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Sample records for accurate dose calculations

  1. DICOM organ dose does not accurately represent calculated dose in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, Moayyad E.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to analyze the agreement between the mean glandular dose estimated by the mammography unit (organ dose) and mean glandular dose calculated using Dance et al published method (calculated dose). Anonymised digital mammograms from 50 BreastScreen NSW centers were downloaded and exposure information required for the calculation of dose was extracted from the DICOM header along with the organ dose estimated by the system. Data from quality assurance annual tests for the included centers were collected and used to calculate the mean glandular dose for each mammogram. Bland-Altman analysis and a two-tailed paired t-test were used to study the agreement between calculated and organ dose and the significance of any differences. A total of 27,869 dose points from 40 centers were included in the study, mean calculated dose and mean organ dose (+/- standard deviation) were 1.47 (+/-0.66) and 1.38 (+/-0.56) mGy respectively. A statistically significant 0.09 mGy bias (t = 69.25; p<0.0001) with 95% limits of agreement between calculated and organ doses ranging from -0.34 and 0.52 were shown by Bland-Altman analysis, which indicates a small yet highly significant difference between the two means. The use of organ dose for dose audits is done at the risk of over or underestimating the calculated dose, hence, further work is needed to identify the causal agents for differences between organ and calculated doses and to generate a correction factor for organ dose.

  2. Numerical system utilising a Monte Carlo calculation method for accurate dose assessment in radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, F; Endo, A

    2007-01-01

    A system utilising radiation transport codes has been developed to derive accurate dose distributions in a human body for radiological accidents. A suitable model is quite essential for a numerical analysis. Therefore, two tools were developed to setup a 'problem-dependent' input file, defining a radiation source and an exposed person to simulate the radiation transport in an accident with the Monte Carlo calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. Necessary resources are defined by a dialogue method with a generally used personal computer for both the tools. The tools prepare human body and source models described in the input file format of the employed Monte Carlo codes. The tools were validated for dose assessment in comparison with a past criticality accident and a hypothesized exposure.

  3. A hybrid approach for rapid, accurate, and direct kilovoltage radiation dose calculations in CT voxel space

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, Alexei; Tambasco, Mauro

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a fast and accurate method that uses computed tomography (CT) voxel data to estimate absorbed radiation dose at a point of interest (POI) or series of POIs from a kilovoltage (kV) imaging procedure. Methods: The authors developed an approach that computes absorbed radiation dose at a POI by numerically evaluating the linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) using a combination of deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. This hybrid approach accounts for material heterogeneity with a level of accuracy comparable to the general MC algorithms. Also, the dose at a POI is computed within seconds using the Intel Core i7 CPU 920 2.67 GHz quad core architecture, and the calculations are performed using CT voxel data, making it flexible and feasible for clinical applications. To validate the method, the authors constructed and acquired a CT scan of a heterogeneous block phantom consisting of a succession of slab densities: Tissue (1.29 cm), bone (2.42 cm), lung (4.84 cm), bone (1.37 cm), and tissue (4.84 cm). Using the hybrid transport method, the authors computed the absorbed doses at a set of points along the central axis and x direction of the phantom for an isotropic 125 kVp photon spectral point source located along the central axis 92.7 cm above the phantom surface. The accuracy of the results was compared to those computed with MCNP, which was cross-validated with EGSnrc, and served as the benchmark for validation. Results: The error in the depth dose ranged from -1.45% to +1.39% with a mean and standard deviation of -0.12% and 0.66%, respectively. The error in the x profile ranged from -1.3% to +0.9%, with standard deviations of -0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. The number of photons required to achieve these results was 1x10{sup 6}. Conclusions: The voxel-based hybrid method evaluates the LBTE rapidly and accurately to estimate the absorbed x-ray dose at any POI or series of POIs from a kV imaging procedure.

  4. Accurate dose assessment system for an exposed person utilising radiation transport calculation codes in emergency response to a radiological accident.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, F; Shigemori, Y; Seki, A

    2009-01-01

    A system has been developed to assess radiation dose distribution inside the body of exposed persons in a radiological accident by utilising radiation transport calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. The system consists mainly of two parts, pre-processor and post-processor of the radiation transport calculation. Programs for the pre-processor are used to set up a 'problem-dependent' input file, which defines the accident condition and dosimetric quantities to be estimated. The program developed for the post-processor part can effectively indicate dose information based upon the output file of the code. All of the programs in the dosimetry system can be executed with a generally used personal computer and accurately give the dose profile to an exposed person in a radiological accident without complicated procedures. An experiment using a physical phantom was carried out to verify the availability of the dosimetry system with the developed programs in a gamma ray irradiation field.

  5. New approach based on tetrahedral-mesh geometry for accurate 4D Monte Carlo patient-dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Min Cheol; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Sohn, Jason W.

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, to achieve accurate 4D Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy, we devised a new approach that combines (1) modeling of the patient body using tetrahedral-mesh geometry based on the patient’s 4D CT data, (2) continuous movement/deformation of the tetrahedral patient model by interpolation of deformation vector fields acquired through deformable image registration, and (3) direct transportation of radiation particles during the movement and deformation of the tetrahedral patient model. The results of our feasibility study show that it is certainly possible to construct 4D patient models (= phantoms) with sufficient accuracy using the tetrahedral-mesh geometry and to directly transport radiation particles during continuous movement and deformation of the tetrahedral patient model. This new approach not only produces more accurate dose distribution in the patient but also replaces the current practice of using multiple 3D voxel phantoms and combining multiple dose distributions after Monte Carlo simulations. For routine clinical application of our new approach, the use of fast automatic segmentation algorithms is a must. In order to achieve, simultaneously, both dose accuracy and computation speed, the number of tetrahedrons for the lungs should be optimized. Although the current computation speed of our new 4D Monte Carlo simulation approach is slow (i.e. ~40 times slower than that of the conventional dose accumulation approach), this problem is resolvable by developing, in Geant4, a dedicated navigation class optimized for particle transportation in tetrahedral-mesh geometry.

  6. New approach based on tetrahedral-mesh geometry for accurate 4D Monte Carlo patient-dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Han, Min Cheol; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Sohn, Jason W

    2015-02-21

    In the present study, to achieve accurate 4D Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy, we devised a new approach that combines (1) modeling of the patient body using tetrahedral-mesh geometry based on the patient's 4D CT data, (2) continuous movement/deformation of the tetrahedral patient model by interpolation of deformation vector fields acquired through deformable image registration, and (3) direct transportation of radiation particles during the movement and deformation of the tetrahedral patient model. The results of our feasibility study show that it is certainly possible to construct 4D patient models (= phantoms) with sufficient accuracy using the tetrahedral-mesh geometry and to directly transport radiation particles during continuous movement and deformation of the tetrahedral patient model. This new approach not only produces more accurate dose distribution in the patient but also replaces the current practice of using multiple 3D voxel phantoms and combining multiple dose distributions after Monte Carlo simulations. For routine clinical application of our new approach, the use of fast automatic segmentation algorithms is a must. In order to achieve, simultaneously, both dose accuracy and computation speed, the number of tetrahedrons for the lungs should be optimized. Although the current computation speed of our new 4D Monte Carlo simulation approach is slow (i.e. ~40 times slower than that of the conventional dose accumulation approach), this problem is resolvable by developing, in Geant4, a dedicated navigation class optimized for particle transportation in tetrahedral-mesh geometry.

  7. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  8. Calibrating the High Density Magnetic Port within Tissue Expanders to Achieve more Accurate Dose Calculations for Postmastectomy Patients with Immediate Breast Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jasmine; Zhang, Rui; Heins, David; Castle, Katherine

    In postmastectomy radiotherapy, an increasing number of patients have tissue expanders inserted subpectorally when receiving immediate breast reconstruction. These tissue expanders are composed of silicone and are inflated with saline through an internal metallic port; this serves the purpose of stretching the muscle and skin tissue over time, in order to house a permanent implant. The issue with administering radiation therapy in the presence of a tissue expander is that the port's magnetic core can potentially perturb the dose delivered to the Planning Target Volume, causing significant artifacts in CT images. Several studies have explored this problem, and suggest that density corrections must be accounted for in treatment planning. However, very few studies accurately calibrated commercial TP systems for the high density material used in the port, and no studies employed fusion imaging to yield a more accurate contour of the port in treatment planning. We compared depth dose values in the water phantom between measurement and TPS calculations, and we were able to overcome some of the inhomogeneities presented by the image artifact by fusing the KVCT and MVCT images of the tissue expander together, resulting in a more precise comparison of dose calculations at discrete locations. We expect this method to be pivotal in the quantification of dose distribution in the PTV. Research funded by the LS-AMP Award.

  9. Electron beam dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, K R; Mills, M D; Almond, P R

    1981-05-01

    Electron beam dose distributions in the presence of inhomogeneous tissue are calculated by an algorithm that sums the dose distribution of individual pencil beams. The off-axis dependence of the pencil beam dose distribution is described by the Fermi-Eyges theory of thick-target multiple Coulomb scattering. Measured square-field depth-dose data serve as input for the calculations. Air gap corrections are incorporated and use data from'in-air' measurements in the penumbra of the beam. The effective depth, used to evaluate depth-dose, and the sigma of the off-axis Gaussian spread against depth are calculated by recursion relations from a CT data matrix for the material underlying individual pencil beams. The correlation of CT number with relative linear stopping power and relative linear scattering power for various tissues is shown. The results of calculations are verified by comparison with measurements in a 17 MeV electron beam from the Therac 20 linear accelerator. Calculated isodose lines agree nominally to within 2 mm of measurements in a water phantom. Similar agreement is observed in cork slabs simulating lung. Calculations beneath a bone substitute illustrate a weakness in the calculation. Finally a case of carcinoma in the maxillary antrum is studied. The theory suggests an alternative method for the calculation of depth-dose of rectangular fields.

  10. Calculation of effective dose.

    PubMed

    McCollough, C H; Schueler, B A

    2000-05-01

    The concept of "effective dose" was introduced in 1975 to provide a mechanism for assessing the radiation detriment from partial body irradiations in terms of data derived from whole body irradiations. The effective dose is the mean absorbed dose from a uniform whole-body irradiation that results in the same total radiation detriment as from the nonuniform, partial-body irradiation in question. The effective dose is calculated as the weighted average of the mean absorbed dose to the various body organs and tissues, where the weighting factor is the radiation detriment for a given organ (from a whole-body irradiation) as a fraction of the total radiation detriment. In this review, effective dose equivalent and effective dose, as established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 1977 and 1990, respectively, are defined and various methods of calculating these quantities are presented for radionuclides, radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography and mammography. In order to calculate either quantity, it is first necessary to estimate the radiation dose to individual organs. One common method of determining organ doses is through Monte Carlo simulations of photon interactions within a simplified mathematical model of the human body. Several groups have performed these calculations and published their results in the form of data tables of organ dose per unit activity or exposure. These data tables are specified according to particular examination parameters, such as radiopharmaceutical, x-ray projection, x-ray beam energy spectra or patient size. Sources of these organ dose conversion coefficients are presented and differences between them are examined. The estimates of effective dose equivalent or effective dose calculated using these data, although not intended to describe the dose to an individual, can be used as a relative measure of stochastic radiation detriment. The calculated values, in units of sievert (or rem), indicate the amount of

  11. Dose Calculation Spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, Ali

    1997-06-10

    VENTSAR XL is an EXCEL Spreadsheet that can be used to calculate downwind doses as a result of a hypothetical atmospheric release. Both building effects and plume rise may be considered. VENTSAR XL will run using any version of Microsoft EXCEL version 4.0 or later. Macros (the programming language of EXCEL) was used to automate the calculations. The user enters a minimal amount of input and the code calculates the resulting concentrations and doses at various downwind distances as specified by the user.

  12. Prenatal radiation exposure: dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Scharwächter, C; Röser, A; Schwartz, C A; Haage, P

    2015-05-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero x-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties. • Radiation exposure of the unborn child can result in both deterministic as well as stochastic damage und hitherto should be avoided or reduced to a minimum

  13. SU-E-J-100: The Combination of Deformable Image Registration and Regions-Of-Interest Mapping Technique to Accomplish Accurate Dose Calculation On Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We introduce a new method combined with the deformable image registration (DIR) and regions-of-interest mapping (ROIM) technique to accurately calculate dose on daily CBCT for esophageal cancer. Methods: Patients suffered from esophageal cancer were enrolled in the study. Prescription was set to 66 Gy/30 F and 54 Gy/30 F to the primary tumor (PTV66) and subclinical disease (PTV54) . Planning CT (pCT) were segmented into 8 substructures in terms of their differences in physical density, such as gross target volume (GTV), venae cava superior (SVC), aorta, heart, spinal cord, lung, muscle and bones. The pCT and its substructures were transferred to the MIM software to readout their mean HU values. Afterwards, a deformable planning CT to daily KV-CBCT image registration method was then utilized to acquire a new structure set on CBCT. The newly generated structures on CBCT were then transferred back to the treatment planning system (TPS) and its HU information were overridden manually with mean HU values obtained from pCT. Finally, the treatment plan was projected onto the CBCT images with the same beam arrangements and monitor units (MUs) to accomplish dose calculation. Planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) from both of the pCT and CBCT were compared to evaluate the dose calculation accuracy. Results: It was found that the dose distribution in the CBCT showed little differences compared to the pCT, regardless of whether PTV or OARs were concerned. Specifically, dose variation in GTV, PTV54, PTV66, SVC, lung and heart were within 0.1%. The maximum dose variation was presented in the spinal cord, which was up to 2.7% dose difference. Conclusion: The proposed method combined with DIR and ROIM technique to accurately calculate dose distribution on CBCT for esophageal cancer is feasible.

  14. Practical applications of internal dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.

    1994-06-01

    Accurate estimates of intake magnitude and internal dose are the goal for any assessment of an actual intake of radioactivity. When only one datum is available on which to base estimates, the choices for internal dose assessment become straight-forward: apply the appropriate retention or excretion function, calculate the intake, and calculate the dose. The difficulty comes when multiple data and different types of data become available. Then practical decisions must be made on how to interpret conflicting data, or how to adjust the assumptions and techniques underlying internal dose assessments to give results consistent with the data. This article describes nine types of adjustments which can be incorporated into calculations of intake and internal dose, and then offers several practical insights to dealing with some real-world internal dose puzzles.

  15. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  16. Radiotherapy dose calculations in the presence of hip prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, Paul J.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Jeraj, Robert; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-06-30

    The high density and atomic number of hip prostheses for patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy challenge our ability to accurately calculate dose. A new clinical dose calculation algorithm, Monte Carlo, will allow accurate calculation of the radiation transport both within and beyond hip prostheses. The aim of this research was to investigate, for both phantom and patient geometries, the capability of various dose calculation algorithms to yield accurate treatment plans. Dose distributions in phantom and patient geometries with high atomic number prostheses were calculated using Monte Carlo, superposition, pencil beam, and no-heterogeneity correction algorithms. The phantom dose distributions were analyzed by depth dose and dose profile curves. The patient dose distributions were analyzed by isodose curves, dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability (TCP/NTCP) calculations. Monte Carlo calculations predicted the dose enhancement and reduction at the proximal and distal prosthesis interfaces respectively, whereas superposition and pencil beam calculations did not. However, further from the prosthesis, the differences between the dose calculation algorithms diminished. Treatment plans calculated with superposition showed similar isodose curves, DVHs, and TCP/NTCP as the Monte Carlo plans, except in the bladder, where Monte Carlo predicted a slightly lower dose. Treatment plans calculated with either the pencil beam method or with no heterogeneity correction differed significantly from the Monte Carlo plans.

  17. How accurately can the peak skin dose in fluoroscopy be determined using indirect dose metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle; Ensor, Joe E.; Pasciak, Alexander S.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. There is no consensus as to whether or not indirect skin dosimetry is sufficiently accurate for fluoroscopically-guided interventions. However, measuring PSD with film is difficult and the decision to do so must be madea priori. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different types of indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% using indirect dose metrics for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures at two sites. Indirect dose metrics from the procedures were collected, including reference air kerma. Four different estimates of PSD were calculated from the indirect dose metrics and compared along with reference air kerma to the measured PSD for each case. The four indirect estimates included a standard calculation method, the use of detailed information from the radiation dose structured report, and two simplified calculation methods based on the standard method. Indirect dosimetry results were compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the different indirect estimates were examined. Results: When using the standard calculation method, calculated PSD were within ±35% for all 41 procedures studied. Calculated PSD were within ±50% for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance for all calculations. Reference air kerma was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which reference air kerma or calculated PSD exhibited large (±35%) differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two main causative factors were identified: unusually small or large source-to-patient distances and large contributions to reference air kerma from cone

  18. Monte Carlo dose calculations in advanced radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Karl Kenneth

    The remarkable accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithms has led to the widely accepted view that these methods should and will play a central role in the radiotherapy treatment verification and planning of the future. The advantages of using MC clinically are particularly evident for radiation fields passing through inhomogeneities, such as lung and air cavities, and for small fields, including those used in today's advanced intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques. Many investigators have reported significant dosimetric differences between MC and conventional dose calculations in such complex situations, and have demonstrated experimentally the unmatched ability of MC calculations in modeling charged particle disequilibrium. The advantages of using MC dose calculations do come at a cost. The nature of MC dose calculations require a highly detailed, in-depth representation of the physical system (accelerator head geometry/composition, anatomical patient geometry/composition and particle interaction physics) to allow accurate modeling of external beam radiation therapy treatments. To perform such simulations is computationally demanding and has only recently become feasible within mainstream radiotherapy practices. In addition, the output of the accelerator head simulation can be highly sensitive to inaccuracies within a model that may not be known with sufficient detail. The goal of this dissertation is to both improve and advance the implementation of MC dose calculations in modern external beam radiotherapy. To begin, a novel method is proposed to fine-tune the output of an accelerator model to better represent the measured output. In this method an intensity distribution of the electron beam incident on the model is inferred by employing a simulated annealing algorithm. The method allows an investigation of arbitrary electron beam intensity distributions and is not restricted to the commonly assumed Gaussian intensity. In a second component of

  19. Photon beam description in PEREGRINE for Monte Carlo dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L. J., LLNL

    1997-03-04

    Goal of PEREGRINE is to provide capability for accurate, fast Monte Carlo calculation of radiation therapy dose distributions for routine clinical use and for research into efficacy of improved dose calculation. An accurate, efficient method of describing and sampling radiation sources is needed, and a simple, flexible solution is provided. The teletherapy source package for PEREGRINE, coupled with state-of-the-art Monte Carlo simulations of treatment heads, makes it possible to describe any teletherapy photon beam to the precision needed for highly accurate Monte Carlo dose calculations in complex clinical configurations that use standard patient modifiers such as collimator jaws, wedges, blocks, and/or multi-leaf collimators. Generic beam descriptions for a class of treatment machines can readily be adjusted to yield dose calculation to match specific clinical sites.

  20. Tank Z-361 dose rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, R.F.

    1998-09-30

    Neutron and gamma ray dose rates were calculated above and around the 6-inch riser of tank Z-361 located at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Dose rates were also determined off of one side of the tank. The largest dose rate 0.029 mrem/h was a gamma ray dose and occurred 76.2 cm (30 in.) directly above the open riser. All other dose rates were negligible. The ANSI/ANS 1991 flux to dose conversion factor for neutrons and photons were used in this analysis. Dose rates are reported in units of mrem/h with the calculated uncertainty shown within the parentheses.

  1. A MULTIMODEL APPROACH FOR CALCULATING BENCHMARK DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory


    A Multimodel Approach for Calculating Benchmark Dose
    Ramon I. Garcia and R. Woodrow Setzer

    In the assessment of dose response, a number of plausible dose- response models may give fits that are consistent with the data. If no dose response formulation had been speci...

  2. The influence of the dose calculation resolution of VMAT plans on the calculated dose for eye lens and optic pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Min; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jung-In; Carlson, Joel; Kim, Jin Ho

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effect of dose calculation grid on calculated dose-volumetric parameters for eye lenses and optic pathways. A total of 30 patients treated using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique, were retrospectively selected. For each patient, dose distributions were calculated with calculation grids ranging from 1 to 5 mm at 1 mm intervals. Identical structures were used for VMAT planning. The changes in dose-volumetric parameters according to the size of the calculation grid were investigated. Compared to dose calculation with 1 mm grid, the maximum doses to the eye lens with calculation grids of 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm increased by 0.2 ± 0.2 Gy, 0.5 ± 0.5 Gy, 0.9 ± 0.8 Gy and 1.7 ± 1.5 Gy on average, respectively. The Spearman's correlation coefficient between dose gradients near structures vs. the differences between the calculated doses with 1 mm grid and those with 5 mm grid, were 0.380 (p < 0.001). For the accurate calculation of dose distributions, as well as efficiency, using a grid size of 2 mm appears to be the most appropriate choice.

  3. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Lee, J; Kim, H; Kim, I; Ye, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield.

  4. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  5. Dose Calculation Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Algorithm for CyberKnife Compared with Other Commercially Available Dose Calculation Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Subhash; Ott, Joseph Williams, Jamone; Dickow, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms have the potential for greater accuracy than traditional model-based algorithms. This enhanced accuracy is particularly evident in regions of lateral scatter disequilibrium, which can develop during treatments incorporating small field sizes and low-density tissue. A heterogeneous slab phantom was used to evaluate the accuracy of several commercially available dose calculation algorithms, including Monte Carlo dose calculation for CyberKnife, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm and Pencil Beam convolution for the Eclipse planning system, and convolution-superposition for the Xio planning system. The phantom accommodated slabs of varying density; comparisons between planned and measured dose distributions were accomplished with radiochromic film. The Monte Carlo algorithm provided the most accurate comparison between planned and measured dose distributions. In each phantom irradiation, the Monte Carlo predictions resulted in gamma analysis comparisons >97%, using acceptance criteria of 3% dose and 3-mm distance to agreement. In general, the gamma analysis comparisons for the other algorithms were <95%. The Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for CyberKnife provides more accurate dose distribution calculations in regions of lateral electron disequilibrium than commercially available model-based algorithms. This is primarily because of the ability of Monte Carlo algorithms to implicitly account for tissue heterogeneities, density scaling functions; and/or effective depth correction factors are not required.

  6. Dose calculation accuracy of the Monte Carlo algorithm for CyberKnife compared with other commercially available dose calculation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Subhash; Ott, Joseph; Williams, Jamone; Dickow, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms have the potential for greater accuracy than traditional model-based algorithms. This enhanced accuracy is particularly evident in regions of lateral scatter disequilibrium, which can develop during treatments incorporating small field sizes and low-density tissue. A heterogeneous slab phantom was used to evaluate the accuracy of several commercially available dose calculation algorithms, including Monte Carlo dose calculation for CyberKnife, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm and Pencil Beam convolution for the Eclipse planning system, and convolution-superposition for the Xio planning system. The phantom accommodated slabs of varying density; comparisons between planned and measured dose distributions were accomplished with radiochromic film. The Monte Carlo algorithm provided the most accurate comparison between planned and measured dose distributions. In each phantom irradiation, the Monte Carlo predictions resulted in gamma analysis comparisons >97%, using acceptance criteria of 3% dose and 3-mm distance to agreement. In general, the gamma analysis comparisons for the other algorithms were <95%. The Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for CyberKnife provides more accurate dose distribution calculations in regions of lateral electron disequilibrium than commercially available model-based algorithms. This is primarily because of the ability of Monte Carlo algorithms to implicitly account for tissue heterogeneities, density scaling functions; and/or effective depth correction factors are not required.

  7. Fluence-convolution broad-beam (FCBB) dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Mingli

    2010-12-07

    IMRT optimization requires a fast yet relatively accurate algorithm to calculate the iteration dose with small memory demand. In this paper, we present a dose calculation algorithm that approaches these goals. By decomposing the infinitesimal pencil beam (IPB) kernel into the central axis (CAX) component and lateral spread function (LSF) and taking the beam's eye view (BEV), we established a non-voxel and non-beamlet-based dose calculation formula. Both LSF and CAX are determined by a commissioning procedure using the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) method as the standard dose engine. The proposed dose calculation involves a 2D convolution of a fluence map with LSF followed by ray tracing based on the CAX lookup table with radiological distance and divergence correction, resulting in complexity of O(N(3)) both spatially and temporally. This simple algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than the CCCS method. Without pre-calculation of beamlets, its implementation is also orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional voxel-based beamlet-superposition (VBS) approach. We compared the presented algorithm with the CCCS method using simulated and clinical cases. The agreement was generally within 3% for a homogeneous phantom and 5% for heterogeneous and clinical cases. Combined with the 'adaptive full dose correction', the algorithm is well suitable for calculating the iteration dose during IMRT optimization.

  8. Strategy Guideline. Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  9. Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  10. Historical river flow rates for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.

    1991-06-10

    Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

  11. Extremity model for neutron dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sattelberger, J. A.; Shores, E. F.

    2001-01-01

    In personnel dosimetry for external radiation exposures, health physicists tend to focus on measurement of whole body dose, where 'whole body' is generally regarded as the torso on which the dosimeter is placed.' Although a variety of scenarios exist in which workers must handle radioactive materials, whole body dose estimates may not be appropriate when assessing dose, particularly to the extremities. For example, consider sources used for instrument calibration. If such sources are in a contact geometry (e.g. held by fingers), an extremity dose estimate may be more relevant than a whole body dose. However, because questions arise regarding how that dose should be calculated, a detailed extremity model was constructed with the MCNP-4Ca Monte Carlo code. Although initially intended for use with gamma sources, recent work by Shores2 provided the impetus to test the model with neutrons.

  12. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  13. Calculation of Accurate Hexagonal Discontinuity Factors for PARCS

    SciTech Connect

    Pounders. J., Bandini, B. R. , Xu, Y, and Downar, T. J.

    2007-11-01

    In this study we derive a methodology for calculating discontinuity factors consistent with the Triangle-based Polynomial Expansion Nodal (TPEN) method implemented in PARCS for hexagonal reactor geometries. The accuracy of coarse-mesh nodal methods is greatly enhanced by permitting flux discontinuities at node boundaries, but the practice of calculating discontinuity factors from infinite-medium (zero-current) single bundle calculations may not be sufficiently accurate for more challenging problems in which there is a large amount of internodal neutron streaming. The authors therefore derive a TPEN-based method for calculating discontinuity factors that are exact with respect to generalized equivalence theory. The method is validated by reproducing the reference solution for a small hexagonal core.

  14. Multigroup neutron dose calculations for proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey Iv, Charles T; Prinja, Anil K

    2009-01-01

    We have developed tools for the preparation of coupled multigroup proton/neutron cross section libraries. Our method is to use NJOY to process evaluated nuclear data files for incident particles below 150 MeV and MCNPX to produce data for higher energies. We modified the XSEX3 program of the MCNPX code system to produce Legendre expansions of scattering matrices generated by sampling the physics models that are comparable to the output of the GROUPR routine of NJOY. Our code combines the low and high energy scattering data with user input stopping powers and energy deposition cross sections that we also calculated using MCNPX. Our code also calculates momentum transfer coefficients for the library and optionally applies an energy straggling model to the scattering cross sections and stopping powers. The motivation was initially for deterministic solution of space radiation shielding calculations using Attila, but noting that proton therapy treatment planning may neglect secondary neutron dose assessments because of difficulty and expense, we have also investigated the feasibility of multi group methods for this application. We have shown that multigroup MCNPX solutions for secondary neutron dose compare well with continuous energy solutions and are obtainable with less than half computational cost. This efficiency comparison neglects the cost of preparing the library data, but this becomes negligible when distributed over many multi group calculations. Our deterministic calculations illustrate recognized obstacles that may have to be overcome before discrete ordinates methods can be efficient alternatives for proton therapy neutron dose calculations.

  15. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  16. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mohd Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A L; Osman, N D; Abdullah, R; Rabaie, N A; Salikin, M S

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  17. Calculation of external dose from distributed source

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses a relatively simple calculational method, called the point kernel method (Fo68), for estimating external dose from distributed sources that emit photon or electron radiations. The principles of the point kernel method are emphasized, rather than the presentation of extensive sets of calculations or tables of numerical results. A few calculations are presented for simple source geometries as illustrations of the method, and references and descriptions are provided for other caluclations in the literature. This paper also describes exposure situations for which the point kernel method is not appropriate and other, more complex, methods must be used, but these methods are not discussed in any detail.

  18. Independent dose calculations for commissioning, quality assurance and dose reconstruction of PBS proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Meier, G; Besson, R; Nanz, A; Safai, S; Lomax, A J

    2015-04-07

    Pencil beam scanning proton therapy allows the delivery of highly conformal dose distributions by delivering several thousand pencil beams. These beams have to be individually optimised and accurately delivered requiring a significant quality assurance workload. In this work we describe a toolkit for independent dose calculations developed at Paul Scherrer Institut which allows for dose reconstructions at several points in the treatment workflow. Quality assurance based on reconstructed dose distributions was shown to be favourable to pencil beam by pencil beam comparisons for the detection of delivery uncertainties and estimation of their effects. Furthermore the dose reconstructions were shown to have a sensitivity of the order of or higher than the measurements currently employed in the clinical verification procedures. The design of the independent dose calculation tool allows for a high modifiability of the dose calculation parameters (e.g. depth dose profiles, angular spatial distributions) allowing for a safe environment outside of the clinical treatment planning system for investigating the effect of such parameters on the resulting dose distributions and thus distinguishing between different contributions to measured dose deviations. The presented system could potentially reduce the amount of patient-specific quality assurance measurements which currently constitute a bottleneck in the clinical workflow.

  19. Use of Fluka to Create Dose Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kerry T.; Barzilla, Janet; Townsend, Lawrence; Brittingham, John

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo codes provide an effective means of modeling three dimensional radiation transport; however, their use is both time- and resource-intensive. The creation of a lookup table or parameterization from Monte Carlo simulation allows users to perform calculations with Monte Carlo results without replicating lengthy calculations. FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code was used to develop lookup tables and parameterizations for data resulting from the penetration of layers of aluminum, polyethylene, and water with areal densities ranging from 0 to 100 g/cm^2. Heavy charged ion radiation including ions from Z=1 to Z=26 and from 0.1 to 10 GeV/nucleon were simulated. Dose, dose equivalent, and fluence as a function of particle identity, energy, and scattering angle were examined at various depths. Calculations were compared against well-known results and against the results of other deterministic and Monte Carlo codes. Results will be presented.

  20. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  1. Validation of the photon dose calculation model in the VARSKIN 4 skin dose computer code.

    PubMed

    Sherbini, Sami; Decicco, Joseph; Struckmeyer, Richard; Saba, Mohammad; Bush-Goddard, Stephanie

    2012-12-01

    An updated version of the skin dose computer code VARSKIN, namely VARSKIN 4, was examined to determine the accuracy of the photon model in calculating dose rates with different combinations of source geometry and radionuclides. The reference data for this validation were obtained by means of Monte Carlo transport calculations using MCNP5. The geometries tested included the zero volume sources point and disc, as well as the volume sources sphere and cylinder. Three geometries were tested using source directly on the skin, source off the skin with an absorber material between source and skin, and source off the skin with only an air gap between source and skin. The results of these calculations showed that the non-volume sources produced dose rates that were in very good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculations, but the volume sources resulted in overestimates of the dose rates compared with the Monte Carlo results by factors that ranged up to about 2.5. The results for the air gap showed poor agreement with Monte Carlo for all source geometries, with the dose rates overestimated in all cases. The conclusion was that, for situations where the beta dose is dominant, these results are of little significance because the photon dose in such cases is generally a very small fraction of the total dose. For situations in which the photon dose is dominant, use of the point or disc geometries should be adequate in most cases except those in which the dose approaches or exceeds an applicable limit. Such situations will often require a more accurate dose assessment and may require the use of methods such as Monte Carlo transport calculations.

  2. Photon dose calculation based on electron multiple-scattering theory: primary dose deposition kernels.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Jette, D

    1999-08-01

    The transport of the secondary electrons resulting from high-energy photon interactions is essential to energy redistribution and deposition. In order to develop an accurate dose-calculation algorithm for high-energy photons, which can predict the dose distribution in inhomogeneous media and at the beam edges, we have investigated the feasibility of applying electron transport theory [Jette, Med. Phys. 15, 123 (1988)] to photon dose calculation. In particular, the transport of and energy deposition by Compton electron and electrons and positrons resulting from pair production were studied. The primary photons are treated as the source of the secondary electrons and positrons, which are transported through the irradiated medium using Gaussian multiple-scattering theory [Jette, Med. Phys. 15, 123 (1988)]. The initial angular and kinetic energy distribution(s) of the secondary electrons (and positrons) emanating from the photon interactions are incorporated into the transport. Due to different mechanisms of creation and cross-section functions, the transport of and the energy deposition by the electrons released in these two processes are studied and modeled separately based on first principles. In this article, we focus on determining the dose distribution for an individual interaction site. We define the Compton dose deposition kernel (CDK) or the pair-production dose deposition kernel (PDK) as the dose distribution relative to the point of interaction, per unit interaction density, for a monoenergetic photon beam in an infinite homogeneous medium of unit density. The validity of this analytic modeling of dose deposition was evaluated through EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation. Quantitative agreement between these two calculations of the dose distribution and the average energy deposited per interaction was achieved. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the electron dose-calculation method to photon dose calculation.

  3. Accurate and efficient linear scaling DFT calculations with universal applicability.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Stephan; Ratcliff, Laura E; Genovese, Luigi; Caliste, Damien; Boulanger, Paul; Goedecker, Stefan; Deutsch, Thierry

    2015-12-21

    Density functional theory calculations are computationally extremely expensive for systems containing many atoms due to their intrinsic cubic scaling. This fact has led to the development of so-called linear scaling algorithms during the last few decades. In this way it becomes possible to perform ab initio calculations for several tens of thousands of atoms within reasonable walltimes. However, even though the use of linear scaling algorithms is physically well justified, their implementation often introduces some small errors. Consequently most implementations offering such a linear complexity either yield only a limited accuracy or, if one wants to go beyond this restriction, require a tedious fine tuning of many parameters. In our linear scaling approach within the BigDFT package, we were able to overcome this restriction. Using an ansatz based on localized support functions expressed in an underlying Daubechies wavelet basis - which offers ideal properties for accurate linear scaling calculations - we obtain an amazingly high accuracy and a universal applicability while still keeping the possibility of simulating large system with linear scaling walltimes requiring only a moderate demand of computing resources. We prove the effectiveness of our method on a wide variety of systems with different boundary conditions, for single-point calculations as well as for geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics.

  4. More accurate fitting of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd radial dose functions

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R. E. P.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2008-09-15

    In this study an improved functional form for fitting the radial dose functions, g(r), of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds is presented. The new function is capable of accurately fitting radial dose functions over ranges as large as 0.05 cm{<=}r{<=}10 cm for {sup 125}I seeds and 0.10 cm{<=}r{<=}10 cm for {sup 103}Pd seeds. The average discrepancies between fit and calculated data are less than 0.5% over the full range of fit and maximum discrepancies are 2% or less. The fitting function is also capable of accounting for the sharp increase in g(r) (upturn) seen for some sources for r<0.1 cm. This upturn has previously been attributed to the breakdown of the approximation of the sources as a line, however, in this study we demonstrate that another contributing factor is the 4.5 keV characteristic x-rays emitted from the Ti seed casing. Radial dose functions are calculated for 18 {sup 125}I seeds and 9 {sup 103}Pd seeds using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose. Fitting coefficients of the new function are tabulated for all 27 seeds. Extrapolation characteristics of the function are also investigated. The new functional form is an improvement over currently used fitting functions with its main strength being the ability to accurately fit the rapidly varying radial dose function at small distances. The new function is an excellent candidate for fitting the radial dose function of all {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I brachytherapy seeds and will increase the accuracy of dose distributions calculated around brachytherapy seeds using the TG-43 protocol over a wider range of data. More accurate values of g(r) for r<0.5 cm may be particularly important in the treatment of ocular melanoma.

  5. Brachytherapy source characterization for improved dose calculations using primary and scatter dose separation.

    PubMed

    Russell, Kellie R; Tedgren, Asa K Carlsson; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2005-09-01

    In brachytherapy, tissue heterogeneities, source shielding, and finite patient/phantom extensions affect both the primary and scatter dose distributions. The primary dose is, due to the short range of secondary electrons, dependent only on the distribution of material located on the ray line between the source and dose deposition site. The scatter dose depends on both the direct irradiation pattern and the distribution of material in a large volume surrounding the point of interest, i.e., a much larger volume must be included in calculations to integrate many small dose contributions. It is therefore of interest to consider different methods for the primary and the scatter dose calculation to improve calculation accuracy with limited computer resources. The algorithms in present clinical use ignore these effects causing systematic dose errors in brachytherapy treatment planning. In this work we review a primary and scatter dose separation formalism (PSS) for brachytherapy source characterization to support separate calculation of the primary and scatter dose contributions. We show how the resulting source characterization data can be used to drive more accurate dose calculations using collapsed cone superposition for scatter dose calculations. Two types of source characterization data paths are used: a direct Monte Carlo simulation in water phantoms with subsequent parameterization of the results, and an alternative data path built on processing of AAPM TG43 formatted data to provide similar parameter sets. The latter path is motivated of the large amounts of data already existing in the TG43 format. We demonstrate the PSS methods using both data paths for a clinical 192Ir source. Results are shown for two geometries: a finite but homogeneous water phantom, and a half-slab consisting of water and air. The dose distributions are compared to results from full Monte Carlo simulations and we show significant improvement in scatter dose calculations when the collapsed

  6. GMctdospp: Description and validation of a CT dose calculation system

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Ralph Wulff, Jörg; Zink, Klemens

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To develop a Monte Carlo (MC)-based computed tomography (CT) dose estimation method with a graphical user interface with options to define almost arbitrary simulation scenarios, to make calculations sufficiently fast for comfortable handling, and to make the software free of charge for general availability to the scientific community. Methods: A framework called GMctdospp was developed to calculate phantom and patient doses with the MC method based on the EGSnrc system. A CT scanner was modeled for testing and was adapted to half-value layer, beam-shaping filter, z-profile, and tube-current modulation (TCM). To validate the implemented variance reduction techniques, depth-dose and cross-profile calculations of a static beam were compared against DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc. Measurements for beam energies of 80 and 120 kVp at several positions of a CT dose-index (CTDI) standard phantom were compared against calculations of the created CT model. Finally, the efficiency of the adapted code was benchmarked against EGSnrc defaults. Results: The CT scanner could be modeled accurately. The developed TCM scheme was confirmed by the dose measurement. A comparison of calculations to DOSXYZnrc showed no systematic differences. Measurements in a CTDI phantom could be reproduced within 2% average, with a maximal difference of about 6%. Efficiency improvements of about six orders of magnitude were observed for larger organ structures of a chest-examination protocol in a voxelized phantom. In these cases, simulations took 25 s to achieve a statistical uncertainty of ∼0.5%. Conclusions: A fast dose-calculation system for phantoms and patients in a CT examination was developed, successfully validated, and benchmarked. Influences of scan protocols, protection method, and other issues can be easily examined with the developed framework.

  7. Phage therapy pharmacology: calculating phage dosing.

    PubMed

    Abedon, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Phage therapy, which can be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria (or, simply, biocontrol), is the application of bacterial viruses-also bacteriophages or phages-to reduce densities of nuisance or pathogenic bacteria. Predictive calculations for phage therapy dosing should be useful toward rational development of therapeutic as well as biocontrol products. Here, I consider the theoretical basis of a number of concepts relevant to phage dosing for phage therapy including minimum inhibitory concentration (but also "inundation threshold"), minimum bactericidal concentration (but also "clearance threshold"), decimal reduction time (D value), time until bacterial eradication, threshold bacterial density necessary to support phage population growth ("proliferation threshold"), and bacterial density supporting half-maximal phage population growth rates (K(B)). I also address the concepts of phage killing titers, multiplicity of infection, and phage peak densities. Though many of the presented ideas are not unique to this chapter, I nonetheless provide variations on derivations and resulting formulae, plus as appropriate discuss relative importance. The overriding goal is to present a variety of calculations that are useful toward phage therapy dosing so that they may be found in one location and presented in a manner that allows facile appreciation, comparison, and implementation. The importance of phage density as a key determinant of the phage potential to eradicate bacterial targets is stressed throughout the chapter.

  8. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar{sub 3}), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar{sub 3} rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10{sup −3} cm{sup −1} or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar{sub 3} are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar{sub 3} is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar{sub 3} may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  9. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-01

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar3), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar3 rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10-3 cm-1 or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar3 are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar3 is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar3 may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  10. Efficient determination of accurate atomic polarizabilities for polarizeable embedding calculations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate embedding potentials, obtained via various methods, used for polarizable embedding computations of excitation energies of para‐nitroaniline in water and organic solvents as well as of the green fluorescent protein. We found that isotropic polarizabilities derived from DFTD3 dispersion coefficients correlate well with those obtained via the LoProp method. We show that these polarizabilities in conjunction with appropriately derived point charges are in good agreement with calculations employing static multipole moments up to quadrupoles and anisotropic polarizabilities for both computed systems. The (partial) use of these easily‐accessible parameters drastically reduces the computational effort to obtain accurate embedding potentials especially for proteins. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27317509

  11. Validation of Dose Calculation Codes for Clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, S.; Wirendal, B.; Bjerler, J.; Studsvik; Teunckens, L.

    2003-02-27

    Various international and national bodies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency, the European Commission, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have put forward proposals or guidance documents to regulate the ''clearance'' from regulatory control of very low level radioactive material, in order to allow its recycling as a material management practice. All these proposals are based on predicted scenarios for subsequent utilization of the released materials. The calculation models used in these scenarios tend to utilize conservative data regarding exposure times and dose uptake as well as other assumptions as a safeguard against uncertainties. None of these models has ever been validated by comparison with the actual real life practice of recycling. An international project was organized in order to validate some of the assumptions made in these calculation models, and, thereby, better assess the radiological consequences of recycling on a practical large scale.

  12. Highly Accurate Calculations of the Phase Diagram of Cold Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulenburger, Luke; Baczewski, Andrew

    The phase diagram of lithium is particularly complicated, exhibiting many different solid phases under the modest application of pressure. Experimental efforts to identify these phases using diamond anvil cells have been complemented by ab initio theory, primarily using density functional theory (DFT). Due to the multiplicity of crystal structures whose enthalpy is nearly degenerate and the uncertainty introduced by density functional approximations, we apply the highly accurate many-body diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method to the study of the solid phases at low temperature. These calculations span many different phases, including several with low symmetry, demonstrating the viability of DMC as a method for calculating phase diagrams for complex solids. Our results can be used as a benchmark to test the accuracy of various density functionals. This can strengthen confidence in DFT based predictions of more complex phenomena such as the anomalous melting behavior predicted for lithium at high pressures. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Accurate calculation of field and carrier distributions in doped semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenji; Tang, Jianping; Yu, Hongchun; Wang, Yanguo

    2012-06-01

    We use the numerical squeezing algorithm(NSA) combined with the shooting method to accurately calculate the built-in fields and carrier distributions in doped silicon films (SFs) in the micron and sub-micron thickness range and results are presented in graphical form for variety of doping profiles under different boundary conditions. As a complementary approach, we also present the methods and the results of the inverse problem (IVP) - finding out the doping profile in the SFs for given field distribution. The solution of the IVP provides us the approach to arbitrarily design field distribution in SFs - which is very important for low dimensional (LD) systems and device designing. Further more, the solution of the IVP is both direct and much easy for all the one-, two-, and three-dimensional semiconductor systems. With current efforts focused on the LD physics, knowing of the field and carrier distribution details in the LD systems will facilitate further researches on other aspects and hence the current work provides a platform for those researches.

  14. Accurate calculated optical properties of substituted quaterphenylene nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Justin J; Koch, Rainer

    2010-01-14

    The accurate prediction of both excitation and emission energies of substituted p-quaterphenylenes using a variety of established and newly developed density functional methods is evaluated and compared against experimental data, both from single molecules and from nanofibers. For calculation of the UV-vis excitation the MPW1K functional is the best performing method (with the employed TZVP basis set). After a linear scaling factor is applied, mPW2-PLYP, CIS and the very fast INDO/S also reproduce the experimental data correctly. For the fluorescence relaxation energies MPW1K, mPW2-PLYP, and INDO/S give good results, even without scaling. However, mPW2-PLYP involves second-order perturbation to introduce nonlocal electron correlation and therefore requires significantly more resources, so the recommended level of theory for a single methodology to investigate the optical properties of substituted phenylenes and related systems is MPW1K/6-311+G(2d,p), followed by INDO/S as a low-cost alternative. As an extension of a previous work on predicting first hyperpolarisabilities, we can now demonstrate that the chosen approach (HF/6-31G(d)//B3LYP/6-31G(d)) produces data that correlate well with the susceptibilities derived from measurements on nanofibers.

  15. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  16. Recommendations for Insulin Dose Calculator Risk Management.

    PubMed

    Rees, Christen

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown the usefulness of an automated insulin dose bolus advisor (BA) in achieving improved glycemic control for insulin-using diabetes patients. Although regulatory agencies have approved several BAs over the past decades, these devices are not standardized in their approach to dosage calculation and include many features that may introduce risk to patients. Moreover, there is no single standard of care for diabetes worldwide and no guidance documents for BAs, specifically. Given the emerging and more stringent regulations on software used in medical devices, the approval process is becoming more difficult for manufacturers to navigate, with some manufacturers opting to remove BAs from their products altogether. A comprehensive literature search was performed, including publications discussing: diabetes BA use and benefit, infusion pump safety and regulation, regulatory submissions, novel BAs, and recommendations for regulation and risk management of BAs. Also included were country-specific and international guidance documents for medical device, infusion pump, medical software, and mobile medical application risk management and regulation. No definitive worldwide guidance exists regarding risk management requirements for BAs, specifically. However, local and international guidance documents for medical devices, infusion pumps, and medical device software offer guidance that can be applied to this technology. In addition, risk management exercises that are algorithm-specific can help prepare manufacturers for regulatory submissions. This article discusses key issues relevant to BA use and safety, and recommends risk management activities incorporating current research and guidance.

  17. Recommendations for Insulin Dose Calculator Risk Management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown the usefulness of an automated insulin dose bolus advisor (BA) in achieving improved glycemic control for insulin-using diabetes patients. Although regulatory agencies have approved several BAs over the past decades, these devices are not standardized in their approach to dosage calculation and include many features that may introduce risk to patients. Moreover, there is no single standard of care for diabetes worldwide and no guidance documents for BAs, specifically. Given the emerging and more stringent regulations on software used in medical devices, the approval process is becoming more difficult for manufacturers to navigate, with some manufacturers opting to remove BAs from their products altogether. A comprehensive literature search was performed, including publications discussing: diabetes BA use and benefit, infusion pump safety and regulation, regulatory submissions, novel BAs, and recommendations for regulation and risk management of BAs. Also included were country-specific and international guidance documents for medical device, infusion pump, medical software, and mobile medical application risk management and regulation. No definitive worldwide guidance exists regarding risk management requirements for BAs, specifically. However, local and international guidance documents for medical devices, infusion pumps, and medical device software offer guidance that can be applied to this technology. In addition, risk management exercises that are algorithm-specific can help prepare manufacturers for regulatory submissions. This article discusses key issues relevant to BA use and safety, and recommends risk management activities incorporating current research and guidance. PMID:24876550

  18. Verification of the VARSKIN beta skin dose calculation computer code.

    PubMed

    Sherbini, Sami; DeCicco, Joseph; Gray, Anita Turner; Struckmeyer, Richard

    2008-06-01

    The computer code VARSKIN is used extensively to calculate dose to the skin resulting from contaminants on the skin or on protective clothing covering the skin. The code uses six pre-programmed source geometries, four of which are volume sources, and a wide range of user-selectable radionuclides. Some verification of this code had been carried out before the current version of the code, version 3.0, was released, but this was limited in extent and did not include all the source geometries that the code is capable of modeling. This work extends this verification to include all the source geometries that are programmed in the code over a wide range of beta radiation energies and skin depths. Verification was carried out by comparing the doses calculated using VARSKIN with the doses for similar geometries calculated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP5. Beta end-point energies used in the calculations ranged from 0.3 MeV up to 2.3 MeV. The results showed excellent agreement between the MCNP and VARSKIN calculations, with the agreement being within a few percent for point and disc sources and within 20% for other sources with the exception of a few cases, mainly at the low end of the beta end-point energies. The accuracy of the VARSKIN results, based on the work in this paper, indicates that it is sufficiently accurate for calculation of skin doses resulting from skin contaminations, and that the uncertainties arising from the use of VARSKIN are likely to be small compared with other uncertainties that typically arise in this type of dose assessment, such as those resulting from a lack of exact information on the size, shape, and density of the contaminant, the depth of the sensitive layer of the skin at the location of the contamination, the duration of the exposure, and the possibility of the source moving over various areas of the skin during the exposure period if the contaminant is on protective clothing.

  19. Ab initio calculations to support accurate modelling of the rovibronic spectroscopy calculations of vanadium monoxide (VO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKemmish, Laura K.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of the rovibronic near-infrared and visible spectra of vanadium monoxide (VO) is very important for studies of cool stellar and hot planetary atmospheres. Here, the required ab initio dipole moment and spin-orbit coupling curves for VO are produced. This data forms the basis of a new VO line list considering 13 different electronic states and containing over 277 million transitions. Open shell transition, metal diatomics are challenging species to model through ab initio quantum mechanics due to the large number of low-lying electronic states, significant spin-orbit coupling and strong static and dynamic electron correlation. Multi-reference configuration interaction methodologies using orbitals from a complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) calculation are the standard technique for these systems. We use different state-specific or minimal-state CASSCF orbitals for each electronic state to maximise the calculation accuracy. The off-diagonal dipole moment controls the intensity of electronic transitions. We test finite-field off-diagonal dipole moments, but found that (1) the accuracy of the excitation energies were not sufficient to allow accurate dipole moments to be evaluated and (2) computer time requirements for perpendicular transitions were prohibitive. The best off-diagonal dipole moments are calculated using wavefunctions with different CASSCF orbitals.

  20. A novel sulfur mustard (HD) vapor inhalation exposure system for accurate inhaled dose delivery

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark R.; Benson, Eric M.; Kohne, Jonathon W.; Plahovinsak, Jennifer L.; Babin, Michael C.; Platoff, Gennady E.; Yeung, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A custom designed HD exposure system was used to deliver controlled inhaled doses to an animal model through an endotracheal tube. Methods Target HD vapor challenges were generated by a temperature controlled bubbler/aerosol trap, while concentration was monitored near real-time by gas chromatography. Animal breathing parameters were monitored real-time by an in-line pneumotach, pressure transducer, and Buxco pulmonary analysis computer/software. For each exposure, the challenge atmosphere was allowed to stabilize at the desired concentration while the anesthetized animal was provided humidity controlled clean air. Once the target concentration was achieved and stable, a portion of the challenge atmosphere was drawn past the endotracheal tube, where the animal inhaled the exposure ad libitum. During the exposure, HD vapor concentration and animal weight were used to calculate the needed inhaled volume to achieve the target inhaled dose (μg/kg). The exposures were halted when the inhaled volume was achieved. Results The exposure system successfully controlled HD concentrations from 22.2 to 278 mg/m3 and accurately delivered inhaled doses between 49.3 and 1120 μg/kg with actual administered doses being within 4% of the target level. Discussion This exposure system administers specific HD inhaled doses to evaluate physiological effects and for evaluation of potential medical countermeasure treatments. PMID:25291290

  1. Development of a New Shielding Model for JB-Line Dose Rate Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    2001-08-09

    This report describes the shielding model development for the JB-Line Upgrade project. The product of this effort is a simple-to-use but accurate method of estimating the personnel dose expected for various operating conditions on the line. The current techniques for shielding calculations use transport codes such as ANISN which, while accurate for geometries which can be accurately approximated as one dimensional slabs, cylinders or spheres, fall short in calculating configurations in which two-or three-dimensional effects (e.g., streaming) play a role in the dose received by workers.

  2. Calculation of Dose Deposition in Nanovolumes and Simulation of gamma-H2AX Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik

    2010-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track structure simulations can accurately simulate experimental data: a) Frequency of target hits. b) Dose per event. c) Dose per ion. d) Radial dose. The dose is uniform in micrometers sized voxels; at the nanometer scale, the difference in energy deposition between high and low-LET radiations appears. The calculated 3D distribution of dose voxels, combined with chromosomes simulated by random walk is very similar to the distribution of DSB observed with gamma-H2AX experiments. This is further evidenced by applying a visualization threshold on dose.

  3. Time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations with multigrid acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. D.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Atkins, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating unsteady flows is presented, with emphasis on a modified version of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Fourier stability analysis is used to illustrate the effect of treating the source term implicitly instead of explicity, as well as to illustrate other algorithmic choices. A 2D circular cylinder (with a Reynolds number of 1200 and a Mach number of 0.3) is calculated. The present scheme requires only about 10 percent of the computer time required by global minimum time stepping.

  4. Machine Learning of Parameters for Accurate Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules. PMID:26146493

  5. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempiricalmore » OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.« less

  6. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  7. Machine Learning of Parameters for Accurate Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Dral, Pavlo O; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-05-12

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  8. Perspective: Accurate ro-vibrational calculations on small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    In what has been described as the fourth age of quantum chemistry, variational nuclear motion programs are now routinely being used to obtain the vibration-rotation levels and corresponding wavefunctions of small molecules to the sort of high accuracy demanded by comparison with spectroscopy. In this perspective, I will discuss the current state-of-the-art which, for example, shows that these calculations are increasingly competitive with measurements or, indeed, replacing them and thus becoming the primary source of data on key processes. To achieve this accuracy ab initio requires consideration of small effects, routinely ignored in standard calculations, such as those due to quantum electrodynamics. Variational calculations are being used to generate huge lists of transitions which provide the input for models of radiative transport through hot atmospheres and to fill in or even replace measured transition intensities. Future prospects such as the study of molecular states near dissociation, which can provide a link with low-energy chemical reactions, are discussed.

  9. Methods of calculating radiation absorbed dose.

    PubMed

    Wegst, A V

    1987-01-01

    The new tumoricidal radioactive agents being developed will require a careful estimate of radiation absorbed tumor and critical organ dose for each patient. Clinical methods will need to be developed using standard imaging or counting instruments to determine cumulated organ activities with tracer amounts before the therapeutic administration of the material. Standard MIRD dosimetry methods can then be applied.

  10. The Calculation of Accurate Metal-Ligand Bond Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Partridge, Harry, III; Ricca, Alessandra; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The optimization of the geometry and calculation of zero-point energies are carried out at the B3LYP level of theory. The bond energies are determined at this level, as well as at the CCSD(T) level using very large basis sets. The successive OH bond energies to the first row transition metal cations are reported. For most systems there has been an experimental determination of the first OH. In general, the CCSD(T) values are in good agreement with experiment. The bonding changes from mostly covalent for the early metals to mostly electrostatic for the late transition metal systems.

  11. Automatic computed tomography patient dose calculation using DICOM header metadata.

    PubMed

    Jahnen, A; Kohler, S; Hermen, J; Tack, D; Back, C

    2011-09-01

    The present work describes a method that calculates the patient dose values in computed tomography (CT) based on metadata contained in DICOM images in support of patient dose studies. The DICOM metadata is preprocessed to extract necessary calculation parameters. Vendor-specific DICOM header information is harmonized using vendor translation tables and unavailable DICOM tags can be completed with a graphical user interface. CT-Expo, an MS Excel application for calculating the radiation dose, is used to calculate the patient doses. All relevant data and calculation results are stored for further analysis in a relational database. Final results are compiled by utilizing data mining tools. This solution was successfully used for the 2009 CT dose study in Luxembourg. National diagnostic reference levels for standard examinations were calculated based on each of the countries' hospitals. The benefits using this new automatic system saved time as well as resources during the data acquisition and the evaluation when compared with earlier questionnaire-based surveys.

  12. Improved Ecosystem Predictions of the California Current System via Accurate Light Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    System via Accurate Light Calculations Curtis D. Mobley Sequoia Scientific, Inc. 2700 Richards Road, Suite 107 Bellevue, WA 98005 phone: 425...incorporate extremely fast but accurate light calculations into coupled physical-biological-optical ocean ecosystem models as used for operational three...dimensional ecosystem predictions. Improvements in light calculations lead to improvements in predictions of chlorophyll concentrations and other

  13. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: Imaging Dose during CBCT Scan Acquisition and Accuracy of CBCT Based Dose Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, David Matthew

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a recent development in radiotherapy for use in image guidance. Image guided radiotherapy using CBCT allows visualization of soft tissue targets and critical structures prior to treatment. Dose escalation is made possible by accurately localizing the target volume while reducing normal tissue toxicity. The kilovoltage x-rays of the cone beam imaging system contribute additional dose to the patient. In this study a 2D reference radiochromic film dosimetry method employing GAFCHROMIC(TM) model XR-QA film is used to measure point skin doses and dose profiles from the Elekta XVI CBCT system integrated onto the Synergy linac. The soft tissue contrast of the daily CBCT images makes adaptive radiotherapy possible in the clinic. In order to track dose to the patient or utilize on-line replanning for adaptive radiotherapy the CBCT images must be used to calculate dose. A Hounsfield unit calibration method for scatter correction is investigated for heterogeneity corrected dose calculation in CBCT images. Three Hounsfield unit to density calibration tables are used for each of four cases including patients and an anthropomorphic phantom, and the calculated dose from each is compared to results from the clinical standard fan beam CT. The dose from the scan acquisition is reported and the effect of scan geometry and total output of the x-ray tube on dose magnitude and distribution is shown. The ability to calculate dose with CBCT is shown to improve with the use of patient specific density tables for scatter correction, and for high beam energies the calculated dose agreement is within 1%.

  14. The accuracy of timed maximum local anaesthetic dose calculations with an electronic calculator, nomogram, and pen and paper.

    PubMed

    Walker, J D; Williams, N; Williams, D J

    2017-02-24

    Forty anaesthetists calculated maximum permissible doses of eight local anaesthetic formulations for simulated patients three times with three methods: an electronic calculator; nomogram; and pen and paper. Correct dose calculations with the nomogram (85/120) were more frequent than with the calculator (71/120) or pen and paper (57/120), Bayes Factor 4 and 287, p = 0.01 and p = 0.0003, respectively. The rates of calculations at least 120% the recommended dose with each method were different, Bayes Factor 7.9, p = 0.0007: 14/120 with the calculator; 5/120 with the nomogram; 13/120 with pen and paper. The median (IQR [range]) speed of calculation with pen and paper, 38.0 (25.0-56.3 [5-142]) s, was slower than with the calculator, 24.5 (17.8-37.5 [6-204]) s, p = 0.0001, or nomogram, 23.0 (18.0-29.0 [4-100]) s, p = 1 × 10(-7) . Local anaesthetic dose calculations with the nomogram were more accurate than with an electronic calculator or pen and paper and were faster than with pen and paper.

  15. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  16. Complexity of Monte Carlo and deterministic dose-calculation methods.

    PubMed

    Börgers, C

    1998-03-01

    Grid-based deterministic dose-calculation methods for radiotherapy planning require the use of six-dimensional phase space grids. Because of the large number of phase space dimensions, a growing number of medical physicists appear to believe that grid-based deterministic dose-calculation methods are not competitive with Monte Carlo methods. We argue that this conclusion may be premature. Our results do suggest, however, that finite difference or finite element schemes with orders of accuracy greater than one will probably be needed if such methods are to compete well with Monte Carlo methods for dose calculations.

  17. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. Results: The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). Conclusion: The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. PMID:24163510

  18. Review of Fast Monte Carlo Codes for Dose Calculation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan

    2011-01-01

    An important requirement in radiation therapy is a fast and accurate treatment planning system. This system, using computed tomography (CT) data, direction, and characteristics of the beam, calculates the dose at all points of the patient's volume. The two main factors in treatment planning system are accuracy and speed. According to these factors, various generations of treatment planning systems are developed. This article is a review of the Fast Monte Carlo treatment planning algorithms, which are accurate and fast at the same time. The Monte Carlo techniques are based on the transport of each individual particle (e.g., photon or electron) in the tissue. The transport of the particle is done using the physics of the interaction of the particles with matter. Other techniques transport the particles as a group. For a typical dose calculation in radiation therapy the code has to transport several millions particles, which take a few hours, therefore, the Monte Carlo techniques are accurate, but slow for clinical use. In recent years, with the development of the ‘fast’ Monte Carlo systems, one is able to perform dose calculation in a reasonable time for clinical use. The acceptable time for dose calculation is in the range of one minute. There is currently a growing interest in the fast Monte Carlo treatment planning systems and there are many commercial treatment planning systems that perform dose calculation in radiation therapy based on the Monte Carlo technique. PMID:22606661

  19. [CUDA-based fast dose calculation in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianliang; Liu, Cao; Hou, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Dose calculation plays a key role in treatment planning of radiotherapy. Algorithms for dose calculation require high accuracy and computational efficiency. Finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm is a method commonly adopted in the treatment planning system for radiotherapy. However, improvement on its computational efficiency is still desirable for such purpose as real time treatment planning. In this paper, we present an implementation of the FSPB, by which the most time-consuming parts in the algorithm are parallelized and ported on graphic processing unit (GPU). Compared with the FSPB completely running on central processing unit (CPU), the GPU-implemented FSPB can speed up the dose calculation for 25-35 times on a low price GPU (Geforce GT320) and for 55-100 times on a Tesla C1060, indicating that the GPU-implemented FSPB can provide fast enough dose calculations for real-time treatment planning.

  20. Verification of Calculated Skin Doses in Postmastectomy Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Shima; Parker, Brent C.; Levine, Renee; Sanders, Mary Ella; Fontenot, Jonas; Gibbons, John; Hogstrom, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To verify the accuracy of calculated skin doses in helical tomotherapy for postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: In vivo thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the skin dose at multiple points in each of 14 patients throughout the course of treatment on a TomoTherapy Hi.Art II system, for a total of 420 TLD measurements. Five patients were evaluated near the location of the mastectomy scar, whereas 9 patients were evaluated throughout the treatment volume. The measured dose at each location was compared with calculations from the treatment planning system. Results: The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for the scar measurements was -1.8% {+-} 0.2% (standard deviation [SD], 4.3%; range, -11.1% to 10.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for measurements throughout the treatment volume was -3.0% {+-} 0.4% (SD, 4.7%; range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for all measurements was -2.1% {+-} 0.2% (standard deviation, 4.5%: range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference between measured and calculated TLD doses was statistically significant at two standard deviations of the mean, but was not clinically significant (i.e., was <5%). However, 23% of the measured TLD doses differed from the calculated TLD doses by more than 5%. Conclusions: The mean of the measured TLD doses agreed with TomoTherapy calculated TLD doses within our clinical criterion of 5%.

  1. SU-E-T-481: In Vivo and Post Mortem Animal Irradiation: Measured Vs. Calculated Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, P; Heintz, B; Sandoval, D; Weber, W; Melo, D; Guilmette, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Computerized radiation therapy treatment planning is performed on almost all patients today. However it is seldom used for laboratory irradiations. The first objective is to assess whether modern radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP) systems accurately predict the subject dose by comparing in vivo and decedent dose measurements to calculated doses. The other objective is determine the importance of using a RTP system for laboratory irradiations. Methods: 5 MOSFET radiation dosimeters were placed enterically in each subject (2 sedated Rhesus Macaques) to measure the absorbed dose at 5 levels (carina, lung, heart, liver and rectum) during whole body irradiation. The subjects were treated with large opposed lateral fields and extended distances to cover the entire subject using a Varian 600C linac. CT simulation was performed ante-mortem (AM) and post-mortem (PM). To compare AM and PM doses, calculation points were placed at the location of each dosimeter in the treatment plan. The measured results were compared to the results using Varian Eclipse and Prowess Panther RTP systems. Results: The Varian and Prowess treatment planning system agreed to within in +1.5% for both subjects. However there were significant differences between the measured and calculated doses. For both animals the calculated central axis dose was higher than prescribed by 3–5%. This was caused in part by inaccurate measurement of animal thickness at the time of irradiation. For one subject the doses ranged from 4% to 7% high and the other subject the doses ranged 7% to 14% high when compared to the RTP doses. Conclusions: Our results suggest that using proper CT RTP system can more accurately deliver the prescribed dose to laboratory subjects. It also shows that there is significant dose variation in such subjects when inhomogeneities are not considered in the planning process.

  2. Comparison of dose distributions calculated by the cyberknife Monte Carlo and ray tracing algorithms for lung tumors: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koksal, Canan; Akbas, Ugur; Okutan, Murat; Demir, Bayram; Hakki Sarpun, Ismail

    2015-07-01

    Commercial treatment planning systems with have different dose calculation algorithms have been developed for radiotherapy plans. The Ray Tracing and the Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms are available for MultiPlan treatment planning system. Many studies indicated that the Monte Carlo algorithm enables the more accurate dose distributions in heterogeneous regions such a lung than the Ray Tracing algorithm. The purpose of this study was to compare the Ray Tracing algorithm with the Monte Carlo algorithm for lung tumors in CyberKnife System. An Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom was used for creating CyberKnife treatment plans. The treatment plan was developed using the Ray Tracing algorithm. Then, this plan was recalculated with the Monte Carlo algorithm. EBT3 radiochromic films were put in the phantom to obtain measured dose distributions. The calculated doses were compared with the measured doses. The Monte Carlo algorithm is the more accurate dose calculation method than the Ray Tracing algorithm in nonhomogeneous structures.

  3. Gamma Knife radiosurgery with CT image-based dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-11-01

    The Leksell GammaPlan software version 10 introduces a CT image-based segmentation tool for automatic skull definition and a convolution dose calculation algorithm for tissue inhomogeneity correction. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the impact of these new approaches on routine clinical Gamma Knife treatment planning. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT image-guided Gamma Knife radiosurgeries at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in recent years were retrospectively investigated. The diagnoses for these cases include trigeminal neuralgia, meningioma, acoustic neuroma, AVM, glioma, and benign and metastatic brain tumors. Dose calculations were performed for each patient with the same dose prescriptions and the same shot arrangements using three different approaches: 1) TMR 10 dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 2) convolution dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 3) TMR 10 dose calculation with conventional measurement-based skull definition. For each treatment matrix, the total treatment time, the target coverage index, the selectivity index, the gradient index, and a set of dose statistics parameters were compared between the three calculations. The dose statistics parameters investigated include the prescription isodose volume, the 12 Gy isodose volume, the minimum, maximum and mean doses on the treatment targets, and the critical structures under consideration. The difference between the convolution and the TMR 10 dose calculations for the 104 treatment matrices were found to vary with the patient anatomy, location of the treatment shots, and the tissue inhomogeneities around the treatment target. An average difference of 8.4% was observed for the total treatment times between the convolution and the TMR algorithms. The maximum differences in the treatment times, the prescription isodose volumes, the 12 Gy isodose volumes, the target coverage indices, the selectivity indices, and the gradient indices from the convolution

  4. Gamma Knife radiosurgery with CT image-based dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-11-08

    The Leksell GammaPlan software version 10 introduces a CT image-based segmentation tool for automatic skull definition and a convolution dose calculation algorithm for tissue inhomogeneity correction. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the impact of these new approaches on routine clinical Gamma Knife treatment planning. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT image-guided Gamma Knife radiosurgeries at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in recent years were retrospectively investigated. The diagnoses for these cases include trigeminal neuralgia, meningioma, acoustic neuroma, AVM, glioma, and benign and metastatic brain tumors. Dose calculations were performed for each patient with the same dose prescriptions and the same shot arrangements using three different approaches: 1) TMR 10 dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 2) convolution dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 3) TMR 10 dose calculation with conventional measurement-based skull definition. For each treatment matrix, the total treatment time, the target coverage index, the selectivity index, the gradient index, and a set of dose statistics parameters were compared between the three calculations. The dose statistics parameters investigated include the prescription isodose volume, the 12 Gy isodose volume, the minimum, maximum and mean doses on the treatment targets, and the critical structures under consideration. The difference between the convolution and the TMR 10 dose calculations for the 104 treatment matrices were found to vary with the patient anatomy, location of the treatment shots, and the tissue inhomogeneities around the treatment target. An average difference of 8.4% was observed for the total treatment times between the convolution and the TMR algorithms. The maximum differences in the treatment times, the prescription isodose volumes, the 12 Gy isodose volumes, the target coverage indices, the selectivity indices, and the gradient indices from the convolution

  5. Data required for testicular dose calculation during radiotherapy of seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Kokona, Georgiana; Varveris, Haralambos; Damilakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the direct calculation of testicular dose resulting from radiotherapy in patients with seminoma. Paraortic (PA) treatment fields and dog-leg (DL) portals including paraortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodes were simulated on a male anthropomorphic phantom equipped with an artificial testicle. Anterior and posterior irradiations were performed for five different PA and DL field dimensions. Dose measurements were carried out using a calibrated ionization chamber. The dependence of testicular dose upon the distance separating the testicle from the treatment volume and upon the tissue thickness at the entrance point of the beam was investigated. A clamshell lead shield was used to reduce testicular dose. The scattered dose to testicle was measured in nine patients using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Phantom and patient exposures were generated with a 6 MV x-ray beam. Linear and nonlinear regression analysis was employed to obtain formulas describing the relation between the radiation dose to an unshielded and/or shielded testicle with the field size and the distance from the inferior field edge. Correction factors showing the variation of testicular dose with the patient thickness along beam axis were found. Bland-Altman statistical analysis showed that testicular dose obtained by the proposed calculation method may differ from the measured dose value by less than 25%. The current study presents a method providing reasonable estimations of testicular dose for individual patients undergoing PA or DL radiotherapy.

  6. Monte Carlo calculation of patient organ doses from computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Tsuduki, Shoya; Kawasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate quantitatively the patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo calculations. A multidetector CT unit (Aquilion 16, TOSHIBA Medical Systems) was modeled with the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The X-ray spectrum and the configuration of the bowtie filter for the Monte Carlo modeling were determined from the chamber measurements for the half-value layer (HVL) of aluminum and the dose profile (off-center ratio, OCR) in air. The calculated HVL and OCR were compared with measured values for body irradiation with 120 kVp. The Monte Carlo-calculated patient dose distribution was converted to the absorbed dose measured by a Farmer chamber with a (60)Co calibration factor at the center of a CT water phantom. The patient dose was evaluated from dose-volume histograms for the internal organs in the pelvis. The calculated Al HVL was in agreement within 0.3% with the measured value of 5.2 mm. The calculated dose profile in air matched the measured value within 5% in a range of 15 cm from the central axis. The mean doses for soft tissues were 23.5, 23.8, and 27.9 mGy for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively, under exposure conditions of 120 kVp, 200 mA, a beam pitch of 0.938, and beam collimation of 32 mm. For bones of the femur and pelvis, the mean doses were 56.1 and 63.6 mGy, respectively. The doses for bone increased by up to 2-3 times that of soft tissue, corresponding to the ratio of their mass-energy absorption coefficients.

  7. Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanser, Steven E.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Leu, Matthias; Nielsen, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    The Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS is a tool that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS 10 Desktop application to aid with the visualization of relationships between two raster GIS datasets. A dose-response curve is a line graph commonly used in medical research to examine the effects of different dosage rates of a drug or chemical (for example, carcinogen) on an outcome of interest (for example, cell mutations) (Russell and others, 1982). Dose-response curves have recently been used in ecological studies to examine the influence of an explanatory dose variable (for example, percentage of habitat cover, distance to disturbance) on a predicted response (for example, survival, probability of occurrence, abundance) (Aldridge and others, 2008). These dose curves have been created by calculating the predicted response value from a statistical model at different levels of the explanatory dose variable while holding values of other explanatory variables constant. Curves (plots) developed using the Dose-Response Calculator overcome the need to hold variables constant by using values extracted from the predicted response surface of a spatially explicit statistical model fit in a GIS, which include the variation of all explanatory variables, to visualize the univariate response to the dose variable. Application of the Dose-Response Calculator can be extended beyond the assessment of statistical model predictions and may be used to visualize the relationship between any two raster GIS datasets (see example in tool instructions). This tool generates tabular data for use in further exploration of dose-response relationships and a graph of the dose-response curve.

  8. SU-F-BRF-13: Investigating the Feasibility of Accurate Dose Measurement in a Deforming Radiochromic Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, T; Adamovics, J; Oldham, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Presage-Def, a deformable radiochromic 3D dosimeter, has been previously shown to have potential for validating deformable image registration algorithms. This work extends this effort to investigate the feasibility of using Presage-Def to validate dose-accumulation algorithms in deforming structures. Methods: Two cylindrical Presage-Def dosimeters (8cm diameter, 4.5cm length) were irradiated in a water-bath with a simple 4-field box treatment. Isocentric dose was 20Gy. One dosimeter served as control (no deformation) while the other was laterally compressed during irradiation by 21%. Both dosimeters were imaged before and after irradiation with a fast (∼10 minutes for 1mm isotropic resolution), broad beam, high resolution optical-CT scanner. Measured dose distributions were compared to corresponding distributions calculated by a commissioned Eclipse planning system. Accuracy in the control was evaluated with 3D gamma (3%/3mm). The dose distribution calculated for the compressed dosimeter in the irradiation geometry cannot be directly compared via profiles or 3D gamma to the measured distribution, which deforms with release from compression. Thus, accuracy under deformation was determined by comparing integral dose within the high dose region of the deformed dosimeter distribution versus calculated dose. Dose profiles were used to study temporal stability of measured dose distributions. Results: Good dose agreement was demonstrated in the control with a 3D gamma passing rate of 96.6%. For the dosimeter irradiated under compression, the measured integral dose in the high dose region (518.0Gy*cm3) was within 6% of the Eclipse-calculated integral dose (549.4Gy*cm3). Elevated signal was noted on the dosimeter edge in the direction of compression. Change in dosimeter signal over 1.5 hours was ≤2.7%, and the relative dose distribution remained stable over this period of time. Conclusion: Presage-Def is promising as a 3D dosimeter capable of accurately

  9. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  10. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 004

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  11. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-08-05

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with a site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average adult fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum adult fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr. Consumption values for the teen and child age groups should be increased proportionally: (1) teen average = 8.5; maximum = 25.9 kg/yr; and (2) child average = 3.6; maximum = 11.2 kg/yr. 8 refs.

  12. Comparison of dose calculation algorithms for colorectal cancer brachytherapy treatment with a shielded applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Xiangsheng; Poon, Emily; Reniers, Brigitte; Vuong, Te; Verhaegen, Frank

    2008-11-15

    Colorectal cancer patients are treated at our hospital with {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using an applicator that allows the introduction of a lead or tungsten shielding rod to reduce the dose to healthy tissue. The clinical dose planning calculations are, however, currently performed without taking the shielding into account. To study the dose distributions in shielded cases, three techniques were employed. The first technique was to adapt a shielding algorithm which is part of the Nucletron PLATO HDR treatment planning system. The isodose pattern exhibited unexpected features but was found to be a reasonable approximation. The second technique employed a ray tracing algorithm that assigns a constant dose ratio with/without shielding behind the shielding along a radial line originating from the source. The dose calculation results were similar to the results from the first technique but with improved accuracy. The third and most accurate technique used a dose-matrix-superposition algorithm, based on Monte Carlo calculations. The results from the latter technique showed quantitatively that the dose to healthy tissue is reduced significantly in the presence of shielding. However, it was also found that the dose to the tumor may be affected by the presence of shielding; for about a quarter of the patients treated the volume covered by the 100% isodose lines was reduced by more than 5%, leading to potential tumor cold spots. Use of any of the three shielding algorithms results in improved dose estimates to healthy tissue and the tumor.

  13. Quantification of Proton Dose Calculation Accuracy in the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Daartz, Juliane; Dowdell, Stephen; Ruggieri, Thomas; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the accuracy of a clinical proton treatment planning system (TPS) as well as Monte Carlo (MC)–based dose calculation through measurements and to assess the clinical impact in a cohort of patients with tumors located in the lung. Methods and Materials: A lung phantom and ion chamber array were used to measure the dose to a plane through a tumor embedded in the lung, and to determine the distal fall-off of the proton beam. Results were compared with TPS and MC calculations. Dose distributions in 19 patients (54 fields total) were simulated using MC and compared to the TPS algorithm. Results: MC increased dose calculation accuracy in lung tissue compared with the TPS and reproduced dose measurements in the target to within ±2%. The average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target was 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients showed a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. For large tumors, MC also predicted consistently higher V5 and V10 to the normal lung, because of a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target could show large deviations, although this effect was highly patient specific. Range measurements showed that MC can reduce range uncertainty by a factor of ∼2: the average (maximum) difference to the measured range was 3.9 mm (7.5 mm) for MC and 7 mm (17 mm) for the TPS in lung tissue. Conclusion: Integration of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. In addition, the ability to confidently reduce range margins would benefit all patients by potentially lowering toxicity.

  14. COMPARING MEASURED AND CALCULATED DOSES IN INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY PROCEDURES.

    PubMed

    Oliveira da Silva, M W; Canevaro, L V; Hunt, J; Rodrigues, B B D

    2017-03-16

    Interventional cardiology requires complex procedures and can result in high doses and dose rates to the patient and medical staff. The many variables that influence the dose to the patient and staff include the beam position and angle, beam size, kVp, filtration, kerma-area product and focus-skin distance. A number of studies using the Monte Carlo method have been undertaken to obtain prospective dose assessments. In this paper, detailed irradiation scenarios were simulated mathematically and the resulting dose estimates were compared with real measurements made previously under very similar irradiation conditions and geometries. The real measurements and the calculated doses were carried out using or simulating an interventional cardiology system with a flat monoplane detector installed in a dedicated room with an Alderson phantom placed on the procedure table. The X-ray spectra, beam angles, focus-skin distance, measured kerma-area product and filtration were simulated, and the real dose measurements and calculated doses were compared. It was shown that the Monte Carlo method was capable of reproducing the real dose measurements within acceptable levels of uncertainty.

  15. Calculation and prescription of dose for total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, J.M.

    1983-12-01

    The use of large total body fields creates a unique set of problems that stress the accuracy of techniques routinely used for dose calculation. This paper discusses an approach suggested by the Children's Cancer Study Group (CCSG) for both prescribing the total body irradiation (TBI) dose and calculating the beam-on time or meter set needed to deliver it. It is aimed at guaranteeing the accuracy of the calculation, while at the same time ensuring a high degree of compliance for various CCSG protocols using TBI. Data supporting the various CCSG recommendations are presented.

  16. Limitations of analytical dose calculations for small field proton radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Changran; Daartz, Juliane; Lam-Tin-Cheung, Kimberley; Bussiere, Marc; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to evaluate the dosimetric uncertainties of an analytical dose calculation engine and the impact on treatment plans using small fields in intracranial proton stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS) for a gantry based double scattering system. 50 patients were evaluated including 10 patients for each of 5 diagnostic indications of: arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma (AN), meningioma (MGM), metastasis (METS), and pituitary adenoma (PIT). Treatment plans followed standard prescription and optimization procedures for PSRS. We performed comparisons between delivered dose distributions, determined by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and those calculated with the analytical dose calculation algorithm (ADC) used in our current treatment planning system in terms of dose volume histogram parameters and beam range distributions. Results show that the difference in the dose to 95% of the target (D95) is within 6% when applying measured field size output corrections for AN, MGM, and PIT. However, for AVM and METS, the differences can be as great as 10% and 12%, respectively. Normalizing the MC dose to the ADC dose based on the dose of voxels in a central area of the target reduces the difference of the D95 to within 6% for all sites. The generally applied margin to cover uncertainties in range (3.5% of the prescribed range  +  1 mm) is not sufficient to cover the range uncertainty for ADC in all cases, especially for patients with high tissue heterogeneity. The root mean square of the R90 difference, the difference in the position of distal falloff to 90% of the prescribed dose, is affected by several factors, especially the patient geometry heterogeneity, modulation and field diameter. In conclusion, implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic can reduce the uncertainty of the target dose for proton stereotactic radiosurgery. If MC is not available for treatment planning, using MC dose distributions to

  17. Evaluation of dose calculation accuracy of treatment planning systems at hip prosthesis interfaces.

    PubMed

    Paulu, David; Alaei, Parham

    2017-03-20

    There are an increasing number of radiation therapy patients with hip prosthesis. The common method of minimizing treatment planning inaccuracies is to avoid radiation beams to transit through the prosthesis. However, the beams often exit through them, especially when the patient has a double-prosthesis. Modern treatment planning systems employ algorithms with improved dose calculation accuracies but even these algorithms may not predict the dose accurately at high atomic number interfaces. The current study evaluates the dose calculation accuracy of three common dose calculation algorithms employed in two commercial treatment planning systems. A hip prosthesis was molded inside a cylindrical phantom and the dose at several points within the phantom at the interface with prosthesis was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The measured doses were then compared to the predicted ones by the planning systems. The results of the study indicate all three algorithms underestimate the dose at the prosthesis interface, albeit to varying degrees, and for both low- and high-energy x rays. The measured doses are higher than calculated ones by 5-22% for Pinnacle Collapsed Cone Convolution algorithm, 2-23% for Eclipse Acuros XB, and 6-25% for Eclipse Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm. There are generally better agreements for AXB algorithm and the worst results are for the AAA.

  18. Calculation of the biological effective dose for piecewise defined dose-rate fits

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Sgouros, George

    2009-03-15

    An algorithmic solution to the biological effective dose (BED) calculation from the Lea-Catcheside formula for a piecewise defined function is presented. Data from patients treated for metastatic thyroid cancer were used to illustrate the solution. The Lea-Catcheside formula for the G-factor of the BED is integrated numerically using a large number of small trapezoidal fits to each integral. The algorithmically calculated BED is compatible with an analytic calculation for a similarly valued exponentially fitted dose-rate plot and is the only resolution for piecewise defined dose-rate functions.

  19. Three-Dimensional Dose Calculation for Total Body Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Akira

    Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) therapy has been a big success in the treatment of leukemia and other haematopoietic diseases 1 . Prior to BMT, total body irradiation (TBI) is given to the patient for the purpose of (1) killing leukemia cells in bone marrow, as well as in the whole body, and (2) producing immuno-suppressive status in the patient so that the donor's marrow cells will be transplanted without rejection. TBI employs a very large field photon beam to irradiate the whole body of the patient. A uniform dose distribution over the entire body is the treatment goal. To prevent the occurrence of a serious side effect (interstitial pneumonia), the lung dose should not exceed a certain level. This novel technique poses various new radiological physics problems. The accurate assessment of dose and dose distribution in the patient is essential. Physical and dosimetric problems associated with TBI are reviewed elsewhere 2,3 .

  20. Implementation of Monte Carlo Dose calculation for CyberKnife treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Li, J. S.; Deng, J.; Fan, J.

    2008-02-01

    Accurate dose calculation is essential to advanced stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) especially for treatment planning involving heterogeneous patient anatomy. This paper describes the implementation of a fast Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm in SRS/SRT treatment planning for the CyberKnife® SRS/SRT system. A superposition Monte Carlo algorithm is developed for this application. Photon mean free paths and interaction types for different materials and energies as well as the tracks of secondary electrons are pre-simulated using the MCSIM system. Photon interaction forcing and splitting are applied to the source photons in the patient calculation and the pre-simulated electron tracks are repeated with proper corrections based on the tissue density and electron stopping powers. Electron energy is deposited along the tracks and accumulated in the simulation geometry. Scattered and bremsstrahlung photons are transported, after applying the Russian roulette technique, in the same way as the primary photons. Dose calculations are compared with full Monte Carlo simulations performed using EGS4/MCSIM and the CyberKnife treatment planning system (TPS) for lung, head & neck and liver treatments. Comparisons with full Monte Carlo simulations show excellent agreement (within 0.5%). More than 10% differences in the target dose are found between Monte Carlo simulations and the CyberKnife TPS for SRS/SRT lung treatment while negligible differences are shown in head and neck and liver for the cases investigated. The calculation time using our superposition Monte Carlo algorithm is reduced up to 62 times (46 times on average for 10 typical clinical cases) compared to full Monte Carlo simulations. SRS/SRT dose distributions calculated by simple dose algorithms may be significantly overestimated for small lung target volumes, which can be improved by accurate Monte Carlo dose calculations.

  1. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose/EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within {approx}2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off

  2. An accurate potential energy curve for helium based on ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, A. R.; Aziz, R. A.

    1997-07-01

    Korona, Williams, Bukowski, Jeziorski, and Szalewicz [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 1 (1997)] constructed a completely ab initio potential for He2 by fitting their calculations using infinite order symmetry adapted perturbation theory at intermediate range, existing Green's function Monte Carlo calculations at short range and accurate dispersion coefficients at long range to a modified Tang-Toennies potential form. The potential with retardation added to the dipole-dipole dispersion is found to predict accurately a large set of microscopic and macroscopic experimental data. The potential with a significantly larger well depth than other recent potentials is judged to be the most accurate characterization of the helium interaction yet proposed.

  3. Dosimetric impact of intermediate dose calculation for optimization convergence error.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung Do; Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Jong Eon

    2016-06-21

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) provides the protection of the normal organs and a precise treatment plan through its optimization process. However, the final dose-volume histogram (DVH) obtained by this technique differs from the optimal DVH, owing to optimization convergence errors. Herein, intermediate dose calculation was applied to IMRT plans during the optimization process to solve these issues.Homogeneous and heterogeneous targets were delineated on a virtual phantom, and the final DVH for the target volume was assessed on the target coverage. The IMRT plans of 30 patients were established to evaluate the usefulness of intermediate dose calculation.The target coverage results were analogous in the three plans with homogeneous targets. Conversely, conformity indices (conformity index [CI], heterogeneity index [HI], and uniformity index [UI]) of plans with intermediate dose calculation were estimated to be more homogenous than plans without this option for heterogeneous targets (CI, 0.371 vs. 1.000; HI, 0.104 vs. 0.036; UI, 1.099 vs. 1.031 for Phantom B; and CI, 0.318 vs. 0.956; HI, 0.167 vs. 0.076; UI, 1.165 vs. 1.057 for Phantom C). In brain and prostate cancers, a slight difference between plans calculated with anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) was observed (HI, p = 0.043, UI, p = 0.043 for brain; HI, p = 0.042, UI, p = 0.043 for prostate). All target coverage indices were improved by intermediate dose calculation in lung cancer cases (p = 0.043).In conclusion, intermediate dose calculation in IMRT plans improves the target coverage in the target volume around heterogeneous materials. Moreover, the optimization time can be reduced.

  4. Accurate calculation of the p Ka of trifluoroacetic acid using high-level ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazian, Mansoor; Zakery, Maryam; Noorbala, Mohammad R.; Coote, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    The p Ka value of trifluoroacetic acid has been successfully calculated using high-level ab initio methods such as G3 and CBS-QB3. Solvation energies have been calculated using CPCM continuum model of solvation at the HF and B3-LYP levels of theory with various basis sets. Excellent agreement with experiment (to within 0.4 p Ka units) was obtained using CPCM solvation energies at the B3-LYP/6-31+G(d) level (or larger) in conjunction with CBS-QB3 or G3 gas-phase energies of trifluoroacetic acid and its anion.

  5. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  6. Accurate calculation of multispar cantilever and semicantilever wings with parallel webs under direct and indirect loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, Eugen

    1932-01-01

    In the present report the computation is actually carried through for the case of parallel spars of equal resistance in bending without direct loading, including plotting of the influence lines; for other cases the method of calculation is explained. The development of large size airplanes can be speeded up by accurate methods of calculation such as this.

  7. Influence of polarization and a source model for dose calculation in MRT

    SciTech Connect

    Bartzsch, Stefan Oelfke, Uwe; Lerch, Michael; Petasecca, Marco; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), an alternative preclinical treatment strategy using spatially modulated synchrotron radiation on a micrometer scale, has the great potential to cure malignant tumors (e.g., brain tumors) while having low side effects on normal tissue. Dose measurement and calculation in MRT is challenging because of the spatial accuracy required and the arising high dose differences. Dose calculation with Monte Carlo simulations is time consuming and their accuracy is still a matter of debate. In particular, the influence of photon polarization has been discussed in the literature. Moreover, it is controversial whether a complete knowledge of phase space trajectories, i.e., the simulation of the machine from the wiggler to the collimator, is necessary in order to accurately calculate the dose. Methods: With Monte Carlo simulations in the Geant4 toolkit, the authors investigate the influence of polarization on the dose distribution and the therapeutically important peak to valley dose ratios (PVDRs). Furthermore, the authors analyze in detail phase space information provided byMartínez-Rovira et al. [“Development and commissioning of a Monte Carlo photon model for the forthcoming clinical trials in microbeam radiation therapy,” Med. Phys. 39(1), 119–131 (2012)] and examine its influence on peak and valley doses. A simple source model is developed using parallel beams and its applicability is shown in a semiadjoint Monte Carlo simulation. Results are compared to measurements and previously published data. Results: Polarization has a significant influence on the scattered dose outside the microbeam field. In the radiation field, however, dose and PVDRs deduced from calculations without polarization and with polarization differ by less than 3%. The authors show that the key consequences from the phase space information for dose calculations are inhomogeneous primary photon flux, partial absorption due to inclined beam incidence outside

  8. Model-based dose calculations for {sup 125}I lung brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Furutani, K. M.; Garces, Y. I.; Thomson, R. M.

    2012-07-15

    healthy lung tissue. Conclusions: Metallic artifact correction is necessary for accurate application of MBDCs for lung brachytherapy; simpler threshold replacement methods may be sufficient for early adopters concerned with clinical dose metrics. Rigorous determination of voxel tissue parameters and tissue assignment is required for accurate dose calculations as different tissue assignment schemes can result in significantly different dose distributions. Significant differences are seen between MBDCs and TG-43 dose distributions with TG-43 underestimating dose in volumes containing healthy lung tissue.

  9. Fast and accurate calculation of dilute quantum gas using Uehling-Uhlenbeck model equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2017-02-01

    The Uehling-Uhlenbeck (U-U) model equation is studied for the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas. In particular, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to solve the U-U model equation. DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation is expected to enable the thermalization to be accurately obtained using a small number of sample particles and the dilute quantum gas dynamics to be calculated in a practical time. Finally, the applicability of DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation to the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas is confirmed by calculating the viscosity coefficient of a Bose gas on the basis of the Green-Kubo expression and the shock layer of a dilute Bose gas around a cylinder.

  10. The Multi-Step CADIS method for shutdown dose rate calculations and uncertainty propagation

    DOE PAGES

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E.; ...

    2015-12-01

    Shutdown dose rate (SDDR) analysis requires (a) a neutron transport calculation to estimate neutron flux fields, (b) an activation calculation to compute radionuclide inventories and associated photon sources, and (c) a photon transport calculation to estimate final SDDR. In some applications, accurate full-scale Monte Carlo (MC) SDDR simulations are needed for very large systems with massive amounts of shielding materials. However, these simulations are impractical because calculation of space- and energy-dependent neutron fluxes throughout the structural materials is needed to estimate distribution of radioisotopes causing the SDDR. Biasing the neutron MC calculation using an importance function is not simple becausemore » it is difficult to explicitly express the response function, which depends on subsequent computational steps. Furthermore, the typical SDDR calculations do not consider how uncertainties in MC neutron calculation impact SDDR uncertainty, even though MC neutron calculation uncertainties usually dominate SDDR uncertainty.« less

  11. The Multi-Step CADIS method for shutdown dose rate calculations and uncertainty propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Johnson, Seth R.

    2015-12-01

    Shutdown dose rate (SDDR) analysis requires (a) a neutron transport calculation to estimate neutron flux fields, (b) an activation calculation to compute radionuclide inventories and associated photon sources, and (c) a photon transport calculation to estimate final SDDR. In some applications, accurate full-scale Monte Carlo (MC) SDDR simulations are needed for very large systems with massive amounts of shielding materials. However, these simulations are impractical because calculation of space- and energy-dependent neutron fluxes throughout the structural materials is needed to estimate distribution of radioisotopes causing the SDDR. Biasing the neutron MC calculation using an importance function is not simple because it is difficult to explicitly express the response function, which depends on subsequent computational steps. Furthermore, the typical SDDR calculations do not consider how uncertainties in MC neutron calculation impact SDDR uncertainty, even though MC neutron calculation uncertainties usually dominate SDDR uncertainty.

  12. An Effective Method to Accurately Calculate the Phase Space Factors for β - β - Decay

    DOE PAGES

    Neacsu, Andrei; Horoi, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Accurate calculations of the electron phase space factors are necessary for reliable predictions of double-beta decay rates and for the analysis of the associated electron angular and energy distributions. We present an effective method to calculate these phase space factors that takes into account the distorted Coulomb field of the daughter nucleus, yet it allows one to easily calculate the phase space factors with good accuracy relative to the most exact methods available in the recent literature.

  13. Interior Ballistic Calculations Using an Accurate Equation of State for the Propellant Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    equation of state for propellant gases in interior ballistic calculations is very important for two reasons. The burning rate...subtracted from the heat of formation of the propellant consumed before the equilibrium calculation is performed. The accurate equation of state proposed...inside the gun is monitored as a function of time. Ballistic performance using this approach is compared to the more conventional IBHVG2 calculation.... Interior ballistics, Equation of state , MCVECE Thermochemical

  14. Optimization of Couch Modeling in the Change of Dose Calculation Methods and Their Versions.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Junichi; Nakata, Manabu; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Makoto; Tsuruta, Yusuke; Yano, Shinsuke; Higashimura, Kyoji; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    In external radiotherapy, the X-ray beam passes through the treatment couch, leading to the dose reduction by the attenuation of the couch. As a method to compensate for the reduction, radiation treatment planning systems (RTPS) support virtual couch function, namely "couch modeling method". In the couch modeling method, the computed tomography (CT) numbers assigned to each structure should be optimized by comparing calculations to measurements for accurate dose calculation. Thus, re-optimization of CT numbers will be required when the dose calculation algorithm or their version changes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the calculation accuracy of the couch modeling method in different calculation algorithms and their versions. The optimal CT numbers were determined by minimizing the difference between measured transmission factors and calculated ones. When CT numbers optimized by Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) Ver. 8.6 were used, the maximum and the mean difference of transmission factor were 5.8% and 1.5%, respectively, for Acuros XB (AXB) Ver. 11.0. However, when CT numbers optimized by AXB Ver. 11.0 were used, they were 2.6% and 0.6%, respectively. The CT numbers for couch structures should be optimized when changing dose calculation algorithms and their versions. From the comparison of the measured transmission to calculation, it was found that the CT numbers had high accuracy.

  15. Analytical probabilistic proton dose calculation and range uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, M.; Hennig, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce the concept of analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) to calculate the mean and the standard deviation of intensity-modulated proton dose distributions under the influence of range uncertainties in closed form. For APM, range uncertainties are modeled with a multivariate Normal distribution p(z) over the radiological depths z. A pencil beam algorithm that parameterizes the proton depth dose d(z) with a weighted superposition of ten Gaussians is used. Hence, the integrals ∫ dz p(z) d(z) and ∫ dz p(z) d(z)2 required for the calculation of the expected value and standard deviation of the dose remain analytically tractable and can be efficiently evaluated. The means μk, widths δk, and weights ωk of the Gaussian components parameterizing the depth dose curves are found with least squares fits for all available proton ranges. We observe less than 0.3% average deviation of the Gaussian parameterizations from the original proton depth dose curves. Consequently, APM yields high accuracy estimates for the expected value and standard deviation of intensity-modulated proton dose distributions for two dimensional test cases. APM can accommodate arbitrary correlation models and account for the different nature of random and systematic errors in fractionated radiation therapy. Beneficial applications of APM in robust planning are feasible.

  16. Calculation of dose conversion factors for doses in the fingernails to organ doses at external gamma irradiation in air

    PubMed Central

    Khailov, A.M.; Ivannikov, A. I.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Orlenko, S.P.; Flood, A.B.; Williams, B.B.; Swartz, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Absorbed doses to fingernails and organs were calculated for a set of homogenous external gamma-ray irradiation geometries in air. The doses were obtained by stochastic modeling of the ionizing particle transport (Monte Carlo method) for a mathematical human phantom with arms and hands placed loosely along the sides of the body. The resulting dose conversion factors for absorbed doses in fingernails can be used to assess the dose distribution and magnitude in practical dose reconstruction problems. For purposes of estimating dose in a large population exposed to radiation in order to triage people for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the calculated data for a range of energies having a width of from 0.05 to 3.5 MeV were used to convert absorbed doses in fingernails to corresponding doses in organs and the whole body as well as the effective dose. Doses were assessed based on assumed rates of radioactive fallout at different time periods following a nuclear explosion. PMID:26347593

  17. Characterization of dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung lesions via Monte Carlo calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassiah, Premavathy

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy is a new form of treatment where hypofractionated (i.e., large dose fractions), conformal doses are delivered to small extracranial target volumes. This technique has proven to be especially effective for treating lung lesions. The inability of most commercially available algorithms/treatment planning systems to accurately account for electron transport in regions of heterogeneous electron density and tissue interfaces make prediction of accurate doses especially challenging for such regions. Monte Carlo which a model based calculation algorithm has proven to be extremely accurate for dose calculation in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous environment. This study attempts to accurately characterize the doses received by static targets located in the lung, as well as critical structures (contra and ipsi -lateral lung, major airways, esophagus and spinal cord) for the serial tomotherapeutic intensity-modulated delivery method used for stereotactic body radiation therapy at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center. PEREGRINERTM (v 1.6. NOMOS) Monte Carlo, doses were compared to the Finite Sized Pencil Beam/Effective Path Length predicted values from the CORVUS 5.0 planning system. The Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was first validated in both homogenous and inhomogeneous environments. 77 stereotactic body radiation therapy lung patients previously treated with doses calculated using the Finite Sized Pencil Beam/Effective Path Length, algorithm were then retrieved and recalculated with Monte Carlo. All 77 patients plans were also recalculated without inhomogeneity correction in an attempt to counteract the known overestimation of dose at the periphery of the target by EPL with increased attenuation. The critical structures were delineated in order to standardize the contouring. Both the ipsi-lateral and contra-lateral lungs were contoured. The major airways were contoured from the apex of the lungs (trachea) to 4 cm below

  18. The Monte Carlo calculation of integral radiation dose in xeromammography.

    PubMed

    Dance, D R

    1980-01-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program has been developed for the computation of integral radiation dose to the breast in xeromammography. The results are given in terms of the integral dose per unit area of the breast per unit incident exposure. The calculations have been made for monoenergetic incident photons and the results integrated over a variety of X-ray spectra from both tungsten and molybdenum targets. This range incorporates qualities used in conventional and xeromammography. The program includes the selenium plate used in xeroradiography; the energy absorbed in this detector has also been investigated. The latter calculations have been used to predict relative values of exposure and of integral dose to the breast for xeromammograms taken at various radiation qualities. The results have been applied to recent work on the reduction of patient exposure in xeromammography by the addition of aluminium filters to the X-ray beam.

  19. Dose calculation using megavoltage cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Olivier . E-mail: Morin@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Chen, Josephine; Aubin, Michele; Gillis, Amy; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Bose, Supratik; Chen Hong; Descovich, Martina; Xia Ping; Pouliot, Jean

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of performing dose calculation on megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) of head-and-neck patients in order to track the dosimetric errors produced by anatomic changes. Methods and Materials: A simple geometric model was developed using a head-size water cylinder to correct an observed cupping artifact occurring with MVCBCT. The uniformity-corrected MVCBCT was calibrated for physical density. Beam arrangements and weights from the initial treatment plans defined using the conventional CT were applied to the MVCBCT image, and the dose distribution was recalculated. The dosimetric inaccuracies caused by the cupping artifact were evaluated on the water phantom images. An ideal test patient with no observable anatomic changes and a patient imaged with both CT and MVCBCT before and after considerable weight loss were used to clinically validate MVCBCT for dose calculation and to determine the dosimetric impact of large anatomic changes. Results: The nonuniformity of a head-size water phantom ({approx}30%) causes a dosimetric error of less than 5%. The uniformity correction method developed greatly reduces the cupping artifact, resulting in dosimetric inaccuracies of less than 1%. For the clinical cases, the agreement between the dose distributions calculated using MVCBCT and CT was better than 3% and 3 mm where all tissue was encompassed within the MVCBCT. Dose-volume histograms from the dose calculations on CT and MVCBCT were in excellent agreement. Conclusion: MVCBCT can be used to estimate the dosimetric impact of changing anatomy on several structures in the head-and-neck region.

  20. Moving GPU-OpenCL-based Monte Carlo dose calculation toward clinical use: Automatic beam commissioning and source sampling for treatment plan dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Hassan-Rezaeian, Nima; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2017-03-01

    We have previously developed a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose engine on the OpenCL platform, named goMC, with a built-in analytical linear accelerator (linac) beam model. In this paper, we report our recent improvement on goMC to move it toward clinical use. First, we have adapted a previously developed automatic beam commissioning approach to our beam model. The commissioning was conducted through an optimization process, minimizing the discrepancies between calculated dose and measurement. We successfully commissioned six beam models built for Varian TrueBeam linac photon beams, including four beams of different energies (6 MV, 10 MV, 15 MV, and 18 MV) and two flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams of 6 MV and 10 MV. Second, to facilitate the use of goMC for treatment plan dose calculations, we have developed an efficient source particle sampling strategy. It uses the pre-generated fluence maps (FMs) to bias the sampling of the control point for source particles already sampled from our beam model. It could effectively reduce the number of source particles required to reach a statistical uncertainty level in the calculated dose, as compared to the conventional FM weighting method. For a head-and-neck patient treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a reduction factor of ~2.8 was achieved, accelerating dose calculation from 150.9 s to 51.5 s. The overall accuracy of goMC was investigated on a VMAT prostate patient case treated with 10 MV FFF beam. 3D gamma index test was conducted to evaluate the discrepancy between our calculated dose and the dose calculated in Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. The passing rate was 99.82% for 2%/2 mm criterion and 95.71% for 1%/1 mm criterion. Our studies have demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of our auto-commissioning approach and new source sampling strategy for fast and accurate MC dose calculations for treatment plans.

  1. Dose Calculation Evolution for Internal Organ Irradiation in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez V, Reina A.

    2007-10-26

    The International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) has established through the years, a discrimination system regarding the security levels on the prescription and administration of doses in radiation treatments (Radiotherapy, Brach therapy, Nuclear Medicine). The first level is concerned with the prescription and posterior assurance of dose administration to a point of interest (POI), commonly located at the geometrical center of the region to be treated. In this, the effects of radiation around that POI, is not a priority. The second level refers to the dose specifications in a particular plane inside the patient, mostly the middle plane of the lesion. The dose is calculated to all the structures in that plane regardless if they are tumor or healthy tissue. In this case, the dose is not represented by a point value, but by level curves called 'isodoses' as in a topographic map, so you can assure the level of doses to this particular plane, but it also leave with no information about how this values go thru adjacent planes. This is why the third level is referred to the volumetrical description of doses so these isodoses construct now a volume (named 'cloud') that give us better assurance about tissue irradiation around the volume of the lesion and its margin (sub clinical spread or microscopic illness). This work shows how this evolution has resulted, not only in healthy tissue protection improvement but in a rise of tumor control, quality of life, better treatment tolerance and minimum permanent secuelae.

  2. Internal dose conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This publication contains 50-year committed dose equivalent factors, in tabular form. The document is intended to be used as the primary reference by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors for calculating radiation dose equivalents for members of the public, resulting from ingestion or inhalation of radioactive materials. Its application is intended specifically for such materials released to the environment during routine DOE operations, except in those instances where compliance with 40 CFR 61 (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) requires otherwise. However, the calculated values may be equally applicable to unusual releases or to occupational exposures. The use of these committed dose equivalent tables should ensure that doses to members of the public from internal exposures are calculated in a consistent manner at all DOE facilities.

  3. Fast optimization and dose calculation in scanned ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hild, S.; Graeff, C.; Trautmann, J.; Kraemer, M.; Zink, K.; Durante, M.; Bert, C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Particle therapy (PT) has advantages over photon irradiation on static tumors. An increased biological effectiveness and active target conformal dose shaping are strong arguments for PT. However, the sensitivity to changes of internal geometry complicates the use of PT for moving organs. In case of interfractionally moving objects adaptive radiotherapy (ART) concepts known from intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be adopted for PT treatments. One ART strategy is to optimize a new treatment plan based on daily image data directly before a radiation fraction is delivered [treatment replanning (TRP)]. Optimizing treatment plans for PT using a scanned beam is a time consuming problem especially for particles other than protons where the biological effective dose has to be calculated. For the purpose of TRP, fast optimization and fast dose calculation have been implemented into the GSI in-house treatment planning system (TPS) TRiP98. Methods: This work reports about the outcome of a code analysis that resulted in optimization of the calculation processes as well as implementation of routines supporting parallel execution of the code. To benchmark the new features, the calculation time for therapy treatment planning has been studied. Results: Compared to the original version of the TPS, calculation times for treatment planning (optimization and dose calculation) have been improved by a factor of 10 with code optimization. The parallelization of the TPS resulted in a speedup factor of 12 and 5.5 for the original version and the code optimized version, respectively. Hence the total speedup of the new implementation of the authors' TPS yielded speedup factors up to 55. Conclusions: The improved TPS is capable of completing treatment planning for ion beam therapy of a prostate irradiation considering organs at risk in this has been overseen in the review process. Also see below 6 min.

  4. External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This report presents a tabulation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides in the environment. This report was prepared in conjunction with criteria for limiting dose equivalents to members of the public from operations of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The dose-rate conversion factors are provided for use by the DOE and its contractors in performing calculations of external dose equivalents to members of the public. The dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons presented in this report are based on a methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, some adjustments of the previously documented methodology have been made in obtaining the dose-rate conversion factors in this report. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. Voxel-based dose calculation in radiocolloid therapy of cystic craniopharyngiomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuer, H.; Hoevels, M.; Luyken, K.; Gierich, A.; Hellerbach, A.; Lachtermann, B.; Visser-Vandewalle, V.; Ruge, M.; Wirths, J.

    2015-02-01

    Very high doses are administered in radiocolloid therapy of cystic craniopharyngiomas. However individual dose planning is not common yet mainly due to insufficient image resolution. Our aim was to investigate whether currently available high-resolution image data can be used for voxel-based dose calculation for short-ranged β-emitters (32P,90Y,186Re) and to assess the achievable accuracy. We developed a convolution algorithm based on voxelized dose activity distributions and dose-spread kernels. Results for targets with 5-40 mm diameter were compared with high-resolution Monte Carlo calculations in spherical phantoms. Voxel size was 0.35 mm. Homogeneous volume and surface activity distributions were used. Dose-volume histograms of targets and shell structures were compared and γ index (dose tolerance 5%, distance to agreement 0.35 mm) was calculated for dose profiles along the principal axes. For volumetric activity distributions 89.3% ± 11.9% of all points passed the γ test (mean γ 0.53  ±  0.16). For surface distributions 33.6% ± 14.8% of all points passed the γ test (mean γ 2.01  ±  0.60). The shift of curves in dose-volume histograms was -1.7 Gy ± 7.6 Gy (-4.4 Gy ± 24.1 Gy for 186Re) in volumetric distributions and 46.3% ± 32.8% in surface distributions. The results show that individual dose planning for radiocolloid therapy of cystic craniopharyngiomas based on high-resolution voxelized image data is feasible and yields highly accurate results for volumetric activity distributions and reasonable dose estimates for surface distributions.

  6. Monte Carlo dose calculations for phantoms with hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazalova, M.; Coolens, C.; Cury, F.; Childs, P.; Beaulieu, L.; Verhaegen, F.

    2008-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients with hip prostheses are severely degraded by metal streaking artefacts. The low image quality makes organ contouring more difficult and can result in large dose calculation errors when Monte Carlo (MC) techniques are used. In this work, the extent of streaking artefacts produced by three common hip prosthesis materials (Ti-alloy, stainless steel, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy) was studied. The prostheses were tested in a hypothetical prostate treatment with five 18 MV photon beams. The dose distributions for unilateral and bilateral prosthesis phantoms were calculated with the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc MC code. This was done in three phantom geometries: in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry, and in an artefact-corrected geometry. The artefact-corrected geometry was created using a modified filtered back-projection correction technique. It was found that unilateral prosthesis phantoms do not show large dose calculation errors, as long as the beams miss the artefact-affected volume. This is possible to achieve in the case of unilateral prosthesis phantoms (except for the Co-Cr-Mo prosthesis which gives a 3% error) but not in the case of bilateral prosthesis phantoms. The largest dose discrepancies were obtained for the bilateral Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis phantom, up to 11% in some voxels within the prostate. The artefact correction algorithm worked well for all phantoms and resulted in dose calculation errors below 2%. In conclusion, a MC treatment plan should include an artefact correction algorithm when treating patients with hip prostheses.

  7. SU-E-T-226: Correction of a Standard Model-Based Dose Calculator Using Measurement Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M; Jiang, S; Lu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a hybrid method that combines advantages of the model-based and measurement-based method for independent dose calculation. Modeled-based dose calculation, such as collapsed-cone-convolution/superposition (CCCS) or the Monte-Carlo method, models dose deposition in the patient body accurately; however, due to lack of detail knowledge about the linear accelerator (LINAC) head, commissioning for an arbitrary machine is tedious and challenging in case of hardware changes. On the contrary, the measurement-based method characterizes the beam property accurately but lacks the capability of dose disposition modeling in heterogeneous media. Methods: We used a standard CCCS calculator, which is commissioned by published data, as the standard model calculator. For a given machine, water phantom measurements were acquired. A set of dose distributions were also calculated using the CCCS for the same setup. The difference between the measurements and the CCCS results were tabulated and used as the commissioning data for a measurement based calculator. Here we used a direct-ray-tracing calculator (ΔDRT). The proposed independent dose calculation consists of the following steps: 1. calculate D-model using CCCS. 2. calculate D-ΔDRT using ΔDRT. 3. combine Results: D=D-model+D-ΔDRT. Results: The hybrid dose calculation was tested on digital phantoms and patient CT data for standard fields and IMRT plan. The results were compared to dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). The agreement of the hybrid and the TPS was within 3%, 3 mm for over 98% of the volume for phantom studies and lung patients. Conclusion: The proposed hybrid method uses the same commissioning data as those for the measurement-based method and can be easily extended to any non-standard LINAC. The results met the accuracy, independence, and simple commissioning criteria for an independent dose calculator.

  8. Application of dose kernel calculation using a simplified Monte Carlo method to treatment plan for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Shohei; Takada, Yoshihisa; Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Tansho, Ryohei; Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2016-03-01

    Full Monte Carlo (FMC) calculation of dose distribution has been recognized to have superior accuracy, compared with the pencil beam algorithm (PBA). However, since the FMC methods require long calculation time, it is difficult to apply them to routine treatment planning at present. In order to improve the situation, a simplified Monte Carlo (SMC) method has been introduced to the dose kernel calculation applicable to dose optimization procedure for the proton pencil beam scanning. We have evaluated accuracy of the SMC calculation by comparing a result of the dose kernel calculation using the SMC method with that using the FMC method in an inhomogeneous phantom. The dose distribution obtained by the SMC method was in good agreement with that obtained by the FMC method. To assess the usefulness of SMC calculation in clinical situations, we have compared results of the dose calculation using the SMC with those using the PBA method for three clinical cases of tumor treatment. The dose distributions calculated with the PBA dose kernels appear to be homogeneous in the planning target volumes (PTVs). In practice, the dose distributions calculated with the SMC dose kernels with the spot weights optimized with the PBA method show largely inhomogeneous dose distributions in the PTVs, while those with the spot weights optimized with the SMC method have moderately homogeneous distributions in the PTVs. Calculation using the SMC method is faster than that using the GEANT4 by three orders of magnitude. In addition, the graphic processing unit (GPU) boosts the calculation speed by 13 times for the treatment planning using the SMC method. Thence, the SMC method will be applicable to routine clinical treatment planning for reproduction of the complex dose distribution more accurately than the PBA method in a reasonably short time by use of the GPU-based calculation engine. PACS number(s): 87.55.Gh.

  9. Application of dose kernel calculation using a simplified Monte Carlo method to treatment plan for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Shohei; Takada, Yoshihisa; Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Tansho, Ryohei; Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2016-03-08

    Full Monte Carlo (FMC) calculation of dose distribution has been recognized to have superior accuracy, compared with the pencil beam algorithm (PBA). However, since the FMC methods require long calculation time, it is difficult to apply them to routine treatment planning at present. In order to improve the situation, a simplified Monte Carlo (SMC) method has been introduced to the dose kernel calculation applicable to dose optimization procedure for the proton pencil beam scanning. We have evaluated accuracy of the SMC calculation by comparing a result of the dose kernel calculation using the SMC method with that using the FMC method in an inhomogeneous phantom. The dose distribution obtained by the SMC method was in good agreement with that obtained by the FMC method. To assess the usefulness of SMC calculation in clinical situations, we have compared results of the dose calculation using the SMC with those using the PBA method for three clinical cases of tumor treatment. The dose distributions calculated with the PBA dose kernels appear to be homogeneous in the planning target volumes (PTVs). In practice, the dose distributions calculated with the SMC dose kernels with the spot weights optimized with the PBA method show largely inhomogeneous dose distributions in the PTVs, while those with the spot weights optimized with the SMC method have moderately homogeneous distributions in the PTVs. Calculation using the SMC method is faster than that using the GEANT4 by three orders of magnitude. In addition, the graphic processing unit (GPU) boosts the calculation speed by 13 times for the treatment planning using the SMC method. Thence, the SMC method will be applicable to routine clinical treatment planning for reproduction of the complex dose distribution more accurately than the PBA method in a reasonably short time by use of the GPU-based calculation engine.

  10. NAC-1 cask dose rate calculations for LWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    CARLSON, A.B.

    1999-02-24

    A Nuclear Assurance Corporation nuclear fuel transport cask, NAC-1, is being considered as a transport and storage option for spent nuclear fuel located in the B-Cell of the 324 Building. The loaded casks will be shipped to the 200 East Area Interim Storage Area for dry interim storage. Several calculations were performed to assess the photon and neutron dose rates. This report describes the analytical methods, models, and results of this investigation.

  11. Calculation of dose contributions of electron and charged heavy particles inside phantoms irradiated by monoenergetic neutron.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Akira; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    The radiation-transport code PHITS with an event generator mode has been applied to analyze energy depositions of electrons and charged heavy particles in two spherical phantoms and a voxel-based mouse phantom upon neutron irradiation. The calculations using the spherical phantoms quantitatively clarified the type and energy of charged particles which are released through interactions of neutrons with the phantom elements and contribute to the radiation dose. The relative contribution of electrons increased with an increase in the size of the phantom and with a decrease in the energy of the incident neutrons. Calculations with the voxel-based mouse phantom for 2.0-MeV neutron irradiation revealed that the doses to different locations inside the body are uniform, and that the energy is mainly deposited by recoil protons. The present study has demonstrated that analysis using PHITS can yield dose distributions that are accurate enough for RBE evaluation.

  12. Monte Carlo fast dose calculator for proton radiotherapy: application to a voxelized geometry representing a patient with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Pablo; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Taddei, Phillip J; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2009-01-07

    The Monte Carlo method is used to provide accurate dose estimates in proton radiation therapy research. While it is more accurate than commonly used analytical dose calculations, it is computationally intense. The aim of this work was to characterize for a clinical setup the fast dose calculator (FDC), a Monte Carlo track-repeating algorithm based on GEANT4. FDC was developed to increase computation speed without diminishing dosimetric accuracy. The algorithm used a database of proton trajectories in water to calculate the dose of protons in heterogeneous media. The extrapolation from water to 41 materials was achieved by scaling the proton range and the scattering angles. The scaling parameters were obtained by comparing GEANT4 dose distributions with those calculated with FDC for homogeneous phantoms. The FDC algorithm was tested by comparing dose distributions in a voxelized prostate cancer patient as calculated with well-known Monte Carlo codes (GEANT4 and MCNPX). The track-repeating approach reduced the CPU time required for a complete dose calculation in a voxelized patient anatomy by more than two orders of magnitude, while on average reproducing the results from the Monte Carlo predictions within 2% in terms of dose and within 1 mm in terms of distance.

  13. NOTE: Monte Carlo fast dose calculator for proton radiotherapy: application to a voxelized geometry representing a patient with prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes, Pablo; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Taddei, Phillip J.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2009-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to provide accurate dose estimates in proton radiation therapy research. While it is more accurate than commonly used analytical dose calculations, it is computationally intense. The aim of this work was to characterize for a clinical setup the fast dose calculator (FDC), a Monte Carlo track-repeating algorithm based on GEANT4. FDC was developed to increase computation speed without diminishing dosimetric accuracy. The algorithm used a database of proton trajectories in water to calculate the dose of protons in heterogeneous media. The extrapolation from water to 41 materials was achieved by scaling the proton range and the scattering angles. The scaling parameters were obtained by comparing GEANT4 dose distributions with those calculated with FDC for homogeneous phantoms. The FDC algorithm was tested by comparing dose distributions in a voxelized prostate cancer patient as calculated with well-known Monte Carlo codes (GEANT4 and MCNPX). The track-repeating approach reduced the CPU time required for a complete dose calculation in a voxelized patient anatomy by more than two orders of magnitude, while on average reproducing the results from the Monte Carlo predictions within 2% in terms of dose and within 1 mm in terms of distance.

  14. Monte Carlo fast dose calculator for proton radiotherapy: application to a voxelized geometry representing a patient with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yepes, Pablo; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Taddei, Phillip J; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2014-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to provide accurate dose estimates in proton radiation therapy research. While it is more accurate than commonly used analytical dose calculations, it is computationally intense. The aim of this work was to characterize for a clinical setup the fast dose calculator (FDC), a Monte Carlo track-repeating algorithm based on GEANT4. FDC was developed to increase computation speed without diminishing dosimetric accuracy. The algorithm used a database of proton trajectories in water to calculate the dose of protons in heterogeneous media. The extrapolation from water to 41 materials was achieved by scaling the proton range and the scattering angles. The scaling parameters were obtained by comparing GEANT4 dose distributions with those calculated with FDC for homogeneous phantoms. The FDC algorithm was tested by comparing dose distributions in a voxelized prostate cancer patient as calculated with well-known Monte Carlo codes (GEANT4 and MCNPX). The track-repeating approach reduced the CPU time required for a complete dose calculation in a voxelized patient anatomy by more than two orders of magnitude, while on average reproducing the results from the Monte Carlo predictions within 2% in terms of dose and within 1 mm in terms of distance. PMID:19075361

  15. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo dose calculation for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xun; Schümann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-12-07

    Accurate radiation dose calculation is essential for successful proton radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is considered to be the most accurate method. However, the long computation time limits it from routine clinical applications. Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely used to accelerate computationally intensive tasks in radiotherapy. We have developed a fast MC dose calculation package, gPMC, for proton dose calculation on a GPU. In gPMC, proton transport is modeled by the class II condensed history simulation scheme with a continuous slowing down approximation. Ionization, elastic and inelastic proton nucleus interactions are considered. Energy straggling and multiple scattering are modeled. Secondary electrons are not transported and their energies are locally deposited. After an inelastic nuclear interaction event, a variety of products are generated using an empirical model. Among them, charged nuclear fragments are terminated with energy locally deposited. Secondary protons are stored in a stack and transported after finishing transport of the primary protons, while secondary neutral particles are neglected. gPMC is implemented on the GPU under the CUDA platform. We have validated gPMC using the TOPAS/Geant4 MC code as the gold standard. For various cases including homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms as well as a patient case, good agreements between gPMC and TOPAS/Geant4 are observed. The gamma passing rate for the 2%/2 mm criterion is over 98.7% in the region with dose greater than 10% maximum dose in all cases, excluding low-density air regions. With gPMC it takes only 6-22 s to simulate 10 million source protons to achieve ∼1% relative statistical uncertainty, depending on the phantoms and energy. This is an extremely high efficiency compared to the computational time of tens of CPU hours for TOPAS/Geant4. Our fast GPU-based code can thus facilitate the routine use of MC dose calculation in proton therapy.

  16. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo dose calculation for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xun; Schümann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate radiation dose calculation is essential for successful proton radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is considered to be the most accurate method. However, the long computation time limits it from routine clinical applications. Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely used to accelerate computationally intensive tasks in radiotherapy. We have developed a fast MC dose calculation package, gPMC, for proton dose calculation on a GPU. In gPMC, proton transport is modeled by the class II condensed history simulation scheme with a continuous slowing down approximation. Ionization, elastic and inelastic proton nucleus interactions are considered. Energy straggling and multiple scattering are modeled. Secondary electrons are not transported and their energies are locally deposited. After an inelastic nuclear interaction event, a variety of products are generated using an empirical model. Among them, charged nuclear fragments are terminated with energy locally deposited. Secondary protons are stored in a stack and transported after finishing transport of the primary protons, while secondary neutral particles are neglected. gPMC is implemented on the GPU under the CUDA platform. We have validated gPMC using the TOPAS/Geant4 MC code as the gold standard. For various cases including homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms as well as a patient case, good agreements between gPMC and TOPAS/Geant4 are observed. The gamma passing rate for the 2%/2 mm criterion is over 98.7% in the region with dose greater than 10% maximum dose in all cases, excluding low-density air regions. With gPMC it takes only 6-22 s to simulate 10 million source protons to achieve ˜1% relative statistical uncertainty, depending on the phantoms and energy. This is an extremely high efficiency compared to the computational time of tens of CPU hours for TOPAS/Geant4. Our fast GPU-based code can thus facilitate the routine use of MC dose calculation in proton therapy.

  17. A comparison of Monte Carlo dose calculation denoising techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, I.; Kawrakow, I.; Fippel, M.; Siebers, J. V.; Lindsay, P. E.; Wickerhauser, M. V.; Vicic, M.; Zakarian, K.; Kauffmann, N.; Deasy, J. O.

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Monte Carlo (MC) denoising techniques can reduce MC radiotherapy dose computation time significantly by preferentially eliminating statistical fluctuations ('noise') through smoothing. In this study, we compare new and previously published approaches to MC denoising, including 3D wavelet threshold denoising with sub-band adaptive thresholding, content adaptive mean-median-hybrid (CAMH) filtering, locally adaptive Savitzky-Golay curve-fitting (LASG), anisotropic diffusion (AD) and an iterative reduction of noise (IRON) method formulated as an optimization problem. Several challenging phantom and computed-tomography-based MC dose distributions with varying levels of noise formed the test set. Denoising effectiveness was measured in three ways: by improvements in the mean-square-error (MSE) with respect to a reference (low noise) dose distribution; by the maximum difference from the reference distribution and by the 'Van Dyk' pass/fail criteria of either adequate agreement with the reference image in low-gradient regions (within 2% in our case) or, in high-gradient regions, a distance-to-agreement-within-2% of less than 2 mm. Results varied significantly based on the dose test case: greater reductions in MSE were observed for the relatively smoother phantom-based dose distribution (up to a factor of 16 for the LASG algorithm); smaller reductions were seen for an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) head and neck case (typically, factors of 2-4). Although several algorithms reduced statistical noise for all test geometries, the LASG method had the best MSE reduction for three of the four test geometries, and performed the best for the Van Dyk criteria. However, the wavelet thresholding method performed better for the head and neck IMRT geometry and also decreased the maximum error more effectively than LASG. In almost all cases, the evaluated methods provided acceleration of MC results towards statistically more accurate

  18. Dose calculation software for helical tomotherapy, utilizing patient CT data to calculate an independent three-dimensional dose cube

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Simon J.; Eyre, Katie R.; Tudor, G. Samuel J.; Fairfoul, Jamie

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Treatment plans for the TomoTherapy unit are produced with a planning system that is integral to the unit. The authors have produced an independent dose calculation system, to enable plans to be recalculated in three dimensions, using the patient's CT data. Methods: Software has been written using MATLAB. The DICOM-RT plan object is used to determine the treatment parameters used, including the treatment sinogram. Each projection of the sinogram is segmented and used to calculate dose at multiple calculation points in a three-dimensional grid using tables of measured beam data. A fast ray-trace algorithm is used to determine effective depth for each projection angle at each calculation point. Calculations were performed on a standard desktop personal computer, with a 2.6 GHz Pentium, running Windows XP. Results: The time to perform a calculation, for 3375 points averaged 1 min 23 s for prostate plans and 3 min 40 s for head and neck plans. The mean dose within the 50% isodose was calculated and compared with the predictions of the TomoTherapy planning system. When the modified CT (which includes the TomoTherapy couch) was used, the mean difference for ten prostate patients, was -0.4% (range -0.9% to +0.3%). With the original CT (which included the CT couch), the mean difference was -1.0% (range -1.7% to 0.0%). The number of points agreeing with a gamma 3%/3 mm averaged 99.2% with the modified CT, 96.3% with the original CT. For ten head and neck patients, for the modified and original CT, respectively, the mean difference was +1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.1%) and 1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.0%) with 94.4% and 95.4% passing a gamma 4%/4 mm. The ability of the program to detect a variety of simulated errors has been tested. Conclusions: By using the patient's CT data, the independent dose calculation performs checks that are not performed by a measurement in a cylindrical phantom. This enables it to be used either as an additional check or to replace phantom

  19. Dose calculation for electron therapy using an improved LBR method

    SciTech Connect

    Gebreamlak, Wondesen T.; Alkhatib, Hassaan A.; Tedeschi, David J.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To calculate the percentage depth dose (PDD) of any irregularly shaped electron beam using a modified lateral build-up ratio (LBR) method.Methods: Percentage depth dose curves were measured using 6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV electron beam energies for applicator cone sizes of 6 Multiplication-Sign 6, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10, 14 Multiplication-Sign 14, and 20 Multiplication-Sign 20 cm{sup 2}. Circular cutouts for each cone were prepared from 2.0 cm diameter to the maximum possible size for each cone. In addition, three irregular cutouts were prepared.Results: The LBR for each circular cutout was calculated from the measured PDD curve using the open field of the 14 Multiplication-Sign 14 cm{sup 2} cone as the reference field. Using the LBR values and the radius of the circular cutouts, the corresponding lateral spread parameter [{sigma}{sub R}(z)] of the electron shower was calculated. Unlike the commonly accepted assumption that {sigma}{sub R}(z) is independent of cutout size, it is shown that its value increases linearly with circular cutout size (R). Using this characteristic of the lateral spread parameter, the PDD curves of irregularly shaped cutouts were calculated. Finally, the calculated PDD curves were compared with measured PDD curves.Conclusions: In this research, it is shown that the lateral spread parameter {sigma}{sub R}(z) increases with cutout size. For radii of circular cutout sizes up to the equilibrium range of the electron beam, the increase of {sigma}{sub R}(z) with the cutout size is linear. The percentage difference of the calculated PDD curve from the measured PDD data for irregularly shaped cutouts was under 1.0% in the region between the surface and therapeutic range of the electron beam. Similar results were obtained for four electron beam energies (6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV)

  20. Calculating the peak skin dose resulting from fluoroscopically guided interventions. Part I: Methods.

    PubMed

    Jones, A Kyle; Pasciak, Alexander S

    2011-11-15

    While direct measurement of the peak skin dose resulting from a fluoroscopically-guided procedure is possible, the decision must be made a priori at additional cost and time. It is most often the case that the need for accurate knowledge of the peak skin dose is realized only after a procedure has been completed, or after a suspected reaction has been discovered. Part I of this review article discusses methods for calculating the peak skin dose across a range of clinical scenarios. In some cases, a wealth of data are available, while in other cases few data are available and additional data must be measured in order to estimate the peak skin dose. Data may be gathered from a dose report, the DICOM headers of images, or from staff and physician interviews. After data are gathered, specific steps must be followed to convert dose metrics, such as the reference point air kerma (K(a,r)) or the kerma area product (KAP), into peak skin dose. These steps require knowledge of other related factors, such as the f-factor and the backscatter factor, tables of which are provided in this manuscript. Sources of error and the impact of these errors on the accuracy of the final estimate of the peak skin dose are discussed.

  1. Calculations of increased solar UV fluxes and DUV doses due to stratospheric-ozone depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1982-02-01

    Accurate radiative transfer calculations are performed in the middle ultraviolet spectral region for aerosol-loaded atmospheres with the goal of determining the solar irradiance at the ground and quantifying the irradiance perturbations due to the presence of aerosols and various ozone depletions. The extent of the increase of UV-B radiation as a function of wave-length and solar zenith angle is calculated for five model atmospheres. In addition, the damaging ultraviolet dose rates and radiation amplification factors are evaluated at different latitudes and seasons for erythemal and DNA action spectra.

  2. Benchmarking density-functional-theory calculations of rotational g tensors and magnetizabilities using accurate coupled-cluster calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutnæs, Ola B.; Teale, Andrew M.; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    An accurate set of benchmark rotational g tensors and magnetizabilities are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the results obtained is established for the rotational g tensors by careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. After an analysis of the basis sets employed, extrapolation techniques are used to provide estimates of the basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. The utility of the data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of density functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the density-functional methods are competitive with the CCSD or CCSD(T) methods. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of density-functional calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. The importance of current dependence in exchange-correlation functionals is discussed in light of this comparison.

  3. An accurate derivation of the air dose-rate and the deposition concentration distribution by aerial monitoring in a low level contaminated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Yukiyasu; Sugita, Takeshi; Sanada, Yukihisa; Torii, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    Since 2011, MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan) have been conducting aerial monitoring to investigate the distribution of radioactive cesium dispersed into the atmosphere after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), Tokyo Electric Power Company. Distribution maps of the air dose-rate at 1 m above the ground and the radioactive cesium deposition concentration on the ground are prepared using spectrum obtained by aerial monitoring. The radioactive cesium deposition is derived from its dose rate, which is calculated by excluding the dose rate of the background radiation due to natural radionuclides from the air dose-rate at 1 m above the ground. The first step of the current method of calculating the dose rate due to natural radionuclides is calculate the ratio of the total count rate of areas where no radioactive cesium is detected and the count rate of regions with energy levels of 1,400 keV or higher (BG-Index). Next, calculate the air dose rate of radioactive cesium by multiplying the BG-Index and the integrated count rate of 1,400 keV or higher for the area where the radioactive cesium is distributed. In high dose-rate areas, however, the count rate of the 1,365-keV peak of Cs-134, though small, is included in the integrated count rate of 1,400 keV or higher, which could cause an overestimation of the air dose rate of natural radionuclides. We developed a method for accurately evaluating the distribution maps of natural air dose-rate by excluding the effect of radioactive cesium, even in contaminated areas, and obtained the accurate air dose-rate map attributed the radioactive cesium deposition on the ground. Furthermore, the natural dose-rate distribution throughout Japan has been obtained by this method.

  4. Source term calculations for assessing radiation dose to equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, R.S.; Freeman-Kelly, R.; Cybulskis, P.; Curtis, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    This study examines results of analyses performed with the Source Term Code Package to develop updated source terms using NUREG-0956 methods. The updated source terms are to be used to assess the adequacy of current regulatory source terms used as the basis for equipment qualification. Time-dependent locational distributions of radionuclides within a containment following a severe accident have been developed. The Surry reactor has been selected in this study as representative of PWR containment designs. Similarly, the Peach Bottom reactor has been used to examine radionuclide distributions in boiling water reactors. The time-dependent inventory of each key radionuclide is provided in terms of its activity in curies. The data are to be used by Sandia National Laboratories to perform shielding analyses to estimate radiation dose to equipment in each containment design. See NUREG/CR-5175, Beta and Gamma Dose Calculations for PWR and BWR Containments.'' 6 refs., 11 tabs.

  5. X-ray dose estimation from cathode ray tube monitors by Monte Carlo calculation.

    PubMed

    Khaledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Dabaghi, Moloud

    2015-04-01

    Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors are associated with the possible emission of bremsstrahlung radiation produced by electrons striking the monitor screen. Because of the low dose rate, accurate dosimetry is difficult. In this study, the dose equivalent (DE) and effective dose (ED) to an operator working in front of the monitor have been calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) method by employing the MCNP code. The mean energy of photons reaching the operator was above 17 keV. The phantom ED was 454 μSv y (348 nSv h), which was reduced to 16 μSv y (12 nSv h) after adding a conventional leaded glass sheet. The ambient dose equivalent (ADE) and personal dose equivalent (PDE) for the head, neck, and thorax of the phantom were also calculated. The uncertainty of calculated ED, ADE, and PDE ranged from 3.3% to 10.7% and 4.2% to 14.6% without and with the leaded glass, respectively.

  6. Comparison of selected dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning for tissues with inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woon, Y. L.; Heng, S. P.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ung, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    Inhomogeneity correction is recommended for accurate dose calculation in radiotherapy treatment planning since human body are highly inhomogeneous with the presence of bones and air cavities. However, each dose calculation algorithm has its own limitations. This study is to assess the accuracy of five algorithms that are currently implemented for treatment planning, including pencil beam convolution (PBC), superposition (SP), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), Monte Carlo (MC) and Acuros XB (AXB). The calculated dose was compared with the measured dose using radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT2) in inhomogeneous phantoms. In addition, the dosimetric impact of different algorithms on intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was studied for head and neck region. MC had the best agreement with the measured percentage depth dose (PDD) within the inhomogeneous region. This was followed by AXB, AAA, SP and PBC. For IMRT planning, MC algorithm is recommended for treatment planning in preference to PBC and SP. The MC and AXB algorithms were found to have better accuracy in terms of inhomogeneity correction and should be used for tumour volume within the proximity of inhomogeneous structures.

  7. An empirical model for calculation of the collimator contamination dose in therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, M.; De Marzi, L.; Szymanowski, H.; Guinement, L.; Nauraye, C.; Hierso, E.; Freud, N.; Ferrand, R.; François, P.; Sarrut, D.

    2016-02-01

    Collimators are used as lateral beam shaping devices in proton therapy with passive scattering beam lines. The dose contamination due to collimator scattering can be as high as 10% of the maximum dose and influences calculation of the output factor or monitor units (MU). To date, commercial treatment planning systems generally use a zero-thickness collimator approximation ignoring edge scattering in the aperture collimator and few analytical models have been proposed to take scattering effects into account, mainly limited to the inner collimator face component. The aim of this study was to characterize and model aperture contamination by means of a fast and accurate analytical model. The entrance face collimator scatter distribution was modeled as a 3D secondary dose source. Predicted dose contaminations were compared to measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Measurements were performed on two different proton beam lines (a fixed horizontal beam line and a gantry beam line) with divergent apertures and for several field sizes and energies. Discrepancies between analytical algorithm dose prediction and measurements were decreased from 10% to 2% using the proposed model. Gamma-index (2%/1 mm) was respected for more than 90% of pixels. The proposed analytical algorithm increases the accuracy of analytical dose calculations with reasonable computation times.

  8. Time-accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic calculations for wings using Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1988-01-01

    A time-accurate approach to simultaneously solve the Euler flow equations and modal structural equations of motion is presented for computing aeroelastic responses of wings. The Euler flow eauations are solved by a time-accurate finite difference scheme with dynamic grids. The coupled aeroelastic equations of motion are solved using the linear acceleration method. The aeroelastic configuration adaptive dynamic grids are time accurately generated using the aeroelastically deformed shape of the wing. The unsteady flow calculations are validated wih experiment, both for a semi-infinite wing and a wall-mounted cantilever rectangular wings. Aeroelastic responses are computed for a rectangular wing using the modal data generated by the finite-element method. The robustness of the present approach in computing unsteady flows and aeroelastic responses that are beyond the capability of earlier approaches using the potential equations are demonstrated.

  9. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single-spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-02-21

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field size effects on dose output. In this study, we developed a pencil beam algorithm for scanning proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy.

  10. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field-size effects on dose output. In the present study, we developed a pencil-beam algorithm for scanning-proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil-beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field-size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy. PMID:22297324

  11. Site-specific range uncertainties caused by dose calculation algorithms for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuemann, J.; Dowdell, S.; Grassberger, C.; Min, C. H.; Paganetti, H.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of introducing site-specific range margins to replace current generic margins in proton therapy. Further, the goal was to study the potential of reducing margins with current analytical dose calculations methods. For this purpose we investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict the range of proton fields. Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencil-beam algorithm were compared with those obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations (TOPAS). A total of 508 passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for seven disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma-spine, medulloblastoma-whole brain, lung and head and neck). Voxel-by-voxel comparisons were performed on two-dimensional distal dose surfaces calculated by pencil-beam and MC algorithms to obtain the average range differences and root mean square deviation for each field for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). The average dose degradation of the distal falloff region, defined as the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80-R20), was also analyzed. All ranges were calculated in water-equivalent distances. Considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone, we were able to deduce site-specific estimations. For liver, prostate and whole brain fields our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible even without introducing MC dose calculations. We recommend range margins of 2.8% + 1.2 mm for liver and prostate treatments and 3.1% + 1.2 mm for whole brain treatments, respectively. On the other hand, current margins seem to be insufficient for some breast, lung and head and neck patients, at least if used generically. If no case specific adjustments are applied, a generic margin of 6.3% + 1.2 mm would be

  12. A brief look at model-based dose calculation principles, practicalities, and promise

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Hali; Cawston-Grant, Brie; Menon, Geetha V.

    2017-01-01

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) have recently emerged as potential successors to the highly practical, but sometimes inaccurate TG-43 formalism for brachytherapy treatment planning. So named for their capacity to more accurately calculate dose deposition in a patient using information from medical images, these approaches to solve the linear Boltzmann radiation transport equation include point kernel superposition, the discrete ordinates method, and Monte Carlo simulation. In this overview, we describe three MBDCAs that are commercially available at the present time, and identify guidance from professional societies and the broader peer-reviewed literature intended to facilitate their safe and appropriate use. We also highlight several important considerations to keep in mind when introducing an MBDCA into clinical practice, and look briefly at early applications reported in the literature and selected from our own ongoing work. The enhanced dose calculation accuracy offered by a MBDCA comes at the additional cost of modelling the geometry and material composition of the patient in treatment position (as determined from imaging), and the treatment applicator (as characterized by the vendor). The adequacy of these inputs and of the radiation source model, which needs to be assessed for each treatment site, treatment technique, and radiation source type, determines the accuracy of the resultant dose calculations. Although new challenges associated with their familiarization, commissioning, clinical implementation, and quality assurance exist, MBDCAs clearly afford an opportunity to improve brachytherapy practice, particularly for low-energy sources. PMID:28344608

  13. SU-F-303-17: Real Time Dose Calculation of MRI Guided Co-60 Radiotherapy Treatments On Free Breathing Patients, Using a Motion Model and Fast Monte Carlo Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Yang, Y; Agazaryan, N; Lee, P; Low, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate real-time dose calculation of free-breathing MRI guided Co−60 treatments, using a motion model and Monte-Carlo dose calculation to accurately account for the interplay between irregular breathing motion and an IMRT delivery. Methods: ViewRay Co-60 dose distributions were optimized on ITVs contoured from free-breathing CT images of lung cancer patients. Each treatment plan was separated into 0.25s segments, accounting for the MLC positions and beam angles at each time point. A voxel-specific motion model derived from multiple fast-helical free-breathing CTs and deformable registration was calculated for each patient. 3D images for every 0.25s of a simulated treatment were generated in real time, here using a bellows signal as a surrogate to accurately account for breathing irregularities. Monte-Carlo dose calculation was performed every 0.25s of the treatment, with the number of histories in each calculation scaled to give an overall 1% statistical uncertainty. Each dose calculation was deformed back to the reference image using the motion model and accumulated. The static and real-time dose calculations were compared. Results: Image generation was performed in real time at 4 frames per second (GPU). Monte-Carlo dose calculation was performed at approximately 1frame per second (CPU), giving a total calculation time of approximately 30 minutes per treatment. Results show both cold- and hot-spots in and around the ITV, and increased dose to contralateral lung as the tumor moves in and out of the beam during treatment. Conclusion: An accurate motion model combined with a fast Monte-Carlo dose calculation allows almost real-time dose calculation of a free-breathing treatment. When combined with sagittal 2D-cine-mode MRI during treatment to update the motion model in real time, this will allow the true delivered dose of a treatment to be calculated, providing a useful tool for adaptive planning and assessing the effectiveness of gated treatments.

  14. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2014-02-15

    simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model simulations, the average dose to the lens is larger by 7%–9% than the dose to the center of the lens, and the maximum dose to the optic nerve is 17%–22% higher than the dose to the optic disk for all radionuclides. In general, when normalized to the same prescription dose at the tumor apex, doses delivered to all structures of interest in the full eye model are lowest for{sup 103}Pd and highest for {sup 131}Cs, except for the tumor where the average dose is highest for {sup 103}Pd and lowest for {sup 131}Cs. Conclusions : The eye is not radiologically water-equivalent, as doses from simulations of the plaque in the full eye model differ considerably from doses for the plaque in a water phantom and from simulated TG-43 calculated doses. This demonstrates the importance of model-based dose calculations for eye plaque brachytherapy, for which accurate elemental compositions of ocular media are necessary.

  15. Implementation of spot scanning dose optimization and dose calculation for helium ions in Hyperion

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Hermann; Schreiner, Thomas; Georg, Dietmar

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Helium ions ({sup 4}He) may supplement current particle beam therapy strategies as they possess advantages in physical dose distribution over protons. To assess potential clinical advantages, a dose calculation module accounting for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was developed and integrated into the treatment planning system Hyperion. Methods: Current knowledge on RBE of {sup 4}He together with linear energy transfer considerations motivated an empirical depth-dependent “zonal” RBE model. In the plateau region, a RBE of 1.0 was assumed, followed by an increasing RBE up to 2.8 at the Bragg-peak region, which was then kept constant over the fragmentation tail. To account for a variable proton RBE, the same model concept was also applied to protons with a maximum RBE of 1.6. Both RBE models were added to a previously developed pencil beam algorithm for physical dose calculation and included into the treatment planning system Hyperion. The implementation was validated against Monte Carlo simulations within a water phantom using γ-index evaluation. The potential benefits of {sup 4}He based treatment plans were explored in a preliminary treatment planning comparison (against protons) for four treatment sites, i.e., a prostate, a base-of-skull, a pediatric, and a head-and-neck tumor case. Separate treatment plans taking into account physical dose calculation only or using biological modeling were created for protons and {sup 4}He. Results: Comparison of Monte Carlo and Hyperion calculated doses resulted in a γ{sub mean} of 0.3, with 3.4% of the values above 1 and γ{sub 1%} of 1.5 and better. Treatment plan evaluation showed comparable planning target volume coverage for both particles, with slightly increased coverage for {sup 4}He. Organ at risk (OAR) doses were generally reduced using {sup 4}He, some by more than to 30%. Improvements of {sup 4}He over protons were more pronounced for treatment plans taking biological effects into account. All

  16. Calculs Monte Carlo en transport d'energie pour le calcul de la dose en radiotherapie sur plateforme graphique hautement parallele

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hissoiny, Sami

    Dose calculation is a central part of treatment planning. The dose calculation must be 1) accurate so that the medical physicists and the radio-oncologists can make a decision based on results close to reality and 2) fast enough to allow a routine use of dose calculation. The compromise between these two factors in opposition gave way to the creation of several dose calculation algorithms, from the most approximate and fast to the most accurate and slow. The most accurate of these algorithms is the Monte Carlo method, since it is based on basic physical principles. Since 2007, a new computing platform gains popularity in the scientific computing community: the graphics processor unit (GPU). The hardware platform exists since before 2007 and certain scientific computations were already carried out on the GPU. Year 2007, on the other hand, marks the arrival of the CUDA programming language which makes it possible to disregard graphic contexts to program the GPU. The GPU is a massively parallel computing platform and is adapted to data parallel algorithms. This thesis aims at knowing how to maximize the use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to speed up the execution of a Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation. To answer this question, the GPUMCD platform was developed. GPUMCD implements the simulation of a coupled photon-electron Monte Carlo simulation and is carried out completely on the GPU. The first objective of this thesis is to evaluate this method for a calculation in external radiotherapy. Simple monoenergetic sources and phantoms in layers are used. A comparison with the EGSnrc platform and DPM is carried out. GPUMCD is within a gamma criteria of 2%-2mm against EGSnrc while being at least 1200x faster than EGSnrc and 250x faster than DPM. The second objective consists in the evaluation of the platform for brachytherapy calculation. Complex sources based on the geometry and the energy spectrum of real sources are used inside a TG-43

  17. TH-A-19A-06: Site-Specific Comparison of Analytical and Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Schuemann, J; Grassberger, C; Paganetti, H; Dowdell, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict dose distributions and to verify currently used uncertainty margins in proton therapy. Methods: Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencilbeam algorithm were compared with Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) using TOPAS. 79 complete patient treatment plans were investigated for 7 disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma spine and whole brain, lung and head and neck). A total of 508 individual passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for field specific properties. Comparisons based on target coverage indices (EUD, D95, D90 and D50) were performed. Range differences were estimated for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). Two-dimensional distal dose surfaces were calculated and the root mean square differences (RMSD), average range difference (ARD) and average distal dose degradation (ADD), the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80- R20), were analyzed. Results: We found target coverage indices calculated by TOPAS to generally be around 1–2% lower than predicted by the analytical algorithm. Differences in R90 predicted by TOPAS and the planning system can be larger than currently applied range margins in proton therapy for small regions distal to the target volume. We estimate new site-specific range margins (R90) for analytical dose calculations considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone based on the RMSD. Our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible for liver, prostate and whole brain fields even without introducing MC dose calculations. Conclusion: Analytical dose calculation algorithms predict dose distributions within clinical limits for more homogeneous patients sites (liver, prostate, whole brain). However, we recommend

  18. Quantification of confounding factors in MRI-based dose calculations as applied to prostate IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maspero, Matteo; Seevinck, Peter R.; Schubert, Gerald; Hoesl, Michaela A. U.; van Asselen, Bram; Viergever, Max A.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Meijer, Gert J.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-only radiotherapy treatment planning requires pseudo-CT (pCT) images to enable MR-based dose calculations. To verify the accuracy of MR-based dose calculations, institutions interested in introducing MR-only planning will have to compare pCT-based and computer tomography (CT)-based dose calculations. However, interpreting such comparison studies may be challenging, since potential differences arise from a range of confounding factors which are not necessarily specific to MR-only planning. Therefore, the aim of this study is to identify and quantify the contribution of factors confounding dosimetric accuracy estimation in comparison studies between CT and pCT. The following factors were distinguished: set-up and positioning differences between imaging sessions, MR-related geometric inaccuracy, pCT generation, use of specific calibration curves to convert pCT into electron density information, and registration errors. The study comprised fourteen prostate cancer patients who underwent CT/MRI-based treatment planning. To enable pCT generation, a commercial solution (MRCAT, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) was adopted. IMRT plans were calculated on CT (gold standard) and pCTs. Dose difference maps in a high dose region (CTV) and in the body volume were evaluated, and the contribution to dose errors of possible confounding factors was individually quantified. We found that the largest confounding factor leading to dose difference was the use of different calibration curves to convert pCT and CT into electron density (0.7%). The second largest factor was the pCT generation which resulted in pCT stratified into a fixed number of tissue classes (0.16%). Inter-scan differences due to patient repositioning, MR-related geometric inaccuracy, and registration errors did not significantly contribute to dose differences (0.01%). The proposed approach successfully identified and quantified the factors confounding accurate MRI-based dose calculation in

  19. Quantification of confounding factors in MRI-based dose calculations as applied to prostate IMRT.

    PubMed

    Maspero, Matteo; Seevinck, Peter R; Schubert, Gerald; Hoesl, Michaela A U; van Asselen, Bram; Viergever, Max A; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Meijer, Gert J; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2017-02-07

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-only radiotherapy treatment planning requires pseudo-CT (pCT) images to enable MR-based dose calculations. To verify the accuracy of MR-based dose calculations, institutions interested in introducing MR-only planning will have to compare pCT-based and computer tomography (CT)-based dose calculations. However, interpreting such comparison studies may be challenging, since potential differences arise from a range of confounding factors which are not necessarily specific to MR-only planning. Therefore, the aim of this study is to identify and quantify the contribution of factors confounding dosimetric accuracy estimation in comparison studies between CT and pCT. The following factors were distinguished: set-up and positioning differences between imaging sessions, MR-related geometric inaccuracy, pCT generation, use of specific calibration curves to convert pCT into electron density information, and registration errors. The study comprised fourteen prostate cancer patients who underwent CT/MRI-based treatment planning. To enable pCT generation, a commercial solution (MRCAT, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) was adopted. IMRT plans were calculated on CT (gold standard) and pCTs. Dose difference maps in a high dose region (CTV) and in the body volume were evaluated, and the contribution to dose errors of possible confounding factors was individually quantified. We found that the largest confounding factor leading to dose difference was the use of different calibration curves to convert pCT and CT into electron density (0.7%). The second largest factor was the pCT generation which resulted in pCT stratified into a fixed number of tissue classes (0.16%). Inter-scan differences due to patient repositioning, MR-related geometric inaccuracy, and registration errors did not significantly contribute to dose differences (0.01%). The proposed approach successfully identified and quantified the factors confounding accurate MRI-based dose calculation in

  20. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianwei

    CT scanner models in this dissertation were versatile and accurate tools for estimating dose to different patient phantoms undergoing various CT procedures. The organ doses from kV and MV CBCT were also calculated. This dissertation finally summarizes areas where future research can be performed including MV CBCT further validation and application, dose reporting software and image and dose correlation study.

  1. Investigation of Nonuniform Dose Voxel Geometry in Monte Carlo Calculations.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiankui; Chen, Quan; Brindle, James; Zheng, Yiran; Lo, Simon; Sohn, Jason; Wessels, Barry

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the efficacy of using multi-resolution nonuniform dose voxel geometry in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. An in-house MC code based on the dose planning method MC code was developed in C++ to accommodate the nonuniform dose voxel geometry package since general purpose MC codes use their own coupled geometry packages. We devised the package in a manner that the entire calculation volume was first divided into a coarse mesh and then the coarse mesh was subdivided into nonuniform voxels with variable voxel sizes based on density difference. We name this approach as multi-resolution subdivision (MRS). It generates larger voxels in small density gradient regions and smaller voxels in large density gradient regions. To take into account the large dose gradients due to the beam penumbra, the nonuniform voxels can be further split using ray tracing starting from the beam edges. The accuracy of the implementation of the algorithm was verified by comparing with the data published by Rogers and Mohan. The discrepancy was found to be 1% to 2%, with a maximum of 3% at the interfaces. Two clinical cases were used to investigate the efficacy of nonuniform voxel geometry in the MC code. Applying our MRS approach, we started with the initial voxel size of 5 × 5 × 3 mm(3), which was further divided into smaller voxels. The smallest voxel size was 1.25 × 1.25 × 3 mm(3). We found that the simulation time per history for the nonuniform voxels is about 30% to 40% faster than the uniform fine voxels (1.25 × 1.25 × 3 mm(3)) while maintaining similar accuracy.

  2. Calculation of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent induced by medium energy neutrons and protons and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Bishop, B. L.

    1972-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to determine the absorbed dose and dose equivalent for 592-MeV protons incident on a cylindrical phantom and for neutrons from 580-MeV proton-Be collisions incident on a semi-infinite phantom. For both configurations, the calculated depth dependence of the absorbed dose is in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Efficient photon beam dose calculations using DOSXYZnrc with BEAMnrc.

    PubMed

    Kawrakow, I; Walters, B R B

    2006-08-01

    This study examines the efficiencies of doses calculated using DOSXYZnrc for 18 MV (10 X 10 cm2 field size) and 6 MV (10 X 10 cm2 and 20 X 20 cm2 field sizes) photon beams simulated using BEAMnrc. Both phase-space sources and full BEAMnrc simulation sources are used in the DOSXYZnrc calculations. BEAMnrc simulation sources consist of a BEAMnrc accelerator simulation compiled as a shared library and run by the user code (DOSXYZnrc in this case) to generate source particles. Their main advantage is in eliminating the need to store intermediate phase-space files. In addition, the efficiency improvements due to photon splitting and particle recycling in the DOSXYZnrc simulation are examined. It is found that photon splitting increases dose calculation efficiency by a factor of up to 6.5, depending on beam energy, field size, voxel size, and the type of secondary collimation used in the BEAMnrc simulation (multileaf collimator vs photon jaws). The optimum efficiency with photon splitting is approximately 55% higher than that with particle recycling, indicating that, while most of the gain is due to time saved by reusing source particle data, there is significant gain due to the uniform distribution of interaction sites and faster DOSXYZnrc simulation time when photon splitting is employed. Use of optimized directional bremsstrahlung splitting in the BEAMnrc simulation sources increases the efficiency of photon beam simulations sufficiently that the peak efficiencies (i.e., with optimum setting of the photon splitting number) of DOSXYZnrc simulations using these sources are only 3-13% lower than those with phase-space file sources. This points towards eliminating the need for storing intermediate phase-space files.

  4. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  5. Monte Carlo calculations of the impact of a hip prosthesis on the dose distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffard, Edwige; Gschwind, Régine; Makovicka, Libor; David, Céline

    2006-09-01

    Because of the ageing of the population, an increasing number of patients with hip prostheses are undergoing pelvic irradiation. Treatment planning systems (TPS) currently available are not always able to accurately predict the dose distribution around such implants. In fact, only Monte Carlo simulation has the ability to precisely calculate the impact of a hip prosthesis during radiotherapeutic treatment. Monte Carlo phantoms were developed to evaluate the dose perturbations during pelvic irradiation. A first model, constructed with the DOSXYZnrc usercode, was elaborated to determine the dose increase at the tissue-metal interface as well as the impact of the material coating the prosthesis. Next, CT-based phantoms were prepared, using the usercode CTCreate, to estimate the influence of the geometry and the composition of such implants on the beam attenuation. Thanks to a program that we developed, the study was carried out with CT-based phantoms containing a hip prosthesis without metal artefacts. Therefore, anthropomorphic phantoms allowed better definition of both patient anatomy and the hip prosthesis in order to better reproduce the clinical conditions of pelvic irradiation. The Monte Carlo results revealed the impact of certain coatings such as PMMA on dose enhancement at the tissue-metal interface. Monte Carlo calculations in CT-based phantoms highlighted the marked influence of the implant's composition, its geometry as well as its position within the beam on dose distribution.

  6. SU-E-T-355: Efficient Scatter Correction for Direct Ray-Tracing Based Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M; Jiang, S; Lu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a scatter correction method with linear computational complexity for direct-ray-tracing (DRT) based dose calculation. Due to its speed and simplicity, DRT is widely used as a dose engine in the treatment planning system (TPS) and monitor unit (MU) verification software, where heterogeneity correction is applied by radiological distance scaling. However, such correction only accounts for attenuation but not scatter difference, causing the DRT algorithm less accurate than the model-based algorithms for small field size in heterogeneous media. Methods: Inspired by the convolution formula derived from an exponential kernel as is typically done in the collapsed-cone-convolution-superposition (CCCS) method, we redesigned the ray tracing component as the sum of TERMA scaled by a local deposition factor, which is linear with respect to density, and dose of the previous voxel scaled by a remote deposition factor, D(i)=aρ(i)T(i)+(b+c(ρ(i)-1))D(i-1),where T(i)=e(-αr(i)+β(r(i))2) and r(i)=Σ-(j=1,..,i)ρ(j).The two factors together with TERMA can be expressed in terms of 5 parameters, which are subsequently optimized by curve fitting using digital phantoms for each field size and each beam energy. Results: The proposed algorithm was implemented for the Fluence-Convolution-Broad-Beam (FCBB) dose engine and evaluated using digital slab phantoms and clinical CT data. Compared with the gold standard calculation, dose deviations were improved from 20% to 2% in the low density regions of the slab phantoms for the 1-cm field size, and within 2% for over 95% of the volume with the largest discrepancy at the interface for the clinical lung case. Conclusion: We developed a simple recursive formula for scatter correction for the DRT-based dose calculation with much improved accuracy, especially for small field size, while still keeping calculation to linear complexity. The proposed calculator is fast, yet accurate, which is crucial for dose updating in IMRT

  7. HADOC: a computer code for calculation of external and inhalation doses from acute radionuclide releases

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    The computer code HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) is described and instructions for its use are presented. The code calculates external dose from air submersion and inhalation doses following acute radionuclide releases. Atmospheric dispersion is calculated using the Hanford model with options to determine maximum conditions. Building wake effects and terrain variation may also be considered. Doses are calculated using dose conversion factor supplied in a data library. Doses are reported for one and fifty year dose commitment periods for the maximum individual and the regional population (within 50 miles). The fractional contribution to dose by radionuclide and exposure mode are also printed if requested.

  8. TH-C-BRD-02: Analytical Modeling and Dose Calculation Method for Asymmetric Proton Pencil Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gelover, E; Wang, D; Hill, P; Flynn, R; Hyer, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A dynamic collimation system (DCS), which consists of two pairs of orthogonal trimmer blades driven by linear motors has been proposed to decrease the lateral penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy. The DCS reduces lateral penumbra by intercepting the proton pencil beam near the lateral boundary of the target in the beam's eye view. The resultant trimmed pencil beams are asymmetric and laterally shifted, and therefore existing pencil beam dose calculation algorithms are not capable of trimmed beam dose calculations. This work develops a method to model and compute dose from trimmed pencil beams when using the DCS. Methods: MCNPX simulations were used to determine the dose distributions expected from various trimmer configurations using the DCS. Using these data, the lateral distribution for individual beamlets was modeled with a 2D asymmetric Gaussian function. The integral depth dose (IDD) of each configuration was also modeled by combining the IDD of an untrimmed pencil beam with a linear correction factor. The convolution of these two terms, along with the Highland approximation to account for lateral growth of the beam along the depth direction, allows a trimmed pencil beam dose distribution to be analytically generated. The algorithm was validated by computing dose for a single energy layer 5×5 cm{sup 2} treatment field, defined by the trimmers, using both the proposed method and MCNPX beamlets. Results: The Gaussian modeled asymmetric lateral profiles along the principal axes match the MCNPX data very well (R{sup 2}≥0.95 at the depth of the Bragg peak). For the 5×5 cm{sup 2} treatment plan created with both the modeled and MCNPX pencil beams, the passing rate of the 3D gamma test was 98% using a standard threshold of 3%/3 mm. Conclusion: An analytical method capable of accurately computing asymmetric pencil beam dose when using the DCS has been developed.

  9. Accurate Cross-section Calculations for Low-Energy Electron-Atom Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2011-05-11

    We describe a recently developed fully relativistic B-spline R-matrix method for atomic structure as well as calculations for electron and photon collision with atoms and ions. The method is based on the solution of the many-electron Fock-Dirac equation and allows to employ non-orthogonal sets of atomic orbitals. A B-spline basis is used to generate both the target description and the R-matrix basis functions in the inner region. Employing B-splines of different orders for the large and small components prevents the appearance of spurious states in the spectrum of the Dirac equation. Using term-dependent and thus nonorthogonal sets of one-electron functions enables us to generate accurate and flexible representations of the target states and the scattering function. Our method is based upon the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian and thus may be employed for any complex atom or ion, without the use of phenomenological core potentials. Example results from recent applications of the method for accurate calculations of low-energy electron scattering from noble gases are presented. In most cases we obtained a substantial improvement over results obtained in previous Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculations.

  10. Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1990-12-01

    The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs.

  11. Absorbed photon dose measurement and calculation for some patient organs examined by computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.

    Patient doses from computed tomography (CT) examinations are usually expressed in terms of dose index, organ doses, and effective dose. The CT dose index (CTDI) can be measured free-in-air or in a CT dosimetry phantom. Organ doses can be measured directly in anthropomorphic Rando phantoms using thermoluminescent detectors. Organ doses can also be calculated by the Monte Carlo method utilizing measured CTDI values. In this work, organ doses were assessed for three main CT examinations: head, chest, and abdomen, using the different mentioned methods. Results of directly measured doses were compared with calculated doses for different organs in the study, and also compared with published international studies.

  12. Calculation of patient effective dose and scattered dose for dental mobile fluoroscopic equipment: application of the Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boram; Lee, Jungseok; Kang, Sangwon; Cho, Hyelim; Shin, Gwisoon; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Choi, Jonghak

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the patient effective dose and scattered dose from recently developed dental mobile equipment in Korea. The MCNPX 2.6 (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) was used in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate both the effective and scattered doses. The MCNPX code was constructed identically as in the general use of equipment and the effective dose and scattered dose were calculated using the KTMAN-2 digital phantom. The effective dose was calculated as 906 μSv. The equivalent doses per organ were calculated via the MCNPX code, and were 32 174 and 19 μSv in the salivary gland and oesophagus, respectively. The scattered dose of 22.5-32.6 μSv of the tube side at 25 cm from the centre in anterior and posterior planes was measured as 1.4-3 times higher than the detector side of 10.5-16.0 μSv.

  13. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each use, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document.

  15. The Block recursion library: accurate calculation of resolvent submatrices using the block recursion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, T. J.; Haydock, Roger

    1991-04-01

    The Block Recursion Library, a collection of FORTRAN subroutines, calculates submatrices of the resolvent of a linear operator. The resolvent, in matrix theory, is a powerful tool for extracting information about solutions of linear systems. The routines use the block recursion method and achieve high accuracy for very large systems of coupled equations. This technique is a generalization of the scalar recursion method, an accurate technique for finding the local density of states. A sample program uses these routines to find the quantum mechanical transmittance of a randomly disordered two-dimensional cluster of atoms.

  16. NOTE: A sector-integration method for dose/MU calculation in a uniform scanning proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qingya; Wu, Huanmei; Wolanski, Mark; Pack, Daniel; Johnstone, Peter A. S.; Das, Indra J.

    2010-02-01

    An accurate, simple and time-saving sector integration method for calculating the proton output (dose/monitor unit, MU) is presented based on the following treatment field parameters: aperture shape, aperture size, measuring position, beam range and beam modulation. The model is validated with dose/MU values for 431 fields previously measured at our center. The measurements were obtained in a uniform scanning proton beam with a parallel plate ionization chamber in a water phantom. For beam penetration depths of clinical interest (6-27 cm water), dose/MU values were measured as a function of spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) extent and aperture diameter. First, 90 randomly selected fields were used to derive the model parameters, which were used to compute the dose/MU values for the remaining 341 fields. The min, max, average and the standard deviation of the difference between the calculated and the measured dose/MU values of the 341 fields were used to evaluate the accuracy and stability, for different energy ranges, aperture sizes, measurement positions and SOBP values. The experimental results of the five different functional sets showed that the calculation model is accurate with calculation errors ranging from -2.4% to 3.3%, and 99% of the errors are less than ±2%. The accuracy increases with higher energy, larger SOBP and bigger aperture size. The average error in the dose/MU calculation for small fields (field size <25 cm2) is 0.31 ± 0.96 (%).

  17. Voxel modeling of rabbits for use in radiological dose rate calculations.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, E A; Johansen, M P; Higley, K A

    2016-01-01

    Radiation dose to biota is generally calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of whole body ellipsoids with homogeneously distributed radioactivity throughout. More complex anatomical phantoms, termed voxel phantoms, have been developed to test the validity of these simplistic geometric models. In most voxel models created to date, human tissue composition and density values have been used in lieu of biologically accurate values for non-human biota. This has raised questions regarding variable tissue composition and density effects on the fraction of radioactive emission energy absorbed within tissues (e.g. the absorbed fraction - AF), along with implications for age-dependent dose rates as organisms mature. The results of this study on rabbits indicates that the variation in composition between two mammalian tissue types (e.g. human vs rabbit bones) made little difference in self-AF (SAF) values (within 5% over most energy ranges). However, variable tissue density (e.g. bone vs liver) can significantly impact SAF values. An examination of differences across life-stages revealed increasing SAF with testis and ovary size of over an order of magnitude for photons and several factors for electrons, indicating the potential for increasing dose rates to these sensitive organs as animals mature. AFs for electron energies of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 4.0 MeV and photon energies of 0.01, 0.015, 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 4.0 MeV are provided for eleven rabbit tissues. The data presented in this study can be used to calculate accurate organ dose rates for rabbits and other small rodents; to aide in extending dose results among different mammal species; and to validate the use of ellipsoidal models for regulatory purposes.

  18. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields.

    PubMed

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-07

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac's head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  19. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego Azcona, Juan; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac’s head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  20. Towards real-time photon Monte Carlo dose calculation in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Ziegenhein, Peter; Kozin, Igor; Kamerling, Cornelis Philippus; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-01-31

    Near real-time application of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation in clinic and research is hindered by long computational runtimes of established software. Currently, fast MC software solutions are available utilising accelerators such as GPUs or clusters of central processing units (CPU)-based system. Both platforms are expensive in terms of purchase costs and maintenance and, in case of the GPU, provide only limited scalability. In this work we propose a cloud-based MC solution, which offers high scalability of accurate photon dose calculations. The MC simulations run on a private virtual supercomputer that forms in the cloud. Computational resources can be provisioned dynamically at low costs without upfront investment in expensive hardware. A client-server software solution has been developed which controls the simulations and efficiently transports data to and from the cloud. The client application integrates seamlessly into a Treatment Planning System (TPS). It runs the MC simulation workflow automatically and securely exchanges simulation data with the server side application that controls the virtual supercomputer. The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) was used to add an addition security layer which encrypts and decrypts patient data on-the-fly at the processor register level. We could show that our cloud-based MC framework enables near real-time dose computation. It delivers excellent linear scaling for high-resolution datasets with absolute runtimes of 1.1 to 10.9 seconds for simulating a clinical prostate and liver case up to 1\\% statistical uncertainty. The computation times include the data transportation processes with the cloud as well as process scheduling and synchronisation overhead. Cloud based MC simulations offer a fast, affordable and easily accessible alternative for near real-time accurate dose calculations to currently used GPU or cluster solutions.

  1. A system for individualized dosing of intravenous aminophylline using a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, J C; Fleck, R J

    1984-01-01

    A program that calculates a value of clearance for an individual patient prior to reaching steady state in the early stages of aminophylline therapy is presented. The program is written for the Texas Instruments TI-59 programmable calculator and may be used with or without the PC-100C printer. The program can provide clinically useful information concerning projected plasma concentrations prior to reaching steady state with an accurate history of the dose administration and serum concentration determination. If the patient has not received xanthene therapy prior to admission, only one serum sample is required. If there has been prior drug exposure, a second serum sample is required. An iterative technique, which would be impractical to use without calculator assistance, is employed to make these determinations.

  2. Characterization of differences in calculated and actual measured skin doses to canine limbs during stereotactic radiosurgery using Gafchromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jerri; Ryan, Stewart; Harmon, Joseph F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate calculation of absorbed dose to the skin, especially the superficial and radiosensitive basal cell layer, is difficult for many reasons including, but not limited to, the build-up effect of megavoltage photons, tangential beam effects, mixed energy scatter from support devices, and dose interpolation caused by a finite resolution calculation matrix. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been developed as an alternative limb salvage treatment option at Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for dogs with extremity bone tumors. Optimal dose delivery to the tumor during SBRT treatment can be limited by uncertainty in skin dose calculation. The aim of this study was to characterize the difference between measured and calculated radiation dose by the Varian Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) AAA treatment planning algorithm (for 1-mm, 2-mm, and 5-mm calculation voxel dimensions) as a function of distance from the skin surface. The study used Gafchromic EBT film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ), FilmQA analysis software, a limb phantom constructed from plastic water Trade-Mark-Sign (fluke Biomedical, Everett, WA) and a canine cadaver forelimb. The limb phantom was exposed to 6-MV treatments consisting of a single-beam, a pair of parallel opposed beams, and a 7-beam coplanar treatment plan. The canine forelimb was exposed to the 7-beam coplanar plan. Radiation dose to the forelimb skin at the surface and at depths of 1.65 mm and 1.35 mm below the skin surface were also measured with the Gafchromic film. The calculation algorithm estimated the dose well at depths beyond buildup for all calculation voxel sizes. The calculation algorithm underestimated the dose in portions of the buildup region of tissue for all comparisons, with the most significant differences observed in the 5-mm calculation voxel and the least difference in the 1-mm voxel. Results indicate a significant difference between measured and calculated data

  3. Comparisons of TORT and MCNP dose calculations for BNCT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersol, D.T.; Slater, C.O.; Williams, L.R.; Redmond, E.L., II; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The relative merit of using a deterministic code to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications were examined. The TORT discrete deterministic ordinated code was used in comparison to MCNP4A to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications

  4. Accurate calculation of the intensity dependence of the refractive index using polarized basis sets.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z; Fernández, Berta

    2012-01-14

    Using the single and double excitation coupled cluster level of theory (CCSD) and the density functional theory/Becke 3-parameter Lee-Yang and Parr (DFT/B3LYP) methods, we test the performance of the Pol, ZPol, and LPol-n (n = ds, dl, fs, fl) basis sets in the accurate description of the intensity dependence of the refractive index in the Ne atom, and the N(2) and the CO molecules. Additionally, we test the aug-pc-n (n = 1, 2) basis sets of Jensen, and the SVPD, TZVPD, and QZVPD bases by Rappoport and Furche. Tests involve calculations of dynamic polarizabilities and frequency dependent second hyperpolarizabilities. The results are interpreted in terms of the medium constants entering the expressions for optically induced birefringences. In all achiral systems, the performance of the LPol-n sets is very good. Also the aug-pc-2 set yields promising results. Accurate CCSD results available in the literature allow us to select the best basis sets in order to carry out DFT/B3LYP calculations of medium constants in larger molecules. As applications, we show results for (R)-fluoro-oxirane and (R)-methyloxirane.

  5. Calculating tumor trajectory and dose-of-the-day using cone-beam CT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bernard L. Westerly, David; Miften, Moyed

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection images provide anatomical data in real-time over several respiratory cycles, forming a comprehensive picture of tumor movement. The authors developed and validated a method which uses these projections to determine the trajectory of and dose to highly mobile tumors during each fraction of treatment. Methods: CBCT images of a respiration phantom were acquired, the trajectory of which mimicked a lung tumor with high amplitude (up to 2.5 cm) and hysteresis. A template-matching algorithm was used to identify the location of a steel BB in each CBCT projection, and a Gaussian probability density function for the absolute BB position was calculated which best fit the observed trajectory of the BB in the imager geometry. Two modifications of the trajectory reconstruction were investigated: first, using respiratory phase information to refine the trajectory estimation (Phase), and second, using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to sample the estimated Gaussian tumor position distribution. The accuracies of the proposed methods were evaluated by comparing the known and calculated BB trajectories in phantom-simulated clinical scenarios using abdominal tumor volumes. Results: With all methods, the mean position of the BB was determined with accuracy better than 0.1 mm, and root-mean-square trajectory errors averaged 3.8% ± 1.1% of the marker amplitude. Dosimetric calculations using Phase methods were more accurate, with mean absolute error less than 0.5%, and with error less than 1% in the highest-noise trajectory. MC-based trajectories prevent the overestimation of dose, but when viewed in an absolute sense, add a small amount of dosimetric error (<0.1%). Conclusions: Marker trajectory and target dose-of-the-day were accurately calculated using CBCT projections. This technique provides a method to evaluate highly mobile tumors using ordinary CBCT data, and could facilitate better strategies to mitigate or compensate for motion during

  6. Accuracy of pencil-beam redefinition algorithm dose calculations in patient-like cylindrical phantoms for bolus electron conformal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, Robert L.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Chu, Connel; Fields, Robert S.; Sprunger, Conrad P.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document the improved accuracy of the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) compared to the pencil beam algorithm (PBA) for bolus electron conformal therapy using cylindrical patient phantoms based on patient computed tomography (CT) scans of retromolar trigone and nose cancer.Methods: PBRA and PBA electron dose calculations were compared with measured dose in retromolar trigone and nose phantoms both with and without bolus. For the bolus treatment plans, a radiation oncologist outlined a planning target volume (PTV) on the central axis slice of the CT scan for each phantom. A bolus was designed using the planning.decimal{sup Registered-Sign} (p.d) software (.decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL) to conform the 90% dose line to the distal surface of the PTV. Dose measurements were taken with thermoluminescent dosimeters placed into predrilled holes. The Pinnacle{sup 3} (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MD) treatment planning system was used to calculate PBA dose distributions. The PBRA dose distributions were calculated with an in-house C++ program. In order to accurately account for the phantom materials a table correlating CT number to relative electron stopping and scattering powers was compiled and used for both PBA and PBRA dose calculations. Accuracy was determined by comparing differences in measured and calculated dose, as well as distance to agreement for each measurement point.Results: The measured doses had an average precision of 0.9%. For the retromolar trigone phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average {+-}1{sigma} dose difference (calculated - measured) of -0.65%{+-} 1.62% without the bolus and -0.20%{+-} 1.54% with the bolus. The PBA dose calculation had an average dose difference of 0.19%{+-} 3.27% without the bolus and -0.05%{+-} 3.14% with the bolus. For the nose phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average dose difference of 0.50%{+-} 3.06% without bolus and -0.18%{+-} 1.22% with the bolus. The PBA

  7. SU-E-T-416: VMAT Dose Calculations Using Cone Beam CT Images: A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Kuo, J; Daroui, P; Ramsinghani, N; Al-Ghazi, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) images have been used routinely for patient positioning throughout the treatment course. However, use of CBCT for dose calculation is still investigational. The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of CBCT images for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plan dose calculation. Methods: A CATPHAN 504 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) was used to compare the dosimetric and geometric accuracy between conventional CT and CBCT (in both full and half fan modes). Hounsfield units (HU) profiles at different density areas were evaluated. A C shape target that surrounds a central avoidance structure was created and a VMAT plan was generated on the CT images and copied to the CBCT phantom images. Patient studies included three brain patients, and one head and neck (H'N) patient. VMAT plans generated on the patients treatment planning CT was applied to CBCT images obtained during the first treatment. Isodose distributions and dosevolume- histograms (DVHs) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, the HU difference between CT and CBCT is within 100 (maximum 96 HU for Teflon CBCT images in full fan mode). The impact of these differences on the calculated dose distributions was clinically insignificant. In both phantom and patient studies, target DVHs based on CBCT images were in excellent agreement with those based on planning CT images. Mean, Median, near minimum (D98%), and near maximum (D2%) doses agreed within 0-2.5%. A slightly larger discrepancy is observed in the patient studies compared to that seen in the phantom study, (0-1% vs. 0 - 2.5%). Conclusion: CBCT images can be used to accurately predict dosimetric results, without any HU correction. It is feasible to use CBCT to evaluate the actual dose delivered at each fraction. The dosimetric consequences resulting from tumor response and patient geometry changes could be monitored.

  8. Generalized eMC implementation for Monte Carlo dose calculation of electron beams from different machine types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Michael K.; Cygler, Joanna; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J.; Manser, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm available in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and uses a beam model applicable to Varian linear accelerators. This leads to limitations in accuracy if eMC is applied to non-Varian machines. In this work eMC is generalized to also allow accurate dose calculations for electron beams from Elekta and Siemens accelerators. First, changes made in the previous study to use eMC for low electron beam energies of Varian accelerators are applied. Then, a generalized beam model is developed using a main electron source and a main photon source representing electrons and photons from the scattering foil, respectively, an edge source of electrons, a transmission source of photons and a line source of electrons and photons representing the particles from the scrapers or inserts and head scatter radiation. Regarding the macro MC dose calculation algorithm, the transport code of the secondary particles is improved. The macro MC dose calculations are validated with corresponding dose calculations using EGSnrc in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms. The validation of the generalized eMC is carried out by comparing calculated and measured dose distributions in water for Varian, Elekta and Siemens machines for a variety of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs. The comparisons are performed in units of cGy per MU. Overall, a general agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions for all machine types and all combinations of parameters investigated is found to be within 2% or 2 mm. The results of the dose comparisons suggest that the generalized eMC is now suitable to calculate dose distributions for Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators with sufficient accuracy in the range of the investigated combinations of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs.

  9. Dose calculation for hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy: approximating continuous arc delivery and tongue-and-groove modeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Tang, Grace; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Lim, Seng B; LoSasso, Thomas; Mageras, Gig

    2016-03-01

    Hypofractionated treatments generally increase the complexity of a treatment plan due to the more stringent constraints of normal tissues and target coverage. As a result, treatment plans contain more modulated MLC motions that may require extra efforts for accurate dose calculation. This study explores methods to minimize the differences between in-house dose calculation and actual delivery of hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), by focusing on arc approximation and tongue-and-groove (TG) modeling. For dose calculation, the continuous delivery arc is typically approximated by a series of static beams with an angular spacing of 2°. This causes significant error when there is large MLC movement from one beam to the next. While increasing the number of beams will minimize the dose error, calculation time will increase significantly. We propose a solution by inserting two additional apertures at each of the beam angle for dose calculation. These additional apertures were interpolated at two-thirds' degree before and after each beam. Effectively, there were a total of three MLC apertures at each beam angle, and the weighted average fluence from the three apertures was used for calculation. Because the number of beams was kept the same, calculation time was only increased by about 6%-8%. For a lung plan, areas of high local dose differences (>4%) between film measurement and calculation with one aperture were significantly reduced in calculation with three apertures. Ion chamber measurement also showed similar results, where improvements were seen with calculations using additional apertures. Dose calculation accuracy was further improved for TG modeling by developing a sampling method for beam fluence matrix. Single element point sampling for fluence transmitted through MLC was used for our fluence matrix with 1 mm resolution. For Varian HDMLC, grid alignment can cause fluence sampling error. To correct this, transmission volume averaging was

  10. Dose calculation for hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy: approximating continuous arc delivery and tongue-and-groove modeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Tang, Grace; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Lim, Seng B; LoSasso, Thomas; Mageras, Gig

    2016-03-08

    Hypofractionated treatments generally increase the complexity of a treatment plan due to the more stringent constraints of normal tissues and target coverage. As a result, treatment plans contain more modulated MLC motions that may require extra efforts for accurate dose calculation. This study explores methods to minimize the differences between in-house dose calculation and actual delivery of hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), by focusing on arc approximation and tongue-and-groove (TG) modeling. For dose calculation, the continuous delivery arc is typically approximated by a series of static beams with an angular spacing of 2°. This causes significant error when there is large MLC movement from one beam to the next. While increasing the number of beams will minimize the dose error, calculation time will increase significantly. We propose a solution by inserting two additional apertures at each of the beam angle for dose calculation. These additional apertures were interpolated at two-thirds' degree before and after each beam. Effectively, there were a total of three MLC apertures at each beam angle, and the weighted average fluence from the three apertures was used for calculation. Because the number of beams was kept the same, calculation time was only increased by about 6%-8%. For a lung plan, areas of high local dose differences (> 4%) between film measurement and calculation with one aperture were significantly reduced in calculation with three apertures. Ion chamber measurement also showed similar results, where improvements were seen with calculations using additional apertures. Dose calculation accuracy was further improved for TG modeling by developing a sampling method for beam fluence matrix. Single element point sampling for fluence transmitted through MLC was used for our fluence matrix with 1 mm resolution. For Varian HDMLC, grid alignment can cause fluence sampling error. To correct this, transmission volume averaging was

  11. Efficient yet accurate approximations for ab initio calculations of alcohol cluster thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Umer, Muhammad; Kopp, Wassja A; Leonhard, Kai

    2015-12-07

    We have calculated the binding enthalpies and entropies of gas phase alcohol clusters from ethanol to 1-decanol. In addition to the monomers, we have investigated dimers, tetramers, and pentamers. Geometries have been obtained at the B3LYP/TZVP level and single point energy calculations have been performed with the Resolution of the Identity-MP2 (RIMP2) method and basis set limit extrapolation using aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets. Thermochemistry is calculated with decoupled hindered rotor treatment for large amplitude motions. The results show three points: First, it is more accurate to transfer the rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator entropies from propanol to longer alcohols than to compute them with an ultra-fine grid and tight geometry convergence criteria. Second, the computational effort can be reduced considerably by using dimerization energies of longer alcohols at density functional theory (B3LYP) level plus a RIMP2 correction obtained from 1-propanol. This approximation yields results almost with the same accuracy as RIMP2 - both methods differ for 1-decanol only 0.4 kJ/mol. Third, the entropy of dimerization including the hindered rotation contribution is converged at 1-propanol with respect to chain length. This allows for a transfer of hindered rotation contributions from smaller alcohols to longer ones which reduces the required computational and man power considerably.

  12. Efficient yet accurate approximations for ab initio calculations of alcohol cluster thermochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer, Muhammad; Kopp, Wassja A.; Leonhard, Kai

    2015-12-01

    We have calculated the binding enthalpies and entropies of gas phase alcohol clusters from ethanol to 1-decanol. In addition to the monomers, we have investigated dimers, tetramers, and pentamers. Geometries have been obtained at the B3LYP/TZVP level and single point energy calculations have been performed with the Resolution of the Identity-MP2 (RIMP2) method and basis set limit extrapolation using aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets. Thermochemistry is calculated with decoupled hindered rotor treatment for large amplitude motions. The results show three points: First, it is more accurate to transfer the rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator entropies from propanol to longer alcohols than to compute them with an ultra-fine grid and tight geometry convergence criteria. Second, the computational effort can be reduced considerably by using dimerization energies of longer alcohols at density functional theory (B3LYP) level plus a RIMP2 correction obtained from 1-propanol. This approximation yields results almost with the same accuracy as RIMP2 — both methods differ for 1-decanol only 0.4 kJ/mol. Third, the entropy of dimerization including the hindered rotation contribution is converged at 1-propanol with respect to chain length. This allows for a transfer of hindered rotation contributions from smaller alcohols to longer ones which reduces the required computational and man power considerably.

  13. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2010-10-15

    in the mean compositions of tissues affect low energy brachytherapy dosimetry. Dose differences between mean and one standard deviation of the mean composition increasing with distance from the source are observed. It is established that the {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs sources are the least sensitive to variations in elemental compositions while {sup 103}Pd is most sensitive. The EBS falls in between and exhibits complex behavior due to significant spectral hardening. Results from simulation (2) show that two prostate compositions are dosimetrically equivalent to water while the third shows D{sub 90} differences of up to 4%. Results from simulation (3) show that breast is more sensitive than prostate with dose variations of up to 30% from water for 70% adipose/30% gland breast. The variability of the breast composition adds a {+-}10% dose variation. Conclusions: Low energy brachytherapy dose distributions in tissue differ from water and are influenced by density, mean tissue composition, and patient-to-patient composition variations. The results support the use of a dose calculation algorithm accounting for heterogeneities such as MC. Since this work shows that variations in mean tissue compositions affect MC dosimetry and result in increased dose uncertainties, the authors conclude that imaging tools providing more accurate estimates of elemental compositions such as dual energy CT would be beneficial.

  14. BENCHMARKING UPGRADED HOTSPOT DOSE CALCULATIONS AGAINST MACCS2 RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Brotherton, Kevin

    2009-04-30

    The radiological consequence of interest for a documented safety analysis (DSA) is the centerline Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) incurred by the Maximally Exposed Offsite Individual (MOI) evaluated at the 95th percentile consequence level. An upgraded version of HotSpot (Version 2.07) has been developed with the capabilities to read site meteorological data and perform the necessary statistical calculations to determine the 95th percentile consequence result. These capabilities should allow HotSpot to join MACCS2 (Version 1.13.1) and GENII (Version 1.485) as radiological consequence toolbox codes in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Central Registry. Using the same meteorological data file, scenarios involving a one curie release of {sup 239}Pu were modeled in both HotSpot and MACCS2. Several sets of release conditions were modeled, and the results compared. In each case, input parameter specifications for each code were chosen to match one another as much as the codes would allow. The results from the two codes are in excellent agreement. Slight differences observed in results are explained by algorithm differences.

  15. A method for calculating Bayesian uncertainties on internal doses resulting from complex occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Puncher, M; Birchall, A; Bull, R K

    2012-08-01

    Estimating uncertainties on doses from bioassay data is of interest in epidemiology studies that estimate cancer risk from occupational exposures to radionuclides. Bayesian methods provide a logical framework to calculate these uncertainties. However, occupational exposures often consist of many intakes, and this can make the Bayesian calculation computationally intractable. This paper describes a novel strategy for increasing the computational speed of the calculation by simplifying the intake pattern to a single composite intake, termed as complex intake regime (CIR). In order to assess whether this approximation is accurate and fast enough for practical purposes, the method is implemented by the Weighted Likelihood Monte Carlo Sampling (WeLMoS) method and evaluated by comparing its performance with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The MCMC method gives the full solution (all intakes are independent), but is very computationally intensive to apply routinely. Posterior distributions of model parameter values, intakes and doses are calculated for a representative sample of plutonium workers from the United Kingdom Atomic Energy cohort using the WeLMoS method with the CIR and the MCMC method. The distributions are in good agreement: posterior means and Q(0.025) and Q(0.975) quantiles are typically within 20 %. Furthermore, the WeLMoS method using the CIR converges quickly: a typical case history takes around 10-20 min on a fast workstation, whereas the MCMC method took around 12-72 hr. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed.

  16. Colocalization analysis in fluorescence micrographs: verification of a more accurate calculation of pearson's correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Andrew L; Macleod, Alasdair; Noppen, Samuel; Sanderson, Jeremy; Guérin, Christopher J

    2010-12-01

    One of the most routine uses of fluorescence microscopy is colocalization, i.e., the demonstration of a relationship between pairs of biological molecules. Frequently this is presented simplistically by the use of overlays of red and green images, with areas of yellow indicating colocalization of the molecules. Colocalization data are rarely quantified and can be misleading. Our results from both synthetic and biological datasets demonstrate that the generation of Pearson's correlation coefficient between pairs of images can overestimate positive correlation and fail to demonstrate negative correlation. We have demonstrated that the calculation of a thresholded Pearson's correlation coefficient using only intensity values over a determined threshold in both channels produces numerical values that more accurately describe both synthetic datasets and biological examples. Its use will bring clarity and accuracy to colocalization studies using fluorescent microscopy.

  17. Accurate Calculations of Rotationally Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections Using Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-16

    For computational treatment of rotationally inelastic scattering of molecules, we propose to use the mixed quantum/classical theory, MQCT. The old idea of treating translational motion classically, while quantum mechanics is used for rotational degrees of freedom, is developed to the new level and is applied to Na + N2 collisions in a broad range of energies. Comparison with full-quantum calculations shows that MQCT accurately reproduces all, even minor, features of energy dependence of cross sections, except scattering resonances at very low energies. The remarkable success of MQCT opens up wide opportunities for computational predictions of inelastic scattering cross sections at higher temperatures and/or for polyatomic molecules and heavier quenchers, which is computationally close to impossible within the full-quantum framework.

  18. Accurate MRCI calculations of the low-lying electronic states of the NCl molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ziyue; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2017-03-01

    Characterization of 22 electronic states of NCl correlating to the two lowest dissociation channels are carried out using high level CASSCF/MRCI calculations with a sextuple-ζ basis set including Davidson modification, core-valence correlation correction and scalar relativistic effects. As far as we know, this radical has never been the preference of theoretical researchers and experimental investigations only concern the ground state and the two low-lying metastable states. Accurate potential energy curves, dissociation energies as well as the equilibrium constants are determined and avoided crossings between the Π symmetry are studied. Moreover, spin-orbit splitting of several states and transition probabilities and radiative lifetimes for some allowed or forbidden transitions are presented.

  19. Using Interpolation for Fast and Accurate Calculation of Ion–Ion Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations between pairs of ions of various diameters (2–5.5 Å in increments of 0.5 Å) and charge (+1 or −1) interacting in explicit water (TIP3P) under ambient conditions. We extract their potentials of mean force (PMFs). We develop an interpolation scheme, called i-PMF, that is capable of capturing the full set of PMFs for arbitrary combinations of ion sizes ranging from 2 to 5.5 Å. The advantage of the interpolation process is computational cost. Whereas it can take 100 h to simulate each PMF by MD, we can compute an equivalently accurate i-PMF in seconds. This process may be useful for rapid and accurate calculation of the strengths of salt bridges and the effects of bridging waters in biomolecular simulations. We also find that our data is consistent with Collins’ “law of matching affinities” of ion solubilities: small–small or large–large ion pairs are poorly soluble in water, whereas small–large are highly soluble. PMID:24625086

  20. Rapid and Accurate Calculation of a Speed Dependent Spectral Line Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beverstock, D. Reed; Weaver, Kendra Letchworth; Benner, D. Chris

    2014-06-01

    Use of the Voigt profile with the Lorentz width allowed to vary with the speed of collision has been hampered by the lack of fast accurate algorithms. Such an algorithm has been written assuming a quadratic dependence of the Lorentz width upon the speed of collision that is accurate to one part in 10 000 and is generally only a factor of four or so slower than the equivalent Voigt calculation with the Letchworth and Benner algorithm. The only exception to the accuracy is far from line center near the Doppler limit when the speed dependent parameter is quite large. At this point the spectral line has fallen by at least 17 orders of magnitude from the line center and is generally insignificant. Gauss-Hermite quadrature of third to seventeenth order, Taylor series expansion about precomputed points and spline interpolation are used in the computation of both the real and imaginary parts for various regions. Kendra L. Letchworth and D. Chris Benner, JQSRT 107 (2007) 173-192. This work was funded by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and National Science Foundation.

  1. Dose calculation accuracies in whole breast radiotherapy treatment planning: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Shogo; Miyabe, Yuki; Tohyama, Naoki; Kumazaki, Yu; Kurooka, Masahiko; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kito, Satoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Ohotomo, Yuko; Ikagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishikura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Miwako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishio, Teiji

    2015-07-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the variation in the doses delivered among institutions due to dose calculation inaccuracies in whole breast radiotherapy. We have developed practical procedures for quality assurance (QA) of radiation treatment planning systems. These QA procedures are designed to be performed easily at any institution and to permit comparisons of results across institutions. The dose calculation accuracy was evaluated across seven institutions using various irradiation conditions. In some conditions, there was a >3 % difference between the calculated dose and the measured dose. The dose calculation accuracy differs among institutions because it is dependent on both the dose calculation algorithm and beam modeling. The QA procedures in this study are useful for verifying the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm and of the beam model before clinical use for whole breast radiotherapy.

  2. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townson, Reid W.; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Jiang Graves, Yan; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-06-01

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  3. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources.

    PubMed

    Townson, Reid W; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Graves, Yan Jiang; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-06-21

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  4. Accurate, precise, and efficient theoretical methods to calculate anion-π interaction energies in model structures.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Pál D; Csonka, Gábor I; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Sun, Jianwei

    2015-01-13

    A correct description of the anion-π interaction is essential for the design of selective anion receptors and channels and important for advances in the field of supramolecular chemistry. However, it is challenging to do accurate, precise, and efficient calculations of this interaction, which are lacking in the literature. In this article, by testing sets of 20 binary anion-π complexes of fluoride, chloride, bromide, nitrate, or carbonate ions with hexafluorobenzene, 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene, 2,4,6-trifluoro-1,3,5-triazine, or 1,3,5-triazine and 30 ternary π-anion-π' sandwich complexes composed from the same monomers, we suggest domain-based local-pair natural orbital coupled cluster energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit as reference values. We give a detailed explanation of the origin of anion-π interactions, using the permanent quadrupole moments, static dipole polarizabilities, and electrostatic potential maps. We use symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) to calculate the components of the anion-π interaction energies. We examine the performance of the direct random phase approximation (dRPA), the second-order screened exchange (SOSEX), local-pair natural-orbital (LPNO) coupled electron pair approximation (CEPA), and several dispersion-corrected density functionals (including generalized gradient approximation (GGA), meta-GGA, and double hybrid density functional). The LPNO-CEPA/1 results show the best agreement with the reference results. The dRPA method is only slightly less accurate and precise than the LPNO-CEPA/1, but it is considerably more efficient (6-17 times faster) for the binary complexes studied in this paper. For 30 ternary π-anion-π' sandwich complexes, we give dRPA interaction energies as reference values. The double hybrid functionals are much more efficient but less accurate and precise than dRPA. The dispersion-corrected double hybrid PWPB95-D3(BJ) and B2PLYP-D3(BJ) functionals perform better than the GGA and meta

  5. Advantages of multiple algorithm support in treatment planning system for external beam dose calculations.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The complexity of interactions and the nature of the approximations made in the formulation of the algorithm require that the user be familiar with the limitations of various models. As computer power keeps growing, calculation algorithms are tending more towards physically based models. The nature and quantity of the data required varies according to the model which may be either measurement based models or physical based models. Multiple dose calculation algorithm support found in XiO Treatment Planning System can be used to advantage when choice is to be made between speed and accuracy. Thus XiO allows end users generate plans accurately and quickly to optimize the delivery of radiation therapy.

  6. Accurate Monte Carlo modeling of cyclotrons for optimization of shielding and activation calculations in the biomedical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Marengo, Mario; Baschetti, Serafina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Longo Vaschetto, Vittorio; Lucconi, Giulia; Massucci, Piera; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-11-01

    Biomedical cyclotrons for production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radionuclides and radiotherapy with hadrons or ions are widely diffused and established in hospitals as well as in industrial facilities and research sites. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for radiation protection assessment, are given in a number of international documents; however, these well-established guides typically offer analytic methods of calculation of both shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealized geometry set up. The availability of Monte Carlo codes with accurate and up-to-date libraries for transport and interactions of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of nowadays computers, makes systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to radiation protection. In this work, the well-known Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to simulate two representative models of cyclotron for PET radionuclides production, including their targetry; and one type of proton therapy cyclotron including the energy selection system. Simulations yield estimates of various quantities of radiological interest, including the effective dose distribution around the equipment, the effective number of neutron produced per incident proton and the activation of target materials, the structure of the cyclotron, the energy degrader, the vault walls and the soil. The model was validated against experimental measurements and comparison with well-established reference data. Neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was measured around a GE PETtrace cyclotron: an average ratio between experimental measurement and simulations of 0.99±0.07 was found. Saturation yield of 18F, produced by the well-known 18O(p,n)18F reaction, was calculated and compared with the IAEA recommended

  7. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Naichang; Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran; Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James; Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  8. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach.

  9. Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

  10. Patient-specific IMRT verification using independent fluence-based dose calculation software: experimental benchmarking and initial clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Stock, Markus; Kroupa, Bernhard; Olofsson, Jörgen; Nyholm, Tufve; Ahnesjö, Anders; Karlsson, Mikael

    2007-08-01

    . The physical effects modelled in the dose calculation software MUV allow accurate dose calculations in individual verification points. Independent calculations may be used to replace experimental dose verification once the IMRT programme is mature.

  11. An analytic linear accelerator source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Folkerts, Michael; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-21

    dose difference within 1.7%. The maximum relative difference of output factors was within 0.5%. Over 98.5% passing rate was achieved in 3D gamma-index tests with 2%/2 mm criteria in both an IMRT prostate patient case and a head-and-neck case. These results demonstrated the efficacy of our model in terms of accurately representing a reference phase-space file. We have also tested the efficiency gain of our source model over our previously developed phase-space-let file source model. The overall efficiency of dose calculation was found to be improved by ~1.3-2.2 times in water and patient cases using our analytical model.

  12. Automatic commissioning of a GPU-based Monte Carlo radiation dose calculation code for photon radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen; Jiang Graves, Yan; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. Commissioning of a beam model in the MC code against a clinical linear accelerator beam is of crucial importance for its clinical implementation. In this paper, we propose an automatic commissioning method for our GPU-based MC dose engine, gDPM. gDPM utilizes a beam model based on a concept of phase-space-let (PSL). A PSL contains a group of particles that are of the same type and close in space and energy. A set of generic PSLs was generated by splitting a reference phase-space file. Each PSL was associated with a weighting factor, and in dose calculations the particle carried a weight corresponding to the PSL where it was from. Dose for each PSL in water was pre-computed, and hence the dose in water for a whole beam under a given set of PSL weighting factors was the weighted sum of the PSL doses. At the commissioning stage, an optimization problem was solved to adjust the PSL weights in order to minimize the difference between the calculated dose and measured one. Symmetry and smoothness regularizations were utilized to uniquely determine the solution. An augmented Lagrangian method was employed to solve the optimization problem. To validate our method, a phase-space file of a Varian TrueBeam 6 MV beam was used to generate the PSLs for 6 MV beams. In a simulation study, we commissioned a Siemens 6 MV beam on which a set of field-dependent phase-space files was available. The dose data of this desired beam for different open fields and a small off-axis open field were obtained by calculating doses using these phase-space files. The 3D γ-index test passing rate within the regions with dose above 10% of dmax dose for those open fields tested was improved averagely from 70.56 to 99.36% for 2%/2 mm criteria and from 32.22 to 89.65% for 1%/1 mm criteria. We also tested our commissioning method on a six-field head-and-neck cancer IMRT plan. The

  13. Anharmonic zero point vibrational energies: Tipping the scales in accurate thermochemistry calculations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Florian; Rauhut, Guntram; Feller, David; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2013-01-01

    Anharmonic zero point vibrational energies (ZPVEs) calculated using both conventional CCSD(T) and MP2 in combination with vibrational second-order perturbation theory (VPT2) are compared to explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12 and MP2-F12 results that utilize vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) theory for 26 molecules of varying size. Sequences of correlation consistent basis sets are used throughout. It is found that the explicitly correlated methods yield results close to the basis set limit even with double-zeta quality basis sets. In particular, the anharmonic contributions to the ZPVE are accurately recovered at just the MP2 (or MP2-F12) level of theory. Somewhat surprisingly, the best vibrational CI results agreed with the VPT2 values with a mean unsigned deviation of just 0.09 kJ/mol and a standard deviation of just 0.11 kJ/mol. The largest difference was observed for C4H4O (0.34 kJ/mol). A simplified version of the vibrational CI procedure that limited the modal expansion to at most 2-mode coupling yielded anharmonic corrections generally within about 0.1 kJ/mol of the full 3- or 4-mode results, except in the cases of C3H8 and C4H4O where the contributions were underestimated by 1.3 and 0.8 kJ/mol, respectively (34% and 40%, respectively). For the molecules considered in this work, accurate anharmonic ZPVEs are most economically obtained by combining CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12 harmonic frequencies with either MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ/VPT2 or MP2-F12/cc-pVDZ-F12/VCI anharmonic corrections.

  14. Hanford Site Annual Report Radiological Dose Calculation Upgrade Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Sandra F.

    2010-02-28

    Operations at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, result in the release of radioactive materials to offsite residents. Site authorities are required to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed offsite resident. Due to the very low levels of exposure at the residence, computer models, rather than environmental samples, are used to estimate exposure, intake, and dose. A DOS-based model has been used in the past (GENII version 1.485). GENII v1.485 has been updated to a Windows®-based software (GENII version 2.08). Use of the updated software will facilitate future dose evaluations, but must be demonstrated to provide results comparable to those of GENII v1.485. This report describes the GENII v1.485 and GENII v2.08 dose exposure, intake, and dose estimates for the maximally exposed offsite resident reported for calendar year 2008. The GENII v2.08 results reflect updates to implemented algorithms. No two environmental models produce the same results, as was again demonstrated in this report. The aggregated dose results from 2008 Hanford Site airborne and surface water exposure scenarios provide comparable dose results. Therefore, the GENII v2.08 software is recommended for future offsite resident dose evaluations.

  15. Use of dose-dependent absorption into target tissues to more accurately predict cancer risk at low oral doses of hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Haney, J

    2015-02-01

    The mouse dose at the lowest water concentration used in the National Toxicology Program hexavalent chromium (CrVI) drinking water study (NTP, 2008) is about 74,500 times higher than the approximate human dose corresponding to the 35-city geometric mean reported in EWG (2010) and over 1000 times higher than that based on the highest reported tap water concentration. With experimental and environmental doses differing greatly, it is a regulatory challenge to extrapolate high-dose results to environmental doses orders of magnitude lower in a meaningful and toxicologically predictive manner. This seems particularly true for the low-dose extrapolation of results for oral CrVI-induced carcinogenesis since dose-dependent differences in the dose fraction absorbed by mouse target tissues are apparent (Kirman et al., 2012). These data can be used for a straightforward adjustment of the USEPA (2010) draft oral slope factor (SFo) to be more predictive of risk at environmentally-relevant doses. More specifically, the evaluation of observed and modeled differences in the fraction of dose absorbed by target tissues at the point-of-departure for the draft SFo calculation versus lower doses suggests that the draft SFo be divided by a dose-specific adjustment factor of at least an order of magnitude to be less over-predictive of risk at more environmentally-relevant doses.

  16. Does vertebroplasty affect radiation dose distribution?: comparison of spatial dose distributions in a cement-injected vertebra as calculated by treatment planning system and actual spatial dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Yagi, Rie; Nakatani, Miyuki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sano, Akira; Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Harima, Yoko; Sawada, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution.

  17. SU-E-I-06: A Dose Calculation Algorithm for KV Diagnostic Imaging Beams by Empirical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, M; Aldoohan, S; Sonnad, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop accurate three-dimensional (3D) empirical dose calculation model for kV diagnostic beams for different radiographic and CT imaging techniques. Methods: Dose was modeled using photon attenuation measured using depth dose (DD), scatter radiation of the source and medium, and off-axis ratio (OAR) profiles. Measurements were performed using single-diode in water and a diode-array detector (MapCHECK2) with kV on-board imagers (OBI) integrated with Varian TrueBeam and Trilogy linacs. The dose parameters were measured for three energies: 80, 100, and 125 kVp with and without bowtie filters using field sizes 1×1–40×40 cm2 and depths 0–20 cm in water tank. Results: The measured DD decreased with depth in water because of photon attenuation, while it increased with field size due to increased scatter radiation from medium. DD curves varied with energy and filters where they increased with higher energies and beam hardening from half-fan and full-fan bowtie filters. Scatter radiation factors increased with field sizes and higher energies. The OAR was with 3% for beam profiles within the flat dose regions. The heal effect of this kV OBI system was within 6% from the central axis value at different depths. The presence of bowtie filters attenuated measured dose off-axis by as much as 80% at the edges of large beams. The model dose predictions were verified with measured doses using single point diode and ionization chamber or two-dimensional diode-array detectors inserted in solid water phantoms. Conclusion: This empirical model enables fast and accurate 3D dose calculation in water within 5% in regions with near charge-particle equilibrium conditions outside buildup region and penumbra. It considers accurately scatter radiation contribution in water which is superior to air-kerma or CTDI dose measurements used usually in dose calculation for diagnostic imaging beams. Considering heterogeneity corrections in this model will enable patient specific dose

  18. SU-E-T-465: Dose Calculation Method for Dynamic Tumor Tracking Using a Gimbal-Mounted Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, S; Inoue, T; Kurokawa, C; Usui, K; Sasai, K; Utsunomiya, S; Ebe, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking using the gimbal-mounted linac (Vero4DRT, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Japan) has been available when respiratory motion is significant. The irradiation accuracy of the dynamic tumor tracking has been reported to be excellent. In addition to the irradiation accuracy, a fast and accurate dose calculation algorithm is needed to validate the dose distribution in the presence of respiratory motion because the multiple phases of it have to be considered. A modification of dose calculation algorithm is necessary for the gimbal-mounted linac due to the degrees of freedom of gimbal swing. The dose calculation algorithm for the gimbal motion was implemented using the linear transformation between coordinate systems. Methods: The linear transformation matrices between the coordinate systems with and without gimbal swings were constructed using the combination of translation and rotation matrices. The coordinate system where the radiation source is at the origin and the beam axis along the z axis was adopted. The transformation can be divided into the translation from the radiation source to the gimbal rotation center, the two rotations around the center relating to the gimbal swings, and the translation from the gimbal center to the radiation source. After operating the transformation matrix to the phantom or patient image, the dose calculation can be performed as the no gimbal swing. The algorithm was implemented in the treatment planning system, PlanUNC (University of North Carolina, NC). The convolution/superposition algorithm was used. The dose calculations with and without gimbal swings were performed for the 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} field with the grid size of 5 mm. Results: The calculation time was about 3 minutes per beam. No significant additional time due to the gimbal swing was observed. Conclusions: The dose calculation algorithm for the finite gimbal swing was implemented. The calculation time was moderate.

  19. Fast and Accurate Radiative Transfer Calculations Using Principal Component Analysis for (Exo-)Planetary Retrieval Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, P.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crisp, D.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) computations form the engine of atmospheric retrieval codes. However, full treatment of RT processes is computationally expensive, prompting usage of two-stream approximations in current exoplanetary atmospheric retrieval codes [Line et al., 2013]. Natraj et al. [2005, 2010] and Spurr and Natraj [2013] demonstrated the ability of a technique using principal component analysis (PCA) to speed up RT computations. In the PCA method for RT performance enhancement, empirical orthogonal functions are developed for binned sets of inherent optical properties that possess some redundancy; costly multiple-scattering RT calculations are only done for those few optical states corresponding to the most important principal components, and correction factors are applied to approximate radiation fields. Kopparla et al. [2015, in preparation] extended the PCA method to a broadband spectral region from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared (0.3-3 micron), accounting for major gas absorptions in this region. Here, we apply the PCA method to a some typical (exo-)planetary retrieval problems. Comparisons between the new model, called Universal Principal Component Analysis Radiative Transfer (UPCART) model, two-stream models and line-by-line RT models are performed, for spectral radiances, spectral fluxes and broadband fluxes. Each of these are calculated at the top of the atmosphere for several scenarios with varying aerosol types, extinction and scattering optical depth profiles, and stellar and viewing geometries. We demonstrate that very accurate radiance and flux estimates can be obtained, with better than 1% accuracy in all spectral regions and better than 0.1% in most cases, as compared to a numerically exact line-by-line RT model. The accuracy is enhanced when the results are convolved to typical instrument resolutions. The operational speed and accuracy of UPCART can be further improved by optimizing binning schemes and parallelizing the codes, work

  20. SMARTIES: User-friendly codes for fast and accurate calculations of light scattering by spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, W. R. C.; Auguié, B.; Le Ru, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    We provide a detailed user guide for SMARTIES, a suite of MATLAB codes for the calculation of the optical properties of oblate and prolate spheroidal particles, with comparable capabilities and ease-of-use as Mie theory for spheres. SMARTIES is a MATLAB implementation of an improved T-matrix algorithm for the theoretical modelling of electromagnetic scattering by particles of spheroidal shape. The theory behind the improvements in numerical accuracy and convergence is briefly summarized, with reference to the original publications. Instructions of use, and a detailed description of the code structure, its range of applicability, as well as guidelines for further developments by advanced users are discussed in separate sections of this user guide. The code may be useful to researchers seeking a fast, accurate and reliable tool to simulate the near-field and far-field optical properties of elongated particles, but will also appeal to other developers of light-scattering software seeking a reliable benchmark for non-spherical particles with a challenging aspect ratio and/or refractive index contrast.

  1. Is the Separable Propagator Perturbation Approach Accurate in Calculating Angle Resolved Photoelectron Diffraction Spectra?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. N.; Chu, T. P.; Wu, Huasheng; Tong, S. Y.; Huang, Hong

    1997-03-01

    We compare multiple scattering results of angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction spectra between the exact slab method and the separable propagator perturbation method. In the slab method,footnote C.H. Li, A.R. Lubinsky and S.Y. Tong, Phys. Rev. B17, 3128 (1978). the source wave and multiple scattering within the strong scattering atomic layers are expanded in spherical waves while interlayer scattering is expressed in plane waves. The transformation between spherical waves and plane waves is done exactly. The plane waves are then matched across the solid-vacuum interface to a single outgoing plane wave in the detector's direction. The separable propagator perturbation approach uses two approximations: (i) A separable representation of the Green's function propagator and (ii) A perturbation expansion of multiple scattering terms. Results of c(2x2) S-Ni(001) show that this approximate method fails to converge due to the very slow convergence of the separable representation for scattering angles less than 90^circ. However, this method is accurate in the backscattering regime and may be applied to XAFS calculations.(J.J. Rehr and R.C. Albers, Phys. Rev. B41, 8139 (1990).) The use of this method for angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction spectra is substantially less reliable.

  2. Analysis of offsite dose calculation methodology for a nuclear power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Donna Smith

    1995-01-01

    This technical study reviews the methodology for calculating offsite dose estimates as described in the offsite dose calculation manual (ODCM) for Pennsylvania Power and Light - Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES). An evaluation of the SSES ODCM dose assessment methodology indicates that it conforms with methodology accepted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Using 1993 SSES effluent data, dose estimates are calculated according to SSES ODCM methodology and compared to the dose estimates calculated according to SSES ODCM and the computer model used to produce the reported 1993 dose estimates. The 1993 SSES dose estimates are based on the axioms of Publication 2 of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). SSES Dose estimates based on the axioms of ICRP Publication 26 and 30 reveal the total body estimates to be the most affected.

  3. Evaluation of PENFAST--a fast Monte Carlo code for dose calculations in photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Habib, B; Poumarede, B; Tola, F; Barthe, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the potential of accelerated dose calculations, using the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code referred to as PENFAST, rather than the conventional MC code PENELOPE, without losing accuracy in the computed dose. For this purpose, experimental measurements of dose distributions in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were compared with simulated results using both PENELOPE and PENFAST. The simulations and experiments were performed using a Saturne 43 linac operated at 12 MV (photons), and at 18 MeV (electrons). Pre-calculated phase space files (PSFs) were used as input data to both the PENELOPE and PENFAST dose simulations. Since depth-dose and dose profile comparisons between simulations and measurements in water were found to be in good agreement (within +/-1% to 1 mm), the PSF calculation is considered to have been validated. In addition, measured dose distributions were compared to simulated results in a set of clinically relevant, inhomogeneous phantoms, consisting of lung and bone heterogeneities in a water tank. In general, the PENFAST results agree to within a 1% to 1 mm difference with those produced by PENELOPE, and to within a 2% to 2 mm difference with measured values. Our study thus provides a pre-clinical validation of the PENFAST code. It also demonstrates that PENFAST provides accurate results for both photon and electron beams, equivalent to those obtained with PENELOPE. CPU time comparisons between both MC codes show that PENFAST is generally about 9-21 times faster than PENELOPE.

  4. SU-E-T-470: Importance of HU-Mass Density Calibration Technique in Proton Pencil Beam Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Penfold, S; Miller, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stoichiometric calibration of Hounsfield Units (HUs) for conversion to proton relative stopping powers (RStPs) is vital for accurate dose calculation in proton therapy. However proton dose distributions are not only dependent on RStP, but also on relative scattering power (RScP) of patient tissues. RScP is approximated from material density but a stoichiometric calibration of HU-density tables is commonly neglected. The purpose of this work was to quantify the difference in calculated dose of a commercial TPS when using HU-density tables based on tissue substitute materials and stoichiometric calibrated ICRU tissues. Methods: Two HU-density calibration tables were generated based on scans of the CIRS electron density phantom. The first table was based directly on measured HU and manufacturer quoted density of tissue substitute materials. The second was based on the same CT scan of the CIRS phantom followed by a stoichiometric calibration of ICRU44 tissue materials. The research version of Pinnacle{sup 3} proton therapy was used to compute dose in a patient CT data set utilizing both HU-density tables. Results: The two HU-density tables showed significant differences for bone tissues; the difference increasing with increasing HU. Differences in density calibration table translated to a difference in calculated RScP of −2.5% for ICRU skeletal muscle and 9.2% for ICRU femur. Dose-volume histogram analysis of a parallel opposed proton therapy prostate plan showed that the difference in calculated dose was negligible when using the two different HU-density calibration tables. Conclusion: The impact of HU-density calibration technique on proton therapy dose calculation was assessed. While differences were found in the calculated RScP of bony tissues, the difference in dose distribution for realistic treatment scenarios was found to be insignificant.

  5. Accuracy of the phase space evolution dose calculation model for clinical 25 MeV electron beams.

    PubMed

    Korevaar, E W; Akhiat, A; Heijmen, B J; Huizenga, H

    2000-10-01

    The phase space evolution (PSE) model is a dose calculation model for electron beams in radiation oncology developed with the aim of a higher accuracy than the commonly used pencil beam (PB) models and with shorter calculation times than needed for Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. In this paper the accuracy of the PSE model has been investigated for 25 MeV electron beams of a MM50 racetrack microtron (Scanditronix Medical AB, Sweden) and compared with the results of a PB model. Measurements have been performed for tests like non-standard SSD, irregularly shaped fields, oblique incidence and in phantoms with heterogeneities of air, bone and lung. MC calculations have been performed as well, to reveal possible errors in the measurements and/or possible inaccuracies in the interaction data used for the bone and lung substitute materials. Results show a good agreement between PSE calculated dose distributions and measurements. For all points the differences--in absolute dose--were generally well within 3% and 3 mm. However, the PSE model was found to be less accurate in large regions of low-density material and errors of up to 6% were found for the lung phantom. Results of the PB model show larger deviations, with differences of up to 6% and 6 mm and of up to 10% for the lung phantom; at shortened SSDs the dose was overestimated by up to 6%. The agreement between MC calculations and measurement was good. For the bone and the lung phantom maximum deviations of 4% and 3% were found, caused by uncertainties about the actual interaction data. In conclusion, using the phase space evolution model, absolute 3D dose distributions of 25 MeV electron beams can be calculated with sufficient accuracy in most cases. The accuracy is significantly better than for a pencil beam model. In regions of lung tissue, a Monte Carlo model yields more accurate results than the current implementation of the PSE model.

  6. Accuracy of the phase space evolution dose calculation model for clinical 25 MeV electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korevaar, Erik W.; Akhiat, Abdelhafid; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Huizenga, Henk

    2000-10-01

    The phase space evolution (PSE) model is a dose calculation model for electron beams in radiation oncology developed with the aim of a higher accuracy than the commonly used pencil beam (PB) models and with shorter calculation times than needed for Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. In this paper the accuracy of the PSE model has been investigated for 25 MeV electron beams of a MM50 racetrack microtron (Scanditronix Medical AB, Sweden) and compared with the results of a PB model. Measurements have been performed for tests like non-standard SSD, irregularly shaped fields, oblique incidence and in phantoms with heterogeneities of air, bone and lung. MC calculations have been performed as well, to reveal possible errors in the measurements and/or possible inaccuracies in the interaction data used for the bone and lung substitute materials. Results show a good agreement between PSE calculated dose distributions and measurements. For all points the differences - in absolute dose - were generally well within 3% and 3 mm. However, the PSE model was found to be less accurate in large regions of low-density material and errors of up to 6% were found for the lung phantom. Results of the PB model show larger deviations, with differences of up to 6% and 6 mm and of up to 10% for the lung phantom; at shortened SSDs the dose was overestimated by up to 6%. The agreement between MC calculations and measurement was good. For the bone and the lung phantom maximum deviations of 4% and 3% were found, caused by uncertainties about the actual interaction data. In conclusion, using the phase space evolution model, absolute 3D dose distributions of 25 MeV electron beams can be calculated with sufficient accuracy in most cases. The accuracy is significantly better than for a pencil beam model. In regions of lung tissue, a Monte Carlo model yields more accurate results than the current implementation of the PSE model.

  7. Production of pure quasi-monochromatic 11C beams for accurate radiation therapy and dose delivery verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, Marta; Brahme, Anders

    2015-09-01

    In the present study we develop a new technique for the production of clean quasi-monochromatic 11C positron emitter beams for accurate radiation therapy and PET-CT dose delivery imaging and treatment verification. The 11C ion beam is produced by projectile fragmentation using a primary 12C ion beam. The practical elimination of the energy spread of the secondary 11C fragments and other beam contaminating fragments is described. Monte Carlo calculation with the SHIELD-HIT10+ code and analytical methods for the transport of the ions in matter are used in the analysis. Production yields, as well as energy, velocity and magnetic rigidity distributions of the fragments generated in a cylindrical target are scored as a function of the depth within 1 cm thick slices for an optimal target consisting of a fixed 20 cm section of liquid hydrogen followed by a variable thickness section of polyethylene. The wide energy and magnetic rigidity spread of the 11C ion beam can be reduced to values around 1% by using a variable monochromatizing wedge-shaped degrader in the beam line. Finally, magnetic rigidity and particle species selection, as well as discrimination of the particle velocity through a combined Time of Flight and Radio Frequency-driven Velocity filter purify the beam from similar magnetic rigidity contaminating fragments (mainly 7Be and 3He fragments). A beam purity of about 99% is expected by the combined method.

  8. Calculation of total effective dose equivalent and collective dose in the event of a LOCA in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Raisali, G; Davilu, H; Haghighishad, A; Khodadadi, R; Sabet, M

    2006-01-01

    In this research, total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and collective dose (CD) are calculated for the most adverse potential accident in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant from the viewpoint of radionuclides release to the environment. Calculations are performed using a Gaussian diffusion model and a slightly modified version of AIREM computer code to adopt for conditions in Bushehr. The results are comparable with the final safety analysis report which used DOZAM code. Results of our calculations show no excessive dose in populated regions. Maximum TEDE is determined to be in the WSW direction. CD in the area around the nuclear power plant by a distance of 30 km (138 man Sv) is far below the accepted limits. Thyroid equivalent dose is also calculated for the WSW direction (maximum 25.6 mSv) and is below the limits at various distances from the reactor stack.

  9. Dose calculation and in-phantom measurement in BNCT using response matrix method.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Shahriari, Majid

    2011-12-01

    In-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution is very important for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) planning validation. If any changes take place in therapeutic neutron beam due to the beam shaping assembly (BSA) change, the dose will be changed so another group of simulations should be carried out for dose calculation. To avoid this time consuming procedure and speed up the dose calculation to help patients not wait for a long time, response matrix method was used. This procedure was performed for neutron beam of the optimized BSA as a reference beam. These calculations were carried out using the MCNPX, Monte Carlo code. The calculated beam parameters were measured for a SNYDER head phantom placed 10 cm away from beam the exit of the BSA. The head phantom can be assumed as a linear system and neutron beam and dose distribution can be assumed as an input and a response of this system (head phantom), respectively. Neutron spectrum energy was digitized into 27 groups. Dose response of each group was calculated. Summation of these dose responses is equal to a total dose of the whole neutron/gamma spectrum. Response matrix is the double dimension matrix (energy/dose) in which each parameter represents a depth-dose resulted from specific energy. If the spectrum is changed, response of each energy group may be differed. By considering response matrix and energy vector, dose response can be calculated. This method was tested for some BSA, and calculations show statistical errors less than 10%.

  10. User Guide for GoldSim Model to Calculate PA/CA Doses and Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.

    2016-10-31

    A model to calculate doses for solid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and corresponding disposal limits has been developed using the GoldSim commercial software. The model implements the dose calculations documented in SRNL-STI-2015-00056, Rev. 0 “Dose Calculation Methodology and Data for Solid Waste Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) at the Savannah River Site”.

  11. Characterizing a Proton Beam Scanning System for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C; Lomax, Tony; Paganetti, H

    2015-01-01

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low–energy electrons (<0.6MeV for 230MeV protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:25549079

  12. Characterizing a proton beam scanning system for Monte Carlo dose calculation in patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, C.; Lomax, Anthony; Paganetti, H.

    2015-01-01

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low-energy electrons (<0.6 MeV for 230 MeV protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of-field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5 mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. A Comparison of Model Calculation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose for Proton Irradiation. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, N.; Semones, E.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F.

    2003-01-01

    With the increase in the amount of time spent EVA that is necessary to complete the construction and subsequent maintenance of ISS, it will become increasingly important for ground support personnel to accurately characterize the radiation exposures incurred by EVA crewmembers. Since exposure measurements cannot be taken within the organs of interest, it is necessary to estimate these exposures by calculation. To validate the methods and tools used to develop these estimates, it is necessary to model experiments performed in a controlled environment. This work is such an effort. A human phantom was outfitted with detector equipment and then placed in American EMU and Orlan-M EVA space suits. The suited phantom was irradiated at the LLUPTF with proton beams of known energies. Absorbed dose measurements were made by the spaceflight operational dosimetrist from JSC at multiple sites in the skin, eye, brain, stomach, and small intestine locations in the phantom. These exposures are then modeled using the BRYNTRN radiation transport code developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, and the CAM (computerized anatomical male) human geometry model of Billings and Yucker. Comparisons of absorbed dose calculations with measurements show excellent agreement. This suggests that there is reason to be confident in the ability of both the transport code and the human body model to estimate proton exposure in ground-based laboratory experiments.

  14. Updates in the real-time Dose Tracking System (DTS) to improve the accuracy in calculating the radiation dose to the patients skin during fluoroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Rana, Vijay K; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R

    2013-03-06

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) to manage the risk of deterministic skin effects to the patient during fluoroscopic image-guided interventional cardiac procedures. The DTS calculates the radiation dose to the patient's skin in real-time by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba C-arm unit and displays the cumulative dose values as a color map on a 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Several recent updates have been made to the software to improve its function and performance. Whereas the older system needed manual input of pulse rate for dose-rate calculation and used the CPU clock with its potential latency to monitor exposure duration, each x-ray pulse is now individually processed to determine the skin-dose increment and to automatically measure the pulse rate. We also added a correction for the table pad which was found to reduce the beam intensity to the patient for under-table projections by an additional 5-12% over that of the table alone at 80 kVp for the x-ray filters on the Toshiba system. Furthermore, mismatch between the DTS graphic and the patient skin can result in inaccuracies in dose calculation because of inaccurate inverse-square-distance calculation. Therefore, a means for quantitative adjustment of the patient-graphic-model position and a parameterized patient-graphic library have been developed to allow the graphic to more closely match the patient. These changes provide more accurate estimation of the skin-dose which is critical for managing patient radiation risk.

  15. Accurate calculation of the transverse anisotropy of a magnetic domain wall in perpendicularly magnetized multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Felix; Krüger, Benjamin; Eisebitt, Stefan; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-08-01

    Bloch domain walls are the most common type of transition between two out-of-plane magnetized domains (one magnetized upwards, one downwards) in films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The rotation of the spins of such domain walls in the plane of the film requires energy, which is described by an effective anisotropy, the so-called transverse or hard axis anisotropy K⊥. This anisotropy and the related Döring mass density of the domain wall are key parameters of the one-dimensional model to describe the motion of magnetic domain walls. In particular, the critical field strength or current density where oscillatory domain wall motion sets in (Walker breakdown) is directly proportional to K⊥. So far, no general framework is available to determine K⊥ from static characterizations such as magnetometry measurements. Here, we derive a universal analytical expression to calculate the transverse anisotropy constant for the important class of perpendicular magnetic multilayers. All the required input parameters of the model, such as the number of repeats, the thickness of a single magnetic layer, and the layer periodicity, as well as the effective perpendicular anisotropy, the saturation magnetization, and the static domain wall width are accessible by static sample characterizations. We apply our model to a widely used multilayer system and find that the effective transverse anisotropy constant is a factor of seven different from that when using the conventional approximations, showing the importance of using our analysis scheme. Our model is also applicable to domain walls in materials with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). The accurate knowledge of K⊥ is needed to determine other unknown parameters from measurements, such as the DMI strength or the spin polarization of the spin current in current-induced domain wall motion experiments.

  16. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to dose in 1945. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 003

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 003) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk (calculation 001). Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in Calculation 001.

  17. SU-E-T-795: Validations of Dose Calculation Accuracy of Acuros BV in High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a Shielded Cylinder Applicator Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Hrycushko, B; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Acuros BV has become available to perform accurate dose calculations in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with phantom heterogeneity considered by solving the Boltzmann transport equation. In this work, we performed validation studies regarding the dose calculation accuracy of Acuros BV in cases with a shielded cylinder applicator using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Fifteen cases were considered in our studies, covering five different diameters of the applicator and three different shielding degrees. For each case, a digital phantom was created in Varian BrachyVision with the cylinder applicator inserted in the middle of a large water phantom. A treatment plan with eight dwell positions was generated for these fifteen cases. Dose calculations were performed with Acuros BV. We then generated a voxelized phantom of the same geometry, and the materials were modeled according to the vendor’s specifications. MC dose calculations were then performed using our in-house developed fast MC dose engine for HDR brachytherapy (gBMC) on a GPU platform, which is able to simulate both photon transport and electron transport in a voxelized geometry. A phase-space file for the Ir-192 HDR source was used as a source model for MC simulations. Results: Satisfactory agreements between the dose distributions calculated by Acuros BV and those calculated by gBMC were observed in all cases. Quantitatively, we computed point-wise dose difference within the region that receives a dose higher than 10% of the reference dose, defined to be the dose at 5mm outward away from the applicator surface. The mean dose difference was ∼0.45%–0.51% and the 95-percentile maximum difference was ∼1.24%–1.47%. Conclusion: Acuros BV is able to accurately perform dose calculations in HDR brachytherapy with a shielded cylinder applicator.

  18. Kilovoltage beam Monte Carlo dose calculations in submillimeter voxels for small animal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Zhou, Hu; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Small animal conformal radiotherapy (RT) is essential for preclinical cancer research studies and therefore various microRT systems have been recently designed. The aim of this paper is to efficiently calculate the dose delivered using our microRT system based on a microCT scanner with the Monte Carlo (MC) method and to compare the MC calculations to film measurements. Methods: Doses from 2-30 mm diameter 120 kVp photon beams deposited in a solid water phantom with 0.2x0.2x0.2 mm{sup 3} voxels are calculated using the latest versions of the EGSnrc codes BEAMNRC and DOSXYZNRC. Two dose calculation approaches are studied: a two-step approach using phase-space files and direct dose calculation with BEAMNRC simulation sources. Due to the small beam size and submillimeter voxel size resulting in long calculation times, variance reduction techniques are studied. The optimum bremsstrahlung splitting number (NBRSPL in BEAMNRC) and the optimum DOSXYZNRC photon splitting (N{sub split}) number are examined for both calculation approaches and various beam sizes. The dose calculation efficiencies and the required number of histories to achieve 1% statistical uncertainty--with no particle recycling--are evaluated for 2-30 mm beams. As a final step, film dose measurements are compared to MC calculated dose distributions. Results: The optimum NBRSPL is approximately 1x10{sup 6} for both dose calculation approaches. For the dose calculations with phase-space files, N{sub split} varies only slightly for 2-30 mm beams and is established to be 300. N{sub split} for the DOSXYZNRC calculation with the BEAMNRC source ranges from 300 for the 30 mm beam to 4000 for the 2 mm beam. The calculation time significantly increases for small beam sizes when the BEAMNRC simulation source is used compared to the simulations with phase-space files. For the 2 and 30 mm beams, the dose calculations with phase-space files are more efficient than the dose calculations with BEAMNRC sources by

  19. Alanine/EPR dosimetry applied to the verification of a total body irradiation protocol and treatment planning dose calculation using a humanoid phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeken, B.; Lelie, S.; Meijnders, P.; Van den Weyngaert, D.; Janssens, H.; Verellen, D.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To avoid complications in total body irradiation (TBI), it is important to achieve a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the body and to deliver a correct dose to the lung which is an organ at risk. The purpose of this work was to validate the TBI dose protocol and to check the accuracy of the 3D dose calculations of the treatment planning system. Methods: Dosimetry based on alanine/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to measure dose at numerous locations within an anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson) that was irradiated in a clinical TBI beam setup. The alanine EPR dosimetry system was calibrated against water calorimetry in a Co-60 beam and the absorbed dose was determined by the use of ''dose-normalized amplitudes'' A{sub D}. The dose rate of the TBI beam was checked against a Farmer ionization chamber. The phantom measurements were compared to 3D dose calculations from a treatment planning system (Pinnacle) modeled for standard dose calculations. Results: Alanine dosimetry allowed accurate measurements which were in accordance with ionization chamber measurements. The combined relative standard measurement uncertainty in the Alderson phantom was U{sub r}(A{sub D})=0.6%. The humanoid phantom was irradiated to a reference dose of 10 Gy, limiting the lung dose to 7.5 Gy. The ratio of the average measured dose midplane in the craniocaudal direction to the reference dose was 1.001 with a spread of {+-}4.7% (1 sd). Dose to the lung was measured in 26 locations and found, in average, 1.8% lower than expected. Lung dose was homogeneous in the ventral-dorsal direction but a dose gradient of 0.10 Gy cm{sup -1} was observed in the craniocaudal direction midline within the lung lobe. 3D dose calculations (Pinnacle) were found, in average, 2% lower compared to dose measurements on the body axis and 3% lower for the lungs. Conclusions: The alanine/EPR dosimetry system allowed accurate dose measurements which enabled the authors to validate their TBI

  20. TH-E-BRE-02: A Forward Scattering Approximation to Dose Calculation Using the Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Catt, B; Snyder, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of the linear Boltzmann transport equation as a dose calculation tool which can account for interface effects, while still having faster computation times than Monte Carlo methods. In particular, we introduce a forward scattering approximation, in hopes of improving calculation time without a significant hindrance to accuracy. Methods: Two coupled Boltzmann transport equations were constructed, one representing the fluence of photons within the medium, and the other, the fluence of electrons. We neglect the scattering term within the electron transport equation, resulting in an extreme forward scattering approximation to reduce computational complexity. These equations were then solved using a numerical technique for solving partial differential equations, known as a finite difference scheme, where the fluence at each discrete point in space is calculated based on the fluence at the previous point in the particle's path. Using this scheme, it is possible to develop a solution to the Boltzmann transport equations by beginning with boundary conditions and iterating across the entire medium. The fluence of electrons can then be used to find the dose at any point within the medium. Results: Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations indicate that even simplistic techniques for solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation yield expected interface effects, which many popular dose calculation algorithms are not capable of predicting. Implementation of a forward scattering approximation does not appear to drastically reduce the accuracy of this algorithm. Conclusion: Optimized implementations of this algorithm have been shown to be very accurate when compared with Monte Carlo simulations, even in build up regions where many models fail. Use of a forward scattering approximation could potentially give a reasonably accurate dose distribution in a shorter amount of time for situations where a completely accurate dose distribution is not

  1. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  2. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-21

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  3. A comparison between anisotropic analytical and multigrid superposition dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Tse, Teddy K.H.; Ho, Cola L.M.; Yeung, Eric C.Y.

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is currently the most accurate dose calculation algorithm in radiotherapy planning but requires relatively long processing time. Faster model-based algorithms such as the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by the Eclipse treatment planning system and multigrid superposition (MGS) by the XiO treatment planning system are 2 commonly used algorithms. This study compared AAA and MGS against MC, as the gold standard, on brain, nasopharynx, lung, and prostate cancer patients. Computed tomography of 6 patients of each cancer type was used. The same hypothetical treatment plan using the same machine and treatment prescription was computed for each case by each planning system using their respective dose calculation algorithm. The doses at reference points including (1) soft tissues only, (2) bones only, (3) air cavities only, (4) soft tissue-bone boundary (Soft/Bone), (5) soft tissue-air boundary (Soft/Air), and (6) bone-air boundary (Bone/Air), were measured and compared using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), which was a function of the percentage dose deviations from MC. Besides, the computation time of each treatment plan was recorded and compared. The MAPEs of MGS were significantly lower than AAA in all types of cancers (p<0.001). With regards to body density combinations, the MAPE of AAA ranged from 1.8% (soft tissue) to 4.9% (Bone/Air), whereas that of MGS from 1.6% (air cavities) to 2.9% (Soft/Bone). The MAPEs of MGS (2.6%±2.1) were significantly lower than that of AAA (3.7%±2.5) in all tissue density combinations (p<0.001). The mean computation time of AAA for all treatment plans was significantly lower than that of the MGS (p<0.001). Both AAA and MGS algorithms demonstrated dose deviations of less than 4.0% in most clinical cases and their performance was better in homogeneous tissues than at tissue boundaries. In general, MGS demonstrated relatively smaller dose deviations than AAA but required longer computation time.

  4. SU-E-T-632: Preliminary Study On Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Price, R; Ma, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Uneven nose surfaces and air cavities underneath and the use of bolus present complexity and dose uncertainty when using a single electron energy beam to plan treatments of nose skin with a pencil beam-based planning system. This work demonstrates more accurate dose calculation and more optimal planning using energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) delivered with a pMLC. Methods: An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. Our previous work demonstrates good agreement in percentage depth dose and off-axis dose between calculations and film measurement for various field sizes. A MERT plan was generated for treating the nose skin using a patient geometry and a dose volume histogram (DVH) was obtained. The work also shows the comparison of 2D dose distributions between a clinically used conventional single electron energy plan and the MERT plan. Results: The MERT plan resulted in improved target dose coverage as compared to the conventional plan, which demonstrated a target dose deficit at the field edge. The conventional plan showed higher dose normal tissue irradiation underneath the nose skin while the MERT plan resulted in improved conformity and thus reduces normal tissue dose. Conclusion: This preliminary work illustrates that MC-based MERT planning is a promising technique in treating nose skin, not only providing more accurate dose calculation, but also offering an improved target dose coverage and conformity. In addition, this technique may eliminate the necessity of bolus, which often produces dose delivery uncertainty due to the air gaps that may exist between the bolus and skin.

  5. A Monte Carlo model for out-of-field dose calculation from high-energy photon therapy.

    PubMed

    Kry, Stephen F; Titt, Uwe; Followill, David; Pönisch, Falk; Vassiliev, Oleg N; White, R Allen; Stovall, Marilyn; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2007-09-01

    As cancer therapy becomes more efficacious and patients survive longer, the potential for late effects increases, including effects induced by radiation dose delivered away from the treatment site. This out-of-field radiation is of particular concern with high-energy radiotherapy, as neutrons are produced in the accelerator head. We recently developed an accurate Monte Carlo model of a Varian 2100 accelerator using MCNPX for calculating the dose away from the treatment field resulting from low-energy therapy. In this study, we expanded and validated our Monte Carlo model for high-energy (18 MV) photon therapy, including both photons and neutrons. Simulated out-of-field photon doses were compared with measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters in an acrylic phantom up to 55 cm from the central axis. Simulated neutron fluences and energy spectra were compared with measurements using moderated gold foil activation in moderators and data from the literature. The average local difference between the calculated and measured photon dose was 17%, including doses as low as 0.01% of the central axis dose. The out-of-field photon dose varied substantially with field size and distance from the edge of the field but varied little with depth in the phantom, except at depths shallower than 3 cm, where the dose sharply increased. On average, the difference between the simulated and measured neutron fluences was 19% and good agreement was observed with the neutron spectra. The neutron dose equivalent varied little with field size or distance from the central axis but decreased with depth in the phantom. Neutrons were the dominant component of the out-of-field dose equivalent for shallow depths and large distances from the edge of the treatment field. This Monte Carlo model is useful to both physicists and clinicians when evaluating out-of-field doses and associated potential risks.

  6. A Monte Carlo model for calculating out-of-field dose from a varian 6 MV beam.

    PubMed

    Kry, Stephen F; Titt, Uwe; Pönisch, Falk; Followill, David; Vassiliev, Oleg N; White, R Allen; Mohan, Radhe; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2006-11-01

    Dose to the patient outside of the treatment field is important when evaluating the outcome of radiotherapy treatments. However, determining out-of-field doses for any particular treatment plan currently requires either time-consuming measurements or calculated estimations that may be highly uncertain. A Monte Carlo model may allow these doses to be determined quickly, accurately, and with a great degree of flexibility. MCNPX was used to create a Monte Carlo model of a Varian Clinac 2100 accelerator head operated at 6 MV. Simulations of the dose out-of-field were made and measurements were taken with thermoluminescent dosimeters in an acrylic phantom and with an ion chamber in a water tank to validate the Monte Carlo model. Although local differences between the out-of-field doses calculated by the model and those measured did exceed 50% at some points far from the treatment field, the average local difference was only 16%. This included a range of doses as low as 0.01% of the central axis dose, and at distances in excess of 50 cm from the central axis of the treatment field. The out-of-field dose was found to vary with field size and distance from the central axis, but was almost independent of the depth in the phantom except where the dose increased substantially at depths less than dmax. The relationship between dose and kerma was also investigated, and kerma was found to be a good estimate of dose (within 3% on average) except near the surface and in the field penumbra. Our Monte Carlo model was found to well represent typical Varian 2100 accelerators operated at 6 MV.

  7. Recommended environmental dose calculation methods and Hanford-specific parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Rhoads, K.; Napier, B.A.; Ramsdell, J.V. ); Davis, J.S. )

    1993-03-01

    This document was developed to support the Hanford Environmental Dose overview Panel (HEDOP). The Panel is responsible for reviewing all assessments of potential doses received by humans and other biota resulting from the actual or possible environmental releases of radioactive and other hazardous materials from facilities and/or operations belonging to the US Department of Energy on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. This document serves as a guide to be used for developing estimates of potential radiation doses, or other measures of risk or health impacts, to people and other biota in the environs on and around the Hanford Site. It provides information to develop technically sound estimates of exposure (i.e., potential or actual) to humans or other biotic receptors that could result from the environmental transport of potentially harmful materials that have been, or could be, released from Hanford operations or facilities. Parameter values and information that are specific to the Hanford environs as well as other supporting material are included in this document.

  8. Specification of absorbed dose to water using model-based dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning in brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2013-04-01

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), recently introduced in treatment planning systems (TPS) for brachytherapy, calculate tissue absorbed doses. In the TPS framework, doses have hereto been reported as dose to water and water may still be preferred as a dose specification medium. Dose to tissue medium Dmed then needs to be converted into dose to water in tissue Dw,med. Methods to calculate absorbed dose to differently sized water compartments/cavities inside tissue, infinitesimal (used for definition of absorbed dose), small, large or intermediate, are reviewed. Burlin theory is applied to estimate photon energies at which cavity sizes in the range 1 nm-10 mm can be considered small or large. Photon and electron energy spectra are calculated at 1 cm distance from the central axis in cylindrical phantoms of bone, muscle and adipose tissue for 20, 50, 300 keV photons and photons from 125I, 169Yb and 192Ir sources; ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers and mass energy absorption coefficients are calculated as applicable to convert Dmed into Dw,med for small and large cavities. Results show that 1-10 nm sized cavities are small at all investigated photon energies; 100 µm cavities are large only at photon energies <20 keV. A choice of an appropriate conversion coefficient Dw, med/Dmed is discussed in terms of the cavity size in relation to the size of important cellular targets. Free radicals from DNA bound water of nanometre dimensions contribute to DNA damage and cell killing and may be the most important water compartment in cells implying use of ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers for converting Dmed into Dw,med.

  9. Specification of absorbed dose to water using model-based dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning in brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Carlsson, Gudrun Alm

    2013-04-21

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), recently introduced in treatment planning systems (TPS) for brachytherapy, calculate tissue absorbed doses. In the TPS framework, doses have hereto been reported as dose to water and water may still be preferred as a dose specification medium. Dose to tissue medium Dmed then needs to be converted into dose to water in tissue Dw,med. Methods to calculate absorbed dose to differently sized water compartments/cavities inside tissue, infinitesimal (used for definition of absorbed dose), small, large or intermediate, are reviewed. Burlin theory is applied to estimate photon energies at which cavity sizes in the range 1 nm-10 mm can be considered small or large. Photon and electron energy spectra are calculated at 1 cm distance from the central axis in cylindrical phantoms of bone, muscle and adipose tissue for 20, 50, 300 keV photons and photons from (125)I, (169)Yb and (192)Ir sources; ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers and mass energy absorption coefficients are calculated as applicable to convert Dmed into Dw,med for small and large cavities. Results show that 1-10 nm sized cavities are small at all investigated photon energies; 100 µm cavities are large only at photon energies <20 keV. A choice of an appropriate conversion coefficient Dw, med/Dmed is discussed in terms of the cavity size in relation to the size of important cellular targets. Free radicals from DNA bound water of nanometre dimensions contribute to DNA damage and cell killing and may be the most important water compartment in cells implying use of ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers for converting Dmed into Dw,med.

  10. WE-E-18A-03: How Accurately Can the Peak Skin Dose in Fluoroscopy Be Determined Using Indirect Dose Metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A; Pasciak, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that Result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures. Indirect dose metrics from procedures were collected, including reference air kerma (RAK). Four different estimates of PSD were calculated and compared along with RAK to the measured PSD. The indirect estimates included a standard method, use of detailed information from the RDSR, and two simplified calculation methods. Indirect dosimetry was compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the indirect estimates were examined. Results: PSD calculated with the standard calculation method were within ±50% for all 41 procedures. This was also true for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance (SPD) for all calculations. RAK was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which RAK or calculated PSD exhibited large differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two causative factors were identified: ‘extreme’ SPD and large contributions to RAK from rotational angiography or runs acquired at large gantry angles. When calculated uncertainty limits [−12.8%, 10%] were applied to directly measured PSD, most indirect PSD estimates remained within ±50% of the measured PSD. Conclusions: Using indirect dose metrics, PSD can be determined within ±50% for embolization procedures, and usually to within ±35%. RAK can be used without modification to set notification limits and substantial radiation dose levels. These results can be extended to similar procedures, including vascular and interventional oncology

  11. Investigation of the usability of conebeam CT data sets for dose calculation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Anne; Hu, Qiaoqiao; Steglich, Doreen; Baier, Kurt; Wilbert, Jürgen; Guckenberger, Matthias; Flentje, Michael

    2008-01-01

    between planning CT and CBCT: 0.9% ± 0.9%, 1.8% ± 1.6%, 1.5% ± 2.5% for pelvis, thorax and head patients, respectively. The application of the phantom based HU-D table was acceptable for the head patients but larger deviations were determined for the pelvis and thorax patient populations. Conclusion The generation of three HU-D tables specific for the anatomical regions pelvis, thorax and head and specific for the corresponding CBCT image acquisition parameters resulted in accurate dose calculation in CBCT images. Once these HU-D tables are created, direct dose calculation on CBCT datasets is possible without the need of a reference CT images for pixel value calibration. PMID:19087250

  12. Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervoort, Eric J. Cygler, Joanna E.; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; La Russa, Daniel J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Methods: Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Results: Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm{sup 2}. Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm γ-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.

  13. Quantitative assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation using pencil beam and Monte Carlo algorithms and requirements for clinical quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    systematic lack of dose coverage. The dose calculated by PB for lung tumors was overestimated by up to 40%. An interesting feature that was observed is that despite large discrepancies in dose-volume histogram coverage of the planning target volume between PB and MC, the point doses at the isocenter (center of the lesions) calculated by both algorithms were within 7% even for lung cases. The dose distributions measured with EBT GAFCHROMIC films in heterogeneous phantoms showed large discrepancies of nearly 15% lower than PB at interfaces between heterogeneous media, where these lower doses measured by the film were in agreement with those by MC. The doses (V95) calculated by MC and PB agreed within 5% for treatment sites with small tissue heterogeneities such as the prostate, brain, head and neck, and paraspinal tumors. Considerable discrepancies, up to 40%, were observed in the dose-volume coverage between MC and PB in lung tumors, which may affect clinical outcomes. The discrepancies between MC and PB increased for 15 MV compared with 6 MV indicating the importance of implementation of accurate clinical treatment planning such as MC. The comparison of point doses is not representative of the discrepancies in dose coverage and might be misleading in evaluating the accuracy of dose calculation between PB and MC. Thus, the clinical quality assurance procedures required to verify the accuracy of dose calculation using PB and MC need to consider measurements of 2- and 3-dimensional dose distributions rather than a single point measurement using heterogeneous phantoms instead of homogenous water-equivalent phantoms.

  14. Quantitative assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation using pencil beam and Monte Carlo algorithms and requirements for clinical quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2013-01-01

    systematic lack of dose coverage. The dose calculated by PB for lung tumors was overestimated by up to 40%. An interesting feature that was observed is that despite large discrepancies in dose-volume histogram coverage of the planning target volume between PB and MC, the point doses at the isocenter (center of the lesions) calculated by both algorithms were within 7% even for lung cases. The dose distributions measured with EBT GAFCHROMIC films in heterogeneous phantoms showed large discrepancies of nearly 15% lower than PB at interfaces between heterogeneous media, where these lower doses measured by the film were in agreement with those by MC. The doses (V95) calculated by MC and PB agreed within 5% for treatment sites with small tissue heterogeneities such as the prostate, brain, head and neck, and paraspinal tumors. Considerable discrepancies, up to 40%, were observed in the dose-volume coverage between MC and PB in lung tumors, which may affect clinical outcomes. The discrepancies between MC and PB increased for 15MV compared with 6MV indicating the importance of implementation of accurate clinical treatment planning such as MC. The comparison of point doses is not representative of the discrepancies in dose coverage and might be misleading in evaluating the accuracy of dose calculation between PB and MC. Thus, the clinical quality assurance procedures required to verify the accuracy of dose calculation using PB and MC need to consider measurements of 2- and 3-dimensional dose distributions rather than a single point measurement using heterogeneous phantoms instead of homogenous water-equivalent phantoms.

  15. Implementing an Accurate and Rapid Sparse Sampling Approach for Low-Dose Atomic Resolution STEM Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, Libor; Stevens, Andrew J.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-10-17

    Aberration correction for scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) has dramatically increased spatial image resolution for beam-stable materials, but it is the sample stability rather than the microscope that often limits the practical resolution of STEM images. To extract physical information from images of beam sensitive materials it is becoming clear that there is a critical dose/dose-rate below which the images can be interpreted as representative of the pristine material, while above it the observation is dominated by beam effects. Here we describe an experimental approach for sparse sampling in the STEM and in-painting image reconstruction in order to reduce the electron dose/dose-rate to the sample during imaging. By characterizing the induction limited rise-time and hysteresis in scan coils, we show that sparse line-hopping approach to scan randomization can be implemented that optimizes both the speed of the scan and the amount of the sample that needs to be illuminated by the beam. The dose and acquisition time for the sparse sampling is shown to be effectively decreased by factor of 5x relative to conventional acquisition, permitting imaging of beam sensitive materials to be obtained without changing the microscope operating parameters. The use of sparse line-hopping scan to acquire STEM images is demonstrated with atomic resolution aberration corrected Z-contrast images of CaCO3, a material that is traditionally difficult to image by TEM/STEM because of dose issues.

  16. Optimization of deterministic transport parameters for the calculation of the dose distribution around a high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Kent A; Price, Michael J; Horton, John L; Wareing, Todd A; Mourtada, Firas

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this work was to calculate the dose distribution around a high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source using a multi-group discrete ordinates code and then to compare the results with a Monte Carlo calculated dose distribution. The unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code Attila version 6.1.1 was used to calculate the photon kerma rate distribution in water around the Nucletron microSelectron mHDRv2 source. MCNPX 2.5.c was used to compute the Monte Carlo water photon kerma rate distribution. Two hundred million histories were simulated, resulting in standard errors of the mean of less than 3% overall. The number of energy groups, S(n) (angular order), P(n) (scattering order), and mesh elements were varied in addition to the method of analytic ray tracing to assess their effects on the deterministic solution. Water photon kerma rate matrices were exported from both codes into an in-house data analysis software. This software quantified the percent dose difference distribution, the number of points within +/- 3% and +/- 5%, and the mean percent difference between the two codes. The data demonstrated that a 5 energy-group cross-section set calculated results to within 0.5% of a 15 group cross-section set. S12 was sufficient to resolve the solution in angle. P2 expansion of the scattering cross-section was necessary to compute accurate distributions. A computational mesh with 55 064 tetrahedral elements in a 30 cm diameter phantom resolved the solution spatially. An efficiency factor of 110 with the above parameters was realized in comparison to MC methods. The Attila code provided an accurate and efficient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for the mHDRv2 source.

  17. Effect of Embolization Material in the Calculation of Dose Deposition in Arteriovenous Malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Cruz, O. O. Galván; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, J. M.; Moreno-Jiménez, S.; Célis-López, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this work it is studied the impact of the incorporation of high Z materials (embolization material) in the dose calculation for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment for arteriovenous malformations. A statistical analysis is done to establish the variables that may impact in the dose calculation. To perform the comparison pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms were used. The comparison between both dose calculations shows that PB overestimates the dose deposited. The statistical analysis, for the quantity of patients of the study (20), shows that the variable that may impact in the dose calculation is the volume of the high Z material in the arteriovenous malformation. Further studies have to be done to establish the clinical impact with the radiosurgery result.

  18. Utilising pseudo-CT data for dose calculation and plan optimization in adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Brendan; Kumar, Shivani; Dowling, Jason; Begg, Jarrad; Lambert, Jonathan; Lim, Karen; Vinod, Shalini K; Greer, Peter B; Holloway, Lois

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the dose calculation error and resulting optimization uncertainty caused by performing inverse treatment planning on inaccurate electron density data (pseudo-CT) as needed for adaptive radiotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based treatment planning. Planning Computer Tomography (CT) data from 10 cervix cancer patients was used to generate 4 pseudo-CT data sets. Each pseudo-CT was created based on an available method of assigning electron density to an anatomic image. An inversely modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was developed on each planning CT. The dose calculation error caused by each pseudo-CT data set was quantified by comparing the dose calculated each pseudo-CT data set with that calculated on the original planning CT for the same IMRT plan. The optimization uncertainty introduced by the dose calculation error was quantified by re-optimizing the same optimization parameters on each pseudo-CT data set and comparing against the original planning CT. Dose differences were quantified by assessing the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD) for targets and relevant organs at risk. Across all pseudo-CT data sets and all organs, the absolute mean dose calculation error was 0.2 Gy, and was within 2 % of the prescription dose in 98.5 % of cases. Then absolute mean optimisation error was 0.3 Gy EUD, indicating that that inverse optimisation is impacted by the dose calculation error. However, the additional uncertainty introduced to plan optimisation is small compared the sources of variation which already exist. Use of inaccurate electron density data for inverse treatment planning results in a dose calculation error, which in turn introduces additional uncertainty into the plan optimization process. In this study, we showed that both of these effects are clinically acceptable for cervix cancer patients using four different pseudo-CT data sets. Dose calculation and inverse optimization on pseudo-CT is feasible for this patient cohort.

  19. Measurement of Entrance Skin Dose and Calculation of Effective Dose for Common Diagnostic X-Ray Examinations in Kashan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Masoumbeigi, Mahboubeh; Salimian, Morteza; Mohseni, Mehran

    2015-02-24

    The knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during the radiological examination is essential to prevent risks of exposures. The aim of this work is to study patient doses for common diagnostic radiographic examinations in hospitals affiliated to Kashan University of Medical sciences, Iran. The results of this survey are compared with those published by some national and international values. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured based on the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and effective dose (ED) was calculated by use of conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo methods. The mean entrance surface dose and effective dose for examinations of the chest (PA, Lat), abdomen (AP), pelvis (AP), lumbar spine (AP, Lat) and skull (AP, Lat) are 0.37, 0.99, 2.01, 1.76, 2.18, 5.36, 1.39 and 1.01 mGy, and 0.04, 0.1, 0.28, 0,28, 0.23, 0.13, 0.01 and 0.01 mSv, respectively. The ESDs and EDs reported in this study, except for examinations of the chest, are generally lower than comparable reference dose values published in the literature. On the basis of the results obtained in this study can conclude that use of newer equipment and use of the proper radiological parameter can significantly reduce the absorbed dose. It is recommended that radiological parameter in chest examinations be revised.

  20. Spreadsheet calculations of absorbed dose to water for photons and electrons according to established dosimetry protocols.

    PubMed

    Cederbaum, M; Kuten, A

    1999-01-01

    The calculation of absorbed dose to water according to a Code of Practice demands a strict adherence to the rules and data of the protocol. To ease the calculations and to avoid computational and methodological errors, we have developed a number of spreadsheets to perform the calculations in accordance with an established dosimetry protocol-in our case those of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Institution of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and Biology (IPEMB). The spreadsheets are implemented as Microsoft Excel V5.0 worksheets. Only a limited selection of dosimetry equipment is used for calibration, which is performed according to only one of the methods allowed by the protocol. This voluntary limitation of equipment and methods is reflected in a spreadsheet that is beam-specific, compact, focused, and very practical. There are four main spreadsheets: high-energy photons (IAEA), high-energy electrons (IAEA), medium energy X rays (IPEMB), and low-energy X rays (IPEMB). The sheets allow the input of setup and measured data, but tabulated data and formulas are protected. Parameter values are copied from the protocols, and the relevant value is found by linear interpolation. Once the spreadsheets are drawn up correctly and thoroughly checked, protocol calculations are performed easily and accurately. The spreadsheets presented are tailored to suit our specific needs but can easily be modified to conform to the practices of any other institution. They are not intended as "cookbooks" but need to be filled in by a radiation physicist with the input data checked by a second professional. The same method is also used for calculating the Reference Air Kerma Rate of brachytherapy sources.

  1. Accurate calculation of second virial coefficient of the Exp-6 potential and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, B. A.; Somuncu, E.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a new approach to calculate the second virial coefficient of the Exp-6 potential is proposed. Over a wide temperature range, the calculated results of the second virial coefficient determined from Exp-6 potential are comparable with the calculations of second virial coefficient over Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential. As an example of application, the formulas obtained for second virial coefficient are calculated for molecules Kr,Xe,N2,Hg,CH4 and C2H6. The obtained results are in good agreement with the data available in the literature.

  2. Benchmarking and validation of a Geant4-SHADOW Monte Carlo simulation for dose calculations in microbeam radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Iwan; Guatelli, Susanna; Fournier, Pauline; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Sanchez Del Rio, Manuel; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Lerch, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron-based radiotherapy modality that uses high-intensity beams of spatially fractionated radiation to treat tumours. The rapid evolution of MRT towards clinical trials demands accurate treatment planning systems (TPS), as well as independent tools for the verification of TPS calculated dose distributions in order to ensure patient safety and treatment efficacy. Monte Carlo computer simulation represents the most accurate method of dose calculation in patient geometries and is best suited for the purpose of TPS verification. A Monte Carlo model of the ID17 biomedical beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has been developed, including recent modifications, using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit interfaced with the SHADOW X-ray optics and ray-tracing libraries. The code was benchmarked by simulating dose profiles in water-equivalent phantoms subject to irradiation by broad-beam (without spatial fractionation) and microbeam (with spatial fractionation) fields, and comparing against those calculated with a previous model of the beamline developed using the PENELOPE code. Validation against additional experimental dose profiles in water-equivalent phantoms subject to broad-beam irradiation was also performed. Good agreement between codes was observed, with the exception of out-of-field doses and toward the field edge for larger field sizes. Microbeam results showed good agreement between both codes and experimental results within uncertainties. Results of the experimental validation showed agreement for different beamline configurations. The asymmetry in the out-of-field dose profiles due to polarization effects was also investigated, yielding important information for the treatment planning process in MRT. This work represents an important step in the development of a Monte Carlo-based independent verification tool for treatment planning in MRT.

  3. A model to calculate the induced dose rate around an 18 MV ELEKTA linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Bruce; Walker, Anne; Mackay, Ranald

    2003-03-07

    The dose rate due to activity induced by (gamma, n) reactions around an ELEKTA Precise accelerator running at 18 MV is reported. A model to calculate the induced dose rate for a variety of working practices has been derived and compared to the measured values. From this model, the dose received by the staff using the machine can be estimated. From measured dose rates at the face of the linear accelerator for a 10 x 10 cm2 jaw setting at 18 MV an activation coefficient per MU was derived for each of the major activation products. The relative dose rates at points around the linac head, for different energy and jaw settings, were measured. Dose rates adjacent to the patient support system and portal imager were also measured. A model to calculate the dose rate at these points was derived, and compared to those measured over a typical working week. The model was then used to estimate the maximum dose to therapists for the current working schedule on this machine. Calculated dose rates at the linac face agreed to within +/- 12% of those measured over a week, with a typical dose rate of 4.5 microSv h(-1) 2 min after the beam has stopped. The estimated maximum annual whole body dose for a treatment therapist, with the machine treating at only 18 MV, for 60000 MUs per week was 2.5 mSv. This compares well with value of 2.9 mSv published for a Clinac 21EX. A model has been derived to calculate the dose from the four dominant activation products of an ELEKTA Precise 18 MV linear accelerator. This model is a useful tool to calculate the induced dose rate around the treatment head. The model can be used to estimate the dose to the staff for typical working patterns.

  4. Conservatism in effective dose calculations for accident events involving fuel reprocessing waste tanks.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2011-07-01

    Conservatism in the calculation of the effective dose following an airborne release from an accident involving a fuel reprocessing waste tank is examined. Within the regulatory constraints at the Hanford Site, deterministic effective dose calculations are conservative by at least an order of magnitude. Deterministic calculations should be used with caution in reaching decisions associated with required safety systems and mitigation philosophy related to the accidental release of airborne radioactive material to the environment.

  5. SU-E-T-256: Development of a Monte Carlo-Based Dose-Calculation System in a Cloud Environment for IMRT and VMAT Dosimetric Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are techniques that are widely used for treating cancer due to better target coverage and critical structure sparing. The increasing complexity of IMRT and VMAT plans leads to decreases in dose calculation accuracy. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method for the determination of dose distributions in patients. However, the simulation settings for modeling an accurate treatment head are very complex and time consuming. The purpose of this work is to report our implementation of a simple Monte Carlo simulation system in a cloud-computing environment for dosimetric verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian Clinac linear accelerator were performed using the BEAMnrc code, and dose distributions were calculated using the DOSXYZnrc code. Input files for the simulations were automatically generated from DICOM RT files by the developed web application. We therefore must only upload the DICOM RT files through the web interface, and the simulations are run in the cloud. The calculated dose distributions were exported to RT Dose files that can be downloaded through the web interface. The accuracy of the calculated dose distribution was verified by dose measurements. Results: IMRT and VMAT simulations were performed and good agreement results were observed for measured and MC dose comparison. Gamma analysis with a 3% dose and 3 mm DTA criteria shows a mean gamma index value of 95% for the studied cases. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo-based dose calculation system has been successfully implemented in a cloud environment. The developed system can be used for independent dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans in routine clinical practice. The system will also be helpful for improving accuracy in beam modeling and dose calculation in treatment planning systems. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25861057.

  6. SU-E-T-273: Do Task Group External Beam QA Recommendations Guarantee Accurate Treatment Plan Dose Delivery?

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, A; Liao, Y; Redler, G; Zhen, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM task groups 40/142 have provided an invaluable set of goals for physicists designing QA programs, attempting to standardize what would otherwise likely be a highly variable phenomenon across institutions. However, with the complexity of modalities such as VMAT, we hypothesize that following these guidelines to the letter might still allow unacceptable dose discrepancies. To explore this hypothesis we simulated machines bordering on QA acceptability, and calculated the effect on patient plans. Methods: Two errant machines were simulated in Aria/Eclipse, each just within task group criteria for output, percent depth dose, beam profile, gantry and collimator rotations, and jaw and MLC positions. One machine minimized dose to the PTV (machine A) and the other maximized dose to the OARs (machine B). Clinical treatment plans (3-phase prostate, n=3; hypofractionated lung, n=1) were calculated on these machines and the dose distributions compared. A prostate case was examined for contribution of error sources and evaluated using delivery QA data. Results: The prostate plans showed mean decreases in target D95 of 9.9% of prescription dose on machine A. On machine B, The rectal and bladder V70Gy each increased by 7.1 percentage points, while their V45Gy increased by 16.2% and 15.0% respectively. In the lung plan, the target D95 decreased by 12.8% and the bronchial tree Dmax increased by 21% of prescription dose, on machines A and B. One prostate plan showed target dose errors of 3.8% from MLC changes, 2% from output, ∼3% from energy and ∼0.5% from other factors. This plan achieved an 88.4% gamma passing rate using 3%/3mm using ArcCHECK. Conclusion: In the unlikely event that a machine exhibits all maximum errors allowed by TG 40/142, unacceptably large changes in dose delivered are possible especially in highly modulated VMAT plans, despite the machine passing routine QA.

  7. TU-F-18A-03: Improving Tissue Segmentation for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using DECT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Salvio A; Bedwani, S; Carrier, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a new segmentation technique using dual energy CT (DECT) to overcome limitations related to segmentation from a standard Hounsfield unit (HU) to electron density (ED) calibration curve. Both methods are compared with a Monte Carlo analysis of dose distribution. Methods: DECT allows a direct calculation of both ED and effective atomic number (EAN) within a given voxel. The EAN is here defined as a function of the total electron cross-section of a medium. These values can be effectively acquired using a calibrated method from scans at two different energies. A prior stoichiometric calibration on a Gammex RMI phantom allows us to find the parameters to calculate EAN and ED within a voxel. Scans from a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source system provided the data for our study. A Monte Carlo analysis compares dose distribution simulated by dosxyz-nrc, considering a head phantom defined by both segmentation techniques. Results: Results from depth dose and dose profile calculations show that materials with different atomic compositions but similar EAN present differences of less than 1%. Therefore, it is possible to define a short list of basis materials from which density can be adapted to imitate interaction behavior of any tissue. Comparison of the dose distributions on both segmentations shows a difference of 50% in dose in areas surrounding bone at low energy. Conclusion: The presented segmentation technique allows a more accurate medium definition in each voxel, especially in areas of tissue transition. Since the behavior of human tissues is highly sensitive at low energies, this reduces the errors on calculated dose distribution. This method could be further developed to optimize the tissue characterization based on anatomic site.

  8. Modification of SRIM-calculated dose and injected ion profiles due to sputtering, injected ion buildup and void swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bailey, Nathan; Garner, Frank A.; Gigax, Jonathan; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    In radiation effects on materials utilizing self-ion irradiations, it is necessary to calculate the local displacement damage level and ion injection profile because of the short distance that self-ions travel in a material and because of the strong variation of displacement rate with depth in a specimen. The most frequently used tool for this is the software package called Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM). A SRIM-calculated depth-dependent dose level is usually determined under the implicit assumption that the target does not undergo any significant changes in volume during the process, in particular SRIM ignores the effect of sputtering, injected ions, and void swelling on the redistribution of the dose and injected ion profiles. This approach become increasingly invalid as the ion fluence reaches ever higher levels, especially for low energy ion irradiations. The original surface is not maintained due to sputter-induced erosion, while within the irradiated region of the specimen, injected ions are adding material, and if void swelling is occurring, it is creating empty space. An iterative mathematical treatment of SRIM outputs to produce corrected dose and injected ion profiles based on these phenomenon and without regard to diffusion is presented along with examples of differences between SRIM-calculated values and corrected values over a range of typical ion energies. The intent is to provide the reader with a convenient tool for more accurately calculating dose and injected ion profiles for heavy-ion irradiations.

  9. Multiple-estimate Monte Carlo calculation of the dose rate constant for a cesium-131 interstitial brachytherapy seed

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, Richard S.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2007-01-03

    The purpose of this study was to calculate a more accurate dose rate constant for the Cs-131 (model CS-1, IsoRay Medical, Inc., Richland, Washington) interstitial brachytherapy seed. Previous measurements of the dose rate constant for this seed have been reported by others with incongruity. Recent direct measurements by thermoluminescence dosimetry and by gamma-ray spectroscopy were about 15 percent greater than earlier thermoluminescence dosimetry measurements. Therefore, we set about to calculate independent values by a Monte Carlo approach that combined three estimates as a consistency check, and to quantify the computational uncertainty. The calculated dose rate constant for the Cs-131 seed was 1.040 cGy h^{-1} U^{-1} for an ionization chamber model and 1.032 cGy h^{-1} U^{-1} for a circular ring model. A formal value of 2.2% uncertainty was calculated for both values. The range of our multi-estimate values were from 1.032 cGy h^{-1} U^{-1} to 1.061 cGy h^{-1} U^{-1}. We also modeled three I-125 seeds with known dose rate constants to test the accuracy of this study's approach.

  10. Accurate Accumulation of Dose for Improved Understanding of Radiation Effects in Normal Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffray, David A.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Brock, Kristy K.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Tome, W.A.

    2010-03-01

    The actual distribution of radiation dose accumulated in normal tissues over the complete course of radiation therapy is, in general, poorly quantified. Differences in the patient anatomy between planning and treatment can occur gradually (e.g., tumor regression, resolution of edema) or relatively rapidly (e.g., bladder filling, breathing motion) and these undermine the accuracy of the planned dose distribution. Current efforts to maximize the therapeutic ratio require models that relate the true accumulated dose to clinical outcome. The needed accuracy can only be achieved through the development of robust methods that track the accumulation of dose within the various tissues in the body. Specific needs include the development of segmentation methods, tissue-mapping algorithms, uncertainty estimation, optimal schedules for image-based monitoring, and the development of informatics tools to support subsequent analysis. These developments will not only improve radiation outcomes modeling but will address the technical demands of the adaptive radiotherapy paradigm. The next 5 years need to see academia and industry bring these tools into the hands of the clinician and the clinical scientist.

  11. Calculation of Dose, Dose Equivalent, and Relative Biological Effectiveness for High Charge and Energy Ion Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Reginatto, M.; Hajnal, F.; Chun, S. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The Green's function for the transport of ions of high charge and energy is utilized with a nuclear fragmentation database to evaluate dose, dose equivalent, and RBE for C3H1OT1/2 cell survival and neoplastic transformation as a function of depth in soft tissue. Such evaluations are useful to estimates of biological risk for high altitude aircraft, space operations, accelerator operations, and biomedical applications.

  12. Calculation of dose, dose equivalent, and relative biological effectiveness for high charge and energy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Chun, S. Y.; Reginatto, M.; Hajnal, F.

    1995-01-01

    The Green's function for the transport of ions of high charge and energy is utilized with a nuclear fragmentation database to evaluate dose, dose equivalent, and RBE for C3H10T1/2 cell survival and neo-plastic transformation as function of depth in soft tissue. Such evaluations are useful to estimates of biological risk for high altitude aircraft, space operations, accelerator operations, and biomedical application.

  13. A design of a DICOM-RT-based tool box for nonrigid 4D dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victy Y W; Baker, Colin R; Leung, T W; Tung, Stewart Y

    2016-03-08

    The study was aimed to introduce a design of a DICOM-RT-based tool box to facilitate 4D dose calculation based on deformable voxel-dose registration. The computational structure and the calculation algorithm of the tool box were explicitly discussed in the study. The tool box was written in MATLAB in conjunction with CERR. It consists of five main functions which allow a) importation of DICOM-RT-based 3D dose plan, b) deformable image registration, c) tracking voxel doses along breathing cycle, d) presentation of temporal dose distribution at different time phase, and e) derivation of 4D dose. The efficacy of using the tool box for clinical application had been verified with nine clinical cases on retrospective-study basis. The logistic and the robustness of the tool box were tested with 27 applications and the results were shown successful with no computational errors encountered. In the study, the accumulated dose coverage as a function of planning CT taken at end-inhale, end-exhale, and mean tumor position were assessed. The results indicated that the majority of the cases (67%) achieved maximum target coverage, while the planning CT was taken at the temporal mean tumor position and 56% at the end-exhale position. The comparable results to the literature imply that the studied tool box can be reliable for 4D dose calculation. The authors suggest that, with proper application, 4D dose calculation using deformable registration can provide better dose evaluation for treatment with moving target.

  14. Comparison of EGS4 and MCNP Monte Carlo codes when calculating radiotherapy depth doses.

    PubMed

    Love, P A; Lewis, D G; Al-Affan, I A; Smith, C W

    1998-05-01

    The Monte Carlo codes EGS4 and MCNP have been compared when calculating radiotherapy depth doses in water. The aims of the work were to study (i) the differences between calculated depth doses in water for a range of monoenergetic photon energies and (ii) the relative efficiency of the two codes for different electron transport energy cut-offs. The depth doses from the two codes agree with each other within the statistical uncertainties of the calculations (1-2%). The relative depth doses also agree with data tabulated in the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25. A discrepancy in the dose build-up region may by attributed to the different electron transport algorithims used by EGS4 and MCNP. This discrepancy is considerably reduced when the improved electron transport routines are used in the latest (4B) version of MCNP. Timing calculations show that EGS4 is at least 50% faster than MCNP for the geometries used in the simulations.

  15. Accurate calculation and Matlab based fast realization of merit function's Hesse matrix for the design of multilayer optical coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Su-Yong; Long, Xing-Wu; Yang, Kai-Yong

    2009-09-01

    To improve the current status of home multilayer optical coating design with low speed and poor efficiency when a large layer number occurs, the accurate calculation and fast realization of merit function’s gradient and Hesse matrix is pointed out. Based on the matrix method to calculate the spectral properties of multilayer optical coating, an analytic model is established theoretically. And the corresponding accurate and fast computation is successfully achieved by programming with Matlab. Theoretical and simulated results indicate that this model is mathematically strict and accurate, and its maximal precision can reach floating-point operations in the computer, with short time and fast speed. Thus it is very suitable to improve the optimal search speed and efficiency of local optimization methods based on the derivatives of merit function. It has outstanding performance in multilayer optical coating design with a large layer number.

  16. Determination of the feasibility of reducing the spatial domain of the HEDR dose code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 006

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Snyder, S.F.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. The primary impetus for this scoping calculation was to determine if large areas of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project atmospheric domain could be excluded from detailed calculation because the atmospheric transport of radionuclides from Hanford resulted in no (or negligible) deposition in those areas. The secondary impetus was to investigate whether an intermediate screen could be developed to reduce the data storage requirements by taking advantage of locations with periods of ``effectively zero`` deposition. This scoping calculation (Calculation 006) examined the spatial distribution of potential doses resulting from releases in the year 1945. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study, of iodine in cow`s milk, and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, and (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cow`s milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in scoping calculation 001.

  17. Moderated 252Cf neutron energy spectra in brain tissue and calculated boron neutron capture dose.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Zamenhof, Robert G

    2004-11-01

    While there is significant clinical experience using both low- and high-dose (252)Cf brachytherapy, combination therapy using (10)B for neutron capture therapy-enhanced (252)Cf brachytherapy has not been performed. Monte Carlo calculations were performed in a brain phantom (ICRU 44 brain tissue) to evaluate the dose enhancement predicted for a range of (10)B concentrations over a range of distances from a clinical (252)Cf source. These results were compared to experimental measurements and calculations published in the literature. For (10)B concentrations dose enhancement was small in comparison to the (252)Cf fast neutron dose.

  18. JCZS: An Intermolecular Potential Database for Performing Accurate Detonation and Expansion Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; McGee, B.C.

    1998-11-03

    Exponential-13,6 (EXP-13,6) potential pammeters for 750 gases composed of 48 elements were determined and assembled in a database, referred to as the JCZS database, for use with the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler equation of state (JCZ3-EOS)~l) The EXP- 13,6 force constants were obtained by using literature values of Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential functions, by using corresponding states (CS) theory, by matching pure liquid shock Hugoniot data, and by using molecular volume to determine the approach radii with the well depth estimated from high-pressure isen- tropes. The JCZS database was used to accurately predict detonation velocity, pressure, and temperature for 50 dif- 3 Accurate predictions were also ferent explosives with initial densities ranging from 0.25 glcm3 to 1.97 g/cm . obtained for pure liquid shock Hugoniots, static properties of nitrogen, and gas detonations at high initial pressures.

  19. Accurate calculation of Green functions on the d-dimensional hypercubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yen Lee

    2011-07-01

    We write the Green function of the d-dimensional hypercubic lattice in a piecewise form covering the entire real frequency axis. Each piece is a single integral involving modified Bessel functions of the first and second kinds. The smoothness of the integrand allows both real and imaginary parts of the Green function to be computed quickly and accurately for any dimension d and any real frequency, and the computational time scales only linearly with d.

  20. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces and the Calculation of Accurate Vibrational Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Due to advances in quantum mechanical methods over the last few years, it is now possible to determine ab initio potential energy surfaces in which fundamental vibrational frequencies are accurate to within plus or minus 8 cm(exp -1) on average, and molecular bond distances are accurate to within plus or minus 0.001-0.003 Angstroms, depending on the nature of the bond. That is, the potential energy surfaces have not been scaled or empirically adjusted in any way, showing that theoretical methods have progressed to the point of being useful in analyzing spectra that are not from a tightly controlled laboratory environment, such as vibrational spectra from the interstellar medium. Some recent examples demonstrating this accuracy will be presented and discussed. These include the HNO, CH4, C2H4, and ClCN molecules. The HNO molecule is interesting due to the very large H-N anharmonicity, while ClCN has a very large Fermi resonance. The ab initio studies for the CH4 and C2H4 molecules present the first accurate full quartic force fields of any kind (i.e., whether theoretical or empirical) for a five-atom and six-atom system, respectively.

  1. Performance of dose calculation algorithms from three generations in lung SBRT: comparison with full Monte Carlo-based dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Jarkko J; Kapanen, Mika K; Hyödynmaa, Simo J; Wigren, Tuija K; Pitkänen, Maunu A

    2014-03-06

    The accuracy of dose calculation is a key challenge in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of the lung. We have benchmarked three photon beam dose calculation algorithms--pencil beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and Acuros XB (AXB)--implemented in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), Varian Eclipse. Dose distributions from full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were regarded as a reference. In the first stage, for four patients with central lung tumors, treatment plans using 3D conformal radiotherapy (CRT) technique applying 6 MV photon beams were made using the AXB algorithm, with planning criteria according to the Nordic SBRT study group. The plans were recalculated (with same number of monitor units (MUs) and identical field settings) using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc MC codes. The MC-calculated dose distributions were compared to corresponding AXB-calculated dose distributions to assess the accuracy of the AXB algorithm, to which then other TPS algorithms were compared. In the second stage, treatment plans were made for ten patients with 3D CRT technique using both the PBC algorithm and the AAA. The plans were recalculated (with same number of MUs and identical field settings) with the AXB algorithm, then compared to original plans. Throughout the study, the comparisons were made as a function of the size of the planning target volume (PTV), using various dose-volume histogram (DVH) and other parameters to quantitatively assess the plan quality. In the first stage also, 3D gamma analyses with threshold criteria 3%/3mm and 2%/2 mm were applied. The AXB-calculated dose distributions showed relatively high level of agreement in the light of 3D gamma analysis and DVH comparison against the full MC simulation, especially with large PTVs, but, with smaller PTVs, larger discrepancies were found. Gamma agreement index (GAI) values between 95.5% and 99.6% for all the plans with the threshold criteria 3%/3 mm were achieved, but 2%/2 mm

  2. Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

  3. A method for the evaluation of dose-effect data utilizing a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Carmines, E L; Carchman, R A; Borzelleca, J F

    1980-08-01

    A program for the calculation of the median effective dose (ED50) and the slope of the dose-effect line was developed for a programmable calculator. The method employed approximated the solution described by Bliss. Experimental data were evaluated and compared to both hand calculated results and results of other computer methods. This method produced results which differed from other computer methods by less than 1 percent. This program provided information necessary for the test for parallelism and estimate of relative potency of two dose-effect lines.

  4. Dose Rate Calculation of TRU Metal Ingot in Pyroprocessing - 12202

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Lee, Kunjai

    2012-07-01

    Spent fuel management has been a main problem to be solved for continuous utilization of nuclear energy. Spent fuel management policy of Korea is 'Wait and See'. It is focused on Pyro-process and SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) for closed-fuel cycle research and development in Korea. For peaceful use of nuclear facilities, the proliferation resistance has to be proved. Proliferation resistance is one of key constraints in the deployment of advanced nuclear energy systems. Non-proliferation and safeguard issues have been strengthening internationally. Barriers to proliferation are that reduces desirability or attractiveness as an explosive and makes it difficult to gain access to the materials, or makes it difficult to misuse facilities and/or technologies for weapons applications. Barriers to proliferation are classified into intrinsic and extrinsic barriers. Intrinsic barrier is inherent quality of reactor materials or the fuel cycle that is built into the reactor design and operation such as material and technical barriers. As one of the intrinsic measures, the radiation from the material is considered significantly. Therefore the radiation of TRU metal ingot from the pyro-process was calculated using ORIGEN and MCNP code. (authors)

  5. Monte Carlo calculated doses to treatment volumes and organs at risk for permanent implant lung brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Furutani, K. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2013-10-01

    Iodine-125 (125I) and Caesium-131 (131Cs) brachytherapy have been used with sublobar resection to treat stage I non-small cell lung cancer and other radionuclides, 169Yb and 103Pd, are considered for these treatments. This work investigates the dosimetry of permanent implant lung brachytherapy for a range of source energies and various implant sites in the lung. Monte Carlo calculated doses are calculated in a patient CT-derived computational phantom using the EGsnrc user-code BrachyDose. Calculations are performed for 103Pd, 125I, 131Cs seeds and 50 and 100 keV point sources for 17 implant positions. Doses to treatment volumes, ipsilateral lung, aorta, and heart are determined and compared to those determined using the TG-43 approach. Considerable variation with source energy and differences between model-based and TG-43 doses are found for both treatment volumes and organs. Doses to the heart and aorta generally increase with increasing source energy. TG-43 underestimates the dose to the heart and aorta for all implants except those nearest to these organs where the dose is overestimated. Results suggest that model-based dose calculations are crucial for selecting prescription doses, comparing clinical endpoints, and studying radiobiological effects for permanent implant lung brachytherapy.

  6. The Dirac equation in electronic structure calculations: Accurate evaluation of DFT predictions for actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, John M; Mattsson, Ann E

    2012-06-06

    Brooks, Johansson, and Skriver, using the LMTO-ASA method and considerable insight, were able to explain many of the ground state properties of the actinides. In the many years since this work was done, electronic structure calculations of increasing sophistication have been applied to actinide elements and compounds, attempting to quantify the applicability of DFT to actinides and actinide compounds and to try to incorporate other methodologies (i.e. DMFT) into DFT calculations. Through these calculations, the limits of both available density functionals and ad hoc methodologies are starting to become clear. However, it has also become clear that approximations used to incorporate relativity are not adequate to provide rigorous tests of the underlying equations of DFT, not to mention ad hoc additions. In this talk, we describe the result of full-potential LMTO calculations for the elemental actinides, comparing results obtained with a full Dirac basis with those obtained from scalar-relativistic bases, with and without variational spin-orbit. This comparison shows that the scalar relativistic treatment of actinides does not have sufficient accuracy to provide a rigorous test of theory and that variational spin-orbit introduces uncontrolled errors in the results of electronic structure calculations on actinide elements.

  7. A study of patient experience using a blood glucose meter with an in-built insulin dose calculator.

    PubMed

    Ramtoola, Shenaz; Jude, Edward; Robinson, Anthony; Malik, Iqbal; Rayman, Gerrard; Dang, Cuong; RossMartin, Graham David; Ali, Amar

    2014-07-01

    Accurate calculation and adjustment of insulin doses is integral to maintaining glycemic control in insulin treated patients. Difficulties with insulin dose calculations may lead to poor adherence to blood glucose monitoring and insulin treatment regimes, resulting in poor metabolic control. The main objective of this study was to evaluate ease of use and user preference of a high specification touch screen blood glucose meter, which has an in-built insulin calculator, compared to patients' usual method of testing blood glucose and deciding insulin doses. Patients with diabetes on a multiple daily injection insulin regime used the Test Meter without the insulin calculator and 1 of 3 comparator meters, each for a 7-day period. They then used the Test Meter with the in-built calculator for 10 days. Patients completed an ease of use questionnaire after each 7-day period, a preference questionnaire after the second 7-day period, and a questionnaire comparing the Test Meter with their usual method after the final 10-day period. Of 164 patients who completed the study, 76% stated a preference for the Test Meter as a diabetes management tool compared to their usual method. A small number of patients preferred familiar methods and/or calculating insulin doses themselves. The log book function of meters was important to most patients. The Test Meter system with in-built insulin calculator supports people to better manage their diabetes and increases their confidence. Patients have different needs and preferences which should be acknowledged and supported in a patient centered health service.

  8. A GPU OpenCL based cross-platform Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (goMC).

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been recognized as the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, the extremely long computation time impedes its clinical application. Recently, a lot of effort has been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on graphic processing units (GPUs). However, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines have been developed under NVidia's CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a GPU OpenCL based cross-platform MC dose engine named goMC with coupled photon-electron simulation for external photon and electron radiotherapy in the MeV energy range. Compared to our previously developed GPU-based MC code named gDPM (Jia et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 7783-97), goMC has two major differences. First, it was developed under the OpenCL environment for high code portability and hence could be run not only on different GPU cards but also on CPU platforms. Second, we adopted the electron transport model used in EGSnrc MC package and PENELOPE's random hinge method in our new dose engine, instead of the dose planning method employed in gDPM. Dose distributions were calculated for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement between the two MC dose engines goMC and gDPM was observed in all cases. The average dose differences in the regions that received a dose higher than 10% of the maximum dose were 0.48-0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15-0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, goMC was ~4-16% slower than gDPM when running on the same NVidia TITAN card for all the cases we tested, due to both the different electron transport models and the different development environments. The code portability of our new dose engine goMC was validated by

  9. A GPU OpenCL based cross-platform Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (goMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been recognized as the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, the extremely long computation time impedes its clinical application. Recently, a lot of effort has been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on graphic processing units (GPUs). However, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines have been developed under NVidia’s CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a GPU OpenCL based cross-platform MC dose engine named goMC with coupled photon-electron simulation for external photon and electron radiotherapy in the MeV energy range. Compared to our previously developed GPU-based MC code named gDPM (Jia et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 7783-97), goMC has two major differences. First, it was developed under the OpenCL environment for high code portability and hence could be run not only on different GPU cards but also on CPU platforms. Second, we adopted the electron transport model used in EGSnrc MC package and PENELOPE’s random hinge method in our new dose engine, instead of the dose planning method employed in gDPM. Dose distributions were calculated for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement between the two MC dose engines goMC and gDPM was observed in all cases. The average dose differences in the regions that received a dose higher than 10% of the maximum dose were 0.48-0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15-0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, goMC was ~4-16% slower than gDPM when running on the same NVidia TITAN card for all the cases we tested, due to both the different electron transport models and the different development environments. The code portability of our new dose engine goMC was validated by

  10. Accurate transition probabilities from large-scale multiconfiguration calculations - A tribute to Charlotte Froese Fischer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, Per; Godefroid, Michel; Gaigalas, Gediminas; Bieroń, Jacek; Brage, Tomas

    2013-07-01

    The development of multiconfiguration computer packages for atomic structure calculations is reviewed with special attention to the work of Charlotte Froese Fischer. The underlying theory is described along with methodologies to choose basis expansions of configuration state functions. Calculations of energies and transitions rates are presented and the accuracy of the results is assessed. Limitations of multiconfiguration methods are discussed and it is shown how these limitations can be circumvented by a division of the original large-scale computational problem into a number of smaller problems.

  11. Biologically Based Dose-Response Modeling. What is the potential for accurate description of the biological linkages in the applied dose - tissue dose-health effect continuum?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given knowledge of exposure, the shape of the dose response curve is the key to predicting health risk, which in turn determines allowable levels of exposure and the associated economic costs of compliance.

  12. Monte Carlo modeling of proton therapy installations: a global experimental method to validate secondary neutron dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, J.; Martinetti, F.; Sayah, R.; Lacoste, V.; Donadille, L.; Trompier, F.; Nauraye, C.; De Marzi, L.; Vabre, I.; Delacroix, S.; Hérault, J.; Clairand, I.

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations are increasingly used to assess stray radiation dose to healthy organs of proton therapy patients and estimate the risk of secondary cancer. Among the secondary particles, neutrons are of primary concern due to their high relative biological effectiveness. The validation of Monte Carlo simulations for out-of-field neutron doses remains however a major challenge to the community. Therefore this work focused on developing a global experimental approach to test the reliability of the MCNPX models of two proton therapy installations operating at 75 and 178 MeV for ocular and intracranial tumor treatments, respectively. The method consists of comparing Monte Carlo calculations against experimental measurements of: (a) neutron spectrometry inside the treatment room, (b) neutron ambient dose equivalent at several points within the treatment room, (c) secondary organ-specific neutron doses inside the Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Results have proven that Monte Carlo models correctly reproduce secondary neutrons within the two proton therapy treatment rooms. Sensitive differences between experimental measurements and simulations were nonetheless observed especially with the highest beam energy. The study demonstrated the need for improved measurement tools, especially at the high neutron energy range, and more accurate physical models and cross sections within the Monte Carlo code to correctly assess secondary neutron doses in proton therapy applications.

  13. Monte Carlo modeling of proton therapy installations: a global experimental method to validate secondary neutron dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Farah, J; Martinetti, F; Sayah, R; Lacoste, V; Donadille, L; Trompier, F; Nauraye, C; De Marzi, L; Vabre, I; Delacroix, S; Hérault, J; Clairand, I

    2014-06-07

    Monte Carlo calculations are increasingly used to assess stray radiation dose to healthy organs of proton therapy patients and estimate the risk of secondary cancer. Among the secondary particles, neutrons are of primary concern due to their high relative biological effectiveness. The validation of Monte Carlo simulations for out-of-field neutron doses remains however a major challenge to the community. Therefore this work focused on developing a global experimental approach to test the reliability of the MCNPX models of two proton therapy installations operating at 75 and 178 MeV for ocular and intracranial tumor treatments, respectively. The method consists of comparing Monte Carlo calculations against experimental measurements of: (a) neutron spectrometry inside the treatment room, (b) neutron ambient dose equivalent at several points within the treatment room, (c) secondary organ-specific neutron doses inside the Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Results have proven that Monte Carlo models correctly reproduce secondary neutrons within the two proton therapy treatment rooms. Sensitive differences between experimental measurements and simulations were nonetheless observed especially with the highest beam energy. The study demonstrated the need for improved measurement tools, especially at the high neutron energy range, and more accurate physical models and cross sections within the Monte Carlo code to correctly assess secondary neutron doses in proton therapy applications.

  14. Sub-second pencil beam dose calculation on GPU for adaptive proton therapy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Ansorge, Richard; Jena, Rajesh

    2015-06-21

    Although proton therapy delivered using scanned pencil beams has the potential to produce better dose conformity than conventional radiotherapy, the created dose distributions are more sensitive to anatomical changes and patient motion. Therefore, the introduction of adaptive treatment techniques where the dose can be monitored as it is being delivered is highly desirable. We present a GPU-based dose calculation engine relying on the widely used pencil beam algorithm, developed for on-line dose calculation. The calculation engine was implemented from scratch, with each step of the algorithm parallelized and adapted to run efficiently on the GPU architecture. To ensure fast calculation, it employs several application-specific modifications and simplifications, and a fast scatter-based implementation of the computationally expensive kernel superposition step. The calculation time for a skull base treatment plan using two beam directions was 0.22 s on an Nvidia Tesla K40 GPU, whereas a test case of a cubic target in water from the literature took 0.14 s to calculate. The accuracy of the patient dose distributions was assessed by calculating the γ-index with respect to a gold standard Monte Carlo simulation. The passing rates were 99.2% and 96.7%, respectively, for the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria, matching those produced by a clinical treatment planning system.

  15. Monte Carlo calculation of the sensitivity of a commercial dose calibrator to gamma and beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Valley, Jean-François; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, François O

    2004-06-01

    The detection process used in a commercial dose calibrator was modeled using the GEANT 3 Monte Carlo code. Dose calibrator efficiency for gamma and beta emitters, and the response to monoenergetic photons and electrons was calculated. The model shows that beta emitters below 2.5 MeV deposit energy indirectly in the detector through bremsstrahlung produced in the chamber wall or in the source itself. Higher energy beta emitters (E > 2.5 MeV) deposit energy directly in the chamber sensitive volume, and dose calibrator sensitivity increases abruptly for these radionuclides. The Monte Carlo calculations were compared with gamma and beta emitter measurements. The calculations show that the variation in dose calibrator efficiency with measuring conditions (source volume, container diameter, container wall thickness and material, position of the source within the calibrator) is relatively small and can be considered insignificant for routine measurement applications. However, dose calibrator efficiency depends strongly on the inner-wall thickness of the detector.

  16. First principle calculation of accurate native defect levels in CaF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibraheem, Abdelaziz M.; Khalafalla, Mohammed A. H.; Eisa, Mohamed H.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the first principle density functional calculation of the charge transition levels of native defects (vacancies and interstitials) in CaF2 structure. The transition level was defined as the Fermi level where two charge states of given defect have the same formation energy. The common error in the band gap inherited to semiclocal density functional has been accounted for by incorporating the hybrid density functional method, leading to correct placement of the transition levels within the band gap. The band gap size from hybrid calculation has been validated using the full potential, Linearized Augmented Planewave method with the Modified-Becke-Johnson exchange potential. Prior to level calculations, we ensured that an agreement between the formation energies from small (95-97 atoms) and large (323-325 atoms) supercells was achieved after applying the Makov-Payne correction method. Our calculated transition level for the anion vacancy was 2.97 eV below the conduction band, agreeing with the experimental optical absorption band at 3.3 eV associated with the electron transition from the ground state F-center to the conduction band in CaF2.

  17. Calculation of accurate channel spacing of an AWG optical demultiplexer applying proportional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyringer, D.; Hodzic, E.

    2015-06-01

    We present the proportional method to correct the channel spacing between the transmitted output channels of an AWG. The developed proportional method was applied to 64-channel, 50 GHz AWG and the achieved results confirm very good correlation between designed channel spacing (50 GHz) and the channel spacing calculated from simulated AWG transmission characteristics.

  18. PyVCI: A flexible open-source code for calculating accurate molecular infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibaev, Marat; Crittenden, Deborah L.

    2016-06-01

    The PyVCI program package is a general purpose open-source code for simulating accurate molecular spectra, based upon force field expansions of the potential energy surface in normal mode coordinates. It includes harmonic normal coordinate analysis and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) algorithms, implemented primarily in Python for accessibility but with time-consuming routines written in C. Coriolis coupling terms may be optionally included in the vibrational Hamiltonian. Non-negligible VCI matrix elements are stored in sparse matrix format to alleviate the diagonalization problem. CPU and memory requirements may be further controlled by algorithmic choices and/or numerical screening procedures, and recommended values are established by benchmarking using a test set of 44 molecules for which accurate analytical potential energy surfaces are available. Force fields in normal mode coordinates are obtained from the PyPES library of high quality analytical potential energy surfaces (to 6th order) or by numerical differentiation of analytic second derivatives generated using the GAMESS quantum chemical program package (to 4th order).

  19. Thermochemistry and Charge Delocalization in Cyclization Reactions Using Accurate Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritas, Kayahan; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    Molecules that undergo pericyclic isomerization reactions find interesting optical and energy storage applications, because of their usually high quantum yields, large spectral shifts and small structural changes upon light absorption. These reactions induce a drastic change in the conjugated structure such that substituents that become a part of the conjugated system upon isomerization can play an important role in determining properties such as enthalpy of isomerization and HOMO-LUMO gap. Therefore, theoretical investigations dealing with such systems should be capable of accurately capturing the interplay between electron correlation and exchange effects. In this work, we examine the dihydroazulene isomerization as an example conjugated system. We employ the highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method to predict thermochemical properties and to benchmark results from density functional theory (DFT) methods. Although DFT provides sufficient accuracy for similar systems, in this particular system, DFT predictions of ground state and reaction paths are inconsistent and non-systematic errors arise. We present a comparison between QMC and DFT results for enthalpy of isomerization, HOMO-LUMO gap and charge densities with a range of DFT functionals.

  20. The Calculation of Accurate Harmonic Frequencies of Large Molecules: The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, a Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of naphthalene neutral and cation are studied at the self-consistent-field (SCF), second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2), and density functional theory (DFT) levels using a variety of one-particle basis sets. Very accurate frequencies can be obtained at the DFT level in conjunction with large basis sets if they are scaled with two factors, one for the C-H stretches and a second for all other modes. We also find remarkably good agreement at the B3LYP/4-31G level using only one scale factor. Unlike the neutral PAHs where all methods do reasonably well for the intensities, only the DFT results are accurate for the PAH cations. The failure of the SCF and MP2 methods is caused by symmetry breaking and an inability to describe charge delocalization. We present several interesting cases of symmetry breaking in this study. An assessment is made as to whether an ensemble of PAH neutrals or cations could account for the unidentified infrared bands observed in many astronomical sources.

  1. Do Bond Functions Help for the Calculation of Accurate Bond Energies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The bond energies of 8 chemically bound diatomics are computed using several basis sets with and without bond functions (BF). The bond energies obtained using the aug-pVnZ+BF basis sets (with a correction for basis set superposition error, BSSE) tend to be slightly smaller that the results obtained using the aug-pV(n+I)Z basis sets, but slightly larger than the BSSE corrected aug-pV(n+I)Z results. The aug-cc-pVDZ+BF and aug-cc-pVTZ+BF basis sets yield reasonable estimates of bond energies, but, in most cases, these results cannot be considered highly accurate. Extrapolation of the results obtained with basis sets including bond functions appears to be inferior to the results obtained by extrapolation using atom-centered basis sets. Therefore bond functions do not appear to offer a path for obtaining highly accurate results for chemically bound systems at a lower computational cost than atom centered basis sets.

  2. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: A Cloud-Based Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for Electron Cutout Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T; Bush, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For electron cutouts of smaller sizes, it is necessary to verify electron cutout factors due to perturbations in electron scattering. Often, this requires a physical measurement using a small ion chamber, diode, or film. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast Monte Carlo based dose calculation framework that requires only a smart phone photograph of the cutout and specification of the SSD and energy to determine the electron cutout factor, with the ultimate goal of making this cloud-based calculation widely available to the medical physics community. Methods: The algorithm uses a pattern recognition technique to identify the corners of the cutout in the photograph as shown in Figure 1. It then corrects for variations in perspective, scaling, and translation of the photograph introduced by the user’s positioning of the camera. Blob detection is used to identify the portions of the cutout which comprise the aperture and the portions which are cutout material. This information is then used define physical densities of the voxels used in the Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm as shown in Figure 2, and select a particle source from a pre-computed library of phase-spaces scored above the cutout. The electron cutout factor is obtained by taking a ratio of the maximum dose delivered with the cutout in place to the dose delivered under calibration/reference conditions. Results: The algorithm has been shown to successfully identify all necessary features of the electron cutout to perform the calculation. Subsequent testing will be performed to compare the Monte Carlo results with a physical measurement. Conclusion: A simple, cloud-based method of calculating electron cutout factors could eliminate the need for physical measurements and substantially reduce the time required to properly assure accurate dose delivery.

  3. NOTE: The effect of tomotherapy imaging beam output instabilities on dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchateau, Michael; Tournel, Koen; Verellen, Dirk; Van de Vondel, Iwein; Reynders, Truus; Linthout, Nadine; Gevaert, Thierry; de Coninck, Peter; Depuydt, Tom; Storme, Guy

    2010-06-01

    A radiotherapy treatment plan is based on an anatomical 'snapshot' of the patient acquired during the preparation stage using a kVCT (kilovolt computed tomography) scanner. Anatomical changes will occur during the treatment course, in some cases requiring a new treatment plan to deliver the prescribed dose. With the introduction of 3D volumetric on-board imaging devices, it became feasible to use the produced images for dose recalculation. However, the use of these on-board imaging devices in clinical routine for the calculation of dose depends on the stability of the images. In this study the validation of tomotherapy MVCT (megavolt computed tomography) produced images, for the purpose of dose recalculation by the Planned Adaptive software, has been performed. To investigate the validity of MVCT images for dose calculation, a treatment plan was created based on kVCT-acquired images of a solid water phantom. During a period of 4 months, MVCT images of the phantom have been acquired and were used by the planned adaptive software to recalculate the initial kVCT-based dose on the MVCT images. The influence of the adapted IVDTs (image value-to-density tables) has been investigated as well as the effect of image acquisition with or without preceding airscan. Output fluctuations and/or instabilities of the imaging beam result in MV images of different quality yielding different results when used for dose calculation. It was shown that the output of the imaging beam is not stable, leading to differences of nearly 3% between the original kV-based dose and the recalculated MV-based dose, for solid water only. MVCT images can be used for dose calculation purposes bearing in mind that the output beam is liable to fluctuations. The acquisition of an IVDT together with the MVCT image set, that is going to be used for dose calculation, is highly recommended.

  4. The Monte Carlo code MCPTV--Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy with carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Karg, Juergen; Speer, Stefan; Schmidt, Manfred; Mueller, Reinhold

    2010-07-07

    The Monte Carlo code MCPTV is presented. MCPTV is designed for dose calculation in treatment planning in radiation therapy with particles and especially carbon ions. MCPTV has a voxel-based concept and can perform a fast calculation of the dose distribution on patient CT data. Material and density information from CT are taken into account. Electromagnetic and nuclear interactions are implemented. Furthermore the algorithm gives information about the particle spectra and the energy deposition in each voxel. This can be used to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each voxel. Depth dose distributions are compared to experimental data giving good agreement. A clinical example is shown to demonstrate the capabilities of the MCPTV dose calculation.

  5. A dose calculation algorithm with correction for proton-nucleus interactions in non-water materials for proton radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Sato, S.; Kohno, R.

    2016-01-01

    In treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, the dose measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling by stopping power ratio {ρ\\text{S}} . Since the body tissues are chemically different from water, this approximation may cause dose calculation errors, especially due to differences in nuclear interactions. We proposed and validated an algorithm for correcting these errors. The dose in water is decomposed into three constituents according to the physical interactions of protons in water: the dose from primary protons continuously slowing down by electromagnetic interactions, the dose from protons scattered by elastic and/or inelastic interactions, and the dose resulting from nonelastic interactions. The proportions of the three dose constituents differ between body tissues and water. We determine correction factors for the proportion of dose constituents with Monte Carlo simulations in various standard body tissues, and formulated them as functions of their {ρ\\text{S}} for patient dose calculation. The influence of nuclear interactions on dose was assessed by comparing the Monte Carlo simulated dose and the uncorrected dose in common phantom materials. The influence around the Bragg peak amounted to  -6% for polytetrafluoroethylene and 0.3% for polyethylene. The validity of the correction method was confirmed by comparing the simulated and corrected doses in the materials. The deviation was below 0.8% for all materials. The accuracy of the correction factors derived with Monte Carlo simulations was separately verified through irradiation experiments with a 235 MeV proton beam using common phantom materials. The corrected doses agreed with the measurements within 0.4% for all materials except graphite. The influence on tumor dose was assessed in a prostate case. The dose reduction in the tumor was below 0.5%. Our results verify that this algorithm is practical and accurate for proton radiotherapy treatment planning, and

  6. Calculation of Residual Dose Around Small Objects Using Mu2e Target as an Example

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V.S.; Leveling, A.F.; Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; Aarnio, P.; /Aalto U.

    2011-09-01

    The MARS15 code provides contact residual dose rates for relatively large accelerator and experimental components for predefined irradiation and cooling times. The dose rate at particular distances from the components, some of which can be rather small in size, is calculated in a post Monte-Carlo stage via special algorithms described elsewhere. The approach is further developed and described in this paper.

  7. Misoprostol vaginal insert for induction of labor: a delivery system with accurate dosing and rapid discontinuation.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Megan L; Hawkins, J Seth; Powers, Barbara L; Wing, Deborah A

    2014-01-01

    Labor induction and cervical ripening are widely utilized and new methods are constantly being investigated. Prostaglandins have been shown to be effective labor induction agents and, in particular, were compared with other prostaglandin preparations; vaginal misoprostol used off-label was associated with reduced failure to achieve vaginal delivery. The challenge is to provide this medication with the correct dosing for this indication and with the ability to discontinue the medication if needed, all while ensuring essential maternal and neonatal safety. The misoprostol vaginal insert initiates cervical ripening using a delivery system that controls misoprostol release and can be rapidly removed. This article reviews the development, safety and efficacy of the misoprostol vaginal insert for induction of labor and cervical ripening, and will focus on vaginally administered prostaglandins.

  8. Accurate and efficient calculation of light propagation in one-dimensional inhomogeneous anisotropic media through extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Berreman's 4×4 matrix approach has been generally applied to calculating light propagation in one-dimensional (1-D) inhomogeneous anisotropic media. In numerical calculations the propagator (propagation matrix) of whole 1-D inhomogeneous media is approximated by a stack of N homogeneous slab propagators. We analyze the error of the slab propagator in this slab approximation and show it is correct through the order 1/N2. By using the extrapolation approach, we eliminate the leading error terms of the product (total propagator) of N homogeneous slab propagators successively. Numerical tests for a cholesteric liquid crystal show that the total propagator constructed through extrapolation is of higher accuracy and efficiency than Berreman's and Abdulhalim's or faster 4×4 total propagators.

  9. Les modèles de calcul de dose en radiothérapie clinique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenwald, J. C.

    1998-04-01

    In radiation therapy, it is important to know precisely the dose distribution in the target volume and in the critical organs. To be clinically applicable, the dose calculation models must account for the actual characteristics of the beams and for the tissue densities. An accuracy of 2% in low dose gradient regions and 2mm in high dose gradient is expected, while keeping the computation time consistent with an interactive approach. We describe and discuss briefly the dose calculation models currently used. En radiothérapie, il est indispensable d'avoir une connaissance précise de la dose délivrée dans le volume cible et dans les organes critiques avoisinants. Pour être utilisables cliniquement, les modèles de calcul doivent tenir compte des caractéristiques exactes des faisceaux utilisés et des densités des tissus. Une précision de l'ordre de 2% dans les régions à faible gradient de dose, et de 2mm dans les régions à fort gradient est nécessaire tout en conservant un temps de calcul compatible avec une approche interactive. Les modèles de calcul utilisés sont ici succintement décrits et commentés.

  10. A fast analytic dose calculation method for arc treatments for kilovoltage small animal irradiators.

    PubMed

    Marco-Rius, I; Wack, L; Tsiamas, P; Tryggestad, E; Berbeco, R; Hesser, J; Zygmanski, P

    2013-09-01

    Arc treatments require calculation of dose for collections of discrete gantry angles. The sampling of angles must balance between short computation time of small angle sets and the better calculation reliability of large sets. In this paper, an analytical formula is presented that allows calculation of dose delivered during continuous rotation of the gantry. The formula holds valid for continuous short arcs of up to about 30° and is derived by integrating a dose formula over gantry angles within a small angle approximation. Doses for longer arcs may be obtained in terms of doses for shorter arcs. The formula is derived with an empirical beam model in water and extended to inhomogeneous media. It is validated with experimental data obtained by applying arc treatment using kV small animal irradiator to a phantom of solid water and lung-equivalent material. The results are a promising step towards efficient 3D dose calculation and inverse planning purposes. In principle, this method also applies to VMAT dose calculation and optimization but requires extensions.

  11. Accurate alkynyl radical structures from density functional calculations without Hartree-Fock exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesko, Benjamin G.; Proynov, Emil

    2017-02-01

    Density functional approximations (DFAs) often suffer from self-repulsion and delocalization errors which are reduced by exact (Hartree-Fock-like) exchange admixture. Oyeyemi and co-workers recently showed that several DFAs with little exact exchange incorrectly predict bent alkynyl radical geometries, giving errors in ab initio composite methods using density functional theory geometries [V. B. Oyeyemi et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 289 (2012)]. We show that the simple Hartree-Fock-Slater and Xα DFAs, which have substantial delocalization error, predict linear alkynyl radical geometries without incorporating exact exchange. Our Rung 3.5 DFAs, and rescaled generalized gradient approximations, can give either linear σ, bent σ -π , or nearly linear π radicals, all without incorporating exact exchange. This highlights the complexity of delocalization error, the utility of accurate empirical DFA geometries for ab initio composite methods, and the insights to be gained from Rung 3.5 DFAs.

  12. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, Omar C-M Ma, Charlie

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  13. A new equation for the accurate calculation of sound speed in all oceans.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Claude C; Robinson, Stephen P; Goldsmith, Mike J

    2008-11-01

    A new equation is proposed for the calculation of sound speed in seawater as a function of temperature, salinity, depth, and latitude in all oceans and open seas, including the Baltic and the Black Sea. The proposed equation agrees to better than +/-0.2 m/s with two reference complex equations, each fitting the best available data corresponding to existing waters of different salinities. The only exceptions are isolated hot brine spots that may be found at the bottom of some seas. The equation is of polynomial form, with 14 terms and coefficients of between one and three significant figures. This is a substantial reduction in complexity compared to the more complex equations using pressure that need to be calculated according to depth and location. The equation uses the 1990 universal temperature scale (an elementary transformation is given for data based on the 1968 temperature scale). It is hoped that the equation will be useful to those who need to calculate sound speed in applications of marine acoustics.

  14. Spectral Quadrature method for accurate O(N) electronic structure calculations of metals and insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Pratapa, Phanisri P.; Suryanarayana, Phanish; Pask, John E.

    2015-12-02

    We present the Clenshaw–Curtis Spectral Quadrature (SQ) method for real-space O(N) Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. In this approach, all quantities of interest are expressed as bilinear forms or sums over bilinear forms, which are then approximated by spatially localized Clenshaw–Curtis quadrature rules. This technique is identically applicable to both insulating and metallic systems, and in conjunction with local reformulation of the electrostatics, enables the O(N) evaluation of the electronic density, energy, and atomic forces. The SQ approach also permits infinite-cell calculations without recourse to Brillouin zone integration or large supercells. We employ a finite difference representation in order tomore » exploit the locality of electronic interactions in real space, enable systematic convergence, and facilitate large-scale parallel implementation. In particular, we derive expressions for the electronic density, total energy, and atomic forces that can be evaluated in O(N) operations. We demonstrate the systematic convergence of energies and forces with respect to quadrature order as well as truncation radius to the exact diagonalization result. In addition, we show convergence with respect to mesh size to established O(N3) planewave results. In conclusion, we establish the efficiency of the proposed approach for high temperature calculations and discuss its particular suitability for large-scale parallel computation.« less

  15. Spectral Quadrature method for accurate O(N) electronic structure calculations of metals and insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratapa, Phanisri P.; Suryanarayana, Phanish; Pask, John E.

    2016-03-01

    We present the Clenshaw-Curtis Spectral Quadrature (SQ) method for real-space O(N) Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. In this approach, all quantities of interest are expressed as bilinear forms or sums over bilinear forms, which are then approximated by spatially localized Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature rules. This technique is identically applicable to both insulating and metallic systems, and in conjunction with local reformulation of the electrostatics, enables the O(N) evaluation of the electronic density, energy, and atomic forces. The SQ approach also permits infinite-cell calculations without recourse to Brillouin zone integration or large supercells. We employ a finite difference representation in order to exploit the locality of electronic interactions in real space, enable systematic convergence, and facilitate large-scale parallel implementation. In particular, we derive expressions for the electronic density, total energy, and atomic forces that can be evaluated in O(N) operations. We demonstrate the systematic convergence of energies and forces with respect to quadrature order as well as truncation radius to the exact diagonalization result. In addition, we show convergence with respect to mesh size to established O(N3) planewave results. Finally, we establish the efficiency of the proposed approach for high temperature calculations and discuss its particular suitability for large-scale parallel computation.

  16. Development of a method to accurately calculate the Dpb and quickly predict the strength of a chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xia; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2013-02-01

    A new approach to characterize and measure bond strength has been developed. First, we propose a method to accurately calculate the potential acting on an electron in a molecule (PAEM) at the saddle point along a chemical bond in situ, denoted by Dpb. Then, a direct method to quickly evaluate bond strength is established. We choose some familiar molecules as models for benchmarking this method. As a practical application, the Dpb of base pairs in DNA along C-H and N-H bonds are obtained for the first time. All results show that C7-H of A-T and C8-H of G-C are the relatively weak bonds that are the injured positions in DNA damage. The significance of this work is twofold: (i) A method is developed to calculate Dpb of various sizable molecules in situ quickly and accurately; (ii) This work demonstrates the feasibility to quickly predict the bond strength in macromolecules.

  17. Determination of the contribution of livestock water ingestion to dose from the cow-milk pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 002

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a series of calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to thyroid doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These evaluations include some pathways that were included in the Phase I air-pathway dose evaluations (HEDR staff 1991, page xx), as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in the future HEDR modeling efforts. This calculation (002) examined the possible doses that may have been received by individuals who drank milk from cows that drank from sources of water (stock tanks and farm ponds) exposed to iodine-131 in the atmosphere during 1945.

  18. SU-E-T-22: A Deterministic Solver of the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck Equation for Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X; Gao, H; Paganetti, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation (BFPE) accurately models the migration of photons/charged particles in tissues. While the Monte Carlo (MC) method is popular for solving BFPE in a statistical manner, we aim to develop a deterministic BFPE solver based on various state-of-art numerical acceleration techniques for rapid and accurate dose calculation. Methods: Our BFPE solver is based on the structured grid that is maximally parallelizable, with the discretization in energy, angle and space, and its cross section coefficients are derived or directly imported from the Geant4 database. The physical processes that are taken into account are Compton scattering, photoelectric effect, pair production for photons, and elastic scattering, ionization and bremsstrahlung for charged particles.While the spatial discretization is based on the diamond scheme, the angular discretization synergizes finite element method (FEM) and spherical harmonics (SH). Thus, SH is used to globally expand the scattering kernel and FFM is used to locally discretize the angular sphere. As a Result, this hybrid method (FEM-SH) is both accurate in dealing with forward-peaking scattering via FEM, and efficient for multi-energy-group computation via SH. In addition, FEM-SH enables the analytical integration in energy variable of delta scattering kernel for elastic scattering with reduced truncation error from the numerical integration based on the classic SH-based multi-energy-group method. Results: The accuracy of the proposed BFPE solver was benchmarked against Geant4 for photon dose calculation. In particular, FEM-SH had improved accuracy compared to FEM, while both were within 2% of the results obtained with Geant4. Conclusion: A deterministic solver of the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation is developed for dose calculation, and benchmarked against Geant4. Xiang Hong and Hao Gao were partially supported by the NSFC (#11405105), the 973 Program (#2015CB856000) and the Shanghai Pujiang

  19. Calculating biologically accurate mitigation credits: insights from the California tiger salamander.

    PubMed

    Searcy, Christopher A; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2008-08-01

    Current conservation mitigation plans often fail to ensure full in-kind habitat replacement for endangered species, which suggests the need for improved methods for calculating mitigation credits. A simple, yet biologically meaningful method for calculating mitigation credits would be to let the number of mitigation credits assigned to a parcel of land scale with the reproductive value of the individuals occupying that parcel. This can be accomplished by dividing the population into 2 or more subdivisions with different reproductive values, calculating the densities of these subdivisions as a function of one or more habitat parameters, and then forming a weighted sum of these densities such that each density distribution is weighted by the reproductive value of its respective subdivision of the population. This weighted sum is the density distribution of reproductive value, and by integrating it over a particular parcel, one can determine the mitigation value of that parcel. We carried out this procedure for a population of California tiger salamanders (Ambystoma californiense), with distance from breeding site as our habitat parameter and the 3 visually identifiable age classes (adults, juveniles, and metamorphs) as our population subdivisions. This led to a density distribution of reproductive value that decreased exponentially with increasing distance from a breeding site. Mitigation strategies derived from this function will be more likely to ensure the persistence of California tiger salamander populations than current approaches, which assign all land within 1.6 km of a breeding site the same mitigation value. Use of the density distribution of reproductive value as a basis for mitigation plans is a procedure that can be applied to all endangered species, and it should improve the quality of mitigation decisions.

  20. Assessing the Clinical Impact of Approximations in Analytical Dose Calculations for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schuemann, Jan Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Moteabbed, Maryam; Min, Chul Hee; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of approximations in current analytical dose calculation methods (ADCs) on tumor control probability (TCP) in proton therapy. Methods: Dose distributions planned with ADC were compared with delivered dose distributions as determined by Monte Carlo simulations. A total of 50 patients were investigated in this analysis with 10 patients per site for 5 treatment sites (head and neck, lung, breast, prostate, liver). Differences were evaluated using dosimetric indices based on a dose-volume histogram analysis, a γ-index analysis, and estimations of TCP. Results: We found that ADC overestimated the target doses on average by 1% to 2% for all patients considered. The mean dose, D95, D50, and D02 (the dose value covering 95%, 50% and 2% of the target volume, respectively) were predicted within 5% of the delivered dose. The γ-index passing rate for target volumes was above 96% for a 3%/3 mm criterion. Differences in TCP were up to 2%, 2.5%, 6%, 6.5%, and 11% for liver and breast, prostate, head and neck, and lung patients, respectively. Differences in normal tissue complication probabilities for bladder and anterior rectum of prostate patients were less than 3%. Conclusion: Our results indicate that current dose calculation algorithms lead to underdosage of the target by as much as 5%, resulting in differences in TCP of up to 11%. To ensure full target coverage, advanced dose calculation methods like Monte Carlo simulations may be necessary in proton therapy. Monte Carlo simulations may also be required to avoid biases resulting from systematic discrepancies in calculated dose distributions for clinical trials comparing proton therapy with conventional radiation therapy.

  1. SU-E-T-277: Dose Calculation Comparisons Between Monaco, Pinnacle and Eclipse Treatment Planning Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, C; Kirby, N; Narayanasamy, G; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Monaco treatment planning system (TPS) version 5.0 uses a Monte-Carlo based dose calculation engine. The aim of this study is to verify and compare the Monaco based dose calculations with both Pinnacle{sup 3} collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC) and Eclipse analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) calculations. Methods: For this study, previously treated SBRT lung, head and neck and abdomen patients were chosen to compare dose calculations between Pinnacle, Monaco and Eclipse. Plans were chosen from those that had been treated using the Elekta VersaHD or a NovalisTX linac. The plans included 3D conventional and IMRT beams using 6MV and 6MV Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. The original plans calculated with CCCS or AAA along with the recalculated ones using MC from the three TPS were exported into Velocity software for inter-comparison. Results: To compare the dose calculations, Mean Lung Dose (MLD), lung V5 and V20 values, and PTV Heterogeneity indexes (HI) and Conformity indexes (CI) were all calculated and recorded from the dose volume histograms (DVH). For each patient, the CI values were identical but there were differences in all other parameters. The HI was computed higher by 5 and 4% for calculated plans AAA and CCCS respectively, compared to the MC ones. The DVH graphs showed large differences between the CCCS and AAA and Monaco for 3D FFF, VMAT and IMRT plans. Better DVH agreement between was observed for 3D conventional plans. Conclusion: Better agreement was observed between CCCS and MC calculations than AAA and MC calculations. Those differences were more profound as the field size was decreasing and in the presence of inhomogeneities.

  2. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Bria M.; Brady, Samuel L. Kaufman, Robert A.; Mirro, Amy E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to

  3. Effective approach for accurately calculating individual energy of polar heterojunction interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakane, Harunobu; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori

    2016-09-01

    We propose a direct approach for calculating individual energy of polar semiconductor interfaces using density functional theory calculations. This approach is applied to polar interfaces between group-III nitrides (AlN and GaN) and SiC and clarifies the interplay of chemical bonding and charge neutrality at the interface, which is crucial for the stability and polarity of group-III nitrides on SiC substrates. The ideal interface is stabilized among various atomic arrangements over the wide range of the chemical potential on Si-face SiC, whereas those with intermixing are favorable on C-face SiC. The stabilization of the ideal interfaces resulting in Ga-polar GaN and Al-polar AlN films on Si-face SiC is consistent with experiments, suggesting that our approach is versatile to evaluate various polar heterojunction interfaces as well as group-III nitrides on semiconductor substrates.

  4. Charged Point Defects in the Flatland: Accurate Formation Energy Calculations in Two-Dimensional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Berseneva, Natalia; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2014-07-01

    Impurities and defects frequently govern materials properties, with the most prominent example being the doping of bulk semiconductors where a minute amount of foreign atoms can be responsible for the operation of the electronic devices. Several computational schemes based on a supercell approach have been developed to get insights into types and equilibrium concentrations of point defects, which successfully work in bulk materials. Here, we show that many of these schemes cannot directly be applied to two-dimensional (2D) systems, as formation energies of charged point defects are dominated by large spurious electrostatic interactions between defects in inhomogeneous environments. We suggest two approaches that solve this problem and give accurate formation energies of charged defects in 2D systems in the dilute limit. Our methods, which are applicable to all kinds of charged defects in any 2D system, are benchmarked for impurities in technologically important h-BN and MoS2 2D materials, and they are found to perform equally well for substitutional and adatom impurities.

  5. TH-E-BRE-07: Development of Dose Calculation Error Predictors for a Widely Implemented Clinical Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, A; Laub, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Several shortcomings of the current implementation of the analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA) may lead to dose calculation errors in highly modulated treatments delivered to highly heterogeneous geometries. Here we introduce a set of dosimetric error predictors that can be applied to a clinical treatment plan and patient geometry in order to identify high risk plans. Once a problematic plan is identified, the treatment can be recalculated with more accurate algorithm in order to better assess its viability. Methods: Here we focus on three distinct sources dosimetric error in the AAA algorithm. First, due to a combination of discrepancies in smallfield beam modeling as well as volume averaging effects, dose calculated through small MLC apertures can be underestimated, while that behind small MLC blocks can overestimated. Second, due the rectilinear scaling of the Monte Carlo generated pencil beam kernel, energy is not properly transported through heterogeneities near, but not impeding, the central axis of the beamlet. And third, AAA overestimates dose in regions very low density (< 0.2 g/cm{sup 3}). We have developed an algorithm to detect the location and magnitude of each scenario within the patient geometry, namely the field-size index (FSI), the heterogeneous scatter index (HSI), and the lowdensity index (LDI) respectively. Results: Error indices successfully identify deviations between AAA and Monte Carlo dose distributions in simple phantom geometries. Algorithms are currently implemented in the MATLAB computing environment and are able to run on a typical RapidArc head and neck geometry in less than an hour. Conclusion: Because these error indices successfully identify each type of error in contrived cases, with sufficient benchmarking, this method can be developed into a clinical tool that may be able to help estimate AAA dose calculation errors and when it might be advisable to use Monte Carlo calculations.

  6. TH-A-19A-09: Towards Sub-Second Proton Dose Calculation On GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J da

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To achieve sub-second dose calculation for clinically relevant proton therapy treatment plans. Rapid dose calculation is a key component of adaptive radiotherapy, necessary to take advantage of the better dose conformity offered by hadron therapy. Methods: To speed up proton dose calculation, the pencil beam algorithm (PBA; clinical standard) was parallelised and implemented to run on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The implementation constitutes the first PBA to run all steps on GPU, and each part of the algorithm was carefully adapted for efficiency. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations obtained using Fluka of individual beams of energies representative of the clinical range impinging on simple geometries were used to tune the PBA. For benchmarking, a typical skull base case with a spot scanning plan consisting of a total of 8872 spots divided between two beam directions of 49 energy layers each was provided by CNAO (Pavia, Italy). The calculations were carried out on an Nvidia Geforce GTX680 desktop GPU with 1536 cores running at 1006 MHz. Results: The PBA reproduced within ±3% of maximum dose results obtained from MC simulations for a range of pencil beams impinging on a water tank. Additional analysis of more complex slab geometries is currently under way to fine-tune the algorithm. Full calculation of the clinical test case took 0.9 seconds in total, with the majority of the time spent in the kernel superposition step. Conclusion: The PBA lends itself well to implementation on many-core systems such as GPUs. Using the presented implementation and current hardware, sub-second dose calculation for a clinical proton therapy plan was achieved, opening the door for adaptive treatment. The successful parallelisation of all steps of the calculation indicates that further speedups can be expected with new hardware, brightening the prospects for real-time dose calculation. This work was funded by ENTERVISION, European Commission FP7 grant 264552.

  7. Accurate spectroscopic calculations of 21 electronic states of ClO radical including transition properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-08-01

    The potential energy curves were calculated for the 21 states (X2Π, A2Π, 32Π, 42Π, 52Π, 12Σ+, 22Σ+, 32Σ+, 12Σ-, 22Σ-, 32Σ-, 12Δ, 22Δ, 32Δ, 12Φ, 14Σ+, a4Σ-, 24Σ-, 14Π, 24Π and 14Δ), which originated from the two lowest dissociation channels of ClO radical. The calculations were done for internuclear separations approximately from 0.08 to 1.10 nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. Of these 21 states, the 14Π, 24Π, 32Δ, 42Π, 52Π, 12Φ, 32Σ+, 14Δ and 24Σ- states are repulsive. The 12Δ, 12Σ-, 14Σ+, 22Σ-, 12Σ+, 22Σ+, 22Δ and 32Σ- states are very weakly bound. Only the A2Π state has one barrier. The avoided crossing exists between the A2Π and the 32Π state. However, the avoided crossing does not generate any double wells. Core- valence correlation correction was accounted for at the level of an aug-cc-pCVQZ basis set. Scalar relativistic correction was included by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of an aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. All the potential energy curves were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters were determined. The 12Σ-, 22Σ-, 32Σ- and 14Σ+ states may be very difficult to be detected in an experiment, since each of these Λ-S states has only one or two vibrational states. The Franck-Condon factors and radiative lifetimes were calculated for several low vibrational levels of the A2Π - X2Π, 32Π - a4Σ-, 22Δ - a4Σ- and 32Σ- - 12Σ- transitions. The spin-orbit coupling effect on the spectroscopic parameters of the X2Π, A2Π, 32Π, a4Σ- and 22Σ+ states were discussed. The spectroscopic properties reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  8. Computer subroutines for the estimation of nuclear reaction effects in proton-tissue-dose calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Calculational methods for estimation of dose from external proton exposure of arbitrary convex bodies are briefly reviewed. All the necessary information for the estimation of dose in soft tissue is presented. Special emphasis is placed on retaining the effects of nuclear reaction, especially in relation to the dose equivalent. Computer subroutines to evaluate all of the relevant functions are discussed. Nuclear reaction contributions for standard space radiations are in most cases found to be significant. Many of the existing computer programs for estimating dose in which nuclear reaction effects are neglected can be readily converted to include nuclear reaction effects by use of the subroutines described herein.

  9. Accurate calculation and assignment of highly excited vibrational levels of floppy triatomic molecules in a basis of adiabatic vibrational eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bačić, Z.

    1991-09-01

    We show that the triatomic adiabatic vibrational eigenstates (AVES) provide a convenient basis for accurate discrete variable representation (DVR) calculation and automatic assignment of highly excited, large amplitude motion vibrational states of floppy triatomic molecules. The DVR-AVES states are eigenvectors of the diagonal (in the stretch states) blocks of the adiabatically rearranged triatomic DVR-ray eigenvector (DVR-REV) Hamiltonian [J. C. Light and Z. Bačić, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 4008 (1987)]. The transformation of the full triatomic vibrational Hamiltonian from the DVR-REV basis to the new DVR-AVES basis is simple, and does not involve calculation of any new matrix elements. No dynamical approximation is made in the energy level calculation by the DVR-AVES approach; its accuracy and efficiency are identical to those of the DVR-REV method. The DVR-AVES states, as the adiabatic approximation to the vibrational states of a triatomic molecule, are labeled by three vibrational quantum numbers. Consequently, accurate large amplitude motion vibrational levels obtained by diagonalizing the full vibrational Hamiltonian transformed to the DVR-AVES basis, can be assigned automatically by the code, with the three quantum numbers of the dominant DVR-AVES state associated with the largest (by modulus) eigenvector element in the DVR-AVES basis. The DVR-AVES approach is used to calculate accurate highly excited localized and delocalized vibrational levels of HCN/HNC and LiCN/LiNC. A significant fraction of localized states of both systems, below and above the isomerization barrier, is assigned automatically, without inspection of wave function plots or separate approximate calculations.

  10. Accurate schemes for calculation of thermodynamic properties of liquid mixtures from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Caro, Miguel A; Laurila, Tomi; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga

    2016-12-28

    We explore different schemes for improved accuracy of entropy calculations in aqueous liquid mixtures from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We build upon the two-phase thermodynamic (2PT) model of Lin et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11792 (2003)] and explore new ways to obtain the partition between the gas-like and solid-like parts of the density of states, as well as the effect of the chosen ideal "combinatorial" entropy of mixing, both of which have a large impact on the results. We also propose a first-order correction to the issue of kinetic energy transfer between degrees of freedom (DoF). This problem arises when the effective temperatures of translational, rotational, and vibrational DoF are not equal, either due to poor equilibration or reduced system size/time sampling, which are typical problems for ab initio MD. The new scheme enables improved convergence of the results with respect to configurational sampling, by up to one order of magnitude, for short MD runs. To ensure a meaningful assessment, we perform MD simulations of liquid mixtures of water with several other molecules of varying sizes: methanol, acetonitrile, N, N-dimethylformamide, and n-butanol. Our analysis shows that results in excellent agreement with experiment can be obtained with little computational effort for some systems. However, the ability of the 2PT method to succeed in these calculations is strongly influenced by the choice of force field, the fluidicity (hard-sphere) formalism employed to obtain the solid/gas partition, and the assumed combinatorial entropy of mixing. We tested two popular force fields, GAFF and OPLS with SPC/E water. For the mixtures studied, the GAFF force field seems to perform as a slightly better "all-around" force field when compared to OPLS+SPC/E.

  11. Accurate ab initio calculations which demonstrate a 3 Pi u ground state for Al2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.; Walch, Stephen P.

    1986-01-01

    The spectroscopic parameters and separations between the three low-lying X 3 Pi u, A 3 Sigma g -, and a 1 Sigma g + states of Al2 are studied as a function of both the one-particle and n-particle basis set. Approximate correlation treatments are calibrated against full Cl calculations correlating the six valence electrons in a double-zeta plus two d-function basis set. Since the CASSCF/MRCI 3 Pi u to 3 Sigma g - separation is in excellent agreement wtih the FCI value, the MRCI calculations were carried out in an extended (20s13p6d4f)/(6s5p3d2f) gaussian basis. Including a small correction for relativistic effects, the best estimate is that 3 Sigma g - state lies 174/cm above the 3 Pi u ground state. The 1 Sigma g + state lies at least 2000/cm higher in energy. At the CPF level, inclusion of 2s and 2p correlation has little effect on D sub e, reduces T sub e by only 26/cm, and shortens the bond lengths by about 0.02 a sub o. Further strong support for a 3 Pi u ground state comes from the experimental absorption spectra, since both observed transitions can be convincingly assigned as 3 Pi u yields 3 Pi g. The (2) 3 Pi g state is observed to be sensitive to the level of correlation treatment, and to have its minimum shifted to shorter rho values, such that the strongest experimental absorption peak probably corresponds to the 0 yields 2 transition.

  12. Accurate bond energies of biodiesel methyl esters from multireference averaged coupled-pair functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Oyeyemi, Victor B; Keith, John A; Carter, Emily A

    2014-09-04

    Accurate bond dissociation energies (BDEs) are important for characterizing combustion chemistry, particularly the initial stages of pyrolysis. Here we contribute to evaluating the thermochemistry of biodiesel methyl ester molecules using ab initio BDEs derived from a multireference averaged coupled-pair functional (MRACPF2)-based scheme. Having previously validated this approach for hydrocarbons and a variety of oxygenates, herein we provide further validation for bonds within carboxylic acids and methyl esters, finding our scheme predicts BDEs within chemical accuracy (i.e., within 1 kcal/mol) for these molecules. Insights into BDE trends with ester size are then analyzed for methyl formate through methyl crotonate. We find that the carbonyl group in the ester moiety has only a local effect on BDEs. C═C double bonds in ester alkyl chains are found to increase the strengths of bonds adjacent to the double bond. An important exception are bonds beta to C═C or C═O bonds, which produce allylic-like radicals upon dissociation. The observed trends arise from different degrees of geometric relaxation and resonance stabilization in the radicals produced. We also compute BDEs in various small alkanes and alkenes as models for the long hydrocarbon chain of actual biodiesel methyl esters. We again show that allylic bonds in the alkenes are much weaker than those in the small methyl esters, indicating that hydrogen abstractions are more likely at the allylic site and even more likely at bis-allylic sites of alkyl chains due to more electrons involved in π-resonance in the latter. Lastly, we use the BDEs in small surrogates to estimate heretofore unknown BDEs in large methyl esters of biodiesel fuels.

  13. Study on GEANT4 code applications to dose calculation using imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Ok; Kang, Jeong Ku; Kim, Jhin Kee; Kwon, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Kim, Bu Gil; Jeong, Dong Hyeok

    2015-07-01

    The use of the GEANT4 code has increased in the medical field. Various studies have calculated the patient dose distributions by users the GEANT4 code with imaging data. In present study, Monte Carlo simulations based on DICOM data were performed to calculate the dose absorb in the patient's body. Various visualization tools are installed in the GEANT4 code to display the detector construction; however, the display of DICOM images is limited. In addition, to displaying the dose distributions on the imaging data of the patient is difficult. Recently, the gMocren code, a volume visualization tool for GEANT4 simulation, was developed and has been used in volume visualization of image files. In this study, the imaging based on the dose distributions absorbed in the patients was performed by using the gMocren code. Dosimetric evaluations with were carried out by using thermo luminescent dosimeter and film dosimetry to verify the calculated results.

  14. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr. )

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No penetration of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor was cross fire between the vessel assumed. The results are useful in assessing the dose to blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures.

  15. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G. ); Poston, J.W. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor cross fire between vessel was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the dose in blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. A design of a DICOM-RT-based tool box for nonrigid 4D dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victy Y W; Baker, Colin R; Leung, T W; Tung, Stewart Y

    2016-03-01

    The study was aimed to introduce a design of a DICOM-RT-based tool box to facilitate 4D dose calculation based on deformable voxel-dose registration. The computational structure and the calculation algorithm of the tool box were explicitly discussed in the study. The tool box was written in MATLAB in conjunction with CERR. It consists of five main functions which allow a) importation of DICOM-RT-based 3D dose plan, b) deformable image registration, c) tracking voxel doses along breathing cycle, d) presentation of temporal dose distribution at different time phase, and e) derivation of 4D dose. The efficacy of using the tool box for clinical application had been verified with nine clinical cases on retrospective-study basis. The logistic and the robustness of the tool box were tested with 27 applications and the results were shown successful with no computational errors encountered. In the study, the accumulated dose coverage as a function of planning CT taken at end-inhale, end-exhale, and mean tumor position were assessed. The results indicated that the majority of the cases (67%) achieved maximum target coverage, while the planning CT was taken at the temporal mean tumor position and 56% at the end-exhale position. The comparable results to the literature imply that the studied tool box can be reliable for 4D dose calculation. The authors suggest that, with proper application, 4D dose calculation using deformable registration can provide better dose evaluation for treatment with moving target. PACS number(s): 87.55.kh.

  17. Measurements and calculations of the absorbed dose distribution around a 60Co source.

    PubMed

    Tiourina, T B; Dries, W J; van der Linden, P M

    1995-05-01

    The data from Meisberger et al. [Radiology 90, 953-957 (1968)] are often used as a basis for dose calculations in brachytherapy. In order to describe the absorbed dose in water around a brachytherapy point source, Meisberger provided a polynomial fit for different isotopes taking into account the effect of attenuation and scattering. The validity of the Meisberger coefficients is restricted to distances up to 10 cm from the source, which is regarded to be satisfactory for most brachytherapy applications. However, for more distant organs it may lead to errors in calculated absorbed dose. For this reason dose measurements have been performed in air and in water around a high activity 60Co source used in high dose rate brachytherapy. Measurements were carried out to distances of 20 cm, using ionization chambers. These data show that at a distance of about 15 cm the amount of scattered radiation virtually equals the amount of primary radiation. This emphasizes the contribution of scattered radiation to the dose in healthy tissue far from the target volume, even with relatively high energy photon radiation of 60Co. It is also shown that the Meisberger data as well as the approach of Van Kleffens and Star [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Phys. 5, 557-563 (1979)] lead to significant errors in absorbed dose between distances of 10 and 20 cm from the source. In addition to these measurements, the Monte Carlo code has been used to calculate separately primary dose and scattered dose from a cobalt point source. The calculated results agree with the experimental data within 1% for a most distant dose scoring region.

  18. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  19. Fast Pencil Beam Dose Calculation for Proton Therapy Using a Double-Gaussian Beam Model.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Ansorge, Richard; Jena, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    The highly conformal dose distributions produced by scanned proton pencil beams (PBs) are more sensitive to motion and anatomical changes than those produced by conventional radiotherapy. The ability to calculate the dose in real-time as it is being delivered would enable, for example, online dose monitoring, and is therefore highly desirable. We have previously described an implementation of a PB algorithm running on graphics processing units (GPUs) intended specifically for online dose calculation. Here, we present an extension to the dose calculation engine employing a double-Gaussian beam model to better account for the low-dose halo. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first such PB algorithm for proton therapy running on a GPU. We employ two different parameterizations for the halo dose, one describing the distribution of secondary particles from nuclear interactions found in the literature and one relying on directly fitting the model to Monte Carlo simulations of PBs in water. Despite the large width of the halo contribution, we show how in either case the second Gaussian can be included while prolonging the calculation of the investigated plans by no more than 16%, or the calculation of the most time-consuming energy layers by about 25%. Furthermore, the calculation time is relatively unaffected by the parameterization used, which suggests that these results should hold also for different systems. Finally, since the implementation is based on an algorithm employed by a commercial treatment planning system, it is expected that with adequate tuning, it should be able to reproduce the halo dose from a general beam line with sufficient accuracy.

  20. SU-E-I-28: Evaluating the Organ Dose From Computed Tomography Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T; Araki, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.

  1. A new approach to account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage x-rays.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jason M; Ding, George X

    2011-07-07

    This study presents a new approach to accurately account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage (kV) x-rays. This approach is based on the hypothesis that the correction factors needed to convert dose from model-based dose calculations to absorbed dose-to-medium depend on both the attenuation characteristics of the absorbing media and the changes to the energy spectrum of the incident x-rays as they traverse media with an effective atomic number different than that of water. Using Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we obtained empirical medium-dependent correction factors that take both effects into account. We found that the correction factors can be expressed as a function of a single quantity, called the effective bone depth, which is a measure of the amount of bone that an x-ray beam must penetrate to reach a voxel. Since the effective bone depth can be calculated from volumetric patient CT images, the medium-dependent correction factors can be obtained for model-based dose calculations based on patient CT images. We tested the accuracy of this new approach on 14 patients for the case of calculating imaging dose from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography used for patient setup in radiotherapy, and compared it with the Monte Carlo method, which is regarded as the 'gold standard'. For all patients studied, the new approach resulted in mean dose errors of less than 3%. This is in contrast to current available inhomogeneity corrected methods, which have been shown to result in mean errors of up to -103% for bone and 8% for soft tissue. Since there is a huge gain in the calculation speed relative to the Monte Carlo method (∼two orders of magnitude) with an acceptable loss of accuracy, this approach provides an alternative accurate dose calculation method for kV x-rays.

  2. Accurate Gaussian basis sets for atomic and molecular calculations obtained from the generator coordinate method with polynomial discretization.

    PubMed

    Celeste, Ricardo; Maringolo, Milena P; Comar, Moacyr; Viana, Rommel B; Guimarães, Amanda R; Haiduke, Roberto L A; da Silva, Albérico B F

    2015-10-01

    Accurate Gaussian basis sets for atoms from H to Ba were obtained by means of the generator coordinate Hartree-Fock (GCHF) method based on a polynomial expansion to discretize the Griffin-Wheeler-Hartree-Fock equations (GWHF). The discretization of the GWHF equations in this procedure is based on a mesh of points not equally distributed in contrast with the original GCHF method. The results of atomic Hartree-Fock energies demonstrate the capability of these polynomial expansions in designing compact and accurate basis sets to be used in molecular calculations and the maximum error found when compared to numerical values is only 0.788 mHartree for indium. Some test calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for N2, F2, CO, NO, HF, and HCN show that total energies within 1.0 to 2.4 mHartree compared to the cc-pV5Z basis sets are attained with our contracted bases with a much smaller number of polarization functions (2p1d and 2d1f for hydrogen and heavier atoms, respectively). Other molecular calculations performed here are also in very good accordance with experimental and cc-pV5Z results. The most important point to be mentioned here is that our generator coordinate basis sets required only a tiny fraction of the computational time when compared to B3LYP/cc-pV5Z calculations.

  3. Influence of different dose calculation algorithms on the estimate of NTCP for lung complications.

    PubMed

    Hedin, Emma; Bäck, Anna

    2013-09-06

    Due to limitations and uncertainties in dose calculation algorithms, different algorithms can predict different dose distributions and dose-volume histograms for the same treatment. This can be a problem when estimating the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for patient-specific dose distributions. Published NTCP model parameters are often derived for a different dose calculation algorithm than the one used to calculate the actual dose distribution. The use of algorithm-specific NTCP model parameters can prevent errors caused by differences in dose calculation algorithms. The objective of this work was to determine how to change the NTCP model parameters for lung complications derived for a simple correction-based pencil beam dose calculation algorithm, in order to make them valid for three other common dose calculation algorithms. NTCP was calculated with the relative seriality (RS) and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) models. The four dose calculation algorithms used were the pencil beam (PB) and collapsed cone (CC) algorithms employed by Oncentra, and the pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) employed by Eclipse. Original model parameters for lung complications were taken from four published studies on different grades of pneumonitis, and new algorithm-specific NTCP model parameters were determined. The difference between original and new model parameters was presented in relation to the reported model parameter uncertainties. Three different types of treatments were considered in the study: tangential and locoregional breast cancer treatment and lung cancer treatment. Changing the algorithm without the derivation of new model parameters caused changes in the NTCP value of up to 10 percentage points for the cases studied. Furthermore, the error introduced could be of the same magnitude as the confidence intervals of the calculated NTCP values. The new NTCP model parameters were tabulated as the algorithm was varied from PB

  4. SU-E-T-464: Implementation and Validation of 4D Acuros XB Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S; Yuen, C; Huang, V; Milette, M; Teke, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this abstract we implement and validate a 4D VMAT Acuros XB dose calculation using Gafchromic film. Special attention is paid to the physical material assignment in the CT dataset and to reported dose to water and dose to medium. Methods: A QUASAR phantom with a 3 cm sinusoidal tumor motion and 5 second period was scanned using 4D computed tomography. A CT was also obtained of the static QUASAR phantom with the tumor at the central position. A VMAT plan was created on the average CT dataset and was delivered on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. The trajectory log file from this treatment was acquired and used to create 10 VMAT subplans (one for each portion of the breathing cycle). Motion for each subplan was simulated by moving the beam isocentre in the superior/inferior direction in the Treatment Planning System on the static CT scan. The 10 plans were calculated (both dose to medium and dose to water) and summed for 1) the original HU values from the static CT scan and 2) the correct physical material assignment in the CT dataset. To acquire a breathing phase synchronized film measurements the trajectory log was used to create a VMAT delivery plan which includes dynamic couch motion using the Developer Mode. Three different treatment start phases were investigated (mid inhalation, full inhalation and full exhalation). Results: For each scenario the coronal dose distributions were measured using Gafchromic film and compared to the corresponding calculation with Film QA Pro Software using a Gamma test with a 3%/3mm distance to agreement criteria. Good agreement was found between calculation and measurement. No statistically significant difference in agreement was found between calculations to original HU values vs calculations to over-written (material-assigned) HU values. Conclusion: The investigated 4D dose calculation method agrees well with measurement.

  5. Accurate quantum calculation of the bound and resonant rovibrational states of Li-(H2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yingsheng; Poirier, Bill

    2005-03-01

    In a recent paper [B. Poirier, Chem. Phys. 308, 305 (2005)] a full-dimensional quantum method for computing the rovibrational dynamics of triatomic systems was presented, incorporating three key features: (1) exact analytical treatment of Coriolis coupling, (2) three-body "effective potential," and (3) a single bend angle basis for all rotational states. In this paper, these ideas are applied to the Li-(H2) electrostatic complex, to compute all of the rovibrational bound state energies, and a number of resonance energies and widths, to very high accuracy (thousandths of a wave number). This application is very challenging, owing to the long-range nature of the interaction and to narrow level spacings near dissociation. Nevertheless, by combining the present method with a G4 symmetry-adapted phase-space-optimized representation, only modest basis sizes are required for which the matrices are amenable to direct diagonalization. Several new bound levels are reported, as compared with a previous calculation [D. T. Chang, G. Surratt, G. Ristroff, and G. I. Gellene, J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9188 (2002)]. The resonances exhibit a clear-cut separation into shape and Feshbach varieties, with the latter characterized by extremely long lifetimes (microseconds or longer).

  6. Changes in dose with segmentation of breast tissues in Monte Carlo calculations for low-energy brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Thomson, R. M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2011-08-15

    treatment volume is reasonably accurate because inaccuracies in photon energy fluence are compensated for by inaccuracies in localized dose scoring. If dose to fibroglandular tissue in the breast is of interest, then the inaccurate photon energy fluence calculated in an averaged tissue phantom will result in inaccurate DVHs and average doses for those tissues. Including calcifications necessitates the use of proper tissue segmentation.

  7. Geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations in Cartesian coordinates: accurate reduction in zero-point energy.

    PubMed

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2005-08-22

    An approach for the inclusion of geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations is introduced. An important aspect of the approach is that Cartesian coordinates are used throughout. We devised an algorithm for the constrained sampling of initial conditions through the use of multivariate Gaussian distribution based on a projected Hessian. We also propose an approach for the constrained evaluation of the so-called Herman-Kluk prefactor in its exact log-derivative form. Sample calculations are performed for free and constrained rare-gas trimers. The results show that the proposed approach provides an accurate evaluation of the reduction in zero-point energy. Exact basis set calculations are used to assess the accuracy of the semiclassical results. Since Cartesian coordinates are used, the approach is general and applicable to a variety of molecular and atomic systems.

  8. Full Dimensional Vibrational Calculations for Methane Using AN Accurate New AB Initio Based Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Moumita; Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker; Li, Jun; Guo, Hua; Manzhos, Sergei

    2014-06-01

    New potential energy surfaces for methane were constructed, represented as analytic fits to about 100,000 individual high-level ab initio data. Explicitly-correlated multireference data (MRCI-F12(AE)/CVQZ-F12) were computed using Molpro [1] and fit using multiple strategies. Fits with small to negligible errors were obtained using adaptations of the permutation-invariant-polynomials (PIP) approach [2,3] based on neural-networks (PIP-NN) [4,5] and the interpolative moving least squares (IMLS) fitting method [6] (PIP-IMLS). The PESs were used in full-dimensional vibrational calculations with an exact kinetic energy operator by representing the Hamiltonian in a basis of products of contracted bend and stretch functions and using a symmetry adapted Lanczos method to obtain eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Very close agreement with experiment was produced from the purely ab initio PESs. References 1- H.-J. Werner, P. J. Knowles, G. Knizia, 2012.1 ed. 2012, MOLPRO, a package of ab initio programs. see http://www.molpro.net. 2- Z. Xie and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Theory Comput 6, 26, 2010. 3- B. J. Braams and J. M. Bowman, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 28, 577, 2009. 4- J. Li, B. Jiang and Hua Guo, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 204103 (2013). 5- S Manzhos, X Wang, R Dawes and T Carrington, JPC A 110, 5295 (2006). 6- R. Dawes, X-G Wang, A.W. Jasper and T. Carrington Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134304 (2010).

  9. Impact of dose calculation accuracy during optimization on lung IMRT plan quality.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Rodrigues, Anna; Li, Taoran; Yuan, Lulin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q Jackie

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dose calculation accuracy and the use of an intermediate dose calculation step during the optimization of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning on the final plan quality for lung cancer patients. This study included replanning for 11 randomly selected free-breathing lung IMRT plans. The original plans were optimized using a fast pencil beam convolution algorithm. After optimization, the final dose calculation was performed using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA). The Varian Treatment Planning System (TPS) Eclipse v11, includes an option to perform intermediate dose calculation during optimization using the AAA. The new plans were created using this intermediate dose calculation during optimization with the same planning objectives and dose constraints as in the original plan. Differences in dosimetric parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage, organs-at-risk (OARs) dose sparing, and the number of monitor units (MU) between the original and new plans were analyzed. Statistical significance was determined with a p-value of less than 0.05. All plans were normalized to cover 95% of the PTV with the prescription dose. Compared with the original plans, the PTV in the new plans had on average a lower maximum dose (69.45 vs. 71.96Gy, p = 0.005), a better homogeneity index (HI) (0.08 vs. 0.12, p = 0.002), and a better conformity index (CI) (0.69 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). In the new plans, lung sparing was increased as the volumes receiving 5, 10, and 30 Gy were reduced when compared to the original plans (40.39% vs. 42.73%, p = 0.005; 28.93% vs. 30.40%, p = 0.001; 14.11%vs. 14.84%, p = 0.031). The volume receiving 20 Gy was not significantly lower (19.60% vs. 20.38%, p = 0.052). Further, the mean dose to the lung was reduced in the new plans (11.55 vs. 12.12 Gy, p = 0.024). For the esophagus, the mean dose, the maximum dose, and the volumes receiving 20 and 60 Gy were lower in

  10. Accurate calculation of absolute one-electron redox potentials of some para-quinone derivatives in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Namazian, Mansoor; Coote, Michelle L

    2007-08-02

    Standard ab initio molecular orbital theory and density functional theory calculations have been used to calculate absolute one-electron reduction potentials of several para-quinones in acetonitrile. The high-level composite method of G3(MP2)-RAD is used for the gas-phase calculations and a continuum model of solvation, CPCM, has been employed to calculate solvation energies. To compare the theoretical reduction potentials with experiment, the reduction potentials relative to a standard calomel electrode (SCE) have also been calculated and compared to experimental values. The average error of the calculated reduction potentials using the proposed method is 0.07 V without any additional approximation. An ONIOM method in which the core is studied at G3(MP2)-RAD and the substituent effect of the rest of the molecule is studied at R(O)MP2/6-311+G(3df,2p) provides an accurate low-cost alternative to G3(MP2)-RAD for larger molecules.

  11. Modifying scoping codes to accurately calculate TMI-cores with lifetimes greater than 500 effective full-power days

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, D.; Levine, S.L. ); Luoma, J.; Mahgerefteh, M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Three Mile Island unit 1 core reloads have been designed using fast but accurate scoping codes, PSUI-LEOPARD and ADMARC. PSUI-LEOPARD has been normalized to EPRI-CPM2 results and used to calculate the two-group constants, whereas ADMARC is a modern two-dimensional, two-group diffusion theory nodal code. Problems in accuracy were encountered for cycles 8 and higher as the core lifetime was increased beyond 500 effective full-power days. This is because the heavier loaded cores in both {sup 235}U and {sup 10}B have harder neutron spectra, which produces a change in the transport effect in the baffle reflector region, and the burnable poison (BP) simulations were not accurate enough for the cores containing the increased amount of {sup 10}B required in the BP rods. In the authors study, a technique has been developed to take into account the change in the transport effect in the baffle region by modifying the fast neutron diffusion coefficient as a function of cycle length and core exposure or burnup. A more accurate BP simulation method is also developed, using integral transport theory and CPM2 data, to calculate the BP contribution to the equivalent fuel assembly (supercell) two-group constants. The net result is that the accuracy of the scoping codes is as good as that produced by CASMO/SIMULATE or CPM2/SIMULATE when comparing with measured data.

  12. Accurate and efficient calculation of discrete correlation functions and power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. F.; Liu, J. M.; Zhu, W. D.

    2015-07-01

    Operational modal analysis (OMA), or output-only modal analysis, has been widely conducted especially when excitation applied on a structure is unknown or difficult to measure. Discrete cross-correlation functions and cross-power spectra between a reference data series and measured response data series are bases for OMA to identify modal properties of a structure. Such functions and spectra can be efficiently transformed from each other using the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and inverse DFT (IDFT) based on the cross-correlation theorem. However, a direct application of the theorem and transforms, including the DFT and IDFT, can yield physically erroneous results due to periodic extension of the DFT on a function of a finite length to be transformed, which is false most of the time. Padding zero series to ends of data series before applying the theorem and transforms can reduce the errors, but the results are still physically erroneous. A new methodology is developed in this work to calculate discrete cross-correlation functions of non-negative time delays and associated cross-power spectra, referred to as half spectra, for OMA. The methodology can be extended to cross-correlation functions of any time delays and associated cross-power spectra, referred to as full spectra. The new methodology is computationally efficient due to use of the transforms. Data series are properly processed to avoid the errors caused by the periodic extension, and the resulting cross-correlation functions and associated cross-power spectra perfectly comply with their definitions. A coherence function, a convergence function, and a convergence index are introduced to evaluate qualities of measured cross-correlation functions and associated cross-power spectra. The new methodology was numerically and experimentally applied to an ideal two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) mass-spring-damper system and a damaged aluminum beam, respectively, and OMA was conducted using half spectra to estimate

  13. Postimplant Dosimetry Using a Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Engine: A New Clinical Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Carrier, Jean-Francois . E-mail: jean-francois.carrier.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; D'Amours, Michel; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To use the Monte Carlo (MC) method as a dose calculation engine for postimplant dosimetry. To compare the results with clinically approved data for a sample of 28 patients. Two effects not taken into account by the clinical calculation, interseed attenuation and tissue composition, are being specifically investigated. Methods and Materials: An automated MC program was developed. The dose distributions were calculated for the target volume and organs at risk (OAR) for 28 patients. Additional MC techniques were developed to focus specifically on the interseed attenuation and tissue effects. Results: For the clinical target volume (CTV) D{sub 90} parameter, the mean difference between the clinical technique and the complete MC method is 10.7 Gy, with cases reaching up to 17 Gy. For all cases, the clinical technique overestimates the deposited dose in the CTV. This overestimation is mainly from a combination of two effects: the interseed attenuation (average, 6.8 Gy) and tissue composition (average, 4.1 Gy). The deposited dose in the OARs is also overestimated in the clinical calculation. Conclusions: The clinical technique systematically overestimates the deposited dose in the prostate and in the OARs. To reduce this systematic inaccuracy, the MC method should be considered in establishing a new standard for clinical postimplant dosimetry and dose-outcome studies in a near future.

  14. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams.

    PubMed

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities.

  15. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities. PMID:20126560

  16. Critical Appraisal of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Dose Calculation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical impact of the Acuros XB algorithm (implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment-planning system) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Methods and Materials: A CT dataset of 10 patients presenting with advanced NSCLC was selected and contoured for planning target volume, lungs, heart, and spinal cord. Plans were created for 6-MV and 15-MV beams using three-dimensional conformal therapy, intensity-modulated therapy, and volumetric modulated arc therapy with RapidArc. Calculations were performed with Acuros XB and the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm. To distinguish between differences coming from the different heterogeneity management and those coming from the algorithm and its implementation, all the plans were recalculated assigning Hounsfield Unit (HU) = 0 (Water) to the CT dataset. Results: Differences in dose distributions between the two algorithms calculated in Water were <0.5%. This suggests that the differences in the real CT dataset can be ascribed mainly to the different heterogeneity management, which is proven to be more accurate in the Acuros XB calculations. The planning target dose difference was stratified between the target in soft tissue, where the mean dose was found to be lower for Acuros XB, with a range of 0.4% {+-} 0.6% (intensity-modulated therapy, 6 MV) to 1.7% {+-} 0.2% (three-dimensional conformal therapy, 6 MV), and the target in lung tissue, where the mean dose was higher for 6 MV (from 0.2% {+-} 0.2% to 1.2% {+-} 0.5%) and lower for 15 MV (from 0.5% {+-} 0.5% to 2.0% {+-} 0.9%). Mean doses to organs at risk presented differences up to 3% of the mean structure dose in the worst case. No particular or systematic differences were found related to the various modalities. Calculation time ratios between calculation time for Acuros XB and the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm were 7 for three-dimensional conformal therapy, 5 for intensity-modulated therapy, and 0.2 for volumetric modulated arc therapy

  17. SU-E-T-27: A Tool for Routine Quality Assurance of Radiotherapy Dose Calculation Software

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, R; Cardan, R; Duan, J; Wu, X; Shen, S; Brezovich, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation software is thoroughly evaluated when it is commissioned; however, evaluation of periodic software updates is typically limited in scope due to staffing constraints and the need to quickly return the treatment planning system to clinical service. We developed a tool for quickly and comprehensively testing and documenting dose calculation software against measured data. Methods: A tool was developed using MatLab (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) for evaluation of dose calculation algorithms against measured data. Inputs to the tool are measured data, reference DICOM RT PLAN files describing the measurements, and dose calculations in DICOM format. The tool consists of a collection of extensible modules that can perform analysis of point dose, depth dose curves, and profiles using dose difference, distance-to-agreement, and the gamma-index. Each module generates a report subsection that is incorporated into a master template, which is converted to final form in portable document format (PDF). Results: After each change to the treatment planning system, a report can be generated in approximately 90 minutes. The tool has been in use for more than 5 years, spanning 5 versions of the eMC and 4 versions of the AAA. We have detected changes to the algorithms that affected clinical practice once during this period. Conclusion: Our tool provides an efficient method for quality assurance of dose calculation software, providing a complete set of tests for an update. Future work includes the addition of plan level tests, allowing incorporation of, for example, the TG-119 test suite for IMRT, and integration with the treatment planning system via an application programming interface. Integration with the planning system will permit fully-automated testing and reporting at scheduled intervals.

  18. SU-E-T-161: Evaluation of Dose Calculation Based On Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, T; Nakazawa, T; Saitou, Y; Nakata, A; Yano, M; Tateoka, K; Fujimoto, K; Sakata, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to convert pixel values in cone-beam CT (CBCT) using histograms of pixel values in the simulation CT (sim-CT) and the CBCT images and to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on the CBCT. Methods: The sim-CT and CBCT images immediately before the treatment of 10 prostate cancer patients were acquired. Because of insufficient calibration of the pixel values in the CBCT, it is difficult to be directly used for dose calculation. The pixel values in the CBCT images were converted using an in-house program. A 7 fields treatment plans (original plan) created on the sim-CT images were applied to the CBCT images and the dose distributions were re-calculated with same monitor units (MUs). These prescription doses were compared with those of original plans. Results: In the results of the pixel values conversion in the CBCT images,the mean differences of pixel values for the prostate,subcutaneous adipose, muscle and right-femur were −10.78±34.60, 11.78±41.06, 29.49±36.99 and 0.14±31.15 respectively. In the results of the calculated doses, the mean differences of prescription doses for 7 fields were 4.13±0.95%, 0.34±0.86%, −0.05±0.55%, 1.35±0.98%, 1.77±0.56%, 0.89±0.69% and 1.69±0.71% respectively and as a whole, the difference of prescription dose was 1.54±0.4%. Conclusion: The dose calculation on the CBCT images achieve an accuracy of <2% by using this pixel values conversion program. This may enable implementation of efficient adaptive radiotherapy.

  19. Benchmarking density-functional theory calculations of NMR shielding constants and spin-rotation constants using accurate coupled-cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Teale, Andrew M; Lutnæs, Ola B; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J; Gauss, Jürgen

    2013-01-14

    Accurate sets of benchmark nuclear-magnetic-resonance shielding constants and spin-rotation constants are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster singles-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the calculated coupled-cluster constants is established by a careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. Coupled-cluster basis-set convergence is analyzed and extrapolation techniques are employed to estimate basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. Together with the set provided for rotational g-tensors and magnetizabilities in our previous work [O. B. Lutnæs, A. M. Teale, T. Helgaker, D. J. Tozer, K. Ruud, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 144104 (2009)], it provides a substantial source of consistently calculated high-accuracy data on second-order magnetic response properties. The utility of this benchmark data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the existing approximate functionals provide an accuracy competitive with that provided by CCSD or CCSD(T) theory. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of Kohn-Sham calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. Routes to future improvements are discussed in light of this comparison.

  20. Interpretation and application of reaction class transition state theory for accurate calculation of thermokinetic parameters using isodesmic reaction method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bi-Yao; Li, Ze-Rong; Tan, Ning-Xin; Yao, Qian; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2013-04-25

    We present a further interpretation of reaction class transition state theory (RC-TST) proposed by Truong et al. for the accurate calculation of rate coefficients for reactions in a class. It is found that the RC-TST can be interpreted through the isodesmic reaction method, which is usually used to calculate reaction enthalpy or enthalpy of formation for a species, and the theory can also be used for the calculation of the reaction barriers and reaction enthalpies for reactions in a class. A correction scheme based on this theory is proposed for the calculation of the reaction barriers and reaction enthalpies for reactions in a class. To validate the scheme, 16 combinations of various ab initio levels with various basis sets are used as the approximate methods and CCSD(T)/CBS method is used as the benchmarking method in this study to calculate the reaction energies and energy barriers for a representative set of five reactions from the reaction class: R(c)CH(R(b))CR(a)CH2 + OH(•) → R(c)C(•)(R(b))CR(a)CH2 + H2O (R(a), R(b), and R(c) in the reaction formula represent the alkyl or hydrogen). Then the results of the approximate methods are corrected by the theory. The maximum values of the average deviations of the energy barrier and the reaction enthalpy are 99.97 kJ/mol and 70.35 kJ/mol, respectively, before correction and are reduced to 4.02 kJ/mol and 8.19 kJ/mol, respectively, after correction, indicating that after correction the results are not sensitive to the level of the ab initio method and the size of the basis set, as they are in the case before correction. Therefore, reaction energies and energy barriers for reactions in a class can be calculated accurately at a relatively low level of ab initio method using our scheme. It is also shown that the rate coefficients for the five representative reactions calculated at the BHandHLYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory via our scheme are very close to the values calculated at CCSD(T)/CBS level. Finally, reaction

  1. SU-F-BRF-14: Increasing the Accuracy of Dose Calculation On Cone-Beam Imaging Using Deformable Image Registration in the Case of Prostate Translation

    SciTech Connect

    Fillion, O; Gingras, L; Archambault, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Artifacts can reduce the quality of dose re-calculations on CBCT scans during a treatment. The aim of this project is to correct the CBCT images in order to allow for more accurate and exact dose calculations in the case of a translation of the tumor in prostate cancer. Methods: Our approach is to develop strategies based on deformable image registration algorithms using the elastix software (Klein et al., 2010) to register the treatment planning CT on a daily CBCT scan taken during treatment. Sets of images are provided by a 3D deformable phantom and comprise two CT and two CBCT scans: one of both with the reference anatomy and the others with known deformations (i.e. translations of the prostate). The reference CT is registered onto the deformed CBCT and the deformed CT serves as the control for dose calculation accuracy. The planned treatment used for the evaluation of dose calculation is a 2-Gy fraction prescribed at the location of the reference prostate and assigned to 7 rectangular fields. Results: For a realistic 0.5-cm translation of the prostate, the relative dose discrepancy between the CBCT and the CT control scan at the prostate's centroid is 8.9 ± 0.8 % while dose discrepancy between the registered CT and the control scan lessens to −2.4 ± 0.8 %. For a 2-cm translation, clinical indices like the V90 and the D100 are more accurate by 0.7 ± 0.3 % and 8.0 ± 0.5 cGy respectively when using registered CT than when using CBCT for dose calculation. Conclusion: The results show that this strategy gives doses in agreement within a few percents with those from calculations on actual CT scans. In the future, various deformations of the phantom anatomy will allow a thorough characterization of the registration strategies needed for more complex anatomies.

  2. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC.

    PubMed

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter

    2010-08-21

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm(2) of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d(max) and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm(2) at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose

  3. Radiation dose calculations for CT scans with tube current modulation using the approach to equilibrium function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The approach to equilibrium function has been used previously to calculate the radiation dose to a shift-invariant medium undergoing CT scans with constant tube current [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 5347–5352 (2012)]. The authors have adapted this method to CT scans with tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: For a scan with variable tube current, the scan range was divided into multiple subscan ranges, each with a nearly constant tube current. Then the dose calculation algorithm presented previously was applied. For a clinical CT scan series that presented tube current per slice, the authors adopted an efficient approach that computed the longitudinal dose distribution for one scan length equal to the slice thickness, which center was at z = 0. The cumulative dose at a specific point was a summation of the contributions from all slices and the overscan. Results: The dose calculations performed for a total of four constant and variable tube current distributions agreed with the published results of Dixon and Boone [Med. Phys. 40, 111920 (14pp.) (2013)]. For an abdomen/pelvis scan of an anthropomorphic phantom (model ATOM 701-B, CIRS, Inc., VA) on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 scanner with 120 kV, N × T = 20 mm, pitch = 1.375, z axis current modulation (auto mA), and angular current modulation (smart mA), dose measurements were performed using two lines of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters, one of which was placed near the phantom center and the other on the surface. Dose calculations were performed on the central and peripheral axes of a cylinder containing water, whose cross-sectional mass was about equal to that of the ATOM phantom in its abdominal region, and the results agreed with the measurements within 28.4%. Conclusions: The described method provides an effective approach that takes into account subject size, scan length, and constant or variable tube current to evaluate CT dose to a shift-invariant medium. For a clinical CT scan

  4. Dose Rate Calculations for the 2-MCO/2-DHLW Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    G. Radulescu

    2000-10-03

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the dose rates on the external surfaces of the waste package (WP) containing two Hanford defense high-level waste (DHLW) glass canisters and two Hanford multi-canister overpacks (MCO). Each MCO is loaded with the N Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the WP type considered in this calculation. The scope of this calculation is limited to reporting dose rates averaged over segments of the WP radial and axial surfaces and of surfaces 1 m and 2 m from the WP. The results of this calculation will be used to assess the shielding performance of the 2-MC012-DHLW WP engineering design.

  5. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  6. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, William P.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Rathkopf, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  7. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-22

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, {alpha}) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg {sup 10}B/g blood.

  8. A non-rigid point matching method with local topology preservation for accurate bladder dose summation in high dose rate cervical brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haibin; Zhong, Zichun; Liao, Yuliang; Pompoš, Arnold; Hrycushko, Brian; Albuquerque, Kevin; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-02-07

    GEC-ESTRO guidelines for high dose rate cervical brachytherapy advocate the reporting of the D2cc (the minimum dose received by the maximally exposed 2cc volume) to organs at risk. Due to large interfractional organ motion, reporting of accurate cumulative D2cc over a multifractional course is a non-trivial task requiring deformable image registration and deformable dose summation. To efficiently and accurately describe the point-to-point correspondence of the bladder wall over all treatment fractions while preserving local topologies, we propose a novel graphic processing unit (GPU)-based non-rigid point matching algorithm. This is achieved by introducing local anatomic information into the iterative update of correspondence matrix computation in the 'thin plate splines-robust point matching' (TPS-RPM) scheme. The performance of the GPU-based TPS-RPM with local topology preservation algorithm (TPS-RPM-LTP) was evaluated using four numerically simulated synthetic bladders having known deformations, a custom-made porcine bladder phantom embedded with twenty one fiducial markers, and 29 fractional computed tomography (CT) images from seven cervical cancer patients. Results show that TPS-RPM-LTP achieved excellent geometric accuracy with landmark residual distance error (RDE) of 0.7  ±  0.3 mm for the numerical synthetic data with different scales of bladder deformation and structure complexity, and 3.7  ±  1.8 mm and 1.6  ±  0.8 mm for the porcine bladder phantom with large and small deformation, respectively. The RDE accuracy of the urethral orifice landmarks in patient bladders was 3.7  ±  2.1 mm. When compared to the original TPS-RPM, the TPS-RPM-LTP improved landmark matching by reducing landmark RDE by 50  ±  19%, 37  ±  11% and 28  ±  11% for the synthetic, porcine phantom and the patient bladders, respectively. This was achieved with a computational time of less than 15 s in all cases

  9. A non-rigid point matching method with local topology preservation for accurate bladder dose summation in high dose rate cervical brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haibin; Zhong, Zichun; Liao, Yuliang; Pompoš, Arnold; Hrycushko, Brian; Albuquerque, Kevin; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-02-01

    GEC-ESTRO guidelines for high dose rate cervical brachytherapy advocate the reporting of the D2cc (the minimum dose received by the maximally exposed 2cc volume) to organs at risk. Due to large interfractional organ motion, reporting of accurate cumulative D2cc over a multifractional course is a non-trivial task requiring deformable image registration and deformable dose summation. To efficiently and accurately describe the point-to-point correspondence of the bladder wall over all treatment fractions while preserving local topologies, we propose a novel graphic processing unit (GPU)-based non-rigid point matching algorithm. This is achieved by introducing local anatomic information into the iterative update of correspondence matrix computation in the ‘thin plate splines-robust point matching’ (TPS-RPM) scheme. The performance of the GPU-based TPS-RPM with local topology preservation algorithm (TPS-RPM-LTP) was evaluated using four numerically simulated synthetic bladders having known deformations, a custom-made porcine bladder phantom embedded with twenty one fiducial markers, and 29 fractional computed tomography (CT) images from seven cervical cancer patients. Results show that TPS-RPM-LTP achieved excellent geometric accuracy with landmark residual distance error (RDE) of 0.7  ±  0.3 mm for the numerical synthetic data with different scales of bladder deformation and structure complexity, and 3.7  ±  1.8 mm and 1.6  ±  0.8 mm for the porcine bladder phantom with large and small deformation, respectively. The RDE accuracy of the urethral orifice landmarks in patient bladders was 3.7  ±  2.1 mm. When compared to the original TPS-RPM, the TPS-RPM-LTP improved landmark matching by reducing landmark RDE by 50  ±  19%, 37  ±  11% and 28  ±  11% for the synthetic, porcine phantom and the patient bladders, respectively. This was achieved with a computational time of less than 15 s in all cases

  10. Antenna modeling considerations for accurate SAR calculations in human phantoms in close proximity to GSM cellular base station antennas.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Marnus J; Bingle, Marianne; Meyer, Frans J C

    2005-09-01

    International bodies such as International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE) make provision for human exposure assessment based on SAR calculations (or measurements) and basic restrictions. In the case of base station exposure this is mostly applicable to occupational exposure scenarios in the very near field of these antennas where the conservative reference level criteria could be unnecessarily restrictive. This study presents a variety of critical aspects that need to be considered when calculating SAR in a human body close to a mobile phone base station antenna. A hybrid FEM/MoM technique is proposed as a suitable numerical method to obtain accurate results. The verification of the FEM/MoM implementation has been presented in a previous publication; the focus of this study is an investigation into the detail that must be included in a numerical model of the antenna, to accurately represent the real-world scenario. This is accomplished by comparing numerical results to measurements for a generic GSM base station antenna and appropriate, representative canonical and human phantoms. The results show that it is critical to take the disturbance effect of the human phantom (a large conductive body) on the base station antenna into account when the antenna-phantom spacing is less than 300 mm. For these small spacings, the antenna structure must be modeled in detail. The conclusion is that it is feasible to calculate, using the proposed techniques and methodology, accurate occupational compliance zones around base station antennas based on a SAR profile and basic restriction guidelines.

  11. Comprehensive evaluation and clinical implementation of commercially available Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aizhen; Wen, Ning; Nurushev, Teamour; Burmeister, Jay; Chetty, Indrin J

    2013-03-04

    A commercial electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm has become available in Eclipse treatment planning system. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the eMC algorithm and investigate the clinical implementation of this system. The beam modeling of the eMC algorithm was performed for beam energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV for a Varian Trilogy and all available applicator sizes in the Eclipse treatment planning system. The accuracy of the eMC algorithm was evaluated in a homogeneous water phantom, solid water phantoms containing lung and bone materials, and an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition, dose calculation accuracy was compared between pencil beam (PB) and eMC algorithms in the same treatment planning system for heterogeneous phantoms. The overall agreement between eMC calculations and measurements was within 3%/2 mm, while the PB algorithm had large errors (up to 25%) in predicting dose distributions in the presence of inhomogeneities such as bone and lung. The clinical implementation of the eMC algorithm was investigated by performing treatment planning for 15 patients with lesions in the head and neck, breast, chest wall, and sternum. The dose distributions were calculated using PB and eMC algorithms with no smoothing and all three levels of 3D Gaussian smoothing for comparison. Based on a routine electron beam therapy prescription method, the number of eMC calculated monitor units (MUs) was found to increase with increased 3D Gaussian smoothing levels. 3D Gaussian smoothing greatly improved the visual usability of dose distributions and produced better target coverage. Differences of calculated MUs and dose distributions between eMC and PB algorithms could be significant when oblique beam incidence, surface irregularities, and heterogeneous tissues were present in the treatment plans. In our patient cases, monitor unit differences of up to 7% were observed between PB and eMC algorithms. Monitor unit calculations were also preformed

  12. Reconstruction of high resolution MLC leaf positions using a low resolution detector for accurate 3D dose reconstruction in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.; Godart, J.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Langendijk, J. A.; van't Veld, A. A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    In pre-treatment dose verification, low resolution detector systems are unable to identify shifts of individual leafs of high resolution multi leaf collimator (MLC) systems from detected changes in the dose deposition. The goal of this study was to introduce an alternative approach (the shutter technique) combined with a previous described iterative reconstruction method to accurately reconstruct high resolution MLC leaf positions based on low resolution measurements. For the shutter technique, two additional radiotherapy treatment plans (RT-plans) were generated in addition to the original RT-plan; one with even MLC leafs closed for reconstructing uneven leaf positions and one with uneven MLC leafs closed for reconstructing even leaf positions. Reconstructed leaf positions were then implemented in the original RT-plan for 3D dose reconstruction. The shutter technique was evaluated for a 6 MV Elekta SLi linac with 5 mm MLC leafs (Agility™) in combination with the MatriXX Evolution detector with detector spacing of 7.62 mm. Dose reconstruction was performed with the COMPASS system (v2.0). The measurement setup allowed one row of ionization chambers to be affected by two adjacent leaf pairs. Measurements were obtained for various field sizes with MLC leaf position errors ranging from 1.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Furthermore, one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam with MLC introduced leaf position errors of 5.0 mm was evaluated to illustrate the impact of the shutter technique on 3D dose reconstruction. Without the shutter technique, MLC leaf position reconstruction showed reconstruction errors up to 6.0 mm. Introduction of the shutter technique allowed MLC leaf position reconstruction for the majority of leafs with sub-millimeter accuracy resulting in a reduction of dose reconstruction errors. The shutter technique in combination with the iterative reconstruction method allows high resolution MLC leaf position reconstruction using low resolution

  13. New explicit equations for the accurate calculation of the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R. C.; Coen, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    The traditional explicit growth equation has been widely used to calculate the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor. This paper reexamines the assumptions underlying the traditional equation and shows that large errors (10-30 percent in some cases) result if it is used carelessly. More accurate explicit equations are derived by approximating the saturation vapor-density difference as a quadratic rather than a linear function of the temperature difference between the particle and ambient air. These new equations, which reduce the error to less than a few percent, merit inclusion in a broad range of atmospheric models.

  14. Construction of new skin models and calculation of skin dose coefficients for electron exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2016-08-01

    The voxel-type reference phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), due to their limited voxel resolutions, cannot represent the 50- μm-thick radiosensitive target layer of the skin necessary for skin dose calculations. Alternatively, in ICRP Publication 116, the dose coefficients (DCs) for the skin were calculated approximately, averaging absorbed dose over the entire skin depth of the ICRP phantoms. This approximation is valid for highly-penetrating radiations such as photons and neutrons, but not for weakly penetrating radiations like electrons due to the high gradient in the dose distribution in the skin. To address the limitation, the present study introduces skin polygon-mesh (PM) models, which have been produced by converting the skin models of the ICRP voxel phantoms to a high-quality PM format and adding a 50- μm-thick radiosensitive target layer into the skin models. Then, the constructed skin PM models were implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code to calculate the skin DCs for external exposures of electrons. The calculated values were then compared with the skin DCs of the ICRP Publication 116. The results of the present study show that for high-energy electrons (≥ 1 MeV), the ICRP-116 skin DCs are, indeed, in good agreement with the skin DCs calculated in the present study. For low-energy electrons (< 1 MeV), however, significant discrepancies were observed, and the ICRP-116 skin DCs underestimated the skin dose as much as 15 times for some energies. Besides, regardless of the small tissue weighting factor of the skin ( w T = 0.01), the discrepancies in the skin dose were found to result in significant discrepancies in the effective dose, demonstarting that the effective DCs in ICRP-116 are not reliable for external exposure to electrons.

  15. Organ doses from environmental exposures calculated using voxel phantoms of adults and children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Endo, A.; Saito, K.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents effective and organ dose conversion coefficients for members of the public due to environmental external exposures, calculated using the ICRP adult male and female reference computational phantoms as well as voxel phantoms of a baby, two children and four adult individual phantoms--one male and three female, one of them pregnant. Dose conversion coefficients are given for source geometries representing environmental radiation exposures, i.e. whole body irradiations from a volume source in air, representing a radioactive cloud, a plane source in the ground at a depth of 0.5 g cm-2, representing ground contamination by radioactive fall-out, and uniformly distributed natural sources in the ground. The organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated employing the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc simulating the photon transport in the voxel phantoms, and are given as effective and equivalent doses normalized to air kerma free-in-air at height 1 m above the ground in Sv Gy-1. The findings showed that, in general, the smaller the body mass of the phantom, the higher the dose. The difference in effective dose between an adult and an infant is 80-90% at 50 keV and less than 40% above 100 keV. Furthermore, dose equivalent rates for photon exposures of several radionuclides for the above environmental exposures were calculated with the most recent nuclear decay data. Data are shown for effective dose, thyroid, colon and red bone marrow. The results are expected to facilitate regulation of exposure to radiation, relating activities of radionuclides distributed in air and ground to dose of the public due to external radiation as well as the investigation of the radiological effects of major radiation accidents such as the recent one in Fukushima and the decision making of several committees.

  16. Monte Carlo photon beam modeling and commissioning for radiotherapy dose calculation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Toutaoui, A; Ait chikh, S; Khelassi-Toutaoui, N; Hattali, B

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present work was a Monte Carlo verification of the Multi-grid superposition (MGS) dose calculation algorithm implemented in the CMS XiO (Elekta) treatment planning system and used to calculate the dose distribution produced by photon beams generated by the linear accelerator (linac) Siemens Primus. The BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc (EGSnrc package) Monte Carlo model of the linac head was used as a benchmark. In the first part of the work, the BEAMnrc was used for the commissioning of a 6 MV photon beam and to optimize the linac description to fit the experimental data. In the second part, the MGS dose distributions were compared with DOSXYZnrc using relative dose error comparison and γ-index analysis (2%/2 mm, 3%/3 mm), in different dosimetric test cases. Results show good agreement between simulated and calculated dose in homogeneous media for square and rectangular symmetric fields. The γ-index analysis confirmed that for most cases the MGS model and EGSnrc doses are within 3% or 3 mm.

  17. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distributions in oligometastatic patients planned for spine stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moiseenko, V; Liu, M; Loewen, S; Kosztyla, R; Vollans, E; Lucido, J; Fong, M; Vellani, R; Popescu, I A

    2013-10-21

    Dosimetric consequences of plans optimized using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy were evaluated by re-calculating with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo. Six patients with spinal vertebral metastases were planned using volumetric modulated arc therapy. The planning goal was to cover at least 80% of the planning target volume with a prescribed dose of 35 Gy in five fractions. Tissue heterogeneity-corrected AAA dose distributions for the planning target volume and spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume were compared against those obtained from Monte Carlo. The results showed that the AAA overestimated planning target volume coverage with the prescribed dose by up to 13.5% (mean 8.3% +/- 3.2%) when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Maximum dose to spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume calculated with Monte Carlo was consistently smaller than calculated with the treatment planning system and remained under spinal cord dose tolerance. Differences in dose distribution appear to be related to the dosimetric effects of accounting for body composition in Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the treatment planning system assumes that all tissues are water-equivalent in their composition and only differ in their electron density.

  18. Clinical implementation of full Monte Carlo dose calculation in proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Hongyu; Parodi, Katia; Slopsema, Roelf; Engelsman, Martijn

    2008-09-07

    The goal of this work was to facilitate the clinical use of Monte Carlo proton dose calculation to support routine treatment planning and delivery. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to simulate the treatment head setup, including a time-dependent simulation of modulator wheels (for broad beam modulation) and magnetic field settings (for beam scanning). Any patient-field-specific setup can be modeled according to the treatment control system of the facility. The code was benchmarked against phantom measurements. Using a simulation of the ionization chamber reading in the treatment head allows the Monte Carlo dose to be specified in absolute units (Gy per ionization chamber reading). Next, the capability of reading CT data information was implemented into the Monte Carlo code to model patient anatomy. To allow time-efficient dose calculation, the standard Geant4 tracking algorithm was modified. Finally, a software link of the Monte Carlo dose engine to the patient database and the commercial planning system was established to allow data exchange, thus completing the implementation of the proton Monte Carlo dose calculation engine ('DoC++'). Monte Carlo re-calculated plans are a valuable tool to revisit decisions in the planning process. Identification of clinically significant differences between Monte Carlo and pencil-beam-based dose calculations may also drive improvements of current pencil-beam methods. As an example, four patients (29 fields in total) with tumors in the head and neck regions were analyzed. Differences between the pencil-beam algorithm and Monte Carlo were identified in particular near the end of range, both due to dose degradation and overall differences in range prediction due to bony anatomy in the beam path. Further, the Monte Carlo reports dose-to-tissue as compared to dose-to-water by the planning system. Our implementation is tailored to a specific Monte Carlo code and the treatment planning system XiO (Computerized Medical Systems Inc

  19. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Radiation Track Structure and Calculation of Dose Deposition in Nanovolumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, I.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The radiation track structure is of crucial importance to understand radiation damage to molecules and subsequent biological effects. Of a particular importance in radiobiology is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) by ionizing radiation, which are caused by clusters of lesions in DNA, and oxidative damage to cellular constituents leading to aberrant signaling cascades. DSB can be visualized within cell nuclei with gamma-H2AX experiments. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In DSB induction models, the DSB probability is usually calculated by the local dose obtained from a radial dose profile of HZE tracks. In this work, the local dose imparted by HZE ions is calculated directly from the 3D Monte-Carlo simulation code RITRACKS. A cubic volume of 5 micron edge (Figure 1) is irradiated by a (Fe26+)-56 ion of 1 GeV/amu (LET approx.150 keV/micron) and by a fluence of 450 H+ ions, 300 MeV/amu (LET approx. 0.3 keV/micron). In both cases, the dose deposited in the volume is approx.1 Gy. The dose is then calculated into each 3D pixels (voxels) of 20 nm edge and visualized in 3D. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The dose is deposited uniformly in the volume by the H+ ions. The voxels which receive a high dose (orange) corresponds to electron track ends. The dose is deposited differently by the 56Fe26+ ion. Very high dose (red) is deposited in voxels with direct ion traversal. Voxels with electron track ends (orange) are also found distributed around the path of the track. In both cases, the appearance of the dose distribution looks very similar to DSBs seen in gammaH2AX experiments, particularly when the visualization threshold is applied. CONCLUSION: The refinement of the dose calculation to the nanometer scale has revealed important differences in the energy deposition between high- and low-LET ions. Voxels of very high dose are only found in the path of high-LET ions. Interestingly, experiments have shown that DSB induced by high-LET radiation are more difficult to

  20. SU-E-J-60: Efficient Monte Carlo Dose Calculation On CPU-GPU Heterogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, K; Chen, D. Z; Hu, X. S; Zhou, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well-known that the performance of GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation implementations is bounded by memory bandwidth. One major cause of this bottleneck is the random memory writing patterns in dose deposition, which leads to several memory efficiency issues on GPU such as un-coalesced writing and atomic operations. We propose a new method to alleviate such issues on CPU-GPU heterogeneous systems, which achieves overall performance improvement for Monte Carlo dose calculation. Methods: Dose deposition is to accumulate dose into the voxels of a dose volume along the trajectories of radiation rays. Our idea is to partition this procedure into the following three steps, which are fine-tuned for CPU or GPU: (1) each GPU thread writes dose results with location information to a buffer on GPU memory, which achieves fully-coalesced and atomic-free memory transactions; (2) the dose results in the buffer are transferred to CPU memory; (3) the dose volume is constructed from the dose buffer on CPU. We organize the processing of all radiation rays into streams. Since the steps within a stream use different hardware resources (i.e., GPU, DMA, CPU), we can overlap the execution of these steps for different streams by pipelining. Results: We evaluated our method using a Monte Carlo Convolution Superposition (MCCS) program and tested our implementation for various clinical cases on a heterogeneous system containing an Intel i7 quad-core CPU and an NVIDIA TITAN GPU. Comparing with a straightforward MCCS implementation on the same system (using both CPU and GPU for radiation ray tracing), our method gained 2-5X speedup without losing dose calculation accuracy. Conclusion: The results show that our new method improves the effective memory bandwidth and overall performance for MCCS on the CPU-GPU systems. Our proposed method can also be applied to accelerate other Monte Carlo dose calculation approaches. This research was supported in part by NSF under Grants CCF

  1. Dose Calculation For Accidental Release Of Radioactive Cloud Passing Over Jeddah

    SciTech Connect

    Alharbi, N. D.; Mayhoub, A. B.

    2011-12-26

    For the evaluation of doses after the reactor accident, in particular for the inhalation dose, a thorough knowledge of the concentration of the various radionuclide in air during the passage of the plume is required. In this paper we present an application of the Gaussian Plume Model (GPM) to calculate the atmospheric dispersion and airborne radionuclide concentration resulting from radioactive cloud over the city of Jeddah (KSA). The radioactive cloud is assumed to be emitted from a reactor of 10 MW power in postulated accidental release. Committed effective doses (CEDs) to the public at different distance from the source to the receptor are calculated. The calculations were based on meteorological condition and data of the Jeddah site. These data are: pasquill atmospheric stability is the class B and the wind speed is 2.4m/s at 10m height in the N direction. The residence time of some radionuclides considered in this study were calculated. The results indicate that, the values of doses first increase with distance, reach a maximum value and then gradually decrease. The total dose received by human is estimated by using the estimated values of residence time of each radioactive pollutant at different distances.

  2. SU-E-T-196: Comparative Analysis of Surface Dose Measurements Using MOSFET Detector and Dose Predicted by Eclipse - AAA with Varying Dose Calculation Grid Size

    SciTech Connect

    Badkul, R; Nejaiman, S; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Kumar, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Skin dose can be the limiting factor and fairly common reason to interrupt the treatment, especially for treating head-and-neck with Intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy(IMRT) or Volumetrically-modulated - arc-therapy (VMAT) and breast with tangentially-directed-beams. Aim of this study was to investigate accuracy of near-surface dose predicted by Eclipse treatment-planning-system (TPS) using Anisotropic-Analytic Algorithm (AAA)with varying calculation grid-size and comparing with metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistors(MOSFETs)measurements for a range of clinical-conditions (open-field,dynamic-wedge, physical-wedge, IMRT,VMAT). Methods: QUASAR™-Body-Phantom was used in this study with oval curved-surfaces to mimic breast, chest wall and head-and-neck sites.A CT-scan was obtained with five radio-opaque markers(ROM) placed on the surface of phantom to mimic the range of incident angles for measurements and dose prediction using 2mm slice thickness.At each ROM, small structure(1mmx2mm) were contoured to obtain mean-doses from TPS.Calculations were performed for open-field,dynamic-wedge,physical-wedge,IMRT and VMAT using Varian-21EX,6&15MV photons using twogrid-sizes:2.5mm and 1mm.Calibration checks were performed to ensure that MOSFETs response were within ±5%.Surface-doses were measured at five locations and compared with TPS calculations. Results: For 6MV: 2.5mm grid-size,mean calculated doses(MCD)were higher by 10%(±7.6),10%(±7.6),20%(±8.5),40%(±7.5),30%(±6.9) and for 1mm grid-size MCD were higher by 0%(±5.7),0%(±4.2),0%(±5.5),1.2%(±5.0),1.1% (±7.8) for open-field,dynamic-wedge,physical-wedge,IMRT,VMAT respectively.For 15MV: 2.5mm grid-size,MCD were higher by 30%(±14.6),30%(±14.6),30%(±14.0),40%(±11.0),30%(±3.5)and for 1mm grid-size MCD were higher by 10% (±10.6), 10%(±9.8),10%(±8.0),30%(±7.8),10%(±3.8) for open-field, dynamic-wedge, physical-wedge, IMRT, VMAT respectively.For 6MV, 86% and 56% of all measured values

  3. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to compare D{sub m,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D{sub w,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether applying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Methods: Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D{sub w,m} over D{sub m,m} are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using {sup 103}Pd) and prostate (using {sup 125}I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D{sub 90} values are compared for D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m}. Results: (1) Differences (D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m}-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D{sub 90(w

  4. Possible calcium centers for hydrogen storage applications: An accurate many-body study by AFQMC calculations with large basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, Wirawan; Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei; Virgus, Yudistira

    2011-03-01

    Weak H2 physisorption energies present a significant challenge to first-principle theoretical modeling and prediction of materials for H storage. There has been controversy regarding the accuracy of DFT on systems involving Ca cations. We use the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method to accurately predict the binding energy of Ca + , - 4{H}2 . AFQMC scales as Nbasis3and has demonstrated accuracy similar to or better than the gold-standard coupled cluster CCSD(T) method. We apply a modified Cholesky decomposition to achieve efficient Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation in AFQMC at large basis sizes. We employ the largest correlation consistent basis sets available, up to Ca/cc-pCV5Z, to extrapolate to the complete basis limit. The calculated potential energy curve exhibits binding with a double-well structure. Supported by DOE and NSF. Calculations were performed at OLCF Jaguar and CPD.

  5. Validation of fast Monte Carlo dose calculation in small animal radiotherapy with EBT3 radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Smekens, F.; Sarrut, D.; Passal, V.; Suhard, J.; Lisbona, A.; Paris, F.; Delpon, G.

    2016-05-01

    In preclinical studies, the absorbed dose calculation accuracy in small animals is fundamental to reliably investigate and understand observed biological effects. This work investigated the use of the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma based Monte Carlo dose calculation method for preclinical radiotherapy using a small animal precision micro irradiator, the X-RAD 225Cx. Monte Carlo modelling of the irradiator with GATE/GEANT4 was extensively evaluated by comparing measurements and simulations for half-value layer, percent depth dose, off-axis profiles and output factors in water and water-equivalent material for seven circular fields, from 20 mm down to 1 mm in diameter. Simulated and measured dose distributions in cylinders of water obtained for a 360° arc were also compared using dose, distance-to-agreement and gamma-index maps. Simulations and measurements agreed within 3% for all static beam configurations, with uncertainties estimated to 1% for the simulation and 3% for the measurements. Distance-to-agreement accuracy was better to 0.14 mm. For the arc irradiations, gamma-index maps of 2D dose distributions showed that the success rate was higher than 98%, except for the 0.1 cm collimator (92%). Using the seTLE method, MC simulations compute 3D dose distributions within minutes for realistic beam configurations with a clinically acceptable accuracy for beam diameter as small as 1 mm.

  6. The Mayak Worker Dosimetry System-2013: Treatment of Organ Masses in the Calculation of Organ Doses.

    PubMed

    Birchall, A; Sokolova, A B

    2017-01-10

    Previous Mayak worker epidemiological studies designed to quantify the risk of cancer following exposure to airborne plutonium have calculated organ doses by dividing the organ-absorbed energy by the individual's estimated organ mass. For living workers, this was done by using a relationship between organ mass and total mass and height. For autopsy cases, this was measured directly. In the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System-2013 study, organ doses are calculated by dividing this energy by a population average organ mass. The reasons for departing from previous methodologies are described in this note. The average organ masses that were used in the final analysis are tabulated for males and females.

  7. Applying graphics processor units to Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiari, M; Malhotra, H; Jones, M D; Chaudhary, V; Walters, J P; Nazareth, D

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the potential in using of using a graphics processor unit (GPU) for Monte-Carlo (MC)-based radiation dose calculations. The percent depth dose (PDD) of photons in a medium with known absorption and scattering coefficients is computed using a MC simulation running on both a standard CPU and a GPU. We demonstrate that the GPU's capability for massive parallel processing provides a significant acceleration in the MC calculation, and offers a significant advantage for distributed stochastic simulations on a single computer. Harnessing this potential of GPUs will help in the early adoption of MC for routine planning in a clinical environment.

  8. Efficient independent planar dose calculation for FFF IMRT QA with a bivariate Gaussian source model.

    PubMed

    Li, Feifei; Park, Ji-Yeon; Barraclough, Brendan; Lu, Bo; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to perform a direct comparison of the source model for photon beams with and without flattening filter (FF) and to develop an efficient independent algorithm for planar dose calculation for FF-free (FFF) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA). The source model consisted of a point source modeling the primary photons and extrafocal bivariate Gaussian functions modeling the head scatter, monitor chamber backscatter, and collimator exchange effect. The model parameters were obtained by minimizing the difference between the calculated and measured in-air output factors (Sc ). The fluence of IMRT beams was calculated from the source model using a backprojection and integration method. The off-axis ratio in FFF beams were modeled with a fourth degree polynomial. An analytical kernel consisting of the sum of three Gaussian functions was used to describe the dose deposition process. A convolution-based method was used to account for the ionization chamber volume averaging effect when commissioning the algorithm. The algorithm was validated by comparing the calculated planar dose distributions of FFF head-and-neck IMRT plans with measurements performed with a 2D diode array. Good agreement between the measured and calculated Sc was achieved for both FF beams (<0.25%) and FFF beams (<0.10%). The relative contribution of the head-scattered photons reduced by 34.7% for 6 MV and 49.3% for 10 MV due to the removal of the FF. Superior agreement between the calculated and measured dose distribution was also achieved for FFF IMRT. In the gamma comparison with a 2%/2 mm criterion, the average passing rate was 96.2 ± 1.9% for 6 MV FFF and 95.5 ± 2.6% for 10 MV FFF. The efficient independent planar dose calculation algorithm is easy to implement and can be valuable in FFF IMRT QA.

  9. Highly accurate relativistic universal Gaussian basis set: Dirac-Fock-Coulomb calculations for atomic systems up to nobelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malli, G. L.; Da Silva, A. B. F.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki

    1994-10-01

    A universal Gaussian basis set is developed that leads to relativistic Dirac-Fock SCF energies of comparable accuracy as that obtained by the accurate numerical finite-difference method (GRASP2 package) [J. Phys. B 25, 1 (1992)]. The Gaussian-type functions of our universal basis set satisfy the relativistic boundary conditions associated with the finite nuclear model for a finite speed of light and conform to the so-called kinetic balance at the nonrelativistic limit. We attribute the exceptionally high accuracy obtained in our calculations to the fact that the representation of the relativistic dynamics of an electron in a spherical ball finite nucleus near the origin in terms of our universal Gaussian basis set is as accurate as that provided by the numerical finite-difference method. Results of the Dirac-Fock-Coulomb energies for a number of atoms up to No (Z=102) and some negative ions are presented and compared with the recent results obtained with the numerical finite-difference method and geometrical Gaussian basis sets by Parpia, Mohanty, and Clementi [J. Phys. B 25, 1 (1992)]. The accuracy of our calculations is estimated to be within a few parts in 109 for all the atomic systems studied.

  10. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R.; Crone, Wendy C.; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  11. Calculation of Dose Deposition in 3D Voxels by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The biological response to high-LET radiation is very different from low-LET radiation, and can be partly attributed to the energy deposition by the radiation. Several experiments, notably detection of gamma-H2AX foci by immunofluorescence, has revealed important differences in the nature and in the spatial distribution of double-strand breaks (DSB) induced by low- and high-LET radiations. Many calculations, most of which are based on amorphous track models with radial dose, have been combined with chromosome models to calculate the number and distribution of DSB within nuclei and chromosome aberrations. In this work, the Monte-Carlo track structure simulation code RITRACKS have been used to calculate directly the energy deposition in voxels (3D pixels). A cubic volume of 5 micrometers of side was irradiated by 1) 450 (1)H+ ions of 300 MeV (LET is approximately 0.3 keV/micrometer) and 2) by 1 (56)Fe26+ ion of 1 GeV/amu (LET is approximately 150 keV/micrometer). In both cases, the dose deposited in the volume is approximately 1 Gy. All energy deposition events are recorded and dose is calculated in voxels of 20 micrometers of side. The voxels are then visualized in 3D by using a color scale to represent the intensity of the dose in a voxel. This simple approach has revealed several important points which may help understand experimental observations. In both simulations, voxels which receive low dose are the most numerous, and those corresponding to electron track ends received a dose which is in the higher range. The dose voxels are distributed randomly and scattered uniformly within the volume irradiated by low-LET radiation. The distribution of the voxels shows major differences for the (56)Fe26+ ion. The track structure can still be seen, and voxels with much higher dose are found in the region corresponding to the track "core". These high-dose voxels are not found in the low-LET irradiation simulation and may be responsible for DSB that are more difficult to

  12. A Review on the Use of Grid-Based Boltzmann Equation Solvers for Dose Calculation in External Photon Beam Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Monica W. K.; Yu, Peter K. N.; Leung, Lucullus H. T.

    2013-01-01

    Deterministic linear Boltzmann transport equation (D-LBTE) solvers have recently been developed, and one of the latest available software codes, Acuros XB, has been implemented in a commercial treatment planning system for radiotherapy photon beam dose calculation. One of the major limitations of most commercially available model-based algorithms for photon dose calculation is the ability to account for the effect of electron transport. This induces some errors in patient dose calculations, especially near heterogeneous interfaces between low and high density media such as tissue/lung interfaces. D-LBTE solvers have a high potential of producing accurate dose distributions in and near heterogeneous media in the human body. Extensive previous investigations have proved that D-LBTE solvers were able to produce comparable dose calculation accuracy as Monte Carlo methods with a reasonable speed good enough for clinical use. The current paper reviews the dosimetric evaluations of D-LBTE solvers for external beam photon radiotherapy. This content summarizes and discusses dosimetric validations for D-LBTE solvers in both homogeneous and heterogeneous media under different circumstances and also the clinical impact on various diseases due to the conversion of dose calculation from a conventional convolution/superposition algorithm to a recently released D-LBTE solver. PMID:24066294

  13. SU-E-T-639: Proton Dose Calculation for Irregular Motion Using a Sliding Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J; Gueorguiev, G; Grassberger, C; Paganetti, H; Sharp, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While many techniques exist to evaluate dose to regularly moving lung targets, there are few available to calculate dose at tumor positions not present in the 4DCT. We have previously developed a method that extrapolates an existing dose to a new tumor location. In this abstract, we present a novel technique that accounts for relative anatomical shifts at the chest wall interface. We also utilize this procedure to simulate breathing motion functions on a cohort of eleven patients. Amplitudes exceeding the original range of motion were used to evaluate coverage using several aperture and smearing beam settings. Methods: The water-equivalent depth (WED) technique requires an initial dose and CT image at the corresponding tumor position. Each dose volume was converted from its Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space. The sliding chest wall interface was determined by converting the lung contour into this same space. Any dose proximal to the initial boundary of the warped lung contour was held fixed, while the remaining distal dose was moved in the direction of motion along the interface. Results: V95 coverage was computed for each patient using the updated algorithm. Incorporation of the sliding motion yielded large dose differences, with gamma pass rates as low as 69.7% (3mm, 3%) and V95 coverage differences up to 2.0%. Clinical coverage was maintained for most patients with 5 mm excess simulated breathing motion, and up to 10 mm of excess motion was tolerated for a subset of patients and beam settings. Conclusion: We have established a method to determine the maximum allowable excess breathing motion for a given plan on a patient-by-patient basis. By integrating a sliding chest wall interface into our dose calculation technique, we have analyzed the robustness of breathing patterns that differ during treatment from at the time of 4DCT acquisition.

  14. A pre–postintervention study to evaluate the impact of dose calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Anas; Cavell, Gillian; Hinton, James; Wade, Paul; Whittlesea, Cate

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gentamicin and vancomycin are narrow-therapeutic-index antibiotics with potential for high toxicity requiring dose individualisation and continuous monitoring. Clinical decision support (CDS) tools have been effective in reducing gentamicin and vancomycin dosing errors. Online dose calculators for these drugs were implemented in a London National Health Service hospital. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses. Methods The study used a pre–postintervention design. Data were collected using electronic patient records and paper notes. Random samples of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses administered during the 8 months before implementation of the calculators were assessed retrospectively against hospital guidelines. Following implementation of the calculators, doses were assessed prospectively. Any gentamicin dose not within ±10% and any vancomycin dose not within ±20% of the guideline-recommended dose were considered incorrect. Results The intranet calculator pages were visited 721 times (gentamicin=333; vancomycin=388) during the 2-month period following the calculators’ implementation. Gentamicin dose errors fell from 61.5% (120/195) to 44.2% (95/215), p<0.001. Incorrect vancomycin loading doses fell from 58.1% (90/155) to 32.4% (46/142), p<0.001. Incorrect vancomycin first maintenance doses fell from 55.5% (86/155) to 33.1% (47/142), p<0.001. Loading and first maintenance vancomycin doses were both incorrect in 37.4% (58/155) of patients before and 13.4% (19/142) after calculator implementation, p<0.001. Conclusions This study suggests that gentamicin and vancomycin dose calculators significantly improved the prescribing of initial doses of these agents. Therefore, healthcare organisations should consider using such CDS tools to support the prescribing of these high-risk drugs. PMID:26044758

  15. Calculation of organ doses in x-ray examinations of premature babies.

    PubMed

    Smans, Kristien; Tapiovaara, Markku; Cannie, Mieke; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Smet, Marleen; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-02-01

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Knowledge of the radiation dose is therefore necessary to justify the exposures. To calculate doses in the entire body and in specific organs, computational models of the human anatomy are needed. Using medical imaging techniques, voxel phantoms have been developed to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties. In this study two voxel phantoms, representing prematurely born babies, were created from computed tomography- and magnetic resonance images: Phantom 1 (1910 g) and Phantom 2 (590 g). The two voxel phantoms were used in Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to assess organ doses. The results were compared with the commercially available software package PCXMC in which the available mathematical phantoms can be downsized toward the prematurely born baby. The simple phantom-scaling method used in PCXMC seems to be sufficient to calculate doses for organs within the radiation field. However, one should be careful in specifying the irradiation geometry. Doses in organs that are wholly or partially outside the primary radiation field depend critically on the irradiation conditions and the phantom model.

  16. The validation of tomotherapy dose calculations in low-density lung media.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Summer R; Pechenaya, Olga L; Goddu, S Murty; Mutic, Sasa; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Low, Daniel

    2009-04-21

    The dose-calculation accuracy of the tomotherapy Hi-Art II(R) (Tomotherapy, Inc., Madison, WI) treatment planning system (TPS) in the presence of low-density lung media was investigated. In this evaluation, a custom-designed heterogeneous phantom mimicking the mediastinum geometry was used. Gammex LN300 and balsa wood were selected as two lung-equivalent materials with different densities. Film analysis and ionization chamber measurements were performed. Treatment plans for esophageal cancers were used in the evaluation. The agreement between the dose calculated by the TPS and the dose measured via ionization chambers was, in most cases, within 0.8%. Gamma analysis using 3% and 3 mm criteria for radiochromic film dosimetry showed that 98% and 95% of the measured dose distribution had passing gamma values < or =1 for LN300 and balsa wood, respectively. For a homogeneous water-equivalent phantom, 95% of the points passed the gamma test. It was found that for the interface between the low-density medium and water-equivalent medium, the TPS calculated the dose distribution within acceptable limits. The phantom developed for this work enabled detailed quality-assurance testing under realistic conditions with heterogeneous media.

  17. Calculation of organ doses in x-ray examinations of premature babies

    SciTech Connect

    Smans, Kristien; Tapiovaara, Markku; Cannie, Mieke; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Smet, Marleen; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-02-15

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Knowledge of the radiation dose is therefore necessary to justify the exposures. To calculate doses in the entire body and in specific organs, computational models of the human anatomy are needed. Using medical imaging techniques, voxel phantoms have been developed to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties. In this study two voxel phantoms, representing prematurely born babies, were created from computed tomography- and magnetic resonance images: Phantom 1 (1910 g) and Phantom 2 (590 g). The two voxel phantoms were used in Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to assess organ doses. The results were compared with the commercially available software package PCXMC in which the available mathematical phantoms can be downsized toward the prematurely born baby. The simple phantom-scaling method used in PCXMC seems to be sufficient to calculate doses for organs within the radiation field. However, one should be careful in specifying the irradiation geometry. Doses in organs that are wholly or partially outside the primary radiation field depend critically on the irradiation conditions and the phantom model.

  18. Radiation therapy for stage IIA and IIB testicular seminoma: peripheral dose calculations and risk assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theocharris; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to calculate the peripheral dose to critical structures and assess the radiation risks from modern radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB testicular seminoma. A Monte Carlo code was used for treatment simulation on a computational phantom representing an average adult. The initial treatment phase involved anteroposterior and posteroanaterior modified dog-leg fields exposing para-aortic and ipsilateral iliac lymph nodes followed by a cone-down phase for nodal mass irradiation. Peripheral doses were calculated using different modified dog-leg field dimensions and an extended conventional dog-leg portal. The risk models of the BEIR-VII report and ICRP-103 were combined with dosimetric calculations to estimate the probability of developing stochastic effects. Radiotherapy for stage IIA seminoma with a target dose of 30 Gy resulted in a range of 23.0-603.7 mGy to non-targeted peripheral tissues and organs. The corresponding range for treatment of stage IIB disease to a cumulative dose of 36 Gy was 24.2-633.9 mGy. A dose variation of less than 13% was found by altering the field dimensions. Radiotherapy with the conventional instead of the modern modified dog-leg field increased the peripheral dose up to 8.2 times. The calculated heart doses of 589.0-632.9 mGy may increase the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases whereas the testicular dose of more than 231.9 mGy may lead to a temporary infertility. The probability of birth abnormalities in the offspring of cancer survivors was below 0.13% which is much lower than the spontaneous mutation rate. Abdominoplevic irradiation may increase the lifetime intrinsic risk for the induction of secondary malignancies by 0.6-3.9% depending upon the site of interest, patient’s age and tumor dose. Radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB seminoma with restricted fields and low doses is associated with an increased morbidity. These data may allow the definition of a risk-adapted follow-up scheme for long

  19. Head-and-neck IMRT treatments assessed with a Monte Carlo dose calculation engine.

    PubMed

    Seco, J; Adams, E; Bidmead, M; Partridge, M; Verhaegen, F

    2005-03-07

    IMRT is frequently used in the head-and-neck region, which contains materials of widely differing densities (soft tissue, bone, air-cavities). Conventional methods of dose computation for these complex, inhomogeneous IMRT cases involve significant approximations. In the present work, a methodology for the development, commissioning and implementation of a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine for intensity modulated radiotherapy (MC-IMRT) is proposed which can be used by radiotherapy centres interested in developing MC-IMRT capabilities for research or clinical evaluations. The method proposes three levels for developing, commissioning and maintaining a MC-IMRT dose calculation engine: (a) development of a MC model of the linear accelerator, (b) validation of MC model for IMRT and (c) periodic quality assurance (QA) of the MC-IMRT system. The first step, level (a), in developing an MC-IMRT system is to build a model of the linac that correctly predicts standard open field measurements for percentage depth-dose and off-axis ratios. Validation of MC-IMRT, level (b), can be performed in a rando phantom and in a homogeneous water equivalent phantom. Ultimately, periodic quality assurance of the MC-IMRT system is needed to verify the MC-IMRT dose calculation system, level (c). Once the MC-IMRT dose calculation system is commissioned it can be applied to more complex clinical IMRT treatments. The MC-IMRT system implemented at the Royal Marsden Hospital was used for IMRT calculations for a patient undergoing treatment for primary disease with nodal involvement in the head-and-neck region (primary treated to 65 Gy and nodes to 54 Gy), while sparing the spinal cord, brain stem and parotid glands. Preliminary MC results predict a decrease of approximately 1-2 Gy in the median dose of both the primary tumour and nodal volumes (compared with both pencil beam and collapsed cone). This is possibly due to the large air-cavity (the larynx of the patient) situated in the centre

  20. Head-and-neck IMRT treatments assessed with a Monte Carlo dose calculation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, J.; Adams, E.; Bidmead, M.; Partridge, M.; Verhaegen, F.

    2005-03-01

    IMRT is frequently used in the head-and-neck region, which contains materials of widely differing densities (soft tissue, bone, air-cavities). Conventional methods of dose computation for these complex, inhomogeneous IMRT cases involve significant approximations. In the present work, a methodology for the development, commissioning and implementation of a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine for intensity modulated radiotherapy (MC-IMRT) is proposed which can be used by radiotherapy centres interested in developing MC-IMRT capabilities for research or clinical evaluations. The method proposes three levels for developing, commissioning and maintaining a MC-IMRT dose calculation engine: (a) development of a MC model of the linear accelerator, (b) validation of MC model for IMRT and (c) periodic quality assurance (QA) of the MC-IMRT system. The first step, level (a), in developing an MC-IMRT system is to build a model of the linac that correctly predicts standard open field measurements for percentage depth-dose and off-axis ratios. Validation of MC-IMRT, level (b), can be performed in a rando phantom and in a homogeneous water equivalent phantom. Ultimately, periodic quality assurance of the MC-IMRT system is needed to verify the MC-IMRT dose calculation system, level (c). Once the MC-IMRT dose calculation system is commissioned it can be applied to more complex clinical IMRT treatments. The MC-IMRT system implemented at the Royal Marsden Hospital was used for IMRT calculations for a patient undergoing treatment for primary disease with nodal involvement in the head-and-neck region (primary treated to 65 Gy and nodes to 54 Gy), while sparing the spinal cord, brain stem and parotid glands. Preliminary MC results predict a decrease of approximately 1-2 Gy in the median dose of both the primary tumour and nodal volumes (compared with both pencil beam and collapsed cone). This is possibly due to the large air-cavity (the larynx of the patient) situated in the centre

  1. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  2. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-21

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  3. Analysis of nominal dose-effect data with an advanced programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Baird, J B; Balster, R L

    1979-01-01

    A step by step procedure is described for programming the method of Bliss for analyzing nominal dose-effect data for use with an advanced programmable calculator. A comparison of the results using this method with the results of others shows a good correspondence.

  4. Dose Rate Calculations from Radioactive Vascular Stents: DPK Versus Exact MC Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodkov, S.; Möslang, A.; Vladimirov, P.

    Vascular stents activated with radioactive isotopes are planned to be used in clinical practice to prevent restenosis in human coronary arteries after balloon angioplasty. Medical stents are cylindrical meshes and their complex geometry is usually treated for energy dose calculation with approximate dose point kernel (DPK) approach. The important point missed in the DPK approach is the absence of the stent material and, hence, the absence of energy absorption inside the stent. We have performed a comparison between DPK and exact Monte Carlo calculations for some simplified stent models. It appears that DPK approximation significantly overestimates pike dose values especially for the case of γ-emitting sources. We suggest DPK kernel normalization, which minimizes the difference at relatively far distances, while significant discrepancies near the stent surface still remain.

  5. Individual Dose Calculations with Use of the Revised Techa River Dosimetry System TRDS-2009D

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    An updated deterministic version of the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS-2009D) has been developed to estimate individual doses from external exposure and intake of radionuclides for residents living on the Techa River contaminated as a result of radioactive releases from the Mayak plutonium facility in 1949–1956. The TRDS-2009D is designed as a flexible system that uses, depending on the input data for an individual, various elements of system databases to provide the dosimetric variables requested by the user. Several phases are included in the computation schedule. The first phase includes calculations with use of a common protocol for all cohort members based on village-average-intake functions and external dose rates; individual data on age, gender and history of residence are included in the first phase. This phase results in dose estimates similar to those obtained with system TRDS-2000 used previously to derive risks of health effects in the Techa River Cohort. The second phase includes refinement of individual internal doses for those persons who have had body-burden measurements or exposure parameters specific to the household where he/she lived on the Techa River. The third phase includes summation of individual doses from environmental exposure and from radiological examinations. The results of TRDS-2009D dose calculations have demonstrated for the ETRC members on average a moderate increase in RBM dose estimates (34%) and a minor increase (5%) in estimates of stomach dose. The calculations for the members of the ETROC indicated similar small changes for stomach, but significant increase in RBM doses (400%). Individual-dose assessments performed with use of TRDS-2009D have been provided to epidemiologists for exploratory risk analysis in the ETRC and ETROC. These data provide an opportunity to evaluate the possible impact on radiogenic risk of such factors as confounding exposure (environmental and medical), changes in the Techa River source

  6. SU-E-T-397: Include Organ Deformation Into Dose Calculation of Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Y; Shen, D; Chen, R; Wang, A; Lian, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is an important curative treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. In brachytherapy, rectal balloon is generally needed to adjust for unfavorable prostate position for seed placement. However, rectal balloon causes prostate deformation, which is not accounted for in dosimetric planning. Therefore, it is possible that brachytherapy dosimetry deviates significantly from initial plan when prostate returns to its non-deformed state (after procedure). The goal of this study is to develop a method to include prostate deformation into the treatment planning of brachytherapy dosimetry. Methods: We prospectively collected ultrasound images of prostate pre- and post- rectal balloon inflation from thirty five consecutive patients undergoing I-125 brachytherapy. Based on the cylinder coordinate systems, we learned the initial coordinate transformation parameters between the manual segmentations of both deformed and non-deformed prostates of each patient in training set. With the nearest-neighbor interpolation, we searched the best transformation between two coordinate systems to maximum the mutual information of deformed and non-deformed images. We then mapped the implanted seeds of five selected patients from the deformed prostate into non-deformed prostate. The seed position is marked on original pre-inflation US image and it is imported into VariSeed software for dose calculation. Results: The accuracy of image registration is 87.5% as quantified by Dice Index. The prostate coverage V100% dropped from 96.5±0.5% of prostate deformed plan to 91.9±2.6% (p<0.05) of non-deformed plan. The rectum V100% decreased from 0.44±0.26 cc to 0.10±0.18 cc (p<0.05). The dosimetry of the urethra showed mild change but not significant: V150% changed from 0.05±0.10 cc to 0.14±0.15 cc (p>0.05) and D1% changed from 212.9±37.3 Gy to 248.4±42.8 Gy (p>0.05). Conclusion: We have developed a deformable image registration method that allows

  7. Calculation of mean central dose in interstitial brachytherapy using Delaunay triangulation.

    PubMed

    Astrahan, M A; Streeter, O E; Jozsef, G

    2001-06-01

    In 1997 the ICRU published Report 58 "Dose and Volume Specification for Reporting Interstitial Therapy" with the objective of addressing the problem of absorbed dose specification for reporting contemporary interstitial therapy. One of the concepts proposed in that report is "mean central dose." The fundamental goal of the mean central dose (MCD) calculation is to obtain a single, readily reportable and intercomparable value which is representative of dose in regions of the implant "where the dose gradient approximates a plateau." Delaunay triangulation (DT) is a method used in computational geometry to partition the space enclosed by the convex hull of a set of distinct points P into a set of nonoverlapping cells. In the three-dimensional case, each point of P becomes a vertex of a tetrahedron and the result of the DT is a set of tetrahedra. All treatment planning for interstitial brachytherapy inherently requires that the location of the radioactive sources, or dwell positions in the case of HDR, be known or digitized. These source locations may be regarded as a set of points representing the implanted volume. Delaunay triangulation of the source locations creates a set of tetrahedra without manual intervention. The geometric centers of these tetrahedra define a new set of points which lie "in between" the radioactive sources and which are distributed uniformly over the volume of the implant. The arithmetic mean of the dose at these centers is a three dimensional analog of the two-dimensional triangulation and inspection methods proposed for calculating MCD in ICRU 58. We demonstrate that DT can be successfully incorporated into a computerized treatment planning system and used to calculate the MCD.

  8. Dose calculations using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study for photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Aurélien; Makovicka, Libor; Martin, Éric; Sauget, Marc; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Bahi, Jacques

    2008-04-01

    Direct dose calculations are a crucial requirement for Treatment Planning Systems. Some methods, such as Monte Carlo, explicitly model particle transport, others depend upon tabulated data or analytic formulae. However, their computation time is too lengthy for clinical use, or accuracy is insufficient, especially for recent techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy. Based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), a new solution is proposed and this work extends the properties of such an algorithm and is called NeuRad. Prior to any calculations, a first phase known as the learning process is necessary. Monte Carlo dose distributions in homogeneous media are used, and the ANN is then acquired. According to the training base, it can be used as a dose engine for either heterogeneous media or for an unknown material. In this report, two networks were created in order to compute dose distribution within a homogeneous phantom made of an unknown material and within an inhomogeneous phantom made of water and TA6V4 (titanium alloy corresponding to hip prosthesis). All NeuRad results were compared to Monte Carlo distributions. The latter required about 7 h on a dedicated cluster (10 nodes). NeuRad learning requires between 8 and 18 h (depending upon the size of the training base) on a single low-end computer. However, the results of dose computation with the ANN are available in less than 2 s, again using a low-end computer, for a 150×1×150 voxels phantom. In the case of homogeneous medium, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 1.7%. With a TA6V4 hip prosthesis bathed in water, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 4.1%. Further improvements in NeuRad will have to include full 3D calculations, inhomogeneity management and input definitions.

  9. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel.

    PubMed

    Herzog, H; Zilken, H; Niederbremer, A; Friedrich, W; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    1997-12-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%+/-18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%+/-6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach.

  10. A patient-specific Monte Carlo dose-calculation method for photon beams.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chui, C S; Lovelock, M

    1998-06-01

    A patient-specific, CT-based, Monte Carlo dose-calculation method for photon beams has been developed to correctly account for inhomogeneity in the patient. The method employs the EGS4 system to sample the interaction of radiation in the medium. CT images are used to describe the patient geometry and to determine the density and atomic number in each voxel. The user code (MCPAT) provides the data describing the incident beams, and performs geometry checking and energy scoring in patient CT images. Several variance reduction techniques have been implemented to improve the computation efficiency. The method was verified with measured data and other calculations, both in homogeneous and inhomogeneous media. The method was also applied to a lung treatment, where significant differences in dose distributions, especially in the low-density region, were observed when compared with the results using an equivalent pathlength method. Comparison of the DVHs showed that the Monte Carlo calculated plan predicted an underdose of nearly 20% to the target, while the maximum doses to the cord and the heart were increased by 25% and 33%, respectively. These results suggested that the Monte Carlo method may have an impact on treatment designs, and also that it can be used as a benchmark to assess the accuracy of other dose calculation algorithms. The computation time for the lung case employing five 15-MV wedged beams, with an approximate field size of 13 X 13 cm and the dose grid size of 0.375 cm, was less than 14 h on a 175-MHz computer with a standard deviation of 1.5% in the high-dose region.

  11. Probable solar flare doses encountered on an interplanetary mission as calculated by the MCFLARE code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.; Karp, I. M.

    1972-01-01

    The computer program, MCFLARE, uses Monte Carlo methods to simulate solar flare occurrences during an interplanetary space voyage. The total biological dose inside a shielded crew compartment due to the flares encountered during the voyage is determined. The computer program evaluates the doses obtained on a large number of trips having identical trajectories. From these results, a dose D sub p having a probability p of not being exceeded during the voyage can be determined as a function of p for any shield material configuration. To illustrate the use of the code, a trip to Mars and return is calculated, and estimated doses behind several thicknesses of aluminum shield and water shield are presented.

  12. Beta skin dose determination using TLDs, Monte-Carlo calculations, and extrapolation chamber.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shachar, B; Levine, S H; Hoffman, J M

    1989-12-01

    The beta doses produced by 90Sr-Y and 204 Tl beta sources were determined using three methods: Monte-Carlo calculations, measurements with TLDs, and measurements with an extrapolation chamber. Excellent agreement was obtained by all three methods, except a TLD nonlinear response to beta s was observed, which gives doses approximately 20% high for the 90Sr-Y source and 5% low for the 204Tl source. Also, analyses performed with low-energy beta s using these methods can determine errors in shield thickness covering TLD elements. Direct measurement of skin dose is not possible by the TLDs because the minimum shield thickness for the elements is 13 mg cm-2. A thinner shield for the elements must be used or the data must be extrapolated. Presently, thinner shields for TLD elements are not available, and the thick shields can lead to significant errors in skin dose when exposed to low-energy beta s.

  13. SU-E-T-313: The Accuracy of the Acuros XB Advanced Dose Calculation Algorithm for IMRT Dose Distributions in Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, F; Onizuka, R; Ohno, T; Tomiyama, Y; Hioki, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of the Acuros XB version 11 (AXB11) advanced dose calculation algorithm by comparing with Monte Caro (MC) calculations. The comparisons were performed with dose distributions for a virtual inhomogeneity phantom and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in head and neck. Methods: Recently, AXB based on Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation has been installed in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Oncology System, USA). The dose calculation accuracy of AXB11 was tested by the EGSnrc-MC calculations. In additions, AXB version 10 (AXB10) and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) were also used. First the accuracy of an inhomogeneity correction for AXB and AAA algorithms was evaluated by comparing with MC-calculated dose distributions for a virtual inhomogeneity phantom that includes water, bone, air, adipose, muscle, and aluminum. Next the IMRT dose distributions for head and neck were compared with the AXB and AAA algorithms and MC by means of dose volume histograms and three dimensional gamma analysis for each structure (CTV, OAR, etc.). Results: For dose distributions with the virtual inhomogeneity phantom, AXB was in good agreement with those of MC, except the dose in air region. The dose in air region decreased in order of MCdose kernel of water, the doses in regions for air, bone, and aluminum considerably became higher than those of AXB and MC. The pass rates of the gamma analysis for IMRT dose distributions in head and neck were similar to those of MC in order of AXB11dose calculation accuracy of AXB11 was almost equivalent to the MC dose calculation.

  14. SU-E-T-339: Dosimetric Verification of Acuros XB Dose Calculation Algorithm On An Air Cavity for 6-MV Flattening Filter-Free Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study was to verify the accuracy of Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm on an air cavity for a single radiation field using 6-MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. Methods: A rectangular slab phantom containing an air cavity was made for this study. The CT images of the phantom for dose calculation were scanned with and without film at measurement depths (4.5, 5.5, 6.5 and 7.5 cm). The central axis doses (CADs) and the off-axis doses (OADs) were measured by film and calculated with Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and AXB for field sizes ranging from 2 Χ 2 to 5 Χ 5 cm{sup 2} of 6-MV FFF beams. Both algorithms were divided into AXB-w and AAA -w when included the film in phantom for dose calculation, and AXB-w/o and AAA-w/o in calculation without film. The calculated OADs for both algorithms were compared with the measured OADs and difference values were determined using root means squares error (RMSE) and gamma evaluation. Results: The percentage differences (%Diffs) between the measured and calculated CAD for AXB-w was most agreement than others. Compared to the %Diff with and without film, the %Diffs with film were decreased than without within both algorithms. The %Diffs for both algorithms were reduced with increasing field size and increased relative to the depth increment. RMSEs of CAD for AXB-w were within 10.32% for both inner-profile and penumbra, while the corresponding values of AAA-w appeared to 96.50%. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the dose calculation with AXB within air cavity shows more accurate than with AAA compared to the measured dose. Furthermore, we found that the AXB-w was superior to AXB-w/o in this region when compared against the measurements.

  15. Accurate first-principles calculations for 12CH3D infrared spectra from isotopic and symmetry transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Michaël; Nikitin, Andrei V.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate variational high-resolution spectra calculations in the range 0-8000 cm-1 are reported for the first time for the monodeutered methane (12CH3D). Global calculations were performed by using recent ab initio surfaces for line positions and line intensities derived from the main isotopologue 12CH4. Calculation of excited vibrational levels and high-J rovibrational states is described by using the normal mode Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian combined with irreducible tensor formalism and appropriate numerical procedures for solving the quantum nuclear motion problem. The isotopic H→D substitution is studied in details by means of symmetry and nonlinear normal mode coordinate transformations. Theoretical spectra predictions are given up to J = 25 and compared with the HITRAN 2012 database representing a compilation of line lists derived from analyses of experimental spectra. The results are in very good agreement with available empirical data suggesting that a large number of yet unassigned lines in observed spectra could be identified and modeled using the present approach.

  16. Accurate first-principles calculations for 12CH3D infrared spectra from isotopic and symmetry transformations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Michaël; Nikitin, Andrei V; Tyuterev, Vladimir G

    2014-07-28

    Accurate variational high-resolution spectra calculations in the range 0-8000 cm(-1) are reported for the first time for the monodeutered methane ((12)CH3D). Global calculations were performed by using recent ab initio surfaces for line positions and line intensities derived from the main isotopologue (12)CH4. Calculation of excited vibrational levels and high-J rovibrational states is described by using the normal mode Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian combined with irreducible tensor formalism and appropriate numerical procedures for solving the quantum nuclear motion problem. The isotopic H→D substitution is studied in details by means of symmetry and nonlinear normal mode coordinate transformations. Theoretical spectra predictions are given up to J = 25 and compared with the HITRAN 2012 database representing a compilation of line lists derived from analyses of experimental spectra. The results are in very good agreement with available empirical data suggesting that a large number of yet unassigned lines in observed spectra could be identified and modeled using the present approach.

  17. Accurate first-principles calculations for {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D infrared spectra from isotopic and symmetry transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, Michaël Tyuterev, Vladimir G.; Nikitin, Andrei V.

    2014-07-28

    Accurate variational high-resolution spectra calculations in the range 0-8000 cm{sup −1} are reported for the first time for the monodeutered methane ({sup 12}CH{sub 3}D). Global calculations were performed by using recent ab initio surfaces for line positions and line intensities derived from the main isotopologue {sup 12}CH{sub 4}. Calculation of excited vibrational levels and high-J rovibrational states is described by using the normal mode Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian combined with irreducible tensor formalism and appropriate numerical procedures for solving the quantum nuclear motion problem. The isotopic H→D substitution is studied in details by means of symmetry and nonlinear normal mode coordinate transformations. Theoretical spectra predictions are given up to J = 25 and compared with the HITRAN 2012 database representing a compilation of line lists derived from analyses of experimental spectra. The results are in very good agreement with available empirical data suggesting that a large number of yet unassigned lines in observed spectra could be identified and modeled using the present approach.

  18. Accurate calculation of conformational free energy differences in explicit water: the confinement-solvation free energy approach.

    PubMed

    Esque, Jeremy; Cecchini, Marco

    2015-04-23

    The calculation of the free energy of conformation is key to understanding the function of biomolecules and has attracted significant interest in recent years. Here, we present an improvement of the confinement method that was designed for use in the context of explicit solvent MD simulations. The development involves an additional step in which the solvation free energy of the harmonically restrained conformers is accurately determined by multistage free energy perturbation simulations. As a test-case application, the newly introduced confinement/solvation free energy (CSF) approach was used to compute differences in free energy between conformers of the alanine dipeptide in explicit water. The results are in excellent agreement with reference calculations based on both converged molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling. To illustrate the general applicability of the method, conformational equilibria of met-enkephalin (5 aa) and deca-alanine (10 aa) in solution were also analyzed. In both cases, smoothly converged free-energy results were obtained in agreement with equilibrium sampling or literature calculations. These results demonstrate that the CSF method may provide conformational free-energy differences of biomolecules with small statistical errors (below 0.5 kcal/mol) and at a moderate computational cost even with a full representation of the solvent.

  19. Accurate and efficient calculation of van der Waals interactions within density functional theory by local atomic potential approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y Y; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Lee, Kyuho; Zhang, S B

    2008-10-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) in the commonly used local density or generalized gradient approximation fails to describe van der Waals (vdW) interactions that are vital to organic, biological, and other molecular systems. Here, we propose a simple, efficient, yet accurate local atomic potential (LAP) approach, named DFT+LAP, for including vdW interactions in the framework of DFT. The LAPs for H, C, N, and O are generated by fitting the DFT+LAP potential energy curves of small molecule dimers to those obtained from coupled cluster calculations with single, double, and perturbatively treated triple excitations, CCSD(T). Excellent transferability of the LAPs is demonstrated by remarkable agreement with the JSCH-2005 benchmark database [P. Jurecka et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)], which provides the interaction energies of CCSD(T) quality for 165 vdW and hydrogen-bonded complexes. For over 100 vdW dominant complexes in this database, our DFT+LAP calculations give a mean absolute deviation from the benchmark results less than 0.5 kcal/mol. The DFT+LAP approach involves no extra computational cost other than standard DFT calculations and no modification of existing DFT codes, which enables straightforward quantum simulations, such as ab initio molecular dynamics, on biomolecular systems, as well as on other organic systems.

  20. Radial secondary electron dose profiles and biological effects in light-ion beams based on analytical and Monte Carlo calculations using distorted wave cross sections.

    PubMed

    Wiklund, Kristin; Olivera, Gustavo H; Brahme, Anders; Lind, Bengt K

    2008-07-01

    To speed up dose calculation, an analytical pencil-beam method has been developed to calculate the mean radial dose distributions due to secondary electrons that are set in motion by light ions in water. For comparison, radial dose profiles calculated using a Monte Carlo technique have also been determined. An accurate comparison of the resulting radial dose profiles of the Bragg peak for (1)H(+), (4)He(2+) and (6)Li(3+) ions has been performed. The double differential cross sections for secondary electron production were calculated using the continuous distorted wave-eikonal initial state method (CDW-EIS). For the secondary electrons that are generated, the radial dose distribution for the analytical case is based on the generalized Gaussian pencil-beam method and the central axis depth-dose distributions are calculated using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. In the Monte Carlo case, the PENELOPE code was used to calculate the whole radial dose profile based on CDW data. The present pencil-beam and Monte Carlo calculations agree well at all radii. A radial dose profile that is shallower at small radii and steeper at large radii than the conventional 1/r(2) is clearly seen with both the Monte Carlo and pencil-beam methods. As expected, since the projectile velocities are the same, the dose profiles of Bragg-peak ions of 0.5 MeV (1)H(+), 2 MeV (4)He(2+) and 3 MeV (6)Li(3+) are almost the same, with about 30% more delta electrons in the sub keV range from (4)He(2+)and (6)Li(3+) compared to (1)H(+). A similar behavior is also seen for 1 MeV (1)H(+), 4 MeV (4)He(2+) and 6 MeV (6)Li(3+), all classically expected to have the same secondary electron cross sections. The results are promising and indicate a fast and accurate way of calculating the mean radial dose profile.

  1. SU-F-BRF-09: A Non-Rigid Point Matching Method for Accurate Bladder Dose Summation in Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Zhen, X; Zhou, L; Zhong, Z; Pompos, A; Yan, H; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To propose and validate a deformable point matching scheme for surface deformation to facilitate accurate bladder dose summation for fractionated HDR cervical cancer treatment. Method: A deformable point matching scheme based on the thin plate spline robust point matching (TPSRPM) algorithm is proposed for bladder surface registration. The surface of bladders segmented from fractional CT images is extracted and discretized with triangular surface mesh. Deformation between the two bladder surfaces are obtained by matching the two meshes' vertices via the TPS-RPM algorithm, and the deformation vector fields (DVFs) characteristic of this deformation is estimated by B-spline approximation. Numerically, the algorithm is quantitatively compared with the Demons algorithm using five clinical cervical cancer cases by several metrics: vertex-to-vertex distance (VVD), Hausdorff distance (HD), percent error (PE), and conformity index (CI). Experimentally, the algorithm is validated on a balloon phantom with 12 surface fiducial markers. The balloon is inflated with different amount of water, and the displacement of fiducial markers is benchmarked as ground truth to study TPS-RPM calculated DVFs' accuracy. Results: In numerical evaluation, the mean VVD is 3.7(±2.0) mm after Demons, and 1.3(±0.9) mm after TPS-RPM. The mean HD is 14.4 mm after Demons, and 5.3mm after TPS-RPM. The mean PE is 101.7% after Demons and decreases to 18.7% after TPS-RPM. The mean CI is 0.63 after Demons, and increases to 0.90 after TPS-RPM. In the phantom study, the mean Euclidean distance of the fiducials is 7.4±3.0mm and 4.2±1.8mm after Demons and TPS-RPM, respectively. Conclusions: The bladder wall deformation is more accurate using the feature-based TPS-RPM algorithm than the intensity-based Demons algorithm, indicating that TPS-RPM has the potential for accurate bladder dose deformation and dose summation for multi-fractional cervical HDR brachytherapy. This work is supported in part by

  2. Correction of CT artifacts and its influence on Monte Carlo dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Beaulieu, Luc; Palefsky, Steven; Verhaegen, Frank

    2007-06-15

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients having metallic implants or dental fillings exhibit severe streaking artifacts. These artifacts may disallow tumor and organ delineation and compromise dose calculation outcomes in radiotherapy. We used a sinogram interpolation metal streaking artifact correction algorithm on several phantoms of exact-known compositions and on a prostate patient with two hip prostheses. We compared original CT images and artifact-corrected images of both. To evaluate the effect of the artifact correction on dose calculations, we performed Monte Carlo dose calculation in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code. For the phantoms, we performed calculations in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry for photon and electron beams. The maximum errors in 6 MV photon beam dose calculation were found to exceed 25% in original CT images when the standard DOSXYZnrc/CTCREATE calibration is used but less than 2% in artifact-corrected images when an extended calibration is used. The extended calibration includes an extra calibration point for a metal. The patient dose volume histograms of a hypothetical target irradiated by five 18 MV photon beams in a hypothetical treatment differ significantly in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry. This was found to be mostly due to miss-assignment of tissue voxels to air due to metal artifacts. We also developed a simple Monte Carlo model for a CT scanner and we simulated the contribution of scatter and beam hardening to metal streaking artifacts. We found that whereas beam hardening has a minor effect on metal artifacts, scatter is an important cause of these artifacts.

  3. A graphical user interface for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, J. C. L.; Leung, M. K. K.

    2008-02-01

    A software graphical user interface (GUI) for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is developed using MATLAB. This GUI (DOSCTP) provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM CT-based dose calculation using EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. It offers numerous features not found in DOSXYZnrc, such as the ability to use multiple beams from different phase-space files, and has built-in dose analysis and visualization tools. DOSCTP is written completely in MATLAB, with integrated access to DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE. The program function may be divided into four subgroups, namely, beam placement, MC simulation with DOSXYZnrc, dose visualization, and export. Each is controlled by separate routines. The verification of DOSCTP was carried out by comparing plans with different beam arrangements (multi-beam/photon arc) on an inhomogeneous phantom as well as patient CT between the GUI and Pinnacle3. DOSCTP was developed and verified with the following features: (1) a built-in voxel editor to modify CT-based DOSXYZnrc phantoms for research purposes; (2) multi-beam placement is possible, which cannot be achieved using the current DOSXYZnrc code; (3) the treatment plan, including the dose distributions, contours and image set can be exported to a commercial treatment planning system such as Pinnacle3 or to CERR using RTOG format for plan evaluation and comparison; (4) a built-in RTOG-compatible dose reviewer for dose visualization and analysis such as finding the volume of hot/cold spots in the 3D dose distributions based on a user threshold. DOSCTP greatly simplifies the use of DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE, and offers numerous features that not found in the original user-code. Moreover, since phase-space beams can be defined and generated by the user, it is a particularly useful tool to carry out plans using specifically designed irradiators/accelerators that cannot be found in the Linac library of commercial treatment planning systems.

  4. Comparison of measured and calculated dose rates for the Castor HAW 20/28 CG.

    PubMed

    Ringleb, O; Kühl, H; Scheib, H; Rimpler, A

    2005-01-01

    In January 2003 neutron and gamma dose rate measurements at a CASTOR HAW 20/28 CG were performed by the Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz at Gorleben. First, commercial dose rate measurement devices were used, then spectral measurements with a Bonner sphere system were made to verify the results. Axial and circumferential dose rate profiles were measured near the cask surface and spectral measurements were performed for some locations. A shielding analysis of the cask was performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo Code with ENDF/B-VI cross section libraries. The cask was modelled 'as built', i.e. with its real inventory, dimensions and material densities and with the same configuration and position as in the storage facility. The average C/E-ratios are 1.3 for neutron dose rates and 1.4 for gamma dose rates. Both the measured and calculated dose rates show the same qualitative trends in the axial and circumferential direction. The spectral measurements show a variation in the spectra across the cask surface. This correlates with the variation found in the C/E-ratios. At cask midheight good agreement between the Bonner sphere system and the commercial device (LB 6411) is found with a 7% lower derived H*(10) dose rate from the Bonner sphere system.

  5. Space Radiation Dose Calculations for the Space Experiment Matroshka-R Modelling Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Kartashov, Dmitrij; Tolochek, Raisa

    Space radiation dose calculations for the space experiment Matroshka-R modelling conditions are presented in the report. The experiment has been carried out onboard the ISS from 2004 to 2014. Dose measurements were realized both outside the ISS on the outer surface of the Service Module with the MTR-facility and in the ISS compartments with anthropomorphic and spherical phantoms, and the protective curtain facility. Newly applied approach to calculate the shielding probability functions for complex shape objects is used when the object surface is composed from a set of the disjoint adjacent triangles that fully cover the surface. Using the simplified Matroshka-R shielding geometry models of the space station compartments the space ionizing radiation dose distributions in tissue-equivalent spherical and anthropomorphic phantoms, and for an additional shielding installed in the compartment are calculated. There is good agreement between the data obtained in the experiment and calculated ones within an experiment accuracy of about 10%. Thus the calculation method used has been successfully verified with the Matroshka-R experiment data. The suggested method can be recommended for modelling of radiation loads on the crewmembers, and estimation of the additional shielding efficiency in space station compartments, and also for pre-flight estimations of radiation shielding in future space missions.

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of a 6 and 18 MV Varian Clinac medical accelerator for in-field and out-of-field dose calculations: development and validation.

    PubMed

    Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X George

    2009-02-21

    There is a serious and growing concern about the increased risk of radiation-induced second cancers and late tissue injuries associated with radiation treatment. To better understand and to more accurately quantify non-target organ doses due to scatter and leakage radiation from medical accelerators, a detailed Monte Carlo model of the medical linear accelerator is needed. This paper describes the development and validation of a detailed accelerator model of the Varian Clinac operating at 6 and 18 MV beam energies. Over 100 accelerator components have been defined and integrated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. A series of in-field and out-of-field dose validation studies were performed. In-field dose distributions calculated using the accelerator models were tuned to match measurement data that are considered the de facto 'gold standard' for the Varian Clinac accelerator provided by the manufacturer. Field sizes of 4 cm x 4 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm, 20 cm x 20 cm and 40 cm x 40 cm were considered. The local difference between calculated and measured dose on the percent depth dose curve was less than 2% for all locations. The local difference between calculated and measured dose on the dose profile curve was less than 2% in the plateau region and less than 2 mm in the penumbra region for all locations. Out-of-field dose profiles were calculated and compared to measurement data for both beam energies for field sizes of 4 cm x 4 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm and 20 cm x 20 cm. For all field sizes considered in this study, the average local difference between calculated and measured dose for the 6 and 18 MV beams was 14 and 16%, respectively. In addition, a method for determining neutron contamination in the 18 MV operating model was validated by comparing calculated in-air neutron fluence with reported calculations and measurements. The average difference between calculated and measured neutron fluence was 20%. As one of the most detailed accelerator models for both in-field and out

  7. A Monte Carlo evaluation of RapidArc dose calculations for oropharynx radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, I. M.; Ansbacher, W.; Zavgorodni, S.; Popescu, C.; Beckham, W. A.

    2008-12-01

    RapidArc™, recently released by Varian Medical Systems, is a novel extension of IMRT in which an optimized 3D dose distribution may be delivered in a single gantry rotation of 360° or less. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA), the sole algorithm for photon dose calculations of RapidArc™ treatment plans. The clinical site chosen was oropharynx and the associated nodes involved. The VIMC-Arc system, which utilizes BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc for particle transport through the linac head and patient CT phantom, was used as a benchmarking tool. As part