, the significant association of mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood samples with the degree of hearing impairment and audiogram configuration has potential for use as a standard test for presbycusis, providing the possibility of the development of an easy

  10. DNA barcode data accurately assign higher spider taxa.

    PubMed

    Coddington, Jonathan A; Agnarsson, Ingi; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Čandek, Klemen; Driskell, Amy; Frick, Holger; Gregorič, Matjaž; Kostanjšek, Rok; Kropf, Christian; Kweskin, Matthew; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Pipan, Miha; Vidergar, Nina; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    The use of unique DNA sequences as a method for taxonomic identification is no longer fundamentally controversial, even though debate continues on the best markers, methods, and technology to use. Although both existing databanks such as GenBank and BOLD, as well as reference taxonomies, are imperfect, in best case scenarios "barcodes" (whether single or multiple, organelle or nuclear, loci) clearly are an increasingly fast and inexpensive method of identification, especially as compared to manual identification of unknowns by increasingly rare expert taxonomists. Because most species on Earth are undescribed, a complete reference database at the species level is impractical in the near term. The question therefore arises whether unidentified species can, using DNA barcodes, be accurately assigned to more inclusive groups such as genera and families-taxonomic ranks of putatively monophyletic groups for which the global inventory is more complete and stable. We used a carefully chosen test library of CO1 sequences from 49 families, 313 genera, and 816 species of spiders to assess the accuracy of genus and family-level assignment. We used BLAST queries of each sequence against the entire library and got the top ten hits. The percent sequence identity was reported from these hits (PIdent, range 75-100%). Accurate assignment of higher taxa (PIdent above which errors totaled less than 5%) occurred for genera at PIdent values >95 and families at PIdent values ≥ 91, suggesting these as heuristic thresholds for accurate generic and familial identifications in spiders. Accuracy of identification increases with numbers of species/genus and genera/family in the library; above five genera per family and fifteen species per genus all higher taxon assignments were correct. We propose that using percent sequence identity between conventional barcode sequences may be a feasible and reasonably accurate method to identify animals to family/genus. However, the quality of the

  11. DNA barcode data accurately assign higher spider taxa

    PubMed Central

    Coddington, Jonathan A.; Agnarsson, Ingi; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Čandek, Klemen; Driskell, Amy; Frick, Holger; Gregorič, Matjaž; Kostanjšek, Rok; Kropf, Christian; Kweskin, Matthew; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Pipan, Miha; Vidergar, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The use of unique DNA sequences as a method for taxonomic identification is no longer fundamentally controversial, even though debate continues on the best markers, methods, and technology to use. Although both existing databanks such as GenBank and BOLD, as well as reference taxonomies, are imperfect, in best case scenarios “barcodes” (whether single or multiple, organelle or nuclear, loci) clearly are an increasingly fast and inexpensive method of identification, especially as compared to manual identification of unknowns by increasingly rare expert taxonomists. Because most species on Earth are undescribed, a complete reference database at the species level is impractical in the near term. The question therefore arises whether unidentified species can, using DNA barcodes, be accurately assigned to more inclusive groups such as genera and families—taxonomic ranks of putatively monophyletic groups for which the global inventory is more complete and stable. We used a carefully chosen test library of CO1 sequences from 49 families, 313 genera, and 816 species of spiders to assess the accuracy of genus and family-level assignment. We used BLAST queries of each sequence against the entire library and got the top ten hits. The percent sequence identity was reported from these hits (PIdent, range 75–100%). Accurate assignment of higher taxa (PIdent above which errors totaled less than 5%) occurred for genera at PIdent values >95 and families at PIdent values ≥ 91, suggesting these as heuristic thresholds for accurate generic and familial identifications in spiders. Accuracy of identification increases with numbers of species/genus and genera/family in the library; above five genera per family and fifteen species per genus all higher taxon assignments were correct. We propose that using percent sequence identity between conventional barcode sequences may be a feasible and reasonably accurate method to identify animals to family/genus. However, the quality of

  12. Global Genetic Determinants of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hengshan; Singh, Keshav K.

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases including development of cancer is associated with depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content. These diseases are collectively described as mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS). High similarity between yeast and human mitochondria allows genomic study of the budding yeast to be used to identify human disease genes. In this study, we systematically screened the pre-existing respiratory-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains using fluorescent microscopy and identified 102 nuclear genes whose deletions result in a complete mtDNA loss, of which 52 are not reported previously. Strikingly, these genes mainly encode protein products involved in mitochondrial protein biosynthesis process (54.9%). The rest of these genes either encode protein products associated with nucleic acid metabolism (14.7%), oxidative phosphorylation (3.9%), or other protein products (13.7%) responsible for bud-site selection, mitochondrial intermembrane space protein import, assembly of cytochrome-c oxidase, vacuolar protein sorting, protein-nucleus import, calcium-mediated signaling, heme biosynthesis and iron homeostasis. Thirteen (12.7%) of the genes encode proteins of unknown function. We identified human orthologs of these genes, conducted the interaction between the gene products and linked them to human mitochondrial disorders and other pathologies. In addition, we screened for genes whose defects affect the nuclear genome integrity. Our data provide a systematic view of the nuclear genes involved in maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. Together, our studies i) provide a global view of the genes regulating mtDNA content; ii) provide compelling new evidence toward understanding novel mechanism involved in mitochondrial genome maintenance and iii) provide useful clues in understanding human diseases in which mitochondrial defect and in particular depletion of mitochondrial genome plays a critical role. PMID:25170845

  13. Genome-wide DNA copy number analysis in pancreatic cancer using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays

    PubMed Central

    Harada, T; Chelala, C; Bhakta, V; Chaplin, T; Caulee, K; Baril, P; Young, BD; Lemoine, NR

    2008-01-01

    To identify genomic abnormalities characteristic of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in vivo, a panel of 27 microdissected PDAC specimens were analysed using high-density microarrays representing ∼116 000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci. We detected frequent gains of 1q, 2, 3, 5, 7p, 8q, 11, 14q and 17q (≥78% of cases), and losses of 1p, 3p, 6, 9p, 13q, 14q, 17p and 18q (≥44%). Although the results were comparable with those from array CGH, regions of those genetic changes were defined more accurately by SNP arrays. Integrating the Ensembl public data, we have generated ‘gene’ copy number indices that facilitate the search for novel candidates involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Copy numbers in a subset of the genes were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. The SKAP2/SCAP2 gene (7p15.2), which belongs to the src family kinases, was most frequently (63%) amplified in our sample set and its recurrent overexpression (67%) was confirmed by reverse transcription–PCR. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization and in situ RNA hybridization analyses for this gene have demonstrated a significant correlation between DNA copy number and mRNA expression level in an independent sample set (P<0.001). These findings indicate that the dysregulation of SKAP2/SCAP2, which is mostly caused by its increased gene copy number, is likely to be associated with the development of PDAC. PMID:17952125

  14. Quantitation of DNA copy number in individual mitochondrial particles by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Navratil, Marian; Poe, Bobby G; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2007-10-15

    Here, we present a direct method for determining mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers in individual mitochondrial particles, isolated from cultured cells, by means of capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection. We demonstrate that this method can detect a single molecule of PicoGreen-stained mtDNA in intact DsRed2-labeled mitochondrial particles isolated from human osteosarcoma 143B cells. This ultimate limit of mtDNA detection made it possible to confirm that an individual mitochondrial nucleoid, the genetic unit of mitochondrial inheritance, can contain a single copy of mtDNA. The validation of this approach was achieved via monitoring chemically induced mtDNA depletion and comparing the CE-LIF results to those obtained by quantitative microscopy imaging and multiplex real-time PCR analysis. Owing to its sensitivity, the CE-LIF method may become a powerful tool for investigating the copy number and organization of mtDNA in mitochondrial disease and aging, and in molecular biology techniques requiring manipulation and quantitation of DNA molecules such as plasmids.

  15. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  16. Allele-specific copy number profiling by next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Bell, John M; Zavala, Nicolas A; Ji, Hanlee P; Zhang, Nancy R

    2015-02-27

    The progression and clonal development of tumors often involve amplifications and deletions of genomic DNA. Estimation of allele-specific copy number, which quantifies the number of copies of each allele at each variant loci rather than the total number of chromosome copies, is an important step in the characterization of tumor genomes and the inference of their clonal history. We describe a new method, falcon, for finding somatic allele-specific copy number changes by next generation sequencing of tumors with matched normals. falcon is based on a change-point model on a bivariate mixed Binomial process, which explicitly models the copy numbers of the two chromosome haplotypes and corrects for local allele-specific coverage biases. By using the Binomial distribution rather than a normal approximation, falcon more effectively pools evidence from sites with low coverage. A modified Bayesian information criterion is used to guide model selection for determining the number of copy number events. Falcon is evaluated on in silico spike-in data and applied to the analysis of a pre-malignant colon tumor sample and late-stage colorectal adenocarcinoma from the same individual. The allele-specific copy number estimates obtained by falcon allows us to draw detailed conclusions regarding the clonal history of the individual's colon cancer.

  17. DNA copy number changes define spatial patterns of heterogeneity in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mamlouk, Soulafa; Childs, Liam Harold; Aust, Daniela; Heim, Daniel; Melching, Friederike; Oliveira, Cristiano; Wolf, Thomas; Durek, Pawel; Schumacher, Dirk; Bläker, Hendrik; von Winterfeld, Moritz; Gastl, Bastian; Möhr, Kerstin; Menne, Andrea; Zeugner, Silke; Redmer, Torben; Lenze, Dido; Tierling, Sascha; Möbs, Markus; Weichert, Wilko; Folprecht, Gunnar; Blanc, Eric; Beule, Dieter; Schäfer, Reinhold; Morkel, Markus; Klauschen, Frederick; Leser, Ulf; Sers, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity between and within tumours is a major factor determining cancer progression and therapy response. Here we examined DNA sequence and DNA copy-number heterogeneity in colorectal cancer (CRC) by targeted high-depth sequencing of 100 most frequently altered genes. In 97 samples, with primary tumours and matched metastases from 27 patients, we observe inter-tumour concordance for coding mutations; in contrast, gene copy numbers are highly discordant between primary tumours and metastases as validated by fluorescent in situ hybridization. To further investigate intra-tumour heterogeneity, we dissected a single tumour into 68 spatially defined samples and sequenced them separately. We identify evenly distributed coding mutations in APC and TP53 in all tumour areas, yet highly variable gene copy numbers in numerous genes. 3D morpho-molecular reconstruction reveals two clusters with divergent copy number aberrations along the proximal–distal axis indicating that DNA copy number variations are a major source of tumour heterogeneity in CRC. PMID:28120820

  18. Comparison of dna-copying fidelity during repair and semiconservative synthesis by radioactive precursor distribution analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nemirovskii, L.E.; Vasil'ev, V.K.

    1986-04-01

    The authors compare the fidelity of DNA copying during semiconservative and reparative synthesis under normal conditions and during cortisol-induced activation of free-radical processes, by examining the distribution of radioactivity among DNA pyrimidine isopliths. Radioactivity of nucleotide material in the isopliths was measured by counting in appropriate zones of the chromatograms in toluene scintillator. The investigation shows that injury to DNA of different organs, both directly and as a result of faulty repair, leads to shortening of the pyrimidine isopliths, i.e., to changes in the primary structure of DNA. These data help to explain the simultaneously cytostatic, carcinostatic, and mutagenic action of irradiation, cortisol and hydroxyurea.

  19. Sequential Model Selection based Segmentation to Detect DNA Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianhua; Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Huixia Judy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Array-based CGH experiments are designed to detect genomic aberrations or regions of DNA copy-number variation that are associated with an outcome, typically a state of disease. Most of the existing statistical methods target on detecting DNA copy number variations in a single sample or array. We focus on the detection of group effect variation, through simultaneous study of multiple samples from multiple groups. Rather than using direct segmentation or smoothing techniques, as commonly seen in existing detection methods, we develop a sequential model selection procedure that is guided by a modified Bayesian information criterion. This approach improves detection accuracy by accumulatively utilizing information across contiguous clones, and has computational advantage over the existing popular detection methods. Our empirical investigation suggests that the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the existing detection methods, in particular, in detecting small segments or separating neighboring segments with differential degrees of copy-number variation. PMID:26954760

  20. Quantification of Fewer than Ten Copies of a DNA Biomarker without Amplification or Labeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonhee; Kim, Youngkyu; Lee, Donggyu; Roy, Dhruvajyoti; Park, Joon Won

    2016-06-08

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a highly sensitive diagnosis technique for detection of nucleic acids and for monitoring residual disease; however, PCR can be unreliable for samples containing very few target molecules. Here, we describe a quantification method, using force-distance (FD) curve based atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect a target DNA bound to small (1.4-1.9 μm diameter) probe DNA spots, allowing mapping of entire spots to nanometer resolution. Using a synthetic BCR-ABL fusion gene sequence target, we examined samples containing between one and 10 target copies. A high degree of correlation (r(2) = 0.994) between numbers of target copies and detected probe clusters was observed, and the approach could detect the BCR-ABL biomarker when only a single copy was present, although multiple screens were required. Our results clearly demonstrate that FD curve-based imaging is suitable for quantitative analysis of fewer than 10 copies of DNA biomarkers without amplification, modification, or labeling.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA detection and copy number determination in the spermatozoa of the sea urchin Arbacia lixula.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, C; D'Alessandro, A; Saccone, C

    1992-02-14

    The Polymerase Chain reaction technique has been used in order to detect and amplify a specific region of mtDNA, in a total DNA preparation extracted from the sperm of the sea urchin Arbacia lixula. The amplified fragment is the D-loop region which hybridizes with the homologous region extracted from the egg mtDNA. The results demonstrate that mtDNA is present in sperm cell, and, since the replication origin is present it is potentially able to replicate in the zygote. Furthermore, the technique used allowed us to estimate mtDNA copy number in sea urchin sperm, which has never been done before. Our results are that sea urchin sperm cell contains between 4 and 28 mtDNA molecules.

  2. High interindividual restriction fragment length and copy number of polymorphism of a TVRI family in moderate human DNA repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Rogaev, E.I.; Shapiro, Yu.A.

    1987-06-01

    The authors describe the selection of cloned human DNA sequences, with a copy number not exceeding 1000 copies per diploid genome, and their testing for interindividual restriction fragment lengths and copy number of polymorphism (RFLCP). As a result of the investigation a DNA clone was found (TVRI-6), about 2.8 kilobase-pairs in size, for which an unusually high level of interindividual RFLCP was discovered. The TVRI-6 sequence was obtained from a bank of Pst I restriction fragments of human placental nuclear DNA cloned in pBR 322. The bank was analyzed by hybridization of colonies with phosphorus 32-labelled human nuclear DNA.

  3. Assessing Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Copy Number in Lymphocytes of ~2,000 Sardinians Using Tailored Sequencing Analysis Tools

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Sidore, Carlo; Butler, Thomas J.; Wing, Mary Kate; Qian, Yong; Meirelles, Osorio; Busonero, Fabio; Tsoi, Lam C.; Maschio, Andrea; Angius, Andrea; Kang, Hyun Min; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Cucca, Francesco; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Schlessinger, David

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequencing identifies common and rare genetic variants for association studies, but studies typically focus on variants in nuclear DNA and ignore the mitochondrial genome. In fact, analyzing variants in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences presents special problems, which we resolve here with a general solution for the analysis of mtDNA in next-generation sequencing studies. The new program package comprises 1) an algorithm designed to identify mtDNA variants (i.e., homoplasmies and heteroplasmies), incorporating sequencing error rates at each base in a likelihood calculation and allowing allele fractions at a variant site to differ across individuals; and 2) an estimation of mtDNA copy number in a cell directly from whole-genome sequencing data. We also apply the methods to DNA sequence from lymphocytes of ~2,000 SardiNIA Project participants. As expected, mothers and offspring share all homoplasmies but a lesser proportion of heteroplasmies. Both homoplasmies and heteroplasmies show 5-fold higher transition/transversion ratios than variants in nuclear DNA. Also, heteroplasmy increases with age, though on average only ~1 heteroplasmy reaches the 4% level between ages 20 and 90. In addition, we find that mtDNA copy number averages ~110 copies/lymphocyte and is ~54% heritable, implying substantial genetic regulation of the level of mtDNA. Copy numbers also decrease modestly but significantly with age, and females on average have significantly more copies than males. The mtDNA copy numbers are significantly associated with waist circumference (p-value = 0.0031) and waist-hip ratio (p-value = 2.4×10-5), but not with body mass index, indicating an association with central fat distribution. To our knowledge, this is the largest population analysis to date of mtDNA dynamics, revealing the age-imposed increase in heteroplasmy, the relatively high heritability of copy number, and the association of copy number with metabolic traits. PMID:26172475

  4. Alterations of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Telomere Length with Early Adversity and Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Audrey R.; Parade, Stephanie H.; Price, Lawrence H.; Kao, Hung-Teh; Porton, Barbara; Philip, Noah S.; Welch, Emma S.; Carpenter, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Telomere shortening and alterations of mitochondrial biogenesis are involved in cellular aging. Childhood adversity is associated with telomere shortening, and several investigations have shown short telomeres in psychiatric disorders. Recent studies have examined whether mitochondria might be involved in neuropsychiatric conditions; findings are limited and no prior work has examined this in relation to stress exposure. Methods Two-hundred and ninety healthy adults provided information on childhood parental loss and maltreatment and completed diagnostic interviews. Participants were categorized into four groups based upon the presence or absence of childhood adversity and the presence or absence of lifetime psychopathology (depressive, anxiety, and substance use disorders). Telomere length and mtDNA copy number were measured from leukocyte DNA by qPCR. Results Childhood adversity and lifetime psychopathology were each associated with shorter telomeres (p < .01) and higher mtDNA copy numbers (p < .001). Significantly higher mtDNA copy numbers and shorter telomeres were seen in individuals with major depression, depressive disorders, and anxiety disorders, as well as those with parental loss and childhood maltreatment. A history of substance disorders was also associated with significantly higher mtDNA copy numbers. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence of an alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis with early life stress and with anxiety and substance use disorders. We replicate prior work on telomere length and psychopathology, and show that this effect is not secondary to medication use or comorbid medical illness. Finally, we show that early life stress and psychopathology are each associated with these markers of cellular aging. PMID:25749099

  5. Mutation of the little finger domain in human DNA polymerase η alters fidelity when copying undamaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Beardslee, Renee A; Suarez, Samuel C; Toffton, Shannon M; McCulloch, Scott D

    2013-10-01

    DNA polymerase η (pol η) synthesizes past cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer and possibly 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesions during DNA replication. Loss of pol η is associated with an increase in mutation rate, demonstrating its indispensable role in mutation suppression. It has been recently reported that β-strand 12 (amino acids 316-324) of the little finger region correctly positions the template strand with the catalytic core of the enzyme. The authors hypothesized that modification of β-strand 12 residues would disrupt correct enzyme-DNA alignment and alter pol η's activity and fidelity. To investigate this, the authors purified proteins containing the catalytic core of the polymerase, incorporated single amino acid changes to select β-strand 12 residues, and evaluated DNA synthesis activity for each pol η. Lesion bypass efficiencies and replication fidelities when copying DNA-containing cis-syn cyclobutane thymine-thymine dimer and 8-oxoG lesions were determined and compared with the corresponding values for the wild-type polymerase. The results confirm the importance of the β-strand in polymerase function and show that fidelity is most often altered when undamaged DNA is copied. Additionally, it is shown that DNA-protein contacts distal to the active site can significantly affect the fidelity of synthesis.

  6. Discovering subgroups of patients from DNA copy number data using NMF on compacted matrices.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Cassio P; Rancoita, Paola M V; Kwee, Ivo; Zucca, Emanuele; Zaffalon, Marco; Bertoni, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In the study of complex genetic diseases, the identification of subgroups of patients sharing similar genetic characteristics represents a challenging task, for example, to improve treatment decision. One type of genetic lesion, frequently investigated in such disorders, is the change of the DNA copy number (CN) at specific genomic traits. Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) is a standard technique to reduce the dimensionality of a data set and to cluster data samples, while keeping its most relevant information in meaningful components. Thus, it can be used to discover subgroups of patients from CN profiles. It is however computationally impractical for very high dimensional data, such as CN microarray data. Deciding the most suitable number of subgroups is also a challenging problem. The aim of this work is to derive a procedure to compact high dimensional data, in order to improve NMF applicability without compromising the quality of the clustering. This is particularly important for analyzing high-resolution microarray data. Many commonly used quality measures, as well as our own measures, are employed to decide the number of subgroups and to assess the quality of the results. Our measures are based on the idea of identifying robust subgroups, inspired by biologically/clinically relevance instead of simply aiming at well-separated clusters. We evaluate our procedure using four real independent data sets. In these data sets, our method was able to find accurate subgroups with individual molecular and clinical features and outperformed the standard NMF in terms of accuracy in the factorization fitness function. Hence, it can be useful for the discovery of subgroups of patients with similar CN profiles in the study of heterogeneous diseases.

  7. DNA Copy Number Signature to Predict Recurrence in Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    and select 330 samples for CNV analysis. Months :1 - 2 • Subtask 2 Prepare sections (10 μm) for microdissection to ensure>80% tumor. Months 3 - 8...Subtask 3 DNA preparation from microdissected specimens. Months 3 - 8 Major Task 2: To determine the copy number gain and loss for early stage high...to prepare chip compatible samples. Months : 9 - 18 • Subtask 2 Genomic abnormality analysis by IlluminaHumanOmniExpress-FFPE BeadChip system. Months

  8. Mutation of the Little Finger Domain in Human DNA Polymerase η Alters Fidelity When Copying Undamaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Beardslee, Renee A.; Suarez, Samuel C.; Toffton, Shannon M.; McCulloch, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerase η (pol η) synthesizes past cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer and possibly 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesions during DNA replication. Loss of pol η is associated with an increase in mutation rate, demonstrating its indispensable role in mutation suppression. It has been recently reported that β-strand 12 (amino acids 316–324) of the little finger region correctly positions the template strand with the catalytic core of the enzyme. The authors hypothesized that modification of β-strand 12 residues would disrupt correct enzyme–DNA alignment and alter pol η’s activity and fidelity. To investigate this, the authors purified proteins containing the catalytic core of the polymerase, incorporated single amino acid changes to select β-strand 12 residues, and evaluated DNA synthesis activity for each pol η. Lesion bypass efficiencies and replication fidelities when copying DNA-containing cis-syn cyclobutane thymine-thymine dimer and 8-oxoG lesions were determined and compared with the corresponding values for the wild-type polymerase. The results confirm the importance of the β-strand in polymerase function and show that fidelity is most often altered when undamaged DNA is copied. Additionally, it is shown that DNA–protein contacts distal to the active site can significantly affect the fidelity of synthesis. PMID:23913529

  9. A novel satellite DNA sequence in the Peromyscus genome (PMSat): Evolution via copy number fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Louzada, Sandra; Vieira-da-Silva, Ana; Mendes-da-Silva, Ana; Kubickova, Svatava; Rubes, Jiri; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Satellite DNAs (satDNA) are tandemly arrayed repeated sequences largely present in eukaryotic genomes, which play important roles in genome evolution and function, and therefore, their analysis is vital. Here, we describe the isolation of a novel satellite DNA family (PMSat) from the rodent Peromyscus eremicus (Cricetidae, Rodentia), which is located in pericentromeric regions and exhibits a typical satellite DNA genome organization. Orthologous PMSat sequences were isolated and characterized from three species belonging to Cricetidae: Cricetus cricetus, Phodopus sungorus and Microtus arvalis. In these species, PMSat is highly conserved, with the absence of fixed species-specific mutations. Strikingly, different numbers of copies of this sequence were found among the species, suggesting evolution by copy number fluctuation. Repeat units of PMSat were also found in the Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii BioProject, but our results suggest that these repeat units are from genome regions outside the pericentromere. The remarkably high evolutionary sequence conservation along with the preservation of a few numbers of copies of this sequence in the analyzed genomes may suggest functional significance but a different sequence nature/organization. Our data highlight that repeats are difficult to analyze due to the limited tools available to dissect genomes and the fact that assemblies do not cover regions of constitutive heterochromatin.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Risk of Oral Cancer: A Report from Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Rosy; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Choudhury, Javed Hussain; Seram, Anil; Sinha, Kavita; Hussain, Marine; Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Rabha, Bijuli; Dey, Pradip; Ganguli, Sabitri; NathChoudhury, Monisha; Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman; Chaudhuri, Biswadeep; Dhar, Bishal

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common cancer globally. Tobacco consumption and HPV infection, both are the major risk factor for the development of oral cancer and causes mitochondrial dysfunction. Genetic polymorphisms in xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes modify the effect of environmental exposures, thereby playing a significant role in gene–environment interactions and hence contributing to the individual susceptibility to cancer. Here, we have investigated the association of tobacco - betel quid chewing, HPV infection, GSTM1-GSTT1 null genotypes, and tumour stages with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content variation in oral cancer patients. Methodology/Principal Findings The study comprised of 124 cases of OSCC and 140 control subjects to PCR based detection was done for high-risk HPV using a consensus primer and multiplex PCR was done for detection of GSTM1-GSTT1 polymorphism. A comparative ΔCt method was used for determination of mtDNA content. The risk of OSCC increased with the ceased mtDNA copy number (Ptrend = 0.003). The association between mtDNA copy number and OSCC risk was evident among tobacco – betel quid chewers rather than tobacco – betel quid non chewers; the interaction between mtDNA copy number and tobacco – betel quid was significant (P = 0.0005). Significant difference was observed between GSTM1 - GSTT1 null genotypes (P = 0.04, P = 0.001 respectively) and HPV infection (P<0.001) with mtDNA content variation in cases and controls. Positive correlation was found with decrease in mtDNA content with the increase in tumour stages (P<0.001). We are reporting for the first time the association of HPV infection and GSTM1-GSTT1 null genotypes with mtDNA content in OSCC. Conclusion Our results indicate that the mtDNA content in tumour tissues changes with tumour stage and tobacco-betel quid chewing habits while low levels of mtDNA content suggests invasive thereby serving as a biomarker in detection

  11. Mutation dependance of the mitochondrial DNA copy number in the first stages of human embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Monnot, Sophie; Samuels, David C; Hesters, Laetitia; Frydman, Nelly; Gigarel, Nadine; Burlet, Philippe; Kerbrat, Violaine; Lamazou, Frédéric; Frydman, René; Benachi, Alexandra; Feingold, Josué; Rotig, Agnes; Munnich, Arnold; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Steffann, Julie

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content is thought to remain stable over the preimplantation period of human embryogenesis that is, therefore, suggested to be entirely dependent on ooplasm mtDNA capital. We have explored the impact of two disease-causing mutations [m.3243A>G myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like syndrome (MELAS) and m.8344A>G myoclonic epilepsy associated with ragged-red fibers (MERRF)] on mtDNA amounts in human oocytes and day 4-5 preimplantation embryos. The mtDNA amount was stable in MERRF and control materials, whereas gradually increasing from the germinal vesicle of oogenesis to the blastocyst stage of embryogenesis in MELAS cells, MELAS embryos carrying ∼3-fold higher mtDNA amount than control embryos (P = 0.0003). A correlation between mtDNA copy numbers and mutant loads was observed in MELAS embryos (R(2) = 0.42, P < 0.0013), suggestive of a compensation for the respiratory chain defect resulting from high mutation levels. These results suggest that mtDNA can replicate in early embryos and emphasize the need for sufficient amount of wild-type mtDNA to sustain embryonic development in humans.

  12. Concerted copy number variation balances ribosomal DNA dosage in human and mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, John G.; Branco, Alan T.; Godinho, Susana A.; Yu, Shoukai; Lemos, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Tandemly repeated ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are among the most evolutionary dynamic loci of eukaryotic genomes. The loci code for essential cellular components, yet exhibit extensive copy number (CN) variation within and between species. CN might be partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance between the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays. The arrays are nonhomologous, physically unlinked in mammals, and encode functionally interdependent RNA components of the ribosome. Here we show that the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays exhibit concerted CN variation (cCNV). Despite 5S and 45S rDNA elements residing on different chromosomes and lacking sequence similarity, cCNV between these loci is strong, evolutionarily conserved in humans and mice, and manifested across individual genotypes in natural populations and pedigrees. Finally, we observe that bisphenol A induces rapid and parallel modulation of 5S and 45S rDNA CN. Our observations reveal a novel mode of genome variation, indicate that natural selection contributed to the evolution and conservation of cCNV, and support the hypothesis that 5S CN is partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance with the 45S rDNA array. We suggest that human disease variation might be traced to disrupted rDNA dosage balance in the genome. PMID:25583482

  13. DNA copy number aberrations associated with lymphovascular invasion in upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Taku; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Miyachika, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Satoshi; Chochi, Yasuyo; Nakao, Motonao; Nagao, Kazuhiro; Hara, Takahiko; Sakano, Shigeru; Furuya, Tomoko; Oga, Atsunori; Kawauchi, Shigeto; Sasaki, Kohsuke; Matsuyama, Hideyasu

    2012-06-01

    Recent studies have reported that lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is a predictor of patient prognosis in upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUTUC). DNA copy number aberrations (DCNAs) identified by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) had not previously been examined in UUTUC. We therefore examined DCNAs in UUTUC and compared them with DCNAs in LVI. We applied aCGH technology using DNA chips spotted with 4,030 BAC clones to 32 UUTUC patients. Frequent copy number gains were detected on chromosomal regions 8p23.1 and 20q13.12, whereas frequent copy number losses were detected on chromosomal regions 13q21.1, 17p13.1, 6q16.3, and 17p11.2. DCNAs occurred more frequently in tumors with LVI than in those without it (P = 0.0002), and this parameter was more closely associated with LVI than with the tumor grade or pT stage. Disease-specific survival rate was higher in tumors without LVI than in those with it (P = 0.0120); however, tumor grade and stage were not significant prognostic factors of patient outcome. These data support our hypothesis that tumors with LVI have more genetic alterations in terms of total numbers of DCNAs than those without, and provide proof that aggressive adjuvant therapy should be considered for UUTUC patients with LVI.

  14. DNA copy-number alterations underlie gene expression differences between microsatellite stable and unstable colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jorissen, Robert N.; Lipton, Lara; Gibbs, Peter; Chapman, Matthew; Desai, Jayesh; Jones, Ian T.; Yeatman, Timothy J.; East, Philip; Tomlinson, Ian P.M.; Verspaget, Hein W.; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Ørntoft, Torben F.; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Sieber, Oliver M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose About 15% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) harbor microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI-associated gene expression changes have been identified in CRCs, but little overlap exists between signatures hindering an assessment of overall consistency. Little is known about the causes and downstream effects of differential gene expression. Experimental Design DNA microarray data on 89 MSI and 140 MSS CRCs from this study, and 58 MSI and 77 MSS cases from three published reports were randomly divided into test and training sets. MSI-associated gene expression changes were assessed for cross-study consistency using training samples, and validated as MSI classifier using test samples. Differences in biological pathways were identified by functional category analysis. Causation of differential gene expression was investigated by comparison to DNA copy-number data. Results MSI-associated gene expression changes in CRCs were found to be highly consistent across multiple studies of primary tumors and cancer cell lines from patients of different ethnicities (P<0.001). Clustering based on consistent changes separated additional test cases by MSI status, and classification of individual samples predicted MSI status with a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 85%. Genes associated with immune response were up-regulated in MSI cancers, whereas genes associated with cell-cell adhesion, ion-binding and regulation of metabolism were down-regulated. Differential gene expression was shown to reflect systematic differences in DNA copy-number aberrations between MSI and MSS tumors (P<0.001). Conclusions Our results demonstrate cross-study consistency of MSI-associated gene expression changes in CRCs. DNA copy-number alterations partly cause the differences in gene expression between MSI and MSS cancers. PMID:19088021

  15. DNA is hypomethylated at repetitive and single copy loci in patients with ICF syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schuffenhauer, S.; Buchholz, B.; Neitinger, T.

    1994-09-01

    ICF syndrome (immunodeficiency, centromeric heterochromatin instability, facial anomaly) is a very rare genetic disorder, reported in only 12 cases. Chromosomal rearrangements occur predominantly in the heterochromatic regions of HC 1 and 16 and include stretching, whole arm deletions and multibranched configurations. The molecular defect of these abnormalities is not known. Similar abnormalities have been found in cell cultures treated with viruses or 5-acacytidine, agents which cause DNA hypomethylation. Because heterochromatic DNA is known to be highly methylated, we hypothesise that DNA hypomethylation and subsequent disturbance of heterochromatin structure may play a role in the chromosomal rearrangements of ICF syndrome. Methylation studies in DNA from peripheral lymphocytes of two non-related ICF patients revealed hypomethylation of satellite-2 DNA localized in the heterochromatic regions of HC 1 and 16. DNA hypomethylation was also found at single copy loci, e.g. D15S63, D15S9, H19 and DXS255. Differences between the two patients suggest a random distribution of DNA hypomethylation. While a causal relationship between the molecular and cytogenetic abnormalities is likely, the postulated relationship between hypomethylation and the clinical symptoms in ICF syndrome remains to be elucidated.

  16. An initiator protein for plasmid R6K DNA replication. Mutations affecting the copy-number control.

    PubMed

    Inuzuka, M; Wada, Y

    1988-02-08

    Two kinds of mutations affecting the copy-number control of plasmid R6K were isolated and identified in an initiator pi protein by DNA sequencing. Firstly, a temperature-sensitive replication mutation, ts22, with decreased copy number results in a substitution of threonine to isoleucine at position 138 of the 305-amino-acid pi protein. Secondly, a high-copy-number (cop21) mutant was isolated from this ts mutant and was identified by an alteration of alanine to serine at position 162. This cop21 mutation suppressed the Ts character and was recessive to the wild-type allele in the copy control.

  17. Role of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Alteration in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Sung; Lee, Hui-Ting; Lee, Ming-Huei; Pan, Siao-Cian; Ke, Chen-Yeh; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number alteration in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The mtDNA copy numbers of paired cancer and non-cancer parts from five resected RCC kidneys after radical nephrectomy were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). An RCC cell line, 786-O, was infected by lentiviral particles to knock down mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM). Null target (NT) and TFAM-knockdown (TFAM-KD) represented the control and knockdown 786-O clones, respectively. Protein or mRNA expression levels of TFAM; mtDNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), ND6 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (COX-2); nuclear DNA (nDNA)-encoded succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA); v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 gene (AKT)-encoded AKT and v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog gene (c-MYC)-encoded MYC; glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase II (HK-II), glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and lactate dehydrogenase subunit A (LDHA); and hypoxia-inducible factors the HIF-1α and HIF-2α, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component α subunit (PDHA1) were analyzed by Western blot or Q-PCR. Bioenergetic parameters of cellular metabolism, basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (mOCRB) and basal extracellular acidification rate (ECARB), were measured by a Seahorse XFe-24 analyzer. Cell invasiveness was evaluated by a trans-well migration assay and vimentin expression. Doxorubicin was used as a chemotherapeutic agent. The results showed a decrease of mtDNA copy numbers in resected RCC tissues (p = 0.043). The TFAM-KD clone expressed lower mtDNA copy number (p = 0.034), lower mRNA levels of TFAM (p = 0.008), ND1 (p = 0.007), and ND6 (p = 0.017), and lower protein levels of TFAM and COX-2 than did the NT clone. By contrast, the protein levels of HIF-2α, HK-II, PFK, LDHA, AKT, MYC and vimentin; trans-well migration activity (p = 0

  18. Two Drosophila retrotransposon gypsy subfamilies differ in ability to produce new DNA copies via reverse transcription in Drosophila cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lyubomirskaya, N V; Avedisov, S N; Surkov, S A; Ilyin, Y V

    1993-01-01

    Plasmid DNA constructs containing 5' end truncated retrotransposon gypsy were introduced into Drosophila cultured cells. Appearance of new complete DNA copies with reconstructed via reverse transcription 5'LTR were detected by PCR after transient expression and by Southern blot analysis of genome DNA of stably transformed cells. Two gypsy subfamilies supposed to be different in transpositional activity were analyzed in terms of their ability to produce new DNA copies via reverse transcription in D. hydei cultured cells. It was demonstrated that both gypsy variants undergo retrotransposition but with different efficiency. Images PMID:7688116

  19. The effects of mitochondrial DNA deletion and copy number variations on different exercise intensities in highly trained swimmers.

    PubMed

    Baykara, O; Sahin, S K; Akbas, F; Guven, M; Onaran, I

    2016-10-31

    It has been suggested that heavy exercise might increase oxidative stress, causing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations as well as DNA mutations and changes in the mtDNA copy number in cells. mtDNA4977 deletion is one of the most common deletions seen on mitochondria. We hypothesize association between exercise induced oxidative stress and mtDNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of highly trained swimmers. Therefore we studied the mtDNA4977 deletion level, mtDNA copy number and their relationship with cellular ATP and oxidative stress status in PBLs of swimmers. 8 highly trained and 8 normal trained swimmers and 8 non-athlete subjects were included in the study. The mtDNA4977 deletion and amount of mtDNA were measured using RT-PCR method whereas dichlorohydrofluoroscein (DCF) assay method was used to assess cellular oxidative stress and ATP levels were measured using bioluminescence method. Even though an increase in mtDNA4977 deletion was found in all study groups, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.98). The mtDNA copy numbers were found to be surprisingly high in highly trained swimmers compared to normal trained swimmers and non-athlete subjects by 4.03 fold (p= 0.0002) and 5.58 fold (p=0.0003), respectively. No significant differences were found between groups by means of intracellular ATP levels (p=0.406) and oxidative stress (p=0.430).  No correlation was found between mtDNA copy number and intracellular ATP content of the PBLs (p=0.703). Our results suggest that heavy training does not have a specific effect on mtDNA4977 deletion but it may be affecting mitochondrial copy numbers which may act as a compensatory mechanism related to ATP levels in blood.

  20. Integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression in multiple myeloma reveals alterations related to relapse

    PubMed Central

    Krzeminski, Patryk; Corchete, Luis A.; García, Juan L.; López-Corral, Lucía; Fermiñán, Encarna; García, Eva M.; Martín, Ana A.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; García-Sanz, Ramón; Miguel, Jesús F. San; Gutiérrez, Norma C.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite the introduction of novel agents, and a relapsing course is observed in most patients. Although the development of genomic technologies has greatly improved our understanding of MM pathogenesis, the mechanisms underlying relapse have been less thoroughly investigated. In this study, an integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression was conducted in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from MM patients. Overall, the acquisition of abnormalities at relapse was much more frequent than the loss of lesions present at diagnosis, and DNA losses were significantly more frequent in relapse than in diagnosis samples. Interestingly, copy number abnormalities involving more than 100 Mb of DNA at relapse significantly affect the gene expression of these samples, provoking a particular deregulation of the IL-8 pathway. On the other hand, no significant modifications of gene expression were observed in those samples with less than 100 Mb affected by chromosomal changes. Although several statistical approaches were used to identify genes whose abnormal expression at relapse was regulated by methylation, only two genes that were significantly deregulated in relapse samples (SORL1 and GLT1D1) showed a negative correlation between methylation and expression. Further analysis revealed that DNA methylation was involved in regulating SORL1 expression in MM. Finally, relevant changes in gene expression observed in relapse samples, such us downregulation of CD27 and P2RY8, were most likely not preceded by alterations in the corresponding DNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the genomic heterogeneity described at diagnosis remains at relapse. PMID:27811368

  1. Integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression in multiple myeloma reveals alterations related to relapse.

    PubMed

    Krzeminski, Patryk; Corchete, Luis A; García, Juan L; López-Corral, Lucía; Fermiñán, Encarna; García, Eva M; Martín, Ana A; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F; Gutiérrez, Norma C

    2016-12-06

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite the introduction of novel agents, and a relapsing course is observed in most patients. Although the development of genomic technologies has greatly improved our understanding of MM pathogenesis, the mechanisms underlying relapse have been less thoroughly investigated. In this study, an integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression was conducted in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from MM patients. Overall, the acquisition of abnormalities at relapse was much more frequent than the loss of lesions present at diagnosis, and DNA losses were significantly more frequent in relapse than in diagnosis samples. Interestingly, copy number abnormalities involving more than 100 Mb of DNA at relapse significantly affect the gene expression of these samples, provoking a particular deregulation of the IL-8 pathway. On the other hand, no significant modifications of gene expression were observed in those samples with less than 100 Mb affected by chromosomal changes. Although several statistical approaches were used to identify genes whose abnormal expression at relapse was regulated by methylation, only two genes that were significantly deregulated in relapse samples (SORL1 and GLT1D1) showed a negative correlation between methylation and expression. Further analysis revealed that DNA methylation was involved in regulating SORL1 expression in MM. Finally, relevant changes in gene expression observed in relapse samples, such us downregulation of CD27 and P2RY8, were most likely not preceded by alterations in the corresponding DNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the genomic heterogeneity described at diagnosis remains at relapse.

  2. QUANTITATIVE SCREENING OF SINGLE COPIES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRAL DNA WITHOUT AMPLIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiangwei; Lee, Ji-Young; Yeung, Edward S.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a novel quantitative viral screening method based on single-molecule detection that does not require amplification. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV), the major etiological agent of cervical cancer, served as the screening target in this study. Eight 100-nucleotide (nt) single-stranded (ss)-DNA probes were designed complementary to the E6-E7 gene of HPV-16 DNA. The probes were covalently stained with Alexa Fluor 532 and hybridized to the target in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell, and had a linear dynamic range of over six orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, we employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and added YOYO-3 dye as the acceptor. The two colors from Alexa Fluor 532 and YOYO-3 were dispersed by a transmission grating located in front of the ICCD. With this reinforced criteria for identifying the hybridized molecules, zero false-positive count was achieved. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the measurements. PMID:16970325

  3. Identification of single copy nuclear DNA markers for North American pit vipers.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, H Lisle; Diaz, Jose

    2010-01-01

    We describe 18 single copy nuclear DNA loci (10 loci cloned from a Sistrurus catenatus catenatus genomic library and eight intron-based loci amplified using conserved primers) that detect sequence variation in species from all genera (Sistrurus, Agkistrodon and Crotalus) of North American pit viper snakes. These loci (mean size in bp ± SE: 433 ± 51) show large numbers of phylogenetically informative sites across species (mean + SE: 10.2 ± 1.5), but limited variation within subspecies suggesting that they will be most useful for multilocus species-level phylogenetic analyses in these snakes.

  4. Association of telomere length and mitochondrial DNA copy number in a community sample of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Tyrka, Audrey R; Carpenter, Linda L; Kao, Hung-Teh; Porton, Barbara; Philip, Noah S; Ridout, Samuel J; Ridout, Kathryn K; Price, Lawrence H

    2015-06-01

    Cellular aging plays a role in longevity and senescence, and has been implicated in medical and psychiatric conditions, including heart disease, cancer, major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Telomere shortening and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be central to the cellular aging process. The present study examined the association between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and telomere length in a sample of medically healthy adults. Participants (total n=392) were divided into 4 groups based on the presence or absence of early life adversity and lifetime psychopathology: No Adversity/No Disorder, n=136; Adversity/No Disorder, n=91; No Adversity/Disorder, n=46; Adversity/Disorder, n=119. Telomere length and mtDNA copy number were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. There was a positive correlation between mtDNA and telomere length in the entire sample (r=0.120, p<0.001) and in each of the four groups of participants (No Adversity/No Disorder, r=0.291, p=0.001; Adversity/No Disorder r=0.279, p=0.007; No Adversity/Disorder r=0.449, p=0.002; Adversity/Disorder, r=0.558, p<0.001). These correlations remained significant when controlling for age, smoking, and body mass index and establish an association between mtDNA and telomere length in a large group of women and men both with and without early adversity and psychopathology, suggesting co-regulation of telomeres and mitochondrial function. The mechanisms underlying this association may be important in the pathophysiology of age-related medical conditions, such as heart disease and cancer, as well as for stress-associated psychiatric disorders.

  5. Familial longevity study reveals a significant association of mitochondrial DNA copy number between centenarians and their offspring.

    PubMed

    He, Yong-Han; Chen, Xiao-Qiong; Yan, Dong-Jing; Xiao, Fu-Hui; Lin, Rong; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Yao-Wen; Pu, Shao-Yan; Yu, Qin; Sun, Hong-Peng; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Cai, Wang-Wei; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2016-11-01

    Reduced mitochondrial function is an important cause of aging and age-related diseases. We previously revealed a relatively higher level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in centenarians. However, it is still unknown whether such an mtDNA content pattern of centenarians could be passed on to their offspring and how it was regulated. To address these issues, we recruited 60 longevity families consisting of 206 family members (cohort 1) and explored their mtDNA copy number. The results showed that the first generation of the offspring (F1 offspring) had a higher level of mtDNA copy number than their spouses (p < 0.05) independent of a gender effect. In addition, we found a positive association of mtDNA copy number in centenarians with that in F1 offspring (r = 0.54, p = 0.0008) but not with that in F1 spouses. These results were replicated in another independent cohort consisting of 153 subjects (cohort 2). RNA sequencing analysis suggests that the single-stranded DNA-binding protein 4 was significantly associated with mtDNA copy number and was highly expressed in centenarians as well as F1 offspring versus the F1 spouses, thus likely regulates the mtDNA copy number in the long-lived family members. In conclusion, our results suggest that the pattern of high mtDNA copy number is likely inheritable, which may act as a favorable factor to familial longevity through assuring adequate energy supply.

  6. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  7. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  8. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii’s physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene. PMID:27672381

  9. DNA copy number amplifications in human neoplasms: review of comparative genomic hybridization studies.

    PubMed Central

    Knuutila, S.; Björkqvist, A. M.; Autio, K.; Tarkkanen, M.; Wolf, M.; Monni, O.; Szymanska, J.; Larramendy, M. L.; Tapper, J.; Pere, H.; El-Rifai, W.; Hemmer, S.; Wasenius, V. M.; Vidgren, V.; Zhu, Y.

    1998-01-01

    This review summarizes reports of recurrent DNA sequence copy number amplifications in human neoplasms detected by comparative genomic hybridization. Some of the chromosomal areas with recurrent DNA copy number amplifications (amplicons) of 1p22-p31, 1p32-p36, 1q, 2p13-p16, 2p23-p25, 2q31-q33, 3q, 5p, 6p12-pter, 7p12-p13, 7q11.2, 7q21-q22, 8p11-p12, 8q, 11q13-q14, 12p, 12q13-q21, 13q14, 13q22-qter, 14q13-q21, 15q24-qter, 17p11.2-p12, 17q12-q21, 17q22-qter, 18q, 19p13.2-pter, 19cen-q13.3, 20p11.2-p12, 20q, Xp11.2-p21, and Xp11-q13 and genes therein are presented in more detail. The paper with more than 150 references and two tables can be accessed from our web site http://www.helsinki.fi/lglvwww/CMG.html. The data will be updated biannually until the year 2001. PMID:9588877

  10. Accurate phylogenetic classification of DNA fragments based onsequence composition

    SciTech Connect

    McHardy, Alice C.; Garcia Martin, Hector; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Hugenholtz, Philip; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2006-05-01

    Metagenome studies have retrieved vast amounts of sequenceout of a variety of environments, leading to novel discoveries and greatinsights into the uncultured microbial world. Except for very simplecommunities, diversity makes sequence assembly and analysis a verychallenging problem. To understand the structure a 5 nd function ofmicrobial communities, a taxonomic characterization of the obtainedsequence fragments is highly desirable, yet currently limited mostly tothose sequences that contain phylogenetic marker genes. We show that forclades at the rank of domain down to genus, sequence composition allowsthe very accurate phylogenetic 10 characterization of genomic sequence.We developed a composition-based classifier, PhyloPythia, for de novophylogenetic sequence characterization and have trained it on adata setof 340 genomes. By extensive evaluation experiments we show that themethodis accurate across all taxonomic ranks considered, even forsequences that originate fromnovel organisms and are as short as 1kb.Application to two metagenome datasets 15 obtained from samples ofphosphorus-removing sludge showed that the method allows the accurateclassification at genus level of most sequence fragments from thedominant populations, while at the same time correctly characterizingeven larger parts of the samples at higher taxonomic levels.

  11. Accurate phylogenetic classification of variable-length DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    McHardy, Alice Carolyn; Martín, Héctor García; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Hugenholtz, Philip; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2007-01-01

    Metagenome studies have retrieved vast amounts of sequence data from a variety of environments leading to new discoveries and insights into the uncultured microbial world. Except for very simple communities, the encountered diversity has made fragment assembly and the subsequent analysis a challenging problem. A taxonomic characterization of metagenomic fragments is required for a deeper understanding of shotgun-sequenced microbial communities, but success has mostly been limited to sequences containing phylogenetic marker genes. Here we present PhyloPythia, a composition-based classifier that combines higher-level generic clades from a set of 340 completed genomes with sample-derived population models. Extensive analyses on synthetic and real metagenome data sets showed that PhyloPythia allows the accurate classification of most sequence fragments across all considered taxonomic ranks, even for unknown organisms. The method requires no more than 100 kb of training sequence for the creation of accurate models of sample-specific populations and can assign fragments >or=1 kb with high specificity.

  12. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  13. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes.

  14. Elevated Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Peripheral Blood and Tissue Predict the Opposite Outcome of Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan; Wen, Shu; Sun, Xiaoru; Fang, Qian; Huang, Lin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Wanling; Qiu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number was associated with cancer risk. However, no solid conclusion revealed the potential predictive value of mtDNA copy number for cancer prognosis. The present meta-analysis was performed to clarify the problem. Hence, we performed a systematic search in PubMed, EmBase, Web of Science databases independently and a total of eighteen studies comprising 3961 cases satisfied the criteria and finally enrolled. Our results didn’t show the association between them but significant heterogeneity in overall analysis (OS: HR = 0.923, 95% CI: 0.653–1.306, p = 0.652; DFS: HR = 0.997, 95% CI: 0.599–1.659, p = 0.99). However, subgroup analysis stratified by sample came to the opposite conclusion. High level mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood predicted a poor cancer prognosis (OS: HR = 1.624, 95% CI: 1.211–2.177, p = 0.001; DFS: HR = 1.582, 95% CI: 1.026–2.439, p = 0.038) while patients with high level mitochondrial DNA copy number in tumor tissue exhibited better outcomes (OS: HR = 0.604 95% CI: 0.406–0.899, p = 0.013; DFS: HR = 0.593, 95% CI: 0.411–0.857, p = 0.005). These findings were further proved in detailed analyses in blood or tissue subgroup. In conclusion, our study suggested the elevated mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood predicted a poor cancer prognosis while the better outcome was presented among patients with elevated mtDNA copy number in tumor tissue. PMID:27857175

  15. An evaluation of new and established methods to determine T‐DNA copy number and homozygosity in transgenic plants.

    PubMed Central

    Głowacka, Katarzyna; Kromdijk, Johannes; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Clemente, Tom E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stable transformation of plants is a powerful tool for hypothesis testing. A rapid and reliable evaluation method of the transgenic allele for copy number and homozygosity is vital in analysing these transformations. Here the suitability of Southern blot analysis, thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL‐)PCR, quantitative (q)PCR and digital droplet (dd)PCR to estimate T‐DNA copy number, locus complexity and homozygosity were compared in transgenic tobacco. Southern blot analysis and ddPCR on three generations of transgenic offspring with contrasting zygosity and copy number were entirely consistent, whereas TAIL‐PCR often underestimated copy number. qPCR deviated considerably from the Southern blot results and had lower precision and higher variability than ddPCR. Comparison of segregation analyses and ddPCR of T1 progeny from 26 T0 plants showed that at least 19% of the lines carried multiple T‐DNA insertions per locus, which can lead to unstable transgene expression. Segregation analyses failed to detect these multiple copies, presumably because of their close linkage. This shows the importance of routine T‐DNA copy number estimation. Based on our results, ddPCR is the most suitable method, because it is as reliable as Southern blot analysis yet much faster. A protocol for this application of ddPCR to large plant genomes is provided. PMID:26670088

  16. An evaluation of new and established methods to determine T-DNA copy number and homozygosity in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, Katarzyna; Kromdijk, Johannes; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Niyogi, Krishna K; Clemente, Tom E; Long, Stephen P

    2016-04-01

    Stable transformation of plants is a powerful tool for hypothesis testing. A rapid and reliable evaluation method of the transgenic allele for copy number and homozygosity is vital in analysing these transformations. Here the suitability of Southern blot analysis, thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL-)PCR, quantitative (q)PCR and digital droplet (dd)PCR to estimate T-DNA copy number, locus complexity and homozygosity were compared in transgenic tobacco. Southern blot analysis and ddPCR on three generations of transgenic offspring with contrasting zygosity and copy number were entirely consistent, whereas TAIL-PCR often underestimated copy number. qPCR deviated considerably from the Southern blot results and had lower precision and higher variability than ddPCR. Comparison of segregation analyses and ddPCR of T1 progeny from 26 T0 plants showed that at least 19% of the lines carried multiple T-DNA insertions per locus, which can lead to unstable transgene expression. Segregation analyses failed to detect these multiple copies, presumably because of their close linkage. This shows the importance of routine T-DNA copy number estimation. Based on our results, ddPCR is the most suitable method, because it is as reliable as Southern blot analysis yet much faster. A protocol for this application of ddPCR to large plant genomes is provided.

  17. Variation in copy number of the 28S rDNA of Aspergillus fumigatus measured by droplet digital PCR and analog quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Benabou, Marion; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) after DNA digestion yielded a 28S rDNA copy number of 61 to 86 copies/genome when testing 10 unrelated Aspergillus fumigatus isolates, higher than with quantitative PCR. Unfortunately, ddPCR after DNA digestion did not improve the sensitivity of our PCR assay when testing serum patients with invasive aspergillosis.

  18. EGFR-activating mutations, DNA copy number abundance of ErbB family, and prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Ya-Hsuan; Yu, Sung-Liang; Ho, Bing-Ching; Hsu, Chung-Ping; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Hsu, Kuo-Hsuan; Tseng, Jeng-Sen; Hsia, Jiun-Yi; Chuang, Cheng-Yen; Chang, Chi-Sheng; Li, Yu-Cheng; Li, Ker-Chau; Chang, Gee-Chen; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2016-02-23

    In this study, EGFR-activating mutation status and DNA copy number abundances of members of ErbB family were measured in 261 lung adenocarcinomas. The associations between DNA copy number abundances of ErbB family, EGFR-activating mutation status, and prognosis were explored. Results showed that DNA copy number abundances of EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4 had associations with overall survival in lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR-activating mutations. In the stratification analysis, only ERBB2 showed significant discrepancy in patients carrying wild type EGFR and other members of ErbB family in patients carrying EGFR-activating mutation. This indicated that CNAs of ErbB family had effect modifications of EGFR-activating mutation status. Findings of this study demonstrate potential molecular guidance of patient management of lung adenocarcinoma with or without EGFR-activating mutations.

  19. Low copy number DNA profiling from isolated sperm using the aureka®-micromanipulation system.

    PubMed

    Schneider, C; Müller, U; Kilper, R; Siebertz, B

    2012-07-01

    A new cell isolation technique linked to the aureka® micromanipulation system (aureka®) was used to pick sperm from mixed samples containing sperm and epithelial cells. Both cell types were stained using the HY-LITER™ high-resolution, fluorescent staining kit. To isolate a single sperm of interest under a fluorescent microscope, a specific microsphere picking technique was used. This sensitive and reliable cell identification and isolation technique enables low-copy-number (LCN) DNA profiling, as few as 20 sperm are sufficient for obtaining a full short tandem repeat (STR) profile without any allelic drop out. The presented protocol covers the whole workflow, from sample staining and cell pick up to STR analysis.

  20. Elevation of Pollen Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number by WHIRLY2: Altered Respiration and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Guo, Liang; Shen, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be much lower than the number of mitochondria. The biological significance and regulatory mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, using the pollen vegetative cell, we examined the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mtDNA-binding protein WHIRLY2 (AtWHY2). AtWHY2 decreases during pollen development, in parallel with the rapid degradation of mtDNA; to examine the importance of this decrease, we used the pollen vegetative cell-specific promoter Lat52 to express AtWHY2. The transgenic plants (LWHY2) had very high mtDNA levels in pollen, more than 10 times more than in the wild type (ecotype Columbia-0). LWHY2 plants were fertile, morphologically normal, and set seeds; however, reciprocal crosses with heterozygous plants showed reduced transmission of LWHY2-1 through the male and slower growth of LWHY2-1 pollen tubes. We found that LWHY2-1 pollen had significantly more reactive oxygen species and less ATP compared with the wild type, indicating an effect on mitochondrial respiration. These findings reveal that AtWHY2 affects mtDNA copy number in pollen and suggest that low mtDNA copy numbers might be the normal means by which plant cells maintain mitochondrial genetic information. PMID:26195569

  1. Development and validation of InnoQuant™, a sensitive human DNA quantitation and degradation assessment method for forensic samples using high copy number mobile elements Alu and SVA.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Gina M; Montgomery, Anne H; Thompson, Robyn; Indest, Brooke; Carroll, Marion; Sinha, Sudhir K

    2014-11-01

    There is a constant need in forensic casework laboratories for an improved way to increase the first-pass success rate of forensic samples. The recent advances in mini STR analysis, SNP, and Alu marker systems have now made it possible to analyze highly compromised samples, yet few tools are available that can simultaneously provide an assessment of quantity, inhibition, and degradation in a sample prior to genotyping. Currently there are several different approaches used for fluorescence-based quantification assays which provide a measure of quantity and inhibition. However, a system which can also assess the extent of degradation in a forensic sample will be a useful tool for DNA analysts. Possessing this information prior to genotyping will allow an analyst to more informatively make downstream decisions for the successful typing of a forensic sample without unnecessarily consuming DNA extract. Real-time PCR provides a reliable method for determining the amount and quality of amplifiable DNA in a biological sample. Alu are Short Interspersed Elements (SINE), approximately 300bp insertions which are distributed throughout the human genome in large copy number. The use of an internal primer to amplify a segment of an Alu element allows for human specificity as well as high sensitivity when compared to a single copy target. The advantage of an Alu system is the presence of a large number (>1000) of fixed insertions in every human genome, which minimizes the individual specific variation possible when using a multi-copy target quantification system. This study utilizes two independent retrotransposon genomic targets to obtain quantification of an 80bp "short" DNA fragment and a 207bp "long" DNA fragment in a degraded DNA sample in the multiplex system InnoQuant™. The ratio of the two quantitation values provides a "Degradation Index", or a qualitative measure of a sample's extent of degradation. The Degradation Index was found to be predictive of the observed loss

  2. Excessive genomic DNA copy number variation in the Li–Fraumeni cancer predisposition syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shlien, Adam; Tabori, Uri; Marshall, Christian R.; Pienkowska, Malgorzata; Feuk, Lars; Novokmet, Ana; Nanda, Sonia; Druker, Harriet; Scherer, Stephen W.; Malkin, David

    2008-01-01

    DNA copy number variations (CNVs) are a significant and ubiquitous source of inherited human genetic variation. However, the importance of CNVs to cancer susceptibility and tumor progression has not yet been explored. Li–Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by a strikingly increased risk of early-onset breast cancer, sarcomas, brain tumors and other neoplasms in individuals harboring germline TP53 mutations. Known genetic determinants of LFS do not fully explain the variable clinical phenotype in affected family members. As part of a wider study of CNVs and cancer, we conducted a genome-wide profile of germline CNVs in LFS families. Here, by examining DNA from a large healthy population and an LFS cohort using high-density oligonucleotide arrays, we show that the number of CNVs per genome is well conserved in the healthy population, but strikingly enriched in these cancer-prone individuals. We found a highly significant increase in CNVs among carriers of germline TP53 mutations with a familial cancer history. Furthermore, we identified a remarkable number of genomic regions in which known cancer-related genes coincide with CNVs, in both LFS families and healthy individuals. Germline CNVs may provide a foundation that enables the more dramatic chromosomal changes characteristic of TP53-related tumors to be established. Our results suggest that screening families predisposed to cancer for CNVs may identify individuals with an abnormally high number of these events. PMID:18685109

  3. High-resolution genomic copy number profiling of glioblastoma multiforme by single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dong; Ogawa, Seishi; Kawamata, Norihiko; Tunici, Patrizia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Eoli, Marica; Ruckert, Christian; Huynh, Thien; Liu, Gentao; Kato, Motohiro; Sanada, Masashi; Jauch, Anna; Dugas, Martin; Black, Keith L; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2009-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an extremely malignant brain tumor. To identify new genomic alterations in GBM, genomic DNA of tumor tissue/explants from 55 individuals and 6 GBM cell lines were examined using single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray (SNP-Chip). Further gene expression analysis relied on an additional 56 GBM samples. SNP-Chip results were validated using several techniques, including quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), nucleotide sequencing, and a combination of Q-PCR and detection of microsatellite markers for loss of heterozygosity with normal copy number [acquired uniparental disomy (AUPD)]. Whole genomic DNA copy number in each GBM sample was profiled by SNP-Chip. Several signaling pathways were frequently abnormal. Either the p16(INK4A)/p15(INK4B)-CDK4/6-pRb or p14(ARF)-MDM2/4-p53 pathways were abnormal in 89% (49 of 55) of cases. Simultaneous abnormalities of both pathways occurred in 84% (46 of 55) samples. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway was altered in 71% (39 of 55) GBMs either by deletion of PTEN or amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor and/or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Deletion of chromosome 6q26-27 often occurred (16 of 55 samples). The minimum common deleted region included PARK2, PACRG, QKI, and PDE10A genes. Further reverse transcription Q-PCR studies showed that PARK2 expression was decreased in another collection of GBMs at a frequency of 61% (34 of 56) of samples. The 1p36.23 region was deleted in 35% (19 of 55) of samples. Notably, three samples had homozygous deletion encompassing this site. Also, a novel internal deletion of a putative tumor suppressor gene, LRP1B, was discovered causing an aberrant protein. AUPDs occurred in 58% (32 of 55) of the GBM samples and five of six GBM cell lines. A common AUPD was found at chromosome 17p13.3-12 (included p53 gene) in 13 of 61 samples and cell lines. Single-strand conformational polymorphism and nucleotide

  4. Reduced rDNA copy number does not affect "competitive" chromosome pairing in XYY males of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Maggert, Keith A

    2014-03-20

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are causal agents in X-Y chromosome pairing in meiosis I of Drosophila males. Despite broad variation in X-linked and Y-linked rDNA copy number, polymorphisms in regulatory/spacer sequences between rRNA genes, and variance in copy number of interrupting R1 and R2 retrotransposable elements, there is little evidence that different rDNA arrays affect pairing efficacy. I investigated whether induced rDNA copy number polymorphisms affect chromosome pairing in a "competitive" situation in which complex pairing configurations were possible using males with XYY constitution. Using a common normal X chromosome, one of two different full-length Y chromosomes, and a third chromosome from a series of otherwise-isogenic rDNA deletions, I detected no differences in X-Y or Y-Y pairing or chromosome segregation frequencies that could not be attributed to random variation alone. This work was performed in the context of an undergraduate teaching program at Texas A&M University, and I discuss the pedagogical utility of this and other such experiments.

  5. Reduced rDNA Copy Number Does Not Affect “Competitive” Chromosome Pairing in XYY Males of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Maggert, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are causal agents in X-Y chromosome pairing in meiosis I of Drosophila males. Despite broad variation in X-linked and Y-linked rDNA copy number, polymorphisms in regulatory/spacer sequences between rRNA genes, and variance in copy number of interrupting R1 and R2 retrotransposable elements, there is little evidence that different rDNA arrays affect pairing efficacy. I investigated whether induced rDNA copy number polymorphisms affect chromosome pairing in a “competitive” situation in which complex pairing configurations were possible using males with XYY constitution. Using a common normal X chromosome, one of two different full-length Y chromosomes, and a third chromosome from a series of otherwise-isogenic rDNA deletions, I detected no differences in X-Y or Y-Y pairing or chromosome segregation frequencies that could not be attributed to random variation alone. This work was performed in the context of an undergraduate teaching program at Texas A&M University, and I discuss the pedagogical utility of this and other such experiments. PMID:24449686

  6. The effects of a wheat germ rich diet on oxidative mtDNA damage, mtDNA copy number and antioxidant enzyme activities in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ayse Gul

    2013-03-01

    The free radical theory of aging posits that the accumulation of macromolecular damage induced by toxic reactive oxygen species plays a central role in the aging process. Therefore consumption of dietary antioxidants appears to be of great importance. Wheat germ have strong antioxidant properties. Aim of this study is investigate the effects of a wheat germ rich diet on oxidative mtDNA damage, mtDNA copy number and antioxidant enzyme activities in Drosophila. Current results suggested that dietary wheat germ enhances the activities of antioxidant enzymes in Drosophila. There was no statistically difference in mtDNA damage and mtDNA copy number results of "Wheat Germ" and "Refined White Flour" feed groups. mtDNA damage slightly increased with aging in both groups but these changes were no statistically different.

  7. Accurately assessing the risk of schizophrenia conferred by rare copy-number variation affecting genes with brain function.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Korn, Joshua M; McCarroll, Steven A; Altshuler, David; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; Daly, Mark J

    2010-09-09

    Investigators have linked rare copy number variation (CNVs) to neuropsychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia. One hypothesis is that CNV events cause disease by affecting genes with specific brain functions. Under these circumstances, we expect that CNV events in cases should impact brain-function genes more frequently than those events in controls. Previous publications have applied "pathway" analyses to genes within neuropsychiatric case CNVs to show enrichment for brain-functions. While such analyses have been suggestive, they often have not rigorously compared the rates of CNVs impacting genes with brain function in cases to controls, and therefore do not address important confounders such as the large size of brain genes and overall differences in rates and sizes of CNVs. To demonstrate the potential impact of confounders, we genotyped rare CNV events in 2,415 unaffected controls with Affymetrix 6.0; we then applied standard pathway analyses using four sets of brain-function genes and observed an apparently highly significant enrichment for each set. The enrichment is simply driven by the large size of brain-function genes. Instead, we propose a case-control statistical test, cnv-enrichment-test, to compare the rate of CNVs impacting specific gene sets in cases versus controls. With simulations, we demonstrate that cnv-enrichment-test is robust to case-control differences in CNV size, CNV rate, and systematic differences in gene size. Finally, we apply cnv-enrichment-test to rare CNV events published by the International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC). This approach reveals nominal evidence of case-association in neuronal-activity and the learning gene sets, but not the other two examined gene sets. The neuronal-activity genes have been associated in a separate set of schizophrenia cases and controls; however, testing in independent samples is necessary to definitively confirm this association. Our method is implemented in the PLINK software package.

  8. Fluorescence imaging of single-copy DNA sequences within the human genome using PNA-directed padlock probe assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yaroslavsky, Anastasia I.; Smolina, Irina V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a novel approach for fluorescent in situ detection of short, single-copy sequences within genomic DNA in human cells. The single copy sensitivity and single base specificity of our method is achieved due to the combination of three components. First, a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe locally opens a chosen target site, which allows a padlock DNA probe to access the site and become ligated. Second, rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates thousands of single-stranded copies of the target sequence. Finally, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to visualize the amplified DNA. We validate this new technique by successfully detecting six unique target sites on human mitochondrial and autosomal DNA. We also demonstrate the high specificity of this method by detecting X- and Y- specific sequences on human sex chromosomes and by simultaneously detecting three unique target sites. Finally, we discriminate two target sites that differ by two nucleotides. The PNA-RCA-FISH approach is a unique in situ hybridization method capable of multi-target visualization within human chromosomes and nuclei that does not require DNA denaturation and is extremely sequence specific. PMID:23521801

  9. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Shannon C.K.; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual’s consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%). Most nrDNA positions (91%) were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the “noncoding” ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming). PMID:25653903

  10. Accurate measurement of psoralen-crosslinked DNA: direct biochemical measurements and indirect measurement by hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, N.; Ross, P.M.

    1988-11-01

    This paper evaluates methods to measure crosslinkage due to psoralen plus light in total DNA and in specific sequences. DNA exposed in cells or in vitro to a bifunctional psoralen and near ultraviolet light accumulates interstrand crosslinks. Crosslinkage is the DNA mass fraction that is attached in both strands to a crosslink. We show here biochemical methods to measure psoralen photocrosslinkage accurately in total DNA. We also describe methods to measure photocrosslinkage indirectly, in specific sequences, by nucleic acid hybridization. We show that a single 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (TMP) crosslink causes at least 50 kbp of alkali-denatured DNA contiguous in both strands with it to snap back into the duplex form when the denatured preparation is returned to neutral pH. This process was so efficient that the DNA was not nicked by the single-strand nuclease S1 at 100-fold excess after snapping back. Uncrosslinked DNA was digested to acid-soluble material by the enzyme. Crosslinkage therefore equals the fraction of S1-resistant nucleotide in this kind of experiment. We alkali-denatured DNA samples crosslinked to varying degrees by varying TMP concentration at constant light exposure. We then measured crosslinkage by ethidium bromide (EtBr) fluorometry at pH 11.8; by EtBr fluorometry at neutral pH of S1 digests of the DNA; and by the fraction of radioactivity remaining acid insoluble in S1-digests of DNA labeled uniformly with (3H)deoxythymidine. These assays measure distinct physical properties of crosslinked DNA. Numerical agreement is expected only when all three measurements are accurate. Under optimum conditions, the three methods yielded identical results over the range of measurement. Using alkaline EtBr fluorescence in crude cell lysates, we detected crosslinks at frequencies in the range of 1.6 X 10(-7) per base pair.

  11. Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Occupations Associated with Low-Dose Benzene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Dioni, Laura; Hoxha, Mirjam; Bollati, Valentina; Albetti, Benedetta; Byun, Hyang-Min; Bonzini, Matteo; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cocco, Pierluigi; Satta, Giannina; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Cipolla, Massimo; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Baccarelli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background: Benzene is an established leukemogen at high exposure levels. Although low-level benzene exposure is widespread and may induce oxidative damage, no mechanistic biomarkers are available to detect biological dysfunction at low doses. Objectives: Our goals were to determine in a large multicenter cross-sectional study whether low-level benzene is associated with increased blood mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn, a biological oxidative response to mitochondrial DNA damage and dysfunction) and to explore potential links between mtDNAcn and leukemia-related epigenetic markers. Methods: We measured blood relative mtDNAcn by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 341 individuals selected from various occupational groups with low-level benzene exposures (> 100 times lower than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration/European Union standards) and 178 referents from three Italian cities (Genoa, Milan, Cagliari). Results: In each city, benzene-exposed participants showed higher mtDNAcn than referents: mtDNAcn was 0.90 relative units in Genoa bus drivers and 0.75 in referents (p = 0.019); 0.90 in Milan gas station attendants, 1.10 in police officers, and 0.75 in referents (p-trend = 0.008); 1.63 in Cagliari petrochemical plant workers, 1.25 in referents close to the plant, and 0.90 in referents farther from the plant (p-trend = 0.046). Using covariate-adjusted regression models, we estimated that an interquartile range increase in personal airborne benzene was associated with percent increases in mtDNAcn equal to 10.5% in Genoa (p = 0.014), 8.2% (p = 0.008) in Milan, 7.5% in Cagliari (p = 0.22), and 10.3% in all cities combined (p < 0.001). Using methylation data available for the Milan participants, we found that mtDNAcn was associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation (–2.41%; p = 0.007) and p15 hypermethylation (+15.95%, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Blood MtDNAcn was increased in persons exposed to low benzene levels, potentially reflecting mitochondrial

  12. An accurate DNA marker assay for stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stem rust resistance gene Sr2 has provided broad-spectrum protection against stem rust (Puccinia graminis) since its wide spread deployment in wheat from the 1940s. Because Sr2 confers partial resistance which is difficult to select under field conditions, a DNA marker is desirable that accurate...

  13. DNA copy number aberrations in small-cell lung cancer reveal activation of the focal adhesion pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ocak, S; Yamashita, H; Udyavar, AR; Miller, AN; Gonzalez, AL; Zou, Y; Jiang, A; Yi, Y; Shyr, Y; Estrada, L; Quaranta, V; Massion, PP

    2015-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive subtype of lung cancer in its clinical behavior, with a 5-year overall survival as low as 5%. Despite years of research in the field, molecular determinants of SCLC behavior are still poorly understood, and this deficiency has translated into an absence of specific diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. We hypothesized that tumor DNA copy number alterations would allow the identification of molecular pathways involved in SCLC progression. Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed on DNA extracted from 46 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded SCLC tissue specimens. Genomic profiling of tumor and sex-matched control DNA allowed the identification of 70 regions of copy number gain and 55 regions of copy number loss. Using molecular pathway analysis, we found a strong enrichment in these regions of copy number alterations for 11 genes associated with the focal adhesion pathway. We verified these findings at the genomic, gene expression and protein level. Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), one of the central genes represented in this pathway, was commonly expressed in SCLC tumors and constitutively phosphorylated in SCLC cell lines. Those were poorly adherent to most substrates but not to laminin-322. Inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Tyr397 by a small-molecule inhibitor, PF-573,228, induced a dose-dependent decrease of adhesion and an increase of spreading in SCLC cell lines on laminin-322. Cells that tended to spread also showed a decrease in focal adhesions, as demonstrated by a decreased vinculin expression. These results support the concept that pathway analysis of genes in regions of copy number alterations may uncover molecular mechanisms of disease progression and demonstrate a new role of FAK and associated adhesion pathways in SCLC. Further investigations of FAK at the functional level may lead to a better understanding of SCLC progression and may have therapeutic implications. PMID:20802517

  14. Genome-wide copy number profiling of single cells in S-phase reveals DNA-replication domains.

    PubMed

    Van der Aa, Niels; Cheng, Jiqiu; Mateiu, Ligia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Kumar, Parveen; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Vanneste, Evelyne; Moreau, Yves; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Voet, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    Single-cell genomics is revolutionizing basic genome research and clinical genetic diagnosis. However, none of the current research or clinical methods for single-cell analysis distinguishes between the analysis of a cell in G1-, S- or G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Here, we demonstrate by means of array comparative genomic hybridization that charting the DNA copy number landscape of a cell in S-phase requires conceptually different approaches to that of a cell in G1- or G2/M-phase. Remarkably, despite single-cell whole-genome amplification artifacts, the log2 intensity ratios of single S-phase cells oscillate according to early and late replication domains, which in turn leads to the detection of significantly more DNA imbalances when compared with a cell in G1- or G2/M-phase. Although these DNA imbalances may, on the one hand, be falsely interpreted as genuine structural aberrations in the S-phase cell's copy number profile and hence lead to misdiagnosis, on the other hand, the ability to detect replication domains genome wide in one cell has important applications in DNA-replication research. Genome-wide cell-type-specific early and late replicating domains have been identified by analyses of DNA from populations of cells, but cell-to-cell differences in DNA replication may be important in genome stability, disease aetiology and various other cellular processes.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA copy number and future risk of B-cell lymphoma in a nested case-control study in the prospective EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hosnijeh, Fatemeh Saberi; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; San Liu, Chin; Cheng, Wen-Ling; Nieters, Alexandra; Guldberg, Per; Tjønneland, Anne; Campa, Daniele; Martino, Alessandro; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Huerta Castaño, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Sala, Núria; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, J. Ramón; Sánchez, María-José; Melin, Beatrice; Johansson, Ann Sofie; Malm, Johan; Borgquist, Signe; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth C.; Brennan, Paul; Siddiq, Afshan; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage are involved in lymphomagenesis. Increased copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a compensatory mechanism of mitochondrial dysfunction previously has been associated with B-cell lymphomas, in particular chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, current evidence is limited and based on a relatively small number of cases. Using a nested case-control study, we extended these findings with a focus on subtype-specific analyses. Relative mtDNA copy number was measured in the buffy coat of prospectively collected blood of 469 lymphoma cases and 469 matched controls. The association between mtDNA copy number and the risk of developing lymphoma and histologic subtypes was examined using logistic regression models. We found no overall association between mtDNA and risk of lymphoma. Subtype analyses revealed significant increased risks of CLL (n = 102) with increasing mtDNA copy number (odds ratio = 1.34, 1.44, and 1.80 for quartiles 2-4, respectively; P trend = .001). mtDNA copy number was not associated with follow-up time, suggesting that this observation is not strongly influenced by indolent disease status. This study substantially strengthens the evidence that mtDNA copy number is related to risk of CLL and supports the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible mechanistic pathway in CLL ontogenesis. PMID:24899624

  16. Mitochondrial DNA as a non-invasive biomarker: Accurate quantification using real time quantitative PCR without co-amplification of pseudogenes and dilution bias

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, Afshan N.; Shahni, Rojeen; Rodriguez-de-Ledesma, Ana; Laftah, Abas; Cunningham, Phil

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial dysfunction is central to many diseases of oxidative stress. {yields} 95% of the mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the nuclear genome. {yields} Dilution of untreated genomic DNA leads to dilution bias. {yields} Unique primers and template pretreatment are needed to accurately measure mitochondrial DNA content. -- Abstract: Circulating mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) is a potential non-invasive biomarker of cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, the latter known to be central to a wide range of human diseases. Changes in MtDNA are usually determined by quantification of MtDNA relative to nuclear DNA (Mt/N) using real time quantitative PCR. We propose that the methodology for measuring Mt/N needs to be improved and we have identified that current methods have at least one of the following three problems: (1) As much of the mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the nuclear genome, many commonly used MtDNA primers co-amplify homologous pseudogenes found in the nuclear genome; (2) use of regions from genes such as {beta}-actin and 18S rRNA which are repetitive and/or highly variable for qPCR of the nuclear genome leads to errors; and (3) the size difference of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes cause a 'dilution bias' when template DNA is diluted. We describe a PCR-based method using unique regions in the human mitochondrial genome not duplicated in the nuclear genome; unique single copy region in the nuclear genome and template treatment to remove dilution bias, to accurately quantify MtDNA from human samples.

  17. International Comparison of Enumeration-Based Quantification of DNA Copy-Concentration Using Flow Cytometric Counting and Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hee-Bong; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Dong, Lianhua; Wang, Jing; Sui, Zhiwei; Pavšič, Jernej; Milavec, Mojca; Akgoz, Muslum; Mozioğlu, Erkan; Corbisier, Philippe; Janka, Mátrai; Cosme, Bruno; de V Cavalcante, Janaina J; Flatshart, Roberto Becht; Burke, Daniel; Forbes-Smith, Michael; McLaughlin, Jacob; Emslie, Kerry; Whale, Alexandra S; Huggett, Jim F; Parkes, Helen; Kline, Margaret C; Harenza, Jo Lynne; Vallone, Peter M

    2016-12-20

    Enumeration-based determination of DNA copy-concentration was assessed through an international comparison among national metrology institutes (NMIs) and designated institutes (DIs). Enumeration-based quantification does not require a calibration standard thereby providing a route to "absolute quantification", which offers the potential for reliable value assignments of DNA reference materials, and International System of Units (SI) traceability to copy number 1 through accurate counting. In this study, 2 enumeration-based methods, flow cytometric (FCM) counting and the digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR), were compared to quantify a solution of the pBR322 plasmid at a concentration of several thousand copies per microliter. In addition, 2 orthogonal chemical-analysis methods based on nucleotide quantification, isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) were applied to quantify a more concentrated solution of the plasmid. Although 9 dPCR results from 8 laboratories showed some dispersion (relative standard deviation [RSD] = 11.8%), their means were closely aligned with those of the FCM-based counting method and the orthogonal chemical-analysis methods, corrected for gravimetric dilution factors. Using the means of dPCR results, the RSD of all 4 methods was 1.8%, which strongly supported the validity of the recent enumeration approaches. Despite a good overall agreement, the individual dPCR results were not sufficiently covered by the reported measurement uncertainties. These findings suggest that some laboratories may not have considered all factors contributing to the measurement uncertainty of dPCR, and further investigation of this possibility is warranted.

  18. CNVkit: Genome-Wide Copy Number Detection and Visualization from Targeted DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shain, A. Hunter; Botton, Thomas; Bastian, Boris C.

    2016-01-01

    Germline copy number variants (CNVs) and somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are of significant importance in syndromic conditions and cancer. Massively parallel sequencing is increasingly used to infer copy number information from variations in the read depth in sequencing data. However, this approach has limitations in the case of targeted re-sequencing, which leaves gaps in coverage between the regions chosen for enrichment and introduces biases related to the efficiency of target capture and library preparation. We present a method for copy number detection, implemented in the software package CNVkit, that uses both the targeted reads and the nonspecifically captured off-target reads to infer copy number evenly across the genome. This combination achieves both exon-level resolution in targeted regions and sufficient resolution in the larger intronic and intergenic regions to identify copy number changes. In particular, we successfully inferred copy number at equivalent to 100-kilobase resolution genome-wide from a platform targeting as few as 293 genes. After normalizing read counts to a pooled reference, we evaluated and corrected for three sources of bias that explain most of the extraneous variability in the sequencing read depth: GC content, target footprint size and spacing, and repetitive sequences. We compared the performance of CNVkit to copy number changes identified by array comparative genomic hybridization. We packaged the components of CNVkit so that it is straightforward to use and provides visualizations, detailed reporting of significant features, and export options for integration into existing analysis pipelines. CNVkit is freely available from https://github.com/etal/cnvkit. PMID:27100738

  19. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep' proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep', in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replica...

  20. Leukocyte mitochondrial DNA copy number, anthropometric indices, and weight change in US women

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shasha; Wu, Shaowei; Liang, Liming; Liang, Geyu; Giovannucci, Edward; Vivo, Immaculata De; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between leukocyte mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtCN) and different anthropometric indices as well as weight changes; and to compare mtCN and telomere length with respect to their associations with BMI and age. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Nurses' Health Study, an ongoing prospective cohort study of 121,700 nurses enrolled in 1976; in 1989-1990 a subset of 32,826 women provided blood samples. Participants 1,700 disease-free US women from case-control studies nested within the Nurses' Health Study with mtCN and telomere length measured who also have anthropometric measurements. Main outcome measure Relative mtCN and telomere lengths in peripheral blood leukocytes measured by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and various anthropometric measurements data from initial questionnaire. Results Leukocyte mtCN was inversely associated with current weight (LS means Q1-Q4: 0.07, 0.04, 0.03, −0.17; P trend =0.002), waist size (LS means Q1-Q4: 0.06, 0.05, −0.04, −0.06; P trend = 0.04), BMI (LS means normal light, normal heavy, overweight, pre-obese, obese: 0.11, −0.01, −0.04, 0.04, −0.25; P trend<0.0001), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) (LS means Q1-Q4: 0.06, 0.08, −0.04, −0.06; P trend = 0.03). A one-unit decrease in mtCN z score was equivalent to approximately 3.5 pounds of weight gain for an adult of 5′10″. In addition, weight gain was bi-directionally and inversely associated with mtCN. Moreover, mtCN was strongly positively correlated with telomere length (LS means Q1-Q4: −0.02, 0.09, 0.11, 0.33; P trend <0.0001). MtCN was inversely associated with BMI even after adjusting for telomere length (P trend =0.003), while telomere length was not associated with BMI. On the other hand, telomere length was inversely associated with age after adjusting for mtCN (P trend =0.04), while mtCN was not associated with age. Conclusions Our results provide compelling evidence for a potential bi

  1. Coordinating DNA replication to produce one copy of the genome requires genes that act in ubiquitin metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J D; Manning, B M; Formosa, T

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a genetic screen of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify genes that act to coordinate DNA replication so that each part of the genome is copied exactly once per cell cycle. A mutant was recovered in this screen that accumulates aberrantly high DNA contents but does not complete a second round of synthesis. The mutation principally responsible for this phenotype is in the DOA4 gene, which encodes a ubiquitin hydrolase, one of several yeast genes that encode enzymes that can remove the signalling polypeptide ubiquitin hydrolase, one of several yeast genes that encode enzymes that can remove the signaling polypeptide ubiquitin from its covalently linked conjugated forms. DOA4 is nonessential, and deleting this gene causes uncoordinated replication. Overreplication does not occur in cells with limiting amounts of Cdc7 protein kinase, suggesting that entry into S phase is required for this phenotype. The DNA formed in doa4 mutants is not highly unusual in the sense that mitotic recombination rates are normal, implying that a high level of repair is not induced. The temperature sensitivity of doa4 mutations is partially suppressed by extra copies of the polyubiquitin gene UB14, but overreplication still occurs in the presence of this suppressor. Mutations in DOA4 cause loss of the free ubiquitin pool in cells under heat stress conditions, and extra copies of UB14 restore this pool without restoring coordination of replication. We conclude that a ubiquitin-mediated signaling event directly involving the ubiquitin hydrolase encoded by DOA4 is needed in S. cerevisiae to prevent uncoordinated DNA replication. PMID:8657109

  2. Accurate Quantification of microRNA via Single Strand Displacement Reaction on DNA Origami Motif

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jingyu; Li, Weidong; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Hongxin; Yang, Lun; Zhang, Aiping; He, Lin; Li, Can

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs) labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs. PMID:23990889

  3. Altered mitochondrial DNA copy number contributes to human cancer risk: evidence from an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liwen; Yao, Xinyue; Shen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates that the quantitative changes in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number could affect the genetic susceptibility of malignancies in a tumor-specific manner, but the results are still elusive. To provide a more precise estimation on the association between mtDNA copy number and risk of diverse malignancies, a meta-analysis was conducted by calculating the pooled odds ratios (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A total of 36 case-control studies involving 11,847 cases and 15,438 controls were finally included in the meta-analysis. Overall analysis of all studies suggested no significant association between mtDNA content and cancer risk (OR = 1.044, 95% CI = 0.866–1.260, P = 0.651). Subgroup analyses by cancer types showed an obvious positive association between mtDNA content and lymphoma and breast cancer (OR = 1.645, 95% CI = 1.117–2.421, P = 0.012; OR = 1.721, 95% CI = 1.130–2.622, P = 0.011, respectively), and a negative association for hepatic carcinoma. Stratified analyses by other confounding factors also found increased cancer risk in people with drinking addiction. Further analysis using studies of quartiles found that populations with the highest mtDNA content may be under more obvious risk of melanoma and that Western populations were more susceptible than Asians. PMID:27775013

  4. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5-8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be...

  5. Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test Using ddPCR (SMART-ddPCR): An Accurate Method for Assessment of Preferential Allelic Imbalance in Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    de Smith, Adam J.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Hansen, Helen M.; Endicott, Alyson A.; Wiencke, John K.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which heritable genetic variants can affect tumor development has yet to be fully elucidated. Tumor selection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk alleles, a phenomenon called preferential allelic imbalance (PAI), has been demonstrated in some cancer types. We developed a novel application of digital PCR termed Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test using Droplet Digital PCR (SMART-ddPCR) for accurate assessment of tumor PAI, and have applied this method to test the hypothesis that heritable SNPs associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may demonstrate tumor PAI. These SNPs are located at CDKN2A (rs3731217) and IKZF1 (rs4132601), genes frequently lost in ALL, and at CEBPE (rs2239633), ARID5B (rs7089424), PIP4K2A (rs10764338), and GATA3 (rs3824662), genes located on chromosomes gained in high-hyperdiploid ALL. We established thresholds of AI using constitutional DNA from SNP heterozygotes, and subsequently measured allelic copy number in tumor DNA from 19–142 heterozygote samples per SNP locus. We did not find significant tumor PAI at these loci, though CDKN2A and IKZF1 SNPs showed a trend towards preferential selection of the risk allele (p = 0.17 and p = 0.23, respectively). Using a genomic copy number control ddPCR assay, we investigated somatic copy number alterations (SCNA) underlying AI at CDKN2A and IKZF1, revealing a complex range of alterations including homozygous and hemizygous deletions and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, with varying degrees of clonality. Copy number estimates from ddPCR showed high agreement with those from multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays. We demonstrate that SMART-ddPCR is a highly accurate method for investigation of tumor PAI and for assessment of the somatic alterations underlying AI. Furthermore, analysis of publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas identified 16 recurrent SCNA loci that contain heritable cancer risk SNPs associated with a

  6. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that

  7. Effective use of the TSPY gene-specific copy number in determining fetal DNA in the maternal blood of cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Lubna; Takano, Jun-Ichiro; Sankai, Tadashi

    2016-08-01

    Since the available concentration of single-copy fetal genes in maternal blood DNA is sometimes lower than detection limits by PCR methods, the development of specific and quantitative PCR detection methods for fetal DNA in maternal blood is anticipated, which may broaden the methods that can be used to monitor pregnancy. We used the TaqMan qPCR amplification for DYS14 multi-copy sequence and the SRY gene in maternal blood plasma (cell-free DNA) and fractional precipitated blood cells (cellular DNA) from individual cynomolgus monkeys at 22 weeks of pregnancy. The availability of cell-free fetal DNA was higher in maternal blood plasma than that of cellular DNA from fractional precipitated blood cells. There was a significantly higher (P < 0.001) mean copy number of fetal male DYS14 from maternal plasma (4.4 × 10(4) copies/mL) than that of detected fetal cellular DNA from fractional blood cell pellets. The sensitivity of the DYS14 PCR assay was found to be higher than that of the SRY assay for the detection of fetal DNA when its presence was at a minimum. The DYS14 assay is an improved method for quantifying male fetal DNA in circulating maternal blood in the primate model.

  8. SNP-microarrays can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex forensic DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, Lev; Ayers, Sheri B; LeFebvre, Aaron K; Darvasi, Ariel

    2015-05-01

    Common forensic and mass disaster scenarios present DNA evidence that comprises a mixture of several contributors. Identifying the presence of an individual in such mixtures has proven difficult. In the current study, we evaluate the practical usefulness of currently available "off-the-shelf" SNP microarrays for such purposes. We found that a set of 3000 SNPs specifically selected for this purpose can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex DNA mixtures of various compositions. For example, individuals contributing as little as 5% to a complex DNA mixture can be robustly identified even if the starting DNA amount was as little as 5.0ng and had undergone whole-genome amplification (WGA) prior to SNP analysis. The work presented in this study represents proof-of-principle that our previously proposed approach, can work with real "forensic-type" samples. Furthermore, in the absence of a low-density focused forensic SNP microarray, the use of standard, currently available high-density SNP microarrays can be similarly used and even increase statistical power due to the larger amount of available information.

  9. Pairagon: a highly accurate, HMM-based cDNA-to-genome aligner

    PubMed Central

    Lu, David V.; Brown, Randall H.; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Brent, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The most accurate way to determine the intron–exon structures in a genome is to align spliced cDNA sequences to the genome. Thus, cDNA-to-genome alignment programs are a key component of most annotation pipelines. The scoring system used to choose the best alignment is a primary determinant of alignment accuracy, while heuristics that prevent consideration of certain alignments are a primary determinant of runtime and memory usage. Both accuracy and speed are important considerations in choosing an alignment algorithm, but scoring systems have received much less attention than heuristics. Results: We present Pairagon, a pair hidden Markov model based cDNA-to-genome alignment program, as the most accurate aligner for sequences with high- and low-identity levels. We conducted a series of experiments testing alignment accuracy with varying sequence identity. We first created ‘perfect’ simulated cDNA sequences by splicing the sequences of exons in the reference genome sequences of fly and human. The complete reference genome sequences were then mutated to various degrees using a realistic mutation simulator and the perfect cDNAs were aligned to them using Pairagon and 12 other aligners. To validate these results with natural sequences, we performed cross-species alignment using orthologous transcripts from human, mouse and rat. We found that aligner accuracy is heavily dependent on sequence identity. For sequences with 100% identity, Pairagon achieved accuracy levels of >99.6%, with one quarter of the errors of any other aligner. Furthermore, for human/mouse alignments, which are only 85% identical, Pairagon achieved 87% accuracy, higher than any other aligner. Availability: Pairagon source and executables are freely available at http://mblab.wustl.edu/software/pairagon/ Contact: davidlu@wustl.edu; brent@cse.wustl.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19414532

  10. Integrated DNA methylation and copy-number profiling identify three clinically and biologically relevant groups of anaplastic glioma.

    PubMed

    Wiestler, Benedikt; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Jones, David T W; Hovestadt, Volker; Sturm, Dominik; Koelsche, Christian; Bertoni, Anna; Schweizer, Leonille; Korshunov, Andrey; Weiß, Elisa K; Schliesser, Maximilian G; Radbruch, Alexander; Herold-Mende, Christel; Roth, Patrick; Unterberg, Andreas; Hartmann, Christian; Pietsch, Torsten; Reifenberger, Guido; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Platten, Michael; Pfister, Stefan M; von Deimling, Andreas; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    The outcome of patients with anaplastic gliomas varies considerably. Whether a molecular classification of anaplastic gliomas based on large-scale genomic or epigenomic analyses is superior to histopathology for reflecting distinct biological groups, predicting outcomes and guiding therapy decisions has yet to be determined. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation analysis, using a platform which also allows the detection of copy-number aberrations, was performed in a cohort of 228 patients with anaplastic gliomas (astrocytomas, oligoastrocytomas, and oligodendrogliomas), including 115 patients of the NOA-04 trial. We further compared these tumors with a group of 55 glioblastomas. Unsupervised clustering of DNA methylation patterns revealed two main groups correlated with IDH status: CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) positive (77.5 %) or negative (22.5 %). CIMP(pos) (IDH mutant) tumors showed a further separation based on copy-number status of chromosome arms 1p and 19q. CIMP(neg) (IDH wild type) tumors showed hallmark copy-number alterations of glioblastomas, and clustered together with CIMP(neg) glioblastomas without forming separate groups based on WHO grade. Notably, there was no molecular evidence for a distinct biological entity representing anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Tumor classification based on CIMP and 1p/19q status was significantly associated with survival, allowing a better prediction of outcome than the current histopathological classification: patients with CIMP(pos) tumors with 1p/19q codeletion (CIMP-codel) had the best prognosis, followed by patients with CIMP(pos) tumors but intact 1p/19q status (CIMP-non-codel). Patients with CIMP(neg) anaplastic gliomas (GBM-like) had the worst prognosis. Collectively, our data suggest that anaplastic gliomas can be grouped by IDH and 1p/19q status into three molecular groups that show clear links to underlying biology and a significant association with clinical outcome in a prospective trial cohort.

  11. A scale-space method for detecting recurrent DNA copy number changes with analytical false discovery rate control.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Ewald; Reinders, Marcel J T; Wessels, Lodewyk F A

    2013-05-01

    Tumor formation is partially driven by DNA copy number changes, which are typically measured using array comparative genomic hybridization, SNP arrays and DNA sequencing platforms. Many techniques are available for detecting recurring aberrations across multiple tumor samples, including CMAR, STAC, GISTIC and KC-SMART. GISTIC is widely used and detects both broad and focal (potentially overlapping) recurring events. However, GISTIC performs false discovery rate control on probes instead of events. Here we propose Analytical Multi-scale Identification of Recurrent Events, a multi-scale Gaussian smoothing approach, for the detection of both broad and focal (potentially overlapping) recurring copy number alterations. Importantly, false discovery rate control is performed analytically (no need for permutations) on events rather than probes. The method does not require segmentation or calling on the input dataset and therefore reduces the potential loss of information due to discretization. An important characteristic of the approach is that the error rate is controlled across all scales and that the algorithm outputs a single profile of significant events selected from the appropriate scales. We perform extensive simulations and showcase its utility on a glioblastoma SNP array dataset. Importantly, ADMIRE detects focal events that are missed by GISTIC, including two events involving known glioma tumor-suppressor genes: CDKN2C and NF1.

  12. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  13. Detection of the free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri by using conventional and real-time PCR based on a single copy DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The amoeba-flagellate Naegleria fowleri is a causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). This thermophilic species occurs worldwide and tends to proliferate in warm aquatic environment. The PAM cases remain rare but this infection is mostly fatal. Here, we describe a single copy region which has been cloned and sequenced, and was used for both conventional and real-time PCR. Targeting a single-copy DNA sequence allows to directly quantify the N. fowleri cells. The real-time PCR results give a detection limit of 1 copy per reaction with high reproducibility without the need of a Taqman probe. This procedure is of interest as compared to other procedures which are mostly based on the detection of multi-copy DNA associated with a Taqman probe.

  14. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Borba, Juliane C; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M; Feldman, Sanford H; Landers, James P

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer 'trigger' DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use.

  15. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A.; Borba, Juliane C.; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Landers, James P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer ‘trigger’ DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use. PMID:26068926

  16. Measurement and relevance of neuroblastoma DNA copy number changes in the post-genome era.

    PubMed

    Mosse, Yael P; Greshock, Joel; Weber, Barbara L; Maris, John M

    2005-10-18

    The completion of the human genome sequence and the development of high throughput technology present exciting opportunities for the study of cancer cells. High-resolution analysis of chromosomal aberrations provides a global framework for understanding complex patterns in cancer cells, allowing us to ask hypothesis-driven questions. Genome-wide analysis of amplification and deletion of genomic regions is a critical step to resolving the mechanisms of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We used a high-resolution aCGH system that has over 4000 human BAC clones, resulting in an average coverage of 1Mb across the genome, to define whole genome copy number aberrations (CNAs) in a panel of human neuroblastoma-derived cell lines. By combining the aCGH data with meticulous regional validation studies, we showed that array CGH could reliably detect known aberrations including single copy gain or loss, that data correlate well with standard techniques used for the detection of these genetic changes, and that this technique can be used to identify novel regions of genomic imbalance.

  17. Decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number in the hippocampus and peripheral blood during opiate addiction is mediated by autophagy and can be salvaged by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yue-Mei; Jia, Yun-Fang; Su, Ling-Yan; Wang, Dong; Lv, Li; Xu, Lin; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2013-09-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disease that is a serious social problem and causes enormous financial burden. Because mitochondrial abnormalities have been associated with opiate addiction, we examined the effect of morphine on mtDNA levels in rat and mouse models of addiction and in cultured cells. We found that mtDNA copy number was significantly reduced in the hippocampus and peripheral blood of morphine-addicted rats and mice compared with control animals. Concordantly, decreased mtDNA copy number and elevated mtDNA damage were observed in the peripheral blood from opiate-addicted patients, indicating detrimental effects of drug abuse and stress. In cultured rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and mouse neurons, morphine treatment caused many mitochondrial defects, including a reduction in mtDNA copy number that was mediated by autophagy. Knockdown of the Atg7 gene was able to counteract the loss of mtDNA copy number induced by morphine. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant melatonin restored mtDNA content and neuronal outgrowth and prevented the increase in autophagy upon morphine treatment. In mice, coadministration of melatonin with morphine ameliorated morphine-induced behavioral sensitization, analgesic tolerance and mtDNA content reduction. During drug withdrawal in opiate-addicted patients and improvement of protracted abstinence syndrome, we observed an increase of serum melatonin level. Taken together, our study indicates that opioid addiction is associated with mtDNA copy number reduction and neurostructural remodeling. These effects appear to be mediated by autophagy and can be salvaged by melatonin.

  18. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA from noninvasive samples for accurate microsatellite genotyping of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus).

    PubMed

    Morin, P A; Chambers, K E; Boesch, C; Vigilant, L

    2001-07-01

    Noninvasive samples are useful for molecular genetic analyses of wild animal populations. However, the low DNA content of such samples makes DNA amplification difficult, and there is the potential for erroneous results when one of two alleles at heterozygous microsatellite loci fails to be amplified. In this study we describe an assay designed to measure the amount of amplifiable nuclear DNA in low DNA concentration extracts from noninvasive samples. We describe the range of DNA amounts obtained from chimpanzee faeces and shed hair samples and formulate a new efficient approach for accurate microsatellite genotyping. Prescreening of extracts for DNA quantity is recommended for sorting of samples for likely success and reliability. Repetition of results remains extensive for analysis of microsatellite amplifications beginning from low starting amounts of DNA, but is reduced for those with higher DNA content.

  19. DNA copy number profiling reveals extensive genomic loss in hereditary BRCA1 and BRCA2 ovarian carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kamieniak, M M; Muñoz-Repeto, I; Rico, D; Osorio, A; Urioste, M; García-Donas, J; Hernando, S; Robles-Díaz, L; Ramón y Cajal, T; Cazorla, A; Sáez, R; García-Bueno, J M; Domingo, S; Borrego, S; Palacios, J; van de Wiel, M A; Ylstra, B; Benítez, J; García, M J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Few studies have attempted to characterise genomic changes occurring in hereditary epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs) and inconsistent results have been obtained. Given the relevance of DNA copy number alterations in ovarian oncogenesis and growing clinical implications of the BRCA-gene status, we aimed to characterise the genomic profiles of hereditary and sporadic ovarian tumours. Methods: High-resolution array Comparative Genomic Hybridisation profiling of 53 familial (21 BRCA1, 6 BRCA2 and 26 non-BRCA1/2) and 15 sporadic tumours in combination with supervised and unsupervised analysis was used to define common and/or specific copy number features. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering did not stratify tumours according to their familial or sporadic condition or to their BRCA1/2 mutation status. Common recurrent changes, spanning genes potentially fundamental for ovarian carcinogenesis, regardless of BRCA mutations, and several candidate subtype-specific events were defined. Despite similarities, greater contribution of losses was revealed to be a hallmark of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumours. Conclusion: Somatic alterations occurring in the development of familial EOCs do not differ substantially from the ones occurring in sporadic carcinomas. However, some specific features like extensive genomic loss observed in BRCA1/2 tumours may be of clinical relevance helping to identify BRCA-related patients likely to respond to PARP inhibitors. PMID:23558894

  20. The effect of leaving groups on binding and reactivity in enzyme-free copying of DNA and RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kervio, Eric; Sosson, Marilyne; Richert, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    The template-directed incorporation of nucleotides at the terminus of a growing primer is the basis of the transmission of genetic information. Nature uses polymerases-catalyzed reactions, but enzyme-free versions exist that employ nucleotides with organic leaving groups. The leaving group affects yields, but it was not clear whether inefficient extensions are due to poor binding, low reactivity toward the primer, or rapid hydrolysis. We have measured the binding of a total of 15 different activated nucleotides to DNA or RNA sequences. Further, we determined rate constants for the chemical step of primer extension involving methylimidazolides or oxyazabenzotriazolides of deoxynucleotides or ribonucleotides. Binding constants range from 10 to >500 mM and rate constants from 0.1 to 370 M−1 h−1. For aminoterminal primers, a fast covalent step and slow hydrolysis are the main factors leading to high yields. For monomers with weakly pairing bases, the leaving group can improve binding significantly. A detailed mechanistic picture emerges that explains why some enzyme-free primer extensions occur in high yield, while others remain recalcitrant to copying without enzymatic catalysis. A combination of tight binding and rapid extension, coupled with slow hydrolysis induces efficient enzyme-free copying. PMID:27235418

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure decreased sperm mitochondrial DNA copy number: A cross-sectional study (MARHCS) in Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Zhang, Guowei; Sun, Lei; Wang, Zhi; Zou, Peng; Gao, Jianfang; Peng, Kaige; Chen, Qing; Yang, Huan; Zhou, Niya; Cui, Zhihong; Zhou, Ziyuan; Liu, Jinyi; Cao, Jia; Ao, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental pollutants that have adverse effects on the male reproductive function. Many studies have confirmed that PAHs preferentially accumulate in mitochondria DNA relative to nuclear DNA and disrupt mitochondrial functions. However, it is rare whether exposure to PAHs is associated with mitochondrial damage and dysfunction in sperm. To evaluate the effects of PAHs on sperm mitochondria, we measured mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) and mtDNA integrity in 666 individuals from the Male Reproductive Health in Chongqing College Students (MARHCS) study. PAHs exposure was estimated by measuring eight urinary PAH metabolites (1-OHNap, 2-OHNap, 1-OHPhe, 2-OHPhe, 3-OHPhe, 4-OHPhe, 2-OHFlu and 1-OHPyr). The subjects were divided into low, median and high exposure groups using the tertile levels of urinary PAH metabolites. In univariate analyses, the results showed that increased levels of 2-OHPhe, 3-OHPhe, ∑Phe metabolites and 2-OHFlu were found to be associated with decreased sperm mtDNAcn. After adjusting for potential confounders, significantly negative associations of these metabolites remained (p = 0.039, 0.012, 0.01, 0.035, respectively). Each 1 μg/g creatinine increase in 2-OHPhe, 3-OHPhe, ∑Phe metabolites and 2-OHFlu was associated with a decrease in sperm mtDNAcn of 9.427%, 11.488%, 9.635% and 11.692%, respectively. There were no significant associations between urinary PAH metabolites and sperm MMP or mtDNA integrity. The results indicated that the low exposure levels of PAHs can cause abnormities in sperm mitochondria.

  2. Transfer of Large Contiguous DNA Fragments onto a Low Copy Plasmid or into the Bacterial Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Analise Z; Lesser, Cammie F

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity islands and other contiguous operons can be difficult to clone using conventional methods due to their large size. Here we describe a robust 3-step method to transfer large defined fragments of DNA from virulence plasmids or cosmids onto smaller autonomously replicating plasmids or directly into defined sites in the bacterial chromosome that incorporates endogenous yeast and λ Red homologous recombination systems. This methodology has been successfully used to isolate and integrate at least 31 kb of contiguous DNA and can be readily adapted for the recombineering of E. coli and its close relatives. PMID:28203614

  3. The application of ultraviolet irradiation to exogenous sources of DNA in plasticware and water for the amplification of low copy number DNA.

    PubMed

    Tamariz, Jeannie; Voynarovska, Kristina; Prinz, Mechthild; Caragine, Theresa

    2006-07-01

    Using high sensitivity forensic STR polymerase chain reaction (PCR) typing procedures, we have found low concentrations of DNA contamination in plasticware and water assumed to be sterile, which is not detected by standard DNA procedures. One technique commonly used to eliminate the presence of DNA is ultraviolet (UV) irradiation; we optimized such a protocol used in the treatment of water, tubes, plates, and tips for low copy number DNA (LCN) amplification. UV light from a Stratalinker((R)) 2400 was administered to 0.2, 1.5 mL tubes, and PCR plates contaminated with up to 500 pg of DNA. They were subsequently quantified with an ALU-based real-time PCR method using the Rotorgene 3000. Overall, there was a decrease in concentration of DNA recovered as the duration of treatment increased. Nonetheless, following 45 min of irradiating a PCR plate with 500 pg of DNA, nearly 6 pg were still detected. However, when the plate was raised within an inch of the UV source, less than 0.2 pg of DNA was detected. Additionally, lining the area around the samples with aluminum foil further reduced the amount of time necessary for irradiation, as only 30 min eliminated the presence DNA in the raised PCR plate. Similar experiments were conducted using tubes filled with a solution of DNA and water in equivalent concentrations for 50, 15, and 1.5 mL tubes with comparative results. It is plausible that the aluminum foil increased the amount of reflection in the area thereby enhancing penetration of UV rays through the walls of the plasticware. This protocol was tested for the possibility of inhibitors produced from irradiation of plastic tubes. As our protocols require less irradiation time than previous studies, PCR sensitivity was not affected. Moreover, the lifespan of the UV lamps was extended. Our findings demonstrate that this method is useful as an additional precautionary measure to prevent amplification of extraneous DNA from plasticware and water without compromising the

  4. An accurate DNA marker assay for stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in wheat.

    PubMed

    Mago, R; Simkova, H; Brown-Guedira, G; Dreisigacker, S; Breen, J; Jin, Y; Singh, R; Appels, R; Lagudah, E S; Ellis, J; Dolezel, J; Spielmeyer, W

    2011-03-01

    The stem rust resistance gene Sr2 has provided broad-spectrum protection against stem rust (Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici) since its wide spread deployment in wheat from the 1940s. Because Sr2 confers partial resistance which is difficult to select under field conditions, a DNA marker is desirable that accurately predicts Sr2 in diverse wheat germplasm. Using DNA sequence derived from the vicinity of the Sr2 locus, we developed a cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) marker that is associated with the presence or absence of the gene in 115 of 122 (95%) diverse wheat lines. The marker genotype predicted the absence of the gene in 100% of lines which were considered to lack Sr2. Discrepancies were observed in lines that were predicted to carry Sr2 but failed to show the CAPS marker. Given the high level of accuracy observed, the marker provides breeders with a selection tool for one of the most important disease resistance genes of wheat.

  5. Genome-Wide DNA Copy Number Analysis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Identifies New Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Forero-Castro, Maribel; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Abáigar, María; África Martín, Ana; Arefi, Maryam; Fuster, José Luis; de las Heras, Natalia; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Quintero, Jonathan; Riesco, Susana; Hermosín, Lourdes; de la Fuente, Ignacio; Recio, Isabel; Ribera, Jordi; Labrador, Jorge; Alonso, José M.; Olivier, Carmen; Sierra, Magdalena; Megido, Marta; Corchete-Sánchez, Luis A.; Ciudad Pizarro, Juana; García, Juan Luis; Ribera, José M.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying additional genetic alterations associated with poor prognosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is still a challenge. Aims: To characterize the presence of additional DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) in children and adults with ALL by whole-genome oligonucleotide array (aCGH) analysis, and to identify their associations with clinical features and outcome. Array-CGH was carried out in 265 newly diagnosed ALLs (142 children and 123 adults). The NimbleGen CGH 12x135K array (Roche) was used to analyze genetic gains and losses. CNAs were analyzed with GISTIC and aCGHweb software. Clinical and biological variables were analyzed. Three of the patients showed chromothripsis (cth6, cth14q and cth15q). CNAs were associated with age, phenotype, genetic subtype and overall survival (OS). In the whole cohort of children, the losses on 14q32.33 (p = 0.019) and 15q13.2 (p = 0.04) were related to shorter OS. In the group of children without good- or poor-risk cytogenetics, the gain on 1p36.11 was a prognostic marker independently associated with shorter OS. In adults, the gains on 19q13.2 (p = 0.001) and Xp21.1 (p = 0.029), and the loss of 17p (p = 0.014) were independent markers of poor prognosis with respect to OS. In summary, CNAs are frequent in ALL and are associated with clinical parameters and survival. Genome-wide DNA copy number analysis allows the identification of genetic markers that predict clinical outcome, suggesting that detection of these genetic lesions will be useful in the management of patients newly diagnosed with ALL. PMID:26872047

  6. Deficiency of the multi-copy mouse Y gene Sly causes sperm DNA damage and abnormal chromatin packaging.

    PubMed

    Riel, Jonathan M; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Sugawara, Atsushi; Li, Ho Yan J; Ruthig, Victor; Stoytcheva, Zoia; Ellis, Peter J I; Cocquet, Julie; Ward, Monika A

    2013-02-01

    In mouse and man Y chromosome deletions are frequently associated with spermatogenic defects. Mice with extensive deletions of non-pairing Y chromosome long arm (NPYq) are infertile and produce sperm with grossly misshapen heads, abnormal chromatin packaging and DNA damage. The NPYq-encoded multi-copy gene Sly controls the expression of sex chromosome genes after meiosis and Sly deficiency results in a remarkable upregulation of sex chromosome genes. Sly deficiency has been shown to be the underlying cause of the sperm head anomalies and infertility associated with NPYq gene loss, but it was not known whether it recapitulates sperm DNA damage phenotype. We produced and examined mice with transgenically (RNAi) silenced Sly and demonstrated that these mice have increased incidence of sperm with DNA damage and poorly condensed and insufficiently protaminated chromatin. We also investigated the contribution of each of the two Sly-encoded transcript variants and noted that the phenotype was only observed when both variants were knocked down, and that the phenotype was intermediate in severity compared with mice with severe NPYq deficiency. Our data demonstrate that Sly deficiency is responsible for the sperm DNA damage/chromatin packaging defects observed in mice with NPYq deletions and point to SLY proteins involvement in chromatin reprogramming during spermiogenesis, probably through their effect on the post-meiotic expression of spermiogenic genes. Considering the importance of the sperm epigenome for embryonic and fetal development and the possibility of its inter-generational transmission, our results are important for future investigations of the molecular mechanisms of this biologically and clinically important process.

  7. Laser capture microdissection of cervical human papillomavirus infections: copy number of the virus in cancerous and normal tissue and heterogeneous DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Mina; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Morales-Vazquez, Claudia Dalia; Zuna, Rosemary; Montiel, Delia Perez; Calleja-Macias, Itzel E; Johansson, Bo; Andersson, Sonia; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    Research on the pathogenicity of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) during cervical carcinogenesis often relies on the study of homogenized tissue or cultured cells. This approach does not detect molecular heterogeneities within the infected tissue. It is desirable to understand molecular properties in specific histological contexts. We asked whether laser capture microdissection (LCM) of archival cervical tumors in combination with real-time polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing permits (i) sensitive DNA diagnosis of small clusters of formalin-fixed cells, (ii) quantification of HPV DNA in neoplastic and normal cells, and (iii) analysis of HPV DNA methylation, a marker of tumor progression. We analyzed 26 tumors containing HPV-16 or 18. We prepared DNA from LCM dissected thin sections of 100 to 2000 cells, and analyzed aliquots corresponding to between nine and 70 cells. We detected nine to 630 HPV-16 genome copies and one to 111 HPV-18 genome copies per tumor cell, respectively. In 17 of the 26 samples, HPV DNA existed in histologically normal cells distant from the margins of the tumors, but at much lower concentrations than in the tumor, suggesting that HPVs can infect at low levels without pathogenic changes. Methylation of HPV DNA, a biomarker of integration of the virus into cellular DNA, could be measured only in few samples due to limited sensitivity, and indicated heterogeneous methylation patterns in small clusters of cancerous and normal cells. LCM is powerful to study molecular parameters of cervical HPV infections like copy number, latency and epigenetics.

  8. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R; Shaw, Chad; Wang, Xueqing; Patel, Ankita; Patterson, Lance W; Kolodziejska, Katarzyna; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Ou, Zhishuo; Tian, Qi; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Jinnah, Amina; Ali, Sophia; Malik, Aamir; Hixson, Patricia; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Dawson, Brian; Beaudet, Arthur L; Boricha, Fatima M; Whittaker, Runako; Li, Chumei; Ware, Stephanie M; Cheung, Sau Wai; Penny, Daniel J; Jefferies, John Lynn; Belmont, John W

    2013-01-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5–8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be detected in patients with CVMs plus extracardiac anomalies (ECAs). Through a genome-wide survey of 203 subjects with CVMs and ECAs, we identified 55 CNVs >50 kb in length that were not present in children without known cardiovascular defects (n=872). Sixteen unique CNVs overlapping these variants were found in an independent CVM plus ECA cohort (n=511), which were not observed in 2011 controls. The study identified 12/16 (75%) novel loci including non-recurrent de novo 16q24.3 loss (4/714) and de novo 2q31.3q32.1 loss encompassing PPP1R1C and PDE1A (2/714). The study also narrowed critical intervals in three well-recognized genomic disorders of CVM, such as the cat-eye syndrome region on 22q11.1, 8p23.1 loss encompassing GATA4 and SOX7 and 17p13.3-p13.2 loss. An analysis of protein-interaction databases shows that the rare inherited and de novo CNVs detected in the combined cohort are enriched for genes encoding proteins that are direct or indirect partners of proteins known to be required for normal cardiac development. Our findings implicate rare variants such as 16q24.3 loss and 2q31.3-q32.1 loss, and delineate regions within previously reported structural variants known to cause CVMs. PMID:22929023

  9. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep׳ proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Andrew K

    2015-07-01

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep׳, in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replication) and generates the single-stranded circular (ssc) genome from the displaced DNA strand. In the process, a minus-genome primer (MGP) necessary for complementary-strand synthesis, from ssc to ccc, is synthesized. Rep׳ cleaves the growing nascent-strand to regenerate the parent ccc molecule. In the process, a Rep׳-DNA hybrid containing the right palindromic sequence (at the origin of DNA replication) is generated. Analysis of the virus particle showed that it is composed of four components: ssc, MGP, capsid protein and a novel Rep-related protein (designated Protein-3).

  10. Mitochondrial DNA copy number is maintained during spermatogenesis and in the development of male larvae to sustain the doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA system in the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Sano, Natsumi; Obata, Mayu; Ooie, Yosiyasu; Komaru, Akira

    2011-08-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial (mt) DNA has been reported in the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In DUI, males inherit both paternal (M type) and maternal (F type) mtDNA. Here we investigated changes in M type mtDNA copy numbers and mitochondrial mass in testicular cells by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. The ratios of M type mtDNA copy numbers to nuclear DNA content were not different between haploid (1n), diploid (2n) and tetraploid (4n) spermatogenic cells. The mitochondrial mass decreased gradually during spermatogenesis. These results suggest that mtDNA and mitochondrial mass are maintained during spermatogenesis. We then traced M type mtDNA in larvae after fertilization. M type mtDNA was maintained up to 24 h after fertilization in the male-biased crosses, but decreased significantly in female-biased crosses (predicted by Mito Tracker staining pattern). These results are strikingly different from those reported for mammals and fish, where it is well known that the mitochondria and mtDNA are reduced during spermatogenesis and that sperm mitochondria and mtDNA are eliminated soon after fertilization. Thus, the M type mtDNA copy number is maintained during spermatogenesis and in the development of male larvae to sustain the DUI system in the blue mussel.

  11. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  12. Efficacy and limits of genotyping low copy number (LCN) DNA samples by multiplex PCR of STR loci.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Ate D; Kersbergen, Paula

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy and the validity of the AmpFISTR SGM plus multiplex PCR typing system when Low Copy Number (LCN) amounts of DNA are processed. The characteristics of SGM plus profiles produced under LCN conditions were studied on the basis of heterozygote balance, between loci balance and stutter proportion based on profiles that were obtained from a variety of mock casework samples. These experiments clearly showed that LCN DNA profiles carry their own characteristic features, which must be taken into account during interpretation. Herewith, we confirmed the data of recent other studies that a comprehensive interpretation strategy is dependent upon multiple replication of the PCR using the same extract together with the proper use of extraction and amplification controls. The limitations of LCN DNA analysis were further studied in a series of single cell PCR experiments using an amplification regime of 34 PCR cycles. The allele dropout phenomenon was demonstrated to its full extent when single cells were analysed. However, the "consensus profile" which was obtained from separate single cell PCR experiments matched the actual profile of the cell donor. Single cell PCR experiments also showed that a further increase of the number of PCR cycles did not result in enhanced sensitivity and had a highly negative effect on the balance of this multiplex PCR system which hampered correct interpretation of the profile. Also, the potential of LCN typing in analysing mixtures of DNA was investigated. It was clearly shown that LCN typing had no advantages over 28 cycles amplification in the detection of the minor component of DNA-mixtures. In addition to the 34 cycles PCR amplification regime, the utility of a new approach that involved reamplification of the 28 cycle SGM plus PCR products with an extra 6 PCR cycles after the addition of fresh AmpliTaq Gold DNA Polymerase was investigated. This approach provides the scientist with an extra typing

  13. Effects of acetyl-L-carnitine on lamb oocyte blastocyst rate, ultrastructure, and mitochondrial DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Reader, Karen L; Cox, Neil R; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    Viable lambs can be produced after transfer of in vitro-derived embryos from oocytes harvested from prepubertal lambs. However, this occurs at a much lower efficiency than from adult ewe oocyte donors. The reduced competence of prepubertal oocytes is believed to be due, at least in part, to deficiencies in cytoplasmic maturation. Differences in the cytoplasmic ultrastructure between prepubertal and adult oocytes have been described in the sheep, pig, and cow. Prepubertal lamb oocytes have been shown to have a different distribution of mitochondria and lipid droplets, and less mitochondria and storage vesicles than their adult counterparts. L-carnitine plays a role in supplying energy to the cell by transporting long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for β-oxidation to produce ATP. Both L-carnitine and its derivative acetyl-L-carnitine have been reported to increase the blastocyst rate of oocytes from mice, cows, and pigs, treated during IVM. L-carnitine has also been shown to increase mitochondrial biogenesis in adipose cells. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine if treatment of oocytes from prepubertal lambs with acetyl-L-carnitine during IVM could increase the blastocyst rate and alter mitochondria, vesicle, or lipid droplet number, volume, or distribution. The blastocyst rate was doubled in prepubertal lamb oocytes treated with acetyl-L-carnitine when compared to untreated oocytes (10.0% and 4.6%, respectively; P = 0.028). Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and stereology techniques were used to quantify organelles in untreated and acetyl-L-carnitine-treated lamb oocytes, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods were used to measure the mitochondrial DNA copy number. There were no differences in mitochondrial volume, number, or mitochondrial DNA copy number. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment increased the cytoplasmic volume (P = 0.015) of the oocytes, and there were trends toward an increase in the vesicle volume (P = 0

  14. Quantification of plasmid DNA copies in the nucleus after lipoplex and polyplex transfection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Richard N; van der Aa, Marieke A E M; Macaraeg, Nichole; Lee, Ai Ping; Szoka, Francis C

    2009-04-17

    Nuclear uptake of plasmid DNA is one of the many cellular barriers that limit the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery systems. We have determined the number of plasmids that reach the nucleus of a transfected cell using an internally standardized quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. We isolated nuclei using two different protocols: a density gradient technique and a detergent-based method. The density gradient procedure yielded nuclei with substantially less adhering plasmids on the outside of the nuclei. Using the density gradient protocol we determined that cells transfected with Lipofectamine lipoplexes or polyethylenimine polyplexes contained between 75 and 50,000 plasmids/nucleus, depending on the applied plasmid dose. Any increase above 3000 plasmids/nucleus resulted in only marginal increases in transgene expression. Furthermore, lipoplex-delivered plasmids were more efficiently expressed, on the basis of protein expression per plasmid number in the nucleus, than polyplex-delivered plasmids. This indicates that polymer may remain bound to some plasmids in the nucleus. Lastly, by sorting transfected cells into high- and low-expressing sub-populations, we observe that a sub-population of cells contain 3x greater plasmids/nucleus but express nearly 100x more transgene than other cells within a single transfection reaction. Taken together these results suggest the importance of considering the processes downstream from nuclear entry for strategies to improve the efficiency of gene transfer reagents.

  15. A whole-genome mouse BAC microarray with 1-Mb resolution for analysis of DNA copy number changes by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yeun-Jun; Jonkers, Jos; Kitson, Hannah; Fiegler, Heike; Humphray, Sean; Scott, Carol; Hunt, Sarah; Yu, Yuejin; Nishijima, Ichiko; Velds, Arno; Holstege, Henne; Carter, Nigel; Bradley, Allan

    2004-01-01

    Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has become a powerful method for the genome-wide detection of chromosomal imbalances. Although BAC microarrays have been used for mouse CGH studies, the resolving power of these analyses was limited because high-density whole-genome mouse BAC microarrays were not available. We therefore developed a mouse BAC microarray containing 2803 unique BAC clones from mouse genomic libraries at 1-Mb intervals. For the general amplification of BAC clone DNA prior to spotting, we designed a set of three novel degenerate oligonucleotide-primed (DOP) PCR primers that preferentially amplify mouse genomic sequences while minimizing unwanted amplification of contaminating Escherichia coli DNA. The resulting 3K mouse BAC microarrays reproducibly identified DNA copy number alterations in cell lines and primary tumors, such as single-copy deletions, regional amplifications, and aneuploidy.

  16. Preferential access to genetic information from endogenous hominin ancient DNA and accurate quantitative SNP-typing via SPEX

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Paul; Sanchez, Juan J.; Cooper, Alan; Endicott, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of targeted genetic loci from ancient, forensic and clinical samples is usually built upon polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated sequence data. However, many studies have shown that PCR amplification from poor-quality DNA templates can create sequence artefacts at significant levels. With hominin (human and other hominid) samples, the pervasive presence of highly PCR-amplifiable human DNA contaminants in the vast majority of samples can lead to the creation of recombinant hybrids and other non-authentic artefacts. The resulting PCR-generated sequences can then be difficult, if not impossible, to authenticate. In contrast, single primer extension (SPEX)-based approaches can genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms from ancient fragments of DNA as accurately as modern DNA. A single SPEX-type assay can amplify just one of the duplex DNA strands at target loci and generate a multi-fold depth-of-coverage, with non-authentic recombinant hybrids reduced to undetectable levels. Crucially, SPEX-type approaches can preferentially access genetic information from damaged and degraded endogenous ancient DNA templates over modern human DNA contaminants. The development of SPEX-type assays offers the potential for highly accurate, quantitative genotyping from ancient hominin samples. PMID:19864251

  17. Stability of single copy transgene expression in CHOK1 cells is affected by histone modifications but not by DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Shawal; Gugliotta, Agustina; Koenitzer, Jennifer; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2015-02-10

    Intraclonal heterogeneity of genetically modified mammalian cells has been observed as a phenomenon that has a strong impact on overall transgene expression levels and that limits the predictability of transgene expression in genetically modified cells, thereby hampering single cell based screening approaches. The underlying mechanism(s) leading to this variance are poorly understood. To study the dynamics and mechanisms of heterogeneity of early stage silencing we analyzed the expression in more than 100 independent clones of CHOK1 cells that harbour genetically stable integrates of single copy reporter cassettes driven by EF1α and CMV promoters. Single cell analysis showed intraclonal variability with heterogeneity in expression in genetically uniform populations. DNA methylation is a well known mechanism responsible for silencing of gene expression. Interestingly, loss of expression was not associated with DNA methylation of the CMV promoter. However, in most of the clonal populations expression could be increased by inhibitors of the histone deacetylases (HDACi) suggesting that heterogeneity of transgene expression is crucially governed by histone modifications. Further, to determine if the epigenetic status of transgene expression is governed by the chromosomal integration locus we targeted heterologous expression cassettes into two chromosomal sites using recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). The expression status of a particular clone was faithfully re-established when the same promoter used. In this way the problem of early stage cell clone instability can be bypassed. However, upon introduction of an unrelated promoter methylation-independent silencing was observed. Together, these results suggest that histone modifications are the relevant mechanisms by which epigenetic modulation of transgene expression cassettes is governed in the early phase of clone generation.

  18. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement.

  19. Identification of DNA copy-number aberrations by array-comparative genomic hybridization in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ho Jin; Yim, Sung-Vin; Lee, Woon Kyu; Jeon, Yang-Whan; Kim, Young Hoon; Ko, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Kweon-Haeng; Han, Sang-Ick; Rha, Hyoung Kyun

    2006-06-02

    Chromosomal abnormalities are implicated as important markers for the pathogenesis in patients with schizophrenia. In this study, with using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), we analyzed DNA copy-number changes among 30 patients with schizophrenia. The most frequent changes were partial gain of Xq23 (52%) and loss of 3q13.12 (32%). Other frequent gains were found in: 1p, 6q, 10p, 11p, 11q, 14p, and 15q regions, and frequent losses were found in: 2p, 9q, 10q, 14q, 20q, and 22q regions. The set of abnormal regions was confirmed by real-time PCR (9q12, 9q34.2, 11p15.4, 14q32.33, 15q15.1, 22q11.21, and Xq23). All real-time PCR results were consistent with the array-CGH results. Therefore, it is suggested that array-CGH and real-time PCR analysis could be used as powerful tools in screening for schizophrenia-related genes. Our results might be useful for further exploration of candidate genomic regions in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  20. Lake sedimentary DNA accurately records 20(th) Century introductions of exotic conifers in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Per; Edwards, Mary E; Gielly, Ludovic; Langdon, Catherine T; Croudace, Ian W; Merkel, Marie Kristine Føreid; Fonville, Thierry; Alsos, Inger Greve

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentary DNA (sedDNA) has recently emerged as a new proxy for reconstructing past vegetation, but its taphonomy, source area and representation biases need better assessment. We investigated how sedDNA in recent sediments of two small Scottish lakes reflects a major vegetation change, using well-documented 20(th) Century plantations of exotic conifers as an experimental system. We used next-generation sequencing to barcode sedDNA retrieved from subrecent lake sediments. For comparison, pollen was analysed from the same samples. The sedDNA record contains 73 taxa (mainly genus or species), all but one of which are present in the study area. Pollen and sedDNA shared 35% of taxa, which partly reflects a difference in source area. More aquatic taxa were recorded in sedDNA, whereas taxa assumed to be of regional rather than local origin were recorded only as pollen. The chronology of the sediments and planting records are well aligned, and sedDNA of exotic conifers appears in high quantities with the establishment of plantations around the lakes. SedDNA recorded other changes in local vegetation that accompanied afforestation. There were no signs of DNA leaching in the sediments or DNA originating from pollen.

  1. The activity and copy number of mitochondrial DNA in ovine oocytes throughout oogenesis in vivo and during oocyte maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cotterill, Matthew; Harris, Sarah E; Collado Fernandez, Esther; Lu, Jianping; Huntriss, John D; Campbell, Bruce K; Picton, Helen M

    2013-07-01

    Mitochondria are responsible for the production of ATP, which drives cellular metabolic and biosynthetic processes. This is the first study to quantify the mtDNA copy number across all stages of oogenesis in a large monovulatory species, it includes assessment of the activity of mitochondria in germinal vesicle (GV) and metaphase II (MII) oocytes through JC1 staining. Primordial to early antral follicles (n = 249) were isolated from the sheep ovarian cortex following digestion at 37°C for 1 h and all oocytes were disaggregated from their somatic cells. Germinal vesicle oocytes (n = 133) were aspirated from 3- to 5-mm diameter antral follicles, and mature MII oocytes (n = 71) were generated following in vitro maturation (IVM). The mtDNA copy number in each oocyte was quantified using real-time PCR and showed a progressive, but variable increase in the amount of mtDNA in oocytes from primordial follicles (605 ± 205, n = 8) to mature MII oocytes (744 633 ± 115 799, n = 13; P < 0.05). Mitochondrial activity (P > 0.05) was not altered during meiotic progression from GV to MII during IVM. The observed increase in the mtDNA copy number across oogenesis reflects the changing ATP demands needed to orchestrate cytoskeletal and cytoplasmic reorganization during oocyte growth and maturation and the need to fuel the resumption of meiosis in mature oocytes following the pre-ovulatory gonadotrophin surge.

  2. Development of a PCR free, fieldable, rapid, accurate, and sensitive bio-electronic DNA biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Doyle; Chafin, David; Greco, Roberta; Jafri, Samina; Murante, Richard; Noonan, John; Pham, An; Seabridge, Scott; Tannous, Vera; VanDerMeid, Karl; Wang, Daguang; Wescott, Nate; McFarlane, Kristin; Shah, Sanjiv

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate proof of concept for the Integrated Nano-Technologies BioDetect Bacillus anthracis electronic DNA sensor. B. anthracis Ames strain DNA was successfully detected by the formation of DNA bridges on the sensor. The bridges were coated with metal, resulting in a significant drop in electrical resistance. In this small test, at a relatively high DNA concentration, the overall accuracy of the sensor was 90.7%. The technology shows significant promise for future development as a bio-agent detection system.

  3. Performance of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIP) in Allele CopyNumber Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuker; Moorhead, Martin; Karlin-Neumann, George; Wang,Nicolas J.; Ireland, James; Lin, Steven; Chen, Chunnuan; Heiser, LauraM.; Chin, Koei; Esserman, Laura; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Faham,Malek

    2007-05-14

    We have developed a new protocol for using MolecularInversion Probes (MIP) to accurately and specifically measure allele copynumber (ACN). The new protocol provides for significant improvementsincluding the reduction of input DNA (from 2?g) by more than 25 fold (to75ng total genomic DNA), higher overall precision resulting in one orderof magnitude lower false positive rate, and greater dynamic range withaccurate absolute copy number up to 60 copies.

  4. Accurate Identification of Candida parapsilosis (Sensu Lato) by Use of Mitochondrial DNA and Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana Carolina R.; Ferreira, Renata C.; Gonçalves, Sarah S.; Quindós, Guillermo; Eraso, Elena; Bizerra, Fernando C.; Briones, Marcelo R. S.

    2012-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is the Candida species isolated the second most frequently from blood cultures in South America and some European countries, such as Spain. Since 2005, this species has been considered a complex of 3 closely related species: C. parapsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, and Candida orthopsilosis. Here, we describe a real-time TaqMan-MGB PCR assay, using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as the target, which readily distinguishes these 3 species. We first used comparative genomics to locate syntenic regions between these 3 mitochondrial genomes and then selected NADH5 as the target for the real-time PCR assay. Probes were designed to include a combination of different single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are able to differentiate each species within the C. parapsilosis complex. This new methodology was first tested using mtDNA and then genomic DNA from 4 reference and 5 clinical strains. For assay validation, a total of 96 clinical isolates and 4 American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) isolates previously identified by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing were tested. Real-time PCR using genomic DNA was able to differentiate the 3 species with 100% accuracy. No amplification was observed when DNA from other species was used as the template. We observed 100% congruence with ITS rDNA sequencing identification, including for 30 strains used in blind testing. This novel method allows a quick and accurate intracomplex identification of C. parapsilosis and saves time compared with sequencing, which so far has been considered the “gold standard” for Candida yeast identification. In addition, this assay provides a useful tool for epidemiological and clinical studies of these emergent species. PMID:22535986

  5. Copy number analysis by low coverage whole genome sequencing using ultra low-input DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kader, Tanjina; Goode, David L; Wong, Stephen Q; Connaughton, Jacquie; Rowley, Simone M; Devereux, Lisa; Byrne, David; Fox, Stephen B; Mir Arnau, Gisela; Tothill, Richard W; Campbell, Ian G; Gorringe, Kylie L

    2016-11-15

    Unlocking clinically translatable genomic information, including copy number alterations (CNA), from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is challenging due to low yields and degraded DNA. We describe a robust, cost-effective low-coverage whole genome sequencing (LC WGS) method for CNA detection using 5 ng of FFPE-derived DNA. CN profiles using 100 ng or 5 ng input DNA were highly concordant and comparable with molecular inversion probe (MIP) array profiles. LC WGS improved CN profiles of samples that performed poorly using MIP arrays. Our technique enables identification of driver and prognostic CNAs in archival patient samples previously deemed unsuitable for genomic analysis due to DNA limitations.

  6. Accurate characterization of carcinogenic DNA adducts using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Charles A.; Chiu, Norman H. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical carcinogens and their in vivo activated metabolites react readily with genomic DNA, and form covalently bound carcinogen-DNA adducts. Clinically, carcinogen-DNA adducts have been linked to various cancer diseases. Among the current methods for DNA adduct analysis, mass spectroscopic method allows the direct measurement of unlabeled DNA adducts. The goal of this study is to explore the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) to determine the identity of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Two of the known carcinogenic DNA adducts, namely N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP) and N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP), were selected as our models. In MALDI-TOF MS measurements, the small matrix ion and its cluster ions did not interfere with the measurements of both selected dG adducts. To achieve a higher accuracy for the characterization of selected dG adducts, 1 keV collision energy in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS was used to measure the adducts. In comparison to other MS/MS techniques with lower collision energies, more extensive precursor ion dissociations were observed. The detection of the corresponding fragment ions allowed the identities of guanine, PhIP or ABP, and the position of adduction to be confirmed. Some of the fragment ions of dG-C8-PhIP have not been reported by other MS/MS techniques.

  7. A repeat protein-based DNA polymerase inhibitor for an efficient and accurate gene amplification by PCR.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Da-Eun; Shin, Yong-Keol; Munashingha, Palinda Ruvan; Park, So-Yeon; Seo, Yeon-Soo; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-12-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a thermostable DNA polymerase is the most widely applied method in many areas of research, including life sciences, biotechnology, and medical sciences. However, a conventional PCR incurs an amplification of undesired genes mainly owing to non-specifically annealed primers and the formation of a primer-dimer complex. Herein, we present the development of a Taq DNA polymerase-specific repebody, which is a small-sized protein binder composed of leucine rich repeat (LRR) modules, as a thermolabile inhibitor for a precise and accurate gene amplification by PCR. We selected a repebody that specifically binds to the DNA polymerase through a phage display, and increased its affinity to up to 10 nM through a modular evolution approach. The repebody was shown to effectively inhibit DNA polymerase activity at low temperature and undergo thermal denaturation at high temperature, leading to a rapid and full recovery of the polymerase activity, during the initial denaturation step of the PCR. The performance and utility of the repebody was demonstrated through an accurate and efficient amplification of a target gene without nonspecific gene products in both conventional and real-time PCRs. The repebody is expected to be effectively utilized as a thermolabile inhibitor in a PCR. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2544-2552. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that mammalian mitochondrial nucleoids have a uniform size and frequently contain a single copy of mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Kukat, Christian; Wurm, Christian A; Spåhr, Henrik; Falkenberg, Maria; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Jakobs, Stefan

    2011-08-16

    Mammalian mtDNA is packaged in DNA-protein complexes denoted mitochondrial nucleoids. The organization of the nucleoid is a very fundamental question in mitochondrial biology and will determine tissue segregation and transmission of mtDNA. We have used a combination of stimulated emission depletion microscopy, enabling a resolution well below the diffraction barrier, and molecular biology to study nucleoids in a panel of mammalian tissue culture cells. We report that the nucleoids labeled with antibodies against DNA, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), or incorporated BrdU, have a defined, uniform mean size of ∼100 nm in mammals. Interestingly, the nucleoid frequently contains only a single copy of mtDNA (average ∼1.4 mtDNA molecules per nucleoid). Furthermore, we show by molecular modeling and volume calculations that TFAM is a main constituent of the nucleoid, besides mtDNA. These fundamental insights into the organization of mtDNA have broad implications for understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in disease and aging.

  9. Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic Is Associated with Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Longer Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ameer, Syeda S.; Xu, YiYi; Engström, Karin; Li, Huiqi; Tallving, Pia; Nermell, Barbro; Boemo, Analia; Parada, Luis A.; Peñaloza, Lidia G.; Concha, Gabriela; Harari, Florencia; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water causes cancer. Alterations in mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) and telomere length in blood have been associated with cancer risk. We elucidated if arsenic exposure alters mtDNAcn and telomere length in individuals with different arsenic metabolizing capacity. Methods: We studied two groups in the Salta province, Argentina, one in the Puna area of the Andes (N = 264, 89% females) and one in Chaco (N = 169, 75% females). We assessed arsenic exposure as the sum of arsenic metabolites [iAs, methylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)] in urine (U-As) using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Efficiency of arsenic metabolism was expressed as percentage of urinary metabolites. MtDNAcn and telomere length were determined in blood by real-time PCR. Results: Median U-As was 196 (5–95 percentile: 21–537) μg/L in Andes and 80 (5–95 percentile: 15–1637) μg/L in Chaco. The latter study group had less-efficient metabolism, with higher %iAs and %MMA in urine compared with the Andean group. U-As was significantly associated with increased mtDNAcn (log2 transformed to improve linearity) in Chaco (β = 0.027 per 100 μg/L, p = 0.0085; adjusted for age and sex), but not in Andes (β = 0.025, p = 0.24). U-As was also associated with longer telomere length in Chaco (β = 0.016, p = 0.0066) and Andes (β = 0.0075, p = 0.029). In both populations, individuals with above median %iAs showed significantly higher mtDNAcn and telomere length compared with individuals with below median %iAs. Conclusions: Arsenic was associated with increased mtDNAcn and telomere length, particularly in individuals with less-efficient arsenic metabolism, a group who may have increased risk for arsenic-related cancer. PMID:27597942

  10. Using minimum DNA marker loci for accurate population classification in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using few DNA markers to classify genetic background of a germplasm pool will help breeders make a quick decision while saving time and resources. WHICHLOCI is a computer program that selects the best combination of loci for population assignment through empiric analysis of molecular marker data. Th...

  11. Accurate quantification of DNA methylation of DRD4 applying capillary gel electrophoresis with LIF detection.

    PubMed

    Goedecke, Simon; Schlosser, Sabrina; Mühlisch, Jörg; Hempel, Georg; Frühwald, Michael C; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2009-04-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation of gene promoters may be investigated by an array of different technologies. Besides DNA sequencing techniques following bisulfite treatment and determination of overall methylation by quantification of 5-methylcytosine/cytosine ratio following DNA hydrolysis, most approaches rely on PCR amplification of a defined template and subsequent analysis by conventional gel electrophoresis. As an additional analytical tool, a capillary gel electrophoresis method has been developed to quantify the methylation in combined bisulfite restriction analysis products of the gene dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4). Analyses were carried out in a bare fused-silica capillary dynamically coated with a 1% w/w solution of PVA (M(r)=72,000). A buffer (pH 7.3) containing 3% w/w 2-hydroxyethylcellulose (M(nu) approximately 90,000 g/mol) was used as sieving matrix. With 1/x weighted regression the accuracy (bias) of the method is within +/-10% and the precision (expressed as RSD) also meets the common acceptance criteria of 15% (20% near lower LOQ). It overcomes the limitations of standard gel electrophoresis, which allows only one single run per analysis and requires large amounts of DNA. Therefore, the method represents a valuable tool for routine quantitative analysis of the methylation status of DRD4 and other target genes.

  12. Basal-like Breast cancer DNA copy number losses identify genes involved in genomic instability, response to therapy, and patient survival.

    PubMed

    Weigman, Victor J; Chao, Hann-Hsiang; Shabalin, Andrey A; He, Xiaping; Parker, Joel S; Nordgard, Silje H; Grushko, Tatyana; Huo, Dezheng; Nwachukwu, Chika; Nobel, Andrew; Kristensen, Vessela N; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Perou, Charles M

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with known expression-defined tumor subtypes. DNA copy number studies have suggested that tumors within gene expression subtypes share similar DNA Copy number aberrations (CNA) and that CNA can be used to further sub-divide expression classes. To gain further insights into the etiologies of the intrinsic subtypes, we classified tumors according to gene expression subtype and next identified subtype-associated CNA using a novel method called SWITCHdna, using a training set of 180 tumors and a validation set of 359 tumors. Fisher's exact tests, Chi-square approximations, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were performed to evaluate differences in CNA by subtype. To assess the functional significance of loss of a specific chromosomal region, individual genes were knocked down by shRNA and drug sensitivity, and DNA repair foci assays performed. Most tumor subtypes exhibited specific CNA. The Basal-like subtype was the most distinct with common losses of the regions containing RB1, BRCA1, INPP4B, and the greatest overall genomic instability. One Basal-like subtype-associated CNA was loss of 5q11-35, which contains at least three genes important for BRCA1-dependent DNA repair (RAD17, RAD50, and RAP80); these genes were predominantly lost as a pair, or all three simultaneously. Loss of two or three of these genes was associated with significantly increased genomic instability and poor patient survival. RNAi knockdown of RAD17, or RAD17/RAD50, in immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines caused increased sensitivity to a PARP inhibitor and carboplatin, and inhibited BRCA1 foci formation in response to DNA damage. These data suggest a possible genetic cause for genomic instability in Basal-like breast cancers and a biological rationale for the use of DNA repair inhibitor related therapeutics in this breast cancer subtype.

  13. Design of accurate predictors for DNA-binding sites in proteins using hybrid SVM-PSSM method.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shinn-Ying; Yu, Fu-Chieh; Chang, Chia-Yun; Huang, Hui-Ling

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the design of accurate predictors for DNA-binding sites in proteins from amino acid sequences. As a result, we propose a hybrid method using support vector machine (SVM) in conjunction with evolutionary information of amino acid sequences in terms of their position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) for prediction of DNA-binding sites. Considering the numbers of binding and non-binding residues in proteins are significantly unequal, two additional weights as well as SVM parameters are analyzed and adopted to maximize net prediction (NP, an average of sensitivity and specificity) accuracy. To evaluate the generalization ability of the proposed method SVM-PSSM, a DNA-binding dataset PDC-59 consisting of 59 protein chains with low sequence identity on each other is additionally established. The SVM-based method using the same six-fold cross-validation procedure and PSSM features has NP=80.15% for the training dataset PDNA-62 and NP=69.54% for the test dataset PDC-59, which are much better than the existing neural network-based method by increasing the NP values for training and test accuracies up to 13.45% and 16.53%, respectively. Simulation results reveal that SVM-PSSM performs well in predicting DNA-binding sites of novel proteins from amino acid sequences.

  14. Localization of single-copy T-DNA insertion in transgenic shallots (Allium cepa) by using ultra-sensitive FISH with tyramide signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Khrustaleva, L I; Kik, C

    2001-03-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for mapping plant chromosomes of single-copy DNA sequences is limited. We have adapted for plant cytogenetics a new signal-amplification method termed tyramide-FISH (Tyr-FISH). Until present this technique has only been applied to human chromosomes. The method is based on enzymatic deposition of fluorochrome-conjugated tyramide. With Tyr-FISH it was possible to detect target T-DNA sequences on plant metaphase chromosomes as small as 710 bp without using a cooled CCD camera. Short detection time and high sensitivity, in combination with a low background, make the Tyr-FISH method very suitable for routine application in plant cytogenetic research. With Tyr-FISH we analysed the position of T-DNA inserts in transgenic shallots. We found that the inserts were preferentially located in the distal region of metaphase chromosomes. Sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization with a 375 bp satellite sequence suggested that a specific T-DNA insert was located within the satellite sequence hybridization region on a metaphase chromosome. Analysis of less-condensed prophase and interphase chromosomes revealed that the T-DNA was integrated outside the satellite DNA-hybridization region in a more proximal euchromatin region.

  15. Nucleobase-functionalized graphene nanoribbons for accurate high-speed DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulechka, Eugene; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Kazakov, Andrei; Smolyanitsky, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We propose a water-immersed nucleobase-functionalized suspended graphene nanoribbon as an intrinsically selective device for nucleotide detection. The proposed sensing method combines Watson-Crick selective base pairing with graphene's capacity for converting anisotropic lattice strain to changes in an electrical current at the nanoscale. Using detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we study sensor operation at ambient conditions. We combine simulated data with theoretical arguments to estimate the levels of measurable electrical signal variation in response to strains and determine that the proposed sensing mechanism shows significant promise for realistic DNA sensing devices without the need for advanced data processing, or highly restrictive operational conditions.We propose a water-immersed nucleobase-functionalized suspended graphene nanoribbon as an intrinsically selective device for nucleotide detection. The proposed sensing method combines Watson-Crick selective base pairing with graphene's capacity for converting anisotropic lattice strain to changes in an electrical current at the nanoscale. Using detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we study sensor operation at ambient conditions. We combine simulated data with theoretical arguments to estimate the levels of measurable electrical signal variation in response to strains and determine that the proposed sensing mechanism shows significant promise for realistic DNA sensing devices without the need for advanced data processing, or highly restrictive operational conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07061a

  16. Poisonous or non-poisonous plants? DNA-based tools and applications for accurate identification.

    PubMed

    Mezzasalma, Valerio; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Galimberti, Andrea; Cornara, Laura; Ferri, Emanuele; Labra, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Plant exposures are among the most frequently reported cases to poison control centres worldwide. This is a growing condition due to recent societal trends oriented towards the consumption of wild plants as food, cosmetics, or medicine. At least three general causes of plant poisoning can be identified: plant misidentification, introduction of new plant-based supplements and medicines with no controls about their safety, and the lack of regulation for the trading of herbal and phytochemical products. Moreover, an efficient screening for the occurrence of plants poisonous to humans is also desirable at the different stages of the food supply chain: from the raw material to the final transformed product. A rapid diagnosis of intoxication cases is necessary in order to provide the most reliable treatment. However, a precise taxonomic characterization of the ingested species is often challenging. In this review, we provide an overview of the emerging DNA-based tools and technologies to address the issue of poisonous plant identification. Specifically, classic DNA barcoding and its applications using High Resolution Melting (Bar-HRM) ensure high universality and rapid response respectively, whereas High Throughput Sequencing techniques (HTS) provide a complete characterization of plant residues in complex matrices. The pros and cons of each approach have been evaluated with the final aim of proposing a general user's guide to molecular identification directed to different stakeholder categories interested in the diagnostics of poisonous plants.

  17. TP53 copy number expansion is associated with the evolution of increased body size and an enhanced DNA damage response in elephants.

    PubMed

    Sulak, Michael; Fong, Lindsey; Mika, Katelyn; Chigurupati, Sravanthi; Yon, Lisa; Mongan, Nigel P; Emes, Richard D; Lynch, Vincent J

    2016-09-19

    A major constraint on the evolution of large body sizes in animals is an increased risk of developing cancer. There is no correlation, however, between body size and cancer risk. This lack of correlation is often referred to as 'Peto's Paradox'. Here, we show that the elephant genome encodes 20 copies of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 and that the increase in TP53 copy number occurred coincident with the evolution of large body sizes, the evolution of extreme sensitivity to genotoxic stress, and a hyperactive TP53 signaling pathway in the elephant (Proboscidean) lineage. Furthermore, we show that several of the TP53 retrogenes (TP53RTGs) are transcribed and likely translated. While TP53RTGs do not appear to directly function as transcription factors, they do contribute to the enhanced sensitivity of elephant cells to DNA damage and the induction of apoptosis by regulating activity of the TP53 signaling pathway. These results suggest that an increase in the copy number of TP53 may have played a direct role in the evolution of very large body sizes and the resolution of Peto's paradox in Proboscideans.

  18. TP53 copy number expansion is associated with the evolution of increased body size and an enhanced DNA damage response in elephants

    PubMed Central

    Sulak, Michael; Fong, Lindsey; Mika, Katelyn; Chigurupati, Sravanthi; Yon, Lisa; Mongan, Nigel P; Emes, Richard D; Lynch, Vincent J

    2016-01-01

    A major constraint on the evolution of large body sizes in animals is an increased risk of developing cancer. There is no correlation, however, between body size and cancer risk. This lack of correlation is often referred to as 'Peto's Paradox'. Here, we show that the elephant genome encodes 20 copies of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 and that the increase in TP53 copy number occurred coincident with the evolution of large body sizes, the evolution of extreme sensitivity to genotoxic stress, and a hyperactive TP53 signaling pathway in the elephant (Proboscidean) lineage. Furthermore, we show that several of the TP53 retrogenes (TP53RTGs) are transcribed and likely translated. While TP53RTGs do not appear to directly function as transcription factors, they do contribute to the enhanced sensitivity of elephant cells to DNA damage and the induction of apoptosis by regulating activity of the TP53 signaling pathway. These results suggest that an increase in the copy number of TP53 may have played a direct role in the evolution of very large body sizes and the resolution of Peto's paradox in Proboscideans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11994.001 PMID:27642012

  19. ArrayExplorer, a program in Visual Basic for robust and accurate filter cDNA array analysis.

    PubMed

    Patriotis, P C; Querec, T D; Gruver, B N; Brown, T R; Patriotis, C

    2001-10-01

    Determining the dynamics in the global regulation of gene expression holds the promise of bringing a better understanding of the processes that govern physiological cell growth regulation and its disruption during the development of disease. The advent for cDNA arrays has created the possibility for the parallel analysis of expression of thousands of genes in a given cell population, simultaneously. The level of expression of a given set of genes within the studied tissue corresponds to the intensity of a labeled cDNA probe synthesized from the studied tissue RNA and bound specifically to the cDNAs of the genes spotted on the array. The accurate extraction of gene expression intensity values is essential for further data analysis and the interpretation of the obtained results. Here, we describe a new array image-processing software developed in Microsoft Visual Basic, the ArrayExplorer, which provides a user-friendly, multiple-window interface and a number of automatic and manual features that facilitate a reliable, robust, and accurate extraction of gene intensity values from filter-array images.

  20. Accurate and Efficient Bypass of 8,5'-Cyclopurine-2'-Deoxynucleosides by Human and Yeast DNA Polymerase η

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Ashley L.; Wang, Jianshuang; Wang, Yinsheng

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be produced during normal aerobic metabolism, can induce the formation of tandem DNA lesions, including 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cyclo-dA) and 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (cyclo-dG). Previous studies have shown that cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG accumulate in cells and can block mammalian RNA polymerase II and replicative DNA polymerases. Here, we used primer extension and steady-state kinetic assays to examine the efficiency and fidelity for polymerase η to insert nucleotides opposite, and extend primer past, these cyclopurine lesions. We found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human polymerase η inserted 2'-deoxynucleotides opposite cyclo-dA, cyclo-dG, and their adjacent 5' nucleosides at fidelities and efficiencies that were similar as their respective undamaged nucleosides. Moreover, the yeast enzyme exhibited similar processivity in DNA synthesis on templates housing a cyclo-dA or cyclo-dG as those carrying an unmodified dA or dG; the human polymerase, however, dissociated from the primer-template complex after inserting one or two additional nucleotides after the lesion. Pol η's accurate and efficient bypass of cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG indicate that this polymerase is likely responsible for error-free bypass of these lesions, whereas mutagenic bypass of these lesions may involve other translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. Together, our results suggested that pol η may have an additional function in cells, i.e., to alleviate the cellular burden of endogenously induced DNA lesions, including cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG. PMID:22768970

  1. Accurate and efficient bypass of 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides by human and yeast DNA polymerase η.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Ashley L; Wang, Jianshuang; Wang, Yinsheng

    2012-08-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be produced during normal aerobic metabolism, can induce the formation of tandem DNA lesions, including 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cyclo-dA) and 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (cyclo-dG). Previous studies have shown that cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG accumulate in cells and can block mammalian RNA polymerase II and replicative DNA polymerases. Here, we used primer extension and steady-state kinetic assays to examine the efficiency and fidelity for polymerase η to insert nucleotides opposite, and extend primer past, these cyclopurine lesions. We found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human polymerase η inserted 2'-deoxynucleotides opposite cyclo-dA, cyclo-dG and their adjacent 5' nucleosides at fidelities and efficiencies that were similar to those of their respective undamaged nucleosides. Moreover, the yeast enzyme exhibited similar processivity in DNA synthesis on templates housing a cyclo-dA or cyclo-dG to those carrying an unmodified dA or dG; the human polymerase, however, dissociated from the primer-template complex after inserting one or two additional nucleotides after the lesion. Pol η's accurate and efficient bypass of cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG indicates that this polymerase is likely responsible for error-free bypass of these lesions, whereas mutagenic bypass of these lesions may involve other translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. Together, our results suggested that pol η may have an additional function in cells, i.e., to alleviate the cellular burden of endogenously induced DNA lesions, including cyclo-dA and cyclo-dG.

  2. Integrated Genome-wide DNA Copy Number and Expression Analysis Identifies Distinct Mechanisms of Primary Chemo-resistance in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; deFazio, Anna; Beroukhim, Rameen; Mermel, Craig; George, Joshy; Getz, Gaddy; Tothill, Richard; Okamoto, Aikou; Raeder, Maria B; Harnett, Paul; Lade, Stephen; Akslen, Lars A; Tinker, Anna; Locandro, Bianca; Alsop, Kathryn; Chiew, Yoke-Eng; Traficante, Nadia; Fereday, Sian; Johnson, Daryl; Fox, Stephen; Sellers, William; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Salvesen, Helga B; Meyerson, Matthew; Bowtell, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose A significant number of women with serous ovarian cancer are intrinsically refractory to platinum-taxol based treatment. We analyzed somatic DNA copy number variation (CNV) and gene expression data to identify key mechanisms associated with primary resistance in advanced-stage serous cancers. Experimental Design Genome-wide CNV was measured in 118 ovarian tumors using high-resolution oligonucleotide microarrays. A well-defined subset of 85 advanced-stage serous tumors was then used to relate CNV to primary resistance to treatment. The discovery-based approach was complemented by quantitative-PCR copy number analysis of twelve candidate genes as independent validation of previously reported associations with clinical outcome. Likely CNV targets and tumor molecular subtypes were further characterized by gene expression profiling. Results Amplification of 19q12, containing Cyclin E (CCNE1) and 20q11.22-q13.12, mapping immediately adjacent to the steroid receptor co-activator NCOA3, were significantly associated with poor response to primary treatment. Other genes previously associated with CNV and clinical outcome in ovarian cancer were not associated with primary treatment resistance. Chemoresistant tumors with high CCNE1 copy number and protein expression were associated with increased cellular proliferation but so too were a subset of treatment responsive patients, suggesting a cell-cycle independent role for CCNE1 in modulating chemoresponse. Patients with a poor clinical outcome without CCNE1 amplification over expressed genes involved in extracellular matrix deposition. Conclusions We have identified two distinct mechanisms of primary treatment failure in serous ovarian cancer, involving CCNE1 amplification and enhanced extracellular matrix deposition. CCNE1 copy number is validated as a dominant marker of patient outcome in ovarian cancer. PMID:19193619

  3. Reticulate evolution in diploid and tetraploid species of Polystachya (Orchidaceae) as shown by plastid DNA sequences and low-copy nuclear genes

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Anton; Samuel, Rosabelle; Klejna, Verena; Barfuss, Michael H. J.; Rupp, Barbara; Chase, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Here evidence for reticulation in the pantropical orchid genus Polystachya is presented, using gene trees from five nuclear and plastid DNA data sets, first among only diploid samples (homoploid hybridization) and then with the inclusion of cloned tetraploid sequences (allopolyploids). Two groups of tetraploids are compared with respect to their origins and phylogenetic relationships. Methods Sequences from plastid regions, three low-copy nuclear genes and ITS nuclear ribosomal DNA were analysed for 56 diploid and 17 tetraploid accessions using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Reticulation was inferred from incongruence between gene trees using supernetwork and consensus network analyses and from cloning and sequencing duplicated loci in tetraploids. Key Results Diploid trees from individual loci showed considerable incongruity but little reticulation signal when support from more than one gene tree was required to infer reticulation. This was coupled with generally low support in the individual gene trees. Sequencing the duplicated gene copies in tetraploids showed clearer evidence of hybrid evolution, including multiple origins of one group of tetraploids included in the study. Conclusions A combination of cloning duplicate gene copies in allotetraploids and consensus network comparison of gene trees allowed a phylogenetic framework for reticulation in Polystachya to be built. There was little evidence for homoploid hybridization, but our knowledge of the origins and relationships of three groups of allotetraploids are greatly improved by this study. One group showed evidence of multiple long-distance dispersals to achieve a pantropical distribution; another showed no evidence of multiple origins or long-distance dispersal but had greater morphological variation, consistent with hybridization between more distantly related parents. PMID:20525745

  4. Chopping Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses ways an editor can cut out words to help the reader understand quickly. Discusses dead wood, redundancy, redundancy in thought, smothered verbs, false precision, editing and academia, and making copy smoother. (SR)

  5. Mitochondrial DNA copy number augments performance of A1C and oral glucose tolerance testing in the prediction of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong Beom; Koh, InSong; Nam, Hye-Young; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Lee, Hong Kyu; Han, Bok-Ghee

    2017-01-01

    Here, we tested the performance of the mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA-CN) in predicting future type 2 diabetes (n = 1108). We used the baseline clinical data (age, sex, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) and the mtDNA-CN, hemoglobin A1c (A1C) levels and results of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) including fasting plasma glucose, 1-hour glucose, and 2-hour glucose levels, to predict future diabetes. We built a prediction model using the baseline data and the diabetes status at biannual follow-up of 8 years. The mean area under curve (AUC) for all follow-ups of the full model including all variables was 0.92 ± 0.04 (mean ± standard deviation), while that of the model excluding the mtDNA-CN was 0.90 ± 0.03. The sensitivity of the f4ull model was much greater than that of the model not including mtDNA-CN: the mean sensitivities of the model with and without mtDNA-CN were 0.60 ± 0.06 and 0.53 ± 0.04, respectively. We found that the mtDNA-CN of peripheral leukocytes is a biomarker that augments the predictive power for future diabetes of A1C and OGTT. We believe that these results could provide invaluable information for developing strategies for the management of diabetes. PMID:28251996

  6. Validation of a digital PCR method for quantification of DNA copy number concentrations by using a certified reference material.

    PubMed

    Deprez, Liesbet; Corbisier, Philippe; Kortekaas, Anne-Marie; Mazoua, Stéphane; Beaz Hidalgo, Roxana; Trapmann, Stefanie; Emons, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Digital PCR has become the emerging technique for the sequence-specific detection and quantification of nucleic acids for various applications. During the past years, numerous reports on the development of new digital PCR methods have been published. Maturation of these developments into reliable analytical methods suitable for diagnostic or other routine testing purposes requires their validation for the intended use. Here, the results of an in-house validation of a droplet digital PCR method are presented. This method is intended for the quantification of the absolute copy number concentration of a purified linearized plasmid in solution with a nucleic acid background. It has been investigated which factors within the measurement process have a significant effect on the measurement results, and the contribution to the overall measurement uncertainty has been estimated. A comprehensive overview is provided on all the aspects that should be investigated when performing an in-house method validation of a digital PCR method.

  7. Performance Evaluation of NIPT in Detection of Chromosomal Copy Number Variants Using Low-Coverage Whole-Genome Sequencing of Plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Linhua; Yin, Xuyang; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dayang; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Hui; Ren, Jinghui; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the performance of noninvasively prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal copy number variants (CNVs) in clinical samples, using a whole-genome sequencing method. Method A total of 919 archived maternal plasma samples with karyotyping/microarray results, including 33 CNVs samples and 886 normal samples from September 1, 2011 to May 31, 2013, were enrolled in this study. The samples were randomly rearranged and blindly sequenced by low-coverage (about 7M reads) whole-genome sequencing of plasma DNA. Fetal CNVs were detected by Fetal Copy-number Analysis through Maternal Plasma Sequencing (FCAPS) to compare to the karyotyping/microarray results. Sensitivity, specificity and were evaluated. Results 33 samples with deletions/duplications ranging from 1 to 129 Mb were detected with the consistent CNV size and location to karyotyping/microarray results in the study. Ten false positive results and two false negative results were obtained. The sensitivity and specificity of detection deletions/duplications were 84.21% and 98.42%, respectively. Conclusion Whole-genome sequencing-based NIPT has high performance in detecting genome-wide CNVs, in particular >10Mb CNVs using the current FCAPS algorithm. It is possible to implement the current method in NIPT to prenatally screening for fetal CNVs. PMID:27415003

  8. A single amino acid alteration in the initiation protein is responsible for the DNA overproduction phenotype of copy number mutants of plasmid R6K.

    PubMed Central

    Inuzuka, M; Wada, Y

    1985-01-01

    A novel type of high copy-number (cop) mutants of a mini-R6K plasmid were isolated. The mutations were mapped in the pir gene which encodes the pi initiation protein for plasmid R6K DNA replication. They resulted in an alteration by substitution of a single amino acid: threonine to isoleucine at the 108th position for the cop41, and proline to serine at the 113th position for the cop50, of the 305 amino acid pi protein. The cop41 mutation in the pi protein was found to be trans-dominant over the wild-type allele in the copy control of plasmid R6K. Moreover, it was shown that the altered pi protein was not overproduced in maxicells carrying this mutant plasmid and had a higher affinity to the repeated sequence which is present in the pir promoter region. Most likely the mutated pi protein also interacts more efficiently with the same repeated sequences, a target of pi, in the replication origin region and increases the frequency of the initiation event per cell division. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. PMID:3000771

  9. Validation and development of interpretation guidelines for low copy number (LCN) DNA profiling in New Zealand using the AmpFlSTR SGM Plus multiplex.

    PubMed

    Petricevic, Sue; Whitaker, Jonathan; Buckleton, John; Vintiner, Sue; Patel, Jayshree; Simon, Pauline; Ferraby, Helen; Hermiz, Waseem; Russell, Amanda

    2010-10-01

    The characteristics of STR profiles produced from approximately 1 ng starting template using the AMPFlSTR SGM Plus multiplex and 28 PCR cycles, are well documented. However, the analysis of samples perceived as low in starting template (less than 100 pg), and referred to as low template DNA (LTDNA), can require a test of higher sensitivity in order to achieve successful results. One way of increasing this sensitivity is to increase the number of PCR amplification cycles from 28 to 34. This type of analysis has become known as low copy number, or LCN, DNA profiling. Amplification of LTDNA under LCN conditions can result in increased incidents of profile characteristics such as allelic 'drop-in' and allelic 'drop-out'. Adopting a testing regime which includes duplicate analysis, and maintaining a laboratory environment of stringent and monitored cleanliness, enables the scientist to identify and control these phenomena for a reliable interpretation of the DNA profiling results. A recent court ruling has questioned the reliability of LCN analysis and commented on the paucity of publications surrounding the validation of the technique. We present data for the LCN validation undertaken in our laboratory, and describe the guidelines and working practices we have developed for the analysis and interpretation of profiles generated after LCN profiling. This study augments the published record relating to LCN validation and should act as a useful guide for other laboratories who are considering implementing LCN profiling.

  10. A multi-locus analysis of phylogenetic relationships within grass subfamily Pooideae (Poaceae) inferred from sequences of nuclear single copy gene regions compared with plastid DNA.

    PubMed

    Hochbach, Anne; Schneider, Julia; Röser, Martin

    2015-06-01

    To investigate phylogenetic relationships within the grass subfamily Pooideae we studied about 50 taxa covering all recognized tribes, using one plastid DNA (cpDNA) marker (matK gene-3'trnK exon) and for the first time four nuclear single copy gene loci. DNA sequence information from two parts of the nuclear genes topoisomerase 6 (Topo6) spanning the exons 8-13 and 17-19, the exons 9-13 encoding plastid acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (Acc1) and the partial exon 1 of phytochrome B (PhyB) were generated. Individual and nuclear combined data were evaluated using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. All of the phylogenetic results show Brachyelytrum and the tribe Nardeae as earliest diverging lineages within the subfamily. The 'core' Pooideae (Hordeeae and the Aveneae/Poeae tribe complex) are also strongly supported, as well as the monophyly of the tribes Brachypodieae, Meliceae and Stipeae (except PhyB). The beak grass tribe Diarrheneae and the tribe Duthieeae are not monophyletic in some of the analyses. However, the combined nuclear DNA (nDNA) tree yields the highest resolution and the best delimitation of the tribes, and provides the following evolutionary hypothesis for the tribes: Brachyelytrum, Nardeae, Duthieeae, Meliceae, Stipeae, Diarrheneae, Brachypodieae and the 'core' Pooideae. Within the individual datasets, the phylogenetic trees obtained from Topo6 exon 8-13 shows the most interesting results. The divergent positions of some clone sequences of Ampelodesmos mauritanicus and Trikeraia pappiformis, for instance, may indicate a hybrid origin of these stipoid taxa.

  11. Analysis of DNA Copy Number Alterations in Ovarian Serous Tumors Identifies New Molecular Genetic Changes in Low-grade and High-grade Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Guan, Bin; Feng, Yuanjian; Mao, Tsui-Lien; Chen, Xu; Jinawath, Natini; Wang, Yue; Kurman, Robert J.; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian serous carcinoma, the most common and lethal type of ovarian cancer, was thought to develop from two distinct molecular pathways. High-grade (HG) serous carcinomas contain frequent TP53 mutations while low-grade (LG) carcinomas arise from serous borderline tumors (SBT) and harbor mutations in KRAS/BRAF/ERBB2 pathway. However, the molecular alterations involved in the progression from SBT to LG carcinoma remain largely unknown. As well, the extent of deletion of tumor suppressors in ovarian serous carcinomas has not been well-studied. To further address these two issues, we assessed DNA copy number changes among affinity-purified tumor cells from 37 ovarian serous neoplasms including SBT, LG and HG tumors using high density 250K SNP arrays. Chromosomal instability index as measured by changes in DNA copy number was significantly higher in HG than in LG serous carcinomas. Hemizygous ch1p36 deletion was common in LG serous carcinomas but was rarely seen in SBT. This region contains several candidate tumor suppressors including miR-34a. In contrast, in HG serous carcinomas, significant numbers of amplifications and deletions including homozygous deletions were identified. Among homozygous deletions, loci containing Rb1, CDKN2A/B, CSMD1, and DOCK4 were most common, being present in 10.6%, 6.4%, 6.4% and 4.3%, respectively, in independent 47 affinity-purified HG serous carcinomas. Except the CDKN2A/B region, these homozygous deletions were not present in either SBT or LG tumors. Our study provides a genome-wide homozygous deletion profiles in HG serous carcinomas, serving as a molecular foundation to study tumor suppressors in ovarian cancer. PMID:19383911

  12. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rowbotham, David A.; Enfield, Katey S. S.; Martinez, Victor D.; Thu, Kelsie L.; Vucic, Emily A.; Stewart, Greg L.; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Lam, Wan L.

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation. PMID:25298778

  13. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Rowbotham, David A; Enfield, Katey S S; Martinez, Victor D; Thu, Kelsie L; Vucic, Emily A; Stewart, Greg L; Bennewith, Kevin L; Lam, Wan L

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation.

  14. A DNA target-enrichment approach to detect mutations, copy number changes and immunoglobulin translocations in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bolli, N; Li, Y; Sathiaseelan, V; Raine, K; Jones, D; Ganly, P; Cocito, F; Bignell, G; Chapman, M A; Sperling, A S; Anderson, K C; Avet-Loiseau, H; Minvielle, S; Campbell, P J; Munshi, N C

    2016-01-01

    Genomic lesions are not investigated during routine diagnostic workup for multiple myeloma (MM). Cytogenetic studies are performed to assess prognosis but with limited impact on therapeutic decisions. Recently, several recurrently mutated genes have been described, but their clinical value remains to be defined. Therefore, clinical-grade strategies to investigate the genomic landscape of myeloma samples are needed to integrate new and old prognostic markers. We developed a target-enrichment strategy followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) to streamline simultaneous analysis of gene mutations, copy number changes and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) translocations in MM in a high-throughput manner, and validated it in a panel of cell lines. We identified 548 likely oncogenic mutations in 182 genes. By integrating published data sets of NGS in MM, we retrieved a list of genes with significant relevance to myeloma and found that the mutational spectrum of primary samples and MM cell lines is partially overlapping. Gains and losses of chromosomes, chromosomal segments and gene loci were identified with accuracy comparable to conventional arrays, allowing identification of lesions with known prognostic significance. Furthermore, we identified IGH translocations with high positive and negative predictive value. Our approach could allow the identification of novel biomarkers with clinical relevance in myeloma. PMID:27588520

  15. High-resolution copy number profiling by array CGH using DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    van Essen, Hendrik F; Ylstra, Bauke

    2012-01-01

    We describe protocols to acquire high-quality DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for the use in array comparative genome hybridization (CGH). Formalin fixation combined with paraffin embedding is routine procedure for solid malignancies in the diagnostic practice of the pathologist. As a consequence, large archives of FFPE tissues are available in pathology institutes across the globe. This archival material is for many research questions an invaluable resource, with long-term clinical follow-up and survival data available. FFPE is, thus, highly attractive for large genomics studies, including experiments requiring samples for test/learning and validation. Most larger array CGH studies have, therefore, made use of FFPE material and show that CNAs have tumor- and tissue-specific traits (Chin et al. Cancer Cell 10: 529-541, 2006; Fridlyand et al. BMC Cancer 6: 96, 2006; Weiss et al. Oncogene 22: 1872-1879, 2003; Jong et al. Oncogene 26: 1499-1506, 2007). The protocols described are tailored to array CGH of FFPE solid malignancies: from sectioning FFPE blocks to specific cynosures for pathological revisions of sections, DNA isolation, quality testing, and amplification. The protocols are technical in character and elaborate up to the labeling of isolated DNA while further processes and interpretation and data analysis are beyond the scope.

  16. Recurrent De Novo Dominant Mutations in SLC25A4 Cause Severe Early-Onset Mitochondrial Disease and Loss of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kyle; Majd, Homa; Dallabona, Christina; Reinson, Karit; King, Martin S; Alston, Charlotte L; He, Langping; Lodi, Tiziana; Jones, Simon A; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Fraenkel, Nitay D; Saada, Ann; Haham, Alon; Isohanni, Pirjo; Vara, Roshni; Barbosa, Inês A; Simpson, Michael A; Deshpande, Charu; Puusepp, Sanna; Bonnen, Penelope E; Rodenburg, Richard J; Suomalainen, Anu; Õunap, Katrin; Elpeleg, Orly; Ferrero, Ileana; McFarland, Robert; Kunji, Edmund R S; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-10-06

    Mutations in SLC25A4 encoding the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier AAC1 are well-recognized causes of mitochondrial disease. Several heterozygous SLC25A4 mutations cause adult-onset autosomal-dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions, whereas recessive SLC25A4 mutations cause childhood-onset mitochondrial myopathy and cardiomyopathy. Here, we describe the identification by whole-exome sequencing of seven probands harboring dominant, de novo SLC25A4 mutations. All affected individuals presented at birth, were ventilator dependent and, where tested, revealed severe combined mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies associated with a marked loss of mitochondrial DNA copy number in skeletal muscle. Strikingly, an identical c.239G>A (p.Arg80His) mutation was present in four of the seven subjects, and the other three case subjects harbored the same c.703C>G (p.Arg235Gly) mutation. Analysis of skeletal muscle revealed a marked decrease of AAC1 protein levels and loss of respiratory chain complexes containing mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits. We show that both recombinant AAC1 mutant proteins are severely impaired in ADP/ATP transport, affecting most likely the substrate binding and mechanics of the carrier, respectively. This highly reduced capacity for transport probably affects mitochondrial DNA maintenance and in turn respiration, causing a severe energy crisis. The confirmation of the pathogenicity of these de novo SLC25A4 mutations highlights a third distinct clinical phenotype associated with mutation of this gene and demonstrates that early-onset mitochondrial disease can be caused by recurrent de novo mutations, which has significant implications for the application and analysis of whole-exome sequencing data in mitochondrial disease.

  17. Distinct patterns of DNA copy number alteration are associated with different clinicopathological features and gene-expression subtypes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Kim, Young H; Wang, Pei; Sørlie, Therese; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Lonning, Per E; Tibshirani, Robert; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Pollack, Jonathan R

    2006-11-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-death among women, where the clinicopathological features of tumors are used to prognosticate and guide therapy. DNA copy number alterations (CNAs), which occur frequently in breast cancer and define key pathogenetic events, are also potentially useful prognostic or predictive factors. Here, we report a genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) survey of CNAs in 89 breast tumors from a patient cohort with locally advanced disease. Statistical analysis links distinct cytoband loci harboring CNAs to specific clinicopathological parameters, including tumor grade, estrogen receptor status, presence of TP53 mutation, and overall survival. Notably, distinct spectra of CNAs also underlie the different subtypes of breast cancer recently defined by expression-profiling, implying these subtypes develop along distinct genetic pathways. In addition, higher numbers of gains/losses are associated with the "basal-like" tumor subtype, while high-level DNA amplification is more frequent in "luminal-B" subtype tumors, suggesting also that distinct mechanisms of genomic instability might underlie their pathogenesis. The identified CNAs may provide a basis for improved patient prognostication, as well as a starting point to define important genes to further our understanding of the pathobiology of breast cancer. This article contains Supplementary Material available at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1045-2257/suppmat

  18. Loss of 6q or 8p23 is associated with the total number of DNA copy number aberrations in adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oga, Atsunori; Uchida, Kenichiro; Nakao, Motonao; Kawauchi, Shigeto; Furuya, Tomoko; Chochi, Yasuyo; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Okada, Takae; Ueyama, Yoshiya; Sasaki, Kohsuke; Yousefpour, Fatemeh

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed 10 adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) of the salivary glands by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) using DNA chips spotted with 4,030 bacterial artificial chromosome clones. After the data smoothing procedure was applied, a total of 88 DNA copy number aberrations (DCNAs) were detected. The frequent (≥30%) DCNAs were loss of 6q23-27 and 8p23, and gains of 6p, 6q23, 8p23 and 22q13. High-level gains were detected on 12q15, including MDM2 in two cases. These two cases showed an immunohistochemically high-level (>50%) expression of MDM2 and a low-level expression of p53 (<20%). Furthermore, the total number of DCNAs was significantly greater in ACCs with loss of 6q compared to other ACCs, and in ACCs without the loss of 8p23 compared to other ACCs, respectively. Although limitations exist, a-CGH detected several candidate chromosomal imbalances associated with accumulation of DCNAs in ACCs.

  19. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M; Upton, Melissa P; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R; Doody, David R; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC.

  20. Accurate Quantification of Episomal HIV-1 Two-Long Terminal Repeat Circles by Use of Optimized DNA Isolation and Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation. PMID:25502524

  1. Genome-wide analysis of abdominal and pleural malignant mesothelioma with DNA arrays reveals both common and distinct regions of copy number alteration

    PubMed Central

    Borczuk, Alain C.; Pei, Jianming; Taub, Robert N.; Levy, Brynn; Nahum, Odelia; Chen, Jinli; Chen, Katherine; Testa, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive tumor arising from mesothelial linings of the serosal cavities. Pleural space is the most common site, accounting for about 80% of cases, while peritoneum makes up the majority of the remaining 20%. While histologically similar, tumors from these sites are epidemiologically and clinically distinct and their attribution to asbestos exposure differs. We compared DNA array-based findings from 48 epithelioid peritoneal MMs and 41 epithelioid pleural MMs to identify similarities and differences in copy number alterations (CNAs). Losses in 3p (BAP1 gene), 9p (CDKN2A) and 22q (NF2) were seen in tumors from both tumor sites, although CDKN2A and NF2 losses were seen at a higher rate in pleural disease (p<0.01). Overall, regions of copy number gain were more common in peritoneal MM, whereas losses were more common in pleural MM, with regions of loss containing known tumor suppressor genes and regions of gain encompassing genes encoding receptor tyrosine kinase pathway members. Cases with known asbestos causation (n = 32 ) were compared with those linked to radiation exposure (n = 9 ). Deletions in 6q, 14q, 17p and 22q, and gain of 17q were seen in asbestos-associated but not radiation-related cases. As reported in post-radiation sarcoma, gains outnumbered losses in radiation-associated MM. The patterns of genomic imbalances suggest overlapping and distinct molecular pathways in MM of the pleura and peritoneum, and that differences in causation (i.e., asbestos vs. radiation) may account for some of these site-dependent differences PMID:26853494

  2. Haplotype Detection from Next-Generation Sequencing in High-Ploidy-Level Species: 45S rDNA Gene Copies in the Hexaploid Spartina maritima

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Julien; Aliaga, Benoît; Lima, Oscar; Ferreira de Carvalho, Julie; Ainouche, Abdelkader; Macas, Jiri; Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Coriton, Olivier; Ainouche, Malika; Salmon, Armel

    2015-01-01

    Gene and whole-genome duplications are widespread in plant nuclear genomes, resulting in sequence heterogeneity. Identification of duplicated genes may be particularly challenging in highly redundant genomes, especially when there are no diploid parents as a reference. Here, we developed a pipeline to detect the different copies in the ribosomal RNA gene family in the hexaploid grass Spartina maritima from next-generation sequencing (Roche-454) reads. The heterogeneity of the different domains of the highly repeated 45S unit was explored by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and assembling reads based on shared polymorphisms. SNPs were validated using comparisons with Illumina sequence data sets and by cloning and Sanger (re)sequencing. Using this approach, 29 validated polymorphisms and 11 validated haplotypes were reported (out of 34 and 20, respectively, that were initially predicted by our program). The rDNA domains of S. maritima have similar lengths as those found in other Poaceae, apart from the 5′-ETS, which is approximately two-times longer in S. maritima. Sequence homogeneity was encountered in coding regions and both internal transcribed spacers (ITS), whereas high intragenomic variability was detected in the intergenic spacer (IGS) and the external transcribed spacer (ETS). Molecular cytogenetic analysis by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed the presence of one pair of 45S rDNA signals on the chromosomes of S. maritima instead of three expected pairs for a hexaploid genome, indicating loss of duplicated homeologous loci through the diploidization process. The procedure developed here may be used at any ploidy level and using different sequencing technologies. PMID:26530424

  3. [Characterization of recombinant single-stranded DNA-binding protein from Escherichia coli and its application in accurate pyrosequencing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Zou, Bingjie; Chen, Zhiyao; Ma, Yinjiao; Xu, Shu; Zhou, Guohua

    2011-10-01

    We expressed recombinant single-stranded DNA-binding protein (r-SSBP) from Escherichia coli with the molecular weight of 24-kDa by using genetic engineering strategy, and demonstrated the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding activity of r-SSBP by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). To further characterize r-SSBP, we studied the effects of r-SSBP on melting temperature (T(m)) of DNA. The results showed that r-SSBP could bind to ssDNA, and lower the T(m) of DNA, especially for single-base mismatched DNA. Therefore, r-SSBP significantly increased the T(m) difference between single-base mismatched DNA and perfect matched DNA. These results are very beneficial for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection. Moreover, we applied r-SSBP in high sensitive pyrosequencing system developed by our group. The results suggest that the r-SSBP decreased non-specific signals, corrected the proportion of signal peak height and improved the performance of pyrosequencing.

  4. Quantification of Plasmid Copy Number with Single Colour Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Plotka, Magdalena; Wozniak, Mateusz; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria can be considered as biological nanofactories that manufacture a cornucopia of bioproducts most notably recombinant proteins. As such, they must perfectly match with appropriate plasmid vectors to ensure successful overexpression of target genes. Among many parameters that correlate positively with protein productivity plasmid copy number plays pivotal role. Therefore, development of new and more accurate methods to assess this critical parameter will result in optimization of expression of plasmid-encoded genes. In this study, we present a simple and highly accurate method for quantifying plasmid copy number utilizing an EvaGreen single colour, droplet digital PCR. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method by examining the copy number of the pBR322 vector within Escherichia coli DH5α cells. The obtained results were successfully validated by real-time PCR. However, we observed a strong dependency of the plasmid copy number on the method chosen for isolation of the total DNA. We found that application of silica-membrane-based columns for DNA purification or DNA isolation with use of bead-beating, a mechanical cell disruption lead to determination of an average of 20.5 or 7.3 plasmid copies per chromosome, respectively. We found that recovery of the chromosomal DNA from purification columns was less efficient than plasmid DNA (46.5 ± 1.9% and 87.4 ± 5.5%, respectively) which may lead to observed differences in plasmid copy number. Besides, the plasmid copy number variations dependent on DNA template isolation method, we found that droplet digital PCR is a very convenient method for measuring bacterial plasmid content. Careful determination of plasmid copy number is essential for better understanding and optimization of recombinant proteins production process. Droplet digital PCR is a very precise method that allows performing thousands of individual PCR reactions in a single tube. The ddPCR does not depend on running standard curves and is a

  5. SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers in cell lines derived from patients with spinal muscular atrophy as measured by array digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Stabley, Deborah L; Harris, Ashlee W; Holbrook, Jennifer; Chubbs, Nicholas J; Lozo, Kevin W; Crawford, Thomas O; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Funanage, Vicky L; Wang, Wenlan; Mackenzie, William; Scavina, Mena; Sol-Church, Katia; Butchbach, Matthew E R

    2015-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an early-onset motor neuron disease characterized by loss of α-motor neurons and associated muscle atrophy. SMA is caused by deletion or other disabling mutation of survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1). In the human genome, a large duplication of the SMN-containing region gives rise to a second copy of this gene (SMN2) that is distinguishable by a single nucleotide change in exon 7. Within the SMA population, there is substantial variation in SMN2 copy number; in general, those individuals with SMA who have a high SMN2 copy number have a milder disease. Because SMN2 functions as a disease modifier, its accurate copy number determination may have clinical relevance. In this study, we describe the development of an assay to assess SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers in DNA samples using an array-based digital PCR (dPCR) system. This dPCR assay can accurately and reliably measure the number of SMN1 and SMN2 copies in DNA samples. In a cohort of SMA patient-derived cell lines, the assay confirmed a strong inverse correlation between SMN2 copy number and disease severity. Array dPCR is a practical technique to determine, accurately and reliably, SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers from SMA samples. PMID:26247043

  6. Low-copy nuclear DNA, phylogeny and the evolution of dichogamy in the betel nut palms and their relatives (Arecinae; Arecaceae).

    PubMed

    Loo, Adrian H B; Dransfield, John; Chase, Mark W; Baker, William J

    2006-06-01

    For the betel nut palm genus Areca and the other seven genera in subtribe Arecinae (Areceae; Arecoideae; Arecaceae) we collected DNA sequences from two low-copy nuclear genes, phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2). The data were used to evaluate monophyly of the subtribe and its component genera, explore the radiation of the group across its range, and examine evolution of protandry and protogyny, which is particularly diverse in Arecinae. The subtribe and some genera are not monophyletic. Three lineages of Arecinae are recovered: one widespread, but centered on the Sunda Shelf, another endemic to the islands east of Wallace's line and a third, comprising the Sri Lanka endemic Loxococcus, that is most closely related to genera from outside subtribe Arecinae. Strong support is obtained for broadening the circumscription of the genus Hydriastele to include Gronophyllum, Gulubia and Siphokentia. In clarifying phylogenetic relationships, we have demonstrated that a perceived bimodal distribution of the subtribe across Wallace's line does not in fact exist. Character optimizations indicate that the evolution of protogyny, an unusual condition in palms, is potentially correlated with a large radiation in the genus Pinanga and possibly also to dramatic diversification in pollen morphology and genome size. The evolution of dichogamy in the clade endemic to the east of Wallace's line is complex and reveals a pattern of numerous transformations between protandry and protogyny that is in marked contrast with other Arecinae. We suggest that this contrast is most likely a reflection of differing geological histories and pollinator spectra in each region.

  7. Sensitive and accurate identification of protein–DNA binding events in ChIP-chip assays using higher order derivative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Christian L.; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Immuno-precipitation of protein–DNA complexes followed by microarray hybridization is a powerful and cost-effective technology for discovering protein–DNA binding events at the genome scale. It is still an unresolved challenge to comprehensively, accurately and sensitively extract binding event information from the produced data. We have developed a novel strategy composed of an information-preserving signal-smoothing procedure, higher order derivative analysis and application of the principle of maximum entropy to address this challenge. Importantly, our method does not require any input parameters to be specified by the user. Using genome-scale binding data of two Escherichia coli global transcription regulators for which a relatively large number of experimentally supported sites are known, we show that ∼90% of known sites were resolved to within four probes, or ∼88 bp. Over half of the sites were resolved to within two probes, or ∼38 bp. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our strategy delivers significant quantitative and qualitative performance gains over available methods. Such accurate and sensitive binding site resolution has important consequences for accurately reconstructing transcriptional regulatory networks, for motif discovery, for furthering our understanding of local and non-local factors in protein–DNA interactions and for extending the usefulness horizon of the ChIP-chip platform. PMID:21051353

  8. DNA extraction techniques compared for accurate detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products.

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Kazan, Hande; Karacanli, Burçin; Lucas, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, DNA extraction methods have been evaluated to detect the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products commercialised in Turkey. All the extraction methods tested performed well for the majority of maize foods and feed products analysed. However, the highest DNA content was achieved by the Wizard, Genespin or the CTAB method, all of which produced optimal DNA yield and purity for different maize food and feed products. The samples were then screened for the presence of GM elements, along with certified reference materials. Of the food and feed samples, 8 % tested positive for the presence of one GM element (NOS terminator), of which half (4 % of the total) also contained a second element (the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter). The results obtained herein clearly demonstrate the presence of GM maize in the Turkish market, and that the Foodproof GMO Screening Kit provides reliable screening of maize food and feed products.

  9. MBRidge: an accurate and cost-effective method for profiling DNA methylome at single-base resolution.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wanshi; Mao, Fengbiao; Teng, Huajing; Cai, Tao; Zhao, Fangqing; Wu, Jinyu; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Organisms and cells, in response to environmental influences or during development, undergo considerable changes in DNA methylation on a genome-wide scale, which are linked to a variety of biological processes. Using MethylC-seq to decipher DNA methylome at single-base resolution is prohibitively costly. In this study, we develop a novel approach, named MBRidge, to detect the methylation levels of repertoire CpGs, by innovatively introducing C-hydroxylmethylated adapters and bisulfate treatment into the MeDIP-seq protocol and employing ridge regression in data analysis. A systematic evaluation of DNA methylome in a human ovarian cell line T29 showed that MBRidge achieved high correlation (R > 0.90) with much less cost (∼10%) in comparison with MethylC-seq. We further applied MBRidge to profiling DNA methylome in T29H, an oncogenic counterpart of T29's. By comparing methylomes of T29H and T29, we identified 131790 differential methylation regions (DMRs), which are mainly enriched in carcinogenesis-related pathways. These are substantially different from 7567 DMRs that were obtained by RRBS and related with cell development or differentiation. The integrated analysis of DMRs in the promoter and expression of DMR-corresponding genes revealed that DNA methylation enforced reverse regulation of gene expression, depending on the distance from the proximal DMR to transcription starting sites in both mRNA and lncRNA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MBRidge is an efficient and cost-effective method that can be widely applied to profiling DNA methylomes.

  10. Roles of the Y-family DNA polymerase Dbh in accurate replication of the Sulfolobus genome at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Foster, Patricia L; Grogan, Dennis W

    2012-04-01

    The intrinsically thermostable Y-family DNA polymerases of Sulfolobus spp. have revealed detailed three-dimensional structure and catalytic mechanisms of trans-lesion DNA polymerases, yet their functions in maintaining their native genomes remain largely unexplored. To identify functions of the Y-family DNA polymerase Dbh in replicating the Sulfolobus genome under extreme conditions, we disrupted the dbh gene in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and characterized the resulting mutant strains phenotypically. Disruption of dbh did not cause any obvious growth defect, sensitivity to any of several DNA-damaging agents, or change in overall rate of spontaneous mutation at a well-characterized target gene. Loss of dbh did, however, cause significant changes in the spectrum of spontaneous forward mutation in each of two orthologous target genes of different sequence. Relative to wild-type strains, dbh(-) constructs exhibited fewer frame-shift and other small insertion-deletion mutations, but exhibited more base-pair substitutions that converted G:C base pairs to T:A base pairs. These changes, which were confirmed to be statistically significant, indicate two distinct activities of the Dbh polymerase in Sulfolobus cells growing under nearly optimal culture conditions (78-80°C and pH 3). The first activity promotes slipped-strand events within simple repetitive motifs, such as mononucleotide runs or triplet repeats, and the second promotes insertion of C opposite a potentially miscoding form of G, thereby avoiding G:C to T:A transversions.

  11. Evolution of ribosomal RNA gene copy number on the sex chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1991-07-01

    A diverse array of cellular and evolutionary forces--including unequal crossing-over, magnification, compensation, and natural selection--is at play modulating the number of copies of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes on the X and Y chromosomes of Drosophila. Accurate estimates of naturally occurring distributions of copy numbers on both the X and Y chromosomes are needed in order to explore the evolutionary end result of these forces. Estimates of relative copy numbers of the ribosomal DNA repeat, as well as of the type I and type II inserts, were obtained for a series of 96 X chromosomes and 144 Y chromosomes by using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult D. melanogaster bearing appropriate deficiencies that reveal chromosome-specific copy numbers. Estimates of copy number were put on an absolute scale with slot blots having serial dilutions both of the repeat and of genomic DNA from nonpolytene larval brain and imaginal discs. The distributions of rRNA copy number are decidedly skewed, with a long tail toward higher copy numbers. These distributions were fitted by a population genetic model that posits three different types of exchange events--sister-chromatid exchange, intrachromatid exchange, and interchromosomal crossing-over. In addition, the model incorporates natural selection, because experimental evidence shows that there is a minimum number of functional elements necessary for survival. Adequate fits of the model were found, indicating that either natural selection also eliminates chromosomes with high copy number or that the rate of intrachromatid exchange exceeds the rate of interchromosomal exchange.

  12. Stochastic and reversible assembly of a multiprotein DNA repair complex ensures accurate target site recognition and efficient repair

    PubMed Central

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; Gourdin, Audrey M.; Politi, Antonio Z.; Moné, Martijn J.; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Goedhart, Joachim; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-01-01

    To understand how multiprotein complexes assemble and function on chromatin, we combined quantitative analysis of the mammalian nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) machinery in living cells with computational modeling. We found that individual NER components exchange within tens of seconds between the bound state in repair complexes and the diffusive state in the nucleoplasm, whereas their net accumulation at repair sites evolves over several hours. Based on these in vivo data, we developed a predictive kinetic model for the assembly and function of repair complexes. DNA repair is orchestrated by the interplay of reversible protein-binding events and progressive enzymatic modifications of the chromatin substrate. We demonstrate that faithful recognition of DNA lesions is time consuming, whereas subsequently, repair complexes form rapidly through random and reversible assembly of NER proteins. Our kinetic analysis of the NER system reveals a fundamental conflict between specificity and efficiency of chromatin-associated protein machineries and shows how a trade off is negotiated through reversibility of protein binding. PMID:20439997

  13. High-resolution separation and accurate size determination in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA. 1. DNA size standards and the effect of agarose and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, M.K.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1988-12-27

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PGF) subjects DNA alternately to two electrical fields to resolve DNA ranging from 10,000 base pairs (10 kb) to 10,000 kb in size. The separations are quite sensitive to a variety of experimental variables. This makes it critical to have a wide range of reliable size standards. A technique is described for preparing mixtures of bacteriophage DNA oligomers that span a size range from monomer to more than 30-mer. The relationship between size and mobility of oligomers of different bacteriophage DNA monomers is generally self-consistent. Thus, these samples can serve as primary length standards for DNAs ranging from 10 kb to more than 1,500 kb. They have been used to estimate the size of the chromosomal DNAs from various Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and to test the effect of gel concentration and temperature on PFG. DNA resolution during PFG is slightly improved in agarose gels with small pore sizes, in contrast to continuous electrophoresis where the opposite is observed. PFG mobility is surprisingly sensitive to changes in the running temperature.

  14. Characterization of three active transposable elements recently inserted in three independent DFR-A alleles and one high-copy DNA transposon isolated from the Pink allele of the ANS gene in onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunggil; Park, Jee Young; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Intact retrotransposon and DNA transposons inserted in a single gene were characterized in onions (Allium cepa) and their transcription and copy numbers were estimated in this study. While analyzing diverse onion germplasm, large insertions in the DFR-A gene encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) involved in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were found in two accessions. A 5,070-bp long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon inserted in the active DFR-A (R4) allele was identified from one of the large insertions and designated AcCOPIA1. An intact ORF encoded typical domains of copia-like LTR retrotransposons. However, AcCOPIA1 contained atypical 'TG' and 'TA' dinucleotides at the ends of the LTRs. A 4,615-bp DNA transposon was identified in the other large insertion. This DNA transposon, designated AcCACTA1, contained an ORF coding for a transposase showing homology with the CACTA superfamily transposable elements (TEs). Another 5,073-bp DNA transposon was identified from the DFR-A (TRN) allele. This DNA transposon, designated AchAT1, belonged to the hAT superfamily with short 4-bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). Finally, a 6,258-bp non-autonomous DNA transposon, designated AcPINK, was identified in the ANS-p allele encoding anthocyanidin synthase, the next downstream enzyme to DFR in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. AcPINK also possessed very short 3-bp TIRs. Active transcription of AcCOPIA1, AcCACTA1, and AchAT1 was observed through RNA-Seq analysis and RT-PCR. The copy numbers of AcPINK estimated by mapping the genomic DNA reads produced by NextSeq 500 were predominantly high compared with the other TEs. A series of evidence indicated that these TEs might have transposed in these onion genes very recently, providing a stepping stone for elucidation of enormously large-sized onion genome structure.

  15. IrisPlex: a sensitive DNA tool for accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour in the absence of ancestry information.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Ballantyne, Kaye N; van Oven, Mannis; Lao, Oscar; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-06-01

    A new era of 'DNA intelligence' is arriving in forensic biology, due to the impending ability to predict externally visible characteristics (EVCs) from biological material such as those found at crime scenes. EVC prediction from forensic samples, or from body parts, is expected to help concentrate police investigations towards finding unknown individuals, at times when conventional DNA profiling fails to provide informative leads. Here we present a robust and sensitive tool, termed IrisPlex, for the accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour from DNA in future forensic applications. We used the six currently most eye colour-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that previously revealed prevalence-adjusted prediction accuracies of over 90% for blue and brown eye colour in 6168 Dutch Europeans. The single multiplex assay, based on SNaPshot chemistry and capillary electrophoresis, both widely used in forensic laboratories, displays high levels of genotyping sensitivity with complete profiles generated from as little as 31pg of DNA, approximately six human diploid cell equivalents. We also present a prediction model to correctly classify an individual's eye colour, via probability estimation solely based on DNA data, and illustrate the accuracy of the developed prediction test on 40 individuals from various geographic origins. Moreover, we obtained insights into the worldwide allele distribution of these six SNPs using the HGDP-CEPH samples of 51 populations. Eye colour prediction analyses from HGDP-CEPH samples provide evidence that the test and model presented here perform reliably without prior ancestry information, although future worldwide genotype and phenotype data shall confirm this notion. As our IrisPlex eye colour prediction test is capable of immediate implementation in forensic casework, it represents one of the first steps forward in the creation of a fully individualised EVC prediction system for future use in forensic DNA intelligence.

  16. Use of competitive PCR to assay copy number of repetitive elements in banana.

    PubMed

    Baurens, F C; Noyer, J L; Lanaud, C; Lagoda, P J

    1996-11-27

    Banana is one of the most important subtropical fruit crops. Genetic improvement by traditional breeding strategies is difficult and better knowledge of genomic structure is needed. Repeated sequences are powerful markers for genetic fingerprinting. The method proposed here to determine the copy number of nuclear repetitive elements is based on competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and can also be used for quantifying cytosolic sequences. The reliability of this method was investigated on crude preparations of total DNA. Variations due to the heterogeneity of crude DNA extracts showed that a single locus reference is needed for accurate quantification. A mapped microsatellite locus was used to normalize copy number measurements. Copy number assay of repetitive elements using this method clearly distinguishes between the two banana subspecies investigated: Musa acuminata spp. banskii and M. acuminata spp. malaccensis. Two repetitive sequence families, pMaCIR1115 and pA9-26, were assayed that cover up to 1% of the M. acuminata genome. Their copy number varied up to six fold between the two subspecies. Furthermore, sequence quantification showed that mitochondrial genomes are present in crude leaf-extracted banana DNA at up to 40 copies per cell.

  17. Nucleic Acids Research Group (NRG): The Importance of DNA Extraction in Metagenomics: The Gatekeeper to Accurate Results!

    PubMed Central

    Carmical, R.; Nadella, V.; Herbert, Z.; Beckloff, N.; Chittur, S.; Rosato, C.; Perera, A.; Auer, H.; Robinson, M.; Tighe, S.; Holbrook, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that the field of metagenomics is becoming a critical tool for studying previously unobtainable population dynamics at both an identification of species level and a functional or transcriptional level. Because the power to resolve microbial information is so important for identifying the components in an mixed sample, metagenomics can be used to study nearly any possible environment or system including clinical, environmental, and industrial, to name a few. Clinically, it may be used to determine sub-populations colonizing regions of the body or determining a rare infection to assist in treatment strategies. Environmentally it may be used to identify microbial populations within a soil, water or air sample, or within a bioreactor to characterize a population- based functional process. The possibilities are endless. However, the accuracy of a metagenomics dataset relies on three important “gatekeepers” including 1) The ability to effectively extract all DNA or RNA from every cell within a sample, 2) The reliability of the methods used for deep or high-throughput sequencing, and 3) The software used to analyze the data. Since DNA extraction is the first step in the technical process of metagenomics, the Nucleic Acid Research Group (NARG) conducted a study to evaluate extraction methods using a synthetic microbial sample. The synthetic microbial sample was prepared from 10 known bacteria at specific concentrations and ranging in diversity. Samples were extracted in duplicate using various popular kit based methods as well as several homebrew protocols then analyzed by NextGen sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq. Results of the study include determining the percent recovery of those organisms by comparing to the known quantity in the original synthetic mix.

  18. Selection of suitable endogenous reference genes for relative copy number detection in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bantong; Guo, Jinlong; Que, Youxiong; Fu, Zhiwei; Wu, Luguang; Xu, Liping

    2014-05-19

    Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM) crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential "single copy" genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3--high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1--medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2--low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane.

  19. Evaluation of gene expression and DNA copy number profiles of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells and consecutive neurosphere-like cells generated from dogs with naturally occurring spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Hey; Koh, Sehwon; Thomas, Rachael; Breen, Matthew; Olby, Natasha J

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate gene expression and DNA copy number in adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and in ADSC-derived neurosphere-like cell clusters (ADSC-NSCs) generated from tissues of chronically paraplegic dogs. ANIMALS 14 client-owned paraplegic dogs. PROCEDURES Dorsal subcutaneous adipose tissue (< 1 cm(3)) was collected under general anesthesia; ADSCs were isolated and cultured. Third-passage ADSCs were cultured in neural cell induction medium to generate ADSC-NSCs. Relative gene expression of mesenchymal cell surface marker CD90 and neural progenitor marker nestin was assessed in ADSCs and ADSC-NSCs from 3 dogs by quantitative real-time PCR assay; expression of these and various neural lineage genes was evaluated for the same dogs by reverse transcription PCR assay. Percentages of cells expressing CD90, nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and tubulin β 3 class III (TUJ1) proteins were determined by flow cytometry for all dogs. The DNA copy number stability (in samples from 6 dogs) and neural cell differentiation (14 dogs) were assessed with array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis and immunocytochemical evaluation, respectively. RESULTS ADSCs and ADSC-NSCs expressed neural cell progenitor and differentiation markers; GFAP and microtubule-associated protein 2 were expressed by ADSC-NSCs but not ADSCs. Relative gene expression of CD90 and nestin was subjectively higher in ADSC-NSCs than in ADSCs. Percentages of ADSC-NSCs expressing nestin, GFAP, and TUJ1 proteins were substantially higher than those of ADSCs. Cells expressing neuronal and glial markers were generated from ADSC-NSCs and had no DNA copy number instability detectable by the methods used. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested ADSCs can potentially be a safe and clinically relevant autologous source for canine neural progenitor cells. Further research is needed to verify these findings.

  20. Breaking and Entering: Copying and Copy Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westlake, Wayne; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes several commercially-available computer programs which allow users to make copies of "protected" software. Current costs, program features, and ordering information are provided for these "encryption" programs. Also describes a monthly journal (The HARDCORE Computist) which focuses on unlocking copy-protected…

  1. Phytochip: development of a DNA-microarray for rapid and accurate identification of Pseudo-nitzschia spp and other harmful algal species.

    PubMed

    Noyer, Charlotte; Abot, Anne; Trouilh, Lidwine; Leberre, Véronique Anton; Dreanno, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Detection of harmful algal blooms has become a challenging concern because of the direct impacts on public health and economy. The identification of toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms in monitoring programs requires an extensive taxonomic expertise and is time consuming. Advances in molecular biology have allowed the development of new approaches, more rapid, accurate and cost-effective for detecting these microorganisms. In this context, we developed a new DNA microarray (called, Phytochip) for the simultaneous detection of multiple HAB species with a particular emphasis on Pseudo-nitzschia species. Oligonucleotide probes were designed along the rRNA operon. After DNA extraction, the target rDNA genes were amplified and labeled using an asymmetric PCR; then, the amplicons were hybridized to the oligonucleotide probes present on the chips. The total assay from seawater sampling to data acquisition can be performed within a working day. Specificity and sensitivity were assessed by using monoclonal cultures, mixtures of species and field samples spiked with a known amount of cultured cells. The Phytochip with its 81 validated oligonucleotide probes was able to detect 12 species of Pseudo-nitzschia and 11 species of dinoflagellates among which were 3 species of Karenia and 3 species of Alexandrium. The Phytochip was applied to environmental samples already characterized by light microscopy and cloned into DNA libraries. The hybridizations on the Phytochip were in good agreement with the sequences retrieved from the clone libraries and the microscopic observations. The Phytochip enables a reliable multiplex detection of phytoplankton and can assist a water quality monitoring program as well as more general ecological research.

  2. Accurate Chromosome Segregation at First Meiotic Division Requires AGO4, a Protein Involved in RNA-Dependent DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Cecilia; Santos, Juan Luis; Pradillo, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    The RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway is important for the transcriptional repression of transposable elements and for heterochromatin formation. Small RNAs are key players in this process by regulating both DNA and histone methylation. Taking into account that methylation underlies gene silencing and that there are genes with meiosis-specific expression profiles, we have wondered whether genes involved in RdDM could play a role during this specialized cell division. To address this issue, we have characterized meiosis progression in pollen mother cells from Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants defective for several proteins related to RdDM. The most relevant results were obtained for ago4-1 In this mutant, meiocytes display a slight reduction in chiasma frequency, alterations in chromatin conformation around centromeric regions, lagging chromosomes at anaphase I, and defects in spindle organization. These abnormalities lead to the formation of polyads instead of tetrads at the end of meiosis, and might be responsible for the fertility defects observed in this mutant. Findings reported here highlight an involvement of AGO4 during meiosis by ensuring accurate chromosome segregation at anaphase I.

  3. Selection of Suitable Endogenous Reference Genes for Relative Copy Number Detection in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bantong; Guo, Jinlong; Que, Youxiong; Fu, Zhiwei; Wu, Luguang; Xu, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM) crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential “single copy” genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3—high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1—medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2—low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane. PMID:24857916

  4. Copy-left and Copy-right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderPlas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Any discussion of open licensing almost invariably devolves into a debate between copy-left licenses and permissive licenses, both sides defending their views with a nearly religious fervor. Copy-left licenses, typified by the GPL family of licenses, require all derived products to maintain the open, GPL license. Permissive licenses, typified by the BSD family of licenses, do not impose such requirements. I'll briefly explore the common arguments put forth in favor of either approach, and discuss some concrete examples of where these approaches have helped or hindered the software packages that used them.

  5. Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Targeting the rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions for Accurate Identification of Clinically Important Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Accurate species identification of Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and other yeast pathogens is important for clinical management. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a yeast species identification scheme by determining the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region length types (LTs) using a sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE) approach. A total of 156 yeast isolates encompassing 32 species were first used to establish a reference SCGE ITS LT database. Evaluation of the ITS LT database was then performed on (i) a separate set of (n = 97) clinical isolates by SCGE, and (ii) 41 isolates of 41 additional yeast species from GenBank by in silico analysis. Of 156 isolates used to build the reference database, 41 ITS LTs were identified, which correctly identified 29 of the 32 (90.6%) species, with the exception of Trichosporon asahii, Trichosporon japonicum and Trichosporon asteroides. In addition, eight of the 32 species revealed different electropherograms and were subtyped into 2–3 different ITS LTs each. Of the 97 test isolates used to evaluate the ITS LT scheme, 96 (99.0%) were correctly identified to species level, with the remaining isolate having a novel ITS LT. Of the additional 41 isolates for in silico analysis, none was misidentified by the ITS LT database except for Trichosporon mucoides whose ITS LT profile was identical to that of Trichosporon dermatis. In conclusion, yeast identification by the present SCGE ITS LT assay is a fast, reproducible and accurate alternative for the identification of clinically important yeasts with the exception of Trichosporon species. PMID:27105313

  6. Comparison of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in identical sequences in primary human fibroblast and immortal hamster-human hybrid cells harboring a single copy of human chromosome 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouladi, B.; Waldren, C. A.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We have optimized a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay that measures induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in specific regions of the genome (Lobrich et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 12050-12054, 1995). The increased sensitivity resulting from these improvements makes it possible to analyze the size distribution of broken DNA molecules immediately after the introduction of DSBs and after repair incubation. This analysis shows that the distribution of broken DNA pieces after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is consistent with the distribution expected from randomly induced DSBs. It is apparent from the distribution of rejoined DNA pieces after repair incubation that DNA ends continue to rejoin between 3 and 24 h postirradiation and that some of these rejoining events are in fact misrejoining events, since novel restriction fragments both larger and smaller than the original fragment are generated after repair. This improved assay was also used to study the kinetics of DSB rejoining and the extent of misrejoining in identical DNA sequences in human GM38 cells and human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells containing a single human chromosome 11. Despite the numerous differences between these cells, which include species and tissue of origin, levels of TP53, expression of telomerase, and the presence or absence of a homologous chromosome for the restriction fragments examined, the kinetics of rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs and the extent of misrejoining were similar in the two cell lines when studied in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, DSBs were removed from the single-copy human chromosome in the hamster A(L) cells with similar kinetics and misrejoining frequency as at a locus on this hybrid's CHO chromosomes.

  7. A Single-Array-Based Method for Detecting Copy Number Variants Using Affymetrix High Density SNP Arrays and its Application to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Fu, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence has shown that structural variations, due to insertions, deletions, and inversions of DNA, may contribute considerably to the development of complex human diseases, such as breast cancer. High-throughput genotyping technologies, such as Affymetrix high density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have produced large amounts of genetic data for genome-wide SNP genotype calling and copy number estimation. Meanwhile, there is a great need for accurate and efficient statistical methods to detect copy number variants. In this article, we introduce a hidden-Markov-model (HMM)-based method, referred to as the PICR-CNV, for copy number inference. The proposed method first estimates copy number abundance for each single SNP on a single array based on the raw fluorescence values, and then standardizes the estimated copy number abundance to achieve equal footing among multiple arrays. This method requires no between-array normalization, and thus, maintains data integrity and independence of samples among individual subjects. In addition to our efforts to apply new statistical technology to raw fluorescence values, the HMM has been applied to the standardized copy number abundance in order to reduce experimental noise. Through simulations, we show our refined method is able to infer copy number variants accurately. Application of the proposed method to a breast cancer dataset helps to identify genomic regions significantly associated with the disease. PMID:26279618

  8. Integrative genomics identifies distinct molecular classes of neuroblastoma and shows that multiple genes are targeted by regional alterations in DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Diskin, Sharon; Rappaport, Eric; Attiyeh, Edward; Mosse, Yael; Shue, Daniel; Seiser, Eric; Jagannathan, Jayanti; Shusterman, Suzanne; Bansal, Manisha; Khazi, Deepa; Winter, Cynthia; Okawa, Erin; Grant, Gregory; Cnaan, Avital; Zhao, Huaqing; Cheung, Nai-Kong; Gerald, William; London, Wendy; Matthay, Katherine K; Brodeur, Garrett M; Maris, John M

    2006-06-15

    Neuroblastoma is remarkable for its clinical heterogeneity and is characterized by genomic alterations that are strongly correlated with tumor behavior. The specific genes that influence neuroblastoma biology and are targeted by genomic alterations remain largely unknown. We quantified mRNA expression in a highly annotated series of 101 prospectively collected diagnostic neuroblastoma primary tumors using an oligonucleotide-based microarray. Genomic copy number status at the prognostically relevant loci 1p36, 2p24 (MYCN), 11q23, and 17q23 was determined by PCR and was aberrant in 26, 20, 40, and 38 cases, respectively. In addition, 72 diagnostic neuroblastoma primary tumors assayed in a different laboratory were used as an independent validation set. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed that gene expression was highly correlated with genomic alterations and clinical markers of tumor behavior. The vast majority of samples with MYCN amplification and 1p36 loss of heterozygosity (LOH) clustered together on a terminal node of the sample dendrogram, whereas the majority of samples with 11q deletion clustered separately and both of these were largely distinct from the copy number neutral group of tumors. Genes involved in neurodevelopment were broadly overrepresented in the more benign tumors, whereas genes involved in RNA processing and cellular proliferation were highly represented in the most malignant cases. By combining transcriptomic and genomic data, we showed that LOH at 1p and 11q was associated with significantly decreased expression of 122 (61%) and 88 (27%) of the genes mapping to 1p35-36 and all of 11q, respectively, suggesting that multiple genes may be targeted by LOH events. A total of 71 of the 1p35-36 genes were also differentially expressed in the independent validation data set, providing a prioritized list of candidate neuroblastoma suppressor genes. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypotheses that the neuroblastoma

  9. Differences in aggressive behavior and DNA copy number variants between BALB/cJ and BALB/cByJ substrains.

    PubMed

    Velez, Lady; Sokoloff, Greta; Miczek, Klaus A; Palmer, Abraham A; Dulawa, Stephanie C

    2010-03-01

    Some BALB/c substrains exhibit different levels of aggression. We compared aggression levels between male BALB/cJ and BALB/cByJ substrains using the resident intruder paradigm. These substrains were also assessed in other tests of emotionality and information processing including the open field, forced swim, fear conditioning, and prepulse inhibition tests. We also evaluated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported between these BALB/c substrains. Finally, we compared BALB/cJ and BALB/cByJ mice for genomic deletions or duplications, collectively termed copy number variants (CNVs), to identify candidate genes that might underlie the observed behavioral differences. BALB/cJ mice showed substantially higher aggression levels than BALB/cByJ mice; however, only minor differences in other behaviors were observed. None of the previously reported SNPs were verified. Eleven CNV regions were identified between the two BALB/c substrains. Our findings identify a robust difference in aggressive behavior between BALB/cJ and BALB/cByJ substrains, which could be the result of the identified CNVs.

  10. Evaluating quantitative methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Shay; Paulsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The life of plasmids is a constant battle against fluctuations: failing to correct copy number fluctuations can increase the plasmid loss rate by many orders of magnitude, as can a failure to more evenly divide the copies between daughters at cell division. Plasmids are therefore long-standing model systems for stochastic processes in cells, much thanks to the efforts of Kurt Nordström to whose memory this issue is dedicated. Here we analyze a range of experimental methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells, focusing on challenges, trade-offs and necessary experimental controls. In particular we analyze published and unpublished strategies to infer copy numbers from expression of plasmid-encoded reporters, direct labeling of plasmids with fluorescent probes or DNA binding proteins fused to fluorescent reporters, PCR based methods applied to single cell lysates, and plasmid-specific replication arrest. We conclude that no method currently exists to measure plasmid copy numbers in single cells, and that most methods instead inadvertently measure various types of experimental noise. We also discuss how accurate methods can be developed. PMID:22305922

  11. Sparse representation and Bayesian detection of genome copy number alterations from microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Pique-Regi, Roger; Monso-Varona, Jordi; Ortega, Antonio; Seeger, Robert C.; Triche, Timothy J.; Asgharzadeh, Shahab

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Genomic instability in cancer leads to abnormal genome copy number alterations (CNA) that are associated with the development and behavior of tumors. Advances in microarray technology have allowed for greater resolution in detection of DNA copy number changes (amplifications or deletions) across the genome. However, the increase in number of measured signals and accompanying noise from the array probes present a challenge in accurate and fast identification of breakpoints that define CNA. This article proposes a novel detection technique that exploits the use of piece wise constant (PWC) vectors to represent genome copy number and sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) to detect CNA breakpoints. Methods: First, a compact linear algebra representation for the genome copy number is developed from normalized probe intensities. Second, SBL is applied and optimized to infer locations where copy number changes occur. Third, a backward elimination (BE) procedure is used to rank the inferred breakpoints; and a cut-off point can be efficiently adjusted in this procedure to control for the false discovery rate (FDR). Results: The performance of our algorithm is evaluated using simulated and real genome datasets and compared to other existing techniques. Our approach achieves the highest accuracy and lowest FDR while improving computational speed by several orders of magnitude. The proposed algorithm has been developed into a free standing software application (GADA, Genome Alteration Detection Algorithm). Availability: http://biron.usc.edu/~piquereg/GADA Contact: jpei@chop.swmed.edu and rpique@ieee.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18203770

  12. Kinetic versus Energetic Discrimination in Biological Copying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-05-01

    We study stochastic copying schemes in which discrimination between a right and a wrong match is achieved via different kinetic barriers or different binding energies of the two matches. We demonstrate that, in single-step reactions, the two discrimination mechanisms are strictly alternative and cannot be mixed to further reduce the error fraction. Close to the lowest error limit, kinetic discrimination results in a diverging copying velocity and dissipation per copied bit. On the other hand, energetic discrimination reaches its lowest error limit in an adiabatic regime where dissipation and velocity vanish. By analyzing experimentally measured kinetic rates of two DNA polymerases, T7 and Polγ, we argue that one of them operates in the kinetic and the other in the energetic regime. Finally, we show how the two mechanisms can be combined in copying schemes implementing error correction through a proofreading pathway.

  13. Conditionally amplifiable BACs: switching from single-copy to high-copy vectors and genomic clones.

    PubMed

    Wild, Jadwiga; Hradecna, Zdenka; Szybalski, Waclaw

    2002-09-01

    The widely used, very-low-copy BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) vectors are the mainstay of present genomic research. The principal advantage of BACs is the high stability of inserted clones, but an important disadvantage is the low yield of DNA, both for vectors alone and when carrying genomic inserts. We describe here a novel class of single-copy/high-copy (SC/HC) pBAC/oriV vectors that retain all the advantages of low-copy BAC vectors, but are endowed with a conditional and tightly controlled oriV/TrfA amplification system that allows: (1) a yield of ~100 copies of the vector per host cell when conditionally induced with L-arabinose, and (2) analogous DNA amplification (only upon induction and with copy number depending on the insert size) of pBAC/oriV clones carrying >100-kb inserts. Amplifiable clones and libraries facilitate high-throughput DNA sequencing and other applications requiring HC plasmid DNA. To turn on DNA amplification, which is driven by the oriV origin of replication, we used copy-up mutations in the gene trfA whose expression was very tightly controlled by the araC-P(araBAD) promoter/regulator system. This system is inducible by L-arabinose, and could be further regulated by glucose and fucose. Amplification of DNA upon induction with L-arabinose and its modulation by glucose are robust and reliable. Furthermore, we discovered that addition of 0.2% D-glucose to the growth medium helped toward the objective of obtaining a real SC state for all BAC systems, thus enhancing the stability of their maintenance, which became equivalent to cloning into the host chromosome

  14. Mechanisms of change in gene copy number.

    PubMed

    Hastings, P J; Lupski, James R; Rosenberg, Susan M; Ira, Grzegorz

    2009-08-01

    Deletions and duplications of chromosomal segments (copy number variants, CNVs) are a major source of variation between individual humans and are an underlying factor in human evolution and in many diseases, including mental illness, developmental disorders and cancer. CNVs form at a faster rate than other types of mutation, and seem to do so by similar mechanisms in bacteria, yeast and humans. Here we review current models of the mechanisms that cause copy number variation. Non-homologous end-joining mechanisms are well known, but recent models focus on perturbation of DNA replication and replication of non-contiguous DNA segments. For example, cellular stress might induce repair of broken replication forks to switch from high-fidelity homologous recombination to non-homologous repair, thus promoting copy number change.

  15. 37 CFR 1.217 - Publication of a redacted copy of an application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... application that corresponds to the application for which a redacted copy is submitted; (2) A translation of... translation is accurate; (3) A marked-up copy of the application showing the redactions in brackets; and (4)...

  16. Effects of Zidovudine Treatment on Heart mRNA Expression and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Associated with Alterations in Deoxynucleoside Triphosphate Composition in a Neonatal Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Snowdin, Jacob W; Hsiung, Chia-Heng; Kesterson, Daniel G; Kamath, Vasudeva G; McKee, Edward E

    2015-10-01

    The prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is a crucial component in HIV therapy. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), primarily 3'-azido-3'-thymidine (AZT [zidovudine]), have been used to treat both mothers and neonates. While AZT is being replaced with less toxic drugs in treating mothers in MTCT prevention, it is still commonly used to treat neonates. Problems related to mitochondrial toxicity and potential mutagenesis associated with AZT treatment have been reported in treated cohorts. Yet little is known concerning the metabolism and potential toxicity of AZT on embryonic and neonatal tissues, especially considering that the enzymes of nucleoside metabolism change dramatically as many tissues convert from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth during this period. AZT is known to inhibit thymidine phosphorylation and potentially alter deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools in adults. This study examines the effects of AZT on dNTP pools, mRNA expression of deoxynucleoside/deoxynucleotide metabolic enzymes, and mitochondrial DNA levels in a neonatal rat model. Results show that AZT treatment dramatically altered dNTP pools in the first 7 days of life after birth, which normalized to age-matched controls in the second and third weeks. Additionally, AZT treatment dramatically increased the mRNA levels of many enzymes involved in deoxynucleotide synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis during the first week of life, which normalized to age-matched controls by the third week. These results were correlated with depletion of mitochondrial DNA noted in the second week. Taken together, results demonstrated that AZT treatment has a powerful effect on the deoxynucleotide synthesis pathways that may be associated with toxicity and mutagenesis.

  17. Copy Machine Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Jean

    1984-01-01

    Images created with copy machines make children feel successful, as their work acquires the authority of being printed. Students can learn advanced processes like electrostatic image-making and can get involved in projects like making collages. They acquire an appreciation of design and of two-dimensional composition. (CS)

  18. The Cellular DNA Helicase ChlR1 Regulates Chromatin and Nuclear Matrix Attachment of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E2 Protein and High-Copy-Number Viral Genome Establishment

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Leanne; McFarlane-Majeed, Laura; Campos-León, Karen; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In papillomavirus infections, the viral genome is established as a double-stranded DNA episome. To segregate the episomes into daughter cells during mitosis, they are tethered to cellular chromatin by the viral E2 protein. We previously demonstrated that the E2 proteins of diverse papillomavirus types, including bovine papillomavirus (BPV) and human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16), associate with the cellular DNA helicase ChlR1. This virus-host interaction is important for the tethering of BPV E2 to mitotic chromatin and the stable maintenance of BPV episomes. The role of the association between E2 and ChlR1 in the HPV16 life cycle is unresolved. Here we show that an HPV16 E2 Y131A mutant (E2Y131A) had significantly reduced binding to ChlR1 but retained transcriptional activation and viral origin-dependent replication functions. Subcellular fractionation of keratinocytes expressing E2Y131A showed a marked change in the localization of the protein. Compared to that of wild-type E2 (E2WT), the chromatin-bound pool of E2Y131A was decreased, concomitant with an increase in nuclear matrix-associated protein. Cell cycle synchronization indicated that the shift in subcellular localization of E2Y131A occurred in mid-S phase. A similar alteration between the subcellular pools of the E2WT protein occurred upon ChlR1 silencing. Notably, in an HPV16 life cycle model in primary human keratinocytes, mutant E2Y131A genomes were established as episomes, but at a markedly lower copy number than that of wild-type HPV16 genomes, and they were not maintained upon cell passage. Our studies indicate that ChlR1 is an important regulator of the chromatin association of E2 and of the establishment and maintenance of HPV16 episomes. IMPORTANCE Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a major cause of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. During infection, the circular DNA genome of HPV persists within the nucleus, independently of the host cell chromatin. Persistence

  19. Lake sediment multi-taxon DNA from North Greenland records early post-glacial appearance of vascular plants and accurately tracks environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, L. S.; Gussarova, G.; Boessenkool, S.; Olsen, J.; Haile, J.; Schrøder-Nielsen, A.; Ludikova, A.; Hassel, K.; Stenøien, H. K.; Funder, S.; Willerslev, E.; Kjær, K.; Brochmann, C.

    2015-06-01

    High Arctic environments are particularly sensitive to climate changes, but retrieval of paleoecological data is challenging due to low productivity and biomass. At the same time, Arctic soils and sediments have proven exceptional for long-term DNA preservation due to their constantly low temperatures. Lake sediments contain DNA paleorecords of the surrounding ecosystems and can be used to retrieve a variety of organismal groups from a single sample. In this study, we analyzed vascular plant, bryophyte, algal (in particular diatom) and copepod DNA retrieved from a sediment core spanning the Holocene, taken from Bliss Lake on the northernmost coast of Greenland. A previous multi-proxy study including microscopic diatom analyses showed that this lake experienced changes between marine and lacustrine conditions. We inferred the same environmental changes from algal DNA preserved in the sediment core. Our DNA record was stratigraphically coherent, with no indication of leaching between layers, and our cross-taxon comparisons were in accordance with previously inferred local ecosystem changes. Authentic ancient plant DNA was retrieved from nearly all layers, both from the marine and the limnic phases, and distinct temporal changes in plant presence were recovered. The plant DNA was mostly in agreement with expected vegetation history, but very early occurrences of vascular plants, including the woody Empetrum nigrum, document terrestrial vegetation very shortly after glacial retreat. Our study shows that multi-taxon metabarcoding of sedimentary ancient DNA from lake cores is a valuable tool both for terrestrial and aquatic paleoecology, even in low-productivity ecosystems such as the High Arctic.

  20. Virus promoters determine interference by defective RNAs: selective amplification of mini-RNA vectors and rescue from cDNA by a 3' copy-back ambisense rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Finke, S; Conzelmann, K K

    1999-05-01

    Typical defective interfering (DI) RNAs are more successful in the competition for viral polymerase than the parental (helper) virus, which is mostly due to an altered DI promoter composition. Rabies virus (RV) internal deletion RNAs which possess the authentic RV terminal promoters, and which therefore are transcriptionally active and can be used as vectors for foreign gene expression, are poorly propagated in RV-infected cells and do not interfere with RV replication. To allow DI-like amplification and high-level gene expression from such mini-RNA vectors, we have used an engineered 3' copy-back (ambisense) helper RV in which the strong replication promoter of the antigenome was replaced with the 50-fold-weaker genome promoter. In cells coinfected with ambisense helper virus and mini-RNAs encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and luciferase, mini-RNAs were amplified to high levels. This was correlated with interference with helper virus replication, finally resulting in a clear predominance of mini-RNAs over helper virus. However, efficient successive passaging of mini-RNAs and high-level reporter gene activity could be achieved without adding exogenous helper virus, revealing a rather moderate degree of interference not precluding substantial HV propagation. Compared to infections with recombinant RV vectors expressing CAT, the availability of abundant mini-RNA templates led to increased levels of CAT mRNA such that CAT activities were augmented up to 250-fold, while virus gene transcription was kept to a minimum. We have also exploited the finding that internal deletion model RNAs behave like DI RNAs and are selectively amplified in the presence of ambisense helper virus to demonstrate for the first time RV-supported rescue of cDNA after transfection of mini-RNA cDNAs in ambisense RV-infected cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase.

  1. Eclipse period of R1 plasmids during downshift from elevated copy number: Nonrandom selection of copies for replication.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan A; Berg, Otto; Nordström, Kurt; Dasgupta, Santanu

    2012-03-01

    The classical Meselson-Stahl density-shift method was used to study replication of pOU71, a runaway-replication derivative of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli. The miniplasmid maintained the normal low copy number of R1 during steady growth at 30°C, but as growth temperatures were raised above 34°C, the copy number of the plasmid increased to higher levels, and at 42°C, it replicated without control in a runaway replication mode with lethal consequences for the host. The eclipse periods (minimum time between successive replication of the same DNA) of the plasmid shortened with rising copy numbers at increasing growth temperatures (Olsson et al., 2003). In this work, eclipse periods were measured during downshifts in copy number of pOU71 after it had replicated at 39 and 42°C, resulting in 7- and 50-fold higher than normal plasmid copy number per cell, respectively. Eclipse periods for plasmid replication, measured during copy number downshift, suggested that plasmid R1, normally selected randomly for replication, showed a bias such that a newly replicated DNA had a higher probability of replication compared to the bulk of the R1 population. However, even the unexpected nonrandom replication followed the copy number kinetics such that every generation, the plasmids underwent the normal inherited number of replication, n, independent of the actual number of plasmid copies in a newborn cell.

  2. CalMaTe: a method and software to improve allele-specific copy number of SNP arrays for downstream segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Aramburu, Ander; Bengtsson, Henrik; Neuvial, Pierre; Rubio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Summary: CalMaTe calibrates preprocessed allele-specific copy number estimates (ASCNs) from DNA microarrays by controlling for single-nucleotide polymorphism-specific allelic crosstalk. The resulting ASCNs are on average more accurate, which increases the power of segmentation methods for detecting changes between copy number states in tumor studies including copy neutral loss of heterozygosity. CalMaTe applies to any ASCNs regardless of preprocessing method and microarray technology, e.g. Affymetrix and Illumina. Availability: The method is available on CRAN (http://cran.r-project.org/) in the open-source R package calmate, which also includes an add-on to the Aroma Project framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/). Contact: arubio@ceit.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22576175

  3. Evolution vs the number of gene copies per primitive cell.

    PubMed

    Koch, A L

    1984-01-01

    Computer simulations are presented of the rate at which an advantageous mutant would displace the prototype in a replicating system without an accurate segregation mechanism. If the number of gene copies in the system is indefinitely large, Darwinian evolution is essentially stopped because there is no coupling of phenotype with genotype, i.e., there is no growth advantage to the advantageous gene relative to the prototype and therefore no "survival of the fittest." The inhibition of evolution due to a number of gene copies less than 100 would have been not insurmountable. Although the presence of multiple copies would have allowed replacement by an advantageous mutant, it provided a way for the primitive cell to conserve less immediately useful genes that could evolve into different or more effective genes. This possibility was lost as accurate segregation mechanisms evolved and cells with few copies of each gene, such as modern procaryotes, arose.

  4. Incorporating 16S gene copy number information improves estimates of microbial diversity and abundance.

    PubMed

    Kembel, Steven W; Wu, Martin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Green, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of different SSU rRNA ("16S") gene sequences in environmental samples is widely used in studies of microbial ecology as a measure of microbial community structure and diversity. However, the genomic copy number of the 16S gene varies greatly - from one in many species to up to 15 in some bacteria and to hundreds in some microbial eukaryotes. As a result of this variation the relative abundance of 16S genes in environmental samples can be attributed both to variation in the relative abundance of different organisms, and to variation in genomic 16S copy number among those organisms. Despite this fact, many studies assume that the abundance of 16S gene sequences is a surrogate measure of the relative abundance of the organisms containing those sequences. Here we present a method that uses data on sequences and genomic copy number of 16S genes along with phylogenetic placement and ancestral state estimation to estimate organismal abundances from environmental DNA sequence data. We use theory and simulations to demonstrate that 16S genomic copy number can be accurately estimated from the short reads typically obtained from high-throughput environmental sequencing of the 16S gene, and that organismal abundances in microbial communities are more strongly correlated with estimated abundances obtained from our method than with gene abundances. We re-analyze several published empirical data sets and demonstrate that the use of gene abundance versus estimated organismal abundance can lead to different inferences about community diversity and structure and the identity of the dominant taxa in microbial communities. Our approach will allow microbial ecologists to make more accurate inferences about microbial diversity and abundance based on 16S sequence data.

  5. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  6. Structure and dynamics of near-threshold leptons driven by dipolar interactions: an accurate computational study for the DNA purinic bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carelli, Fabio; Gianturco, Francesco Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of low-energy scattering electrons/positrons with molecular targets characterized by a "supercritical" permanent dipole moment (≳2.0 D) presents special physical characteristics that affect their spatial distributions, around the nuclear network of the molecular partners, both above and below the energy thresholds. Such special states are described as either dipole scattering states (DSS) above thresholds or as dipole bound states (DBS) below thresholds. The details of their respective behaviour will be presented and discussed in this work in the case of the purinic DNA bases of adenine and guanine. The behavior of the additional electron, in particular, will be discussed in detail by providing new computational results that will be related to the findings from recent experiments on the same DNA bases, confirming the transient electron's behaviour surmised by them. This work is affectionately dedicated to Michael Allan on the occasion of his official retirement. We wish to this dear friend and outstanding scientist many years to come in the happy pursuit of his many scientific interests.Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  7. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  8. 11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-1950, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF UPSTREAM WING WALLS. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  9. 12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-50, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF DISCHARGE BASIN. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  10. Multiplexed highly-accurate DNA sequencing of closely-related HIV-1 variants using continuous long reads from single molecule, real-time sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dilernia, Dario A; Chien, Jung-Ting; Monaco, Daniela C; Brown, Michael P S; Ende, Zachary; Deymier, Martin J; Yue, Ling; Paxinos, Ellen E; Allen, Susan; Tirado-Ramos, Alfredo; Hunter, Eric

    2015-11-16

    Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing (Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA, USA) provides the longest continuous DNA sequencing reads currently available. However, the relatively high error rate in the raw read data requires novel analysis methods to deconvolute sequences derived from complex samples. Here, we present a workflow of novel computer algorithms able to reconstruct viral variant genomes present in mixtures with an accuracy of >QV50. This approach relies exclusively on Continuous Long Reads (CLR), which are the raw reads generated during SMRT Sequencing. We successfully implement this workflow for simultaneous sequencing of mixtures containing up to forty different >9 kb HIV-1 full genomes. This was achieved using a single SMRT Cell for each mixture and desktop computing power. This novel approach opens the possibility of solving complex sequencing tasks that currently lack a solution.

  11. DNA studies are necessary for accurate patient diagnosis in compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) with deletional or nondeletional α-thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Kho, Siew Leng; Ngim, Chin Fang; Chua, Kek Heng; Goh, Ai Sim; Yeoh, Seoh Leng; George, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) interacts with deletional and nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations to produce HbH disorders with varying clinical manifestations from asymptomatic to severe anaemia with significant hepatosplenomegaly. Hb Adana carriers are generally asymptomatic and haemoglobin subtyping is unable to detect this highly unstable α-haemoglobin variant. This study identified 13 patients with compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana with either the 3.7 kb gene deletion (-α3.7), Hb Constant Spring (HbCS) (HBA2:c.427T>C) or Hb Paksé (HBA2:429A>T). Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System was used for the detection of five deletional and six nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations. Duplex-PCR was used to confirm Hb Paksé and HbCS. Results showed 84.6% of the Hb Adana patients were Malays. Using DNA studies, compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana and HbCS (αcodon 59α/αCSα) was confirmed in 11 patients. A novel point in this investigation was that DNA studies confirmed Hb Paksé for the first time in a Malaysian patient (αcodon 59α/αPakséα) after nine years of being misdiagnosis with Hb Adana and HbCS (αcodon 59α/αCSα). Thus, the reliance on haematology studies and Hb subtyping to detect Hb variants is inadequate in countries where thalassaemia is prevalent and caused by a wide spectrum of mutations. PMID:27271331

  12. Accurate, Direct, and High-Throughput Analyses of a Broad Spectrum of Endogenously Generated DNA Base Modifications with Isotope-Dilution Two-Dimensional Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Possible Clinical Implication.

    PubMed

    Gackowski, Daniel; Starczak, Marta; Zarakowska, Ewelina; Modrzejewska, Martyna; Szpila, Anna; Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Olinski, Ryszard

    2016-12-20

    Our hereby presented methodology is suitable for reliable assessment of the most common unavoidable DNA modifications which arise as a product of fundamental metabolic processes. 8-Oxoguanine, one of the oxidatively modified DNA bases, is a typical biomarker of oxidative stress. A noncanonical base, uracil, may be also present in small quantities in DNA. A set of ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins are involved in oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine which can be further oxidized to 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxycytosine. 5-Hydroxymethyluracil may be formed in deamination reaction of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine or can be also generated by TET enzymes. All of the aforementioned modifications seem to play some regulatory roles. We applied isotope-dilution automated online two-dimensional ultraperformance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (2D-UPLC-MS/MS) for direct measurement of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-carboxy-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine, 2'-deoxyuridine, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. Analyses of DNA extracted from matched human samples showed that the 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxycytidine level was 5-fold lower in colorectal carcinoma tumor in comparison with the normal one from the tumor's margin; also 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine and 5-carboxy-2'-deoxycytidine were lower in colorectal carcinoma tissue (ca. 2.5- and 3.5-fold, respectively). No such differences was found for 2'-deoxyuridine and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine. The presented methodology is suitable for fast, accurate, and complex evaluation of an array of endogenously generated DNA deoxynucleosides modifications. This novel technique could be used for monitoring of cancer and other diseases related to oxidative stress, aberrant metabolism, and environmental exposure. Furthermore, the fully automated two-dimensional separation is extremely useful for analysis of material

  13. High-Throughput Amplicon-Based Copy Number Detection of 11 Genes in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Ovarian Tumour Samples by MLPA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashova, Olga; Love, Clare J.; Lunke, Sebastian; Hsu, Arthur L.; Waring, Paul M.; Taylor, Graham R.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst next generation sequencing can report point mutations in fixed tissue tumour samples reliably, the accurate determination of copy number is more challenging. The conventional Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is an effective tool for measurement of gene dosage, but is restricted to around 50 targets due to size resolution of the MLPA probes. By switching from a size-resolved format, to a sequence-resolved format we developed a scalable, high-throughput, quantitative assay. MLPA-seq is capable of detecting deletions, duplications, and amplifications in as little as 5ng of genomic DNA, including from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour samples. We show that this method can detect BRCA1, BRCA2, ERBB2 and CCNE1 copy number changes in DNA extracted from snap-frozen and FFPE tumour tissue, with 100% sensitivity and >99.5% specificity. PMID:26569395

  14. Digital Genotyping of Macrosatellites and Multicopy Genes Reveals Novel Biological Functions Associated with Copy Number Variation of Large Tandem Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Quilez, Javier; Hasson, Dan; Borel, Christelle; Warburton, Peter; Sharp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5–10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality ‘finished’ human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed “repeat induced gene silencing”, which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their role in

  15. An epigenetic biomarker combination of PCDH17 and POU4F2 detects bladder cancer accurately by methylation analyses of urine sediment DNA in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaoling; An, Dan; Fang, Lu; Lin, Youcheng; Hou, Yong; Xu, Abai; Fu, Yu; Lu, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Mingwei; Zhang, Meng; Jiang, Huiling; Zhang, Chuanxia; Dong, Pei; Li, Chong; Chen, Jun; Yang, Guosheng; Liu, Chunxiao; Cai, Zhiming; Zhou, Fangjian; Wu, Song

    2016-01-01

    To develop a routine and effectual procedure of detecting bladder cancer (BlCa), an optimized combination of epigenetic biomarkers that work synergistically with high sensitivity and specificity is necessary. In this study, methylation levels of seven biomarkers (EOMES, GDF15, NID2, PCDH17, POU4F2, TCF21, and ZNF154) in 148 individuals—which including 58 urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) patients, 20 infected urinary calculi (IUC) patients, 20 kidney cancer (KC) patients,20 prostate cancer (PC) patients, and 30 healthy volunteers (HV)—were quantified by qMSP using the urine sediment DNA. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for each biomarker. The combining predictors of possible combinations were calculated through logistic regression model. Subsequently, ROC curves of the three best performing combinations were constructed. Then, we validated the three best performing combinations and POU4F2 in another 72 UCC, 21 IUC, 26 KC and 22 PC, and 23 HV urine samples. The combination of POU4F2/PCDH17 has yielded the highest sensitivity and specificity of 90.00% and 93.96% in all the 312 individuals, showing the capability of detecting BlCa effectively among pathologically varied sample groups. PMID:26700620

  16. Photocopy of copy of 1922 map, revised in 1936. Copy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of copy of 1922 map, revised in 1936. Copy in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Directorate of Public Works, building 118. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. 10. Photographic copy of copy of original construction drawing, dated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photographic copy of copy of original construction drawing, dated 1899?. Original in possession of Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Company, Ordway, Colorado. PLAN OF DAM AND HEAD GATES FOR THE TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  18. Principles and Concepts of DNA Replication in Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Michael; Langston, Lance; Stillman, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The accurate copying of genetic information in the double helix of DNA is essential for inheritance of traits that define the phenotype of cells and the organism. The core machineries that copy DNA are conserved in all three domains of life: bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. This article outlines the general nature of the DNA replication machinery, but also points out important and key differences. The most complex organisms, eukaryotes, have to coordinate the initiation of DNA replication from many origins in each genome and impose regulation that maintains genomic integrity, not only for the sake of each cell, but for the organism as a whole. In addition, DNA replication in eukaryotes needs to be coordinated with inheritance of chromatin, developmental patterning of tissues, and cell division to ensure that the genome replicates once per cell division cycle. PMID:23818497

  19. Accurate measurement of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in human cerebellum DNA by oxidative bisulfite on an array (OxBS-array).

    PubMed

    Field, Sarah F; Beraldi, Dario; Bachman, Martin; Stewart, Sabrina K; Beck, Stephan; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    The Infinium 450K Methylation array is an established tool for measuring methylation. However, the bisulfite (BS) reaction commonly used with the 450K array cannot distinguish between 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). The oxidative-bisulfite assay disambiguates 5mC and 5hmC. We describe the use of oxBS in conjunction with the 450K array (oxBS-array) to analyse 5hmC/5mC in cerebellum DNA. The "methylation" level derived by the BS reaction is the combined level of 5mC and 5hmC at a given base, while the oxBS reaction gives the level of 5mC alone. The level of 5hmC is derived by subtracting the oxBS level from the BS level. Here we present an analysis method that distinguishes genuine positive levels of 5hmC at levels as low as 3%. We performed four replicates of the same sample of cerebellum and found a high level of reproducibility (average r for BS = 98.3, and average r for oxBS = 96.8). In total, 114,734 probes showed a significant positive measurement for 5hmC. The range at which we were able to distinguish 5hmC occupancy was between 3% and 42%. In order to investigate the effects of multiple replicates on 5hmC detection we also simulated fewer replicates and found that decreasing the number of replicates to two reduced the number of positive probes identified by > 50%. We validated our results using qPCR in conjunction with glucosylation of 5hmC sites followed by MspI digestion and we found good concordance with the array estimates (r = 0.94). This experiment provides a map of 5hmC in the cerebellum and a robust dataset for use as a standard in future 5hmC analyses. We also provide a novel method for validating the presence of 5hmC at low levels, and highlight some of the pitfalls associated with measuring 5hmC and 5mC.

  20. Mechanisms of COPI vesicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Victor W.; Yang, Jia-Shu

    2009-01-01

    Coat Protein I (COPI) is one of the most intensely investigated coat complexes. Numerous studies have contributed to a general understanding of how coat proteins act to initiate intracellular vesicular transport. This review highlights key recent findings that have shaped our current understanding of how COPI vesicles are formed. PMID:19854177

  1. Counting copy number and calories.

    PubMed

    White, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) at several genomic loci has been associated with different human traits and diseases, but in many cases the findings could not be replicated. A new study provides insights into the degree of variation present at the amylase locus and calls into question a previous association between amylase copy number and body mass index.

  2. Copy number variants calling for single cell sequencing data by multi-constrained optimization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Cai, Hongmin; Zhang, Changsheng; Yang, Xi; Han, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    Variations in DNA copy number carry important information on genome evolution and regulation of DNA replication in cancer cells. The rapid development of single-cell sequencing technology allows one to explore gene expression heterogeneity among single-cells, thus providing important cancer cell evolution information. Single-cell DNA/RNA sequencing data usually have low genome coverage, which requires an extra step of amplification to accumulate enough samples. However, such amplification will introduce large bias and makes bioinformatics analysis challenging. Accurately modeling the distribution of sequencing data and effectively suppressing the bias influence is the key to success variations analysis. Recent advances demonstrate the technical noises by amplification are more likely to follow negative binomial distribution, a special case of Poisson distribution. Thus, we tackle the problem CNV detection by formulating it into a quadratic optimization problem involving two constraints, in which the underling signals are corrupted by Poisson distributed noises. By imposing the constraints of sparsity and smoothness, the reconstructed read depth signals from single-cell sequencing data are anticipated to fit the CNVs patterns more accurately. An efficient numerical solution based on the classical alternating direction minimization method (ADMM) is tailored to solve the proposed model. We demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method using both synthetic and empirical single-cell sequencing data. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves excellent performance and high promise of success with single-cell sequencing data.

  3. Modeling genetic inheritance of copy number variations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhen; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Glessner, Joseph; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bucan, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are being used as genetic markers or functional candidates in gene-mapping studies. However, unlike single nucleotide polymorphism or microsatellite genotyping techniques, most CNV detection methods are limited to detecting total copy numbers, rather than copy number in each of the two homologous chromosomes. To address this issue, we developed a statistical framework for intensity-based CNV detection platforms using family data. Our algorithm identifies CNVs for a family simultaneously, thus avoiding the generation of calls with Mendelian inconsistency while maintaining the ability to detect de novo CNVs. Applications to simulated data and real data indicate that our method significantly improves both call rates and accuracy of boundary inference, compared to existing approaches. We further illustrate the use of Mendelian inheritance to infer SNP allele compositions in each of the two homologous chromosomes in CNV regions using real data. Finally, we applied our method to a set of families genotyped using both the Illumina HumanHap550 and Affymetrix genome-wide 5.0 arrays to demonstrate its performance on both inherited and de novo CNVs. In conclusion, our method produces accurate CNV calls, gives probabilistic estimates of CNV transmission and builds a solid foundation for the development of linkage and association tests utilizing CNVs. PMID:18832372

  4. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  5. Efficient and accurate calculations on the electronic structure of B-type poly(dG)•poly(dC) DNA by elongation method: First step toward the understanding of the biological properties of aperiodic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orimoto, Yuuichi; Gu, Feng Long; Imamura, Akira; Aoki, Yuriko

    2007-06-01

    Elongation method was applied to determine the electronic structures of B-type poly(dG)•poly(dC) DNA at the ab initio molecular orbital level as a first step toward the calculation of aperiodic DNA. The discrepancy in total energy between the elongation method and a conventional calculation was negligibly small in the order of 10-8hartree/at. for 14 G-C base pair model. The local density of states for 10 G-C base pair model estimated by the elongation method well reproduced the results by the conventional calculation. It was found that the band gap of the whole system is mainly due to the energy difference between the valence band of guanine and the conduction band of cytosine. Moreover, the electron transfer path through stacking G-C base pairs rather than sugar-phosphate backbones has been confirmed by the authors' calculations.

  6. How much DNA is lost? Measuring DNA loss of short-tandem-repeat length fragments targeted by the PowerPlex 16® system using the Qiagen MinElute Purification Kit.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Brian M; Winters, Misa; Monroe, Cara; Barta, Jodi Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The success in recovering genetic profiles from aged and degraded biological samples is diminished by fundamental aspects of DNA extraction, as well as its long-term preservation, that are not well understood. While numerous studies have been conducted to determine whether one extraction method was superior to others, nearly all of them were initiated with no knowledge of the actual starting DNA quantity in the samples prior to extraction, so they ultimately compared the outcome of all methods relative to the best. Using quantitative PCR to estimate the copy count of synthetic standards before (i.e., "copies in") and after (i.e., "copies out") purification by the Qiagen MinElute PCR Purification Kit, we documented DNA loss within a pool of 16 different-sized fragments ranging from 106 to 409 bp in length, corresponding to those targeted by the PowerPlex 16 System (Promega, Madison, WI). Across all standards from 10(4) to 10(7) copies/μL, loss averaged between 21.75% and 60.56% (mean, 39.03%), which is not congruent with Qiagen's claim that 80% of 70 bp to 4 kb fragments are retained using this product (i.e., 20% loss). Our study also found no clear relationship either between DNA strand length and retention or between starting copy number and retention. This suggests that there is no molecule bias across the MinElute column membrane and highlights the need for manufacturers to clearly and accurately describe on what their claims are based, and should also encourage researchers to document DNA retention efficiencies of their own methods and protocols. Understanding how and where to reduce loss of molecules during extraction and purification will serve to generate clearer and more accurate data, which will enhance the utility of ancient and low-copy-number DNA as a tool for closing forensic cases or in reconstructing the evolutionary history of humans and other organisms.

  7. qPCR for quantification of transgene expression and determination of transgene copy number.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is a mature technology that can be used to accurately quantify the number of copies of a target nucleic acid in a sample. Here, we describe a method for using this technology to determine the copy number of a transgene stably integrated into a plant's genome and to ascertain the level of transgene expression.

  8. Cell-Free DNA Provides a Good Representation of the Tumor Genome Despite Its Biased Fragmentation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangjun; Wu, Xue; Bao, Hua; Wang, Xiaonan; Chang, Zhili; Wang, Zhenxin

    2017-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is short, extracellular, fragmented double-stranded DNA found in plasma. Plasma of patients with solid tumor has been found to show significantly increased quantities of cfDNA. Although currently poorly understood, the mechanism of cfDNA generation is speculated to be a product of genomic DNA fragmentation during cellular apoptosis and necrosis. Sequencing of cfDNA with tumor origin has identified tumor biomarkers, elucidating molecular pathology and assisting in accurate diagnosis. In this study, we performed whole-genome sequencing ofcfDNA samples with matching tumor and whole blood samples from five patients diagnosed with stage IV gastric or lung cancer. We analyzed the coverage spectrum of the human genome in our cfDNA samples. cfDNA exhibited no large regions with significant under-coverage, although we observed unbalanced coverage depth in cfDNA at transcription start sites and exon boundaries as a consequence of biased fragmentation due to ordered nucleosome positioning. We also analyzed the copy number variant status based on the whole-genome sequencing results and found high similarity between copy number profile constructed from tumor samples and cfDNA samples. Overall, we conclude that cfDNA comprises a good representation of the tumor genome in late stage gastric and lung cancer. PMID:28046008

  9. How Y-Family DNA polymerase IV is more accurate than Dpo4 at dCTP insertion opposite an N2-dG adduct of benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Sholder, Gabriel; Creech, Amanda; Loechler, Edward L

    2015-11-01

    To bypass DNA damage, cells have Y-Family DNA polymerases (DNAPs). One Y-Family-class includes DNAP κ and DNAP IV, which accurately insert dCTP opposite N(2)-dG adducts, including from the carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BP). Another class includes DNAP η and DNAP V, which insert accurately opposite UV-damage, but inaccurately opposite BP-N(2)-dG. To investigate structural differences between Y-Family-classes, regions are swapped between DNAP IV (a κ/IV-class-member) and Dpo4 (a η/V-class-member); the kinetic consequences are evaluated via primer-extension studies with a BP-N(2)-dG-containing template. Four key structural elements are revealed. (1) Y-Family DNAPs have discreet non-covalent contacts between their little finger-domain (LF-Domain) and their catalytic core-domain (CC-Domain), which we call "non-covalent bridges" (NCBs). Arg37 and Arg38 in DNAP IV's CC-Domain near the active site form a non-covalent bridge (AS-NCB) by interacting with Glu251 and Asp252, respectively, in DNAP IV's LF-Domain. Without these interactions dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions increase. DNAP IV's AS-NCB suppresses misinsertions better than Dpo4's equivalent AS-NCB. (2) DNAP IV also suppresses dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions via a second non-covalent bridge, which is ∼8Å from the active site (Distal-NCB). Dpo4 has no Distal-NCB, rendering it inferior at dATP/dGTP/dTTP suppression. (3) dCTP insertion is facilitated by the larger minor groove opening near the active site in DNAP IV versus Dpo4, which is sensible given that Watson/Crick-like [dCTP:BP-N(2)-dG] pairing requires the BP-moiety to be in the minor groove. (4) Compared to Dpo4, DNAP IV has a smaller major groove opening, which suppresses dGTP misinsertion, implying BP-N(2)-dG bulk in the major groove during Hoogsteen syn-adduct-dG:dGTP pairing. In summary, DNAP IV has a large minor groove opening to enhance dCTP insertion, a plugged major groove opening to suppress dGTP misinsertion, and two non-covalent bridges (near and distal

  10. Chromosome Conformation Capture Carbon Copy (5C) in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Belton, Jon-Matthew; Dekker, Job

    2015-06-01

    Chromosome conformation capture carbon copy (5C) is a high-throughput method for detecting ligation products of interest in a chromosome conformation capture (3C) library. 5C uses ligation-mediated amplification (LMA) to generate carbon copies of 3C ligation product junctions using single-stranded oligonucleotide probes. This procedure produces a 5C library of short DNA molecules which represent the interactions between the corresponding restriction fragments. The 5C library can be amplified using universal primers containing the Illumina paired-end adaptor sequences for subsequent high-throughput sequencing.

  11. Zero-Copy Objects System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Zero-Copy Objects System software enables application data to be encapsulated in layers of communication protocol without being copied. Indirect referencing enables application source data, either in memory or in a file, to be encapsulated in place within an unlimited number of protocol headers and/or trailers. Zero-copy objects (ZCOs) are abstract data access representations designed to minimize I/O (input/output) in the encapsulation of application source data within one or more layers of communication protocol structure. They are constructed within the heap space of a Simple Data Recorder (SDR) data store to which all participating layers of the stack must have access. Each ZCO contains general information enabling access to the core source data object (an item of application data), together with (a) a linked list of zero or more specific extents that reference portions of this source data object, and (b) linked lists of protocol header and trailer capsules. The concatenation of the headers (in ascending stack sequence), the source data object extents, and the trailers (in descending stack sequence) constitute the transmitted data object constructed from the ZCO. This scheme enables a source data object to be encapsulated in a succession of protocol layers without ever having to be copied from a buffer at one layer of the protocol stack to an encapsulating buffer at a lower layer of the stack. For large source data objects, the savings in copy time and reduction in memory consumption may be considerable.

  12. Copy Number Heterogeneity of JC Virus Standards

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Allen C.; Atienza, Ederlyn E.; Wendt, Sharon; Makhsous, Negar; Jerome, Keith R.; Cook, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quantitative PCR is a diagnostic mainstay of clinical virology, and accurate quantitation of viral load among labs requires the use of international standards. However, the use of multiple passages of viral isolates to obtain sufficient material for international standards may result in genomic changes that complicate their use as quantitative standards. We performed next-generation sequencing to obtain single-nucleotide resolution and relative copy number of JC virus (JCV) clinical standards. Strikingly, the WHO international standard and the Exact v1/v2 prototype standards for JCV showed 8-fold and 4-fold variation in genomic coverage between different loci in the viral genome, respectively, due to large deletions in the large T antigen region. Intriguingly, several of the JCV standards sequenced in this study with large T antigen deletions were cultured in cell lines immortalized using simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen, suggesting the possibility of transcomplementation in cell culture. Using a cutoff 5% allele fraction for junctional reads, 7 different rearrangements were present in the JC virus sequences present in the WHO standard across multiple library preparations and sequencing runs. Neither the copy number differences nor the rearrangements were observed in a clinical sample with a high copy number of JCV or a plasmid control. These results were also confirmed by the quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and Sanger sequencing of multiple rearrangements. In summary, targeting different regions of the same international standard can result in up to an 8-fold difference in quantitation. We recommend the use of next-generation sequencing to validate standards in clinical virology. PMID:27974546

  13. Retrotransposon mdg3 of Drosophila: General structure and functional domains of the full-length copy

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisov, S.N.; Ilyin, Yu.V.

    1995-09-01

    A full-length copy of the transposable element mdg3 from the plasmid clone Dm38 of Drosophila melanogaster was obtained by screening the DNA library of the cell culture 67J25D. Previous work demonstrated that only full-length copies of mdg3 (5.5 kb) are amplified in this culture, whereas the number of deleted copies probably has not changed since the cell line was established. We sequenced the full-length copy of mdg3 from cDm38 by the method described by Sanger. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. To Copy-Protect or Not to Copy-Protect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Jonathan

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the issues of software piracy, why people illegally copy software, protection afforded software developers by copyright laws, and current and future methods of disk-based protection built into software by developers and the problems these methods have created. (MBR)

  15. Upregulation of TFAM and mitochondria copy number in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Sanjiban; D'Souza, Reena Reshma; Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada; Gopinath, Puthiya M; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are central to several physiological and pathological conditions in humans. In the present study, we performed copy number analysis of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and its representative lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). We have observed hyper diploid copies of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) gene in the LCLs along with increased mtDNA copy number, mitochondrial mass, intracellular ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting elevated mitochondrial biogenesis in LCLs. Gene expression analysis confirmed TFAM over-expression in LCLs when compared to PBMC. Based on our observation, we suggest that increased copy number of TFAM gene upregulates its expression, increases mtDNA copy numbers and protects it from oxidative stress induced damage in the transformed LCLs.

  16. Genome Architecture and Its Roles in Human Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Zhou, Weichen; Zhang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Besides single-nucleotide variants in the human genome, large-scale genomic variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs), are being increasingly discovered as a genetic source of human diversity and the pathogenic factors of diseases. Recent experimental findings have shed light on the links between different genome architectures and CNV mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize various genomic features and discuss their contributions to CNV formation. Genomic repeats, including both low-copy and high-copy repeats, play important roles in CNV instability, which was initially known as DNA recombination events. Furthermore, it has been found that human genomic repeats can also induce DNA replication errors and consequently result in CNV mutations. Some recent studies showed that DNA replication timing, which reflects the high-order information of genomic organization, is involved in human CNV mutations. Our review highlights that genome architecture, from DNA sequence to high-order genomic organization, is an important molecular factor in CNV mutagenesis and human genomic instability. PMID:25705150

  17. A Robust Protocol for Using Multiplexed Droplet Digital PCR to Quantify Somatic Copy Number Alterations in Clinical Tissue Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Hughesman, Curtis B.; Lu, X. J. David; Liu, Kelly Y. P.; Zhu, Yuqi; Poh, Catherine F.; Haynes, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The ability of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) to accurately determine the concentrations of amplifiable targets makes it a promising platform for measuring copy number alterations (CNAs) in genomic biomarkers. However, its application to clinical samples, particularly formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, will require strategies to reliably determine CNAs in DNA of limited quantity and quality. When applied to cancerous tissue, those methods must also account for global genetic instability and the associated probability that the abundance(s) of one or more chosen reference loci do not represent the average ploidy of cells comprising the specimen. Here we present an experimental design strategy and associated data analysis tool that enables accurate determination of CNAs in a panel of biomarkers using multiplexed ddPCR. The method includes strategies to optimize primer and probes design to cleanly segregate droplets in the data output from reaction wells amplifying multiple independent templates, and to correct for bias from artifacts such as DNA fragmentation. We demonstrate how a panel of reference loci can be used to determine a stable CNA-neutral benchmark. These innovations, when taken together, provide a comprehensive strategy that can be used to reliably detect biomarker CNAs in DNA extracted from either frozen or FFPE tissue biopsies. PMID:27537682

  18. High-resolution copy number arrays in cancer and the problem of normal genome copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    High-resolution techniques for analysis of genome copy number (CN) enable the analysis of complex cancer somatic genetics. However, the analysis of these data is difficult, and failure to consider a number of issues in depth may result in false leads or unnecessary rejection of true positives. First, segmental duplications may falsely generate CN breakpoints in aneuploid samples. Second, even when tumor data were each normalized to matching lymphocyte DNA, we still observed copy number polymorphisms masquerading as somatic alterations due to allelic imbalance. We investigated a number of different solutions and determined that evaluating matching normal DNA, or at least using locally derived normal baseline data, were preferable to relying on current online databases because of poor cross-platform compatibility and the likelihood of excluding genuine small somatic alterations.

  19. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, Andre

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  20. 48 CFR 3401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the... EDAR is available for viewing at: http://www.ed.gov/policy/fund/reg/clibrary/edar.html....

  1. 48 CFR 3401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the... EDAR is available for viewing at: http://www.ed.gov/policy/fund/reg/clibrary/edar.html....

  2. 48 CFR 3401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the... EDAR is available for viewing at: http://www.ed.gov/policy/fund/reg/clibrary/edar.html....

  3. 48 CFR 3401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the... EDAR is available for viewing at: http://www.ed.gov/policy/fund/reg/clibrary/edar.html....

  4. Use of Droplet Digital PCR for Estimation of Fish Abundance and Biomass in Environmental DNA Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hideyuki; Uchii, Kimiko; Takahara, Teruhiko; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    An environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis method has been recently developed to estimate the distribution of aquatic animals by quantifying the number of target DNA copies with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A new quantitative PCR technology, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), partitions PCR reactions into thousands of droplets and detects the amplification in each droplet, thereby allowing direct quantification of target DNA. We evaluated the quantification accuracy of qPCR and ddPCR to estimate species abundance and biomass by using eDNA in mesocosm experiments involving different numbers of common carp. We found that ddPCR quantified the concentration of carp eDNA along with carp abundance and biomass more accurately than qPCR, especially at low eDNA concentrations. In addition, errors in the analysis were smaller in ddPCR than in qPCR. Thus, ddPCR is better suited to measure eDNA concentration in water, and it provides more accurate results for the abundance and biomass of the target species than qPCR. We also found that the relationship between carp abundance and eDNA concentration was stronger than that between biomass and eDNA by using both ddPCR and qPCR; this suggests that abundance can be better estimated by the analysis of eDNA for species with fewer variations in body mass. PMID:25799582

  5. Standard Addition Quantitative Real-Time PCR (SAQPCR): A Novel Approach for Determination of Transgene Copy Number Avoiding PCR Efficiency Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changqing; Wang, Weiwei; Grierson, Donald; Xu, Changjie; Chen, Kunsong

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been previously applied to estimate transgene copy number in transgenic plants. However, the results can be erroneous owing to inaccurate estimation of PCR efficiency. Here, a novel qPCR approach, named standard addition qPCR (SAQPCR), was devised to accurately determine transgene copy number without the necessity of obtaining PCR efficiency data. The procedures and the mathematical basis for the approach are described. A recombinant plasmid harboring both the internal reference gene and the integrated target gene was constructed to serve as the standard DNA. It was found that addition of suitable amounts of standard DNA to test samples did not affect PCR efficiency, and the guidance for selection of suitable cycle numbers for analysis was established. Samples from six individual T0 tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were analyzed by SAQPCR, and the results confirmed by Southern blot analysis. The approach produced accurate results and required only small amounts of plant tissue. It can be generally applied to analysis of different plants and transgenes. In addition, it can also be applied to zygosity analysis. PMID:23308234

  6. Bayesian hierarchical mixture modeling to assign copy number from a targeted CNV array.

    PubMed

    Cardin, Niall; Holmes, Chris; Donnelly, Peter; Marchini, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    Accurate assignment of copy number at known copy number variant (CNV) loci is important for both increasing understanding of the structural evolution of genomes as well as for carrying out association studies of copy number with disease. As with calling SNP genotypes, the task can be framed as a clustering problem but for a number of reasons assigning copy number is much more challenging. CNV assays have lower signal-to-noise ratios than SNP assays, often display heavy tailed and asymmetric intensity distributions, contain outlying observations and may exhibit systematic technical differences among different cohorts. In addition, the number of copy-number classes at a CNV in the population may be unknown a priori. Due to these complications, automatic and robust assignment of copy number from array data remains a challenging problem. We have developed a copy number assignment algorithm, CNVCALL, for a targeted CNV array, such as that used by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium's recent CNV association study. We use a Bayesian hierarchical mixture model that robustly identifies both the number of different copy number classes at a specific locus as well as relative copy number for each individual in the sample. This approach is fully automated which is a critical requirement when analyzing large numbers of CNVs. We illustrate the methods performance using real data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium's CNV association study and using simulated data.

  7. 48 CFR 1401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Copies. 1401.105-3 Section 1401.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1401.105-3 Copies. Copies of...

  8. 48 CFR 1401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copies. 1401.105-3 Section 1401.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1401.105-3 Copies. Copies of...

  9. 48 CFR 1401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 1401.105-3 Section 1401.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1401.105-3 Copies. Copies of...

  10. 48 CFR 1401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies. 1401.105-3 Section 1401.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1401.105-3 Copies. Copies of...

  11. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  12. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  13. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  14. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  15. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  16. 48 CFR 3401.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 3401.104-3 Section 3401.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.104-3 Copies. Copies of...

  17. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  18. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  19. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  20. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  1. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  2. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false File copies. 703.20 Section... Is Not a Party § 703.20 File copies. The Office of the General Counsel will maintain the official file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  3. Copy Number Variation in Familial Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Hetrick, Kurt N.; Sun, Mei; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Halter, Cheryl; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Gusella, James F.; Nichols, William C.; Myers, Richard H.; Foroud, Tatiana; DeStefano, Anita L.

    2011-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are known to cause Mendelian forms of Parkinson disease (PD), most notably in SNCA and PARK2. PARK2 has a recessive mode of inheritance; however, recent evidence demonstrates that a single CNV in PARK2 (but not a single missense mutation) may increase risk for PD. We recently performed a genome-wide association study for PD that excluded individuals known to have either a LRRK2 mutation or two PARK2 mutations. Data from the Illumina370Duo arrays were re-clustered using only white individuals with high quality intensity data, and CNV calls were made using two algorithms, PennCNV and QuantiSNP. After quality assessment, the final sample included 816 cases and 856 controls. Results varied between the two CNV calling algorithms for many regions, including the PARK2 locus (genome-wide p = 0.04 for PennCNV and p = 0.13 for QuantiSNP). However, there was consistent evidence with both algorithms for two novel genes, USP32 and DOCK5 (empirical, genome-wide p-values<0.001). PARK2 CNVs tended to be larger, and all instances that were molecularly tested were validated. In contrast, the CNVs in both novel loci were smaller and failed to replicate using real-time PCR, MLPA, and gel electrophoresis. The DOCK5 variation is more akin to a VNTR than a typical CNV and the association is likely caused by artifact due to DNA source. DNA for all the cases was derived from whole blood, while the DNA for all controls was derived from lymphoblast cell lines. The USP32 locus contains many SNPs with low minor allele frequency leading to a loss of heterozygosity that may have been spuriously interpreted by the CNV calling algorithms as support for a deletion. Thus, only the CNVs within the PARK2 locus could be molecularly validated and associated with PD susceptibility. PMID:21829596

  4. SiNG-PCRseq: Accurate inter-sequence quantification achieved by spiking-in a neighbor genome for competitive PCR amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Oh, Soo A; Yang, Inchul; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Kang, Yong-Kook; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun

    2015-07-06

    Despite the recent technological advances in DNA quantitation by sequencing, accurate delineation of the quantitative relationship among different DNA sequences is yet to be elaborated due to difficulties in correcting the sequence-specific quantitation biases. We here developed a novel DNA quantitation method via spiking-in a neighbor genome for competitive PCR amplicon sequencing (SiNG-PCRseq). This method utilizes genome-wide chemically equivalent but easily discriminable homologous sequences with a known copy arrangement in the neighbor genome. By comparing the amounts of selected human DNA sequences simultaneously to those of matched sequences in the orangutan genome, we could accurately draw the quantitative relationships for those sequences in the human genome (root-mean-square deviations <0.05). Technical replications of cDNA quantitation performed using different reagents at different time points also resulted in excellent correlations (R(2) > 0.95). The cDNA quantitation using SiNG-PCRseq was highly concordant with the RNA-seq-derived version in inter-sample comparisons (R(2) = 0.88), but relatively discordant in inter-sequence quantitation (R(2) < 0.44), indicating considerable level of sequence-dependent quantitative biases in RNA-seq. Considering the measurement structure explicitly relating the amount of different sequences within a sample, SiNG-PCRseq will facilitate sharing and comparing the quantitation data generated under different spatio-temporal settings.

  5. Copying and Evolution of Neuronal Topology

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Chrisantha; Karishma, K. K.; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2008-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for copying of neuronal networks that is of considerable interest for neuroscience for it suggests a neuronal basis for causal inference, function copying, and natural selection within the human brain. To date, no model of neuronal topology copying exists. We present three increasingly sophisticated mechanisms to demonstrate how topographic map formation coupled with Spike-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) can copy neuronal topology motifs. Fidelity is improved by error correction and activity-reverberation limitation. The high-fidelity topology-copying operator is used to evolve neuronal topologies. Possible roles for neuronal natural selection are discussed. PMID:19020662

  6. DNA microarray technology. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has revolutionized biological research by enabling genome-scale explorations. This chapter provides an overview of DNA microarray technology and its application to characterizing the physical genome, with a focus on cancer genomes. Specific areas discussed include investigations of DNA copy number alteration (and loss of heterozygosity), DNA methylation, DNA-protein (i.e., chromatin and transcription factor) interactions, DNA replication, and the integration of diverse genome-scale data types. Also provided is a perspective on recent advances and future directions in characterizing the physical genome.

  7. Estimation of copy number alterations from exome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Bea, Silvia; Puente, Diana A; López-Otín, Carlos; Puente, Xose S

    2012-01-01

    Exome sequencing constitutes an important technology for the study of human hereditary diseases and cancer. However, the ability of this approach to identify copy number alterations in primary tumor samples has not been fully addressed. Here we show that somatic copy number alterations can be reliably estimated using exome sequencing data through a strategy that we have termed exome2cnv. Using data from 86 paired normal and primary tumor samples, we identified losses and gains of complete chromosomes or large genomic regions, as well as smaller regions affecting a minimum of one gene. Comparison with high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays revealed a high sensitivity and a low number of false positives in the copy number estimation between both approaches. We explore the main factors affecting sensitivity and false positives with real data, and provide a side by side comparison with CGH arrays. Together, these results underscore the utility of exome sequencing to study cancer samples by allowing not only the identification of substitutions and indels, but also the accurate estimation of copy number alterations.

  8. Droplet digital PCR-aided screening and characterization of Pichia pastoris multiple gene copy strains.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Elena; Albiol, Joan; Ferrer, Pau

    2016-07-01

    Pichia (syn. Komagataella) pastoris is a widely used yeast platform for heterologous protein production. Expression cassettes are usually stably integrated into the genome of this host via homologous recombination. Although increasing gene dosage is a powerful strategy to improve recombinant protein production, an excess in the number of gene copies often leads to decreased product yields and increased metabolic burden, particularly for secreted proteins. We have constructed a series of strains harboring different copy numbers of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase gene (ROL), aiming to find the optimum gene dosage for secreted Rol production. In order to accurately determine ROL gene dosage, we implemented a novel protocol based on droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and cross validated it with conventional real-time PCR. Gene copy number determination based on ddPCR allowed for an accurate ranking of transformants according to their ROL gene dosage. Results indicated that ddPCR was particularly superior at lower gene dosages (one to five copies) over quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). This facilitated the determination of the optimal ROL gene dosage as low as two copies. The ranking of ROL gene dosage versus Rol yield was consistent at both small scale and bioreactor chemostat cultures, thereby easing clone characterization in terms of gene dosage dependent physiological effects, which could be discriminated even among strains differing by only one ROL copy. A selected two-copy strain showed twofold increase in Rol specific production in a chemostat culture over the single copy strain. Conversely, strains harboring more than two copies of the ROL gene showed decreased product and biomass yields, as well as altered substrate consumption specific rates, compared to the reference (one-copy) strain. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1542-1551. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A method to accurately quantitate intensities of (32)P-DNA bands when multiple bands appear in a single lane of a gel is used to study dNTP insertion opposite a benzo[a]pyrene-dG adduct by Sulfolobus DNA polymerases Dpo4 and Dbh.

    PubMed

    Sholder, Gabriel; Loechler, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    Quantitating relative (32)P-band intensity in gels is desired, e.g., to study primer-extension kinetics of DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Following imaging, multiple (32)P-bands are often present in lanes. Though individual bands appear by eye to be simple and well-resolved, scanning reveals they are actually skewed-Gaussian in shape and neighboring bands are overlapping, which complicates quantitation, because slower migrating bands often have considerable contributions from the trailing edges of faster migrating bands. A method is described to accurately quantitate adjacent (32)P-bands, which relies on having a standard: a simple skewed-Gaussian curve from an analogous pure, single-component band (e.g., primer alone). This single-component scan/curve is superimposed on its corresponding band in an experimentally determined scan/curve containing multiple bands (e.g., generated in a primer-extension reaction); intensity exceeding the single-component scan/curve is attributed to other components (e.g., insertion products). Relative areas/intensities are determined via pixel analysis, from which relative molarity of components is computed. Common software is used. Commonly used alternative methods (e.g., drawing boxes around bands) are shown to be less accurate. Our method was used to study kinetics of dNTP primer-extension opposite a benzo[a]pyrene-N(2)-dG-adduct with four DNAPs, including Sulfolobus solfataricus Dpo4 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Dbh. Vmax/Km is similar for correct dCTP insertion with Dpo4 and Dbh. Compared to Dpo4, Dbh misinsertion is slower for dATP (∼20-fold), dGTP (∼110-fold) and dTTP (∼6-fold), due to decreases in Vmax. These findings provide support that Dbh is in the same Y-Family DNAP class as eukaryotic DNAP κ and bacterial DNAP IV, which accurately bypass N(2)-dG adducts, as well as establish the scan-method described herein as an accurate method to quantitate relative intensity of overlapping bands in a single lane, whether generated

  10. Can Mitochondria DNA Provide a Novel Biomarker for Evaluating the Risk and Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Shuwen, Han; Xi, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) was one of the most frequent cancers worldwide. Accurate risk and prognosis evaluation could obtain better quality of life and longer survival time for the patients. Current research hotspot was focus on the gene biomarker to evaluate the risk and prognosis. Mitochondrion contains its own DNA and regulates self-replicating so that it can be as a candidate biomarker for evaluating the risk and prognosis of colorectal cancer. But there were already huge controversies on this issue. The review was to summarize current viewpoints of the controversial issues and described our understanding from the four aspects including mtDNA copy number, mitochondrial displacement loop, mtDNA variation, and mtDNA microsatellite instability, wishing the summary of the mtDNA in colorectal cancer could provide a meaningful reference or a valuable direction in the future studies.

  11. Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yusi; Li, Chunmei; Lu, Sijia; Zhou, Wenxiong; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X. Sunney; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome amplification (WGA) for next-generation sequencing has seen wide applications in biology and medicine when characterization of the genome of a single cell is required. High uniformity and fidelity of WGA is needed to accurately determine genomic variations, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and single-nucleotide variations (SNVs). Prevailing WGA methods have been limited by fluctuation of the amplification yield along the genome, as well as false-positive and -negative errors for SNV identification. Here, we report emulsion WGA (eWGA) to overcome these problems. We divide single-cell genomic DNA into a large number (105) of picoliter aqueous droplets in oil. Containing only a few DNA fragments, each droplet is led to reach saturation of DNA amplification before demulsification such that the differences in amplification gain among the fragments are minimized. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle of eWGA with multiple displacement amplification (MDA), a popular WGA method. This easy-to-operate approach enables simultaneous detection of CNVs and SNVs in an individual human cell, exhibiting significantly improved amplification evenness and accuracy. PMID:26340991

  12. Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yusi; Li, Chunmei; Lu, Sijia; Zhou, Wenxiong; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X Sunney; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-09-22

    Whole-genome amplification (WGA) for next-generation sequencing has seen wide applications in biology and medicine when characterization of the genome of a single cell is required. High uniformity and fidelity of WGA is needed to accurately determine genomic variations, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and single-nucleotide variations (SNVs). Prevailing WGA methods have been limited by fluctuation of the amplification yield along the genome, as well as false-positive and -negative errors for SNV identification. Here, we report emulsion WGA (eWGA) to overcome these problems. We divide single-cell genomic DNA into a large number (10(5)) of picoliter aqueous droplets in oil. Containing only a few DNA fragments, each droplet is led to reach saturation of DNA amplification before demulsification such that the differences in amplification gain among the fragments are minimized. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle of eWGA with multiple displacement amplification (MDA), a popular WGA method. This easy-to-operate approach enables simultaneous detection of CNVs and SNVs in an individual human cell, exhibiting significantly improved amplification evenness and accuracy.

  13. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  14. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  15. Two computational primitives for algorithmic self-assembly: copying and counting.

    PubMed

    Barish, Robert D; Rothemund, Paul W K; Winfree, Erik

    2005-12-01

    Copying and counting are useful primitive operations for computation and construction. We have made DNA crystals that copy and crystals that count as they grow. For counting, 16 oligonucleotides assemble into four DNA Wang tiles that subsequently crystallize on a polymeric nucleating scaffold strand, arranging themselves in a binary counting pattern that could serve as a template for a molecular electronic demultiplexing circuit. Although the yield of counting crystals is low, and per-tile error rates in such crystals is roughly 10%, this work demonstrates the potential of algorithmic self-assembly to create complex nanoscale patterns of technological interest. A subset of the tiles for counting form information-bearing DNA tubes that copy bit strings from layer to layer along their length.

  16. Methodological strategies for transgene copy number quantification in goats (Capra hircus) using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Batista, Ribrio I T P; Luciano, Maria C S; Teixeira, Dárcio I A; Freitas, Vicente J F; Melo, Luciana M; Andreeva, Lyudmila E; Serova, Irina A; Serov, Oleg L

    2014-01-01

    Taking into account the importance of goats as transgenic models, as well as the rarity of copy number (CN) studies in farm animals, the present work aimed to evaluate methodological strategies for accurate and precise transgene CN quantification in goats using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Mouse and goat lines transgenic for human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor were used. After selecting the best genomic DNA extraction method to be applied in mouse and goat samples, intra-assay variations, accuracy and precision of CN quantifications were assessed. The optimized conditions were submitted to mathematical strategies and used to quantify CN in goat lines. The findings were as follows: validation of qPCR conditions is required, and amplification efficiency is the most important. Absolute and relative quantifications are able to produce similar results. For normalized absolute quantification, the same plasmid fragment used to generate goat lines must be mixed with wild-type goat genomic DNA, allowing the choice of an endogenous reference gene for data normalization. For relative quantifications, a resin-based genomic DNA extraction method is strongly recommended when using mouse tail tips as calibrators to avoid tissue-specific inhibitors. Efficient qPCR amplifications (≥95%) allow reliable CN measurements with SYBR technology. TaqMan must be used with caution in goats if the nucleotide sequence of the endogenous reference gene is not yet well understood. Adhering to these general guidelines can result in more exact CN determination in goats. Even when working under nonoptimal circumstances, if assays are performed that respect the minimum qPCR requirements, good estimations of transgene CN can be achieved.

  17. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  18. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  19. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  20. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  1. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  2. 48 CFR 3001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copies. 3001.105-3 Section 3001.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND SECURITY....105-3 Copies. Official versions of the HSAR are available in the Code of Federal Regulations,...

  3. 48 CFR 3001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....105-3 Copies. The HSAR is available in the Federal Register and electronically at http://www.dhs.gov... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 3001.105-3 Section 3001.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND...

  4. 48 CFR 3001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Copies. 3001.105-3 Section 3001.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND SECURITY....105-3 Copies. Official versions of the HSAR are available in the Code of Federal Regulations,...

  5. 48 CFR 3001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....105-3 Copies. The HSAR is available in the Federal Register and electronically at http://www.dhs.gov... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies. 3001.105-3 Section 3001.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND...

  6. 48 CFR 201.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 201.105-3 Section 201.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 201.105-3 Copies....

  7. 48 CFR 1501.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Copies. 1501.105-3 Section 1501.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL GENERAL... 20402. Copies of loose-leaf EPAAR are distributed within EPA and may be obtained from the EPA...

  8. On the origins of tandemly repeated genes: does histone gene copy number in Drosophila reflect chromosomal location?

    PubMed

    Fitch, D H; Strausbaugh, L D; Barrett, V

    1990-04-01

    Widely regarded beliefs about Drosophila histone gene copy numbers and developmental requirements have been generalized from fairly limited data since studies on histone gene arrangements and copy numbers have been largely confined to a single species, D. melanogaster. Histone gene copy numbers and chromosomal locations were examined in three species: D. melangaster, D. hydei and D. hawaiiensis. Quantitative whole genome blot analysis of DNA from diploid tissues revealed a tenfold variability in histone gene copy numbers for these three species. In situ hybridization to polytene chromosomes showed that the histone DNA (hDNA) chromosomal location is different in all three species. These observations lead us to propose a relationship between histone gene reiteration and chromosomal position.

  9. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  10. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions.

  11. Inferring Haplotypes of Copy Number Variations From High-Throughput Data With Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Yoon, Seungtai; Hosono, Naoya; Leotta, Anthony; Sebat, Jonathan; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate information on haplotypes and diplotypes (haplotype pairs) is required for population-genetic analyses; however, microarrays do not provide data on a haplotype or diplotype at a copy number variation (CNV) locus; they only provide data on the total number of copies over a diplotype or an unphased sequence genotype (e.g., AAB, unlike AB of single nucleotide polymorphism). Moreover, such copy numbers or genotypes are often incorrectly determined when microarray signal intensities derived from different copy numbers or genotypes are not clearly separated due to noise. Here we report an algorithm to infer CNV haplotypes and individuals’ diplotypes at multiple loci from noisy microarray data, utilizing the probability that a signal intensity may be derived from different underlying copy numbers or genotypes. Performing simulation studies based on known diplotypes and an error model obtained from real microarray data, we demonstrate that this probabilistic approach succeeds in accurate inference (error rate: 1–2%) from noisy data, whereas previous deterministic approaches failed (error rate: 12–18%). Applying this algorithm to real microarray data, we estimated haplotype frequencies and diplotypes in 1486 CNV regions for 100 individuals. Our algorithm will facilitate accurate population-genetic analyses and powerful disease association studies of CNVs. PMID:22384316

  12. A method for calling copy number polymorphism using haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ho Jang, Gun; Christie, Jason D.; Feng, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) are both widespread characteristic of the human genome, but are often called separately on common genotyping platforms. To capture integrated SNP and CNV information, methods have been developed for calling allelic specific copy numbers or so called copy number polymorphism (CNP), using limited inter-marker correlation. In this paper, we proposed a haplotype-based maximum likelihood method to call CNP, which takes advantage of the valuable multi-locus linkage disequilibrium (LD) information in the population. We also developed a computationally efficient algorithm to estimate haplotype frequencies and optimize individual CNP calls iteratively, even at presence of missing data. Through simulations, we demonstrated our model is more sensitive and accurate in detecting various CNV regions, compared with commonly-used CNV calling methods including PennCNV, another hidden Markov model (HMM) using CNP, a scan statistic, segCNV, and cnvHap. Our method often performs better in the regions with higher LD, in longer CNV regions, and in common CNV than the opposite. We implemented our method on the genotypes of 90 HapMap CEU samples and 23 patients with acute lung injury (ALI). For each ALI patient the genotyping was performed twice. The CNPs from our method show good consistency and accuracy comparable to others. PMID:24069028

  13. Copy number variation in Thai population.

    PubMed

    Suktitipat, Bhoom; Naktang, Chaiwat; Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Tularak, Thitima; Artiwet, Paramita; Pasomsap, Ekawat; Jongjaroenprasert, Wallaya; Fuchareon, Suthat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chantratita, Wasan; Yimwadsana, Boonsit; Charoensawan, Varodom; Jinawath, Natini

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a major genetic polymorphism contributing to genetic diversity and human evolution. Clinical application of CNVs for diagnostic purposes largely depends on sufficient population CNV data for accurate interpretation. CNVs from general population in currently available databases help classify CNVs of uncertain clinical significance, and benign CNVs. Earlier studies of CNV distribution in several populations worldwide showed that a significant fraction of CNVs are population specific. In this study, we characterized and analyzed CNVs in 3,017 unrelated Thai individuals genotyped with the Illumina Human610, Illumina HumanOmniexpress, or Illumina HapMap550v3 platform. We employed hidden Markov model and circular binary segmentation methods to identify CNVs, extracted 23,458 CNVs consistently identified by both algorithms, and cataloged these high confident CNVs into our publicly available Thai CNV database. Analysis of CNVs in the Thai population identified a median of eight autosomal CNVs per individual. Most CNVs (96.73%) did not overlap with any known chromosomal imbalance syndromes documented in the DECIPHER database. When compared with CNVs in the 11 HapMap3 populations, CNVs found in the Thai population shared several characteristics with CNVs characterized in HapMap3. Common CNVs in Thais had similar frequencies to those in the HapMap3 populations, and all high frequency CNVs (>20%) found in Thai individuals could also be identified in HapMap3. The majorities of CNVs discovered in the Thai population, however, were of low frequency, or uniquely identified in Thais. When performing hierarchical clustering using CNV frequencies, the CNV data were clustered into Africans, Europeans, and Asians, in line with the clustering performed with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. As CNV data are specific to origin of population, our population-specific reference database will serve as a valuable addition to the existing resources for

  14. Enhancing yields of low and single copy number plasmid DNAs from Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Wood, Whitney N; Smith, Kyle D; Ream, Jennifer A; Kevin Lewis, L

    2017-02-01

    Many plasmids used for gene cloning and heterologous protein expression in Escherichia coli cells are low copy number or single copy number plasmids. The extraction of these types of plasmids from small bacterial cell cultures produces low DNA yields. In this study, we have quantitated yields of low copy and single copy number plasmid DNAs after growth of cells in four widely used broths (SB, SOC, TB, and 2xYT) and compared results to those obtained with LB, the most common E. coli cell growth medium. TB (terrific broth) consistently generated the greatest amount of plasmid DNA, in agreement with its ability to produce higher cell titers. The superiority of TB was primarily due to its high levels of yeast extract (24g/L) and was independent of glycerol, a unique component of this broth. Interestingly, simply preparing LB with similarly high levels of yeast extract (LB24 broth) resulted in plasmid yields that were equivalent to those of TB. By contrast, increasing ampicillin concentration to enhance plasmid retention did not improve plasmid DNA recovery. These experiments demonstrate that yields of low and single copy number plasmid DNAs from minipreps can be strongly enhanced using simple and inexpensive media.

  15. Mitochondrial genomic variation associated with higher mitochondrial copy number: the Cache County Study on Memory Health and Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mitochondria are essential organelles and are the location of cellular respiration, which is responsible for the majority of ATP production. Each cell contains multiple mitochondria, and each mitochondrion contains multiple copies of its own circular genome. The ratio of mitochondrial genomes to nuclear genomes is referred to as mitochondrial copy number. Decreases in mitochondrial copy number are known to occur in many tissues as people age, and in certain diseases. The regulation of mitochondrial copy number by nuclear genes has been studied extensively. While mitochondrial variation has been associated with longevity and some of the diseases known to have reduced mitochondrial copy number, the role that the mitochondrial genome itself has in regulating mitochondrial copy number remains poorly understood. Results We analyzed the complete mitochondrial genomes from 1007 individuals randomly selected from the Cache County Study on Memory Health and Aging utilizing the inferred evolutionary history of the mitochondrial haplotypes present in our dataset to identify sequence variation and mitochondrial haplotypes associated with changes in mitochondrial copy number. Three variants belonging to mitochondrial haplogroups U5A1 and T2 were significantly associated with higher mitochondrial copy number in our dataset. Conclusions We identified three variants associated with higher mitochondrial copy number and suggest several hypotheses for how these variants influence mitochondrial copy number by interacting with known regulators of mitochondrial copy number. Our results are the first to report sequence variation in the mitochondrial genome that causes changes in mitochondrial copy number. The identification of these variants that increase mtDNA copy number has important implications in understanding the pathological processes that underlie these phenotypes. PMID:25077862

  16. CODEX: a normalization and copy number variation detection method for whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuchao; Oldridge, Derek A; Diskin, Sharon J; Zhang, Nancy R

    2015-03-31

    High-throughput sequencing of DNA coding regions has become a common way of assaying genomic variation in the study of human diseases. Copy number variation (CNV) is an important type of genomic variation, but detecting and characterizing CNV from exome sequencing is challenging due to the high level of biases and artifacts. We propose CODEX, a normalization and CNV calling procedure for whole exome sequencing data. The Poisson latent factor model in CODEX includes terms that specifically remove biases due to GC content, exon capture and amplification efficiency, and latent systemic artifacts. CODEX also includes a Poisson likelihood-based recursive segmentation procedure that explicitly models the count-based exome sequencing data. CODEX is compared to existing methods on a population analysis of HapMap samples from the 1000 Genomes Project, and shown to be more accurate on three microarray-based validation data sets. We further evaluate performance on 222 neuroblastoma samples with matched normals and focus on a well-studied rare somatic CNV within the ATRX gene. We show that the cross-sample normalization procedure of CODEX removes more noise than normalizing the tumor against the matched normal and that the segmentation procedure performs well in detecting CNVs with nested structures.

  17. Large scale variation in DNA copy number in chicken breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Detecting genetic variation is a critical step in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic diversity. Until recently, such detection has mostly focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) because of the ease in screening complete genomes. Another type of variant, c...

  18. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  19. Variation in topoisomerase I gene copy number as a mechanism for intrinsic drug sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, H. L.; Keith, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I (topo I) is the principle target for camptothecin and its derivatives such as SN38. Levels of topo I expression vary widely between and within tumour types and the basis for this is poorly understood. We have used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to detect the topo I locus in a panel of breast and colon cancer cell lines. This approach has identified a range of topo I gene copies from 1 to 6 between the cell lines as a result of DNA amplification, polysomy and isochromosome formation. Topo I gene copy number was highly correlated with topo I expression, (rs = 0.92), and inversely correlated to sensitivity to a 1 h exposure to SN38 (rs = -0.904). This illustrates the significant impact of altered topo I gene copy number on intrinsic drug sensitivity and influences potential mechanisms for acquisition of drug resistance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8761363

  20. Regional copy number-independent deregulation of transcription in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stransky, Nicolas; Vallot, Céline; Reyal, Fabien; Bernard-Pierrot, Isabelle; de Medina, Sixtina Gil Diez; Segraves, Rick; de Rycke, Yann; Elvin, Paul; Cassidy, Andrew; Spraggon, Carolyn; Graham, Alexander; Southgate, Jennifer; Asselain, Bernard; Allory, Yves; Abbou, Claude C; Albertson, Donna G; Thiery, Jean Paul; Chopin, Dominique K; Pinkel, Daniel; Radvanyi, François

    2006-12-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations have been identified that lead to transcriptional deregulation in cancers. Genetic mechanisms may affect single genes or regions containing several neighboring genes, as has been shown for DNA copy number changes. It was recently reported that epigenetic suppression of gene expression can also extend to a whole region; this is known as long-range epigenetic silencing. Various techniques are available for identifying regional genetic alterations, but no large-scale analysis has yet been carried out to obtain an overview of regional epigenetic alterations. We carried out an exhaustive search for regions susceptible to such mechanisms using a combination of transcriptome correlation map analysis and array CGH data for a series of bladder carcinomas. We validated one candidate region experimentally, demonstrating histone methylation leading to the loss of expression of neighboring genes without DNA methylation.

  1. Novel micelle PCR-based method for accurate, sensitive and quantitative microbiota profiling.

    PubMed

    Boers, Stefan A; Hays, John P; Jansen, Ruud

    2017-04-05

    In the last decade, many researchers have embraced 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques, which has led to a wealth of publications and documented differences in the composition of microbial communities derived from many different ecosystems. However, comparison between different microbiota studies is currently very difficult due to the lack of a standardized 16S rRNA gene sequencing protocol. Here we report on a novel approach employing micelle PCR (micPCR) in combination with an internal calibrator that allows for standardization of microbiota profiles via their absolute abundances. The addition of an internal calibrator allows the researcher to express the resulting operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a measure of 16S rRNA gene copies by correcting the number of sequences of each individual OTU in a sample for efficiency differences in the NGS process. Additionally, accurate quantification of OTUs obtained from negative extraction control samples allows for the subtraction of contaminating bacterial DNA derived from the laboratory environment or chemicals/reagents used. Using equimolar synthetic microbial community samples and low biomass clinical samples, we demonstrate that the calibrated micPCR/NGS methodology possess a much higher precision and a lower limit of detection compared with traditional PCR/NGS, resulting in more accurate microbiota profiles suitable for multi-study comparison.

  2. Novel micelle PCR-based method for accurate, sensitive and quantitative microbiota profiling

    PubMed Central

    Boers, Stefan A.; Hays, John P.; Jansen, Ruud

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, many researchers have embraced 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques, which has led to a wealth of publications and documented differences in the composition of microbial communities derived from many different ecosystems. However, comparison between different microbiota studies is currently very difficult due to the lack of a standardized 16S rRNA gene sequencing protocol. Here we report on a novel approach employing micelle PCR (micPCR) in combination with an internal calibrator that allows for standardization of microbiota profiles via their absolute abundances. The addition of an internal calibrator allows the researcher to express the resulting operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a measure of 16S rRNA gene copies by correcting the number of sequences of each individual OTU in a sample for efficiency differences in the NGS process. Additionally, accurate quantification of OTUs obtained from negative extraction control samples allows for the subtraction of contaminating bacterial DNA derived from the laboratory environment or chemicals/reagents used. Using equimolar synthetic microbial community samples and low biomass clinical samples, we demonstrate that the calibrated micPCR/NGS methodology possess a much higher precision and a lower limit of detection compared with traditional PCR/NGS, resulting in more accurate microbiota profiles suitable for multi-study comparison. PMID:28378789

  3. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  4. Identification of copy number variable gene families in Holstein and Jersey cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy number variants (CNV) represent a large proportion of genetic variation within the cattle genome that has yet to be accurately characterized by SNP genotyping arrays. While significant progress has been made in the identification of CNVs within individual animals using next generation sequence ...

  5. An Algorithm to Improve Test Answer Copying Detection Using the Omega Statistic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeda, Hotaka; Zhang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The omega (?) statistic is reputed to be one of the best indices for detecting answer copying on multiple choice tests, but its performance relies on the accurate estimation of copier ability, which is challenging because responses from the copiers may have been contaminated. We propose an algorithm that aims to identify and delete the suspected…

  6. Concurrent Whole-Genome Haplotyping and Copy-Number Profiling of Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Mateiu, Ligia; Melotte, Cindy; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Das, Rakhi; Theunis, Koen; Cheng, Jiqiu; Legius, Eric; Moreau, Yves; Debrock, Sophie; D’Hooghe, Thomas; Verdyck, Pieter; De Rycke, Martine; Sermon, Karen; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Voet, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Methods for haplotyping and DNA copy-number typing of single cells are paramount for studying genomic heterogeneity and enabling genetic diagnosis. Before analyzing the DNA of a single cell by microarray or next-generation sequencing, a whole-genome amplification (WGA) process is required, but it substantially distorts the frequency and composition of the cell’s alleles. As a consequence, haplotyping methods suffer from error-prone discrete SNP genotypes (AA, AB, BB) and DNA copy-number profiling remains difficult because true DNA copy-number aberrations have to be discriminated from WGA artifacts. Here, we developed a single-cell genome analysis method that reconstructs genome-wide haplotype architectures as well as the copy-number and segregational origin of those haplotypes by employing phased parental genotypes and deciphering WGA-distorted SNP B-allele fractions via a process we coin haplarithmisis. We demonstrate that the method can be applied as a generic method for preimplantation genetic diagnosis on single cells biopsied from human embryos, enabling diagnosis of disease alleles genome wide as well as numerical and structural chromosomal anomalies. Moreover, meiotic segregation errors can be distinguished from mitotic ones. PMID:25983246

  7. ACTA Technology Presents EPA with Patent Copy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    US EPA SBIR awardee, ACTA Technology, presented James H. Johnson, Director of the US EPA National Center for Environmental Research, and April Richards, Program Manager of the US EPA's SBIR Program, with a copy of their Red Ribbon patent.

  8. Line copy presentation slides with Kodalith.

    PubMed

    Kraushar, M F; Bailey, B A

    1978-08-01

    Line copy presentation slides with white letters on a blue background can be produced with a two-step process. The slides are more permanent than diazo slides, and the process is faster and less expensive.

  9. NASA printing, duplicating, and copying management handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook provides information and procedures for the implementation of NASA policy and applicable laws and regulations relating to printing, duplicating, and copying. The topics addressed include a description of relevant laws and regulations, authorizations required, and responsible entities for NASA printing, duplicating, and copying. The policy of NASA is to ensure understanding and application of authority and responsibility on printing matters. Where necessary, the handbook clarifies the intent of basic laws and regulations applicable to NASA.

  10. A Limited Number of Globin Genes in Human DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gambino, Roberto; Kacian, Daniel; O'Donnell, Joyce; Ramirez, Francesco; Marks, Paul A.; Bank, Arthur

    1974-01-01

    The number of globin genes in human cells was determined by hybridizing DNA from human spleens to 3H-labeled DNA complementary to human globin mRNA. Assuming the rates of reannealing of complementary DNA and cellular DNA are similar, the extent of hybridization of complementary DNA at various ratios of cellular DNA to complementary DNA indicate that there are fewer than 10 globin gene copies per haploid human genome. An alternative analysis of the data, which introduces no assumptions concerning the relative rates of reaction of complementary DNA and cellular DNA, indicates fewer than 20 globin gene copies are present. DNA isolated from the spleen of a patient with β+ thalassemia contained a number of globin gene copies similar to that of normal DNA. PMID:4530276

  11. COPI Is Required for Enterovirus 71 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Wu, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a member of the Picornaviridae family, is found in Asian countries where it causes a wide range of human diseases. No effective therapy is available for the treatment of these infections. Picornaviruses undergo RNA replication in association with membranes of infected cells. COPI and COPII have been shown to be involved in the formation of picornavirus-induced vesicles. Replication of several picornaviruses, including poliovirus and Echovirus 11 (EV11), is dependent on COPI or COPII. Here, we report that COPI, but not COPII, is required for EV71 replication. Replication of EV71 was inhibited by brefeldin A and golgicide A, inhibitors of COPI activity. Furthermore, we found EV71 2C protein interacted with COPI subunits by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay, indicating that COPI coatomer might be directed to the viral replication complex through viral 2C protein. Additionally, because the pathway is conserved among different species of enteroviruses, it may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies. PMID:22662263

  12. Discussion on copy constructor in C++ programming language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Fafen; Du, Ruiqing

    2011-12-01

    C++ is a widely used object-orientated programming language in the software industry. The purpose of this paper is to discuss concept and application of the copy constructor, a special constructor in C++. As fundamental knowledge, constructor and destructor were introduced at first. Several examples of copy constructor were presented to illustrate concept of copy constructor and its use. Shallow copy and deep copy were also presented. After discussions on copy constructor by analyzing all the examples of copy constructor, the conclusion was made about that how to define a copy constructor and how to use it properly.

  13. Correction of the lack of commutability between plasmid DNA and genomic DNA for quantification of genetically modified organisms using pBSTopas as a model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Yuhua; Wu, Gang; Cao, Yinglong; Lu, Changming

    2014-10-01

    Plasmid calibrators are increasingly applied for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). To evaluate the commutability between plasmid DNA (pDNA) and genomic DNA (gDNA) as calibrators, a plasmid molecule, pBSTopas, was constructed, harboring a Topas 19/2 event-specific sequence and a partial sequence of the rapeseed reference gene CruA. Assays of the pDNA showed similar limits of detection (five copies for Topas 19/2 and CruA) and quantification (40 copies for Topas 19/2 and 20 for CruA) as those for the gDNA. Comparisons of plasmid and genomic standard curves indicated that the slopes, intercepts, and PCR efficiency for pBSTopas were significantly different from CRM Topas 19/2 gDNA for quantitative analysis of GMOs. Three correction methods were used to calibrate the quantitative analysis of control samples using pDNA as calibrators: model a, or coefficient value a (Cva); model b, or coefficient value b (Cvb); and the novel model c or coefficient formula (Cf). Cva and Cvb gave similar estimated values for the control samples, and the quantitative bias of the low concentration sample exceeded the acceptable range within ±25% in two of the four repeats. Using Cfs to normalize the Ct values of test samples, the estimated values were very close to the reference values (bias -13.27 to 13.05%). In the validation of control samples, model c was more appropriate than Cva or Cvb. The application of Cf allowed pBSTopas to substitute for Topas 19/2 gDNA as a calibrator to accurately quantify the GMO.

  14. Strategies to improve low copy transgenic events in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of maize.

    PubMed

    Sivamani, Elumalai; Li, Xianggan; Nalapalli, Samson; Barron, Yoshimi; Prairie, Anna; Bradley, David; Doyle, Michele; Que, Qiudeng

    2015-12-01

    Transgenic plants containing low copy transgene insertion free of vector backbone are highly desired for many biotechnological applications. We have investigated two different strategies for increasing the percentage of low copy events in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation experiments in maize. One of the strategies is to use a binary vector with two separate T-DNAs, one T-DNA containing an intact E.coli manA gene encoding phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) as selectable marker gene cassette and another T-DNA containing an RNAi cassette of PMI sequences. By using this strategy, low copy transgenic events containing the transgenes were increased from 43 to 60 % in maize. An alternate strategy is using selectable marker gene cassettes containing regulatory or coding sequences derived from essential plant genes such as 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) or MADS box transcription factor. In this paper we demonstrate that higher percentage of low copy transgenic events can be obtained in Agrobacterium-mediated maize transformation experiments using both strategies. We propose that the above two strategies can be used independently or in combination to increase transgenic events that contain low copy transgene insertion in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation experiments.

  15. [Analysis of the inheritance patterns of 5'-truncated copies of the German cockroach R2 retroposons in individual crosses].

    PubMed

    Kagramanova, A S; Korolev, A L; Mukha, D V

    2010-11-01

    The inheritance patterns of the 5'-truncated copies of R2 retroposons were analyzed in individual crosses of the German cockroach. The recombination level within the cluster of ribosomal RNA genes was determined. It was demonstrated that only the frequencies of individual variants of 5'-truncated retroposon copies are appropriate for population analysis rather than the patterns characterizing individual X chromosomes. The methodical approach used in the work is convenient for studying the genetic variation in ribosomal DNA multigene families.

  16. Host Genetic Variants and Gene Expression Patterns Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus Copy Number in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Petrova, Velislava; Liu, Jimmy Z.; Frampton, Dan; Anderson, Carl A.; Gall, Astrid; Kellam, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) are commonly used in molecular genetics, supplying DNA for the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Projects, used to test chemotherapeutic agents, and informing the basis of a number of population genetics studies of gene expression. The process of transforming human B cells into LCLs requires the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a double-stranded DNA virus which through B-cell immortalisation maintains an episomal virus genome in every cell of an LCL at variable copy numbers. Previous studies have reported that EBV alters host-gene expression and EBV copy number may be under host genetic control. We performed a genome-wide association study of EBV genome copy number in LCLs and found the phenotype to be highly heritable, although no individual SNPs achieved a significant association with EBV copy number. The expression of two host genes (CXCL16 and AGL) was positively correlated and expression of ADARB2 was negatively correlated with EBV copy number in a genotype-independent manner. This study shows an association between EBV copy number and the gene expression profile of LCLs, and suggests that EBV copy number should be considered as a covariate in future studies of host gene expression in LCLs. PMID:25290448

  17. The Mechanism of the Translocation Step in DNA Replication by DNA Polymerase I: A Computer Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Golosov, Andrei A.; Warren, Joshua J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Karplus, Martin

    2010-11-03

    High-fidelity DNA polymerases copy DNA rapidly and accurately by adding correct deoxynucleotide triphosphates to a growing primer strand of DNA. Following nucleotide incorporation, a series of conformational changes translocate the DNA substrate by one base pair step, readying the polymerase for the next round of incorporation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the translocation consists globally of a polymerase fingers-opening transition, followed by the DNA displacement and the insertion of the template base into the preinsertion site. They also show that the pyrophosphate release facilitates the opening transition and that the universally conserved Y714 plays a key role in coupling polymerase opening to DNA translocation. The transition involves several metastable intermediates in one of which the O helix is bent in the vicinity of G711. Completion of the translocation appears to require a gating motion of the O1 helix, perhaps facilitated by the presence of G715. These roles are consistent with the high level of conservation of Y714 and the two glycine residues at these positions. It is likely that a corresponding mechanism is applicable to other polymerases.

  18. Transposon-Assisted Genetic Engineering with Mos1-Mediated Single-Copy Insertion (MosSCI).

    PubMed

    Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Transgenesis in model organisms is necessary to determine the function, expression, and subcellular localization of gene products. In Caenorhabditis elegans, injected DNA can be propagated as multicopy extrachromosomal arrays but transgenes in arrays are mosaic, over-expressed in some tissues and silenced in the germline. Here, a method to insert a transgene into a specific genomic location called Mos1-mediated single-copy insertion (MosSCI) is described. Single-copy insertion allows transgene expression at levels that approximate endogenous gene expression as well as expression in the germline.

  19. 23. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of a drawing (Original drawing located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, Calfornia). JANUARY 1960 USAF PLANT 16 MASTER PLOT AND GRID PLAN. - NASA Industrial Plant, Missile Research Laboratory, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 22. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of a print. (Original print located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). 1954 USAF PLANT 16 AERIAL BUILDING 41 NORTH TO SOUTH. - NASA Industrial Plant, Missile Research Laboratory, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 15. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original drawing located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). 1980 BLDG 10, BLDG 42 FLOOR PLAN, NASA MARCH 15 1980. - NASA Industrial Plant, Maintenance Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 9. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative. (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative. (Original drawing located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). 1976 BLDGS.25, 41 SITE PLAN. - NASA Industrial Plant, Storage Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 14. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original photograph by original photographer located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH 1935-1936 CONSOLIDATED VULTEE AIRCRAFT CORPORATION FROM WEST TO EAST - NASA Industrial Plant, Maintenance Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. New class of polyomavirus mutant that can persist as free copies in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ariizumi, K; Ariga, H

    1986-01-01

    A small circular DNA was found extrachromosomally in a clone of F9 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells at high copy numbers per cell. The DNA was cloned in plasmid pUC19. Restriction endonuclease analyses of the DNA indicated that the DNA (fPyF9) was a mutant of polyomavirus (Py) DNA and had a mutation in a noncoding regulatory region. There have been many reports on the isolation of Py mutants capable of replication in undifferentiated cells. However, fPyF9 was different from other Py mutants in the following aspects: it was harbored stably as a free copy at 1 X 10(4) to 5 X 10(4) copies per cell in EC cells; it replicated in undifferentiated cells better than in differentiated cells; it was extremely rearranged in the sequences of the enhancer B domain; and it carried in the enhancer B domain three copies of an exogenous sequence which does not exist in Py strain A2. From these observations, we propose a new class of Py EC mutant which has an autonomous state similar to that of plasmid and small circular DNA in host cells. Images PMID:3025619

  5. Physical Localization and DNA Methylation of 45S rRNA Gene Loci in Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhiyun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Mingliang; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Yong; Shi, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays of repeat units, and not all copies are transcribed during mitosis. DNA methylation is considered to be an epigenetic marker for rDNA activation. Here, we established a clear and accurate karyogram for Jatropha curcas L. The chromosomal formula was found to be 2n = 2x = 22 = 12m+10sm. We found that the 45S rDNA loci were located at the termini of chromosomes 7 and 9 in J. curcas. The distribution of 45S rDNA has no significant difference in J. curcas from different sources. Based on the hybridization signal patterns, there were two forms of rDNA - dispersed and condensed. The dispersed type of signals appeared during interphase and prophase, while the condensed types appeared during different stages of mitosis. DNA methylation analysis showed that when 45S rDNA stronger signals were dispersed and connected to the nucleolus, DNA methylation levels were lower at interphase and prophase. However, when the 45S rDNA loci were condensed, especially during metaphase, they showed different forms of DNA methylation. PMID:24386362

  6. Gene copy number and malaria biology

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tim J.C.; Patel, Jigar; Ferdig, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Alteration in gene copy number provides a simple way to change expression levels and alter phenotype. This was fully appreciated by bacteriologists more than 25 years ago, but the extent and implications of copy number polymorphism (CNP) have only recently become apparent in other organisms. New methods demonstrate the ubiquity of CNPs in eukaryotes and their medical importance in humans. CNP is also widespread in the Plasmodium falciparum genome and has an important and underappreciated role in determining phenotype. In this review, we summarize the distribution of CNP, its evolutionary dynamics within populations, its functional importance and its mode of evolution. PMID:19559648

  7. Plasmid copy number noise in monoclonal populations of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong Ng, Jérôme; Chatenay, Didier; Robert, Jérôme; Poirier, Michael Guy

    2010-01-01

    Plasmids are extra chromosomal DNA that can confer to their hosts’ supplementary characteristics such as antibiotic resistance. Plasmids code for their copy number through their own replication frequency. Even though the biochemical networks underlying the plasmid copy number (PCN) regulation processes have been studied and modeled, no measurement of the heterogeneity in PCN within a whole population has been done. We have developed a fluorescent-based measurement system, which enables determination of the mean and noise in PCN within a monoclonal population of bacteria. Two different fluorescent protein reporters were inserted: one on the chromosome and the other on the plasmid. The fluorescence of these bacteria was measured with a microfluidic flow cytometry device. We show that our measurements are consistent with known plasmid characteristics. We find that the partitioning system lowers the PCN mean and standard deviation. Finally, bacterial populations were allowed to grow without selective pressure. In this case, we were able to determine the plasmid loss rate and growth inhibition effect.

  8. Confirmed rare copy number variants implicate novel genes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tam, Gloria W C; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Redon, Richard; Strathdee, Karen E; Croning, Mike D R; Malloy, Mary P; Muir, Walter J; Pickard, Ben S; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Carter, Nigel P; Grant, Seth G N

    2010-04-01

    Understanding how cognitive processes including learning, memory, decision making and ideation are encoded by the genome is a key question in biology. Identification of sets of genes underlying human mental disorders is a path towards this objective. Schizophrenia is a common disease with cognitive symptoms, high heritability and complex genetics. We have identified genes involved with schizophrenia by measuring differences in DNA copy number across the entire genome in 91 schizophrenia cases and 92 controls in the Scottish population. Our data reproduce rare and common variants observed in public domain data from >3000 schizophrenia cases, confirming known disease loci as well as identifying novel loci. We found copy number variants in PDE10A (phosphodiesterase 10A), CYFIP1 [cytoplasmic FMR1 (Fragile X mental retardation 1)-interacting protein 1], K(+) channel genes KCNE1 and KCNE2, the Down's syndrome critical region 1 gene RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1), cell-recognition protein CHL1 (cell adhesion molecule with homology with L1CAM), the transcription factor SP4 (specificity protein 4) and histone deacetylase HDAC9, among others (see http://www.genes2cognition.org/SCZ-CNV). Integrating the function of these many genes into a coherent model of schizophrenia and cognition is a major unanswered challenge.

  9. The Effects of Answer Copying on the Ability Level Estimates of Cheater Examinees in Answer Copying Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zopluoglu, Cengiz; Davenport, Ernest C., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of answer copying on the ability level estimates of cheater examinees in answer copying pairs. The study generated answer copying pairs for each of 1440 conditions, source ability (12) x cheater ability (12) x amount of copying (10). The average difference between the ability level estimates…

  10. EPSPS Gene Copy Number and Whole-Plant Glyphosate Resistance Level in Kochia scoparia.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Todd A; Barker, Abigail L; Patterson, Eric L; Westra, Philip; Westra, Eric P; Wilson, Robert G; Jha, Prashant; Kumar, Vipan; Kniss, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Kochia scoparia has evolved in dryland chemical fallow systems throughout North America and the mechanism of resistance involves 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene duplication. Agricultural fields in four states were surveyed for K. scoparia in 2013 and tested for glyphosate-resistance level and EPSPS gene copy number. Glyphosate resistance was confirmed in K. scoparia populations collected from sugarbeet fields in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, and Montana. Glyphosate resistance was also confirmed in K. scoparia accessions collected from wheat-fallow fields in Montana. All GR samples had increased EPSPS gene copy number, with median population values up to 11 from sugarbeet fields and up to 13 in Montana wheat-fallow fields. The results indicate that glyphosate susceptibility can be accurately diagnosed using EPSPS gene copy number.

  11. EPSPS Gene Copy Number and Whole-Plant Glyphosate Resistance Level in Kochia scoparia

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Barker, Abigail L.; Patterson, Eric L.; Westra, Philip; Westra, Eric P.; Wilson, Robert G.; Jha, Prashant; Kumar, Vipan

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Kochia scoparia has evolved in dryland chemical fallow systems throughout North America and the mechanism of resistance involves 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene duplication. Agricultural fields in four states were surveyed for K. scoparia in 2013 and tested for glyphosate-resistance level and EPSPS gene copy number. Glyphosate resistance was confirmed in K. scoparia populations collected from sugarbeet fields in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, and Montana. Glyphosate resistance was also confirmed in K. scoparia accessions collected from wheat-fallow fields in Montana. All GR samples had increased EPSPS gene copy number, with median population values up to 11 from sugarbeet fields and up to 13 in Montana wheat-fallow fields. The results indicate that glyphosate susceptibility can be accurately diagnosed using EPSPS gene copy number. PMID:27992501

  12. Template-Directed Biopolymerization: Tape-Copying Turing Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ajeet K.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2012-10-01

    DNA, RNA and proteins are among the most important macromolecules in a living cell. These molecules are polymerized by molecular machines. These natural nano-machines polymerize such macromolecules, adding one monomer at a time, using another linear polymer as the corresponding template. The machine utilizes input chemical energy to move along the template which also serves as a track for the movements of the machine. In the Alan Turing year 2012, it is worth pointing out that these machines are "tape-copying Turing machines". We review the operational mechanisms of the polymerizer machines and their collective behavior from the perspective of statistical physics, emphasizing their common features in spite of the crucial differences in their biological functions. We also draw the attention of the physics community to another class of modular machines that carry out a different type of template-directed polymerization. We hope this review will inspire new kinetic models for these modular machines.

  13. [Copy number variation: markers and predictors for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Valverde, Alan Gilberto; Antúnez-Ortiz, Diana Lizzete; Méndez-Beleche, Alberto; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Ascencio-Montiel, Iván Jesús; Cruz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease characterized by a deficiency in production or action of insulin. It is the result mainly of the interaction of the environment, lifestyle, as well as genetic factors. It is considered as one of the major health issues in the world because it affects severely the psychological well-being and overall life quality. Recently it has been shown that DNA copy number variations (CNVs) are associated with several diseases, including obesity and T2D. The CNVs are present from 9 to 18 % of the genome and can modify the expression levels of mRNA and proteins encoded by genes located near their localization. Less is known about their contribution to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, which is necessary to characterize so that these variations can be potentially used as biomarkers of genetic risk CNVs of T2D.

  14. Calibration of quantitative real-time TaqMan PCR by correlation with hyphal biomass and ITS copies in mycelia of Piloderma croceum.

    PubMed

    Raidl, S; Bonfigli, R; Agerer, R

    2005-11-01

    DNA-based quantification methods such as real-time TaqMan PCR allow a rapid and highly sensitive species-specific quantification of isolated fungal DNA material, but most quantification systems are only able to measure relative amounts of biomass or biomass changes during different treatments. In this experiment, an already established DNA quantification system for the ectomycorrhizal fungus Piloderma croceum, based on the ITS region of ribosomal DNA, was calibrated to absolute biomass to obtain a direct correlation between mycelial biomass and isolated ITS copies. Thin layers of sterile mycelia were cultured on slides. The mycelial biomass was calculated from measurements of the total hyphal length using image analysis, followed by determination of the mycelial volume, and multiplied by the specific weight of hyphae obtained from literature data. Using the very same mycelium, the number of ITS copies was quantified by TaqMan PCR. The mean value of 1047 (+/- 185) copies per mm hypha results in possible data for a direct conversion: one billion (10 (9)) ITS copies corresponded to 0.79 mg hyphal dry weight. For the ribosomal ITS multi-copy genes, the number of ITS copies could be calculated to approx. 152 (+/- 26) copies per dikaryotic cell. These conversion data now allow determination of the mycelial biomass of Piloderma croceum using real-time TaqMan PCR, a prerequisite for competition experiments with Piloderma croceum.

  15. Teaching Ad Copy--I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welty, Ward; Vanden Bergh, Bruce G.

    1981-01-01

    Ward Welty notes that the standard advertising course could be improved by including a unit of study in rhetoric, especially Aristotelian rhetoric. Bruce Vanden Bergh reports on research on the differences in creating advertising copy for radio versus the visual media of magazines, newspapers, and television. (RL)

  16. Copies of clinic letters to the family.

    PubMed

    Bartle, D G; Diskin, L; Finlay, F

    2004-11-01

    In April 2004 guidelines were introduced advising that letters to the GP should be copied to parents of young people. A study was carried out to ascertain the views of young people and their parents as to who they felt should receive correspondence after an outpatient appointment.

  17. Genomic characteristics of cattle copy number variations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We performed a systematic analysis of cattle copy number variations (CNVs) using the Bovine HapMap SNP genotyping data, including 539 animals of 21 modern cattle breeds and 6 outgroups. After correcting genomic waves and considering the trio information, we identified 682 candidate CNV regions (CNVR...

  18. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 703.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DISCLOSURE OR PRODUCTION OF RECORDS OR INFORMATION Testimony by Employees and Production of Documents in Certain Legal Proceedings Where the Library... file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  19. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 703.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DISCLOSURE OR PRODUCTION OF RECORDS OR INFORMATION Testimony by Employees and Production of Documents in Certain Legal Proceedings Where the Library... file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  20. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 703.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DISCLOSURE OR PRODUCTION OF RECORDS OR INFORMATION Testimony by Employees and Production of Documents in Certain Legal Proceedings Where the Library... file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  1. HaplotypeCN: copy number haplotype inference with Hidden Markov Model and localized haplotype clustering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Jen; Chen, Yu-Tin; Hsu, Shu-Ni; Peng, Chien-Hua; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Wen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has been reported to be associated with disease and various cancers. Hence, identifying the accurate position and the type of CNV is currently a critical issue. There are many tools targeting on detecting CNV regions, constructing haplotype phases on CNV regions, or estimating the numerical copy numbers. However, none of them can do all of the three tasks at the same time. This paper presents a method based on Hidden Markov Model to detect parent specific copy number change on both chromosomes with signals from SNP arrays. A haplotype tree is constructed with dynamic branch merging to model the transition of the copy number status of the two alleles assessed at each SNP locus. The emission models are constructed for the genotypes formed with the two haplotypes. The proposed method can provide the segmentation points of the CNV regions as well as the haplotype phasing for the allelic status on each chromosome. The estimated copy numbers are provided as fractional numbers, which can accommodate the somatic mutation in cancer specimens that usually consist of heterogeneous cell populations. The algorithm is evaluated on simulated data and the previously published regions of CNV of the 270 HapMap individuals. The results were compared with five popular methods: PennCNV, genoCN, COKGEN, QuantiSNP and cnvHap. The application on oral cancer samples demonstrates how the proposed method can facilitate clinical association studies. The proposed algorithm exhibits comparable sensitivity of the CNV regions to the best algorithm in our genome-wide study and demonstrates the highest detection rate in SNP dense regions. In addition, we provide better haplotype phasing accuracy than similar approaches. The clinical association carried out with our fractional estimate of copy numbers in the cancer samples provides better detection power than that with integer copy number states.

  2. Image copy-move forgery detection based on polar cosine transform and approximate nearest neighbor searching.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuenan

    2013-01-10

    Copy-move is one of the most commonly used image tampering operation, where a part of image content is copied and then pasted to another part of the same image. In order to make the forgery visually convincing and conceal its trace, the copied part may subject to post-processing operations such as rotation and blur. In this paper, we propose a polar cosine transform and approximate nearest neighbor searching based copy-move forgery detection algorithm. The algorithm starts by dividing the image into overlapping patches. Robust and compact features are extracted from patches by taking advantage of the rotationally-invariant and orthogonal properties of the polar cosine transform. Potential copy-move pairs are then detected by identifying the patches with similar features, which is formulated as approximate nearest neighbor searching and accomplished by means of locality-sensitive hashing (LSH). Finally, post-verifications are performed on potential pairs to filter out false matches and improve the accuracy of forgery detection. To sum up, the LSH based similar patch identification and the post-verification methods are two major novelties of the proposed work. Experimental results reveal that the proposed work can produce accurate detection results, and it exhibits high robustness to various post-processing operations. In addition, the LSH based similar patch detection scheme is much more effective than the widely used lexicographical sorting.

  3. The 2-micron plasmid as a nonselectable, stable, high copy number yeast vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. L.; Bruschi, C. V.

    1991-01-01

    The endogenous 2-microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the construction of yeast cloning and expression plasmids because it is a native yeast plasmid that is able to be maintained stably in cells at high copy number. Almost invariably, these plasmid constructs, containing some or all 2-microns sequences, exhibit copy number levels lower than 2-microns and are maintained stably only under selective conditions. We were interested in determining if there was a means by which 2-microns could be utilized for vector construction, without forfeiting either copy number or nonselective stability. We identified sites in the 2-microns plasmid that could be used for the insertion of genetic sequences without disrupting 2-microns coding elements and then assessed subsequent plasmid constructs for stability and copy number in vivo. We demonstrate the utility of a previously described 2-microns recombination chimera, pBH-2L, for the manipulation and transformation of 2-microns as a pure yeast plasmid vector. We show that the HpaI site near the STB element in the 2-microns plasmid can be utilized to clone yeast DNA of at least 3.9 kb with no loss of plasmid stability. Additionally, the copy number of these constructs is as high as levels reported for the endogenous 2-microns.

  4. COPI selectively drives maturation of the early Golgi

    DOE PAGES

    Papanikou, Effrosyni; Day, Kasey J.; Austin, Jotham; ...

    2015-12-28

    COPI coated vesicles carry material between Golgi compartments, but the role of COPI in the secretory pathway has been ambiguous. Previous studies of thermosensitive yeast COPI mutants yielded the surprising conclusion that COPI was dispensable both for the secretion of certain proteins and for Golgi cisternal maturation. To revisit these issues, we optimized the anchor-away method, which allows peripheral membrane proteins such as COPI to be sequestered rapidly by adding rapamycin. Video fluorescence microscopy revealed that COPI inactivation causes an early Golgi protein to remain in place while late Golgi proteins undergo cycles of arrival and departure. These dynamics generatemore » partially functional hybrid Golgi structures that contain both early and late Golgi proteins, explaining how secretion can persist when COPI has been inactivated. Our findings suggest that cisternal maturation involves a COPI-dependent pathway that recycles early Golgi proteins, followed by multiple COPI-independent pathways that recycle late Golgi proteins.« less

  5. DNA adductomics.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  6. Emerging critical roles of Fe-S clusters in DNA replication and repair

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Jill O.; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Ishida, Justin P.; Tainer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-S clusters are partners in the origin of life that predate cells, acetyl-CoA metabolism, DNA, and the RNA world. The double helix solved the mystery of DNA replication by base pairing for accurate copying. Yet, for genome stability necessary to life, the double helix has equally important implications for damage repair. Here we examine striking advances that uncover Fe-S cluster roles both in copying the genetic sequence by DNA polymerases and in crucial repair processes for genome maintenance, as mutational defects cause cancer and degenerative disease. Moreover, we examine an exciting, controversial role for Fe-S clusters in a third element required for life – the long-range coordination and regulation of replication and repair events. By their ability to delocalize electrons over both Fe and S centers, Fe-S clusters have unbeatable features for protein conformational control and charge transfer via double-stranded DNA that may fundamentally transform our understanding of life, replication, and repair. PMID:25655665

  7. Emerging critical roles of Fe-S clusters in DNA replication and repair.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Jill O; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Ishida, Justin P; Tainer, John A

    2015-06-01

    Fe-S clusters are partners in the origin of life that predate cells, acetyl-CoA metabolism, DNA, and the RNA world. The double helix solved the mystery of DNA replication by base pairing for accurate copying. Yet, for genome stability necessary to life, the double helix has equally important implications for damage repair. Here we examine striking advances that uncover Fe-S cluster roles both in copying the genetic sequence by DNA polymerases and in crucial repair processes for genome maintenance, as mutational defects cause cancer and degenerative disease. Moreover, we examine an exciting, controversial role for Fe-S clusters in a third element required for life - the long-range coordination and regulation of replication and repair events. By their ability to delocalize electrons over both Fe and S centers, Fe-S clusters have unbeatable features for protein conformational control and charge transfer via double-stranded DNA that may fundamentally transform our understanding of life, replication, and repair. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  8. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  9. Copy-number variation and false positive prenatal aneuploidy screening results.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Matthew W; Simmons, LaVone E; Kitzman, Jacob O; Coe, Bradley P; Henson, Jessica M; Daza, Riza M; Eichler, Evan E; Shendure, Jay; Gammill, Hilary S

    2015-04-23

    Investigations of noninvasive prenatal screening for aneuploidy by analysis of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have shown high sensitivity and specificity in both high-risk and low-risk cohorts. However, the overall low incidence of aneuploidy limits the positive predictive value of these tests. Currently, the causes of false positive results are poorly understood. We investigated four pregnancies with discordant prenatal test results and found in two cases that maternal duplications on chromosome 18 were the likely cause of the discordant results. Modeling based on population-level copy-number variation supports the possibility that some false positive results of noninvasive prenatal screening may be attributable to large maternal copy-number variants. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  10. Copy-Number Variation and False Positive Prenatal Aneuploidy Screening Results

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Matthew W.; Simmons, LaVone E.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Coe, Bradley P.; Henson, Jessica M.; Daza, Riza M.; Eichler, Evan E.; Shendure, Jay; Gammill, Hilary S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Investigations of noninvasive prenatal screening for aneuploidy by analysis of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have shown high sensitivity and specificity in both high-risk and low-risk cohorts. However, the overall low incidence of aneuploidy limits the positive predictive value of these tests. Currently, the causes of false positive results are poorly understood. We investigated four pregnancies with discordant prenatal test results and found in two cases that maternal duplications on chromosome 18 were the likely cause of the discordant results. Modeling based on population-level copy-number variation supports the possibility that some false positive results of noninvasive prenatal screening may be attributable to large maternal copy-number variants. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:25830323

  11. ascatNgs: Identifying Somatically Acquired Copy-Number Alterations from Whole-Genome Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Raine, Keiran M; Van Loo, Peter; Wedge, David C; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Butler, Adam P; Teague, Jon W; Tarpey, Patrick; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J

    2016-12-08

    We have developed ascatNgs to aid researchers in carrying out Allele-Specific Copy number Analysis of Tumours (ASCAT). ASCAT is capable of detecting DNA copy number changes affecting a tumor genome when comparing to a matched normal sample. Additionally, the algorithm estimates the amount of tumor DNA in the sample, known as Aberrant Cell Fraction (ACF). ASCAT itself is an R-package which requires the generation of many file types. Here, we present a suite of tools to help handle this for the user. Our code is available on our GitHub site (https://github.com/cancerit). This unit describes both 'one-shot' execution and approaches more suitable for large-scale compute farms. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  13. Laser thermographic technologies for hard copy recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmel'tsev, Viktor P.; Baev, Sergej G.

    1995-04-01

    Methods of hard copies recording based on thermal interaction of the beam from CO2 or YAG lasers with various kinds of films on any substrates have been developed. The recording processes are single-step and require no additional development. Among them are: (1) Laser thermodestruction of thin mask layers or of a material surface on any kinds of substrates. (2) Laser thermochemical reactions of thermal decomposition of metal salts in solid state phase on a surface of various hygroscopic substrates. The laser recording devices using the methods, described above have been developed and are manufactured now; they allow one to record hard copies with a size of up to 27 X 31 inches, a resolution of 4000 dpi.

  14. Colour hard-copy from workstation screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, C. A.

    It is possible to produce a colour print on the DEC LJ250 inkjet printer of either the entire screen or a portion of the screen from VAXstations, DECstations, SUN workstations and the IKON image display. This document describes how to achieve this with each of the above workstations. The IKONPAINT software which is used to produce colour hard-copy from the IKON screen on the inkjet printer is fully documented in SUN/71 and is not described here.

  15. Digital authentication with copy-detection patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Justin

    2004-06-01

    Technologies for making high-quality copies of documents are getting more available, cheaper, and more efficient. As a result, the counterfeiting business engenders huge losses, ranging to 5% to 8% of worldwide sales of brand products, and endangers the reputation and value of the brands themselves. Moreover, the growth of the Internet drives the business of counterfeited documents (fake IDs, university diplomas, checks, and so on), which can be bought easily and anonymously from hundreds of companies on the Web. The incredible progress of digital imaging equipment has put in question the very possibility of verifying the authenticity of documents: how can we discern genuine documents from seemingly "perfect" copies? This paper proposes a solution based on creating digital images with specific properties, called a Copy-detection patterns (CDP), that is printed on arbitrary documents, packages, etc. CDPs make an optimal use of an "information loss principle": every time an imae is printed or scanned, some information is lost about the original digital image. That principle applies even for the highest quality scanning, digital imaging, printing or photocopying equipment today, and will likely remain true for tomorrow. By measuring the amount of information contained in a scanned CDP, the CDP detector can take a decision on the authenticity of the document.

  16. CONTRA: copy number analysis for targeted resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jason; Lupat, Richard; Amarasinghe, Kaushalya C.; Thompson, Ella R.; Doyle, Maria A.; Ryland, Georgina L.; Tothill, Richard W.; Halgamuge, Saman K.; Campbell, Ian G.; Gorringe, Kylie L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: In light of the increasing adoption of targeted resequencing (TR) as a cost-effective strategy to identify disease-causing variants, a robust method for copy number variation (CNV) analysis is needed to maximize the value of this promising technology. Results: We present a method for CNV detection for TR data, including whole-exome capture data. Our method calls copy number gains and losses for each target region based on normalized depth of coverage. Our key strategies include the use of base-level log-ratios to remove GC-content bias, correction for an imbalanced library size effect on log-ratios, and the estimation of log-ratio variations via binning and interpolation. Our methods are made available via CONTRA (COpy Number Targeted Resequencing Analysis), a software package that takes standard alignment formats (BAM/SAM) and outputs in variant call format (VCF4.0), for easy integration with other next-generation sequencing analysis packages. We assessed our methods using samples from seven different target enrichment assays, and evaluated our results using simulated data and real germline data with known CNV genotypes. Availability and implementation: Source code and sample data are freely available under GNU license (GPLv3) at http://contra-cnv.sourceforge.net/ Contact: Jason.Li@petermac.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22474122

  17. Rapid and accurate bacterial identification in probiotics and yoghurts by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Million, Matthieu; Henry, Mireille; Raoult, Didier

    2011-10-01

    Probiotic food is manufactured by adding probiotic strains simultaneously with starter cultures in fermentation tanks. Here, we investigate the accuracy and feasibility of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for bacterial identification at the species level in probiotic food and yoghurts. Probiotic food and yoghurts were cultured in Columbia and Lactobacillus specific agar and tested by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for the detection and quantification of Lactobacillus sp. Bacterial identification was performed by MALDI-TOF analysis and by amplification and sequencing of tuf and 16S rDNA genes. We tested 13 probiotic food and yoghurts and we identified by qPCR that they presented 10(6) to 10(7) copies of Lactobacillus spp. DNA/g. All products contained very large numbers of living bacteria varying from 10(6) to 10(9) colony forming units/g. These bacteria were identified as Lactobacillus casei, Lactococcus lactis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Streptococcus thermophilus. MALDI-TOF MS presented 92% specificity compared to the molecular assays. In one product we found L. lactis, instead of Bifidus spp. which was mentioned on the label and for another L. delbrueckii and S. thermophilus instead of Bifidus spp. MALDI-TOF MS allows a rapid and accurate bacterial identification at the species level in probiotic food and yoghurts. Although the safety and functionality of probiotics are species and strain dependent, we found a discrepancy between the bacterial strain announced on the label and the strain identified. Practical Application:  MALDI-TOF MS is rapid and specific for the identification of bacteria in probiotic food and yoghurts. Although the safety and functionality of probiotics are species and strain dependent, we found a discrepancy between the bacterial strain announced on the label and the strain identified.

  18. Genome-wide copy number profiling on high-density bacterial artificial chromosomes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and oligonucleotide microarrays: a platform comparison based on statistical power analysis.

    PubMed

    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Janssen, Irene M; Smeets, Dominique; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Veltman, Joris A

    2007-02-28

    Recently, comparative genomic hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) has proved to be successful for the detection of submicroscopic DNA copy-number variations in health and disease. Technological improvements to achieve a higher resolution have resulted in the generation of additional microarray platforms encompassing larger numbers of shorter DNA targets (oligonucleotides). Here, we present a novel method to estimate the ability of a microarray to detect genomic copy-number variations of different sizes and types (i.e. deletions or duplications). We applied our method, which is based on statistical power analysis, to four widely used high-density genomic microarray platforms. By doing so, we found that the high-density oligonucleotide platforms are superior to the BAC platform for the genome-wide detection of copy-number variations smaller than 1 Mb. The capacity to reliably detect single copy-number variations below 100 kb, however, appeared to be limited for all platforms tested. In addition, our analysis revealed an unexpected platform-dependent difference in sensitivity to detect a single copy-number loss and a single copy-number gain. These analyses provide a first objective insight into the true capacities and limitations of different genomic microarrays to detect and define DNA copy-number variations.

  19. Can DNA barcoding accurately discriminate megadiverse Neotropical freshwater fish fauna?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The megadiverse Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna is the richest in the world with approximately 6,000 recognized species. Interestingly, they are distributed among only 17 orders, and almost 80% of them belong to only three orders: Characiformes, Siluriformes and Perciformes. Moreover, evidence based on molecular data has shown that most of the diversification of the Neotropical ichthyofauna occurred recently. These characteristics make the taxonomy and identification of this fauna a great challenge, even when using molecular approaches. In this context, the present study aimed to test the effectiveness of the barcoding methodology (COI gene) to identify the mega diverse freshwater fish fauna from the Neotropical region. For this purpose, 254 species of fishes were analyzed from the Upper Parana River basin, an area representative of the larger Neotropical region. Results Of the 254 species analyzed, 252 were correctly identified by their barcode sequences (99.2%). The main K2P intra- and inter-specific genetic divergence values (0.3% and 6.8%, respectively) were relatively low compared with similar values reported in the literature, reflecting the higher number of closely related species belonging to a few higher taxa and their recent radiation. Moreover, for 84 pairs of species that showed low levels of genetic divergence (<2%), application of a complementary character-based nucleotide diagnostic approach proved useful in discriminating them. Additionally, 14 species displayed high intra-specific genetic divergence (>2%), pointing to at least 23 strong candidates for new species. Conclusions Our study is the first to examine a large number of freshwater fish species from the Neotropical area, including a large number of closely related species. The results confirmed the efficacy of the barcoding methodology to identify a recently radiated, megadiverse fauna, discriminating 99.2% of the analyzed species. The power of the barcode sequences to identify species, even with low interspecific divergence, gives us an idea of the distribution of inter-specific genetic divergence in these megadiverse fauna. The results also revealed hidden genetic divergences suggestive of reproductive isolation and putative cryptic speciation in some species (23 candidates for new species). Finally, our study constituted an important contribution to the international Barcoding of Life (iBOL.org) project, providing barcode sequences for use in identification of these species by experts and non-experts, and allowing them to be available for use in other applications. PMID:23497346

  20. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  1. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  2. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  3. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  4. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  5. 19 CFR 133.42 - Infringing copies or phonorecords.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Referral to the U.S. Attorney. In the event that phonorecords or copies of motion pictures arrive in the U... trafficking in counterfeit labels for phonorecords or copies of motion pictures or other audiovisual works...

  6. 9. Photocopy of measured drawing (from a copy of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of measured drawing (from a copy of the original; copy in accompanying field records, location of original unknown) Adolf Scherrer, architect ca. 1906 'CROSS SECTION' - Maennerchor Building, 102 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  7. 17 CFR 230.402 - Number of copies; binding; signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... copy shall be bound, in one or more parts, without stiff covers. The binding shall be made on the side... filed with the Commission. Each copy shall be bound, in one or more parts, without stiff covers....

  8. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  9. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  10. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  11. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  12. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  13. Library preparation for highly accurate population sequencing of RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Ashley; Andino, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Circular resequencing (CirSeq) is a novel technique for efficient and highly accurate next-generation sequencing (NGS) of RNA virus populations. The foundation of this approach is the circularization of fragmented viral RNAs, which are then redundantly encoded into tandem repeats by ‘rolling-circle’ reverse transcription. When sequenced, the redundant copies within each read are aligned to derive a consensus sequence of their initial RNA template. This process yields sequencing data with error rates far below the variant frequencies observed for RNA viruses, facilitating ultra-rare variant detection and accurate measurement of low-frequency variants. Although library preparation takes ~5 d, the high-quality data generated by CirSeq simplifies downstream data analysis, making this approach substantially more tractable for experimentalists. PMID:24967624

  14. CopyRighter: a rapid tool for improving the accuracy of microbial community profiles through lineage-specific gene copy number correction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Culture-independent molecular surveys targeting conserved marker genes, most notably 16S rRNA, to assess microbial diversity remain semi-quantitative due to variations in the number of gene copies between species. Results Based on 2,900 sequenced reference genomes, we show that 16S rRNA gene copy number (GCN) is strongly linked to microbial phylogenetic taxonomy, potentially under-representing Archaea in amplicon microbial profiles. Using this relationship, we inferred the GCN of all bacterial and archaeal lineages in the Greengenes database within a phylogenetic framework. We created CopyRighter, new software which uses these estimates to correct 16S rRNA amplicon microbial profiles and associated quantitative (q)PCR total abundance. CopyRighter parses microbial profiles and, because GCN estimates are pre-computed for all taxa in the reference taxonomy, rapidly corrects GCN bias. Software validation with in silico and in vitro mock communities indicated that GCN correction results in more accurate estimates of microbial relative abundance and improves the agreement between metagenomic and amplicon profiles. Analyses of human-associated and anaerobic digester microbiomes illustrate that correction makes tangible changes to estimates of qPCR total abundance, α and β diversity, and can significantly change biological interpretation. For example, human gut microbiomes from twins were reclassified into three rather than two enterotypes after GCN correction. Conclusions The CopyRighter bioinformatic tools permits rapid correction of GCN in microbial surveys, resulting in improved estimates of microbial abundance, α and β diversity. PMID:24708850

  15. 1 CFR 18.1 - Original and copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Original and copies required. 18.1 Section 18.1... PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.1 Original and copies... two duplicate originals or certified copies. 1 However, if the document is printed or processed...

  16. 1 CFR 18.1 - Original and copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Original and copies required. 18.1 Section 18.1... PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.1 Original and copies... two duplicate originals or certified copies. 1 However, if the document is printed or processed...

  17. 12 CFR 269b.730 - Number of copies; form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Number of copies; form. 269b.730 Section 269b... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) CHARGES OF UNFAIR LABOR PRACTICES General Rules § 269b.730 Number of copies; form... filed with four copies in addition to the original. All matters filed shall be printed, typed,...

  18. 12 CFR 269b.730 - Number of copies; form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Number of copies; form. 269b.730 Section 269b... SYSTEM CHARGES OF UNFAIR LABOR PRACTICES General Rules § 269b.730 Number of copies; form. Except as... copies in addition to the original. All matters filed shall be printed, typed, or otherwise...

  19. Writing Wrongs: Copying as a Strategy for Underachieving EFL Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Graeme K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on a small-scale study of the outcomes generated by 15 underachieving English-as-a-Foreign-Language university writers copying text displayed on a computer monitor under pressure of time. Analysis of student's copied texts showed that various inaccuracies that were not in the original had passed into the copied version,…

  20. Syllables as Functional Units in a Copying Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Sonia; Valdois, Sylviane

    2006-01-01

    This research used a copying task to study spelling acquisition from a perception and action perspective. First to fifth graders copied words and pseudo-words on a digitiser. Simultaneously, a camera registered the children's gaze lifts. First and second graders copied the first syllable and then produced a gaze lift to obtain information on the…

  1. Readability as a Factor in Magazine Ad Copy Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesson, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the relationship between advertising copy readability and advertising effectiveness. Finds that recall is improved when the copy style is either fairly easy or fairly hard to read. Suggests the value of considering copy readability as a potential contributor, though a minor one, to the success of magazine advertising. (RS)

  2. 7 CFR 46.42 - Copies of records; how obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies of records; how obtained. 46.42 Section 46.42 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Records § 46.42 Copies of records; how obtained. Copies of records pertaining to licensees under the...

  3. Real-time PCR for the detection of precise transgene copy number in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Gadaleta, Agata; Giancaspro, Angelica; Cardone, Maria Francesca; Blanco, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Recent results obtained in various crops indicate that real-time PCR could be a powerful tool for the detection and characterization of transgene locus structures. The determination of transgenic locus number through real-time PCR overcomes the problems linked to phenotypic segregation analysis (i.e. lack of detectable expression even when the transgenes are present) and can analyse hundreds of samples in a day, making it an efficient method for estimating gene copy number. Despite these advantages, many authors speak of "estimating" copy number by real-time PCR, and this is because the detection of a precise number of transgene depends on how well real-time PCR performs.This study was conducted to determine transgene copy number in transgenic wheat lines and to investigate potential variability in sensitivity and resolution of real-time chemistry by TaqMan probes. We have applied real-time PCR to a set of four transgenic durum wheat lines previously obtained. A total of 24 experiments (three experiments for two genes in each transgenic line) were conducted and standard curves were obtained from serial dilutions of the plasmids containing the genes of interest. The correlation coefficients ranged from 0.95 to 0.97. By using TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR we were able to detect 1 to 41 copies of transgenes per haploid genome in the DNA of homozygous T4 transformants. Although a slight variability was observed among PCR experiments, in our study we found real-time PCR to be a fast, sensitive and reliable method for the detection of transgene copy number in durum wheat, and a useful adjunct to Southern blot and FISH analyses to detect the presence of transgenic DNA in plant material.

  4. Decoding NF1 Intragenic Copy-Number Variations.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Meng-Chang; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Callens, Tom; Fu, Chuanhua; Wimmer, Katharina; Claes, Kathleen B M; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-08-06

    Genomic rearrangements can cause both Mendelian and complex disorders. Currently, several major mechanisms causing genomic rearrangements, such as non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR), non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), fork stalling and template switching (FoSTeS), and microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR), have been proposed. However, to what extent these mechanisms contribute to gene-specific pathogenic copy-number variations (CNVs) remains understudied. Furthermore, few studies have resolved these pathogenic alterations at the nucleotide-level. Accordingly, our aim was to explore which mechanisms contribute to a large, unique set of locus-specific non-recurrent genomic rearrangements causing the genetic neurocutaneous disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Through breakpoint-spanning PCR as well as array comparative genomic hybridization, we have identified the breakpoints in 85 unrelated individuals carrying an NF1 intragenic CNV. Furthermore, we characterized the likely rearrangement mechanisms of these 85 CNVs, along with those of two additional previously published NF1 intragenic CNVs. Unlike the most typical recurrent rearrangements mediated by flanking low-copy repeats (LCRs), NF1 intragenic rearrangements vary in size, location, and rearrangement mechanisms. We propose the DNA-replication-based mechanisms comprising both FoSTeS and/or MMBIR and serial replication stalling to be the predominant mechanisms leading to NF1 intragenic CNVs. In addition to the loop within a 197-bp palindrome located in intron 40, four Alu elements located in introns 1, 2, 3, and 50 were also identified as intragenic-rearrangement hotspots within NF1.

  5. Decoding NF1 Intragenic Copy-Number Variations

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Meng-Chang; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Callens, Tom; Fu, Chuanhua; Wimmer, Katharina; Claes, Kathleen B.M.; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-01-01

    Genomic rearrangements can cause both Mendelian and complex disorders. Currently, several major mechanisms causing genomic rearrangements, such as non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR), non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), fork stalling and template switching (FoSTeS), and microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR), have been proposed. However, to what extent these mechanisms contribute to gene-specific pathogenic copy-number variations (CNVs) remains understudied. Furthermore, few studies have resolved these pathogenic alterations at the nucleotide-level. Accordingly, our aim was to explore which mechanisms contribute to a large, unique set of locus-specific non-recurrent genomic rearrangements causing the genetic neurocutaneous disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Through breakpoint-spanning PCR as well as array comparative genomic hybridization, we have identified the breakpoints in 85 unrelated individuals carrying an NF1 intragenic CNV. Furthermore, we characterized the likely rearrangement mechanisms of these 85 CNVs, along with those of two additional previously published NF1 intragenic CNVs. Unlike the most typical recurrent rearrangements mediated by flanking low-copy repeats (LCRs), NF1 intragenic rearrangements vary in size, location, and rearrangement mechanisms. We propose the DNA-replication-based mechanisms comprising both FoSTeS and/or MMBIR and serial replication stalling to be the predominant mechanisms leading to NF1 intragenic CNVs. In addition to the loop within a 197-bp palindrome located in intron 40, four Alu elements located in introns 1, 2, 3, and 50 were also identified as intragenic-rearrangement hotspots within NF1. PMID:26189818

  6. Replicating damaged DNA in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail.

  7. Production of random DNA oligomers for scalable DNA computing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sixue S L; Johnson, John J X; Hughes, Bradley S T; Karabay, Dundar A O; Bader, Karson D W; Austin, Allen; Austin, Alan; Habib, Aisha; Hatef, Husnia; Joshi, Megha; Nguyen, Lawrence; Mills, Allen P

    2009-01-01

    While remarkably complex networks of connected DNA molecules can form from a relatively small number of distinct oligomer strands, a large computational space created by DNA reactions would ultimately require the use of many distinct DNA strands. The automatic synthesis of this many distinct strands is economically prohibitive. We present here a new approach to producing distinct DNA oligomers based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a few random template sequences. As an example, we designed a DNA template sequence consisting of a 50-mer random DNA segment flanked by two 20-mer invariant primer sequences. Amplification of a dilute sample containing about 30 different template molecules allows us to obtain around 10(11) copies of these molecules and their complements. We demonstrate the use of these amplicons to implement some of the vector operations that will be required in a DNA implementation of an analog neural network.

  8. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji-Young

    2006-01-01

    was probed with fluorescently-labeled probe molecules and imaged. When only the probes were stained and hybridized in a vial, it had 6 orders of magnitude dynamic range with a detection limit of ~0.7 copy/cell. A second dye was added to lower the false positive levels. Although there was a sacrifice of two orders of magnitude in detection limit, the number of false positives was reduced to zero. HPV-16 DNA was also hybridized and detected on surface-tethered probes. When the entire human genomic DNA and HPV was labeled and hybridized, the detection limit was similar to that of one-color assay detected in capillary. However, non-specific adsorption was high, and the dynamic range was narrow because of saturation of the surface and electrostatic repulsion between hybridized targets on the surface. The second probe was introduced to lower non-specific adsorption, and the strategy succeeded in 4 orders of magnitude linear dynamic range in a log-log plot, along with 2.4 copies/cell detection limit. DNA extracts of cell lines that contained a known copy number of HPV-16 DNA were tested with the four strategies described above. The calculated numbers from observed molecule counts matched the known values. Results from the Pap test sample with added HPV DNA were similar to those of purified DNA, suggesting our method is compatible with the conventional Pap test sample collection method. Further optimization will be needed before this single molecule level detection and identification can actually be used in a real clinical lab, but it has good potential and applicability. Improvement such as automated imaging and scanning, more accurate data processing software as well as sensitive camera, should help increase the efficiency and throughput.

  9. Comparison of PCR assays targeting the multi-copy targets B1 gene and 529 bp repetitive element for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in swine muscle.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Fabrizia; Santoro, Azzurra; Milardi, Giovanni Luigi; Diaferia, Manuela; Branciari, Raffaella; Miraglia, Dino; Cioffi, Attilia; Gabrielli, Simona; Ranucci, David

    2017-05-01

    The comparison of the sensitivities of two molecular assays designed to target the multi-copy sequences of the Toxoplasma gondii genomic B1 region and 529 bp-RE respectively, in detecting T. gondii in swine muscle was assessed. Diaphragm pillars were obtained from 498 slaughtered pigs managed in intensive farms in Central Italy. Genomic DNA was extracted from the tissues and T. gondii-B1 and 529 bp-RE sequences were amplified by specific PCR protocols. Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected in 165 samples (33.13%). There was a good correlation (κ = 0.77) between the results obtained targeting the two different genetic markers, however the 529 bp RE-PCR assay overall detected a significantly higher (P < 0.05) number of T. gondii-positive samples (150 samples) than the B1-PCR protocol (134). Our results show that: i) standardized B1 and 529 bp-RE PCRs applied to muscle tissues can detect a high rate of T. gondii-infection; ii) a multi-target PCR approach is recommended for the accurate diagnosis of infection in swine and can also be used in food testing.

  10. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  11. Retroviral DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  12. Stolen and lost copies of Vesalius's Fabrica.

    PubMed

    Steeno, Omer; Biesbrouck, Maurits

    2012-01-01

    Thefts and losses of precious books are not rare. Here we report several incidents concerning vesalius's Fabrica: the fire of the University Library of Leuven in Belgium, the fate of the collection of the Leopoldina Library of Halle in Germany, the thefts from the Crerar Library in Chicago and in Christ Church College in Oxford, the disappearance of an exceptionally beautiful 'royal' copy from the Castle of Argenteuil (Belgium), and other Fabrica's missing at the Franeker Library in the Netherlands and at the Library of oradea in West Romania. Finally the means of protecting precious book collections are discussed in short as well as the importance of book identification.

  13. A novel interaction between DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma plays an essential role in mitochondrial DNA stability.

    PubMed

    De, Ananya; Campbell, Colin

    2007-02-15

    The data in the present study show that DNA polymerase gamma and DNA ligase III interact in mitochondrial protein extracts from cultured HT1080 cells. An interaction was also observed between the two recombinant proteins in vitro. Expression of catalytically inert versions of DNA ligase III that bind DNA polymerase gamma was associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number and integrity. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type DNA ligase III had no effect on mitochondrial DNA copy number or integrity. Experiments revealed that wild-type DNA ligase III facilitates the interaction of DNA polymerase gamma with a nicked DNA substrate in vitro, and that the zinc finger domain of DNA ligase III is required for this activity. Mitochondrial protein extracts prepared from cells overexpressing a DNA ligase III protein that lacked the zinc finger domain had reduced base excision repair activity compared with extracts from cells overexpressing the wild-type protein. These data support the interpretation that the interaction of DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma is required for proper maintenance of the mammalian mitochondrial genome.

  14. Copy Number Variations in the Survival Motor Neuron Genes: Implications for Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Butchbach, Matthew E. R.

    2016-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant death worldwide, is an early-onset, autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of spinal α-motor neurons. This loss of α-motor neurons is associated with muscle weakness and atrophy. SMA can be classified into five clinical grades based on age of onset and severity of the disease. Regardless of clinical grade, proximal SMA results from the loss or mutation of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1) on chromosome 5q13. In humans a large tandem chromosomal duplication has lead to a second copy of the SMN gene locus known as SMN2. SMN2 is distinguishable from SMN1 by a single nucleotide difference that disrupts an exonic splice enhancer in exon 7. As a result, most of SMN2 mRNAs lack exon 7 (SMNΔ7) and produce a protein that is both unstable and less than fully functional. Although only 10–20% of the SMN2 gene product is fully functional, increased genomic copies of SMN2 inversely correlates with disease severity among individuals with SMA. Because SMN2 copy number influences disease severity in SMA, there is prognostic value in accurate measurement of SMN2 copy number from patients being evaluated for SMA. This prognostic value is especially important given that SMN2 copy number is now being used as an inclusion criterion for SMA clinical trials. In addition to SMA, copy number variations (CNVs) in the SMN genes can affect the clinical severity of other neurological disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and progressive muscular atrophy (PMA). This review will discuss how SMN1 and SMN2 CNVs are detected and why accurate measurement of SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers is relevant for SMA and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27014701

  15. Amy2B copy number variation reveals starch diet adaptations in ancient European dogs

    PubMed Central

    Tresset, Anne; Bastian, Fabiola; Lagoutte, Laetitia; Arendt, Maja-Louise; Bălăşescu, Adrian; Marshour, Marjan; Sablin, Mikhail V.; Salanova, Laure; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Hitte, Christophe; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Extant dog and wolf DNA indicates that dog domestication was accompanied by the selection of a series of duplications on the Amy2B gene coding for pancreatic amylase. In this study, we used a palaeogenetic approach to investigate the timing and expansion of the Amy2B gene in the ancient dog populations of Western and Eastern Europe and Southwest Asia. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to estimate the copy numbers of this gene for 13 ancient dog samples, dated to between 15 000 and 4000 years before present (cal. BP). This evidenced an increase of Amy2B copies in ancient dogs from as early as the 7th millennium cal. BP in Southeastern Europe. We found that the gene expansion was not fixed across all dogs within this early farming context, with ancient dogs bearing between 2 and 20 diploid copies of the gene. The results also suggested that selection for the increased Amy2B copy number started 7000 years cal. BP, at the latest. This expansion reflects a local adaptation that allowed dogs to thrive on a starch rich diet, especially within early farming societies, and suggests a biocultural coevolution of dog genes and human culture. PMID:28018628

  16. Mitochondrial Copy Number and D-Loop Variants in Pompe Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bahreini, Fatemeh; Houshmand, Massoud; Modaresi, Mohammad Hossein; Tonekaboni, Hassan; Nafissi, Shahriar; Nazari, Ferdoss; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pompe disease is a rare neuromuscular genetic disorder and is classified into two forms of early and late-onset. Over the past two decades, mitochondrial abnor- malities have been recognized as an important contributor to an array of neuromuscular diseases. We therefore aimed to compare mitochondrial copy number and mitochondrial displacement-loop sequence variation in infantile and adult Pompe patients. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, the mitochondrial D-loop sequence was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing to detect pos- sible variation in 28 Pompe patients (17 infants and 11 adults). Results were compared with 100 healthy controls and sequences of all individuals were compared with the Cam- bridge reference sequence. Real-time PCR was used to quantify mitochondrial DNA copy number. Results Among 59 variants identified, 37(62.71%) were present in the infant group, 14(23.333%) in the adult group and 8(13.333%) in both groups. Mitochondrial copy number in infant patients was lower than adults (P<0.05). A significant frequency differ- ence was seen between the two groups for 12 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). A novel insertion (317-318 ins CCC) was observed in patients and six SNPs were iden- tified as neutral variants in controls. There was an inverse association between mito- chondrial copy number and D-loop variant number (r=0.54). Conclusion The 317-318 ins CCC was detected as a new mitochondrial variant in Pompe patients. PMID:27602323

  17. A comparison of RNA with DNA in template-directed synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zielinski, M.; Kozlov, I. A.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Nonenzymatic template-directed copying of RNA sequences rich in cytidylic acid using nucleoside 5'-(2-methylimidazol-1-yl phosphates) as substrates is substantially more efficient than the copying of corresponding DNA sequences. However, many sequences cannot be copied, and the prospect of replication in this system is remote, even for RNA. Surprisingly, wobble-pairing leads to much more efficient incorporation of G opposite U on RNA templates than of G opposite T on DNA templates.

  18. Polycomb repressive complex 1 provides a molecular explanation for repeat copy number dependency in FSHD muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Casa, Valentina; Runfola, Valeria; Micheloni, Stefano; Aziz, Arif; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gabellini, Davide

    2016-12-30

    Repression of repetitive elements is crucial to preserve genome integrity and has been traditionally ascribed to constitutive heterochromatin pathways. FacioScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD), one of the most common myopathies, is characterized by a complex interplay of genetic and epigenetic events. The main FSHD form is linked to a reduced copy number of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat on 4q35, causing loss of silencing and aberrant expression of the D4Z4-embedded DUX4 gene leading to disease. By an unknown mechanism, D4Z4 copy-number correlates with FSHD phenotype. Here we show that the DUX4 proximal promoter (DUX4p) is sufficient to nucleate the enrichment of both constitutive and facultative heterochromatin components and to mediate a copy-number dependent gene silencing. We found that both the CpG/GC dense DNA content and the repetitive nature of DUX4p arrays are important for their repressive ability. We showed that DUX4p mediates a copy number-dependent Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) recruitment, which is responsible for the copy-number dependent gene repression. Overall, we directly link genetic and epigenetic defects in FSHD by proposing a novel molecular explanation for the copy number-dependency in FSHD pathogenesis, and offer insight into the molecular functions of repeats in chromatin regulation.

  19. Development of a TT Virus DNA Quantification System Using Real-Time Detection PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Takanobu; Mizokami, Masashi; Mukaide, Motokazu; Orito, Etsuro; Ohno, Tomoyoshi; Nakano, Tatsunori; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kato, Hideaki; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Ueda, Ryuzo; Hirashima, Noboru; Shimamatsu, Kazuhide; Kage, Masayoshi; Kojiro, Masamichi

    2000-01-01

    Although TT virus (TTV) was isolated from a cryptogenic posttransfusion hepatitis patient, its pathogenic role remains unclear. It has been reported that the majority of the healthy population is infected with TTV. To elucidate the differences between TTV infection in patients with liver diseases and TTV infection in the healthy population, a quantification system was developed. TTV DNA was quantified by a real-time detection PCR (RTD-PCR) assay on an ABI Prism 7700 sequence detector. With this system, TTV DNA was quantified in 78 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients (63 with elevated serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] levels and 15 with normal ALT levels) and in 70 voluntary blood donors (BDs). The quantification range was 2.08 to 7.35 log copies/ml. The intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation were 0.37 to 6.33% and 0.60 to 7.07%, respectively. The mean serum TTV DNA levels in the HCV-infected patients with both elevated and normal ALT levels and BDs were 3.69 ± 0.89, 3.45 ± 0.76, and 3.45 ± 0.67 log copies/ml, respectively. Comparison of the serum TTV DNA levels among the HCV-infected patients revealed that they were not related to the serum ALT and HCV core protein levels or to the histopathological score on liver biopsy. This study showed that (i) the RTD-PCR assay for the detection of TTV was accurate and had a high degree of sensitivity, (ii) the mean serum TTV DNA level was similar among HCV-infected patients, irrespective of their ALT level, and also among BDs, and (iii) a high serum TTV DNA level does not affect the serum ALT and HCV levels or liver damage in HCV-infected patients. PMID:10618070

  20. To Copy or Not to Copy for Teaching and Scholarship: What Shall I Tell My Client?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardozo, Michael H.

    1976-01-01

    A clear description of what educators, administrators, or students may and may not copy under the various provisions of the Copyright Law Revision of 1976 is attempted, but the author concludes that the language of the law itself makes such a description impossible. (LBH)

  1. Imitation in Young Children: When Who Gets Copied Is More Important than What Gets Copied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Mark; Blank, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other animals, human children will copy all of an adult's goal-directed actions, including ones that are clearly unnecessary for achieving the demonstrated goal. Here we highlight how social affiliation is key to this species-specific behavior. Preschoolers watched 2 adults retrieve a toy from a novel apparatus. One adult included…

  2. Accurate Estimation of Fungal Diversity and Abundance through Improved Lineage-Specific Primers Optimized for Illumina Amplicon Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Walters, William A.; Lennon, Niall J.; Bochicchio, James; Krohn, Andrew; Pennanen, Taina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While high-throughput sequencing methods are revolutionizing fungal ecology, recovering accurate estimates of species richness and abundance has proven elusive. We sought to design internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers and an Illumina protocol that would maximize coverage of the kingdom Fungi while minimizing nontarget eukaryotes. We inspected alignments of the 5.8S and large subunit (LSU) ribosomal genes and evaluated potential primers using PrimerProspector. We tested the resulting primers using tiered-abundance mock communities and five previously characterized soil samples. We recovered operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to all 8 members in both mock communities, despite DNA abundances spanning 3 orders of magnitude. The expected and observed read counts were strongly correlated (r = 0.94 to 0.97). However, several taxa were consistently over- or underrepresented, likely due to variation in rRNA gene copy numbers. The Illumina data resulted in clustering of soil samples identical to that obtained with Sanger sequence clone library data using different primers. Furthermore, the two methods produced distance matrices with a Mantel correlation of 0.92. Nonfungal sequences comprised less than 0.5% of the soil data set, with most attributable to vascular plants. Our results suggest that high-throughput methods can produce fairly accurate estimates of fungal abundances in complex communities. Further improvements might be achieved through corrections for rRNA copy number and utilization of standardized mock communities. IMPORTANCE Fungi play numerous important roles in the environment. Improvements in sequencing methods are providing revolutionary insights into fungal biodiversity, yet accurate estimates of the number of fungal species (i.e., richness) and their relative abundances in an environmental sample (e.g., soil, roots, water, etc.) remain difficult to obtain. We present improved methods for high-throughput Illumina sequencing of the

  3. Variation of B1 gene and AF146527 repeat element copy numbers according to Toxoplasma gondii strains assessed using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jean-Marc; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2012-04-01

    Using the multicopy B1 gene and AF146527 element for the amplification of Toxoplasma gondii DNA raises the issue of reliable quantification for clinical diagnosis. We applied relative quantification to reference strains using the single-copy P30 gene as a reference. According to the parasite type, the copy numbers for the B1 gene and AF146527 element were found to be 5 to 12 and 4 to 8 times lower than the previous estimations of 35 and 230 copies, respectively.

  4. Accurate Molecular Dimensions from Stearic Acid Monolayers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Charles A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses modifications in the fatty acid monolayer experiment to reduce the inaccurate moleculary data students usually obtain. Copies of the experimental procedure used and a Pascal computer program to work up the data are available from the authors. (JN)

  5. Mapping copy number variation by population-scale genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mills, Ryan E; Walter, Klaudia; Stewart, Chip; Handsaker, Robert E; Chen, Ken; Alkan, Can; Abyzov, Alexej; Yoon, Seungtai Chris; Ye, Kai; Cheetham, R Keira; Chinwalla, Asif; Conrad, Donald F; Fu, Yutao; Grubert, Fabian; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Iqbal, Zamin; Kang, Shuli; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Konkel, Miriam K; Korn, Joshua; Khurana, Ekta; Kural, Deniz; Lam, Hugo Y K; Leng, Jing; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Lin, Chang-Yun; Luo, Ruibang; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Nemesh, James; Peckham, Heather E; Rausch, Tobias; Scally, Aylwyn; Shi, Xinghua; Stromberg, Michael P; Stütz, Adrian M; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Walker, Jerilyn A; Wu, Jiantao; Zhang, Yujun; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Batzer, Mark A; Ding, Li; Marth, Gabor T; McVean, Gil; Sebat, Jonathan; Snyder, Michael; Wang, Jun; Ye, Kenny; Eichler, Evan E; Gerstein, Mark B; Hurles, Matthew E; Lee, Charles; McCarroll, Steven A; Korbel, Jan O

    2011-02-03

    Genomic structural variants (SVs) are abundant in humans, differing from other forms of variation in extent, origin and functional impact. Despite progress in SV characterization, the nucleotide resolution architecture of most SVs remains unknown. We constructed a map of unbalanced SVs (that is, copy number variants) based on whole genome DNA sequencing data from 185 human genomes, integrating evidence from complementary SV discovery approaches with extensive experimental validations. Our map encompassed 22,025 deletions and 6,000 additional SVs, including insertions and tandem duplications. Most SVs (53%) were mapped to nucleotide resolution, which facilitated analysing their origin and functional impact. We examined numerous whole and partial gene deletions with a genotyping approach and observed a depletion of gene disruptions amongst high frequency deletions. Furthermore, we observed differences in the size spectra of SVs originating from distinct formation mechanisms, and constructed a map of SV hotspots formed by common mechanisms. Our analytical framework and SV map serves as a resource for sequencing-based association studies.

  6. Copy Number Variants in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cuccaro, Denis; De Marco, Elvira Valeria; Cittadella, Rita; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating disease mainly afflicting elderly people, characterized by decreased cognition, loss of memory, and eventually death. Although risk and deterministic genes are known, major genetics research programs are underway to gain further insights into the inheritance of AD. In the last years, in particular, new developments in genome-wide scanning methodologies have enabled the association of a number of previously uncharacterized copy number variants (CNVs, gain or loss of DNA) in AD. Because of the exceedingly large number of studies performed, it has become difficult for geneticists as well as clinicians to systematically follow, evaluate, and interpret the growing number of (sometime conflicting) CNVs implicated in AD. In this review, after a brief introduction of this type of structural variation, and a description of available databases, computational analyses, and technologies involved, we provide a systematic review of all published data showing statistical and scientific significance of pathogenic CNVs and discuss the role they might play in AD. PMID:27662298

  7. Development of two highly sensitive forensic sex determination assays based on human DYZ1 and Alu repetitive DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Amanda; Gobeski, Brianne; Foran, David

    2014-11-01

    Sex determination is a critical component of forensic identification, the standard genetic method for which is detection of the single copy amelogenin gene that has differing homologues on the X and Y chromosomes. However, this assay may not be sensitive enough when DNA samples are minute or highly compromised, thus other strategies for sex determination are needed. In the current research, two ultrasensitive sexing assays, based on real-time PCR and pyrosequencing, were developed targeting the highly repetitive elements DYZ1 on the Y chromosome and Alu on the autosomes. The DYZ1/Alu strategy was compared to amelogenin for overall sensitivity based on high molecular weight and degraded DNA, followed by assaying the sex of 34 touch DNA samples and DNA from 30 hair shafts. The real-time DYZ1/Alu assay proved to be approximately 1500 times more sensitive than its amelogenin counterpart based on high molecular weight DNA, and even more sensitive when sexing degraded DNA. The pyrosequencing DYZ1/Alu assay correctly sexed 26 of the touch DNAs, compared to six using amelogenin. Hair shaft DNAs showed equally improved sexing results using the DYZ1/Alu assays. Overall, both DYZ1/Alu assays were far more sensitive and accurate than was the amelogenin assay, and thus show great utility for sexing poor quality and low quantity DNA evidence.

  8. Borrowing Nuclear DNA Helicases to Protect Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    In normal cells, mitochondria are the primary organelles that generate energy, which is critical for cellular metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or an abnormal mtDNA copy number, is linked to a range of human diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, premature aging‎ and cancer. mtDNA resides in the mitochondrial lumen, and its duplication requires the mtDNA replicative helicase, Twinkle. In addition to Twinkle, many DNA helicases, which are encoded by the nuclear genome and are crucial for nuclear genome integrity, are transported into the mitochondrion to also function in mtDNA replication and repair. To date, these helicases include RecQ-like helicase 4 (RECQ4), petite integration frequency 1 (PIF1), DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 (DNA2) and suppressor of var1 3-like protein 1 (SUV3). Although the nuclear functions of some of these DNA helicases have been extensively studied, the regulation of their mitochondrial transport and the mechanisms by which they contribute to mtDNA synthesis and maintenance remain largely unknown. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent research progress on the role of mammalian DNA helicases in mitochondrial genome maintenance and the effects on mitochondria-associated diseases. PMID:25984607

  9. Borrowing nuclear DNA helicases to protect mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Yilun

    2015-05-13

    In normal cells, mitochondria are the primary organelles that generate energy, which is critical for cellular metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or an abnormal mtDNA copy number, is linked to a range of human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, premature aging‎ and cancer. mtDNA resides in the mitochondrial lumen, and its duplication requires the mtDNA replicative helicase, Twinkle. In addition to Twinkle, many DNA helicases, which are encoded by the nuclear genome and are crucial for nuclear genome integrity, are transported into the mitochondrion to also function in mtDNA replication and repair. To date, these helicases include RecQ-like helicase 4 (RECQ4), petite integration frequency 1 (PIF1), DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 (DNA2) and suppressor of var1 3-like protein 1 (SUV3). Although the nuclear functions of some of these DNA helicases have been extensively studied, the regulation of their mitochondrial transport and the mechanisms by which they contribute to mtDNA synthesis and maintenance remain largely unknown. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent research progress on the role of mammalian DNA helicases in mitochondrial genome maintenance and the effects on mitochondria-associated diseases.

  10. The standardised copy of pentagons test

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The 'double-diamond copy' task is a simple paper and pencil test part of the Bender-Gestalt Test and the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Although it is a widely used test, its method of scoring is crude and its psychometric properties are not adequately known. The aim of the present study was to develop a sensitive and reliable method of administration and scoring. Methods The study sample included 93 normal control subjects (53 women and 40 men) aged 35.87 ± 12.62 and 127 patients suffering from schizophrenia (54 women and 73 men) aged 34.07 ± 9.83. Results The scoring method was based on the frequencies of responses of healthy controls and proved to be relatively reliable with Cronbach's α equal to 0.61, test-retest correlation coefficient equal to 0.41 and inter-rater reliability equal to 0.52. The factor analysis produced two indices and six subscales of the Standardised Copy of Pentagons Test (SCPT). The total score as well as most of the individual items and subscales distinguished between controls and patients. The discriminant function correctly classified 63.44% of controls and 75.59% of patients. Discussion The SCPT seems to be a satisfactory, reliable and valid instrument, which is easy to administer, suitable for use in non-organic psychiatric patients and demands minimal time. Further research is necessary to test its psychometric properties and its usefulness and applications as a neuropsychological test. PMID:21481250

  11. Copy-move forgery detection in digital image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamro, Loai; Yusoff, Nooraini

    2016-08-01

    Copy-move is considered as one of the most popular kind of digital image tempering, in which one or more parts of a digital image are copied and pasted into different locations. Geometric transformation is among the major challenges in detecting copy-move forgery of a digital image. In such forgery, the copied and moved parts of a forged image are either rotated or/and re-scaled. Hence, in this study we propose a combination of Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) to detect a copy-move activity. The experiments results prove that the proposed method is superior with overall accuracy 95%. The copy-move attacks in digital image has been successfully detected and the method is also can detect the fraud parts exposed to rotation and scaling issue.

  12. The Association of Mitochondrial Potential and Copy Number with Pig Oocyte Maturation and Developmental Potential

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Seul-Ki; ZHAO, Ming-Hui; KWON, Jung-Woo; LI, Ying-Hua; LIN, Zi-Li; JIN, Yong-Xun; KIM, Nam-Hyung; CUI, Xiang-Shun

    2014-01-01

    ATP is critical for oocyte maturation, fertilization, and subsequent embryo development. Both mitochondrial membrane potential and copy number expand during oocyte maturation. In order to differentiate the roles of mitochondrial metabolic activity and mtDNA copy number during oocyte maturation, we used two inhibitors, FCCP (carbonyl cyanide p-(tri-fluromethoxy)phenyl-hydrazone) and ddC (2’3-dideoxycytidine), to deplete the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δφm) and mitochondrial copy number, respectively. FCCP (2000 nM) reduced ATP production by affecting mitochondrial Δφm, decreased the mRNA expression of Bmp15 (bone morphogenetic protein 15), and shortened the poly(A) tails of Bmp15, Gdf9 (growth differentiation factor 9), and Cyclin B1 transcripts. FCCP (200 and 2000 nM) also affected p34cdc2 kinase activity. By contrast, ddC did not alter ATP production. Instead, ddC significantly decreased mtDNA copy number (P < 0.05). FCCP (200 and 2000 nM) also decreased extrusion of the first polar body, whereas ddC at all concentrations did not affect the ability of immature oocytes to reach metaphase II. Both FCCP (200 and 2000 nM) and ddC (200 and 2000 µM) reduced parthenogenetic blastocyst formation compared with untreated oocytes. However, these inhibitors did not affect total cell number and apoptosis. These findings suggest that mitochondrial metabolic activity is critical for oocyte maturation and that both mitochondrial metabolic activity and replication contribute to the developmental competence of porcine oocytes. PMID:24492657

  13. 38 CFR 1.526 - Copies of records and papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... papers. 1.526 Section 1.526 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Copies of records and papers. (a) Any person desiring a copy of any record or document in the custody of... plain one-sided paper copies of a standard size (81/2″ × 11″; 81/2″ × 14″; 11″ × 14″) $0.15 per...

  14. 38 CFR 1.526 - Copies of records and papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... papers. 1.526 Section 1.526 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Copies of records and papers. (a) Any person desiring a copy of any record or document in the custody of... plain one-sided paper copies of a standard size (81/2″ × 11″; 81/2″ × 14″; 11″ × 14″) $0.15 per...

  15. 38 CFR 1.526 - Copies of records and papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... papers. 1.526 Section 1.526 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Copies of records and papers. (a) Any person desiring a copy of any record or document in the custody of... plain one-sided paper copies of a standard size (81/2″ × 11″; 81/2″ × 14″; 11″ × 14″) $0.15 per...

  16. 40 CFR 716.30 - Submission of copies of studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of copies of studies. 716... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.30 Submission of copies of studies. (a)(1) Except as provided in §§ 716.5, 716.20, and 716.50, persons must send to EPA copies of...

  17. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  18. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  19. COPI selectively drives maturation of the early Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Papanikou, Effrosyni; Day, Kasey J; Austin, Jotham; Glick, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    COPI coated vesicles carry material between Golgi compartments, but the role of COPI in the secretory pathway has been ambiguous. Previous studies of thermosensitive yeast COPI mutants yielded the surprising conclusion that COPI was dispensable both for the secretion of certain proteins and for Golgi cisternal maturation. To revisit these issues, we optimized the anchor-away method, which allows peripheral membrane proteins such as COPI to be sequestered rapidly by adding rapamycin. Video fluorescence microscopy revealed that COPI inactivation causes an early Golgi protein to remain in place while late Golgi proteins undergo cycles of arrival and departure. These dynamics generate partially functional hybrid Golgi structures that contain both early and late Golgi proteins, explaining how secretion can persist when COPI has been inactivated. Our findings suggest that cisternal maturation involves a COPI-dependent pathway that recycles early Golgi proteins, followed by multiple COPI-independent pathways that recycle late Golgi proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13232.001 PMID:26709839

  20. Monopolin recruits condensin to organize centromere DNA and repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Laura S.; Applen Clancey, Shelly E.; Chacón, Jeremy M.; Gardner, Melissa K.; Berman, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of higher-order structure at centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. The monopolin complex is thought to cross-link multiple kinetochore complexes to prevent merotelic attachments that result in chromosome missegregation. This model is based on structural analysis and the requirement that monopolin execute mitotic and meiotic chromosome segregation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has more than one kinetochore–microtubule attachment/centromere, and co-orient sister chromatids in meiosis I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recent data from S. pombe suggest an alternative possibility: that the recruitment of condensin is the primary function of monopolin. Here we test these models using the yeast Candida albicans. C. albicans cells lacking monopolin exhibit defects in chromosome segregation, increased distance between centromeres, and decreased stability of several types of repeat DNA. Of note, changing kinetochore–microtubule copy number from one to more than one kinetochore–microtubule/centromere does not alter the requirement for monopolin. Furthermore, monopolin recruits condensin to C. albicans centromeres, and overexpression of condensin suppresses chromosome segregation defects in strains lacking monopolin. We propose that the key function of monopolin is to recruit condensin in order to promote the assembly of higher-order structure at centromere and repetitive DNA. PMID:23885115

  1. A Novel Mechanism for Activator-Controlled Initiation of DNA Replication that Resolves the Auto-regulation Sequestration Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, K.; Ehrenberg, M.

    For bacterial genes to be inherited to the next bacterial generation, the gene containing DNA sequences must be duplicated before cell division so that each daughter cell contains a complete set of genes. The duplication process is called DNA replication and it starts at one defined site on the DNA molecule called the origin of replication (oriC) [1]. In addition to chromosomal DNA, bacteria often also contain plasmid DNA. Plasmids are extra-chromosomal DNA molecules carrying genes that increase the fitness of their host in certain environments, with genes encoding antibiotic resistance as a notorious example [2]. The chromosome is found at a low per cell copy number and initiation of replication takes place synchronously once every cell generation [3,4], while many plasmids exist at a high copy number and replication initiates asynchronously, throughout the cell generation [5]. In this chapter we present a novel mechanism for the control of initiation of replication, where one type of molecule may activate a round of replication by binding to the origin of replication and also regulate its own synthesis accurately. This mechanism of regulating the initiation of replication also offers a novel solution to the so-called auto-regulation sequestration paradox, i.e. how a molecule sequestered by binding to DNA may at the same time accurately regulate its own synthesis [6]. The novel regulatory mechanism is inspired by the molecular set-up of the replication control of the chromosome in the bacterium Escherichia coli and is here transferred into a plasmid model. This allows us to illustrate principles of replication control in a simple way and to put the novel mechanism into the context of a previous analysis of plasmids regulated by inhibitor-dilution copy number control [7]. We analyze factors important for a sensitive response of the replication initiation rate to changes in plasmid concentration in an asynchronous model and discover a novel mechanism for creating a

  2. Groundtruth approach to accurate quantitation of fluorescence microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mascio-Kegelmeyer, L; Tomascik-Cheeseman, L; Burnett, M S; van Hummelen, P; Wyrobek, A J

    2000-12-01

    To more accurately measure fluorescent signals from microarrays, we calibrated our acquisition and analysis systems by using groundtruth samples comprised of known quantities of red and green gene-specific DNA probes hybridized to cDNA targets. We imaged the slides with a full-field, white light CCD imager and analyzed them with our custom analysis software. Here we compare, for multiple genes, results obtained with and without preprocessing (alignment, color crosstalk compensation, dark field subtraction, and integration time). We also evaluate the accuracy of various image processing and analysis techniques (background subtraction, segmentation, quantitation and normalization). This methodology calibrates and validates our system for accurate quantitative measurement of microarrays. Specifically, we show that preprocessing the images produces results significantly closer to the known ground-truth for these samples.

  3. Phylogeny of the cycads based on multiple single-copy nuclear genes: congruence of concatenated parsimony, likelihood and species tree inference methods

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Leiva, Dayana E.; Meerow, Alan W.; Calonje, Michael; Griffith, M. Patrick; Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Nakamura, Kyoko; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Lewis, Carl E.; Namoff, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Despite a recent new classification, a stable phylogeny for the cycads has been elusive, particularly regarding resolution of Bowenia, Stangeria and Dioon. In this study, five single-copy nuclear genes (SCNGs) are applied to the phylogeny of the order Cycadales. The specific aim is to evaluate several gene tree–species tree reconciliation approaches for developing an accurate phylogeny of the order, to contrast them with concatenated parsimony analysis and to resolve the erstwhile problematic phylogenetic position of these three genera. Methods DNA sequences of five SCNGs were obtained for 20 cycad species representing all ten genera of Cycadales. These were analysed with parsimony, maximum likelihood (ML) and three Bayesian methods of gene tree–species tree reconciliation, using Cycas as the outgroup. A calibrated date estimation was developed with Bayesian methods, and biogeographic analysis was also conducted. Key Results Concatenated parsimony, ML and three species tree inference methods resolve exactly the same tree topology with high support at most nodes. Dioon and Bowenia are the first and second branches of Cycadales after Cycas, respectively, followed by an encephalartoid clade (Macrozamia–Lepidozamia–Encephalartos), which is sister to a zamioid clade, of which Ceratozamia is the first branch, and in which Stangeria is sister to Microcycas and Zamia. Conclusions A single, well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis of the generic relationships of the Cycadales is presented. However, massive extinction events inferred from the fossil record that eliminated broader ancestral distributions within Zamiaceae compromise accurate optimization of ancestral biogeographical areas for that hypothesis. While major lineages of Cycadales are ancient, crown ages of all modern genera are no older than 12 million years, supporting a recent hypothesis of mostly Miocene radiations. This phylogeny can contribute to an accurate infrafamilial

  4. Differences in AMY1 Gene Copy Numbers Derived from Blood, Buccal Cells and Saliva Using Quantitative and Droplet Digital PCR Methods: Flagging the Pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Siong Gim; Chan, Yiong Huak; Heng, Chew Kiat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The human salivary (AMY1) gene, encoding salivary α-amylase, has variable copy number variants (CNVs) in the human genome. We aimed to determine if real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and the more recently available Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) can provide a precise quantification of the AMY1 gene copy number in blood, buccal cells and saliva samples derived from the same individual. Methods Seven participants were recruited and DNA was extracted from the blood, buccal cells and saliva samples provided by each participant. Taqman assay real-time qPCR and ddPCR were conducted to quantify AMY1 gene copy numbers. Statistical analysis was carried out to determine the difference in AMY1 gene copy number between the different biological specimens and different assay methods. Results We found significant within-individual difference (p<0.01) in AMY1 gene copy number between different biological samples as determined by qPCR. However, there was no significant within-individual difference in AMY1 gene copy number between different biological samples as determined by ddPCR. We also found that AMY1 gene copy number of blood samples were comparable between qPCR and ddPCR, while there is a significant difference (p<0.01) between AMY1 gene copy numbers measured by qPCR and ddPCR for both buccal swab and saliva samples. Conclusions Despite buccal cells and saliva samples being possible sources of DNA, it is pertinent that ddPCR or a single biological sample, preferably blood sample, be used for determining highly polymorphic gene copy numbers like AMY1, due to the large within-individual variability between different biological samples if real time qPCR is employed. PMID:28125683

  5. Accurate reactions open up the way for more cooperative societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukov, Jeromos

    2014-09-01

    We consider a prisoner's dilemma model where the interaction neighborhood is defined by a square lattice. Players are equipped with basic cognitive abilities such as being able to distinguish their partners, remember their actions, and react to their strategy. By means of their short-term memory, they can remember not only the last action of their partner but the way they reacted to it themselves. This additional accuracy in the memory enables the handling of different interaction patterns in a more appropriate way and this results in a cooperative community with a strikingly high cooperation level for any temptation value. However, the more developed cognitive abilities can only be effective if the copying process of the strategies is accurate enough. The excessive extent of faulty decisions can deal a fatal blow to the possibility of stable cooperative relations.

  6. Accurate reactions open up the way for more cooperative societies.

    PubMed

    Vukov, Jeromos

    2014-09-01

    We consider a prisoner's dilemma model where the interaction neighborhood is defined by a square lattice. Players are equipped with basic cognitive abilities such as being able to distinguish their partners, remember their actions, and react to their strategy. By means of their short-term memory, they can remember not only the last action of their partner but the way they reacted to it themselves. This additional accuracy in the memory enables the handling of different interaction patterns in a more appropriate way and this results in a cooperative community with a strikingly high cooperation level for any temptation value. However, the more developed cognitive abilities can only be effective if the copying process of the strategies is accurate enough. The excessive extent of faulty decisions can deal a fatal blow to the possibility of stable cooperative relations.

  7. Three or more copies of the proteolipid protein gene PLP1 cause severe Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Nicole I; Sistermans, Erik A; Cundall, Maria; Hobson, Grace M; Davis-Williams, Angelique P; Palmer, Rodger; Stubbs, Paula; Davies, Sally; Endziniene, Milda; Wu, Yvonne; Chong, Wui K; Malcolm, Sue; Surtees, Robert; Garbern, James Y; Woodward, Karen J

    2005-04-01

    We describe five boys from different families with an atypically severe form of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) who have three, and in one case, five copies of the proteolipid protein (PLP1) gene. This is the first report of more than two copies of PLP1 in PMD patients and clearly demonstrates that severe clinical symptoms are associated with increased PLP1 gene dosage. Previously, duplications, deletions and mutations of the PLP1 gene were reported to give rise to this X-linked disorder. Patients with PLP1 duplication are usually classified as having either classical or transitional PMD rather than the more rare severe connatal form. The clinical symptoms of the five patients in this study included lack of stable head control and severe mental retardation, with three having severe paroxysmal disorder and two dying before the first year of life. Gene dosage was determined using interphase FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and the novel approach of multiple ligation probe amplification (MLPA). We found FISH unreliable for dosage detection above the level of a duplication and MLPA to be more accurate in determination of specific copy number. Our finding that three or more copies of the gene give rise to a more severe phenotype is in agreement with observations in transgenic mice where severity of disease increased with Plp1 gene dosage and level of overexpression. The patient with five copies of PLP1 was not more affected than those with a triplication, suggesting that there is possibly a limit to the level of severity or that other genetic factors influence the phenotype. It highlights the significance of PLP1 dosage in CNS myelinogenesis as well as the importance of accurate determination of PLP1 gene copy number in the diagnosis of PMD and carrier detection.

  8. p53 increase mitochondrial copy number via up-regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linhao; Zhou, Hongying; Fang, Dingzhi; Feng, Shi

    2016-01-01

    In colorectal cancer, no study has been carried out discovering the relationship among p53, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) expression and change of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number. In our study, co-expression of p53 and TFAM was observed in colon adenocarcinoma tissues, paracancerous tissues and 9 colorectal cancer cell lines. Then, a significant linear correlation was established between either p53 or TFAM expression and advanced TNM stage, positive lymph nodes and low 5-year survival rate in patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Additionally, advanced TNM stage, large tumor burden, presence of distant metastasis, and high TFAM expression were significantly related to poor overall 5-years survival. Moreover, alteration of p53 expression could change TFAM expression but TFAM could not influence p53 expression, and p53 could enhance TFAM expression via binding to TFAM promoter. While, both of p53 and TFAM expression could incrase mtDNA copy number in vitro. In conclusions, p53 might incrase mtDNA copy number through its regulation on TFAM expression via TFAMpromoter. PMID:27732955

  9. Rapid Accurate Identification of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, John

    2007-03-09

    The goals of this program were to develop two assays for rapid, accurate identification of pathogenic organisms at the strain level. The first assay "Quantitative Genome Profiling or QGP" is a real time PCR assay with a restriction enzyme-based component. Its underlying concept is that certain enzymes should cleave genomic DNA at many sites and that in some cases these cuts will interrupt the connection on the genomic DNA between flanking PCR primer pairs thereby eliminating selected PCR amplifications. When this occurs the appearance of the real-time PCR threshold (Ct) signal during DNA amplification is totally eliminated or, if cutting is incomplete, greatly delayed compared to an uncut control. This temporal difference in appearance of the Ct signal relative to undigested control DNA provides a rapid, high-throughput approach for DNA-based identification of different but closely related pathogens depending upon the nucleotide sequence of the target region. The second assay we developed uses the nucleotide sequence of pairs of shmi identifier tags (-21 bp) to identify DNA molecules. Subtle differences in linked tag pair combinations can also be used to distinguish between closely related isolates..

  10. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  11. The DNA of ciliated protozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, D M

    1994-01-01

    Ciliates contain two types of nuclei: a micronucleus and a macronucleus. The micronucleus serves as the germ line nucleus but does not express its genes. The macronucleus provides the nuclear RNA for vegetative growth. Mating cells exchange haploid micronuclei, and a new macronucleus develops from a new diploid micronucleus. The old macronucleus is destroyed. This conversion consists of amplification, elimination, fragmentation, and splicing of DNA sequences on a massive scale. Fragmentation produces subchromosomal molecules in Tetrahymena and Paramecium cells and much smaller, gene-sized molecules in hypotrichous ciliates to which telomere sequences are added. These molecules are then amplified, some to higher copy numbers than others. rDNA is differentially amplified to thousands of copies per macronucleus. Eliminated sequences include transposonlike elements and sequences called internal eliminated sequences that interrupt gene coding regions in the micronuclear genome. Some, perhaps all, of these are excised as circular molecules and destroyed. In at least some hypotrichs, segments of some micronuclear genes are scrambled in a nonfunctional order and are recorded during macronuclear development. Vegetatively growing ciliates appear to possess a mechanism for adjusting copy numbers of individual genes, which corrects gene imbalances resulting from random distribution of DNA molecules during amitosis of the macronucleus. Other distinctive features of ciliate DNA include an altered use of the conventional stop codons. Images PMID:8078435

  12. Physical Mapping of Amplified Copies of the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase Gene in Glyphosate-Resistant Amaranthus tuberculatus.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Andrew; Varanasi, Vijay K; Danilova, Tatiana V; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Nakka, Sridevi; Peterson, Dallas E; Tranel, Patrick J; Friebe, Bernd; Gill, Bikram S; Jugulam, Mithila

    2017-02-01

    Recent and rapid evolution of resistance to glyphosate, the most widely used herbicides, in several weed species, including common waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus), poses a serious threat to sustained crop production. We report that glyphosate resistance in A tuberculatus was due to amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-P synthase (EPSPS) gene, which encodes the molecular target of glyphosate. There was a positive correlation between EPSPS gene copies and its transcript expression. We analyzed the distribution of EPSPS copies in the genome of A tuberculatus using fluorescence in situ hybridization on mitotic metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis mapped the EPSPS gene to pericentromeric regions of two homologous chromosomes in glyphosate sensitive A tuberculatus In glyphosate-resistant plants, a cluster of EPSPS genes on the pericentromeric region on one pair of homologous chromosomes was detected. Intriguingly, two highly glyphosate-resistant plants harbored an additional chromosome with several EPSPS copies besides the native chromosome pair with EPSPS copies. These results suggest that the initial event of EPSPS gene duplication may have occurred because of unequal recombination mediated by repetitive DNA. Subsequently, gene amplification may have resulted via several other mechanisms, such as chromosomal rearrangements, deletion/insertion, transposon-mediated dispersion, or possibly by interspecific hybridization. This report illustrates the physical mapping of amplified EPSPS copies in A tuberculatus.

  13. Mapping IS6110 in high-copy number Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains shows specific insertion points in the Beijing genotype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains are characterized by a large number of IS6110 copies, suggesting the potential implication of this element in the virulence and capacity for rapid dissemination characteristic of this family. This work studies the insetion points of IS6110 in high-copy clinical isolates specifically focusing on the Beijing genotype. Results In the present work we mapped the insertion points of IS6110 in all the Beijing strains available in the literature and in the DNA sequence databases. We generated a representative primer collection of the IS6110 locations, which was used to analyse 61 high-copy clinical isolates. A total of 440 points of insertion were identified and analysis of their flanking regions determined the exact location, the direct repeats (DRs), the orientation and the distance to neighboring genes of each copy of IS6110. We identified specific points of insertion in Beijing strains that enabled us to obtain a dendrogram that groups the Beijing genotype. Conclusions This work presents a detailed analysis of locations of IS6110 in high-copy clinical isolates, showing points of insertion present with high frequency in the Beijing family and absent in other strains. PMID:23800083

  14. Schizophrenia copy number variants and associative learning.

    PubMed

    Clifton, N E; Pocklington, A J; Scholz, B; Rees, E; Walters, J T R; Kirov, G; O'Donovan, M C; Owen, M J; Wilkinson, L S; Thomas, K L; Hall, J

    2017-02-01

    Large-scale genomic studies have made major progress in identifying genetic risk variants for schizophrenia. A key finding from these studies is that there is an increased burden of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in schizophrenia cases compared with controls. The mechanism through which these CNVs confer risk for the symptoms of schizophrenia, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that schizophrenia risk CNVs impact basic associative learning processes, abnormalities of which have long been associated with the disorder. To investigate whether genes in schizophrenia CNVs impact on specific phases of associative learning we combined human genetics with experimental gene expression studies in animals. In a sample of 11 917 schizophrenia cases and 16 416 controls, we investigated whether CNVs from patients with schizophrenia are enriched for genes expressed during the consolidation, retrieval or extinction of associative memories. We show that CNVs from cases are enriched for genes expressed during fear extinction in the hippocampus, but not genes expressed following consolidation or retrieval. These results suggest that CNVs act to impair inhibitory learning in schizophrenia, potentially contributing to the development of core symptoms of the disorder.

  15. Schizophrenia copy number variants and associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, N E; Pocklington, A J; Scholz, B; Rees, E; Walters, J T R; Kirov, G; O'Donovan, M C; Owen, M J; Wilkinson, L S; Thomas, K L; Hall, J

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale genomic studies have made major progress in identifying genetic risk variants for schizophrenia. A key finding from these studies is that there is an increased burden of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in schizophrenia cases compared with controls. The mechanism through which these CNVs confer risk for the symptoms of schizophrenia, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that schizophrenia risk CNVs impact basic associative learning processes, abnormalities of which have long been associated with the disorder. To investigate whether genes in schizophrenia CNVs impact on specific phases of associative learning we combined human genetics with experimental gene expression studies in animals. In a sample of 11 917 schizophrenia cases and 16 416 controls, we investigated whether CNVs from patients with schizophrenia are enriched for genes expressed during the consolidation, retrieval or extinction of associative memories. We show that CNVs from cases are enriched for genes expressed during fear extinction in the hippocampus, but not genes expressed following consolidation or retrieval. These results suggest that CNVs act to impair inhibitory learning in schizophrenia, potentially contributing to the development of core symptoms of the disorder. PMID:27956746

  16. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy photo: Albern Color Research, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy photo: Albern Color Research, Inc., Philadelphia, July 1960 COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ca. 1904 SHOWING PART OF THE ENFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE SHAKER COMMUNITY WITH THE GREAT STONE HOUSE IN THE CENTER - Shaker Church Family General Views, State Route 4A, Enfield, Grafton County, NH

  18. An Evidence-Informed Picture of Course-Related Copying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Rumi

    2016-01-01

    Recent changes in Canadian copyright law have prompted Canada's educational institutions to reexamine their need for a blanket copying license. Users' rights under the amended Copyright Act now include fair dealing for purposes of education, and the Supreme Court has established that copying short excerpts for classroom use can qualify as fair…

  19. 28. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated May 22, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated May 22, 1951 (from paper copy at Engineer Flight, Ellsworth Air Force Base, SD). Readiness hangar architectural : building sections & details. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Readiness Hangar, Kenny Road, southeast corner of interstction with G Avenue, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  20. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  1. 7 CFR 510.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 510.2 Section 510.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 510.2 Public inspection, copying, and indexing....

  2. 7 CFR 3701.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3701.2 Section 3701.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ECONOMIC RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 3701.2 Public inspection, copying, and indexing....

  3. 7 CFR 3404.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3404.2 Section 3404.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE... inspection, copying, and indexing. 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) requires that certain materials be made available...

  4. 7 CFR 3801.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3801.2 Section 3801.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) WORLD AGRICULTURAL... inspection, copying, and indexing. 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) requires that certain materials be made available...

  5. 45 CFR 1703.404 - Copying and transcription charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Copying and transcription charges. 1703.404... Copying and transcription charges. (a) The Commission will charge fees for furnishing records at the rate of ten cents per page for photocopies and at the actual cost of transcription. When the...

  6. 40 CFR 716.30 - Submission of copies of studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submission of copies of studies. 716.30 Section 716.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.30 Submission of copies...

  7. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Models, Exhibits, Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  8. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Models, Exhibits, Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  9. 17. Photocopy of copy of drawing of Hangar 1301, dated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of copy of drawing of Hangar 1301, dated June 15, 1944. Copy of drawing stored at 436 Civil Engineer Squadron, Design Management Element Cece, 600 8th Street, Dover Air Force Base, DE - Dover Air Force Base, Hangar No. 1301, Dover, Kent County, DE

  10. 18. Photocopy of copy of drawing of boiler plant and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of copy of drawing of boiler plant and shops building, dated June 15, 1944. Copy of drawing stored at 436 Civil Engineer Squadron, Design Management Element Cece, 600 8th Street, Dover AFB, DE - Dover Air Force Base, Hangar No. 1301, Dover, Kent County, DE

  11. 30 CFR 47.72 - Cost for copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cost for copies. 47.72 Section 47.72 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Making HazCom Information Available § 47.72 Cost for copies. (a) The operator...

  12. 30 CFR 47.72 - Cost for copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cost for copies. 47.72 Section 47.72 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Making HazCom Information Available § 47.72 Cost for copies. (a) The operator...

  13. 30 CFR 47.72 - Cost for copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost for copies. 47.72 Section 47.72 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Making HazCom Information Available § 47.72 Cost for copies. (a) The operator...

  14. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  15. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  16. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  17. Perceiving the Impossible: How Individuals with Autism Copy Paradoxical Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Elizabeth; Ropar, Danielle; Mitchell, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Mottron and colleagues found that individuals with autism were less affected by geometric impossibility than comparison participants on a copying task. The current experiment sought to determine whether a local perceptual style could account for this. Participants with and without autism copied possible and impossible geometric figures. Geometric…

  18. 36 CFR 1254.60 - What are NARA's copying services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are NARA's copying services? 1254.60 Section 1254.60 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE USING RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Copying...

  19. 36 CFR 1254.64 - Will NARA certify copies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Will NARA certify copies? 1254.64 Section 1254.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE USING RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Copying...

  20. 36 CFR 1254.60 - What are NARA's copying services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are NARA's copying services? 1254.60 Section 1254.60 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE USING RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Copying...

  1. 36 CFR 1254.64 - Will NARA certify copies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Will NARA certify copies? 1254.64 Section 1254.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE USING RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Copying...

  2. 25 CFR 571.13 - Copies of audit reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .../or reports as a result of the audit setting forth the results of each fiscal year. The submission... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copies of audit reports. 571.13 Section 571.13 Indians... MONITORING AND INVESTIGATIONS Audits § 571.13 Copies of audit reports. (a) Each tribe shall prepare...

  3. 47 CFR 3.25 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Application Procedures § 3.25 Number of copies. One original and one copy of FCC Form 44, “Application For Certification As An Accounting Authority” will be required. Only applications mailed to the Commission on official, Commission...

  4. 47 CFR 3.25 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Application Procedures § 3.25 Number of copies. One original and one copy of FCC Form 44, “Application For Certification As An Accounting Authority” will be required. Only applications mailed to the Commission on official, Commission...

  5. 9. Photographic copy of USRS design drawing, April 1906 (from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photographic copy of USRS design drawing, April 1906 (from duplicate copy on file at United States Bureau of Reclamation, Denver Service Center, Denver, Colorado). Main canal diversion weir from Salmon River - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  6. 7 CFR 3601.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3601.2 Section 3601.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 3601.2 Public inspection, copying,...

  7. 7 CFR 3601.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3601.2 Section 3601.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 3601.2 Public inspection, copying,...

  8. 7 CFR 3601.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3601.2 Section 3601.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 3601.2 Public inspection, copying,...

  9. 8. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH, DATED CA. 19201925, FORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH, DATED CA. 1920-1925, FORT BLISS, ARROW POINTS TO 7TH CAVALRY CANTONMENT, COPY ON FILE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE, FORT BLISS - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  10. 6. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED MAY 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED MAY 15, 1919, 7TH CAVALRY CANTONMENT POST EXCHANGE, WAR DEPARTMENT, CONSTRUCTION DIVISION, PLAN No. 357, COPY ON FILE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE, FORT BLISS - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  11. 5. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED JUNE 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED JUNE 14, 1919, 7TH CAVALRY CANTONMENT MESS BUILDING, WAR DEPARTMENT, CONSTRUCTION DIVISION, PLAN No. 316A, COPY ON FILE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE, FORT BLISS - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  12. 4. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED MAY 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED MAY 13, 1919, DETACHMENT BARRACK WITHOUT MESS, WAR DEPARTMENT, CONSTRUCTION DIVISION, PLAN # 353, COPY ON FILE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE, FORT BLISS - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  13. 52. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Copeland, 7 April 1932 (Original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Heating - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  14. 20. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 193031, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1930-31, by Sverdrup and Parcel, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. Truss stress diagram, and plans of laterals and sway braces - Gasconade Bridge, Spanning Gasconade River at State Route 100, Gasconade, Gasconade County, MO

  15. 41. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. STRESS SHEET - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  16. 37. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1934, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1934, by Sverdrup and Parcel, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department. Stress sheet, continuous span - Mark Twain Memorial Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at US Route 36, Hannibal, Marion County, MO

  17. 53. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by A.G.D., 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Electrical - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  18. Vocal copying of individually distinctive signature whistles in bottlenose dolphins

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephanie L.; Sayigh, Laela S.; Wells, Randall S.; Fellner, Wendi; Janik, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Vocal learning is relatively common in birds but less so in mammals. Sexual selection and individual or group recognition have been identified as major forces in its evolution. While important in the development of vocal displays, vocal learning also allows signal copying in social interactions. Such copying can function in addressing or labelling selected conspecifics. Most examples of addressing in non-humans come from bird song, where matching occurs in an aggressive context. However, in other animals, addressing with learned signals is very much an affiliative signal. We studied the function of vocal copying in a mammal that shows vocal learning as well as complex cognitive and social behaviour, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Copying occurred almost exclusively between close associates such as mother–calf pairs and male alliances during separation and was not followed by aggression. All copies were clearly recognizable as such because copiers consistently modified some acoustic parameters of a signal when copying it. We found no evidence for the use of copying in aggression or deception. This use of vocal copying is similar to its use in human language, where the maintenance of social bonds appears to be more important than the immediate defence of resources. PMID:23427174

  19. 6. Photo copy of photograph, (original owned by Mary Gaudineer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photo copy of photograph, (original owned by Mary Gaudineer, Beckley, WV, copy at National Forest Office, Elkins, WV), Don Gaudineer, 1934. CONSTRUCTION OF FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST BUNKHOUSE AND GARAGE. (see also historic photograph WV-237-13) - Parsons Nursery, Fernow Experimental Forest Residence, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  20. 48. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS L9 TO L12 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO